WorldWideScience

Sample records for fast pixel space

  1. Fast Neutron Detection Using Pixelated CdZnTe Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, Michael; Goodman, David; Zhu, Yuefeng; Brown, Steven; Kiff, Scott; He, Zhong

    2017-07-01

    Fast neutrons are an important signature of special nuclear materials (SNMs). They have a low natural background rate and readily penetrate high atomic number materials that easily shield gamma-ray signatures. Therefore, they provide a complementary signal to gamma rays for detecting shielded SNM. Scattering kinematics dictate that a large nucleus (such as Cd or Te) will recoil with small kinetic energy after an elastic collision with a fast neutron. Charge carrier recombination and quenching further reduce the recorded energy deposited. Thus, the energy threshold of CdZnTe detectors must be very low in order to sense the small signals from these recoils. In this paper, the threshold was reduced to less than 5 keVee to demonstrate that the 5.9-keV X-ray line from 55Fe could be separated from electronic noise. Elastic scattering neutron interactions were observed as small energy depositions (less than 20 keVee) using digitally sampled pulse waveforms from pixelated CdZnTe detectors. Characteristic gamma-ray lines from inelastic neutron scattering were also observed.

  2. Analytical Study of Colour Spaces for Plant Pixel Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of regions of interest is an important pre-processing step in many colour image analysis procedures. Similarly, segmentation of plant objects in digital images is an important preprocessing step for effective phenotyping by image analysis. In this paper, we present results of a statistical analysis to establish the respective abilities of different colour space representations to detect plant pixels and separate them from background pixels. Our hypothesis is that the colour space representation for which the separation of the distributions representing object and background pixels is maximized is the best for the detection of plant pixels. The two pixel classes are modelled by Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs. In our statistical modelling we make no prior assumptions on the number of Gaussians employed. Instead, a constant bandwidth mean-shift filter is used to cluster the data with the number of clusters, and hence the number of Gaussians, being automatically determined. We have analysed the following representative colour spaces: R G B , r g b , H S V , Y c b c r and C I E - L a b . We have analysed the colour space features from a two-class variance ratio perspective and compared the results of our model with this metric. The dataset for our empirical study consisted of 378 digital images (and their manual segmentations of a variety of plant species: Arabidopsis, tobacco, wheat, and rye grass, imaged under different lighting conditions, in either indoor or outdoor environments, and with either controlled or uncontrolled backgrounds. We have found that the best segmentation of plants is found using H S V colour space. This is supported by measures of Earth Mover Distance (EMD of the GMM distributions of plant and background pixels.

  3. GigaTracker, a Thin and Fast Silicon Pixels Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Velghe, Bob; Bonacini, Sandro; Ceccucci, Augusto; Kaplon, Jan; Kluge, Alexander; Mapelli, Alessandro; Morel, Michel; Noël, Jérôme; Noy, Matthew; Perktold, Lukas; Petagna, Paolo; Poltorak, Karolina; Riedler, Petra; Romagnoli, Giulia; Chiozzi, Stefano; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Gianoli, Alberto; Petrucci, Ferruccio; Wahl, Heinrich; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Jarron, Pierre; Marchetto, Flavio; Gil, Eduardo Cortina; Nuessle, Georg; Szilasi, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    GigaTracker, the NA62’s upstream spectrometer, plays a key role in the kinematically constrained background suppression for the study of the K + ! p + n ̄ n decay. It is made of three independent stations, each of which is a six by three cm 2 hybrid silicon pixels detector. To meet the NA62 physics goals, GigaTracker has to address challenging requirements. The hit time resolution must be better than 200 ps while keeping the total thickness of the sensor to less than 0.5 mm silicon equivalent. The 200 μm thick sensor is divided into 18000 300 μm 300 μm pixels bump-bounded to ten independent read-out chips. The chips use an end-of-column architecture and rely on time-over- threshold discriminators. A station can handle a crossing rate of 750 MHz. Microchannel cooling technology will be used to cool the assembly. It allows us to keep the sensor close to 0 C with 130 μm of silicon in the beam area. The sensor and read-out chip performance were validated using a 45 pixel demonstrator with a laser test setu...

  4. Fast Fourier single-pixel imaging via binary illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zibang; Wang, Xueying; Zheng, Guoan; Zhong, Jingang

    2017-09-20

    Fourier single-pixel imaging (FSI) employs Fourier basis patterns for encoding spatial information and is capable of reconstructing high-quality two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. Fourier-domain sparsity in natural scenes allows FSI to recover sharp images from undersampled data. The original FSI demonstration, however, requires grayscale Fourier basis patterns for illumination. This requirement imposes a limitation on the imaging speed as digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) generate grayscale patterns at a low refreshing rate. In this paper, we report a new strategy to increase the speed of FSI by two orders of magnitude. In this strategy, we binarize the Fourier basis patterns based on upsampling and error diffusion dithering. We demonstrate a 20,000 Hz projection rate using a DMD and capture 256-by-256-pixel dynamic scenes at a speed of 10 frames per second. The reported technique substantially accelerates image acquisition speed of FSI. It may find broad imaging applications at wavebands that are not accessible using conventional two-dimensional image sensors.

  5. Fast Contour-Tracing Algorithm Based on a Pixel-Following Method for Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghoon Seo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Contour pixels distinguish objects from the background. Tracing and extracting contour pixels are widely used for smart/wearable image sensor devices, because these are simple and useful for detecting objects. In this paper, we present a novel contour-tracing algorithm for fast and accurate contour following. The proposed algorithm classifies the type of contour pixel, based on its local pattern. Then, it traces the next contour using the previous pixel’s type. Therefore, it can classify the type of contour pixels as a straight line, inner corner, outer corner and inner-outer corner, and it can extract pixels of a specific contour type. Moreover, it can trace contour pixels rapidly because it can determine the local minimal path using the contour case. In addition, the proposed algorithm is capable of the compressing data of contour pixels using the representative points and inner-outer corner points, and it can accurately restore the contour image from the data. To compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to that of conventional techniques, we measure their processing time and accuracy. In the experimental results, the proposed algorithm shows better performance compared to the others. Furthermore, it can provide the compressed data of contour pixels and restore them accurately, including the inner-outer corner, which cannot be restored using conventional algorithms.

  6. Using the pixel detector for fast triggering in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    De Mattai, M

    2006-01-01

    The Standard Model of fundamental interactions (SM) has been extensively tested in many particle experiments during the last 25 years and it has proven to be extremely successful up to the energy scale typical of the weak force. Nevertheless, there is still no experimental evidence of the Higgs boson, one of the key components of the SM, responsible for the breaking of the electroweak symmetry and for the masses of the fermions and of the weak bosons. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is scheduled to provide the first proton on proton collision in 2008 at the center of mass energy of 14 Tev, an energy one order of magnitude higher than the regime explored so far. The CMS experiment is an omni-purpose experiment that will operate at the LHC, it will give insight into Standard Model physics and search for physics beyond the Standard Model. In this work we consider the usage of pixel detector information in the reconstruction of hadronic jets in events collected by the CMS detector under high luminosity running co...

  7. Fast Imaging Detector Readout Circuits with In-Pixel ADCs for Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, D.; Blavier, J-F.; Cunningham, T.; Hancock, B.; Key, R.; Pannell, Z.; Sander, S.; Seshadri, S.; Sun, C.; Wrigley, C.

    2011-01-01

    Focal plane arrays (FPAs) with high frame rates and many pixels benefit several upcoming Earth science missions including GEO-CAPE, GACM, and ACE by enabling broader spatial coverage and higher spectral resolution. FPAs for the PanFTS, a high spatial resolution Fourier transform spectrometer and a candidate instrument for the GEO-CAPE mission are the focus of the developments reported here, but this FPA technology has the potential to enable a variety of future measurements and instruments. The ESTO ACT Program funded the developed of a fast readout integrated circuit (ROIC) based on an innovative in-pixel analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC features 60 ?m pixels, a 14-bit ADC in each pixel and operates at a continuous frame rate of 14 kHz consuming only 1.1 W of power. The ROIC outputs digitized data completely eliminating the bulky, power consuming signal chains needed by conventional FPAs. The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC has been fabricated in CMOS and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current version is designed to be hybridized with PIN photodiode arrays via indium bump bonding for light detection in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. However, the ROIC design incorporates a small photodiode in each cell to permit detailed characterization of the ROICperformance without the need for hybridization. We will describe the essential features of the ROIC design and present results of ROIC performance measurements.

  8. Fast Readout Architectures for Large Arrays of Digital Pixels: Examples and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gabrielli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern pixel detectors, particularly those designed and constructed for applications and experiments for high-energy physics, are commonly built implementing general readout architectures, not specifically optimized in terms of speed. High-energy physics experiments use bidimensional matrices of sensitive elements located on a silicon die. Sensors are read out via other integrated circuits bump bonded over the sensor dies. The speed of the readout electronics can significantly increase the overall performance of the system, and so here novel forms of readout architectures are studied and described. These circuits have been investigated in terms of speed and are particularly suited for large monolithic, low-pitch pixel detectors. The idea is to have a small simple structure that may be expanded to fit large matrices without affecting the layout complexity of the chip, while maintaining a reasonably high readout speed. The solutions might be applied to devices for applications not only in physics but also to general-purpose pixel detectors whenever online fast data sparsification is required. The paper presents also simulations on the efficiencies of the systems as proof of concept for the proposed ideas.

  9. Towards binary robust fast features using the comparison of pixel blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oszust, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Binary descriptors have become popular in many vision-based applications, as a fast and efficient replacement of floating point, heavy counterparts. They achieve a short computation time and low memory footprint due to many simplifications. Consequently, their robustness against a variety of image transformations is lowered, since they rely on pairwise pixel intensity comparisons. This observation has led to the emergence of techniques performing tests on intensities of predefined pixel regions. These approaches, despite a visible improvement in the quality of the obtained results, suffer from a long computation time, and their patch partitioning strategies produce long binary strings requiring the use of salient bit detection techniques. In this paper, a novel binary descriptor is proposed to address these shortcomings. The approach selects image patches around a keypoint, divides them into a small number of pixel blocks and performs binary tests on gradients which are determined for the blocks. The size of each patch depends on the keypoint’s scale. The robustness and distinctiveness of the descriptor are evaluated according to five demanding image benchmarks. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is faster to compute, produces a short binary string and offers a better performance than state-of-the-art binary and floating point descriptors. (paper)

  10. Fast Readout Architectures for Large Arrays of Digital Pixels: Examples and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, A.

    2014-01-01

    Modern pixel detectors, particularly those designed and constructed for applications and experiments for high-energy physics, are commonly built implementing general readout architectures, not specifically optimized in terms of speed. High-energy physics experiments use bidimensional matrices of sensitive elements located on a silicon die. Sensors are read out via other integrated circuits bump bonded over the sensor dies. The speed of the readout electronics can significantly increase the overall performance of the system, and so here novel forms of readout architectures are studied and described. These circuits have been investigated in terms of speed and are particularly suited for large monolithic, low-pitch pixel detectors. The idea is to have a small simple structure that may be expanded to fit large matrices without affecting the layout complexity of the chip, while maintaining a reasonably high readout speed. The solutions might be applied to devices for applications not only in physics but also to general-purpose pixel detectors whenever online fast data sparsification is required. The paper presents also simulations on the efficiencies of the systems as proof of concept for the proposed ideas. PMID:24778588

  11. Pixel partition method using Markov random field for measurements of closely spaced objects by optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Li, Jun; Sheng, Weidong; An, Wei; Du, Qinfeng

    2015-10-01

    ABSTRACT In Space-based optical system, during the tracking for closely spaced objects (CSOs), the traditional method with a constant false alarm rate(CFAR) detecting brings either more clutter measurements or the loss of target information. CSOs can be tracked as Extended targets because their features on optical sensor's pixel-plane. A pixel partition method under the framework of Markov random field(MRF) is proposed, simulation results indicate: the method proposed provides higher pixel partition performance than traditional method, especially when the signal-noise-rate is poor.

  12. Fast serial data transmission for the DEPFET Belle II pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Manuel; Marinas, Carlos; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A two layer vertex pixel detector, built based on the DEPFET technology, is the core component for the Belle II experiment at the super flavor factory SuperKEKB in Japan. The pixel detector produces an estimated total zero-supressed data rate of 256 Gbit/s, which is to be transmitted over 160 high speed links with an individual rate of 1.6 Gbit/s each. Challenges for the design of the serial links include a transmission distance exceeding 15 m, a radiation hard material selection, and high attenuation due to available material budget and space constraints. Modern transmission techniques including pre-emphasis and equalization are necessary to achieve a reliable data transmission; similarly are precise measurements and simulation model extractions needed for the characterization of all high-speed interconnect components. This talk summarizes the challenges, design efforts, and results of the DEPFET collaboration for the high-speed data transmission lines.

  13. Fast Multispectral Imaging by Spatial Pixel-Binning and Spectral Unmixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi-Wei; Shen, Hui-Liang; Li, Chunguang; Chen, Shu-Jie; Xin, John H

    2016-08-01

    Multispectral imaging system is of wide application in relevant fields for its capability in acquiring spectral information of scenes. Its limitation is that, due to the large number of spectral channels, the imaging process can be quite time-consuming when capturing high-resolution (HR) multispectral images. To resolve this limitation, this paper proposes a fast multispectral imaging framework based on the image sensor pixel-binning and spectral unmixing techniques. The framework comprises a fast imaging stage and a computational reconstruction stage. In the imaging stage, only a few spectral images are acquired in HR, while most spectral images are acquired in low resolution (LR). The LR images are captured by applying pixel binning on the image sensor, such that the exposure time can be greatly reduced. In the reconstruction stage, an optimal number of basis spectra are computed and the signal-dependent noise statistics are estimated. Then the unknown HR images are efficiently reconstructed by solving a closed-form cost function that models the spatial and spectral degradations. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is evaluated using real-scene multispectral images. Experimental results validate that, in general, the method outperforms the state of the arts in terms of reconstruction accuracy, with additional 20× or more improvement in computational efficiency.

  14. A novel radiation hard pixel design for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurora, A. M.; Marochkin, V. V.; Tuuva, T.

    2017-11-01

    We have developed a novel radiation hard photon detector concept based on Modified Internal Gate Field Effect Transistor (MIGFET) wherein a buried Modified Internal Gate (MIG) is implanted underneath a channel of a FET. In between the MIG and the channel of the FET there is depleted semiconductor material forming a potential barrier between charges in the channel and similar type signal charges located in the MIG. The signal charges in the MIG have a measurable effect on the conductance of the channel. In this paper a radiation hard double MIGFET pixel is investigated comprising two MIGFETs. By transferring the signal charges between the two MIGs Non-Destructive Correlated Double Sampling Readout (NDCDSR) is enabled. The radiation hardness of the proposed double MIGFET structure stems from the fact that interface related issues can be considerably mitigated. The reason for this is, first of all, that interface generated dark noise can be completely avoided and secondly, that interface generated 1/f noise can be considerably reduced due to a deep buried channel readout configuration. Electrical parameters of the double MIGFET pixel have been evaluated by 3D TCAD simulation study. Simulation results show the absence of interface generated dark noise, significantly reduced interface generated 1/f noise, well performing NDCDSR operation, and blooming protection due to an inherent vertical anti-blooming structure. In addition, the backside illuminated thick fully depleted pixel design results in low crosstalk due to lack of diffusion and good quantum efficiency from visible to Near Infra-Red (NIR) light. These facts result in excellent Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and very low crosstalk enabling thus excellent image quality. The simulation demonstrates the charge to current conversion gain for source current read-out to be 1.4 nA/e.

  15. Development of Fast and High Precision CMOS Pixel Sensors for an ILC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hu-Guo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The development of CMOS pixel sensors with column parallel read-out and integrated zero-suppression has resulted in a full size, nearly 1 Megapixel, prototype with ~100 \\mu s read-out time. Its performances are quite close to the ILD vertex detector specifications, showing that the sensor architecture can presumably be evolved to meet these specifications exactly. Starting from the existing architecture and achieved performances, the paper will expose the details of how the sensor will be evolved in the coming 2-3 years in perspective of the ILD Detector Baseline Document, to be delivered in 2012. Two different devices are foreseen for this objective, one being optimized for the inner layers and their fast read-out requirement, while the other exploits the dimmed background in the outer layers to reduce the power consumption. The sensor evolution relies on a high resistivity epitaxial layer, on the use of an advanced CMOS process and on the combination of column-level ADCs with a pixel array. The paper will p...

  16. Fast Access to Space Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favata', P.; Martineau, N.

    2002-01-01

    creating a revolutionary space-orbiting habitat dedicated to tourism. Up to now, such proposals have focused on two approaches. The first accounts for financial and technological constraints on space flight and living, and sacrifices creativity for practicality. The second is more utopic in nature and proposes projects, which are imaginative but unfeasible in the near future. This proposal is innovative because it considers the current obstacles to space tourism and utilizes existing technologies and infrastructures, but also includes the forethinking of futuristic commercial projects. Project Objectives: NASA claims that commercialization of space activities is so difficult that it will require decades more funding of so-called space-technology development. The benefits of this project show that this is not true. First, safety has been addressed because this proposal utilizes already space tested and assured technologies. Second, the project demonstrates potential for significant economic profit within the near future. Because we are using the least expensive technology available, we have limited start up costs. We forecast up to forty flights per year, with a potential capacity of eighty tourists. The design objectives focus on the proposal of a new approach to space tourism. These include: the expansion of the living space in the interiors, innovative and creative interior design, increased concern for the physiological and psychological comfort of tourists, and attention to entertainment possibilities. Project Content: The efficiency of the launch and configuration phase is one of the strengths of the proposed project. We propose the use of the Zenith 2 launcher, a large two-stage vehicle developed in the Soviet Union in the early 1980s, for the configuration of the orbiting platform. Following the Russian outfitting philosophy, once in orbit, the platform is already functional. The interior design is based on advanced lightweight inflatable technologies which

  17. Autonomous Sub-Pixel Satellite Track Endpoint Determination for Space Based Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, L M

    2011-03-07

    An algorithm for determining satellite track endpoints with sub-pixel resolution in spaced-based images is presented. The algorithm allows for significant curvature in the imaged track due to rotation of the spacecraft capturing the image. The motivation behind the subpixel endpoint determination is first presented, followed by a description of the methodology used. Results from running the algorithm on real ground-based and simulated spaced-based images are shown to highlight its effectiveness.

  18. Fast distributed large-pixel-count hologram computation using a GPU cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuechao; Xu, Xuewu; Liang, Xinan

    2013-09-10

    Large-pixel-count holograms are one essential part for big size holographic three-dimensional (3D) display, but the generation of such holograms is computationally demanding. In order to address this issue, we have built a graphics processing unit (GPU) cluster with 32.5 Tflop/s computing power and implemented distributed hologram computation on it with speed improvement techniques, such as shared memory on GPU, GPU level adaptive load balancing, and node level load distribution. Using these speed improvement techniques on the GPU cluster, we have achieved 71.4 times computation speed increase for 186M-pixel holograms. Furthermore, we have used the approaches of diffraction limits and subdivision of holograms to overcome the GPU memory limit in computing large-pixel-count holograms. 745M-pixel and 1.80G-pixel holograms were computed in 343 and 3326 s, respectively, for more than 2 million object points with RGB colors. Color 3D objects with 1.02M points were successfully reconstructed from 186M-pixel hologram computed in 8.82 s with all the above three speed improvement techniques. It is shown that distributed hologram computation using a GPU cluster is a promising approach to increase the computation speed of large-pixel-count holograms for large size holographic display.

  19. Fast single-photon imager acquires 1024 pixels at 100 kframe/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Fabrizio; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco

    2009-02-01

    We present the design and we discuss in depth the operating conditions of a two-dimensional (2-D) imaging array of single-photon detectors that provides a total of 1024 pixels, laid out in 32 rows by 32 columns array, integrated within a monolithic silicon chip with dimensions of 3.5 mm x 3.5 mm. We employed a standard high-voltage 0.35μm CMOS fabrication technology, with no need of any custom processing. Each pixel consists of one Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) and a compact front-end analog electronics followed by a digital processing circuitry. The in-pixel front-end electronics senses the ignition of the avalanche, quenches the detector, provides a pulse and restores the detector for detecting a subsequent photon. The processing circuitry counts events (both photon and unwelcome "noise" ignition) within user-selectable integration time-slots and stores the count into an in-pixel memory cell, which is read-out in 10 ns/pixel. Such a two-levels pipeline architecture allows to acquire the actual frame while contemporary reading out the previous one, thus achieving a very high free-running frame rate, with negligible inter-frame dead-time. Each pixel is therefore a completely independent photon-counter. The measured Photo Detection Efficiency (PDE) tops 43% at 5V excess-bias, while the Dark-Counting Rate (DCR) is below 4kcps (counts per second) at room temperature. The maximum frame-rate depends on the system clock; with a convenient 100MHz system clock we achieved a free-running speed of 100 kframe/s from the all 1024 pixels.

  20. Soccer player recognition by pixel classification in a hybrid color space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Nicolas; Macaire, Ludovic; Postaire, Jack-Gerard

    1997-08-01

    Soccer is a very popular sport all over the world, Coaches and sport commentators need accurate information about soccer games, especially about the players behavior. These information can be gathered by inspectors who watch the soccer match and report manually the actions of the players involved in the principal phases of the game. Generally, these inspectors focus their attention on the few players standing near the ball and don't report about the motion of all the other players. So it seems desirable to design a system which automatically tracks all the players in real- time. That's why we propose to automatically track each player through the successive color images of the sequences acquired by a fixed color camera. Each player which is present in the image, is modelized by an active contour model or snake. When, during the soccer match, a player is hidden by another, the snakes which track these two players merge. So, it becomes impossible to track the players, except if the snakes are interactively re-initialized. Fortunately, in most cases, the two players don't belong to the same team. That is why we present an algorithm which recognizes the teams of the players by pixels representing the soccer ground which must be withdrawn before considering the players themselves. To eliminate these pixels, the color characteristics of the ground are determined interactively. In a second step, dealing with windows containing only one player of one team, the color features which yield the best discrimination between the two teams are selected. Thanks to these color features, the pixels associated to the players of the two teams form two separated clusters into a color space. In fact, there are many color representation systems and it's interesting to evaluate the features which provide the best separation between the two classes of pixels according to the players soccer suit. Finally, the classification process for image segmentation is based on the three most

  1. Verification of Dosimetry Measurements with Timepix Pixel Detectors for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, M.; Pinsky, L. S.; Idarraga-Munoz, J.; Hoang, S. M.; Semones, E.; Bahadori, A.; Stoffle, N.; Rios, R.; Vykydal, Z.; Jakubek, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The current capabilities of modern pixel-detector technology has provided the possibility to design a new generation of radiation monitors. Timepix detectors are semiconductor pixel detectors based on a hybrid configuration. As such, the read-out chip can be used with different types and thicknesses of sensors. For space radiation dosimetry applications, Timepix devices with 300 and 500 microns thick silicon sensors have been used by a collaboration between NASA and University of Houston to explore their performance. For that purpose, an extensive evaluation of the response of Timepix for such applications has been performed. Timepix-based devices were tested in many different environments both at ground-based accelerator facilities such as HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan), and at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY), as well as in space on board of the International Space Station (ISS). These tests have included a wide range of the particle types and energies, from protons through iron nuclei. The results have been compared both with other devices and theoretical values. This effort has demonstrated that Timepix-based detectors are exceptionally capable at providing accurate dosimetry measurements in this application as verified by the confirming correspondence with the other accepted techniques.

  2. Energy loss and online directional track visualization of fast electrons with the pixel detector Timepix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Granja, C.; Krist, Pavel; Chvátil, David; Šolc, J.; Pospíšil, S.; Jakubek, J.; Opalka, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 59, DEC (2013), s. 245-261 ISSN 1350-4487 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : interaction of radiation with matter * dE/dx detectors * particle tracking detectors * hybrid pixel detectors * active nuclear emulsion * energy loss Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2013

  3. Frustum-Traced Irregular Z-Buffers: Fast, Sub-pixel Accurate Hard Shadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Chris; Hoetzlein, Rama; Lefohn, Aaron

    2016-05-25

    We further describe and analyze a real-time system for rendering antialiased hard shadows using irregular z-buffers (IZBs) that we first presented in Wyman et al. [1]. We focus on identifying bottlenecks, exploring these from an algorithmic complexity standpoint, and presenting techniques to improve performance. Our system remains interactive on a variety of game assets and CAD models while running at resolutions 1920 1080 and above and imposes no constraints on light, camera or geometry, allowing fully dynamic scenes without precomputation. We render sub-pixel accurate, 32 sample per pixel hard shadows at roughly twice the cost of a single sample per pixel. This allows us to smoothly animate even subpixel shadows from grass or wires without introducing spatial or temporal aliasing. Prior algorithms for irregular z-buffer shadows rely heavily on the GPU's compute pipeline. Instead we leverage the standard rasterization-based graphics pipeline, including hardware conservative raster and early-z culling. Our key observation is noting a duality between irregular z-buffer performance and shadow map quality; irregular z-buffering is most costly exactly where shadow maps exhibit the worst aliasing. This allows us to use common shadow map algorithms, which typically improve aliasing, to instead reduce our cost. Compared to state of the art ray tracers, we spawn similar numbers of triangle intersections per pixel yet completely rebuild our data structure in under 1 ms per frame.

  4. Carotenoid pixels characterization under color space tests and RGB formulas for mesocarp of mango's fruits cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ahmed Yahya; Kassim, Farid Saad Eid Saad

    2010-01-01

    This study experimented the pulp (mesocarp) of fourteen cultivars were healthy ripe of Mango fruits (Mangifera indica L.) selected after picking from Mango Spp. namely Taimour [Ta], Dabsha [Da], Aromanis [Ar], Zebda [Ze], Fagri Kelan [Fa], Alphonse [Al], Bulbek heart [Bu], Hindi- Sinnara [Hi], Compania [Co], Langra [La], Mestikawi [Me], Ewais [Ew], Montakhab El Kanater [Mo] and Mabroka [Ma] . Under seven color space tests included (RGB: Red, Green and Blue), (CMY: Cyan, Magenta and Yellow), (CMY: Cyan, Magenta and Yellow), (HSL: Hue, Saturation and Lightness), (CMYK%: Cyan%, Magenta%, Yellow% and Black%), (HSV: Hue, Saturation and Value), (HºSB%: Hueº, Saturation% and Brightness%) and (Lab). (CMY: Cyan, Magenta and Yellow), (HSL: Hue, Saturation and Lightness), (CMYK%: Cyan%, Magenta%, Yellow% and Black%), (HSV: Hue, Saturation and Value), (HºSB%: Hueº, Saturation% and Brightness%) and (Lab). Addition, nine formula of color space tests included (sRGB 0÷1, CMY, CMYK, XYZ, CIE-L*ab, CIE-L*CH, CIE-L*uv, Yxy and Hunter-Lab) and (RGB 0÷FF/hex triplet) and Carotenoid Pixels Scale. Utilizing digital color photographs as tool for obtainment the natural color information for each cultivar then the result expounded with chemical pigment estimations. Our location study in the visual yellow to orange color degrees from the visible color of electromagnetic spectrum in wavelength between (~570 to 620) nm and frequency between (~480 to 530) THz. The results found carotene very strong influence in band Red while chlorophyll (a & b) was very lower subsequently, the values in band Green was depressed. Meanwhile, the general ratios percentage for carotenoid pixels in bands Red, Green and Blue were 50%, 39% and 11% as orderliness opposite the ratios percentage for carotene, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b which were 63%, 22% and 16% approximately. According to that the pigments influence in all color space tests and RGB formulas. Band Yellow% in color test (CMYK%) as signature

  5. A Parallel FPGA Implementation for Real-Time 2D Pixel Clustering for the ATLAS Fast TracKer Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, C-L; The ATLAS collaboration; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Kordas, K; Nikolaidis, S; Petridou, C; Volpi, G

    2014-01-01

    The parallel 2D pixel clustering FPGA implementation used for the input system of the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) processor is presented. The input system for the FTK processor will receive data from the Pixel and micro-strip detectors from inner ATLAS read out drivers (RODs) at full rate, for total of 760Gbs, as sent by the RODs after level-1 triggers. Clustering serves two purposes, the first is to reduce the high rate of the received data before further processing, the second is to determine the cluster centroid to obtain the best spatial measurement. For the pixel detectors the clustering is implemented by using a 2D-clustering algorithm that takes advantage of a moving window technique to minimize the logic required for cluster identification. The cluster detection window size can be adjusted for optimizing the cluster identification process. Additionally, the implementation can be parallelized by instantiating multiple cores to identify different clusters independently thus exploiting more FPGA resources. ...

  6. A Parallel FPGA Implementation for Real-Time 2D Pixel Clustering for the ATLAS Fast TracKer Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, C-L; The ATLAS collaboration; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Kordas, K; Nikolaidis, S; Petridou, C; Volpi, G

    2014-01-01

    The parallel 2D pixel clustering FPGA implementation used for the input system of the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) processor is presented. The input system for the FTK processor will receive data from the Pixel and micro-strip detectors from inner ATLAS read out drivers (RODs) at full rate, for total of 760Gbs, as sent by the RODs after level1 triggers. Clustering serves two purposes, the first is to reduce the high rate of the received data before further processing, the second is to determine the cluster centroid to obtain the best spatial measurement. For the pixel detectors the clustering is implemented by using a 2D-clustering algorithm that takes advantage of a moving window technique to minimize the logic required for cluster identification. The cluster detection window size can be adjusted for optimizing the cluster identification process. Additionally, the implementation can be parallelized by instantiating multiple cores to identify different clusters independently thus exploiting more FPGA resources. T...

  7. Toward Fast, Low-noise, Low-power, Small Pixel Digital CCDs for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, Mark W.; Burke, Barry; Cooper, Michael; Foster, Richard; Grant, Catherine E.; LaMarr, Beverly; Malonis, Andrew; Miller, Eric D.; Prigozhin, Gregory; Schuette, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Future X-ray missions such as Lynx will require large-format imaging detectors with spectroscopic performance at least as good as the best current-generation devices but with much higher readout rates. We have been investigating a detector architecture under development at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, called the Digital CCD, for use in such missions. The Digital CCD is envisioned as a CMOS-compatible detector integrated with parallel CMOS signal processing chains. The combination of fast, low noise CCD amplifiers with highly parallel signal processing offers the high frame-rate required. The CMOS-compatibility of the CCD provides low-power charge transfer.Here we report on the X-ray spectral response of a CMOS-compatible test CCD read at 2.5 MHz (about 25 times faster than the CCDs operating on Chandra ACIS), using transfer clock levels of only +-1 V (power per unit area less than 25 times that of ACIS CCDs). The 8-micron pixels of this device are one third the size of those on Chandra ACIS. We compare charge splitting in this detector with that observed in larger-pixel detectors, and we briefly discuss the implications of the small-pixel, deep-depletion detector configurations required by Lynx.

  8. Fast critical experiment data for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.J.; McFarlane, H.F.; Olsen, D.N.; Atkinson, C.A.; Ross, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Data from a number of previous critical experiments exist that are relevant to the design concepts being considered for SP-100 and MMW space reactors. Although substantial improvements in experiment techniques have since made some of the measured quantities somewhat suspect, the basic criticality data are still useful in most cases. However, the old experiments require recalculation with modern computational methods and nuclear cross section data before they can be applied to today's designs. Recently, we have calculated about 20 fast benchmark critical experiments with the latest ENDF/B data and modern transport codes. These calculations were undertaken as a part of the planning process for a new series of benchmark experiments aimed at supporting preliminary designs of SP-100 and MMW space reactors

  9. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina Gil, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Poltorak, K.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼ 1 GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X0. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2 ×1014 1 MeV neq /cm2, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (< 0.15 %X0) cooling system is being constructed, using a novel microchannel cooling silicon plate. Two complementary read-out architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100 μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200 μm thick silicon sensors.

  10. Fast mega pixels video imaging of a toroidal plasma in KT5D device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Min; Wang Zhijiang; Lu Ronghua; Sun Xiang; Wen Yizhi; Yu Changxuan; Wan Shude; Liu Wandong; Wang Jun; Xiao Delong; Yu Yi; Zhu Zhenghua; Hu Linyin

    2005-01-01

    A direct imaging system, viewing visible light emission from plasmas tangentially or perpendicularly, has been set up on the KT5D toroidal device to monitor the real two-dimensional profiles of purely ECR generated plasmas. This system has a typical spatial resolution of 0.2 mm (1280x1024 pixels) when imaging the whole cross section. Interesting features of ECR plasmas have been found. Different from what classical theories have expected, a resonance layer with two or three bright spots, rather than an even vertical band, has been observed. In addition, images also indicate an intermittent splitting and drifting character of the plasmas

  11. Development of an ultra-fast X-ray camera using hybrid pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawiec, A.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the project whose work described in this thesis is part, was to design a high-speed X-ray camera using hybrid pixels applied to biomedical imaging and for material science. As a matter of fact the hybrid pixel technology meets the requirements of these two research fields, particularly by providing energy selection and low dose imaging capabilities. In this thesis, high frame rate X-ray imaging based on the XPAD3-S photons counting chip is presented. Within a collaboration between CPPM, ESRF and SOLEIL, three XPAD3 cameras were built. Two of them are being operated at the beamline of the ESRF and SOLEIL synchrotron facilities and the third one is embedded in the PIXSCAN II irradiation setup of CPPM. The XPAD3 camera is a large surface X-ray detector composed of eight detection modules of seven XPAD3-S chips each with a high-speed data acquisition system. The readout architecture of the camera is based on the PCI Express interface and on programmable FPGA chips. The camera achieves a readout speed of 240 images/s, with maximum number of images limited by the RAM memory of the acquisition PC. The performance of the device was characterized by carrying out several high speed imaging experiments using the PIXSCAN II irradiation setup described in the last chapter of this thesis. (author)

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Pixel Analysis of the Interacting Face-on Spiral Galaxy NGC 5194 (M51A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Hyeop; Kim, Sang Chul; Park, Hong Soo; Ree, Chang Hee; Kyeong, Jaemann; Chung, Jiwon

    2011-10-01

    A pixel analysis is carried out on the interacting face-on spiral galaxy NGC 5194 (M51A), using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images in the F435W, F555W, and F814W (BVI) bands. After 4 × 4 binning of the HST/ACS images to secure a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio for each pixel, we derive several quantities describing the pixel color-magnitude diagram (pCMD) of NGC 5194: blue/red color cut, red pixel sequence parameters, blue pixel sequence parameters, and blue-to-red pixel ratio. The red sequence pixels are mostly older than 1 Gyr, while the blue sequence pixels are mostly younger than 1 Gyr, in their luminosity-weighted mean stellar ages. The color variation in the red pixel sequence from V = 20 mag arcsec-2 to V = 17 mag arcsec-2 corresponds to a metallicity variation of Δ[Fe/H] ~2 or an optical depth variation of Δτ V ~ 4 by dust, but the actual sequence is thought to originate from the combination of those two effects. At V compressing process by spiral density waves: dense dust → newly formed stars. The tidal interaction between NGC 5194 and NGC 5195 appears to enhance the star formation at the tidal bridge connecting the two galaxies. We find that the pixels corresponding to the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) area of NGC 5194 show a tight sequence at the bright-end of the pCMD, which are in the region of R ~ 100 pc and may be a photometric indicator of AGN properties.

  13. A parallel FPGA implementation for real-time 2D pixel clustering for the ATLAS Fast Tracker Processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotiropoulou, C L; Gkaitatzis, S; Kordas, K; Nikolaidis, S; Petridou, C; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Volpi, G

    2014-01-01

    The parallel 2D pixel clustering FPGA implementation used for the input system of the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) processor is presented. The input system for the FTK processor will receive data from the Pixel and micro-strip detectors from inner ATLAS read out drivers (RODs) at full rate, for total of 760Gbs, as sent by the RODs after level-1 triggers. Clustering serves two purposes, the first is to reduce the high rate of the received data before further processing, the second is to determine the cluster centroid to obtain the best spatial measurement. For the pixel detectors the clustering is implemented by using a 2D-clustering algorithm that takes advantage of a moving window technique to minimize the logic required for cluster identification. The cluster detection window size can be adjusted for optimizing the cluster identification process. Additionally, the implementation can be parallelized by instantiating multiple cores to identify different clusters independently thus exploiting more FPGA resources. This flexibility makes the implementation suitable for a variety of demanding image processing applications. The implementation is robust against bit errors in the input data stream and drops all data that cannot be identified. In the unlikely event of missing control words, the implementation will ensure stable data processing by inserting the missing control words in the data stream. The 2D pixel clustering implementation is developed and tested in both single flow and parallel versions. The first parallel version with 16 parallel cluster identification engines is presented. The input data from the RODs are received through S-Links and the processing units that follow the clustering implementation also require a single data stream, therefore data parallelizing (demultiplexing) and serializing (multiplexing) modules are introduced in order to accommodate the parallelized version and restore the data stream afterwards. The results of the first hardware tests of

  14. Lightning fast and space efficient inequality joins

    KAUST Repository

    Khayyat, Zuhair

    2015-09-01

    Inequality joins, which join relational tables on inequality conditions, are used in various applications. While there have been a wide range of optimization methods for joins in database systems, from algorithms such as sort-merge join and band join, to various indices such as B+-tree, R*-tree and Bitmap, inequality joins have received little attention and queries containing such joins are usually very slow. In this paper, we introduce fast inequality join algorithms. We put columns to be joined in sorted arrays and we use permutation arrays to encode positions of tuples in one sorted array w.r.t. the other sorted array. In contrast to sort-merge join, we use space efficient bit-arrays that enable optimizations, such as Bloom filter indices, for fast computation of the join results. We have implemented a centralized version of these algorithms on top of PostgreSQL, and a distributed version on top of Spark SQL. We have compared against well known optimization techniques for inequality joins and show that our solution is more scalable and several orders of magnitude faster.

  15. Lightning Fast and Space Efficient Inequality Joins

    KAUST Repository

    Khayyat, Zuhair

    2015-09-01

    Inequality joins, which join relational tables on inequality conditions, are used in various applications. While there have been a wide range of optimization methods for joins in database systems, from algorithms such as sort-merge join and band join, to various indices such as B+-tree,R*-tree and Bitmap, inequality joins have received little attention and queries containing such joins are usually very slow. In this paper, we introduce fast inequality join algorithms. We put columns to be joined in sorted arrays and we use permutation arrays to encode positions of tuples in one sorted array w.r.t. the other sorted array. In contrast to sort-merge join, we use space effcient bit-arrays that enable optimizations, such as Bloom filter indices, for fast computation of the join results. We have implemented a centralized version of these algorithms on top of PostgreSQL, and a distributed version on top of Spark SQL. We have compared against well known optimization techniques for inequality joins and show that our solution is more scalable and several orders of magnitude faster.

  16. Studies and development of a readout ASIC for pixelated CdTe detectors for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalowska, A.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is part of a project where a new instrument is developed: a camera for hard X-rays imaging spectroscopy. It is dedicated to fundamental research for observations in astrophysics, at wavelengths which can only be observed using space-borne instruments. In this domain the spectroscopic accuracy as well as the imaging details are of high importance. This work has been realized at CEA/IRFU (Institut de Recherche sur les lois Fondamentales de l'Univers), which has a long-standing and successful experience in instruments for high energy physics and space physics instrumentation. The objective of this thesis is the design of the readout electronics for a pixelated CdTe detector, suitable for a stacked assembly. The principal parameters of this integrated circuit are a very low noise for reaching a good accuracy in X-ray energy measurement, very low power consumption, a critical parameter in space-borne applications, and a small dead area for the full system combining the detector and the readout electronics. In this work I have studied the limits of these three parameters in order to optimize the circuit. In terms of the spectral resolution, two categories of noise had to be distinguished to determine the final performance. The first is the Fano noise limit, related to detector interaction statistics, which cannot be eliminated. The second is the electronic noise, also unavoidable; however it can be minimized through optimization of the detection chain. Within the detector, establishing a small pixel pitch of 300 μm reduces the input capacitance and the dark current. This limits the effects of the electronic noise. Also in order to limit the input capacitance the future camera is designed as a stacked assembly of the detector with the readout ASIC. This allows to reach extremely good input parameters seen by the readout electronics: a capacitance in range of 0.3 pF-1 pF and a dark current below 5 pA. In the frame of this thesis I have

  17. Efficient space-time sampling with pixel-wise coded exposure for high-speed imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dengyu; Gu, Jinwei; Hitomi, Yasunobu; Gupta, Mohit; Mitsunaga, Tomoo; Nayar, Shree K

    2014-02-01

    Cameras face a fundamental trade-off between spatial and temporal resolution. Digital still cameras can capture images with high spatial resolution, but most high-speed video cameras have relatively low spatial resolution. It is hard to overcome this trade-off without incurring a significant increase in hardware costs. In this paper, we propose techniques for sampling, representing, and reconstructing the space-time volume to overcome this trade-off. Our approach has two important distinctions compared to previous works: 1) We achieve sparse representation of videos by learning an overcomplete dictionary on video patches, and 2) we adhere to practical hardware constraints on sampling schemes imposed by architectures of current image sensors, which means that our sampling function can be implemented on CMOS image sensors with modified control units in the future. We evaluate components of our approach, sampling function and sparse representation, by comparing them to several existing approaches. We also implement a prototype imaging system with pixel-wise coded exposure control using a liquid crystal on silicon device. System characteristics such as field of view and modulation transfer function are evaluated for our imaging system. Both simulations and experiments on a wide range of scenes show that our method can effectively reconstruct a video from a single coded image while maintaining high spatial resolution.

  18. Plants and pixels: Comparing phenologies from the ground and from space (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, T.; Stoekli, R.; Jeanneret, F.; Peñuelas, J.

    2010-12-01

    Changes in the seasonality of life cycles of plants as recorded in phenological observations have been widely analysed at the species level with data available for many decades back in time. At the same time, seasonality changes in satellite-based observations and prognostic phenology models comprise information at the pixel-size or landscape scale. Change analysis of satellite-based records is restricted due to relatively short satellite records that further include gaps while model-based analyses are biased due to current model deficiencies. At 30 selected sites across Europe, we analysed three different sources of plant seasonality during the 1971-2000 period. Data consisted of (1) species-specific development stages of flowering and leave-out with different species observed at each site. (2) We used a synthetic phenological metric that integrates the common interannual phenological signal across all species at one site. (3) We estimated daily Leaf Area Index with a prognostic phenology model. The prior uncertainties of the model’s empirical parameter space are constrained by assimilating the Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) and Leaf Area Index (LAI) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We extracted the day of year when the 25%, 50% and 75% thresholds were passed each spring. The question arises how the three phenological signals compare and correlate across climate zones in Europe. Is there a match between single species observations, species-based ground-observed metrics and the landscape-scale prognostic model? Are there single key-species across Europe that best represent a landscape scale measure from the prognostic model? Can one source substitute another and serve as proxy-data? What can we learn from potential mismatches? Focusing on changes in spring this contribution presents first results of an ongoing comparison study from a number of European test sites that will be extended

  19. Fast GC for Space Applications Based on PIES Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a novel analytical instrument which combines the advantages of fast GC and a detector capable of identifying species is proposed. Experiments in the...

  20. Fast head-tail instability with space charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blaskiewicz

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The fast head-tail instability with space charge is studied using series expansion techniques, numerical simulations, and a new formulation which allows for precise estimates of growth rates and thresholds. In regimes where they are reliable, all three techniques predict that space charge suppresses the fast head-tail instability. It is found that the series expansion techniques are unreliable for parameter regimes commonly employed in hadron accelerators. The numerical techniques are less prone to error, but the computational requirements become severe as space charge tune shifts increase. The new model has neither of these problems, but it underestimates the benefits of chromaticity, at least in its simplest form.

  1. Development of a Large-Format Science-Grade CMOS Active Pixel Sensor, for Extreme Ultra Violet Spectroscopy and Imaging in Space Science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waltham, N. R; Prydderch, M; Mapson-Menard, H; Morrissey, Q; Turchetta, R; Pool, P; Harris, A

    2005-01-01

    We describe our programme to develop a large-format science-grade CMOS active pixel sensor for future space science missions, and in particular an extreme ultra-violet spectrograph for solar physics...

  2. Fully Reusable Access to Space Technology (FAST) Methane Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-16

    baseline design – NASA Ames partnered for aerothermal and TPS – Reusable Merlin engine option by SpaceX – Conceptual Research Corp design Key impacts......FAST) 5b. GRANT NUMBER Methane Rocket 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Lt Cole Doupe, Jess Sponable, Jeffrey Zweber (AFRL/VA); Richard

  3. Fast regularizing sequential subspace optimization in Banach spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schöpfer, F; Schuster, T

    2009-01-01

    We are concerned with fast computations of regularized solutions of linear operator equations in Banach spaces in case only noisy data are available. To this end we modify recently developed sequential subspace optimization methods in such a way that the therein employed Bregman projections onto hyperplanes are replaced by Bregman projections onto stripes whose width is in the order of the noise level

  4. Test beam measurement of the first prototype of the fast silicon pixel monolithic detector for the TT-PET project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolozzi, L.; Bandi, Y.; Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Forshaw, D.; Hayakawa, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Kaynak, M.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Ratib, O.; Ripiccini, E.; Rücker, H.; Valerio, P.; Weber, M.

    2018-04-01

    The TT-PET collaboration is developing a PET scanner for small animals with 30 ps time-of-flight resolution and sub-millimetre 3D detection granularity. The sensitive element of the scanner is a monolithic silicon pixel detector based on state-of-the-art SiGe BiCMOS technology. The first ASIC prototype for the TT-PET was produced and tested in the laboratory and with minimum ionizing particles. The electronics exhibit an equivalent noise charge below 600 e‑ RMS and a pulse rise time of less than 2 ns , in accordance with the simulations. The pixels with a capacitance of 0.8 pF were measured to have a detection efficiency greater than 99% and, although in the absence of the post-processing, a time resolution of approximately 200 ps .

  5. A High Performance Multi-Core FPGA Implementation for 2D Pixel Clustering for the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, C-L; The ATLAS collaboration; Beretta, M; Gkaitatzis, S; Kordas, K; Nikolaidis, S; Petridou, C; Volpi, G

    2014-01-01

    The high performance multi-core 2D pixel clustering FPGA implementation used for the input system of the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) processor is presented. The input system for the FTK processor will receive data from the Pixel and micro-strip detectors read out drivers (RODs) at 760Gbps, the full rate of level 1 triggers. Clustering is required as a method to reduce the high rate of the received data before further processing, as well as to determine the cluster centroid for obtaining obtain the best spatial measurement. Our implementation targets the pixel detectors and uses a 2D-clustering algorithm that takes advantage of a moving window technique to minimize the logic required for cluster identification. The design is fully generic and the cluster detection window size can be adjusted for optimizing the cluster identification process. Τhe implementation can be parallelized by instantiating multiple cores to identify different clusters independently thus exploiting more FPGA resources. This flexibility mak...

  6. The Gigatracker: An ultra-fast and low-mass silicon pixel detector for the NA62 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorini, M; Morel, M; Petrucci, F; Marchetto, F; Garbolino, S; Cortina, E; Tiuraniemi, S; Ceccucci, A; Martin, E; Riedler, P; Martoiu, S; Ramusino, A C; Rinella, G A; Mapelli, A; Mazza, G; Noy, M; Jarron, P; Nuessle, G; Dellacasa, G; Kluge, A; Rivetti, A; Kaplon, J

    2011-01-01

    The Gigatracker is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed to track the highly intense NA62 hadron beam with a time resolution of 150 ps (rms). The beam spectrometer of the experiment is composed of three Gigatracker stations installed in vacuum in order to precisely measure momentum, time and direction of every traversing particle. Precise tracking demands a very low mass of the detector assembly (<0.5\\% X(O) per station) in order to limit multiple scattering and beam hadronic interactions. The high rate and especially the high timing precision requirements are very demanding: two R\\&D options are ongoing and the corresponding prototype read-out chips have been recently designed and produced in 0.13 mu m CMOS technology. One solution makes use of a constant fraction discriminator and on-pixel analogue-based time-to-digital-converter (TDC); the other comprises a delay-locked loop based TDC placed at the end of each pixel column and a time-over-threshold discriminator with time-walk correction techniq...

  7. Caliste 256: A CdTe imaging spectrometer for space science with a 580 {mu}m pixel pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limousin, O., E-mail: olimousin@cea.fr [CEA/Saclay, DSM/Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lugiez, F.; Gevin, O. [CEA/Saclay, DSM/Irfu/Service d' Electronique Detecteurs et Informatique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Meuris, A.; Blondel, C. [CEA/Saclay, DSM/Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delagnes, E. [CEA/Saclay, DSM/Irfu/Service d' Electronique Detecteurs et Informatique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Donati, M.; Le Mer, I.; Martignac, J.; Pinsard, F. [CEA/Saclay, DSM/Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vassal, M.C.; Bocage, R.; Soufflet, F. [3D Plus, 641 rue Helene Boucher, F-78532 Buc (France)

    2011-08-11

    Caliste project aims at hybridizing 1 cm{sup 2} CdTe or CdZnTe pixel detectors with low-noise full custom front-end electronics, in a single component standing in a 1x1x2 cm{sup 3} volume. Caliste device is 4-side buttable and can be used as elementary detection unit of a large mosaic to form a hard X-ray focal plane of any size and shape. Caliste is especially designed to match astronomical space mission requirements and its design takes into account environmental constraints, radiation environment in particular. This new imaging spectrometer for hard X-rays detection offers high spectral and spatial resolution together with accurate time-tagging capability and low dead time. Caliste concept relies on a 3D hybridization technology that consists in stacking full custom ASICs perpendicular to the detection surface into a single component. This technique simultaneously permits to realize a buttable imager and to enhance performance and uniformity response. Our last prototype is called Caliste 256 and integrates 16x16 pixels array, 580 {mu}m pitch and 256 corresponding independent spectroscopy channels. This paper presents Caliste 256 design and properties. We emphasize spectral performance and demonstrate spectral resolution capabilities better than 1 keV FWHM at 60 keV.

  8. High-End CMOS Active Pixel Sensors For Space-Borne Imaging Instruments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogaerts, Jan; Lepage, Gerald; Dantes, Didier

    2005-01-01

    ...) offer great promise for use in space-borne imaging instruments. This paper highlights present-day high-end CMOS APS sensors and sketches their advantages with respect to their CCD counterparts...

  9. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer

  10. Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava [University New Hampshire- Durham

    2012-02-16

    Recent developments in experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic reconnection hold promise for providing solutions to outstanding problems in laboratory and space plasma physics. Examples include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth’s Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recently, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density plasmas. In each of these examples, a common and long-standing challenge has been to explain why fast reconnection proceeds rapidly from a relatively quiescent state. In this talk, we demonstrate the advantages of viewing these problems and their solutions from a common perspective. We focus on some recent, surprising discoveries regarding the role of secondary plasmoid instabilities of thin current sheets. Nonlinearly, these instabilities lead to fast reconnection rates that are very weakly dependent on the Lundquist number of the plasma.

  11. The TT-PET project: a thin TOF-PET scanner based on fast novel silicon pixel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Y.; Benoit, M.; Cadoux, F. R.; Forshaw, D. C.; Hänni, R.; Hayakawa, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Michal, S.; Miucci, A.; Paolozzi, L.; Ratib, O.; Ripiccini, E.; Tognina, C.; Valerio, P.; Weber, M.

    2018-01-01

    The TT-PET project aims at developing a compact Time-of-flight PET scanner with 30ps time resolution, capable of withstanding high magnetic fields and allowing for integration in a traditional MRI scanner, providing complimentary real-time PET images. The very high timing resolution of the TT-PET scanner is achieved thanks to a new generation of Silicon-Germanium (Si-Ge) amplifiers, which are embedded in monolithic pixel sensors. The scanner is composed of 16 detection towers as well as cooling blocks, arranged in a ring structure. The towers are composed of multiple ultra-thin pixel modules stacked on top of each other. Making it possible to perform depth of interaction measurements and maximize the spatial resolution along the line of flight of the two photons emitted within a patient. This will result in improved image quality, contrast, and uniformity while drastically reducing backgrounds within the scanner. Allowing for a reduction in the amount of radioactivity delivered to the patient. Due to an expected data rate of about 250 MB/s a custom readout system for high data throughput has been developed, which includes noise filtering and reduced data pressure. The realisation of a first scanner prototype for small animals is foreseen by 2019. A general overview of the scanner will be given including, technical details concerning the detection elements, mechanics, DAQ readout, simulation and results.

  12. ENGage: The use of space and pixel art for increasing primary school children's interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    The Faculty of Engineering at The University of Nottingham, UK, has developed interdisciplinary, hands-on workshops for primary schools that introduce space technology, its relevance to everyday life and the importance of science, technology, engineering and maths. The workshop activities for 7-11 year olds highlight the roles that space and satellite technology play in observing and monitoring the Earth's biosphere as well as being vital to communications in the modern digital world. The programme also provides links to 'how science works', the environment and citizenship and uses pixel art through the medium of digital photography to demonstrate the importance of maths in a novel and unconventional manner. The interactive programme of activities provides learners with an opportunity to meet 'real' scientists and engineers, with one of the key messages from the day being that anyone can become involved in science and engineering whatever their ability or subject of interest. The methodology introduces the role of scientists and engineers using space technology themes, but it could easily be adapted for use with any inspirational topic. Analysis of learners' perceptions of science, technology, engineering and maths before and after participating in ENGage showed very positive and significant changes in their attitudes to these subjects and an increase in the number of children thinking they would be interested and capable in pursuing a career in science and engineering. This paper provides an overview of the activities, the methodology, the evaluation process and results.

  13. Correction of defective pixels for medical and space imagers based on Ising Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Eliahu; Shnitser, Moriel; Avraham, Tsvika; Hadar, Ofer

    2014-09-01

    We propose novel models for image restoration based on statistical physics. We investigate the affinity between these fields and describe a framework from which interesting denoising algorithms can be derived: Ising-like models and simulated annealing techniques. When combined with known predictors such as Median and LOCO-I, these models become even more effective. In order to further examine the proposed models we apply them to two important problems: (i) Digital Cameras in space damaged from cosmic radiation. (ii) Ultrasonic medical devices damaged from speckle noise. The results, as well as benchmark and comparisons, suggest in most of the cases a significant gain in PSNR and SSIM in comparison to other filters.

  14. Adaptive pseudo-color enhancement method of weld radiographic images based on HSI color space and self-transformation of pixels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongquan; Zhao, Yalin; Gao, Jianmin; Gao, Zhiyong

    2017-06-01

    The radiographic testing (RT) image of a steam turbine manufacturing enterprise has the characteristics of low gray level, low contrast, and blurriness, which lead to a substandard image quality. Moreover, it is not conducive for human eyes to detect and evaluate defects. This study proposes an adaptive pseudo-color enhancement method for weld radiographic images based on the hue, saturation, and intensity (HSI) color space and the self-transformation of pixels to solve these problems. First, the pixel's self-transformation is performed to the pixel value of the original RT image. The function value after the pixel's self-transformation is assigned to the HSI components in the HSI color space. Thereafter, the average intensity of the enhanced image is adaptively adjusted to 0.5 according to the intensity of the original image. Moreover, the hue range and interval can be adjusted according to personal habits. Finally, the HSI components after the adaptive adjustment can be transformed to display in the red, green, and blue color space. Numerous weld radiographic images from a steam turbine manufacturing enterprise are used to validate the proposed method. The experimental results show that the proposed pseudo-color enhancement method can improve image definition and make the target and background areas distinct in weld radiographic images. The enhanced images will be more conducive for defect recognition. Moreover, the image enhanced using the proposed method conforms to the human eye visual properties, and the effectiveness of defect recognition and evaluation can be ensured.

  15. Adaptive pseudo-color enhancement method of weld radiographic images based on HSI color space and self-transformation of pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongquan; Zhao, Yalin; Gao, Jianmin; Gao, Zhiyong

    2017-06-01

    The radiographic testing (RT) image of a steam turbine manufacturing enterprise has the characteristics of low gray level, low contrast, and blurriness, which lead to a substandard image quality. Moreover, it is not conducive for human eyes to detect and evaluate defects. This study proposes an adaptive pseudo-color enhancement method for weld radiographic images based on the hue, saturation, and intensity (HSI) color space and the self-transformation of pixels to solve these problems. First, the pixel's self-transformation is performed to the pixel value of the original RT image. The function value after the pixel's self-transformation is assigned to the HSI components in the HSI color space. Thereafter, the average intensity of the enhanced image is adaptively adjusted to 0.5 according to the intensity of the original image. Moreover, the hue range and interval can be adjusted according to personal habits. Finally, the HSI components after the adaptive adjustment can be transformed to display in the red, green, and blue color space. Numerous weld radiographic images from a steam turbine manufacturing enterprise are used to validate the proposed method. The experimental results show that the proposed pseudo-color enhancement method can improve image definition and make the target and background areas distinct in weld radiographic images. The enhanced images will be more conducive for defect recognition. Moreover, the image enhanced using the proposed method conforms to the human eye visual properties, and the effectiveness of defect recognition and evaluation can be ensured.

  16. 4K×4K format 10μm pixel pitch H4RG-10 hybrid CMOS silicon visible focal plane array for space astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yibin; Tennant, William; Anglin, Selmer; Wong, Andre; Farris, Mark; Xu, Min; Holland, Eric; Cooper, Donald; Hosack, Joseph; Ho, Kenneth; Sprafke, Thomas; Kopp, Robert; Starr, Brian; Blank, Richard; Beletic, James W.; Luppino, Gerard A.

    2012-07-01

    Teledyne’s silicon hybrid CMOS focal plane array technology has matured into a viable, high performance and high- TRL alternative to scientific CCD sensors for space-based applications in the UV-visible-NIR wavelengths. This paper presents the latest results from Teledyne’s low noise silicon hybrid CMOS visible focal place array produced in 4K×4K format with 10 μm pixel pitch. The H4RG-10 readout circuit retains all of the CMOS functionality (windowing, guide mode, reference pixels) and heritage of its highly successful predecessor (H2RG) developed for JWST, with additional features for improved performance. Combined with a silicon PIN detector layer, this technology is termed HyViSI™ (Hybrid Visible Silicon Imager). H4RG-10 HyViSI™ arrays achieve high pixel interconnectivity (noise (passed radiation testing for low earth orbit (LEO) environment.

  17. Pixel Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Karin; Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Augustesen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Pixel Experiments The term pixel is traditionally defined as any of the minute elements that together constitute a larger context or image. A pixel has its own form and is the smallest unit seen within a larger structure. In working with the potentials of LED technology in architectural lighting...... design it became relevant to investigate the use of LEDs as the physical equivalent of a pixel as a design approach. In this book our interest has been in identifying how the qualities of LEDs can be used in lighting applications. With experiences in the planning and implementation of architectural...... lighting design in practice, one quickly experiences and realises that there are untapped potentials in the attributes of LED technology. In this research, speculative studies have been made working with the attributes of LEDs in architectural contexts, with the ambition to ascertain new strategies...

  18. Pixel Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Augustesen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Pixel Experiments The term pixel is traditionally defined as any of the minute elements that together constitute a larger context or image. A pixel has its own form and is the smallest unit seen within a larger structure. In working with the potentials of LED technology in architectural lighting...... for using LED lighting in lighting design practice. The speculative experiments that have been set-up have aimed to clarify the variables that can be used as parameters in the design of lighting applications; including, for example, the structuring and software control of light. The experiments also...... elucidate and exemplify already well-known problems in relation to the experience of vertical and horizontal lighting. Pixel Experiments exist as a synergy between speculative test setups and lighting design in practice. This book is one of four books that is published in connection with the research...

  19. Fast pixelated sensors for radiation detection and imaging based on quantum confined structures in III/V semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortora, M.; Biasiol, G.; Cautero, G.; Menk, R.H.; Plaisier, J.R.; Antonelli, M.

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the characterisation of the delivered beams in many types of photon sources, innovative beam profilers based on III/V semiconductor materials (InGaAs/InAlAs) have been deeply investigated. Owing to a tunable and direct band gap these devices allow radiation detection in a wide spectral range. In order to increase the sensitivity of the device in radiation detection charge amplification on the sensor level is implemented. This is obtained by exploiting In 0.75 Ga 0.25 As/In 0.75 Al 0.25 As quantum wells (QW) hosting a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) through molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Internal charge-amplification mechanism can be achieved for very low applied voltages, while the high carrier mobility allows the design of very fast photon detectors with sub-nanosecond response times. This technology has been preliminarily exploited to fabricate prototype beam profilers with a strip geometry (with 50-μm-wide strips). Tests were carried out both with conventional X-ray tubes and at the Elettra synchrotron facility. The results testify how these profilers are capable of reconstructing the shape of the beam, as well as estimating the position of the beam centroid with a precision of about 400 nm. Further measurements with different samples of decreasing thickness have shown how this precision could be further improved by an optimised microfabrication. For this reason a new design, based on a membrane-photodetector, is proposed. Results regarding the spatial resolution as function of the sensor thickness will be presented and discussed.

  20. Analysis of pixel systematics and space point reconstruction with DEPFET PXD5 matrices using high energy beam test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuen, Lars

    2011-02-01

    To answer the current questions in particle physics vertex-detectors, the innermost sub-detector system of a multipurpose particle detector, with brilliant spatial resolution and at the same time with as little sensor material as possible are mandatory. These requirements are the driving force behind the newest generation of silicon pixel sensors like the DEPFET pixel, which incorporates the first amplification stage in form of a transistor in the fully depleted sensor bulk, allowing for a high spatial resolution even with thinned down sensors. A DEPFET pixel prototype system, build for the future TeV-scale liner collider ILC, was characterized in a high energy beam test at CERN with a spatial resolution and statistics that allowed for the first time in-pixel homogeneity measurements of DEPFET pixels. Yet, in the quest for higher precision the sensor development must be accompanied by progress in position reconstruction algorithms. A study with three novel approaches in position reconstruction was undertaken. The results of the in-pixel beam test and the performance of the new methods with an emphasis on δ-electrons will be presented here. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of pixel systematics and space point reconstruction with DEPFET PXD5 matrices using high energy beam test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuen, Lars

    2011-02-15

    To answer the current questions in particle physics vertex-detectors, the innermost sub-detector system of a multipurpose particle detector, with brilliant spatial resolution and at the same time with as little sensor material as possible are mandatory. These requirements are the driving force behind the newest generation of silicon pixel sensors like the DEPFET pixel, which incorporates the first amplification stage in form of a transistor in the fully depleted sensor bulk, allowing for a high spatial resolution even with thinned down sensors. A DEPFET pixel prototype system, build for the future TeV-scale liner collider ILC, was characterized in a high energy beam test at CERN with a spatial resolution and statistics that allowed for the first time in-pixel homogeneity measurements of DEPFET pixels. Yet, in the quest for higher precision the sensor development must be accompanied by progress in position reconstruction algorithms. A study with three novel approaches in position reconstruction was undertaken. The results of the in-pixel beam test and the performance of the new methods with an emphasis on {delta}-electrons will be presented here. (orig.)

  2. Fast QC-LDPC code for free space optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Qi; Udeh, Chinonso Paschal; Wu, Rangzhong

    2017-02-01

    Free Space Optical (FSO) Communication systems use the atmosphere as a propagation medium. Hence the atmospheric turbulence effects lead to multiplicative noise related with signal intensity. In order to suppress the signal fading induced by multiplicative noise, we propose a fast Quasi-Cyclic (QC) Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) code for FSO Communication systems. As a linear block code based on sparse matrix, the performances of QC-LDPC is extremely near to the Shannon limit. Currently, the studies on LDPC code in FSO Communications is mainly focused on Gauss-channel and Rayleigh-channel, respectively. In this study, the LDPC code design over atmospheric turbulence channel which is nether Gauss-channel nor Rayleigh-channel is closer to the practical situation. Based on the characteristics of atmospheric channel, which is modeled as logarithmic-normal distribution and K-distribution, we designed a special QC-LDPC code, and deduced the log-likelihood ratio (LLR). An irregular QC-LDPC code for fast coding, of which the rates are variable, is proposed in this paper. The proposed code achieves excellent performance of LDPC codes and can present the characteristics of high efficiency in low rate, stable in high rate and less number of iteration. The result of belief propagation (BP) decoding shows that the bit error rate (BER) obviously reduced as the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) increased. Therefore, the LDPC channel coding technology can effectively improve the performance of FSO. At the same time, the BER, after decoding reduces with the increase of SNR arbitrarily, and not having error limitation platform phenomenon with error rate slowing down.

  3. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, A.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Anelli, G.; Antinori, F.; Badala, A.; Burns, M.; Cali, I.A.; Campbell, M.; Caselle, M.; Ceresa, S.; Chochula, P.; Dima, R.; Elias, D.; Fabris, D.; Fini, R.A.; Formenti, F.; Krivda, M.; Lenti, V.; Librizzi, F.; Manzari, V.

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the two innermost layers of the ALICE inner tracker system. It contains 9.8x10 6 pixels with a material budget of less than 1% of X 0 per layer. It is based on hybrid pixel technology. The space and material budget constraints have severe impact on the design. The ALICE SPD detector system components are discussed

  4. Exploring the Hidden Structure of Astronomical Images: A "Pixelated" View of Solar System and Deep Space Features!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R. Bruce; Sienkiewicz, Frank; Sadler, Philip; Antonucci, Paul; Miller, Jaimie

    2013-01-01

    We describe activities created to help student participants in Project ITEAMS (Innovative Technology-Enabled Astronomy for Middle Schools) develop a deeper understanding of picture elements (pixels), image creation, and analysis of the recorded data. ITEAMS is an out-of-school time (OST) program funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with…

  5. Design and realization of a fast low noise electronics for a hybrid pixel X-ray detector dedicated to small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantepie, B.

    2008-12-01

    Since the invention of computerized tomography (CT), charge integration detector were widely employed for X-ray biomedical imaging applications. Nevertheless, other options exist. A new technology of direct detection using semiconductors has been developed for high energy physics instrumentation. This new technology, called hybrid pixel detector, works in photon counting mode and allows for selecting the minimum energy of the counted photons. The ImXgam research team at CPPM develops the PIXSCAN demonstrator, a CT-scanner using the hybrid pixel detector XPAD. The aim of this project is to evaluate the improvement in image quality and in dose delivered during X-ray examinations of a small animal. After a first prototype of a hybrid pixel detector XPAD1 proving the feasibility of the project, a complete imager XPAD2 was designed and integrated in the PIXSCAN demonstrator. Since then, with the evolution of microelectronic industry, important improvements are conceivable. To reducing the size of pixels and to improving the energy resolution of detectors, a third design XPAD3 was conceived and will be soon integrated in a second generation of PIXSCAN demonstrator. In this project, my thesis work consisted in taking part to the design of the detector readout electronics, to the characterization of the chips and of the hybrid pixel detectors, and also to the definition of a auto-zeroing architecture for pixels. The first and second chapters present X-ray medical imaging and particle detection with semi-conductors and its modelling. The third chapter deals with the specifications of electronic circuits for imaging applications first for analog pixels then for digital pixels and describes the general architecture of the integrated circuits. The validation tests are presented in the fourth chapter while the last chapter gives an account of expected changes in pixel electronics

  6. Fast Neutron Dosimeter for the Space Environment, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Secondary neutrons make a significant contribution to the total absorbed dose received by space crews during long duration space missions However, only a limited...

  7. Design and realization of a fast low noise electronics for a hybrid pixel X-ray detector dedicated to small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantepie, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    Since the invention of computerized tomography (CT), charge integration detector were widely employed for X-ray biomedical imaging applications. Nevertheless, other options exist. A new technology of direct detection using semiconductors has been developed for high energy physics instrumentation. This new technology, called hybrid pixel detector, works in photon counting mode and allows for selecting the minimum energy of the counted photons. The imXgam research team at CPPM develops the PIXSCAN demonstrator, a CT-scanner using the hybrid pixel detector XPAD. The aim of this project is to evaluate the improvement on image quality and on dose delivered during X-ray examinations of a small animal. After a first prototype of hybrid pixel detector XPAD1 proving the feasibility of the project, a complete imager XPAD2 was designed and integrated in the PIXSCAN demonstrator. Since then, with the evolution of microelectronic industry, important improvements are conceivable. To reducing the size of pixels and to improving the energy resolution of detectors, a third design XPAD3 was conceived and will be soon integrated in a second generation of PIXSCAN demonstrator. In this project, my thesis's work consisted in taking part to the design of the detector readout electronics, to the characterization of the chips and of the hybrid pixel detectors, and also to the definition of an auto-zeroing architecture for pixels. (author) [fr

  8. Effect of space allowance during transport and fasting or non-fasting during lairage on welfare indicators in Merino lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozar, A.; Rodriguez, A.I.; Garijo, P.; Calvo, L.; Vergara, H.

    2016-11-01

    A total of 72 male lambs of Merina breed were sampled in a 3×2 factorial design, testing three different space allowances treatment (SA) during transport [0.16 m2/animal (SAL; n=24); 0.20 m2/animal (SAM; n=24) and 0.30 m2/animal (SAH; n=24)] and two lairage treatments (TL) during 18 h previous slaughter [fasting (FAST; n=36) vs feeding (FEED; n=36)] on welfare physiological indicators. After transport, glucose and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were highest in SAM group and lowest in SAH one (p<0.05). SAL showed intermediate values for both parameters. SA did not affect the rest of the blood parameters studied. TL-FAST treatment decreased glucose values (p<0.001) while increased LDH (p<0.001). Fasting caused an increase (p<0.05) of Red Blood Cell Count values in SAM group. Feed deprivation did not affect cortisol or adrenaline values. Noradrenaline value was higher (p<0.001) in TL-FAST groups than in TL-FEED. In conclusion, under the conditions of this study, a range of space allowance during transport between 0.16 and 0.30 m2/lamb could be recommended without showing major changes on welfare physiological indicators; and feeding could be more appropriate than fasting during lairage. (Author)

  9. Effect of space allowance during transport and fasting or non-fasting during lairage on welfare indicators in Merino lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Rodriguez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 72 male lambs of Merina breed were sampled in a 3×2 factorial design, testing three different space allowances treatment (SA during transport [0.16 m2/animal (SAL; n=24; 0.20 m2/animal (SAM; n=24 and 0.30 m2/animal (SAH; n=24] and two lairage treatments (TL during 18 h previous slaughter [fasting (FAST; n=36 vs feeding (FEED; n=36] on welfare physiological indicators. After transport, glucose and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were highest in SAM group and lowest in SAH one (p<0.05. SAL showed intermediate values for both parameters. SA did not affect the rest of the blood parameters studied. TL-FAST treatment decreased glucose values (p<0.001 while increased LDH (p<0.001. Fasting caused an increase (p<0.05 of Red Blood Cell Count values in SAM group. Feed deprivation did not affect cortisol or adrenaline values. Noradrenaline value was higher (p<0.001 in TL-FAST groups than in TL-FEED. In conclusion, under the conditions of this study, a range of space allowance during transport between 0.16 and 0.30 m2/lamb could be recommended without showing major changes on welfare physiological indicators; and feeding could be more appropriate than fasting during lairage.

  10. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory: Fast Response Space Missions for Early Time Phase of Gamma Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, I.H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2013-01-01

    One of the unexplored domains in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the early time phase of the optical light curve. We have proposed Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of small space missions. The UFFO is eq...

  11. Alpine Pixel Detector Layout

    CERN Document Server

    Delebecque, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Geffroy, N; Massol, N; Rambure, T; Todorov, T

    2013-01-01

    A description of an optimized layout of pixel sensors based on a stave that combines both barrel and endcap module orientations. The mechanical stiffness of the structure is provided by carbon fiber shells spaced by carbon foam. The cooling of the modules is provided by two-phase $CO_{2}$ flowing in a thin titanium pipe glued inside the carbon fiber foam. The electrical services of all modules are provided by a single stave flex. This layout eliminates the need for separate barrel and endcap detector structures, and therefore the barrel services material in front of the endcap. The transition from barrel to endcap module orientation is optimized separately for each layer in order to minimize the active pixel area and the traversed material. The sparse module spacing in the endcap part of the stave allows for multiple fixation points, and for a stiff overall structure composed only of staves interconnected by stiff disks.

  12. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy?from a pixel array detector with fast?dual gating and no readout dead-time

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M.; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8?kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set ...

  13. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  14. Fast GC for Space Applications Based on PIES Technology, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project is aimed at the development of an analytical instrument which combines the advantages of fast gas chromatography (GC) and a detector that...

  15. Combination of fast-ion diagnostics in velocity-space tomographies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh

    2013-01-01

    Fast-ion Dα (FIDA) and collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics provide indirect measurements of fast-ion velocity distribution functions in magnetically confined plasmas. Here we present the first prescription for velocity-space tomographic inversion of CTS and FIDA measurements that can ...

  16. Development of fast and radiation hard Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) optimized for open charm meson detection with the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deveaux, M.

    2008-03-01

    The adequacy of CMOS MAPS (Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors) to provide high spatial resolution while submitted to high particle flux and radiation level is assessed in this work. A 55 Fe-source and minimum ionizing particle beams were used to study the performances of MAPS being irradiated either with neutrons and X-rays. As expected, ionizing radiation dominantly causes an increase of the leakage current of the pixels, which translates into increased shot noise. Non-ionizing radiation generates increases in terms of leakage currents but can reduce substantially the lifetime of the signal electrons in the pixel. The latter was found to cause a dramatic drop of the signal if the lifetime of the electrons shrinks below the time required for charge collection. The performances of irradiated detectors were studied as a function of the operation conditions, i.e. in terms of temperature and integration time of the pixel. It was demonstrated that running the detectors at low temperature ( 7 collisions per second, would shrink the lifetime of the detector to a few days. It was however demonstrated that a balanced configuration exists where, for lower beam interaction rate, enough D 0 -mesons can be collected and analyzed to investigate their production properties with a satisfactory sensitivity. (A.C.)

  17. Fast Neutron Dosimeter for the Space Environment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model calculations and risk assessment estimates indicate that secondary neutrons, with energies ranging between 0.5 to >150 MeV, make a significant contribution...

  18. Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, Benedikt

    2013-01-01

    Fast ions play an important role in heating the plasma in a magnetic confinement fusion device. Fast-ion Dα(FIDA) spectroscopy diagnoses fast ions in small measurement volumes. Spectra measured by a FIDA diagnostic can be related to the 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function. A single FIDA view...... probes certain regions in velocity-space, determined by the geometry of the set-up. Exploiting this, the fast-ion distribution function can be inferred using a velocity-space tomography method. This poster contains a tomography calculated from measured spectra from three different FIDA views at ASDEX...... Upgrade. The quality of the tomography improves with the number of FIDA views simultaneously measuring the same volume. To investigate the potential benefits of including additional views (up to 18), tomographies are inferred from synthetic spectra calculated from a simulated distribution function...

  19. A model and simulation of fast space charge pulses in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zepeng; Rowland, Simon M.; Wu, Kai

    2017-11-01

    The transport of space charge packets across polyethylene and epoxy resin in high electric fields has been characterized as fast or slow depending on packet mobility. Several explanations for the formation and transport of slow space charge packets have been proposed, but the origins of fast space charge pulses, with mobilities above 10-11 m2 V-1 s-1, are unclear. In one suggested model, it is assumed that the formation of fast charge pulses is due to discontinuous electromechanical compression and charge injection at the electrode-insulation interface, and their transport is related to corresponding relaxation processes. In that model, charges travel as a pulse because of group polarization. This paper provides an alternative model based on the reduction of charge carrier activation energy due to charge density triggered polymer chain movement and subsequent chain relaxation times. The generation and transport of fast charge pulses are readily simulated by a bipolar charge transport model with three additional parameters: reduced activation energy, charge density threshold, and chain relaxation time. Such a model is shown to reproduce key features of fast space charge pulses including speed, duration, repetition rate and pulse size. This model provides the basis for a deep understanding of the physical origins of fast space charge pulses in polymers.

  20. Fast space travel by vacuum zero-point field perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froning, H. D. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Forces acting upon an accelerating vehicle that is 'warping' its surrounding space are estimated, using the techniques of computational gas/fluid dynamics. Disturbances corresponding to perturbation of spacetime metric and vacuum zero-point fields by electromagnetic discharges are modeled as changes in the electric permittivity and magnetic permeability characteristics of the vacuum of space. And it is assumed that resistance to acceleration (vehicle inertia) is, in part, a consequence of zero-point radiation pressure field anisotropy in the warped space region surrounding the craft. The paper shows that resistance to vehicle acceleration can be diminished by spacetime warping that increases light propagation speed within the warped region. If sufficient warping is achieved, ship speed is slower than light speed within the region that surrounds it-even if it is moving faster-than-light with respect to earth

  1. Characterization of the CMS Pixel Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Weihua

    2002-01-01

    In 2005 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will start the pp collisions at a high luminosity and at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. The primary goal of the experimental programme is the search of the Higgs boson(s) and the supersymmetric particles. The programme is also proposed to detect a range of diverse signatures in order to provide guidance for future physics. The pixel detector system makes up the innermost part of the CMS experiment, which is one of the two general purpose detectors at the LHC. The main tasks of the system are vertex detection and flavor tagging. The high luminosity and the high particle multiplicity as well as the small bunch spacing at the LHC impose great challenges on the pixel detectors: radiation hardness of sensors and electronics, fast signal processing and a high granularity are the essential requirements. This thesis concentrates on the study of the suitability of two test stands, which are implemented to characterize the CMS pixel detectors: one is con-cerned with test puls...

  2. Space-charge calculations with the fast Fourier transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for calculating linear accelerator beam trajectories in traveling wave tubes. A grid is placed over the region of interest in which there is space charge. A matrix of the Fourier potential coefficients is obtained, and a straight Fourier synthesis is used to add these with the appropriate trigonometric multipliers to obtain the potential matrix. The pulses on a particle for the next trajectory step are found by interpolating and differencing the potentials on that matrix

  3. Fast Arc-Annotated Subsequence Matching in Linear Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2012-01-01

    An arc-annotated string is a string of characters, called bases, augmented with a set of pairs, called arcs, each connecting two bases. Given arc-annotated strings P and Q the arc-preserving subsequence problem is to determine if P can be obtained from Q by deleting bases from Q. Whenever a base...... is deleted any arc with an endpoint in that base is also deleted. Arc-annotated strings where the arcs are "nested" are a natural model of RNA molecules that captures both the primary and secondary structure of these. The arc-preserving subsequence problem for nested arc-annotated strings is basic primitive...... the previous time bound while significantly reducing the space from a quadratic term to linear. This is essential to process large RNA molecules where the space is likely to be a bottleneck. To obtain our result we introduce several novel ideas which may be of independent interest for related problems on arc-annotated...

  4. Fast Arc-Annotated Subsequence Matching in Linear Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2010-01-01

    An arc-annotated string is a string of characters, called bases, augmented with a set; of pairs, called arcs, each connecting two bases. Given arc-annotated strings P and Q the arc-preserving subsequence problem is to determine if P can be obtained from Q by deleting bases from Q. Whenever a base...... is deleted any arc with an endpoint in that base is also deleted. Arc-annotated strings where the arcs are "nested" are a natural model of RNA molecules that captures both the primary and secondary structure of these. The arc-preserving subsequence problem for nested arc-annotated strings is basic primitive...... the previous time bound while significantly reducing the space from a quadratic term to linear. This is essential to process large RNA molecules where the space is a likely to be a bottleneck. To obtain our result we introduce several novel ideas which may be of independent interest for related problems on arc-annotated...

  5. High-definition velocity-space tomography of fast-ion dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function in a fusion plasma is usually a photon-starved tomography method due to limited optical access and signal-to-noise ratio of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) spectroscopy as well as the strive for high-resolution images. In high-definition tomography...... information to reconstruct where in velocity space the measurements and the simulation disagree. This alternative approach is demonstrated for four-view as well as for two-view FIDA measurements. The high-definition tomography tools allow us to study fast ions in sawtoothing plasmas and the formation of NBI...... peaks at full, half and one-third energy by time-resolved tomographic movies....

  6. Fluorescence Across Space and Time (2017 FAST Campaign): Investigating the multiscale links between fluorescence and photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcar-Castell, A.; Atherton, J.; Rajewicz, P. A.; Riikonen, A.; Gebre, S.; Liu, W.; Aalto, J.; Bendoula, R.; Burkart, A.; Chen, H.; Erkkilä, K. M.; Feret, J. B.; Fernández-Marín, B.; García-Plazaola, J. I.; Hakala, T.; Hartikainen, S.; Honkavaara, E.; Ihalainen, J.; Julitta, T.; Kolari, P.; Kooijmans, L.; Levula, J.; Loponen, M.; Mac Arthur, A.; Magney, T.; Maseyk, K. S.; Mottus, M.; Neimane, S.; Oksa, E.; Osterman, G. B.; Robinson, I.; Robson, M. T.; Sabater, N.; Solanki, T.; Tikkanen, M.; Mäkipää, R.; Aro, E. M.; Rascher, U.; Frankenberg, C.; Kulmala, M. T.; Vesala, T.; Back, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    The use of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) as a tracer of photosynthesis is rapidly expanding with increasing numbers of measurements from towers, drones, aircrafts, or satellites. But how to integrate all the informative potential of these multiscale datasets? The connection between ChlF and photosynthesis takes place via multiple mechansisms that depend on the scale. At the leaf level, diurnal variations in ChlF may indicate changes in photochemical or non-photochemical quenching processes, whereas seasonal variations may indicate changes in the protein structure or pigment composition of the photosynthetic apparatus. At the canopy level, variations in ChlF may also reflect changes in total leaf area, canopy structure, species composition, changes in illumination or sun-target-sensor geometry, background properties, etc. At the pixel level, the dynamics of the atmosphere are also important. It is therefore essential to characterize the impact of factors that control ChlF and photosynthesis at each scale. A combination of multiscale and continuous experimentation and modelling is probably the best option to close the remaining knowledge gaps. The goal of the FAST campaign was to characterize the processes that control the ChlF signal dynamics at each scale, establishing a comprehensive dataset for multiscale hypothesis and model validation. The campaign took place in Hyytiälä (Southern Finland) and lasted for 6 months. Measurements expanded from the molecular to the satellite pixel level and from the picosecond to the seasonal scale, including multiple species, and providing a unique optical and phenomenological record of the multiscale spring recovery of photosynthesis in a boreal forest. Amongst others we measured and registered: leaf ChlF spectra, OJIP kinetics, PSI and PSII activity, photosynthetic gas exchange, carbonyl sulphide (COS), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), total leaf absorption, pigment concentrations, photosynthetic proteins

  7. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory’s space GRB mission and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is a space mission to detect the early moments of an explosion from Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), thus enhancing our understanding of the GRB mechanism. It consists of the UFFO Burst & Trigger telescope (UBAT) for the recognition of GRB positions using...

  8. Fast Time and Space Parallel Algorithms for Solution of Parabolic Partial Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, fast time- and Space -Parallel agorithms for solution of linear parabolic PDEs are developed. It is shown that the seemingly strictly serial iterations of the time-stepping procedure for solution of the problem can be completed decoupled.

  9. A singular K-space model for fast reconstruction of magnetic resonance images from undersampled data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianhua; Mou, Zhiying; Qin, Binjie; Li, Wanqing; Ogunbona, Philip; Robini, Marc C; Zhu, Yuemin

    2017-12-09

    Reconstructing magnetic resonance images from undersampled k-space data is a challenging problem. This paper introduces a novel method of image reconstruction from undersampled k-space data based on the concept of singularizing operators and a novel singular k-space model. Exploring the sparsity of an image in the k-space, the singular k-space model (SKM) is proposed in terms of the k-space functions of a singularizing operator. The singularizing operator is constructed by combining basic difference operators. An algorithm is developed to reliably estimate the model parameters from undersampled k-space data. The estimated parameters are then used to recover the missing k-space data through the model, subsequently achieving high-quality reconstruction of the image using inverse Fourier transform. Experiments on physical phantom and real brain MR images have shown that the proposed SKM method constantly outperforms the popular total variation (TV) and the classical zero-filling (ZF) methods regardless of the undersampling rates, the noise levels, and the image structures. For the same objective quality of the reconstructed images, the proposed method requires much less k-space data than the TV method. The SKM method is an effective method for fast MRI reconstruction from the undersampled k-space data. Graphical abstract Two Real Images and their sparsified images by singularizing operator.

  10. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  11. Method and apparatus for dual-spaced fast/epithermal neutron porosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for determining the porosity of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole, comprising: (a) irradiating the earth formations in the vicinity of the well borehole with a continuous chemical type source of fast neutrons, (b) detecting the fast neutron population at a first shorter spaced distance from the neutron source in the borehole and generating signals representative thereof, (c) detecting the epithermal neutron population at a second space distance from the neutron source in the borehole and generating signals representative thereof, the second spaced distance being greater than the first spaced distance from the neutron source, (d) forming a ratio of the signals representing the fast and epithermal neutron populations to derive a measurement signal functionally related to the porosity of the earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole, and (e) calibrating the measurement signal according to a predetermined functional relationship to derive a porosity signal quantitatively representative of the porosity of the earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole

  12. State-Space Realization of the Wave-Radiation Force within FAST: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, T.; Sarmento, A.; Alves, M.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-06-01

    Several methods have been proposed in the literature to find a state-space model for the wave-radiation forces. In this paper, four methods were compared, two in the frequency domain and two in the time domain. The frequency-response function and the impulse response of the resulting state-space models were compared against the ones derived by the numerical code WAMIT. The implementation of the state-space module within the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool was verified, comparing the results against the previously implemented numerical convolution method. The results agreed between the two methods, with a significant reduction in required computational time when using the state-space module.

  13. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  14. FAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathavitharana, R R; Daru, P; Barrera, A E; Mostofa Kamal, S M; Islam, S; Ul-Alam, M; Sultana, R; Rahman, M; Hossain, Md S; Lederer, P; Hurwitz, S; Chakraborty, K; Kak, N; Tierney, D B; Nardell, E

    2017-09-01

    National Institute of Diseases of the Chest and Hospital, Dhaka; Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Dhaka; and Chittagong Chest Disease Hospital, Chittagong, Bangladesh. To present operational data and discuss the challenges of implementing FAST (Find cases Actively, Separate safely and Treat effectively) as a tuberculosis (TB) transmission control strategy. FAST was implemented sequentially at three hospitals. Using Xpert® MTB/RIF, 733/6028 (12.2%, 95%CI 11.4-13.0) patients were diagnosed with unsuspected TB. Patients with a history of TB who were admitted with other lung diseases had more than twice the odds of being diagnosed with unsuspected TB as those with no history of TB (OR 2.6, 95%CI 2.2-3.0, P stakeholder engagement and laboratory capacity are important for sustainability and scalability.

  15. Fast space-varying convolution using matrix source coding with applications to camera stray light reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianing; Bouman, Charles A; Allebach, Jan P

    2014-05-01

    Many imaging applications require the implementation of space-varying convolution for accurate restoration and reconstruction of images. Here, we use the term space-varying convolution to refer to linear operators whose impulse response has slow spatial variation. In addition, these space-varying convolution operators are often dense, so direct implementation of the convolution operator is typically computationally impractical. One such example is the problem of stray light reduction in digital cameras, which requires the implementation of a dense space-varying deconvolution operator. However, other inverse problems, such as iterative tomographic reconstruction, can also depend on the implementation of dense space-varying convolution. While space-invariant convolution can be efficiently implemented with the fast Fourier transform, this approach does not work for space-varying operators. So direct convolution is often the only option for implementing space-varying convolution. In this paper, we develop a general approach to the efficient implementation of space-varying convolution, and demonstrate its use in the application of stray light reduction. Our approach, which we call matrix source coding, is based on lossy source coding of the dense space-varying convolution matrix. Importantly, by coding the transformation matrix, we not only reduce the memory required to store it; we also dramatically reduce the computation required to implement matrix-vector products. Our algorithm is able to reduce computation by approximately factoring the dense space-varying convolution operator into a product of sparse transforms. Experimental results show that our method can dramatically reduce the computation required for stray light reduction while maintaining high accuracy.

  16. PixelLearn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Dominic; Wagstaff, Kiri; Bornstein, Benjamin; Tang, Nghia; Roden, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    PixelLearn is an integrated user-interface computer program for classifying pixels in scientific images. Heretofore, training a machine-learning algorithm to classify pixels in images has been tedious and difficult. PixelLearn provides a graphical user interface that makes it faster and more intuitive, leading to more interactive exploration of image data sets. PixelLearn also provides image-enhancement controls to make it easier to see subtle details in images. PixelLearn opens images or sets of images in a variety of common scientific file formats and enables the user to interact with several supervised or unsupervised machine-learning pixel-classifying algorithms while the user continues to browse through the images. The machinelearning algorithms in PixelLearn use advanced clustering and classification methods that enable accuracy much higher than is achievable by most other software previously available for this purpose. PixelLearn is written in portable C++ and runs natively on computers running Linux, Windows, or Mac OS X.

  17. To Mars and beyond, fast! how plasma propulsion will revolutionize space exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Chang Díaz, Franklin

    2017-01-01

    As advanced space propulsion moves slowly from science fiction to achievable reality, the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket, or VASIMR, is a leading contender for making 'Mars in a month' a possibility. Developed by Ad Astra Rockets, which was founded by astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz and backed by NASA, its first commercial tests are imminent. VASIMR heats plasma to extreme temperatures using radio waves. Strong magnetic fields then funnel this plasma out the back of the engine, creating thrust. The continuous propulsion may place long, fast interplanetary journeys within reach in the near future. While scientists dream of the possibilities of using fusion or well-controlled matter-antimatter interactions to propel spacecraft fast and far, that goal is still some way over the horizon. VASIMR provides a more attainable propulsion technology that is based on the matter-antimatter concept. The book describes a landmark technology grounded in plasma physics and offering a practical technological solu...

  18. Inversion methods for fast-ion velocity-space tomography in fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Stagner, L.; Salewski, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Velocity-space tomography has been used to infer 2D fast-ion velocity distribution functions. Here we compare the performance of five different tomographic inversion methods: truncated singular value decomposition, maximum entropy, minimum Fisher information and zeroth and first-order Tikhonov...... regularization. The inversion methods are applied to fast-ion Dα measurements taken just before and just after a sawtooth crash in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak as well as to synthetic measurements from different test distributions. We find that the methods regularizing by penalizing steep gradients or maximizing...... entropy perform best. We assess the uncertainty of the calculated inversions taking into account photon noise, uncertainties in the forward model as well as uncertainties introduced by the regularization which allows us to distinguish regions of high and low confidence in the tomographies. In high...

  19. Fast polarimetric dehazing method for visibility enhancement in HSI colour space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenfei; Liang, Jian; Ren, Liyong; Ju, Haijuan; Bai, Zhaofeng; Wu, Zhaoxin

    2017-09-01

    Image haze removal has attracted much attention in optics and computer vision fields in recent years due to its wide applications. In particular, the fast and real-time dehazing methods are of significance. In this paper, we propose a fast dehazing method in hue, saturation and intensity colour space based on the polarimetric imaging technique. We implement the polarimetric dehazing method in the intensity channel, and the colour distortion of the image is corrected using the white patch retinex method. This method not only reserves the detailed information restoration capacity, but also improves the efficiency of the polarimetric dehazing method. Comparison studies with state of the art methods demonstrate that the proposed method obtains equal or better quality results and moreover the implementation is much faster. The proposed method is promising in real-time image haze removal and video haze removal applications.

  20. Inversion methods for fast-ion velocity-space tomography in fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Stagner, L.; Salewski, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Velocity-space tomography has been used to infer 2D fast-ion velocity distribution functions. Here we compare the performance of five different tomographic inversion methods: truncated singular value decomposition, maximum entropy, minimum Fisher information and zeroth and first-order Tikhonov re...... confidence regions, all methods agree that ions with pitch values close to zero, as well as ions with large pitch values, are ejected from the plasma center by the sawtooth crash, and that this ejection depletes the ion population with large pitch values more strongly....

  1. Signal dependence of inter-pixel capacitance in hybridized HgCdTe H2RG arrays for use in James Webb space telescope's NIRcam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Kevan; Ninkov, Zoran; Baum, Stefi

    2016-08-01

    Interpixel capacitance (IPC) is a deterministic electronic coupling by which signal generated in one pixel is measured in neighboring pixels. Examination of dark frames from test NIRcam arrays corroborates earlier results and simulations illustrating a signal dependent coupling. When the signal on an individual pixel is larger, the fractional coupling to nearest neighbors is lesser than when the signal is lower. Frames from test arrays indicate a drop in average coupling from approximately 1.0% at low signals down to approximately 0.65% at high signals depending on the particular array in question. The photometric ramifications for this non-uniformity are not fully understood. This non-uniformity intro-duces a non-linearity in the current mathematical model for IPC coupling. IPC coupling has been mathematically formalized as convolution by a blur kernel. Signal dependence requires that the blur kernel be locally defined as a function of signal intensity. Through application of a signal dependent coupling kernel, the IPC coupling can be modeled computationally. This method allows for simultaneous knowledge of the intrinsic parameters of the image scene, the result of applying a constant IPC, and the result of a signal dependent IPC. In the age of sub-pixel precision in astronomy these effects must be properly understood and accounted for in order for the data to accurately represent the object of observation. Implementation of this method is done through python scripted processing of images. The introduction of IPC into simulated frames is accomplished through convolution of the image with a blur kernel whose parameters are themselves locally defined functions of the image. These techniques can be used to enhance the data processing pipeline for NIRcam.

  2. The FPGA Pixel Array Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromalik, Marianne S.; Green, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2013-01-01

    A proposed design for a reconfigurable x-ray Pixel Array Detector (PAD) is described. It operates by integrating a high-end commercial field programmable gate array (FPGA) into a 3-layer device along with a high-resistivity diode detection layer and a custom, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) layer. The ASIC layer contains an energy-discriminating photon-counting front end with photon hits streamed directly to the FPGA via a massively parallel, high-speed data connection. FPGA resources can be allocated to perform user defined tasks on the pixel data streams, including the implementation of a direct time autocorrelation function (ACF) with time resolution down to 100 ns. Using the FPGA at the front end to calculate the ACF reduces the required data transfer rate by several orders of magnitude when compared to a fast framing detector. The FPGA-ASIC high-speed interface, as well as the in-FPGA implementation of a real-time ACF for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments has been designed and simulated. A 16×16 pixel prototype of the ASIC has been fabricated and is being tested. -- Highlights: ► We describe the novelty and need for the FPGA Pixel Array Detector. ► We describe the specifications and design of the Diode, ASIC and FPGA layers. ► We highlight the Autocorrelation Function (ACF) for speckle as an example application. ► Simulated FPGA output calculates the ACF for different input bitstreams to 100 ns. ► Reduced data transfer rate by 640× and sped up real-time ACF by 100× other methods.

  3. Pixel Decimation in Block Matching Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Levicky

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Block motion estimation using full search algorithm is computationallyextensive. Previously proposed fast algorithms reduce the computationcost by limiting the number of locations searched. In this paper wepresent algorithms for block motion estimation that produce similarperformance to that full search algorithm. The algorithms are based onthe pixel decimation.

  4. Fast Estimation Method of Space-Time Two-Dimensional Positioning Parameters Based on Hadamard Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiwen Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation speed of positioning parameters determines the effectiveness of the positioning system. The time of arrival (TOA and direction of arrival (DOA parameters can be estimated by the space-time two-dimensional multiple signal classification (2D-MUSIC algorithm for array antenna. However, this algorithm needs much time to complete the two-dimensional pseudo spectral peak search, which makes it difficult to apply in practice. Aiming at solving this problem, a fast estimation method of space-time two-dimensional positioning parameters based on Hadamard product is proposed in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM system, and the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB is also presented. Firstly, according to the channel frequency domain response vector of each array, the channel frequency domain estimation vector is constructed using the Hadamard product form containing location information. Then, the autocorrelation matrix of the channel response vector for the extended array element in frequency domain and the noise subspace are calculated successively. Finally, by combining the closed-form solution and parameter pairing, the fast joint estimation for time delay and arrival direction is accomplished. The theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce the computational complexity and guarantee that the estimation accuracy is not only better than estimating signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (ESPRIT algorithm and 2D matrix pencil (MP algorithm but also close to 2D-MUSIC algorithm. Moreover, the proposed algorithm also has certain adaptability to multipath environment and effectively improves the ability of fast acquisition of location parameters.

  5. Optimal and fast rotational alignment of volumes with missing data in Fourier space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatsky, Maxim; Arbelaez, Pablo; Glaeser, Robert M; Brenner, Steven E

    2013-11-01

    Electron tomography of intact cells has the potential to reveal the entire cellular content at a resolution corresponding to individual macromolecular complexes. Characterization of macromolecular complexes in tomograms is nevertheless an extremely challenging task due to the high level of noise, and due to the limited tilt angle that results in missing data in Fourier space. By identifying particles of the same type and averaging their 3D volumes, it is possible to obtain a structure at a more useful resolution for biological interpretation. Currently, classification and averaging of sub-tomograms is limited by the speed of computational methods that optimize alignment between two sub-tomographic volumes. The alignment optimization is hampered by the fact that the missing data in Fourier space has to be taken into account during the rotational search. A similar problem appears in single particle electron microscopy where the random conical tilt procedure may require averaging of volumes with a missing cone in Fourier space. We present a fast implementation of a method guaranteed to find an optimal rotational alignment that maximizes the constrained cross-correlation function (cCCF) computed over the actual overlap of data in Fourier space. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Benchmark and combined velocity-space tomography of fast-ion D-alpha spectroscopy and collective Thomson scattering measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.

    2016-01-01

    measurements without using a numerical simulation as common reference. Combined velocity-space tomographies from FIDA and CTS measurements confirm that sawtooth crashes reduce the fast-ion phase-space densities in the plasma center and affect ions with pitches close to one more strongly than those with pitches......We demonstrate the combination of fast-ion D-alpha spectroscopy (FIDA) and collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements to determine a common best estimate of the fastion velocity distribution function by velocity-space tomography. We further demonstrate a benchmark of FIDA tomography and CTS...

  7. The pixelated detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Sutton, C

    1990-01-01

    "Collecting data as patterns of light or subatomic particles is vitally important in all the sciences. The new generation of solid-state detectors called pixel devices could transform experimental research at all levels" (4 pages).

  8. Fast Maximum-Likelihood Decoder for Quasi-Orthogonal Space-Time Block Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the decompositions of sphere and QR-based methods, in this paper we present an extremely fast maximum-likelihood (ML detection approach for quasi-orthogonal space-time block code (QOSTBC. The proposed algorithm with a relatively simple design exploits structure of quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM constellations to achieve its goal and can be extended to any arbitrary constellation. Our decoder utilizes a new decomposition technique for ML metric which divides the metric into independent positive parts and a positive interference part. Search spaces of symbols are substantially reduced by employing the independent parts and statistics of noise. Symbols within the search spaces are successively evaluated until the metric is minimized. Simulation results confirm that the proposed decoder’s performance is superior to many of the recently published state-of-the-art solutions in terms of complexity level. More specifically, it was possible to verify that application of the new algorithms with 1024-QAM would decrease the computational complexity compared to state-of-the-art solution with 16-QAM.

  9. A Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle Concept for Fast Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Initial requirements were for a human mission to Saturn with a greater than 5% payload mass fraction and a one way trip time of less than one year. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 235 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 2,941 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all ma or systems including payload, central truss, nuclear reactor (including divertor and fuel injector), power conversion (including turbine, compressor, alternator, radiator, recuperator, and conditioning), magnetic nozzle, neutral beam injector, tankage, start/re-start reactor and battery, refrigeration, communications, reaction control, and in-space operations. Detailed assessment was done on reactor operations, including plasma characteristics, power balance, power utilization, and component design.

  10. LiTrack A Fast longitudinal phase space tracking code with graphical user interface

    CERN Document Server

    Emma, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Many linear accelerators, such as linac-based light sources and linear colliders, apply longitudinal phase space manipulations in their design, including electron bunch compression and wakefield-induced energy spread control. Several computer codes handle such issues, but most require detailed information on the transverse focusing lattice. In fact, in most linear accelerators, the transverse distributions do not significantly affect the longitudinal, and can be ignored initially. This allows the use of a fast 2D code to study longitudinal aspects without time-consuming considerations of the transverse focusing. LiTrack is based on a 15-year old code (same name) originally written by one of us (KB), which is now a MATLAB-based code with additional features, such as a graphical user interface and output plotting. The single-bunch tracking includes RF acceleration, bunch compression to 3rd order, geometric and resistive wakefields, aperture limits, synchrotron radiation, and flexible output plotting. The code w...

  11. Fast MR image reconstruction for partially parallel imaging with arbitrary k-space trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaojing; Chen, Yunmei; Lin, Wei; Huang, Feng

    2011-03-01

    Both acquisition and reconstruction speed are crucial for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in clinical applications. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction algorithm for SENSE in partially parallel MR imaging with arbitrary k-space trajectories. The proposed method is a combination of variable splitting, the classical penalty technique and the optimal gradient method. Variable splitting and the penalty technique reformulate the SENSE model with sparsity regularization as an unconstrained minimization problem, which can be solved by alternating two simple minimizations: One is the total variation and wavelet based denoising that can be quickly solved by several recent numerical methods, whereas the other one involves a linear inversion which is solved by the optimal first order gradient method in our algorithm to significantly improve the performance. Comparisons with several recent parallel imaging algorithms indicate that the proposed method significantly improves the computation efficiency and achieves state-of-the-art reconstruction quality.

  12. Fast Neutron Spectrum Potassium Worth for Space Power Reactor Design Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Marshall, Margaret A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Briggs, J. Blair [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tsiboulia, Anatoli [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rozhikhin, Yevgeniy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mihalczo, John T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A variety of critical experiments were constructed of enriched uranium metal (oralloy ) during the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. The purposes of these experiments included the evaluation of storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant and providing data for verification of calculation methods and cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included solid cylinders of various diameters, annuli of various inner and outer diameters, two and three interacting cylinders of various diameters, and graphite and polyethylene reflected cylinders and annuli. Of the hundreds of delayed critical experiments, one was performed that consisted of uranium metal annuli surrounding a potassium-filled, stainless steel can. The outer diameter of the annuli was approximately 13 inches (33.02 cm) with an inner diameter of 7 inches (17.78 cm). The diameter of the stainless steel can was 7 inches (17.78 cm). The critical height of the configurations was approximately 5.6 inches (14.224 cm). The uranium annulus consisted of multiple stacked rings, each with radial thicknesses of 1 inch (2.54 cm) and varying heights. A companion measurement was performed using empty stainless steel cans; the primary purpose of these experiments was to test the fast neutron cross sections of potassium as it was a candidate for coolant in some early space power reactor designs.The experimental measurements were performed on July 11, 1963, by J. T. Mihalczo and M. S. Wyatt (Ref. 1) with additional information in its corresponding logbook. Unreflected and unmoderated experiments with the same set of highly enriched uranium metal parts were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in the 1960s and are evaluated in the International Handbook for Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) with the identifier HEU MET FAST 051. Thin

  13. A new Fast Multipole formulation for the elastodynamic half-space Green's tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillat, Stéphanie; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-02-01

    In this article, a version of the frequency-domain elastodynamic Fast Multipole-Boundary Element Method (FM-BEM) for semi-infinite media, based on the half-space Green's tensor (and hence avoiding any discretization of the planar traction-free surface), is presented. The half-space Green's tensor is often used (in non-multipole form until now) for computing elastic wave propagation in the context of soil-structure interaction, with applications to seismology or civil engineering. However, unlike the full-space Green's tensor, the elastodynamic half-space Green's tensor cannot be expressed using derivatives of the Helmholtz fundamental solution. As a result, multipole expansions of that tensor cannot be obtained directly from known expansions, and are instead derived here by means of a partial Fourier transform with respect to the spatial coordinates parallel to the free surface. The obtained formulation critically requires an efficient quadrature for the Fourier integral, whose integrand is both singular and oscillatory. Under these conditions, classical Gaussian quadratures would perform poorly, fail or require a large number of points. Instead, a version custom-tailored for the present needs of a methodology proposed by Rokhlin and coauthors, which generates generalized Gaussian quadrature rules for specific types of integrals, has been implemented. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed formulation is demonstrated through numerical experiments on single-layer elastodynamic potentials involving up to about N=6×105 degrees of freedom. In particular, a complexity significantly lower than that of the non-multipole version is shown to be achieved.

  14. Velocity space resolved absolute measurement of fast ion losses induced by a tearing mode in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Mantsinen, M.; Fietz, S.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Sieglin, B.; Snicker, A.; Tardini, G.; Vezinet, D.; Weiland, M.; Eriksson, L. G.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2018-03-01

    Absolute flux of fast ion losses induced by tearing modes have been measured by means of fast ion loss detectors (FILD) for the first time in RF heated plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Up to 30 MW m‑2 of fast ion losses are measured by FILD at 5 cm from the separatrix, consistent with infra-red camera measurements, with energies in the range of 250–500 keV and pitch angles corresponding to large trapped orbits. A resonant interaction between the fast ions in the high energy tail of the ICRF distribution and a m/n  =  5/4 tearing mode leads to enhanced fast ion losses. Around 9.3 +/- 0.7 % of the fast ion losses are found to be coherent with the mode and scale linearly with its amplitude, indicating the convective nature of the transport mechanism. Simulations have been carried out to estimate the contribution of the prompt losses. A good agreement is found between the simulated and the measured velocity space of the losses. The velocity space resonances that may be responsible for the enhanced fast ion losses are identified.

  15. A fast nonstationary iterative method with convex penalty for inverse problems in Hilbert spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qinian; Lu, Xiliang

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we consider the computation of approximate solutions for inverse problems in Hilbert spaces. In order to capture the special feature of solutions, non-smooth convex functions are introduced as penalty terms. By exploiting the Hilbert space structure of the underlying problems, we propose a fast iterative regularization method which reduces to the classical nonstationary iterated Tikhonov regularization when the penalty term is chosen to be the square of norm. Each iteration of the method consists of two steps: the first step involves only the operator from the problem while the second step involves only the penalty term. This splitting character has the advantage of making the computation efficient. In case the data is corrupted by noise, a stopping rule is proposed to terminate the method and the corresponding regularization property is established. Finally, we test the performance of the method by reporting various numerical simulations, including the image deblurring, the determination of source term in Poisson equation, and the de-autoconvolution problem.

  16. A fast nonstationary iterative method with convex penalty for inverse problems in Hilbert spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Qinian; Lu, Xiliang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider the computation of approximate solutions for inverse problems in Hilbert spaces. In order to capture the special feature of solutions, non-smooth convex functions are introduced as penalty terms. By exploiting the Hilbert space structure of the underlying problems, we propose a fast iterative regularization method which reduces to the classical nonstationary iterated Tikhonov regularization when the penalty term is chosen to be the square of norm. Each iteration of the method consists of two steps: the first step involves only the operator from the problem while the second step involves only the penalty term. This splitting character has the advantage of making the computation efficient. In case the data is corrupted by noise, a stopping rule is proposed to terminate the method and the corresponding regularization property is established. Finally, we test the performance of the method by reporting various numerical simulations, including the image deblurring, the determination of source term in Poisson equation, and the de-autoconvolution problem. (paper)

  17. Characterization of Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Felipe Ferraz

    2017-01-01

    It was commissioned at CERN ATLAS pixel group a fluorescence setup for characterization of pixel sensors. The idea is to measure the energies of different targets to calibrate your sensor. It was measured four matrices (80, 95, 98 and 106) of the Investigator1 sensor with different deep PW using copper, iron and titanium as target materials. The matrix 80 has a higher gain (0.065 ± 0.002) and matrix 106 has a better energy resolution (0.05 ± 0.04). The noise of the setup is around 3.6 mV .

  18. FROM IMAGE CONTOURS TO PIXELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scarmana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper relates to the reconstruction of digital images using their contour representations. The process involves determining the pixel intensity value which would exist at the intersections of a regular grid using the nodes of randomly spaced contour locations. The reconstruction of digital images from their contour maps may also be used as a tool for image compression. This reconstruction process may provide for more accurate results and improved visual details than existing compressed versions of the same image, while requiring similar memory space for storage and speed of transmission over digital links. For the class of images investigated in this work, the contour approach to image reconstruction and compression requires contour data to be filtered and eliminated from the reconstruction process. Statistical tests which validate the proposed process conclude this paper.

  19. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  20. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  1. Effect of space allowance during transport and fasting or non-fasting during lairage on carcass contamination and meat traits in Merino lamb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminia Vergara

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A total of 72 Merino breed male lambs were used in this work, to study the effect of the space allowance during transport [(SA: low (SAL: 0.16 m2/animal; n=24; medium (SAM: 20 m2/animal; n=24; high (SAH: 0.30 m2/animal; n=24], and the management during 18 h lairage [(TL: fasting (TL-FAST; n=36 vs feeding (TL-FEED; n=36] on carcass microbial contamination (total viable count, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas and meat quality. Carcasses contamination determination was carried out by swabbing (neck, flank and rump. Meat quality was assessed by pH, colour coordinates, drip loss (DL, shear force (SF ad lipid oxidation. SA did not have effect on carcass microbiological quality. TL caused a significant effect on total viable count and Pseudomonas spp values. Flank was the most contaminated site. SAL-FEED group showed the highest values of drip loss and lipid oxidation. At 24 h post-mortem, pH values were the highest in fasted lambs. At 7 d post-mortem the lowest pH was found in SAM-FAST group while the highest in SAM-FEED. TL had no effect on SF, DL neither on lipid oxidation values. These results could help to meat industry to decide the best management as in the transportation as during lairage before lambs slaughter.

  2. Design and Characterisation of a Fast Architecture Providing Zero Suppressed Digital Output Integrated in a High Resolution CMOS Pixel Sensor for the STAR Vertex Detector and the EUDET Beam Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Hu-guo, C

    2008-01-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) have demonstrated their strong potential for tracking devices, particularly for flavour tagging. They are foreseen to equip several vertex detectors and beam telescopes. Most applications require high read-out speed, imposing sensors to feature digital output with integrated zero suppression. The most recent development of MAPS at IPHC and IRFU addressing this issue will be reviewed. An architecture will be presented, combining a pixel array, column-level discriminators and zero suppression circuits. Each pixel features a preamplifier and a correlated double sampling (CDS) micro-circuit reducing the temporal and fixed pattern noises. The sensor is fully programmable and can be monitored. It will equip experimental apparatus starting data taking in 2009/2010.

  3. Fast Kalman-like filtering for large-dimensional linear and Gaussian state-space models

    KAUST Repository

    Ait-El-Fquih, Boujemaa

    2015-08-13

    This paper considers the filtering problem for linear and Gaussian state-space models with large dimensions, a setup in which the optimal Kalman Filter (KF) might not be applicable owing to the excessive cost of manipulating huge covariance matrices. Among the most popular alternatives that enable cheaper and reasonable computation is the Ensemble KF (EnKF), a Monte Carlo-based approximation. In this paper, we consider a class of a posteriori distributions with diagonal covariance matrices and propose fast approximate deterministic-based algorithms based on the Variational Bayesian (VB) approach. More specifically, we derive two iterative KF-like algorithms that differ in the way they operate between two successive filtering estimates; one involves a smoothing estimate and the other involves a prediction estimate. Despite its iterative nature, the prediction-based algorithm provides a computational cost that is, on the one hand, independent of the number of iterations in the limit of very large state dimensions, and on the other hand, always much smaller than the cost of the EnKF. The cost of the smoothing-based algorithm depends on the number of iterations that may, in some situations, make this algorithm slower than the EnKF. The performances of the proposed filters are studied and compared to those of the KF and EnKF through a numerical example.

  4. A simple and fast representation space for classifying complex time series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunino, Luciano, E-mail: lucianoz@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CONICET La Plata – CIC), C.C. 3, 1897 Gonnet (Argentina); Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Olivares, Felipe, E-mail: olivaresfe@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso (PUCV), 23-40025 Valparaíso (Chile); Bariviera, Aurelio F., E-mail: aurelio.fernandez@urv.cat [Department of Business, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Universitat 1, 43204 Reus (Spain); Rosso, Osvaldo A., E-mail: oarosso@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), BR 104 Norte km 97, 57072-970, Maceió, Alagoas (Brazil); Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires (ITBA) and CONICET, C1106ACD, Av. Eduardo Madero 399, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Complex Systems Group, Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas, Universidad de los Andes, Av. Mons. Álvaro del Portillo 12.455, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile)

    2017-03-18

    In the context of time series analysis considerable effort has been directed towards the implementation of efficient discriminating statistical quantifiers. Very recently, a simple and fast representation space has been introduced, namely the number of turning points versus the Abbe value. It is able to separate time series from stationary and non-stationary processes with long-range dependences. In this work we show that this bidimensional approach is useful for distinguishing complex time series: different sets of financial and physiological data are efficiently discriminated. Additionally, a multiscale generalization that takes into account the multiple time scales often involved in complex systems has been also proposed. This multiscale analysis is essential to reach a higher discriminative power between physiological time series in health and disease. - Highlights: • A bidimensional scheme has been tested for classification purposes. • A multiscale generalization is introduced. • Several practical applications confirm its usefulness. • Different sets of financial and physiological data are efficiently distinguished. • This multiscale bidimensional approach has high potential as discriminative tool.

  5. CMS pixel upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    Kaestli, Hans-Christian

    2010-01-01

    The LHC machine at CERN finished its first year of pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 7~TeV. While the commissioning to exploit its full potential is still ongoing, there are plans to upgrade its components to reach instantaneous luminosities beyond the initial design value after 2016. A corresponding upgrade of the innermost part of the CMS detector, the pixel detector, is needed. A full replacement of the pixel detector is planned in 2016. It will not only address limitations of the present system at higher data rates, but will aggressively lower the amount of material inside the fiducial tracking volume which will lead to better tracking and b-tagging performance. This article gives an overview of the project and illuminates the motivations and expected improvements in the detector performance.

  6. CMS pixel upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00575876

    2011-01-01

    The LHC machine at CERN finished its first year of pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. While the commissioning to exploit its full potential is still ongoing, there are plans to upgrade its components to reach instantaneous luminosities beyond the initial design value after 2016. A corresponding upgrade of the innermost part of the CMS detector, the pixel detector, is needed. A full replacement of the pixel detector is planned in 2016. It will not only address limitations of the present system at higher data rates, but will aggressively lower the amount of material inside the fiducial tracking volume which will lead to better tracking and b-tagging performance. This article gives an overview of the project and illuminates the motivations and expected improvements in the detector performance.

  7. K2flix: Kepler pixel data visualizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barentsen, Geert

    2015-03-01

    K2flix makes it easy to inspect the CCD pixel data obtained by NASA's Kepler space telescope. The two-wheeled extended Kepler mission, K2, is affected by new sources of systematics, including pointing jitter and foreground asteroids, that are easier to spot by eye than by algorithm. The code takes Kepler's Target Pixel Files (TPF) as input and turns them into contrast-stretched animated gifs or MPEG-4 movies. K2flix can be used both as a command-line tool or using its Python API.

  8. Semiconductor Pixel detectors and their applications in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubek, J

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor technology allow construction of highly efficient and low noise pixel detectors of ionizing radiation. Steadily improving quality of front end electronics enables fast digital signal processing in each pixel which offers recording of more complete information about each detected quantum (energy, time, number of particles). All these features improve an extend applicability of pixel technology in different fields. Some applications of this technology especially for imaging in life sciences will be shown (energy and phase sensitive X-ray radiography and tomography, radiography with heavy charged particles, neutron radiography, etc). On the other hand a number of obstacles can limit the detector performance if not handled. The pixel detector is in fact an array of individual detectors (pixels), each of them has its own efficiency, energy calibration and also noise. The common effort is to make all these parameters uniform for all pixels. However an ideal uniformity can be never reached. Moreover, it is often seen that the signal in one pixel can affect the neighbouring pixels due to various reasons (e.g. charge sharing). All such effects have to be taken into account during data processing to avoid false data interpretation. A brief view into the future of pixel detectors and their applications including also spectroscopy, tracking and dosimetry is given too. Special attention is paid to the problem of detector segmentation in context of the charge sharing effect.

  9. Fast Poisson Solvers for Self-Consistent Beam-Beam and Space-Charge Field Computation in Multiparticle Tracking Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    We present two different approaches to solve the 2-dimensional electrostatic problem with open boundary conditions to be used in fast tracking codes for beam-beam and space charge simulations in high energy accelerators. We compare a fast multipoles method with a hybrid Poisson solver based on the fast Fourier transform and finite differences in polar coordinates. We show that the latter outperforms the first in terms of execution time and precision, allowing for a reduction of the noise in the tracking simulation. Furthermore the new algorithm is shown to scale linearly on parallel architectures with shared memory. We conclude by effectively replacing the HFMM by the new Poisson solver in the COMBI code.

  10. A Detailed Simulation of the CMS Pixel Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Swartz, Morris

    2002-01-01

    This note describes a detailed simulation of pixel sensors called PIXELAV. It is not fast and is not intended as a replacement for the CMSIM/OSCAR pixel simulation but rather as a partial replacement for the test beam. It incorporates much of the currently known physics of charge deposition and transport in silicon. Some additional test beam data are still necessary to validate the simulation and to verify that the electronics works as designed, but hopefully, the simulation will reduce our reliance upon (expensive) test beam running. The simulation is intended to aid in: the fine-tuning of the pixel system design; the development of more realistic reconstruction algorithms; the tuning of the fast simulation to more accurately model the physical pixel system; and perhaps most importantly, the continuing calibration of the charge-sharing functions (needed for simulation and reconstruc tion) as detector is radiation damaged during operation. The simulation is already contributing to many of these goals. It give...

  11. The kilopixel array pathfinder project (KAPPa), a 16-pixel integrated heterodyne focal plane array: characterization of the single pixel prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Caleb H.; Groppi, Christopher E.; Mani, Hamdi; McGarey, Patrick; Kuenzi, Linda; Weinreb, Sander; Russell, Damon S.; Kooi, Jacob W.; Lichtenberger, Arthur W.; Walker, Christopher K.; Kulesa, Craig

    2014-07-01

    We report on the laboratory testing of KAPPa, a 16-pixel proof-of-concept array to enable the creation THz imaging spectrometer with ~1000 pixels. Creating an array an order of magnitude larger than the existing state of the art of 64 pixels requires a simple and robust design as well as improvements to mixer selection, testing, and assembly. Our testing employs a single pixel test bench where a novel 2D array architecture is tested. The minimum size of the footprint is dictated by the diameter of the drilled feedhorn aperture. In the adjoining detector block, a 6mm × 6mm footprint houses the SIS mixer, LNA, matching and bias networks, and permanent magnet. We present an initial characterization of the single pixel prototype using a computer controlled test bench to determine Y-factors for a parameter space of LO power, LO frequency, IF bandwidth, magnet field strength, and SIS bias voltage. To reduce the need to replace poorly preforming pixels that are already mounted in a large format array, we show techniques to improve SIS mixer selection prior to mounting in the detector block. The 2D integrated 16-pixel array design has been evolved as we investigate the properties of the single pixel prototype. Carful design of the prototype has allowed for rapid translation of single pixel design improvements to be easily incorporated into the 16-pixel model.

  12. The ALICE Pixel Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado-Perez, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well

  13. An SDR-based Study of Multi-GNSS Positioning Performance During Fast-developing Space Weather Storm

    OpenAIRE

    Mia Filic; Renato Filjar; Laura Ruotsalainen

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the ionospheric effects on GNSS positioning performance forms an essential pre-requisite for resilient GNSS development. Here we present the results of a study of the effects of a fast-developing space weather disturbance on the positioning performance of a commercial-grade GPS+GLONASS receiver. Using experimentally collected pseudoranges and the RTKLIB, an open-source software-defined GNSS radio receiver operating in the simulation mode, we assessed GNSS positioning perf...

  14. New experimental space for irradiating samples by RA reactor fast neutron flux at temperatures up to 100 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicevic, M.; Novakovic, M.; Zecevic, V.

    1961-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present adaptation of the RA reactor which would enable samples irradiation by fast neutrons and describe new experimental possibilities. New experimental space was achieved using hollow fuel elements which have been reconstructed to enable placement of irradiation capsules inside the tube. This paper includes thermal analysis and describes problems related to operation, safety and radiation protection issues which arise from using reconstructed fuel elements

  15. Accelerated whole brain intracranial vessel wall imaging using black blood fast spin echo with compressed sensing (CS-SPACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Tian, Bing; Chen, Luguang; Eisenmenger, Laura; Raithel, Esther; Forman, Christoph; Ahn, Sinyeob; Laub, Gerhard; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Jing; Hess, Christopher; Saloner, David

    2017-12-05

    Develop and optimize an accelerated, high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic) 3D black blood MRI technique to reduce scan time for whole-brain intracranial vessel wall imaging. A 3D accelerated T 1 -weighted fast-spin-echo prototype sequence using compressed sensing (CS-SPACE) was developed at 3T. Both the acquisition [echo train length (ETL), under-sampling factor] and reconstruction parameters (regularization parameter, number of iterations) were first optimized in 5 healthy volunteers. Ten patients with a variety of intracranial vascular disease presentations (aneurysm, atherosclerosis, dissection, vasculitis) were imaged with SPACE and optimized CS-SPACE, pre and post Gd contrast. Lumen/wall area, wall-to-lumen contrast ratio (CR), enhancement ratio (ER), sharpness, and qualitative scores (1-4) by two radiologists were recorded. The optimized CS-SPACE protocol has ETL 60, 20% k-space under-sampling, 0.002 regularization factor with 20 iterations. In patient studies, CS-SPACE and conventional SPACE had comparable image scores both pre- (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 3.54 ± 0.65, p = 0.13) and post-contrast (3.72 ± 0.58 vs. 3.53 ± 0.57, p = 0.15), but the CS-SPACE acquisition was 37% faster (6:48 vs. 10:50). CS-SPACE agreed with SPACE for lumen/wall area, ER measurements and sharpness, but marginally reduced the CR. In the evaluation of intracranial vascular disease, CS-SPACE provides a substantial reduction in scan time compared to conventional T 1 -weighted SPACE while maintaining good image quality.

  16. Comparing an accelerated 3D fast spin-echo sequence (CS-SPACE) for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with traditional 3D fast spin-echo (SPACE) and routine 2D sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altahawi, Faysal F.; Blount, Kevin J.; Omar, Imran M. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Morley, Nicholas P. [Marshfield Clinic, Department of Radiology, Marshfield, WI (United States); Raithel, Esther [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To compare a faster, new, high-resolution accelerated 3D-fast-spin-echo (3D-FSE) acquisition sequence (CS-SPACE) to traditional 2D and high-resolution 3D sequences for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty patients received knee MRIs that included routine 2D (T1, PD ± FS, T2-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 3 mm{sup 3}; ∝10 min), traditional 3D FSE (SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}; ∝7.5 min), and accelerated 3D-FSE prototype (CS-SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}; ∝5 min) acquisitions on a 3-T MRI system (Siemens MAGNETOM Skyra). Three musculoskeletal radiologists (MSKRs) prospectively and independently reviewed the studies with graded surveys comparing image and diagnostic quality. Tissue-specific signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were also compared. MSKR-perceived diagnostic quality of cartilage was significantly higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE and 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Assessment of diagnostic quality of menisci and synovial fluid was higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE (p < 0.001). CS-SPACE was not significantly different from SPACE but had lower assessments than 2D sequences for evaluation of bones, ligaments, muscles, and fat (p ≤ 0.004). 3D sequences had higher spatial resolution, but lower overall assessed contrast (p < 0.001). Overall image quality from CS-SPACE was assessed as higher than SPACE (p = 0.007), but lower than 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Compared to SPACE, CS-SPACE had higher fluid SNR and CNR against all other tissues (all p < 0.001). The CS-SPACE prototype allows for faster isotropic acquisitions of knee MRIs over currently used protocols. High fluid-to-cartilage CNR and higher spatial resolution over routine 2D sequences may present a valuable role for CS-SPACE in the evaluation of cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  17. The ALICE pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mercado Perez, J

    2002-01-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well. (3 refs).

  18. Adaptive Digital Scan Variable Pixels

    OpenAIRE

    Sugathan, Sherin; Scaria, Reshma; James, Alex Pappachen

    2015-01-01

    The square and rectangular shape of the pixels in the digital images for sensing and display purposes introduces several inaccuracies in the representation of digital images. The major disadvantage of square pixel shapes is the inability to accurately capture and display the details in the objects having variable orientations to edges, shapes and regions. This effect can be observed by the inaccurate representation of diagonal edges in low resolution square pixel images. This paper explores a...

  19. A method for solving the spherical harmonics equations applied for space-energy transport of fast and resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.

    1972-01-01

    A new proposed method for solving the space-energy dependent spherical harmonics equations represents a methodological contribution to neutron transport theory. The proposed method was applied for solving the problem of spec-energy transport of fast and resonance neutrons in multi-zone, cylindrical y symmetric infinite reactor cell and is related to previously developed procedure for treating the thermal energy region. The advantages of this method are as follows: a unique algorithm was obtained for detailed determination of spatial and energy distribution of neutrons (from thermal to fast) in the reactor cell; these detailed distributions enable more precise calculations of criticality conditions, obtaining adequate multigroup data and better interpretation of experimental data; computing time is rather short

  20. Energy difference space random walk to achieve fast free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Donghong; Yang, Wei

    2008-05-21

    A method is proposed to efficiently obtain free energy differences. In the present algorithm, free energy calculations proceed by the realization of an energy difference space random walk. Thereby, this algorithm can greatly improve the sampling of the regions in phase space where target states overlap.

  1. Diamond pixel modules

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, K K; Robichaud, A; Potenza, R; Kuleshov, S; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Wermes, N; Dulinski, W; Eremin, V; Smith, S; Sopko, B; Olivero, P; Gorisek, A; Chren, D; Kramberger, G; Schnetzer, S; Weilhammer, P; Martemyanov, A; Hugging, F; Pernegger, H; Lagomarsino, S; Manfredotti, C; Mishina, M; Trischuk, W; Dobos, D; Cindro, V; Belyaev, V; Duris, J; Claus, G; Wallny, R; Furgeri, A; Tuve, C; Goldstein, J; Sciortino, S; Sutera, C; Asner, D; Mikuz, M; Lo Giudice, A; Velthuis, J; Hits, D; Griesmayer, E; Oakham, G; Frais-Kolbl, H; Bellini, V; D'Alessandro, R; Cristinziani, M; Barbero, M; Schaffner, D; Costa, S; Goffe, M; La Rosa, A; Bruzzi, M; Schreiner, T; de Boer, W; Parrini, G; Roe, S; Randrianarivony, K; Dolenc, I; Moss, J; Brom, J M; Golubev, A; Mathes, M; Eusebi, R; Grigoriev, E; Tsung, J W; Mueller, S; Mandic, I; Stone, R; Menichelli, D

    2011-01-01

    With the commissioning of the LHC in 2010 and upgrades expected in 2015, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. This material is now being considered as a sensor material for use very close to the interaction region where the most extreme radiation conditions exist Recently the RD42 collaboration constructed, irradiated and tested polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond sensors to the highest fluences expected at the super-LHC. We present beam test results of chemical vapor deposition diamond up to fluences of 1.8 x 10(16) protons/cm(2) illustrating that both polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds follow a single damage curve. We also present beam test results of irradiated complete diamond pixel m...

  2. An SDR-based Study of Multi-GNSS Positioning Performance During Fast-developing Space Weather Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Filic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the ionospheric effects on GNSS positioning performance forms an essential pre-requisite for resilient GNSS development. Here we present the results of a study of the effects of a fast-developing space weather disturbance on the positioning performance of a commercial-grade GPS+GLONASS receiver. Using experimentally collected pseudoranges and the RTKLIB, an open-source software-defined GNSS radio receiver operating in the simulation mode, we assessed GNSS positioning performance degradations for various modes of GNSS SDR receiver operation, and identified the benefits of utilisation of multi-GNSS and ionospheric error correction techniques.

  3. ATLAS Pixel Detector Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Di Girolamo, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.9% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  4. Bayesian Integrated Data Analysis of Fast-Ion Measurements by Velocity-Space Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, M.; Nocente, M.; Jacobsen, A.S.

    2018-01-01

    Bayesian integrated data analysis combines measurements from different diagnostics to jointly measure plasma parameters of interest such as temperatures, densities, and drift velocities. Integrated data analysis of fast-ion measurements has long been hampered by the complexity of the strongly non...... framework. The implementation for different types of diagnostics as well as the uncertainties are discussed, and we highlight the importance of integrated data analysis of all available detectors....

  5. Pixel electronics for the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC will use 3 barrel layers and 2x5 disks of silicon pixel detectors as the innermost elements of the semiconductor tracker. The basic building blocks are pixel modules with an active area of 16.4 mmx60.8 mm which include an n + on n-type silicon sensor and 16 VLSI front-end (FE) chips. Every FE chip contains a low power, high speed charge sensitive preamplifier, a fast discriminator, and a readout system which operates at the 40 MHz rate of LHC. The addresses of hit pixels (as well as a low resolution pulse height information) are stored on the FE chips until arrival of a level 1 trigger signal. Hits are then transferred to a module controller chip (MCC) which collects the data of all 16 FE chips, builds complete events and sends the data through two optical links to the data acquisition system. The MCC receives clock and data through an additional optical link and provides timing and configuration information for the FE chips. Two additional chips are used to amplify and decode the pin diode signal and to drive the VCSEL laser diodes of the optical links

  6. The Level 0 Pixel Trigger system for the ALICE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinella, G Aglieri; Kluge, A; Krivda, M

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector contains 1200 readout chips. Fast-OR signals indicate the presence of at least one hit in the 8192 pixel matrix of each chip. The 1200 bits are transmitted every 100 ns on 120 data readout optical links using the G-Link protocol. The Pixel Trigger System extracts and processes them to deliver an input signal to the Level 0 trigger processor targeting a latency of 800 ns. The system is compact, modular and based on FPGA devices. The architecture allows the user to define and implement various trigger algorithms. The system uses advanced 12-channel parallel optical fiber modules operating at 1310 nm as optical receivers and 12 deserializer chips closely packed in small area receiver boards. Alternative solutions with multi-channel G-Link deserializers implemented directly in programmable hardware devices were investigated. The design of the system and the progress of the ALICE Pixel Trigger project are described in this paper

  7. Fast algorithm for exploring and compressing of large hyperspectral images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucheryavskiy, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    , information about pixels density in principal component space for the first two components is utilized. The method was tested on several hyperspectral images and showed significant improvement of performance while the orientation of the latent variables was not very different from the original one. The method...... can be used first of all for fast compression of large data arrays with principal component analysis or similar projection techniques....

  8. Robust, fast and accurate vision-based localization of a cooperative target used for space robotic arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhuoman; Wang, Yanjie; Luo, Jun; Kuijper, Arjan; Di, Nan; Jin, Minghe

    2017-07-01

    When a space robotic arm deploys a payload, usually the pose between the cooperative target fixed on the payload and the hand-eye camera installed on the arm is calculated in real-time. A high-precision robust visual cooperative target localization method is proposed. Combing a circle, a line and dots as markers, a target that guarantees high detection rates is designed. Given an image, single-pixel-width smooth edges are drawn by a novel linking method. Circles are then quickly extracted using isophotes curvature. Around each circle, a square boundary in a pre-calculated proportion to the circle radius is set. In the boundary, the target is identified if certain numbers of lines exist. Based on the circle, the lines, and the target foreground and background intensities, markers are localized. Finally, the target pose is calculated by the Point-3-Perspective algorithm. The algorithm processes 8 frames per second with the target distance ranging from 0.3m to 1.5 m. It generated high-precision poses of above 97.5% on over 100,000 images regardless of camera background, target pose, illumination and motion blur. At 0.3 m, the rotation and translation errors were less than 0.015° and 0.2 mm. The proposed algorithm is very suitable for real-time visual measurement that requires high precision in aerospace.

  9. Effect of land cover and green space on land surface temperature of a fast growing economic region in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, A.; Kanniah, K. D.; Ho, C. H.

    2015-10-01

    Green space must be increased in the development of new cities as green space can moderate temperature in the cities. In this study we estimated the land surface temperature (LST) and established relationships between LST and land cover and various vegetation and urban surface indices in the Iskandar Malaysia (IM) region. IM is one of the emerging economic gateways of Malaysia, and is envisaged to transform into a metropolis by 2025. This change may cause increased temperature in IM and therefore we conducted a study by using Landsat 5 image covering the study region (2,217 km2) to estimate LST, classify different land covers and calculate spectral indices. Results show that urban surface had highest LST (24.49 °C) and the lowest temperature was recorded in, forest, rubber and water bodies ( 20.69 to 21.02°C). Oil palm plantations showed intermediate mean LST values with 21.65 °C. We further investigated the relationship between vegetation and build up densities with temperature. We extracted 1000 collocated pure pixels of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Normalized Difference Built-up Index (NDBI), Urban Index (UI) and LST in the study area. Results show a strong and significant negative correlation with (R2= -0.74 and -0.79) respectively between NDVI, NDWI and LST . Meanwhile a strong positive correlation (R2=0.8 and 0.86) exists between NDBI, UI and LST. These results show the importance of increasing green cover in urban environment to combat any adverse effects of climate change.

  10. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the vertex detector elements and thus existing CCDs are not adequate. New CCD architectures are under development [2] but have yet to achieve the required perfor- mance. For these reasons there is an increased importance on the development of monolithic CMOS pixel detectors that allow extremely fast non-sequential ...

  11. OMI/Aura Zoom-in Ground Pixel Corners 1-Orbit L2 Swath 13x12km V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Version-3 Aura/OMI Zoom-in Pixel Corner Coordinates and Pixel Size Product, OMPIXCORZ, is available (http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Aura/OMI/ompixcorz_v003.shtml)...

  12. On velocity space interrogation regions of fast-ion collective Thomson scattering at ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    the collective scattering in well-defined regions in velocity space, here dubbed interrogation regions. Since the CTS instrument measures entire spectra of scattered radiation, many different interrogation regions are probed simultaneously. We here give analytic expressions for weight functions describing...

  13. Fast and reliable control of steering mirrors with application to free-space communication

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrir, Salim

    2018-03-15

    After modeling a laser beam pointing system actuated by a piezo-electric fast steering mirror (FSM), an observer-based linear feedback controller is developed to correct the position of the laser spot communicated by the position sensing detector (PSD). The modeling and the control actions have been considered with and without the hysteresis effect induced by the piezoelectric actuators of the FSM. The design of the feedback is given through the solution of parametric matrix inequalities. It was found that the integral feedback design is very efficient in handling input and system uncertainty. The linearity of the observer-based feedback has facilitated both the real-time implementation of the control strategy and the proof of stability using dynamic-output feedbacks.

  14. Fast 3D inversion of gravity data using solution space priorconditioned lanczos bidiagonalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Mohammad; Moradzadeh, Ali; Kalateh, Ali Nejati

    2017-01-01

    Inversion of gravity data is one of the most important steps in the quantitative interpretation of practical data. Inversion is a mathematical technique that automatically constructs a subsurface geophysical model from measured data, incorporating some priori information. Inversion of gravity data is time consuming because of increase in data and model parameters. Some efforts have been made to deal with this problem, one of them is using fast algorithms for solving system of equations in inverse problem. Lanczos bidiagonalization method is a fast algorithm that works based on Krylov subspace iterations and projection method, but cannot always provide a good basis for a projection method. So in this study, we combined the Krylov method with a regularization method applied to the low-dimensional projected problem. To achieve the goal, the orthonormal basis vectors of the discrete cosine transform (DCT) were used to build the low-dimensional subspace. The forward operator matrix replaced with a matrix of lower dimension, thus, the required memory and running time of the inverse modeling is decreased by using the proposed algorithm. It is shown that this algorithm can be appropriate to solve a Tikhonov cost function for inversion of gravity data. The proposed method has been applied on a noise-corrupted synthetic data and field gravity data (Mobrun gravity data) to demonstrate its reliability for three dimensional (3D) gravity inversion. The obtained results of 3D inversion both synthetic and field gravity data (Mobrun gravity data) indicate the proposed inversion algorithm could produce density models consistent with true structures.

  15. Fast spectrum space reactor sizing code for calandria-type cores (CORSCO Code)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Eugene R.; Villalobos, Antonio

    1991-01-01

    The CORSCO code rapidly sizes reactor cores that have calandria-type geometry. The fuel configuration modeled is a large ceramic zone that contains numerous small cylindrical coolant channels spaced apart with a triangular pitch. A minimum reactor weight is obtained for a fixed set of constraints (peak fuel temperature, peak coolant velocity, etc.) by obtaining a unique solution to a set of five thermal/hydraulic equations, as well as a required excess reactivity which is specified by a core size dependent one-group criticality expression. Typical results are shown for a W-Re/UN cermet-fueled, lithium-cooled space reactor over a power range of 25 to 100 MWt. Reactor sensitivity coefficients are also shown for changes in reactor weight and number of coolant channels due to changes in core thermal/hydraulic constraints.

  16. The Young-Feynman two-slits experiment with single electrons: Build-up of the interference pattern and arrival-time distribution using a fast-readout pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frabboni, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Gabrielli, Alessandro [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Carlo Gazzadi, Gian [CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Giorgi, Filippo [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Matteucci, Giorgio [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Pozzi, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.pozzi@unibo.it [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Cesari, Nicola Semprini; Villa, Mauro; Zoccoli, Antonio [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    The two-slits experiment for single electrons has been carried out by inserting in a conventional transmission electron microscope a thick sample with two nano-slits fabricated by Focused Ion Beam technique and a fast recording system able to measure the electron arrival-time. The detector, designed for experiments in future colliders, is based on a custom CMOS chip equipped with a fast readout chain able to manage up to 10{sup 6} frames per second. In this way, high statistic samples of single electron events can be collected within a time interval short enough to measure the distribution of the electron arrival-times and to observe the build-up of the interference pattern. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the first results obtained regarding the two-slits Young-Feynman experiment with single electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use two nano-slits fabricated by Focused Ion Beam technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We insert in the transmission electron microscope a detector, designed for experiments in future colliders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We record the build-up of high statistic single electron interference patterns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measure the time distribution of electron arrivals.

  17. Imaging by photon counting with 256 x 256 pixel matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Tlustos, Lukas; Heijne, Erik H M; Llopart-Cudie, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Using 0.25 mum standard CMOS we have developed 2-D semiconductor matrix detectors with sophisticated functionality integrated inside each pixel of a hybrid sensor module. One of these sensor modules is a matrix of 256 multiplied by 256 square 55mum pixels intended for X- ray imaging. This device is called 'Medipix2' and features a fast amplifier and two-level discrimination for signals between 1000 and 100000 equivalent electrons, with overall signal noise similar to 150 e- rms. Signal polarity and comparator thresholds are programmable. A maximum count rate of nearly 1 MHz per pixel can be achieved, which corresponds to an average flux of 3 multiplied by 10exp10 photons per cm2. The selected signals can be accumulated in each pixel in a 13- bit register. The serial readout takes 5-10 ms. A parallel readout of similar to 300 mus could also be used. Housekeeping functions such as local dark current compensation, test pulse generation, silencing of noisy pixels and threshold tuning in each pixel contribute to t...

  18. Space--time dynamics of a fast breeder reactor for localized disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    Sodium voiding accidents in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder reactors may cause a positive reactivity insertion due to a lack of balance between two competing effects following the voiding: (1) the shift in neutron energies to higher values which leads to a positive reactivity addition, and (2) the increased neutron diffusion which generates a negative reactivity. Since these two effects have strong spatial dependence, the amount of reactivity added in a voiding accident depends strongly on the position in the reactor core where the voiding accident has occurred. A method of analysis is developed for the localized voiding perturbation based on a flux factorization technique, accounting for the flux shape changes taking place near the region of the voided subassembly. Heat transfer equations are solved in conjunction with the neutronic equations and the two are coupled via feedback effects like the Doppler effect. For the purpose of analysis, a typical large (1000 MWe) LMFBR with two radial core zones of different enrichments is considered. Time-dependent void fractions, which are the input quantities in the analysis, are taken to be typical of a channel flow blockage accident. The transients are analyzed for voidings taking place at three different radial locations in the core and for two different rates of voiding. Results of the calculations show that the voiding transients occurring at the center of the reactor core cause most severe effects in terms of the positive reactivity addition and the effects become progressively less severe for voidings occurring outward toward the periphery of the reactor

  19. FAST INTEGER AMBIGUITY RESOLUTION IN GPS KINEMATIC POSITIONING USING LEFT NULL SPACE AND MULTI-TIME (INVERSE PAIRED CHOLESKY DECORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Duan

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problems that huge amount of computation in ambiguity resolution with multiple epochs and high-order matrix inversion occurred in the GPS kinematic relative positioning, a modified algorithm for fast integer ambiguity resolution is proposed. Firstly, Singular Value Decomposition (SVD is applied to construct the left null space matrix in order to eliminate the baselines components, which is able to separate ambiguity parameters from the position parameters efficiently. Kalman filter is applied only to estimate the ambiguity parameters so that the real-time ambiguity float solution is obtained. Then, sorting and multi-time (inverse paired Cholesky decomposition are adopted for decorrelation of ambiguity. After diagonal elements preprocessing and diagonal elements sorting according to the results of Cholesky decomposition, the efficiency of decomposition and decorrelation is improved. Lastly, the integer search algorithm implemented in LAMBDA method is used for searching the integer ambiguity. To verify the validity and efficacy of the proposed algorithm, static and kinematic tests are carried out. Experimental results show that this algorithm has good performance of decorrelation and precision of float solution, with computation speed also increased effectively. The final positioning accuracy result with static baseline error less than 1 cm and kinematic error less than 2 cm, which indicates that it can be used for fast kinematic positioning of high precision carrier.

  20. Fast inference of ill-posed problems within a convex space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-de-Cossio-Diaz, J.; Mulet, R.

    2016-07-01

    In multiple scientific and technological applications we face the problem of having low dimensional data to be justified by a linear model defined in a high dimensional parameter space. The difference in dimensionality makes the problem ill-defined: the model is consistent with the data for many values of its parameters. The objective is to find the probability distribution of parameter values consistent with the data, a problem that can be cast as the exploration of a high dimensional convex polytope. In this work we introduce a novel algorithm to solve this problem efficiently. It provides results that are statistically indistinguishable from currently used numerical techniques while its running time scales linearly with the system size. We show that the algorithm performs robustly in many abstract and practical applications. As working examples we simulate the effects of restricting reaction fluxes on the space of feasible phenotypes of a genome scale Escherichia coli metabolic network and infer the traffic flow between origin and destination nodes in a real communication network.

  1. Quantum correlations in Newtonian space and time: arbitrarily fast communication or nonlocality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisin, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Experimental violations of Bell inequalities using space-like separated measurements precludes the explanation of quantum correlations through causal influences propagating at subluminal speed. Yet, ``everything looks as if the two parties somehow communicate behind the scene.'' We investigate the assumption that they do so at a speed faster than light, though finite. Such an assumption doesn't respect the spirit of Einstein relativity. However, it is not crystal clear that such ``communication behind the scene'' would contradict relativity. Indeed, one could imagine that this communication remains for ever hidden to humans, i.e. that it could not be controlled by humans, only Nature exploits it to produce correlations that can't be explained by usual common causes. To define faster than light hidden communication requires a universal privileged reference frame in which this faster than light speed is defined. Again, such a universal privileged frame is not in the spirit of relativity, but it is also clearly not in contradiction: for example the reference frame in which the cosmic microwave background radiation is isotropic defines such a privileged frame. Hence, a priori, a hidden communication explanation is not more surprising than nonlocality. We prove that for any finite speed, such models predict correlations that can be exploited for faster-than-light communication. This superluminal communication doesn't require access to any hidden physical quantities, but only the manipulation of measurement devices at the level of our present-day description of quantum experiments. Consequently, all possible explanations of quantum correlations that satisfy the principle of continuity, which states that everything propagates gradually and continuously through space and time, or in other words, all combination of local common causes and direct causes that reproduce quantum correlations, lead to faster than light communication. Accordingly, either there is superluminal

  2. Edge pixel response studies of edgeless silicon sensor technology for pixellated imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneuski, D.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Doonan, K.; Eklund, L.; Gimenez, E. N.; Hynds, D.; Kachkanov, S.; Kalliopuska, J.; McMullen, T.; O'Shea, V.; Tartoni, N.; Plackett, R.; Vahanen, S.; Wraight, K.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon sensor technologies with reduced dead area at the sensor's perimeter are under development at a number of institutes. Several fabrication methods for sensors which are sensitive close to the physical edge of the device are under investigation utilising techniques such as active-edges, passivated edges and current-terminating rings. Such technologies offer the goal of a seamlessly tiled detection surface with minimum dead space between the individual modules. In order to quantify the performance of different geometries and different bulk and implant types, characterisation of several sensors fabricated using active-edge technology were performed at the B16 beam line of the Diamond Light Source. The sensors were fabricated by VTT and bump-bonded to Timepix ROICs. They were 100 and 200 μ m thick sensors, with the last pixel-to-edge distance of either 50 or 100 μ m. The sensors were fabricated as either n-on-n or n-on-p type devices. Using 15 keV monochromatic X-rays with a beam spot of 2.5 μ m, the performance at the outer edge and corners pixels of the sensors was evaluated at three bias voltages. The results indicate a significant change in the charge collection properties between the edge and 5th (up to 275 μ m) from edge pixel for the 200 μ m thick n-on-n sensor. The edge pixel performance of the 100 μ m thick n-on-p sensors is affected only for the last two pixels (up to 110 μ m) subject to biasing conditions. Imaging characteristics of all sensor types investigated are stable over time and the non-uniformities can be minimised by flat-field corrections. The results from the synchrotron tests combined with lab measurements are presented along with an explanation of the observed effects.

  3. Fusion Ship II- A Fast Manned Interplanetary Space Vehicle Using Inertial Electrostatic Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, R. L.; Momota, H.; Richardson, N.; Shaban, Y.; Miley, G. H.

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary system design, Fusion Ship II, is presented for a high performance 750 MWthrust manned space vehicle in the 500 metric ton class. Fusion Ship II is based on Inertial Electrostatic Fusion (IEC), giving round trip times to the outer planets of 1-2 years. An IEC is chosen because it simplifies structure results in a very high power to weight ratio. The fusion reactor uses D-3He fuel that generates 14.7-MeV protons as the primary reaction product. The propulsion system uses direct conversion of proton energy to electricity, avoiding the thermalization of the working fluid to maximize efficiency. Design calculations are described for the principle system components (crew compartment, crew shielding, avionics, fusion reactor modules, traveling wave direct energy converter, step-down transformer, rectifier, ion thruster, heat rejection radiators) along with vehicle trajectory calculations. Since unburned fusion fuels are recycled rather than exhausted with the propellant, problems of fuel weight and preservation of 3He are minimized. The 750-MWthrust propulsion system is based on NSTAR-extrapolated Argon ion thrusters operating at a specific impulse of 35,000 seconds and a total thrust of 4,370 N. Round trip travel time for a Jupiter mission ΔV of 202,000 m/s is then 363 days. This design requires that an IEC reactor with a proton energy gain (power in 14.7-MeV protons/input electric power) of 9 or better is achieved. Extrapolation of present laboratory-scale IEC experiments to such conditions is possible theoretically, but faces several open issues including stability under high-density plasma operation.

  4. Vertex measurement at a hadron collider. The ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse-Knetter, J.

    2008-03-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system and will contribute significantly to the ATLAS track and vertex reconstruction. The detector consists of identical sensor-chip-hybrid modules, arranged in three barrels in the centre and three disks on either side for the forward region. The position of the Pixel Detector near the interaction point requires excellent radiation hardness, fast read-out, mechanical and thermal robustness, good long-term stability, all combined with a low material budget. The new design concepts used to meet the challenging requirements are discussed with their realisation in the Pixel Detector, followed by a description of a refined and extensive set of measurements to assess the detector performance during and after its construction. (orig.)

  5. Fast Superpixel Segmentation Algorithm for PolSAR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yue

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As a pre-processing technique, superpixel segmentation algorithms should be of high computational efficiency, accurate boundary adherence and regular shape in homogeneous regions. A fast superpixel segmentation algorithm based on Iterative Edge Refinement (IER has shown to be applicable on optical images. However, it is difficult to obtain the ideal results when IER is applied directly to PolSAR images due to the speckle noise and small or slim regions in PolSAR images. To address these problems, in this study, the unstable pixel set is initialized as all the pixels in the PolSAR image instead of the initial grid edge pixels. In the local relabeling of the unstable pixels, the fast revised Wishart distance is utilized instead of the Euclidean distance in CIELAB color space. Then, a post-processing procedure based on dissimilarity measure is empolyed to remove isolated small superpixels as well as to retain the strong point targets. Finally, extensive experiments based on a simulated image and a real-world PolSAR image from Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AirSAR are conducted, showing that the proposed algorithm, compared with three state-of-the-art methods, performs better in terms of several commonly used evaluation criteria with high computational efficiency, accurate boundary adherence, and homogeneous regularity.

  6. Acceleration of single pixel imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, K.

    2018-01-01

    A method for single pixel imaging (SPI) is introduced. The method is proposed to accelerate optical measurement. The method is also useful for high-definition imaging. The processing procedure of the method is described and some features of the based on the proposed method is described.

  7. Pixel History for Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, D.; Grogin, N.; Bourque, M.; Ogaz, S.

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy present in a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can result in additional electrical current. This excess charge is trapped within the silicon lattice structure of the CCD electronics. It can persist through multiple exposures and have an adverse effect on science performance of the detectors unless properly flagged and corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed. These images, generally referred to as "dark" images, allow for the measurement of the thermal-electron contamination present in each pixel of the CCD lattice. This so-called "dark current" can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling the dark to the corresponding exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain threshold are traditionally marked as "hot" and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these because of the extra current. However, these pixels may not be unusable because of an unreliable dark subtraction; if we find these pixels to be stable over an anneal period, we can properly subtract the charge and the extra Poisson noise from this dark current will be propagated into the error arrays. Here we present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every individual pixel of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) CCDs over time and allows pixels that were previously flagged as unusable to be brought back into the science image as a reliable pixel.

  8. Fast single image super-resolution using estimated low-frequency k-space data in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianhua; Mou, Zhiying; Qin, Binjie; Li, Wanqing; Yang, Feng; Robini, Marc; Zhu, Yuemin

    2017-07-01

    Single image super-resolution (SR) is highly desired in many fields but obtaining it is often technically limited in practice. The purpose of this study was to propose a simple, rapid and robust single image SR method in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI). The idea is based on the mathematical formulation of the intrinsic link in k-space between a given (modulus) low-resolution (LR) image and the desired SR image. The method consists of two steps: 1) estimating the low-frequency k-space data of the desired SR image from a single LR image; 2) reconstructing the SR image using the estimated low-frequency and zero-filled high-frequency k-space data. The method was evaluated on digital phantom images, physical phantom MR images and real brain MR images, and compared with existing SR methods. The proposed SR method exhibited a good robustness by reaching a clearly higher PSNR (25.77dB) and SSIM (0.991) averaged over different noise levels in comparison with existing edge-guided nonlinear interpolation (EGNI) (PSNR=23.78dB, SSIM=0.983), zero-filling (ZF) (PSNR=24.09dB, SSIM=0.985) and total variation (TV) (PSNR=24.54dB, SSIM=0.987) methods while presenting the same order of computation time as the ZF method but being much faster than the EGNI or TV method. The average PSNR or SSIM over different slice images of the proposed method (PSNR=26.33 dB or SSIM=0.955) was also higher than the EGNI (PSNR=25.07dB or SSIM=0.952), ZF (PSNR=24.97dB or SSIM=0.950) and TV (PSNR=25.70dB or SSIM=0.953) methods, demonstrating its good robustness to variation in anatomical structure of the images. Meanwhile, the proposed method always produced less ringing artifacts than the ZF method, gave a clearer image than the EGNI method, and did not exhibit any blocking effect presented in the TV method. In addition, the proposed method yielded the highest spatial consistency in the inter-slice dimension among the four methods. This study proposed a fast, robust and efficient single image SR

  9. Optical Cloud Pixel Recovery via Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrina Tahsin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI is a widely used index to monitor vegetation and land use change. NDVI can be retrieved from publicly available data repositories of optical sensors such as Landsat, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS and several commercial satellites. Studies that are heavily dependent on optical sensors are subject to data loss due to cloud coverage. Specifically, cloud contamination is a hindrance to long-term environmental assessment when using information from satellite imagery retrieved from visible and infrared spectral ranges. Landsat has an ongoing high-resolution NDVI record starting from 1984. Unfortunately, this long time series NDVI data suffers from the cloud contamination issue. Though both simple and complex computational methods for data interpolation have been applied to recover cloudy data, all the techniques have limitations. In this paper, a novel Optical Cloud Pixel Recovery (OCPR method is proposed to repair cloudy pixels from the time-space-spectrum continuum using a Random Forest (RF trained and tested with multi-parameter hydrologic data. The RF-based OCPR model is compared with a linear regression model to demonstrate the capability of OCPR. A case study in Apalachicola Bay is presented to evaluate the performance of OCPR to repair cloudy NDVI reflectance. The RF-based OCPR method achieves a root mean squared error of 0.016 between predicted and observed NDVI reflectance values. The linear regression model achieves a root mean squared error of 0.126. Our findings suggest that the RF-based OCPR method is effective to repair cloudy pixels and provides continuous and quantitatively reliable imagery for long-term environmental analysis.

  10. ProtNN: fast and accurate protein 3D-structure classification in structural and topological space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhifli, Wajdi; Diallo, Abdoulaye Baniré

    2016-01-01

    Studying the functions and structures of proteins is important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of life. The number of publicly available protein structures has increasingly become extremely large. Still, the classification of a protein structure remains a difficult, costly, and time consuming task. The difficulties are often due to the essential role of spatial and topological structures in the classification of protein structures. We propose ProtNN, a novel classification approach for protein 3D-structures. Given an unannotated query protein structure and a set of annotated proteins, ProtNN assigns to the query protein the class with the highest number of votes across the k nearest neighbor reference proteins, where k is a user-defined parameter. The search of the nearest neighbor annotated structures is based on a protein-graph representation model and pairwise similarities between vector embedding of the query and the reference protein structures in structural and topological spaces. We demonstrate through an extensive experimental evaluation that ProtNN is able to accurately classify several datasets in an extremely fast runtime compared to state-of-the-art approaches. We further show that ProtNN is able to scale up to a whole PDB dataset in a single-process mode with no parallelization, with a gain of thousands order of magnitude in runtime compared to state-of-the-art approaches.

  11. Status of the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra Aldo, F

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is currently being constructed and will be installed in 2006 to be ready for commissioning at the Large Hadron Collider. The complete pixel detector is composed of three concentric barrels and six disks that are populated by 1744 ATLAS Pixel modules. The main components of the pixel module are the readout electronics and the silicon sensor whose active region is instrumented with rectangular pixels. The module has been designed to be able to survive 10 years of operation within the ATLAS detector. A brief description of the pixel detector will be presented with results and problems encountered during the production stage.

  12. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  13. Algorithms for spectral calibration of energy-resolving small-pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scuffham, J; Veale, M C; Wilson, M D; Seller, P

    2013-01-01

    Small pixel Cd(Zn)Te detectors often suffer from inter-pixel variations in gain, resulting in shifts in the individual energy spectra. These gain variations are mainly caused by inclusions and defects within the crystal structure, which affect the charge transport within the material causing a decrease in the signal pulse height. In imaging applications, spectra are commonly integrated over a particular peak of interest. This means that the individual pixels must be accurately calibrated to ensure that the same portion of the spectrum is integrated in every pixel. The development of large-area detectors with fine pixel pitch necessitates automated algorithms for this spectral calibration, due to the very large number of pixels. Algorithms for automatic spectral calibration require accurate determination of characteristic x-ray or photopeak positions on a pixelwise basis. In this study, we compare two peak searching spectral calibration algorithms for a small-pixel CdTe detector in gamma spectroscopic imaging. The first algorithm uses rigid search ranges to identify peaks in each pixel spectrum, based on the average peak positions across all pixels. The second algorithm scales the search ranges on the basis of the position of the highest-energy peak relative to the average across all pixels. In test spectra acquired with Tc-99m, we found that the rigid search algorithm failed to correctly identify the target calibraton peaks in up to 4% of pixels. In contrast, the scaled search algorithm failed in only 0.16% of pixels. Failures in the scaled search algorithm were attributed to the presence of noise events above the main photopeak, and possible non-linearities in the spectral response in a small number of pixels. We conclude that a peak searching algorithm based on scaling known peak spacings is simple to implement and performs well for the spectral calibration of pixellated radiation detectors

  14. A novel semiconductor pixel device and system for X-ray and gamma ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, D.; Myers, M.; Sanghera, B.

    1996-01-01

    We are presenting clinical images and data from a novel X-ray imaging device and system. The device comprises a pixel semiconductor detector flip-chip joined to an ASIC circuit. CdZnTe and Si pixel detectors with dimensions of the order of 1 cm 2 have been implemented with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. Individual detectors comprise, therefore, tens of thousands of pixels. A novel ASIC accumulates charge created from directly absorbed X-rays impinging on the detector. Each circuit on the ASIC, corresponding to a detector pixel, is capable of accumulating thousands of X-rays in the energy spectrum from a few to hundreds of keV with high efficiency (CdZnTe). Image (X-ray) accumulation times are user controlled and range from just a few to hundreds of ms. Image frame updates are also user controlled and can be provided as fast as every 20 ms, thus offering the possibility of real time imaging. The total thickness of an individual imaging tile including the mounting support does not exceed 4 mm. Individual imaging tiles are combined in a mosaic providing an imaging system with any desired shape and useful active area. The mosaic allows for cost effective replacement of individual tiles. A scanning system, allows for elimination, in the final image, of any inactive space between the imaging tiles without use of software interpolation techniques. The Si version of our system has an MTF of 20% at 14 lp/mm and the CdZnTe version an MTF of 15% at 10 lp/mm. Our digital imaging devices and systems are intended for use in X-ray and gamma-ray imaging for medical diagnosis in a variety of applications ranging from conventional projection X-ray imaging and mammography to fluoroscopy and CT scanning. Similarly, the technology is intended for use in non destructive testing, product quality control and real time on-line monitoring

  15. Depleted fully monolithic CMOS pixel detectors using a column based readout architecture for the ATLAS Inner Tracker upgrade

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, T.; Barbero, M.; Berdalovic, I.; Bespin, C.; Bhat, S.; Breugnon, P.; Caicedo, I.; Cardella, R.; Chen, Z.; Degerli, Y.; Egidos, N.; Godiot, S.; Guilloux, F.; Hemperek, T.; Hirono, T.

    2017-01-01

    Depleted monolithic active pixel sensors (DMAPS), which exploit high voltage and/or high resistivity add-ons of modern CMOS technologies to achieve substantial depletion in the sensing volume, have proven to have high radiation tolerance towards the requirements of ATLAS in the high-luminosity LHC era. Depleted fully monolithic CMOS pixels with fast readout architectures are currently being developed as promising candidates for the outer pixel layers of the future ATLAS Inner Tracker, which w...

  16. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  17. CMS has a heart of pixels

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In the immediate vicinity of the collision point, CMS will be equipped with pixel detectors consisting of no fewer than 50 million pixels measuring 150 microns along each side. Each of the pixels, which receive the signal, is connected to its own electronic circuit by a tiny sphere (seen here in the electron microscope image) measuring 15 to 20 microns in diameter.

  18. Radiation effects on active pixel sensors (APS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.; David, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Active pixel sensor (APS) is a new generation of image sensors which presents several advantages relatively to charge coupled devices (CCDs) particularly for space applications (APS requires only 1 voltage to operate which reduces considerably current consumption). Irradiation was performed using 60 Co gamma radiation at room temperature and at a dose rate of 150 Gy(Si)/h. 2 types of APS have been tested: photodiode-APS and photoMOS-APS. The results show that photoMOS-APS is more sensitive to radiation effects than photodiode-APS. Important parameters of image sensors like dark currents increase sharply with dose levels. Nevertheless photodiode-APS sensitivity is one hundred time lower than photoMOS-APS sensitivity

  19. X-ray micro-beam characterization of a small pixel spectroscopic CdTe detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.

    2012-07-01

    A small pixel, spectroscopic, CdTe detector has been developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) for X-ray imaging applications. The detector consists of 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch with 50 μm inter-pixel spacing. Measurements with an 241Am γ-source demonstrated that 96% of all pixels have a FWHM of better than 1 keV while the majority of the remaining pixels have FWHM of less than 4 keV. Using the Diamond Light Source synchrotron, a 10 μm collimated beam of monochromatic 20 keV X-rays has been used to map the spatial variation in the detector response and the effects of charge sharing corrections on detector efficiency and resolution. The mapping measurements revealed the presence of inclusions in the detector and quantified their effect on the spectroscopic resolution of pixels.

  20. Performance study of new pixel hybrid photon detector prototypes for the LHCb RICH counters

    CERN Document Server

    Moritz, M; Allebone, L; Campbell, M; Gys, Thierry; Newby, C; Pickford, A; Piedigrossi, D; Wyllie, K

    2004-01-01

    A pixel Hybrid Photon Detector was developed according to the specific requirements of the LHCb ring imaging Cerenkov counters. This detector comprises a silicon pixel detector bump-bonded to a binary readout chip to achieve a 25 ns fast readout and a high signal-to-noise ratio. The detector performance was characterized by varying the pixel threshold, the tube high voltage, the silicon bias voltage and by the determination of the photoelectron detection efficiency. Furthermore accelerated aging and high pixel occupancy tests were performed to verify the long term stability. The results were obtained using Cerenkov light and a fast pulsed light emitting diode. All measurements results are within the expectations and fulfill the design goals. (8 refs).

  1. Development of hybrid photon detectors with integrated silicon pixel readout for the RICH counters of LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Alemi, M; Formenti, F; Gys, Thierry; Piedigrossi, D; Puertolas, D; Rosso, E; Snoeys, W; Wyllie, Ken H

    1999-01-01

    We report on the ongoing work towards a hybrid photon detector with integrated silicon pixel readout for the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The photon detector is based $9 on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry where the image is de-magnified by a factor of 4. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array, bump-bonded to a fast, binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The $9 performance of a half-scale prototype is presented, together with the developments and tests of a full-scale tube with large active area. Specific requirements for pixel front-end and readout electronics in LHCb are outlined, and $9 recent results obtained from pixel chips applicable to hybrid photon detector design are summarized.

  2. Pixel-by-pixel mean transit time without deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbeleir, Andre A; Piepsz, Amy; Ham, Hamphrey R

    2008-04-01

    Mean transit time (MTT) within a kidney is given by the integral of the renal activity on a well-corrected renogram between time zero and time t divided by the integral of the plasma activity between zero and t, providing that t is close to infinity. However, as the data acquisition of a renogram is finite, the MTT calculated using this approach might result in the underestimation of the true MTT. To evaluate the degree of this underestimation we conducted a simulation study. One thousand renograms were created by convoluting various plasma curves obtained from patients with different renal clearance levels with simulated retentions curves having different shapes and mean transit times. For a 20 min renogram, the calculated MTT started to underestimate the MTT when the MTT was higher than 6 min. The longer the MTT, the greater was the underestimation. Up to a MTT value of 6 min, the error on the MTT estimation is negligible. As normal cortical transit is less than 2 min, this approach is used for patients to calculate pixel-to-pixel cortical mean transit time and to create a MTT parametric image without deconvolution.

  3. Silicon Pixel Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Graeme Douglas

    Recent advances in particle accelerators have increased the demands being placed on detectors. Novel detector designs are being implemented in many different areas including, for example, high luminosity experiments at the LHC or at next generation synchrotrons. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise some of these novel detectors. The first of the new detector types is called a 3D detector. This design was first proposed by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). In this design, doped electrodes are created that extend through the silicon substrate. When compared to a traditional photodiode with electrodes on the opposing surfaces, the 3D design can combine a reasonable detector thickness with a small electrode spacing resulting in fast charge collection and limited charge sharing. The small electrode spacing leads to the detectors having lower depletion voltages. This, combined with the fast collection time, makes 3D detectors a candidate for radiation hard applications. These applications include the upgra...

  4. Harmonics rejection in pixelated interferograms using spatio-temporal demodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, J M; Servin, M; Estrada, J C

    2011-09-26

    Pixelated phase-mask interferograms have become an industry standard in spatial phase-shifting interferometry. These pixelated interferograms allow full wavefront encoding using a single interferogram. This allows the study of fast dynamic events in hostile mechanical environments. Recently an error-free demodulation method for ideal pixelated interferograms was proposed. However, non-ideal conditions in interferometry may arise due to non-linear response of the CCD camera, multiple light paths in the interferometer, etc. These conditions generate non-sinusoidal fringes containing harmonics which degrade the phase estimation. Here we show that two-dimensional Fourier demodulation of pixelated interferograms rejects most harmonics except the complex ones at {-3(rd), +5(th), -7(th), +9(th), -11(th),…}. We propose temporal phase-shifting to remove these remaining harmonics. In particular, a 2-step phase-shifting algorithm is used to eliminate the -3(rd) and +5(th) complex harmonics, while a 3-step one is used to remove the -3(rd), +5harmonics. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  5. Optimization of CZT Detectors with Sub-mm Pixel Pitches Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and optimize 0.5 cm thick Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors with very small pixel pitches, i.e. 350 micron and 600 micron. The proposed...

  6. Predicting human gaze beyond pixels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Jiang, Ming; Wang, Shuo; Kankanhalli, Mohan S; Zhao, Qi

    2014-01-28

    A large body of previous models to predict where people look in natural scenes focused on pixel-level image attributes. To bridge the semantic gap between the predictive power of computational saliency models and human behavior, we propose a new saliency architecture that incorporates information at three layers: pixel-level image attributes, object-level attributes, and semantic-level attributes. Object- and semantic-level information is frequently ignored, or only a few sample object categories are discussed where scaling to a large number of object categories is not feasible nor neurally plausible. To address this problem, this work constructs a principled vocabulary of basic attributes to describe object- and semantic-level information thus not restricting to a limited number of object categories. We build a new dataset of 700 images with eye-tracking data of 15 viewers and annotation data of 5,551 segmented objects with fine contours and 12 semantic attributes (publicly available with the paper). Experimental results demonstrate the importance of the object- and semantic-level information in the prediction of visual attention.

  7. Detector Performance and Upgrade Plans of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope for Online per-Bunch Luminosity Measurement at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a dedicated system for luminosity measurement at the CMS experiment using silicon pixel sensors. It was installed during LS1 and has been providing luminosity measurements throughout Run 2. The online bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement employs the "fast-or" capability of the pixel readout chip (PSI46) to quickly identify likely tracks at the full 40MHz interaction rate. In addition, the full pixel information is read out at a lower rate, allowing for more detailed offline analysis. In this talk, we will present details of the commissioning, performance and operational history of the currently installed hardware and upgrade plans for LS2.

  8. Pixel hybrid photon detectors for the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Somerville, L

    2005-01-01

    A Pixel Hybrid Photon Detector (pixel HPD) has been developed for the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. The pixel HPD is a vacuum tube with a multi-alkali photocathode, high-voltage cross- focused electron optics and an anode consisting of a silicon pixel detector bump-bonded to a CMOS readout chip; the readout chip is thus fully encapsulated in the device. The pixel HPD fulfils the stringent requirements for the RICH detectors of LHCb, combining single photon sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio and fast readout with an ~8cm diameter active area and an effective pixel size of 2.5mm 2.5mm at the photocathode. The performance and characteristics of two prototype pixel HPDs have been studied in laboratory measurements and in recent beam tests. The results of all measurements agree with expectations and fulfil the LHCb RICH requirements. In readiness for production of the ~500pixel HPDs for the RICH detectors, a test programme was designed and implemented to ensure component quality control at eac...

  9. Noise Originating from Intra-pixel Structure and Satellite Attitude Jitter on COROT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Arentoft, Torben; Kjeldsen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    We present a study on noise in space-based photometry originating from sensitivity variations within individual pixels, known as intra-pixel variations, and satellite attitude jitter. We have measured the intra-pixel structure on an e2v 47-20 CCD and made simulations of the effects these structure...... will have on the photometry obtained with the COROT satellite. By analyzing these simulations we are able to develop tools for lowering these effects, not only on COROT but for other space missions as well, e.g. Kepler....

  10. STAR PIXEL detector mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, H H; Anderssen, E; Greiner, L; Matis, H S; Ritter, H G; Sun, X; Szelezniak, M

    2009-01-01

    A high resolution pixel detector is being designed for the STAR [1] experiment at RHIC. This device will use MAPS as the detector element and will have a pointing accuracy of ∼25 microns. We will be reporting on the mechanical design required to support this resolution. The radiation length of the first layer (∼0.3% X 0 ) and its distance from the interaction point (2.5 cm) determines the resolution. The design makes use of air cooling and thin carbon composite structures to limit the radiation length. The mechanics are being developed to achieve spatial calibrations and stability to 20 microns and to permit rapid detector replacement in event of radiation damage or other potential failures from operation near the beam.

  11. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo, J Scott; Boger, James K; Black, Wiley T; Bowers, David L; Fetrow, Matthew P

    2007-06-11

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or "dead pixels." These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data.

  12. Pixel readout chip for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ackers, M; Blanquart, L; Bonzom, V; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Delpierre, P A; Treis, J; Raith, B A; Wermes, N

    1999-01-01

    Pixel detectors with a high granularity and a very large number of sensitive elements (cells) are a very recent development used for high precision particle detection. At the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN (Geneva) a pixel detector with 1.4*10/sup 8/ individual pixel cells is developed for the ATLAS detector. The concept is a hybrid detector. Consisting of a pixel sensor connected to a pixel electronics chip by bump and flip chip technology in one-to-one cell correspondence. The development and prototype results of the pixel front end chip are presented together with the physical and technical requirements to be met at LHC. Lab measurements are reported. (6 refs).

  13. Development of pixellated Ir-TESs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zen, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kunieda, Yuichi; Dayanthi, Rathnayaka M.T.; Mori, Fumiakira; Fujita, Kaoru; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Fukuda, Daiji; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2006-01-01

    We have been developing Ir-based pixellated superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs). In the area of material or astronomical applications, the sensor with few eV energy resolution and over 1000 pixels imaging property is desired. In order to achieve this goal, we have been analyzing signals from pixellated TESs. In the case of a 20 pixel array of Ir-TESs, with 45 μmx45 μm pixel sizes, the incident X-ray signals have been classified into 16 groups. We have applied numerical signal analysis. On the one hand, the energy resolution of our pixellated TES is strongly degraded. However, using pulse shape analysis, we can dramatically improve the resolution. Thus, we consider that the pulse signal analysis will lead this device to be used as a practical photon incident position identifying TES

  14. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lantzsch, Kerstin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with new service quarter panels to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run 1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning, operation and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector will be presented.

  15. Unitary rotation and gyration of pixellated images on rectangular screens

    OpenAIRE

    Urzúa, Alejandro R.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    In the two space dimensions of screens in optical sy stems, rotations, gyrations, and fractional Fourier transformations form the Fourier subgroup of the symplectic group of linear canonical transformations: U(2) F $\\subset$ Sp(4,R). Here we study the action of this Fourier group on pixellated images within generic rectangular $N_x$ $\\times$ $N_y$ screens; its elements here compose properly and act unitarily, i.e., without loss of information.

  16. Design and realisation of integrated circuits for the readout of pixel sensors in high-energy physics and biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peric, I.

    2004-08-01

    Radiation tolerant pixel-readout chip for the ATLAS pixel detector has been designed, implemented in a deep-submicron CMOS technology and successfully tested. The chip contains readout-channels with complex analog and digital circuits. Chip for steering of the DEPFET active-pixel matrix has been implemented in a high-voltage CMOS technology. The chip contains channels which generate fast sequences of high-voltage signals. Detector containing this chip has been successfully tested. Pixel-readout test chip for an X-ray imaging pixel sensor has been designed, implemented in a CMOS technology and tested. Pixel-readout channels are able to simultaneously count the signals generated by passage of individual photons and to sum the total charge generated during exposure time. (orig.)

  17. CFD modeling of space-time evolution of fast pyrolysis products in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boateng, A.A.; Mtui, P.L.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed has been developed. In this study the unsteady constitutive transport equations for inert gas flow and decomposition kinetics were modeled using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT-12. The Eulerarian-Eulerian multiphase model system described herein is a fluidized bed of sand externally heated to a predetermined temperature prior to introduction of agricultural biomass. We predict the spontaneous emergence of pyrolysis vapors, char and non-condensable (permanent) gases and confirm the observation that the kinetics are fast and that bio-oil vapor evolution is accomplished in a few seconds, and occupying two-thirds of the spatial volume of the reactor as widely reported in the open literature. The model could be advantageous in the virtual design of fast pyrolysis reactors and their optimization to meet economic scales required for distributed or satellite units. - Highlights: ► We model the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed via CFD. ► We predict the spontaneous emergence of pyrolysis products. ► We confirm the experimental observation that the kinetics are fast. ► And that bio-oil vapor evolution is accomplished in a few seconds. ► The model is advantageous in the virtual design of fast pyrolysis reactors.

  18. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The bump-bonded silicon pixel detector, developed at CERN by the EP-MIC group, is shown here in its ceramic carrier. Both represent the ISPA-tube anode. The chip features between 1024 (called OMEGA-1) and 8196 (ALICE-1) active pixels.

  19. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS experiment for the operation at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider requires a new and more performant inner tracker, the ITk. The innermost part of this tracker will be built using silicon pixel detectors. This paper describes the ITk pixel project, which, after few years of design and test e ort, is now defined in detail.

  20. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost element of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  1. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschbuehl, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  2. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Marcisovsky, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  3. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector, therefore, in view of Run-2 of LHC, the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and an additional optical link per module was added to overcome in some layers the readout bandwidth limitation when LHC will exceed the nominal peak luminosity by almost a factor of 3. The key features and challenges met during the IBL project will be presented, as well as its operational experience and Pixel Detector performance in LHC.

  4. Urban Image Classification: Per-Pixel Classifiers, Sub-Pixel Analysis, Object-Based Image Analysis, and Geospatial Methods. 10; Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Soe W.; Mesev, Victor; Quattrochi, Dale; Wentz, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing methods used to generate base maps to analyze the urban environment rely predominantly on digital sensor data from space-borne platforms. This is due in part from new sources of high spatial resolution data covering the globe, a variety of multispectral and multitemporal sources, sophisticated statistical and geospatial methods, and compatibility with GIS data sources and methods. The goal of this chapter is to review the four groups of classification methods for digital sensor data from space-borne platforms; per-pixel, sub-pixel, object-based (spatial-based), and geospatial methods. Per-pixel methods are widely used methods that classify pixels into distinct categories based solely on the spectral and ancillary information within that pixel. They are used for simple calculations of environmental indices (e.g., NDVI) to sophisticated expert systems to assign urban land covers. Researchers recognize however, that even with the smallest pixel size the spectral information within a pixel is really a combination of multiple urban surfaces. Sub-pixel classification methods therefore aim to statistically quantify the mixture of surfaces to improve overall classification accuracy. While within pixel variations exist, there is also significant evidence that groups of nearby pixels have similar spectral information and therefore belong to the same classification category. Object-oriented methods have emerged that group pixels prior to classification based on spectral similarity and spatial proximity. Classification accuracy using object-based methods show significant success and promise for numerous urban 3 applications. Like the object-oriented methods that recognize the importance of spatial proximity, geospatial methods for urban mapping also utilize neighboring pixels in the classification process. The primary difference though is that geostatistical methods (e.g., spatial autocorrelation methods) are utilized during both the pre- and post

  5. Fast fitting of non-Gaussian state-space models to animal movement data via Template Model Builder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Whoriskey, Kim; Yurkowski, David

    2015-01-01

    recommend using the Laplace approximation combined with automatic differentiation (as implemented in the novel R package Template Model Builder; TMB) for the fast fitting of continuous-time multivariate non-Gaussian SSMs. Through Argos satellite tracking data, we demonstrate that the use of continuous...... are able to estimate additional parameters compared to previous methods, all without requiring a substantial increase in computational time. The model implementation is made available through the R package argosTrack....

  6. FED Firmware Interface Testing with Pixel Phase 1 Emulator

    CERN Document Server

    Kilpatrick, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    A hardware emulation of the CMS pixel detector phase 1 upgrade front-end electronics has been developed to test and validate the architecture of the back-end electronics (FED) firmware. The emulation is implemented on a Virtex 6 FPGA on the CERN GLIB uTCA platform, utilizing an 8-way SFP FPGA Mezzanine Card to drive compatible optical transmitters to the back-end electronics at \\mbox{400 Mbps}. The firmware emulates the complex functions of the phase 1 pixel readout chips (PSI46digv2 and PROC600) and token bit manager ASICs and allows for possible abnormalities that can occur in the output data stream. The emulation implements both fixed data patterns that are used as test vectors and realistic simulated data to drive the readout of the FED at the expected data and trigger rates. Testing software was developed to control the emulator and verify correct transmission of data and exception handling in the FED. An installation has been integrated into the pixel DAQ test system at CMS to be used for fast validatio...

  7. FED firmware interface testing with pixel phase 1 emulator

    CERN Document Server

    Kilpatrick, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    A hardware emulation of the CMS pixel detector phase 1 upgrade front-end electronics has been developed to test and validate the architecture of the back-end electronics (FED) firmware. The emulation is implemented on a Virtex 6 FPGA on the CERN GLIB uTCA platform, utilizing an 8-way SFP FPGA Mezzanine Card to drive compatible optical transmitters to the back-end electronics at 400 bps. The firmware emulates the complex functions of the phase 1 pixel readout chips (PSI46digv2 and PROC600) and token bit manager ASICs and allows for possible abnormalities that can occur in the output data stream. The emulation implements both fixed data patterns that are used as test vectors and realistic simulated data to drive the readout of the FED at the expected data and trigger rates. Testing software was developed to control the emulator and verify correct transmission of data and exception handling in the FED. An installation has been integrated into the pixel DAQ test system at CMS to be used for fast validation of F...

  8. CMOS pixel development for the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldi, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the rate and radiation environment expected at the HL-LHC new approaches are being developed on CMOS pixel detectors, providing charge collection in a depleted layer. They are based on: HV enabling technologies that allow to use high depletion voltages, high resistivity wafers for large depletion depths; radiation hard processed with multiple nested wells to allow CMOS electronics embedded with sufficient shielding into the sensor substrate and backside processing and thinning for material minimization and backside voltage application. Since 2014, members of more than 20 groups in the ATLAS experiment are actively pursuing CMOS pixel R$\\&$D in an ATLAS Demonstrator program pursuing sensor design and characterizations. The goal of this program is to demonstrate that depleted CMOS pixels are suited for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at LHC. For this a number of technologies have been explored and characterized. In this presentation the challenges for the usage of CMOS pixel...

  9. Maximum likelihood pixel labeling using a spatially variant finite mixture model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, S.S.; Hebert, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a spatially-variant mixture model for pixel labeling. Based on this spatially-variant mixture model we derive an expectation maximization algorithm for maximum likelihood estimation of the pixel labels. While most algorithms using mixture models entail the subsequent use of a Bayes classifier for pixel labeling, the proposed algorithm yields maximum likelihood estimates of the labels themselves and results in unambiguous pixel labels. The proposed algorithm is fast, robust, easy to implement, flexible in that it can be applied to any arbitrary image data where the number of classes is known and, most importantly, obviates the need for an explicit labeling rule. The algorithm is evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively on simulated data and on clinical magnetic resonance images of the human brain

  10. Performance of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope for Luminosity Measurement at CMS during Run2

    CERN Document Server

    Lujan, Paul Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a dedicated system for luminosity measurement at the CMS experiment using silicon pixel sensors arranged into telescopes, each consisting of three sensor planes. It was installed in CMS at the beginning of 2015 and has been providing online and offline luminosity measurements throughout Run 2 of the LHC. The online bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement employs the fast-or capability of the pixel readout chip to identify events where a hit is registered in all three sensors in a telescope, corresponding primarily to tracks originating from the interaction point. In addition, the full pixel information is read out at a lower rate, allowing for the calculation of corrections to the online luminosity from effects such as the miscounting of tracks not originating from the interaction point and detector efficiency. This paper presents results from the 2016 running of the PLT, including commissioning and operational history, luminosity calibration using Van der Meer scans, and...

  11. Performance of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope for Luminosity Measurement at CMS during Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a dedicated system for luminosity measurement at the CMS experiment using silicon pixel sensors arranged into "telescopes", each consisting of three planes. It was installed during LS1 at the beginning of 2015 and has been providing online and offline luminosity measurements throughout Run 2. The online bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement employs the "fast-or" capability of the pixel readout chip (PSI46) to identify events where a hit is registered in all three sensors in a telescope corresponding primarily to tracks originating from the interaction point. In addition, the full pixel information is read out at a lower rate, allowing for the calculation of corrections to the online luminosity from effects such as the miscounting of tracks not originating from the interaction point and detector efficiency. In this talk, we will present results from 2016 running and preliminary 2017 results, including commissioning and operational history, luminosity calibration using Va...

  12. Fast neutron irradiation tests of flash memories used in space environment at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Paccagnella, A.; Bagatin, M.; Gerardin, S.; Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Picozza, P.; Gorini, G.; Mancini, R.; Sarno, M.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a neutron accelerated study of soft errors in advanced electronic devices used in space missions, i.e. Flash memories performed at the ChipIr and VESUVIO beam lines at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The two neutron beam lines are set up to mimic the space environment spectra and allow neutron irradiation tests on Flash memories in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV and up to 800 MeV. The ISIS neutron energy spectrum is similar to the one occurring in the atmospheric as well as in space and planetary environments, with intensity enhancements varying in the range 108- 10 9 and 106- 10 7 respectively. Such conditions are suitable for the characterization of the atmospheric, space and planetary neutron radiation environments, and are directly applicable for accelerated tests of electronic components as demonstrated here in benchmark measurements performed on flash memories.

  13. Comet Hitchhiker: Harvesting Kinetic Energy from Small Bodies to Enable Fast and Low-Cost Deep Space Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This idea can be intuitively understood by the analogy of fishing. Imagine a fisherman on a small boat tries to catch a big fish that runs at a high relative speed....

  14. Fast neutron irradiation tests of flash memories used in space environment at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andreani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a neutron accelerated study of soft errors in advanced electronic devices used in space missions, i.e. Flash memories performed at the ChipIr and VESUVIO beam lines at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The two neutron beam lines are set up to mimic the space environment spectra and allow neutron irradiation tests on Flash memories in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV and up to 800 MeV. The ISIS neutron energy spectrum is similar to the one occurring in the atmospheric as well as in space and planetary environments, with intensity enhancements varying in the range 108- 10 9 and 106- 10 7 respectively. Such conditions are suitable for the characterization of the atmospheric, space and planetary neutron radiation environments, and are directly applicable for accelerated tests of electronic components as demonstrated here in benchmark measurements performed on flash memories.

  15. Comet Hitchhiker: Harvesting Kinetic Energy from Small Bodies to Enable Fast and Low-Cost Deep Space Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This idea can be intuitively understood by the analogy of fishing. Imagine a fisherman on a small boat tries to catch a big fish that runs at a high relative speed....

  16. Multi-camera intelligent space for a robust, fast and easy deployment of proactive robots in complex and dynamic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Canedo Rodríguez, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    One of the current challenges in robotics is the integration of robots in everyday environments. However, it is difficult to achieve this with stand-alone robots that use only the information provided by their own sensors (on-board sensors). In this thesis, we will explore the use of intelligent spaces (i.e. spaces where many sensors and intelligent devices are distributed and which provide information to the robot), to get robots operating in complex environments in a short perio...

  17. Interactive remote data processing using Pixelize Wavelet Filtration (PWF-method) and PeriodMap analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sych, Robert; Nakariakov, Valery; Anfinogentov, Sergey

    Wavelet analysis is suitable for investigating waves and oscillating in solar atmosphere, which are limited in both time and frequency. We have developed an algorithms to detect this waves by use the Pixelize Wavelet Filtration (PWF-method). This method allows to obtain information about the presence of propagating and non-propagating waves in the data observation (cube images), and localize them precisely in time as well in space. We tested the algorithm and found that the results of coronal waves detection are consistent with those obtained by visual inspection. For fast exploration of the data cube, in addition, we applied early-developed Period- Map analysis. This method based on the Fast Fourier Transform and allows on initial stage quickly to look for "hot" regions with the peak harmonic oscillations and determine spatial distribution at the significant harmonics. We propose the detection procedure of coronal waves separate on two parts: at the first part, we apply the PeriodMap analysis (fast preparation) and than, at the second part, use information about spatial distribution of oscillation sources to apply the PWF-method (slow preparation). There are two possible algorithms working with the data: in automatic and hands-on operation mode. Firstly we use multiply PWF analysis as a preparation narrowband maps at frequency subbands multiply two and/or harmonic PWF analysis for separate harmonics in a spectrum. Secondly we manually select necessary spectral subband and temporal interval and than construct narrowband maps. For practical implementation of the proposed methods, we have developed the remote data processing system at Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Irkutsk. The system based on the data processing server - http://pwf.iszf.irk.ru. The main aim of this resource is calculation in remote access through the local and/or global network (Internet) narrowband maps of wave's sources both in whole spectral band and at significant harmonics. In addition

  18. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  19. Pixel detectors from fundamentals to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Leonardo; Rohe, Tilman; Wermes, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Pixel detectors are a particularly important class of particle and radiation detection devices. They have an extremely broad spectrum of applications, ranging from high-energy physics to the photo cameras of everyday life. This book is a general purpose introduction into the fundamental principles of pixel detector technology and semiconductor-based hybrid pixel devices. Although these devices were developed for high-energy ionizing particles and radiation beyond visible light, they are finding new applications in many other areas. This book will therefore benefit all scientists and engineers working in any laboratory involved in developing or using particle detection.

  20. LISe pixel detector for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Brenden [Technology Development, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Milburn, Rob [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Burger, Arnold [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Life and Physical Sciences, Fisk University, Nashville, TN (United States); Bilheux, Hassina [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Santodonato, Louis [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chvala, Ondrej [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stowe, Ashley [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Technology Development, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Lukosi, Eric, E-mail: elukosi@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Semiconducting lithium indium diselenide, {sup 6}LiInSe{sub 2} or LISe, has promising characteristics for neutron detection applications. The 95% isotopic enrichment of {sup 6}Li results in a highly efficient thermal neutron-sensitive material. In this study, we report on a proof-of-principle investigation of a semiconducting LISe pixel detector to demonstrate its potential as an efficient neutron imager. The LISe pixel detector had a 4×4 of pixels with a 550 µm pitch on a 5×5×0.56 mm{sup 3} LISe substrate. An experimentally verified spatial resolution of 300 µm was observed utilizing a super-sampling technique.

  1. Hardware solutions for the 65k pixel X-ray camera module of 75 μm pixel size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinski, K.; Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Koziol, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present three hardware solutions designed for a detector module built with a 2 cm × 2 cm hybrid pixel detector built from a single 320 or 450 μ m thick silicon sensor designed and fabricated by Hamamatsu and two UFXC32k readout integrated circuits (128 × 256 pixels with 75μ m pitch, designed in CMOS 130 nm at AGH-UST). The chips work in a single photon counting mode and provide ultra-fast X-ray imaging. The presented hardware modules are designed according to requirements of various tests and applications: ṡDevice A: a fast and flexible system for tests with various radiation sources. ṡDevice B: a standalone, all-in-one imaging device providing three standard interfaces (USB 2.0, Ethernet, Camera Link) and up to 640 MB/s bandwidth. ṡDevice C: a prototype large-area imaging system. The paper shows the readout system structure for each case with highlighted circuit board designs with details on power distribution and cooling on both FR4 and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) based circuits.

  2. Performance of ATLAS pixel detector prototype modules

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, A

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS silicon pixel detector is the innermost tracking device of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC consisting of more than 1600 modules for a total sensitive area of about 1.5m**2 and over 70 million pixel cells. The concept is a hybrid of FE-chips bump bonded to the pixel sensor. The elementary pixel cell has 50mum multiplied by 400mum size. Pulse height measurement is provided by the time over threshold technique. The main issue in the design is the radiation hardness of both the sensitive detector and the readout electronics. Assemblies of readout electronics in deep sub-micron technology and oxygenated silicon sensor have been irradiated up to a fluence of 10 **1**5n//e //q/cm**2 and a dose of 60Mrad. The resolution, charge collection and efficiency have been measured in test beams.

  3. Hybrid pixel detector development for medical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midgley, S.; Berry, A.; Benci, N.; Morton, S.; Phillips, D.; Smith, P.; Troja, S.; Lewis, R.

    2007-01-01

    A 7-year project has been initiated to develop hybrid pixel detectors for medical radiography. Crystalline semiconductor will be bonded to a pixellated readout chip where individual integrated circuits process each event, transferring the position, energy and timing information to the data acquisition controller. Chips will be tiled to produce a large area detector, capable of energy dispersive photon counting at moderate spatial resolution. Preliminary results from studies examining the design features and operation of the device are presented

  4. Charge sharing in silicon pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieson, K; Seller, P; Prydderch, M L; O'Shea, V; Bates, R L; Smith, K M; Rahman, M

    2002-01-01

    We used a pixellated hybrid silicon X-ray detector to study the effect of the sharing of generated charge between neighbouring pixels over a range of incident X-ray energies, 13-36 keV. The system is a room temperature, energy resolving detector with a Gaussian FWHM of 265 eV at 5.9 keV. Each pixel is 300 mu m square, 300 mu m deep and is bump bonded to matching read out electronics. The modelling packages MEDICI and MCNP were used to model the complete X-ray interaction and the subsequent charge transport. Using this software a model is developed which reproduces well the experimental results. The simulations are then altered to explore smaller pixel sizes and different X-ray energies. Charge sharing was observed experimentally to be 2% at 13 keV rising to 4.5% at 36 keV, for an energy threshold of 4 keV. The models predict that up to 50% of charge may be lost to the neighbouring pixels, for an X-ray energy of 36 keV, when the pixel size is reduced to 55 mu m.

  5. Charge sharing in silicon pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieson, K.; Passmore, M.S.; Seller, P.; Prydderch, M.L.; O'Shea, V.; Bates, R.L.; Smith, K.M.; Rahman, M.

    2002-01-01

    We used a pixellated hybrid silicon X-ray detector to study the effect of the sharing of generated charge between neighbouring pixels over a range of incident X-ray energies, 13-36 keV. The system is a room temperature, energy resolving detector with a Gaussian FWHM of 265 eV at 5.9 keV. Each pixel is 300 μm square, 300 μm deep and is bump bonded to matching read out electronics. The modelling packages MEDICI and MCNP were used to model the complete X-ray interaction and the subsequent charge transport. Using this software a model is developed which reproduces well the experimental results. The simulations are then altered to explore smaller pixel sizes and different X-ray energies. Charge sharing was observed experimentally to be 2% at 13 keV rising to 4.5% at 36 keV, for an energy threshold of 4 keV. The models predict that up to 50% of charge may be lost to the neighbouring pixels, for an X-ray energy of 36 keV, when the pixel size is reduced to 55 μm

  6. First Light with a 67-Million-Pixel WFI Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    the currently planned, new wide-field telescopes. The FIERA CCD controller The entire detector array of the WFI can be read out in only 27 seconds. Since one WFI image contains 0.14 Gbytes of data, this corresponds to the reading of a book at a rate of almost 1000 pages per second! Even for the most powerful PC's presently available, this can be a real challenge. However, much more remarkable is that FIERA , the high-tech CCD controller developed by ESO engineers, sustains this speed without adding noise or artifacts that exceed the extremely faint signal from the night-sky background on a moonless night at a completely dark site such as La Silla. In addition to the eight large CCD's of the mosaic, FIERA simultaneously commands a ninth CCD of the same type in which a small window centered on a bright star is read out continuously, up to 2 times every second. The fast-rate measurement of the instantaneous position of the star enables the telescope control system to track very accurately the apparent motion of the observed field in the sky so that the images remain perfectly sharp, even during long exposures. Future survey work at ESO In terms of bytes, it is expected that the WFI alone will acquire more observational data than all the rest of the La Silla Observatory and the UT1 of the VLT on Paranal together! This impressively illustrates the ever-accelerating pace at which astronomical facilities are developing. In the meantime, a Dutch/German/Italian consortium is preparing for the construction of the successor to WFI camera. The OmegaCam will have no less than 16,000 x 16,000 pixels and the field-of-view is four times as large, one square degree. It will be attached to the 2.6-m VLT Survey Telescope (VST) to be installed jointly by OAC and ESO on Paranal at the end of the year 2001. Note: [1]: Some technical details of the new camera: The WFI field-of-view measures 0.54 x 0.54 deg 2 (32.4 x 32.4 arcmin 2 ) and the image scale is 0.24 arcsec/pixel. An advanced

  7. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  8. Status of the CMS Phase 1 Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Mattig, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system, providing high precision space point measurements of charged particle trajectories. Before 2018 the instantaneous luminosity of the LHC is expected to reach 2\\,$\\times 10^{34}\\,{\\rm cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$, which will significantly increase the number of interactions per bunch crossing. The current pixel detector of CMS was not designed to work efficiently in such a high occupancy environment and will be degraded by substantial data-loss introduced by buffer filling in the analog Read-Out Chip (ROC) and effects of radiation damage in the sensors, built up over the operational period. To maintain a high tracking efficiency, CMS has planned to replace the current pixel system during ``Phase 1'' (2016/17) by a new lightweight detector, equipped with an additional 4th layer in the barrel, and one additional forward/backward disk. A new digital ROC has been designed, with increased buffers to minimize data-loss, and a digital read-out protoc...

  9. USING BLOCKS OF SKEWERS FOR FASTER COMPUTATION OF PIXEL PURITY INDEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. THEILER; D. LAVENIER; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    The pixel purity index (PPI) algorithm proposed by Boardman, et al.1 identifies potential endmember pixels in multispectral imagery. The algorithm generates a large number of skewers (unit vectors in random directions), and then computes the dot product of each skewer with each pixel. The PPI is incremented for those pixels associated with the extreme values of the dot products. A small number of pixels (a subset of those with the largest PPI values) are selected as pure and the rest of the pixels in the image are expressed as linear mixtures of these pure endmembers. This provides a convenient and physically-motivated decomposition of the image in terms of a relatively few components. We report on a variant of the PPI algorithm in which blocks of B skewers are considered at a time. From the computation of B dot products, one can produce a much larger set of derived dot products that are associated with skewers that are linear combinations of the original B skewers. Since the derived dot products involve only scalar operations, instead of full vector dot products, they can be very cheaply computed. We will also discuss a hardware implementation on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) processor both of the original PPI algorithm and of the block-skewer approach. We will furthermore discuss the use of fast PPI as a front-end to more sophisticated algorithms for selecting the actual endmembers.

  10. The high dynamic range pixel array detector (HDR-PAD): Concept and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanks, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Weiss, Joel T.; Becker, Julian; Tate, Mark W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Experiments at storage ring light sources as well as at next-generation light sources increasingly require detectors capable of high dynamic range operation, combining low-noise detection of single photons with large pixel well depth. XFEL sources in particular provide pulse intensities sufficiently high that a purely photon-counting approach is impractical. The High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector (HDR-PAD) project aims to provide a dynamic range extending from single-photon sensitivity to 10{sup 6} photons/pixel in a single XFEL pulse while maintaining the ability to tolerate a sustained flux of 10{sup 11} ph/s/pixel at a storage ring source. Achieving these goals involves the development of fast pixel front-end electronics as well as, in the XFEL case, leveraging the delayed charge collection due to plasma effects in the sensor. A first prototype of essential electronic components of the HDR-PAD readout ASIC, exploring different options for the pixel front-end, has been fabricated. Here, the HDR-PAD concept and preliminary design will be described.

  11. All-passive pixel super-resolution of time-stretch imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Antony C. S.; Ng, Ho-Cheung; Bogaraju, Sharat C. V.; So, Hayden K. H.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2017-03-01

    Based on image encoding in a serial-temporal format, optical time-stretch imaging entails a stringent requirement of state-of-the-art fast data acquisition unit in order to preserve high image resolution at an ultrahigh frame rate — hampering the widespread utilities of such technology. Here, we propose a pixel super-resolution (pixel-SR) technique tailored for time-stretch imaging that preserves pixel resolution at a relaxed sampling rate. It harnesses the subpixel shifts between image frames inherently introduced by asynchronous digital sampling of the continuous time-stretch imaging process. Precise pixel registration is thus accomplished without any active opto-mechanical subpixel-shift control or other additional hardware. Here, we present the experimental pixel-SR image reconstruction pipeline that restores high-resolution time-stretch images of microparticles and biological cells (phytoplankton) at a relaxed sampling rate (≈2-5 GSa/s)—more than four times lower than the originally required readout rate (20 GSa/s) — is thus effective for high-throughput label-free, morphology-based cellular classification down to single-cell precision. Upon integration with the high-throughput image processing technology, this pixel-SR time-stretch imaging technique represents a cost-effective and practical solution for large scale cell-based phenotypic screening in biomedical diagnosis and machine vision for quality control in manufacturing.

  12. Timing performance of pixellated CdZnTe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrami, R.; Shami, G.; Hefetz, Y.; Pansky, A.; Wainer, N.

    1999-01-01

    Recently introduced nuclear medicine cameras in which Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and the traditional Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT), are combined opened new horizon for the nuclear medicine field These systems applying NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors we very well tested and mailable for some time in the medical imaging field However the traditional NaI(Tl) cameras, optimized for low energy radiation imaging, suffer some severe limitations. The relatively low density (3.67 g/cm 2 ) of NaI(Tl) limits the sensitivity. By incarcerating the NaI(Tl) thickness, the spatial resolution decreases. The long decay time (230 nsec) of the light emitted in NaI(Tl) restricts the the use of coincidence technique , as well as the count rate. In recent years CdZn Te (CZT) detectors are studied for the purpose of SPECT nuclear medical radiation imaging in the form of pixellated and microstrip detectors. CZT detector can served as a good candidate for replacing NaI(Tl) for PET and SPECT imaging due to their relatively high stopping power (density = (6.0 g/im 3 , high Z(48, 30, 52)) and their high count rate capability. Unfortunately there are several difficulties in PET application due to the difficulty in manufacturing thick crystals, registration of the full energy deposited in several pixels and their timing capabilities. The latter is due to large ballistic signal variation induced. This variations caused by the pulse shape, which is composed of two main components, the electron and the hole. The electrons travel about ten times faster than the holes. A photon absorbed clear the cathode plane will cause a large and fast signal induced by the electron and a small and slow signal induced due to the holes. Photons absorbed near the anode plane will induce the opposite signals. The distribution of photon absorption depth in the crystal causes signal splits over a number of pixels, due to the well-known 'small pixel effect'. The different pulses slope

  13. MCBooster: a library for fast Monte Carlo generation of phase-space decays on massively parallel platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Júnior, A. A.; Sokoloff, M. D.

    2017-10-01

    MCBooster is a header-only, C++11-compliant library that provides routines to generate and perform calculations on large samples of phase space Monte Carlo events. To achieve superior performance, MCBooster is capable to perform most of its calculations in parallel using CUDA- and OpenMP-enabled devices. MCBooster is built on top of the Thrust library and runs on Linux systems. This contribution summarizes the main features of MCBooster. A basic description of the user interface and some examples of applications are provided, along with measurements of performance in a variety of environments

  14. Flow tests of a single fuel element coolant channel for a compact fast reactor for space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springborn, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Water flow tests were conducted on a single-fuel-element cooling channel for a nuclear concept to be used for space power. The tests established a method for measuring coolant flow rate which is applicable to water flow testing of a complete mockup of the reference reactor. The inlet plenum-to-outlet plenum pressure drop, which approximates the overall core pressure drop, was measured and correlated with flow rate. This information can be used for reactor coolant flow and heat transfer calculations. An analytical study of the flow characteristics was also conducted.

  15. The Subaru FMOS galaxy redshift survey (FastSound). IV. New constraint on gravity theory from redshift space distortions at z ˜ 1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Teppei; Hikage, Chiaki; Totani, Tomonori; Tonegawa, Motonari; Okada, Hiroyuki; Glazebrook, Karl; Blake, Chris; Ferreira, Pedro G.; More, Surhud; Taruya, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Akiyama, Masayuki; Dalton, Gavin; Goto, Tomotsugu; Ishikawa, Takashi; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Matsubara, Takahiko; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Ohta, Kouji; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Takato, Naruhisa; Tamura, Naoyuki; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We measure the redshift-space correlation function from a spectroscopic sample of 2783 emission line galaxies from the FastSound survey. The survey, which uses the Subaru Telescope and covers a redshift range of 1.19 parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight and its quadrupole moment. RSD has been extensively used to test general relativity on cosmological scales at z < 1. Adopting a ΛCDM cosmology with the fixed expansion history and no velocity dispersion (σv = 0), and using the RSD measurements on scales above 8 h-1 Mpc, we obtain the first constraint on the growth rate at the redshift, f (z)σ8(z) = 0.482 ± 0.116 at z ˜ 1.4 after marginalizing over the galaxy bias parameter b(z)σ8(z). This corresponds to 4.2 σ detection of RSD. Our constraint is consistent with the prediction of general relativity fσ8 ˜ 0.392 within the 1 σ confidence level. When we allow σv to vary and marginalize over it, the growth rate constraint becomes fσ _8=0.494^{+0.126}_{-0.120}. We also demonstrate that by combining with the low-z constraints on fσ8, high-z galaxy surveys like the FastSound can be useful to distinguish modified gravity models without relying on CMB anisotropy experiments.

  16. LBA-ECO LC-02 GOES-08 Hot Pixel Data from Acre, Brazil: 1998, 2000, and 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires that were detected by the GOES-8 satellite for the state of Acre, Brazil. Image data were collected...

  17. LBA-ECO LC-02 GOES-08 Hot Pixel Data from Acre, Brazil: 1998, 2000, and 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires that were detected by the GOES-8 satellite for the state of Acre, Brazil. Image data were...

  18. LBA-ECO LC-02 Hot Pixel Fire Indicator Data for Tri-national MAP Region: 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires, that were detected by various satellites in the tri-national MAP region (Madre de Dios-Peru,...

  19. LBA-ECO LC-02 Hot Pixel Fire Indicator Data for Tri-national MAP Region: 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires, that were detected by various satellites in the tri-national MAP region (Madre de...

  20. OMI/Aura Global Ground Pixel Corners 1-Orbit L2 Swath 13x24km V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Version-3 Aura/OMI Pixel Corner Product, OMPIXCOR, is now available from the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)for the...

  1. Spatial clustering of pixels of a multispectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-08-19

    A method and system for clustering the pixels of a multispectral image is provided. A clustering system computes a maximum spectral similarity score for each pixel that indicates the similarity between that pixel and the most similar neighboring. To determine the maximum similarity score for a pixel, the clustering system generates a similarity score between that pixel and each of its neighboring pixels and then selects the similarity score that represents the highest similarity as the maximum similarity score. The clustering system may apply a filtering criterion based on the maximum similarity score so that pixels with similarity scores below a minimum threshold are not clustered. The clustering system changes the current pixel values of the pixels in a cluster based on an averaging of the original pixel values of the pixels in the cluster.

  2. Geometry optimization of a barrel silicon pixelated tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Yuan; Wang, Meng; Winter, Marc

    2017-08-01

    We have studied optimization of the design of a barrel-shaped pixelated tracker for given spatial boundaries. The optimization includes choice of number of layers and layer spacing. Focusing on tracking performance only, momentum resolution is chosen as the figure of merit. The layer spacing is studied based on Gluckstern’s method and a numerical geometry scan of all possible tracker layouts. A formula to give the optimal geometry for curvature measurement is derived in the case of negligible multiple scattering to deal with trajectories of very high momentum particles. The result is validated by a numerical scan method, which could also be implemented with any track fitting algorithm involving material effects, to search for the optimal layer spacing and to determine the total number of layers for the momentum range of interest under the same magnetic field. The geometry optimization of an inner silicon pixel tracker proposed for BESIII is also studied by using a numerical scan and these results are compared with Geant4-based simulations. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232202)

  3. Radial lens distortion correction with sub-pixel accuracy for X-ray micro-tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nghia T; Atwood, Robert C; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-12-14

    Distortion correction or camera calibration for an imaging system which is highly configurable and requires frequent disassembly for maintenance or replacement of parts needs a speedy method for recalibration. Here we present direct techniques for calculating distortion parameters of a non-linear model based on the correct determination of the center of distortion. These techniques are fast, very easy to implement, and accurate at sub-pixel level. The implementation at the X-ray tomography system of the I12 beamline, Diamond Light Source, which strictly requires sub-pixel accuracy, shows excellent performance in the calibration image and in the reconstructed images.

  4. Current Status of the Pixel Phase I Upgrade in CMS: Barrel Module Production

    CERN Document Server

    Bartek, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system, providing high precision space point measurements of charged particle trajectories. Before 2018 the instantaneous luminosity of the LHC is expected to reach about 2~x~$10^{34}~\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$, which will significantly increase the number of interactions per bunch crossing. To maintain a high tracking efficiency, CMS has planned to replace the current pixel system during phase I by a new lightweight detector, equipped with an additional 4th layer in the barrel, and one additional forward/backward disk. The present status of barrel modules production will be presented, including preliminary results from tests on the first production pixel modules of the new pixel tracker.

  5. Module Production and Qualification for the Phase I Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086689

    2015-01-01

    After consolidation of the LHC in 2013/14 its centre-of-mass energy will increase to 13TeV and the luminosity will reach $2 \\cdot 10^{34}\\, \\textnormal{cm}^{-2} \\textnormal{s}^{-1}$, which is twice the design luminosity. The latter will result in more simultaneous particle collisions, which would significantly increase the dead time of the current readout chip of the CMS pixel detector. Therefore the entire CMS pixel detector is replaced in 2016/17 and a new digital readout with larger buffers will be used to handle increasing pixel hit rates. An additional fourth barrel-layer provides more space points to improve track reconstruction. Half of the required modules for layer four is being produced at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). This poster deals with the smallest discrete subunit of the pixel detector, the module and its assembly process. Moreover first production experience will be shown.

  6. Model simulations of line-of-sight effects in airglow imaging of acoustic and fast gravity waves from ground and space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Guerrero, J.; Snively, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    Acoustic waves (AWs) have been predicted to be detectable by imaging systems for the OH airglow layer [Snively, GRL, 40, 2013], and have been identified in spectrometer data [Pilger et al., JASP, 104, 2013]. AWs are weak in the mesopause region, but can attain large amplitudes in the F region [Garcia et al., GRL, 40, 2013] and have local impacts on the thermosphere and ionosphere. Similarly, fast GWs, with phase speeds over 100 m/s, may propagate to the thermosphere and impart significant local body forcing [Vadas and Fritts, JASTP, 66, 2004]. Both have been clearly identified in ionospheric total electron content (TEC), such as following the 2013 Moore, OK, EF5 tornado [Nishioka et al., GRL, 40, 2013] and following the 2011 Tohoku-Oki tsunami [e.g., Galvan et al., RS, 47, 2012, and references therein], but AWs have yet to be unambiguously imaged in MLT data and fast GWs have low amplitudes near the threshold of detection; nevertheless, recent imaging systems have sufficient spatial and temporal resolution and sensitivity to detect both AWs and fast GWs with short periods [e.g., Pautet et al., AO, 53, 2014]. The associated detectability challenges are related to the transient nature of their signatures and to systematic challenges due to line-of-sight (LOS) effects such as enhancements and cancelations due to integration along aligned or oblique wavefronts and geometric intensity enhancements. We employ a simulated airglow imager framework that incorporates 2D and 3D emission rate data and performs the necessary LOS integrations for synthetic imaging from ground- and space-based platforms to assess relative intensity and temperature perturbations. We simulate acoustic and fast gravity wave perturbations to the hydroxyl layer from a nonlinear, compressible model [e.g., Snively, 2013] for different idealized and realistic test cases. The results show clear signal enhancements when acoustic waves are imaged off-zenith or off-nadir and the temporal evolution of these

  7. Performance of 4096 pixel photon counting chip

    CERN Document Server

    Bisogni, M G; Conti, M; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Heijne, Erik H M; Maestro, P; Magistrati, G; Marzulli, V M; Meddeler, G; Mikulec, B; Pernigotti, E; Rosso, V; Schwarz, C; Snoeys, W; Stumbo, S; Watt, J

    1998-01-01

    A 4096 pixel Photon Counting Chip (PCC) has been developed and tested. It is aimed primarily at medical imaging although it can be used for other applications involving particle counting. The readout chip consists of a matrix of 64 x 64 identical square pixels, whose side measures 170 mm and is bump-bonded to a similar matrix of GaAs or Si pixel diodes covering a sensitive area of 1.18 cm . The electronics in each cell comprises a preamplifier, a discriminator with variable threshold and a 3-bit threshold tune as well as 15-bit counter. Each pixel can be individually addressed for electrical test or masked during acquisition. A shutter allows for switching between the counting and the readout modes and the use of a static logic in the counter enables long data taking periods. Electrical tests of the chip have shown a maximum counting rate of up to 2 MHz in each pixel. The minimum reachable threshold is 1400 e with a variation of 350 e rms that can be reduced to 80 e rms after tuning with the 3-bit adjustment....

  8. X-ray pixel detector for crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Delpierre, P A; Blanquart, L; Caillot, B; Clemens, J C; Mouget, C

    2001-01-01

    For X-ray diffraction experiments, the required dynamic range is a challenge. The signal ranges usually over more than six orders of magnitude. To meet this requirement and to reduce the readout time with respect to the commonly used charge-coupled device camera, a dedicated hybrid pixel detector is under development. We have designed a new counting chip with pixel size of 330 mu m. The expected counting rate per pixel is 10/sup 7/ ph/s, and a continuous readout with time stamping will allow a dynamic range for up to 4*10 /sup 9/ (16-bit counter in each pixel and 16-bit counter per pixel in the readout boards). This chip has been submitted for fabrication and is under test. First results of this chip will be presented. As a first step, a small detector (4*1.6 cm/sup 2/) is being built, using a DELPHI(LEP/CERN) silicon array of diodes, which have good efficiency for collecting X-rays between 5 and 25 keV. After the electrical tests, the performance of this X-ray detector will be measured in the ESRF-D2AM beam ...

  9. X-ray pixel detector for crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Delpierre, P A; Blanquart, L; Caillot, B; Clemens, J C; Mouget, C

    2000-01-01

    For X-rays diffraction experiments, the required dynamic is a challenge. The signal ranges usually over more than six orders of magnitude. To meet this requirement and to reduce the readout time with respect to the commonly used CCD camera a dedicated hybrid pixel detector is under fabrication. We have designed a new counting chip with pixel sizes of 330 mu m. The expected counting rate per pixel is 10/sup 7/ ph/s and a continuous readout with time stamping-will allow for up to 4*10/sup 9/ dynamics range (16-bit counter in each pixel and 16-bit counter per pixel in the readout boards). This chip has been submitted for fabrication and it is under test. We will show first results. As a first step a small detector (4* 1.6 cm/sup 2/) is being built, using a DELPHI (LEP/CERN) Si array of diodes which have good efficiency for collecting X-rays between 5 and 25 keV. After the electrical tests, the performances of this X-ray detector will be measured in the ESRF-D2AM beam line (Grenoble, France), scheduled in next De...

  10. PIXEL PATTERN BASED STEGANOGRAPHY ON IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rejani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the drawback of most of the existing steganography methods is that it alters the bits used for storing color information. Some of the examples include LSB or MSB based steganography. There are also various existing methods like Dynamic RGB Intensity Based Steganography Scheme, Secure RGB Image Steganography from Pixel Indicator to Triple Algorithm etc that can be used to find out the steganography method used and break it. Another drawback of the existing methods is that it adds noise to the image which makes the image look dull or grainy making it suspicious for a person about existence of a hidden message within the image. To overcome these shortcomings we have come up with a pixel pattern based steganography which involved hiding the message within in image by using the existing RGB values whenever possible at pixel level or with minimum changes. Along with the image a key will also be used to decrypt the message stored at pixel levels. For further protection, both the message stored as well as the key file will be in encrypted format which can have same or different keys or decryption. Hence we call it as a RGB pixel pattern based steganography.

  11. Fast Optimal Motion Planning

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computationally-efficient, fast and real-time, and provably-optimal motion planner for systems with highly nonlinear dynamics that can be extended for cooperative...

  12. Spectroscopic quantum imaging using pixel-level ADCS in Semiconductor-based Hybrid pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    San Segundo Bello, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the design of a microelectronic system that can be used to build a spectroscopic imaging system, in particular a spectroscopic quantum imaging using pixel-level ADCs in semiconductor-based hybrid pixel detectors. In such a system the signal generated in the sensor by a photon

  13. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  14. Dense Iterative Contextual Pixel Classification using Kriging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; Loog, Marco; Brandt, Sami

    2009-01-01

    have been proposed to this end, e.g., iterative contextual pixel classification, iterated conditional modes, and other approaches related to Markov random fields. A problem of these methods, however, is their computational complexity, especially when dealing with high-resolution images in which......In medical applications, segmentation has become an ever more important task. One of the competitive schemes to perform such segmentation is by means of pixel classification. Simple pixel-based classification schemes can be improved by incorporating contextual label information. Various methods...... relatively long range interactions may play a role. We propose a new method based on Kriging that makes it possible to include such long range interactions, while keeping the computations manageable when dealing with large medical images....

  15. A 128 pixel linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, L. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gomez, F. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: faustgr@usc.es; Iglesias, A. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lobato, R. [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, 15706 Santiago (Spain); Marin, J. [CIEMAT, Laboratorio de Electronica y Automatica, 28040 Madrid Spain (Spain); Mosquera, J. [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, 15706 Santiago (Spain); Pardo, J. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: juanpm@usc.es; Pazos, A. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pena, J. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pombar, M. [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, 15706 Santiago (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Saavedra, D. [Universidade da Coruna, Dpto. de Enxeneria Industrial II, 15403 Ferrol Spain (Spain); Sendon, J. [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, 15706 Santiago (Spain); Yanez, A. [Universidade da Coruna, Dpto. de Enxeneria Industrial II, 15403 Ferrol Spain (Spain)

    2004-12-11

    New radiotherapy techniques require detectors able to verify and monitor the clinical beam with high spatial resolution and fast response. Room temperature organic liquid ionization detectors are becoming an alternative to standard air ionization chambers, due to their tissue equivalent behavior, their sensibility and small directional dependence. A liquid isooctane filled ionization linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance has been designed, built and tested. The detector consists of 128 pixels, each of them with an area of 1.7mmx1.7mm and a gap of 0.5mm. The small pixel size makes the detector ideal for high gradient beam profiles like those present in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. The gap and the polarization voltage have been chosen in order to guarantee a linear relationship between the dose rate and the readout signal at high dose rates. As readout electronics we use the X-ray Data Acquisition System with the Xchip developed by the CCLRC.In the first device tests we have confirmed linearity up to a 6.7Gy/min dose rate with a deviation less than 1%. A profile with a signal-to-noise ratio around 500 can be obtained for a 4Gy/min dose rate with a 10 ms integration time.

  16. A 128 pixel linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, L.; Gomez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Marin, J.; Mosquera, J.; Pardo, J.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Pombar, M.; Rodriguez, A.; Saavedra, D.; Sendon, J.; Yanez, A.

    2004-01-01

    New radiotherapy techniques require detectors able to verify and monitor the clinical beam with high spatial resolution and fast response. Room temperature organic liquid ionization detectors are becoming an alternative to standard air ionization chambers, due to their tissue equivalent behavior, their sensibility and small directional dependence. A liquid isooctane filled ionization linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance has been designed, built and tested. The detector consists of 128 pixels, each of them with an area of 1.7mmx1.7mm and a gap of 0.5mm. The small pixel size makes the detector ideal for high gradient beam profiles like those present in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. The gap and the polarization voltage have been chosen in order to guarantee a linear relationship between the dose rate and the readout signal at high dose rates. As readout electronics we use the X-ray Data Acquisition System with the Xchip developed by the CCLRC.In the first device tests we have confirmed linearity up to a 6.7Gy/min dose rate with a deviation less than 1%. A profile with a signal-to-noise ratio around 500 can be obtained for a 4Gy/min dose rate with a 10 ms integration time

  17. Toward Multispectral Imaging with Colloidal Metasurface Pixels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jon W; Akselrod, Gleb M; Smith, David R; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2017-02-01

    Multispectral colloidal metasurfaces are fabricated that exhibit greater than 85% absorption and ≈100 nm linewidths by patterning film-coupled nanocubes in pixels using a fusion of bottom-up and top-down fabrication techniques over wafer-scale areas. With this technique, the authors realize a multispectral pixel array consisting of six resonances between 580 and 1125 nm and reconstruct an RGB image with 9261 color combinations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Operational Experience with the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00205212

    2015-05-15

    In the first LHC running period the CMS-pixel detector had to face various operational challenges and had to adapt to the rapidly changing beam conditions. In order to maximize the physics potential and the quality of the data, online and offline calibrations were performed on a regular basis. The detector performed excellently with an average hit efficiency above 99\\% for all layers and disks. In this contribution the operational challenges of the silicon pixel detector in the first LHC run and the current long shutdown are summarized and the expectations for 2015 are discussed.

  19. Wafer-scale pixelated detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Zimmerman, Tom

    2017-10-17

    A large area, gapless, detection system comprises at least one sensor; an interposer operably connected to the at least one sensor; and at least one application specific integrated circuit operably connected to the sensor via the interposer wherein the detection system provides high dynamic range while maintaining small pixel area and low power dissipation. Thereby the invention provides methods and systems for a wafer-scale gapless and seamless detector systems with small pixels, which have both high dynamic range and low power dissipation.

  20. Technology development for SOI monolithic pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczewski, J.; Domanski, K.; Grabiec, P.; Grodner, M.; Jaroszewicz, B.; Kociubinski, A.; Kucharski, K.; Tomaszewski, D.; Caccia, M.; Kucewicz, W.; Niemiec, H.

    2006-01-01

    A monolithic detector of ionizing radiation has been manufactured using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers with a high-resistivity substrate. In our paper the integration of a standard 3 μm CMOS technology, originally designed for bulk devices, with fabrication of pixels in the bottom wafer of a SOI substrate is described. Both technological sequences have been merged minimizing thermal budget and providing suitable properties of all the technological layers. The achieved performance proves that fully depleted monolithic active pixel matrix might be a viable option for a wide spectrum of future applications

  1. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golling, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented

  2. Physics performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00040679; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    One noticeable upgrade from Run-1 to Run-2 with ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at LHC is the introduction of the new pixel detector, IBL, located on the beam pipe as the extra innermost pixel layer. The tracking and vertex reconstruction are significantly improved and good performance is expected in high level object such a $b$-quark jet tagging, in turn, it leads the better physics results. This note summarizes what is the impact on the IBL detector to the physics results especially focusing on the analyses using the $b$-quark jets throughout 2016 summer physics program.

  3. Development of a CMOS SOI pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ishino, Hirokazu; Hazumi, M; Ikegami, Y; Kohriki, T; Tajima, O; Terada, S; Tsuboyama, T; Unno, Y; Ushiroda, Y; Ikeda, H; Hara, K; Ishino, H; Kawasaki, T; Miyake, H; Martin, E; Varner, G; Tajima, H; Ohno, M; Fukuda, K; Komatsubara, H; Ida, J

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a monolithic radiation pixel detector using silicon on insulator (SOI) with a commercial 0.15 m fullydepleted- SOI technology and a Czochralski high resistivity silicon substrate in place of a handle wafer. The SOI TEG (Test Element Group) chips with a size of 2.5 x 2.5mm2 consisting of 20 x 20 um2 pixels have been designed and manufactured. Performance tests with a laser light illumination and a . ray radioactive source indicate successful operation of the detector. We also brie y discuss the back gate effect as well as the simulation study.

  4. Using model-based proposals for fast parameter inference on discrete state space, continuous-time Markov processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, C M; Bishop, S C; Marion, G

    2015-06-06

    Bayesian statistics provides a framework for the integration of dynamic models with incomplete data to enable inference of model parameters and unobserved aspects of the system under study. An important class of dynamic models is discrete state space, continuous-time Markov processes (DCTMPs). Simulated via the Doob-Gillespie algorithm, these have been used to model systems ranging from chemistry to ecology to epidemiology. A new type of proposal, termed 'model-based proposal' (MBP), is developed for the efficient implementation of Bayesian inference in DCTMPs using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). This new method, which in principle can be applied to any DCTMP, is compared (using simple epidemiological SIS and SIR models as easy to follow exemplars) to a standard MCMC approach and a recently proposed particle MCMC (PMCMC) technique. When measurements are made on a single-state variable (e.g. the number of infected individuals in a population during an epidemic), model-based proposal MCMC (MBP-MCMC) is marginally faster than PMCMC (by a factor of 2-8 for the tests performed), and significantly faster than the standard MCMC scheme (by a factor of 400 at least). However, when model complexity increases and measurements are made on more than one state variable (e.g. simultaneously on the number of infected individuals in spatially separated subpopulations), MBP-MCMC is significantly faster than PMCMC (more than 100-fold for just four subpopulations) and this difference becomes increasingly large. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. CMOS pixel sensor development for the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldi, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a fully silicon based detector called Inner Tracker (ITk) before the start of the High Luminosity-LHC project (HL-LHC) in 2026. To cope with the harsh environment expected at the HL-LHC, new approaches are being developed for pixel detector based on CMOS pixel techology. Such detectors provide charge collection, analog and digital amplification in the same silicon bulk. The radiation hardness is obtained with multiple nested wells that have embedded the CMOS electronics with sufficient shielding. The goal of this programme is to demonstrate that depleted CMOS pixels are suitable for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at the LHC. A number of alternative solutions have been explored and characterised, and are presented in this document.

  6. Digital column readout architecture for the ATLAS pixel 025 mum front end IC

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, E; Blanquart, L; Comes, G; Denes, P; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Fischer, P; Marchesini, R; Meddeler, G; Peric, I

    2002-01-01

    A fast low noise, limited power, radiation-hard front-end chip was developed for reading out the Atlas Pixel Silicon Detector. As in the past prototypes, every chip is used to digitize and read out charge and time information from hits on each one of its 2880 inputs. The basic column readout architecture idea was adopted and modified to allow a safe transition to quarter micron technology. Each pixel cell, organized in a 160 multiplied by 18 matrix, can be independently enabled and configured in order to optimize the analog signal response and to prevent defective pixels from saturating the readout. The digital readout organizes hit data coming from each column, with respect to time, and output them on a low-level serial interface. A considerable effort was made to design state machines free of undefined states, where single-point defects and charge deposited by heavy ions in the silicon could have led to unpredicted forbidden states. 7 Refs.

  7. CMOS pixel development for the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Risti{c}, Branislav; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the rate and radiation environment expected at the HL-LHC new approaches are being developed on CMOS pixel detectors, providing charge collection in a depleted layer. They are based on: HV enabling technologies that allow to use high depletion voltages (HV-MAPS), high resistivity wafers for large depletion depths (HR-MAPS); radiation hard processed with multiple nested wells to allow CMOS electronics embedded with sufficient shielding into the sensor substrate and backside processing and thinning for material minimization and backside voltage application. Since 2014, members of more than 20 groups in the ATLAS experiment are actively pursuing CMOS pixel R&D in an ATLAS Demonstrator program pursuing sensor design and characterizations. The goal of this program is to demonstrate that depleted CMOS pixels, with monolithic or hybrid designs, are suited for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at LHC. For this a number of technologies have been explored and characterized. In this pr...

  8. CMOS Pixel Development for the ATLAS Experiment at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudiello, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the rate and radiation environment expected at the HL-LHC new approaches are being developed on CMOS pixel detectors, providing charge collection in a depleted layer. They are based on: HV enabling technologies that allow to use high depletion voltages (HV-MAPS), high resistivity wafers for large depletion depths (HR-MAPS); radiation hard processed with multiple nested wells to allow CMOS electronics embedded with sufficient shielding into the sensor substrate and backside processing and thinning for material minimization and backside voltage application. Since 2014, members of more than 20 groups in the ATLAS experiment are actively pursuing CMOS pixel R&D in an ATLAS Demonstrator program pursuing sensor design and characterizations. The goal of this program is to demonstrate that depleted CMOS pixels, with monolithic or hybrid designs, are suited for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at LHC. For this a number of technologies have been explored and characterized. In this pr...

  9. Research and Development of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the Detection of the Elementary Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.

    2007-09-01

    In order to develop high spatial resolution and readout speed vertex detectors for the future International Linear Collider (ILC), fast CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are studied on this work. Two prototypes of MAPS, MIMOSA 8 and MIMOSA 16, based on the same micro-electronic architecture were developed in CMOS processes with different thickness of epitaxial layer. The size of pixel matrix is 32 x 128: 8 columns of the pixel array are readout directly with analog outputs and the other 24 columns are connected to the column level auto-zero discriminators. The Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) structures are successfully implemented inside pixel and discriminator. The photo diode type pixels with different diode sizes are used in these prototypes. With a 55 Fe X-ray radioactive source, the important parameters, such as Temporal Noise, Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Charge-to-Voltage conversion Factor (CVF) and Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE), are studied as function of readout speed and diode size. For MIMOSA 8, the effect of fast neutrons irradiation is also. Two beam tests campaigns were made: at DESY with a 5 GeV electrons beam and at CERN with a 180 GeV pions beam. Detection Efficiency and Spatial Resolution are studied in function of the discriminator threshold. For these two parameters, the influences of diode size and SNR of the central pixel of a cluster are also discussed. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the digital outputs, a very compact (25 μm x 1 mm) and low consumption (300 μW) column level ADC is designed in AMS 0.35 μm OPTO process. Based on successive approximation architecture, the auto-offset cancellation structure is integrated. A new column level auto-zero discriminator using static latch is also designed. (author)

  10. A Fast Enhanced Secure Image Chaotic Cryptosystem Based on Hybrid Chaotic Magic Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Koppu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An enhanced secure image chaotic cryptosystem has been proposed based on hybrid CMT-Lanczos algorithm. We have achieved fast encryption and decryption along with privacy of images. The pseudorandom generator has been used along with Lanczos algorithm to generate root characteristics and eigenvectors. Using hybrid CMT image, pixels are shuffled to accomplish excellent randomness. Compared with existing methods, the proposed method had more robustness to various attacks: brute-force attack, known cipher plaintext, chosen-plaintext, security key space, key sensitivity, correlation analysis and information entropy, and differential attacks. Simulation results show that the proposed methods give better result in protecting images with low-time complexity.

  11. Per-Pixel, Dual-Counter Scheme for Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, William H.; Bimbaum, Kevin M.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Sburlan, Suzana; Sahasrabudhe, Adit

    2013-01-01

    Free space optical communications links from deep space are projected to fulfill future NASA communication requirements for 2020 and beyond. Accurate laser-beam pointing is required to achieve high data rates at low power levels.This innovation is a per-pixel processing scheme using a pair of three-state digital counters to implement acquisition and tracking of a dim laser beacon transmitted from Earth for pointing control of an interplanetary optical communications system using a focal plane array of single sensitive detectors. It shows how to implement dim beacon acquisition and tracking for an interplanetary optical transceiver with a method that is suitable for both achieving theoretical performance, as well as supporting additional functions of high data rate forward links and precision spacecraft ranging.

  12. What's A Pixel Particle Sensor Chip?

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS particle physics experiment aided with collaboration ON Semiconductor was recently honored by the European Council for Nuclear Research (CERN), with an Industrial Award recognizing the company's contribution in supplying complex "Pixel Particle Sensor" chips for use in CERN's ATLAS particle physics experiment.

  13. Plasmonic nanospherical dimers for color pixels

    KAUST Repository

    Alrasheed, Salma

    2018-04-20

    Display technologies are evolving more toward higher resolution and miniaturization. Plasmonic color pixels can offer solutions to realize such technologies due to their sharp resonances and selective scattering and absorption at particular wavelengths. Metal nanosphere dimers are capable of supporting plasmon resonances that can be tuned to span the entire visible spectrum. In this article, we demonstrate numerically bright color pixels that are highly polarized and broadly tuned using periodic arrays of metal nanosphere dimers on a glass substrate. We show that it is possible to obtain RGB pixels in the reflection mode. The longitudinal plasmon resonance of nanosphere dimers along the axis of the dimer is the main contributor to the color of the pixel, while far-field diffractive coupling further enhances and tunes the plasmon resonance. The computational method used is the finite-difference time-domain method. The advantages of this approach include simplicity of the design, bright coloration, and highly polarized function. In addition, we show that it is possible to obtain different colors by varying the angle of incidence, the periodicity, the size of the dimer, the gap, and the substrate thickness.

  14. CMS has a heart of pixels

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    At the core of CMS, particles will come into contact with tiny detector components, known as pixels, which are almost invisible to the naked eye. With these elementary cells measuring a mere 150 microns (or about 1/10 of a millimetre) along each side, a real technological leap has been made.

  15. Pixel Grafting: An Evolution of Mincing for Transplantation of Full-Thickness Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mansher; Nuutila, Kristo; Kruse, Carla; Dermietzel, Alexander; Caterson, E J; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-01-01

    Split-thickness skin grafting is the gold standard for treatment of major skin loss. This technique is limited by donor-site availability in large burn injuries. With micrografting, a technique where split-thickness skin graft is minced into 0.8 × 0.8-mm pieces, the authors have demonstrated an expansion ratio of 1:100 and healing comparable to that achieved with split-thickness skin grafting. In this study, the authors explore the regenerative potential of a skin graft by cutting split-thickness skin grafts to pixel size (0.3 × 0.3 mm) grafts. Wound healing was studied in full-thickness wounds in a porcine model by creating an incubator-like microenvironment using polyurethane wound chambers. Multiple wound healing parameters were used to study the outcome of pixel grafting and compare it to micrografting and nontransplanted wounds. The authors' results show that 0.3 × 0.3-mm pixel grafts remain viable and contribute to skin regeneration. The pixel graft-transplanted wounds demonstrated a faster reepithelialization rate, decreased wound contraction, and increased mechanical stability compared with nontransplanted wounds. The reepithelialization rates of the wounds were significantly increased with pixel grafting at day 6 after wounding compared with micrografting. Among the other wound healing parameters, there were no significant differences between wounds transplanted with pixel grafts and micrografts. Pixel grafting technique would address the most commonly encountered limitations of the split-thickness skin graft with the possibility of an even larger expansion ratio than micrografting. This technique is simple and fast and can be conducted in the operating room or in the clinic.

  16. Beam test measurements on GaAs strip and pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertz, D.; Braunschweig, W.; Breibach, J.; Graessel, D.; Kubicki, T.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Rente, C.; Roeper, C.; Siedling, R.; Syben, O.; Tenbusch, F.; Toporowski, M.; Xiao, W.J. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). I. Physikalisches Institut

    1998-06-01

    GaAs strip and pixel detectors constructed in Aachen have been tested in a 1.4 GeV electron beam in Bonn and in a 5 GeV electron beam at DESY in February and May 1997. The strip detectors had a pitch of 50 {mu}m with a strip width of 25 {mu}m and were made of a 250 {mu}m thick Freiberger SI-GaAs wafer. The strip detectors included a punch-through bias structure and an integrated coupling capacitor. Additionally, an improved backside contact was formed, allowing a safe operation of the detector in a soft breakdown regime. Using the fast PreMux128 preamplifier multiplexer chip ({tau}{sub p}=50 ns) a signal-to-noise ratio of 13 was obtained at normal beam incidence for a bias voltage of 200 V, leading to a spatial resolution of 11 {mu}m with a simple COG algorithm. The 8 x 16 pixel array with a pixel size of 125 x 125 {mu}m{sup 2} was read out with the PreMux128 as well. With a double-metal technique, it was possible to bond the single-pixels linearly to the amplifier chip. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio of 30 in combination with a COG algorithm lead to the digital resolution value of 36 {mu}m for both pixel coordinates. (orig.) 10 refs.

  17. P.I.X.S.C.A.N.: a micro-CT scanner for small animal based on hybrid pixel detectors; PIXSCAN: micro-tomodensitrometre a pixels hybrides pour le petit animal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, R

    2008-03-15

    Since more than a dozen years, efforts were led in the field of X-ray tomography for small animals, principally for the improvement of spatial resolution and the diminution of the absorbed dose. The C.P.P.M. developed the micro-CT P.I.X.S.C.A.N. based on the hybrid pixel detector X.P.A.D.2. In this context, my thesis work consists in studying the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 and the contribution of the hybrid pixels in the imaging of small animals. A fast analytical simulation, FastSimu, was developed. An extrapolation of the performance of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N, as well as the validation of the results obtained with the measured data, were led by means of the analytical simulator FastSimu. The demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 allowed to obtain reconstructed images with a rather good quality for a relatively weak absorbed dose. Its spatial resolution is degraded by the high number of defective pixels of the detector X.P.A.D.2. Beyond this study, a new version of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 is under construction. This latter, characterized by two and a half times smaller pixels and about no defective pixels will bring a considerable improvement on spatial resolution. (author)

  18. A 2D 4×4 Channel Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Detectors for Medical Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Martínez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles

    2015-10-01

    We present a 16-channel readout integrated circuit (ROIC) with nanosecond-resolution time to digital converter (TDC) for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) gamma-ray detectors. The 4 × 4 pixel array ROIC is the proof of concept of the 10 × 10 pixel array readout ASIC for positron-emission tomography (PET) scanner, positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanner, and Compton gamma camera. The electronics of each individual pixel integrates an analog front-end with switchable gain, an analog to digital converter (ADC), configuration registers, and a 4-state digital controller. For every detected photon, the pixel electronics provides the energy deposited in the detector with 10-bit resolution, and a fast trigger signal for time stamp. The ASIC contains the 16-pixel matrix electronics, a digital controller, five global voltage references, a TDC, a temperature sensor, and a band-gap based current reference. The ASIC has been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μ m mixed-signal CMOS technology and occupies an area of 5.3 mm × 6.8 mm. The TDC shows a resolution of 95.5 ps, a precision of 600 ps at full width half maximum (FWHM), and a power consumption of 130 μ W. In acquisition mode, the total power consumption of every pixel is 200 μ W. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 160 e - RMS at maximum gain and negative polarity conditions has been measured at room temperature.

  19. Design Methodology: ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for Pixel Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim, Farah [Fermilab

    2014-10-31

    The development of Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) for pixel detectors with complex in-pixel processing using Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools that are, themselves, mainly developed for the design of conventional digital circuits requires a specialized approach. Mixed signal pixels often require parasitically aware detailed analog front-ends and extremely compact digital back-ends with more than 1000 transistors in small areas below 100μm x 100μm. These pixels are tiled to create large arrays, which have the same clock distribution and data readout speed constraints as in, for example, micro-processors. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout.

  20. Performance study of a MegaPixel single photon position sensitive photodetector EBCMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, Remi; Baudot, J.; Chabanat, E.; Depasse, P.; Dulinski, W.; Estre, N.; Kaiser, C.T.; Laurent, N.; Winter, M.

    2009-01-01

    This development is related to the design and the integration of a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) into a photosensitive proximity focusing vacuum-based tube. This EBCMOS project is dedicated to the fluorescent and the bioluminescent high speed imaging. The results of the full characterization of the first prototype are presented. Comparative tests with different fluorescent dyes have been performed in biology laboratories. Preliminary conclusions on the ability of EBCMOS to perform fast single-molecule tracking will be given.

  1. Design methodology: edgeless 3D ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim Farah, Fahim Farah [Northwestern U. (main); Deptuch, Grzegorz W. [Fermilab; Hoff, James R. [Fermilab; Mohseni, Hooman [Northwestern U. (main)

    2015-08-28

    The design methodology for the development of 3D integrated edgeless pixel detectors with in-pixel processing using Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools is presented. A large area 3 tier 3D detector with one sensor layer and two ASIC layers containing one analog and one digital tier, is built for x-ray photon time of arrival measurement and imaging. A full custom analog pixel is 65μm x 65μm. It is connected to a sensor pixel of the same size on one side, and on the other side it has approximately 40 connections to the digital pixel. A 32 x 32 edgeless array without any peripheral functional blocks constitutes a sub-chip. The sub-chip is an indivisible unit, which is further arranged in a 6 x 6 array to create the entire 1.248cm x 1.248cm ASIC. Each chip has 720 bump-bond I/O connections, on the back of the digital tier to the ceramic PCB. All the analog tier power and biasing is conveyed through the digital tier from the PCB. The assembly has no peripheral functional blocks, and hence the active area extends to the edge of the detector. This was achieved by using a few flavors of almost identical analog pixels (minimal variation in layout) to allow for peripheral biasing blocks to be placed within pixels. The 1024 pixels within a digital sub-chip array have a variety of full custom, semi-custom and automated timing driven functional blocks placed together. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout. The methodology uses the Cadence design platform, however it is not limited to this tool.

  2. Empirical formula for rates of hot pixel defects based on pixel size, sensor area, and ISO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Glenn H.; Thomas, Rohit; Koren, Zahava; Koren, Israel

    2013-02-01

    Experimentally, image sensors measurements show a continuous development of in-field permanent hot pixel defects increasing in numbers over time. In our tests we accumulated data on defects in cameras ranging from large area (cell phone cameras. The results show that the rate of defects depends on the technology (APS or CCD), and on design parameters like imager area, pixel size (from 1.5 to 7 um), and gain (from ISO100 to 1600). Comparing different sensor sizes with similar pixel sizes has shown that defect rates scale linearly with sensor area, suggesting the metric of defects/year/sq mm, which we call defect density. A search was made to model this defect density as a function of the two parameters pixel size and ISO. The best empirical fit was obtained by a power law curve. For CCD imagers, the defect densities are proportional to the pixel size to the power of -2.25 times the ISO to the power of 0.69. For APS (CMOS) sensors the power law had the defect densities proportional to the pixel size to the power of -3.07 times the ISO raised to the power of 0.5. Extending our empirical formula to include ISO allows us to predict the expected defect development rate for a wide set of sensor parameters.

  3. Upgrade of ATLAS ITk Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Huegging, Fabian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenges to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with an entirely-silicon inner tracker (ITk) which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation levels are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors and low mass global and local support structures. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the ITk ATLAS Pixel detector developments as well as different layout options will be reviewed.

  4. ATLAS Pixel IBL: Stave Quality Assurance

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    For Run 2 of the LHC a fourth innermost Pixel Detector layer on a smaller radius beam pipe has been installed in the ATLAS Detector to add redundancy against radiation damage of the current Pixel Detector and to ensure a high quality tracking and b-tagging performance of the Inner Detector over the coming years until the High Luminosity Upgrade. State of the art components have been produced and assembled onto support structures known as staves over the last two years. In total, 20 staves have been built and qualified in a designated Quality Assurance setup at CERN of which 14 have been integrated onto the beam pipe. Results from the testing are presented.

  5. Monolithic pixel detectors for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic pixel detectors integrating sensor matrix and readout in one piece of silicon have revolutionized imaging for consumer applications, but despite years of research they have not yet been widely adopted for high energy physics. Two major requirements for this application, radiation tolerance and low power consumption, require charge collection by drift for the most extreme radiation levels and an optimization of the collected signal charge over input capacitance ratio ( Q / C ). It is shown that monolithic detectors can achieve Q / C for low analog power consumption and even carryout the promise to practically eliminate analog power consumption, but combining suf fi cient Q / C , collection by drift, and integration of readout circuitry within the pixel remains a challenge. An overview is given of different approaches to address this challenge, with possible advantages and disadvantages.

  6. Pixel hybrid photon detector magnetic distortions characterization and compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Aglieri-Rinella, G; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Forty, Roger W; Gys, Thierry; Patel, Mitesh; Piedigrossi, Didier; Van Lysebetten, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb experiment requires positive kaon identification in the momentum range 2-100 GeV/c. This is provided by two ring imaging Cherenkov detectors. The stringent requirements on the photon detectors are fully satisfied by the novel pixel hybrid photon detector, HPD. The HPD is a vacuum tube with a quartz window, S20 photo-cathode, cross-focusing electron optics and a silicon anode encapsulated within the tube. The anode is a 32*256 pixels hybrid detector, with a silicon sensor bump-bonded onto a readout chip containing 8192 channels with analogue front-end and digital read-out circuitry. An external magnetic field influences the trajectory of the photoelectrons and could thereby degrade the inherent excellent space resolution of the HPD. The HPDs must be operational in the fringe magnetic field of the LHCb magnet. This paper reports on an extensive experimental characterization of the distortion effects. The characterization has allowed the development of parameterisations and of a compensation algorithm. ...

  7. All-Dielectric Dual-Color Pixel with Subwavelength Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masafumi; Takahara, Junichi

    2017-12-13

    An all-dielectric optical antenna supporting Mie resonances enables light confinement below the free-space diffraction limit. The Mie scattering wavelengths of the antenna depend on the structural geometry, which allows the antennas to be used for colored imprint images. However, there is still room for improving the spatial resolution, and new polarization-dependent color functionalities are highly desirable for realizing a wider color-tuning range. Here, we show all-dielectric color printing by means of dual-color pixels with a subwavelength-scale resolution. The simple nanostructures fabricated with monocrystalline silicon exhibit various brilliant reflection color by tuning the physical dimensions of each antenna. The designed nanostructures possess polarization-dependent properties that make it possible to create overlaid color images. The pixels will generate individual color even if operating as a single element, resulting in the achievement of subwavelength-resolution encoding without color mixing. This printing strategy could be used to further extend the degree of freedom in structural color design.

  8. Production chain of CMS pixel modules

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The pictures show the production chain of pixel modules for the CMS detector. Fig.1: overview of the assembly procedure. Fig.2: bump bonding with ReadOut Chip (ROC) connected to the sensor. Fig.3: glueing a raw module onto the baseplate strips. Fig.4: glueing of the High Density Interconnect (HDI) onto a raw module. Fig.5: pull test after heat reflow. Fig.6: wafer sensor processing, Indium evaporation.

  9. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanty, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. During Run-I, the detector provided hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and two endcaps with three disk layers each. It consisted of 1744 n+-in-n silicon modules with a total of about 80 million pixels that were individually read out via chips bump-bonded to the silicon substrate. The ATLAS Pixel Detector started to record data since the first LHC collisions and since the beginning of its operation it performed very well. The operational challenges included the maximization of data taking efficiency, dealing with single event upsets, and the recovery of lost modules. The data acquisition techniques also had to adapt to the rapidly changing LHC beam conditions. In order to maximize the physics potential and the quality of the data, online and offline calibrations were performed on a regular basis. The calibrations ensured maximal hit and charge collection efficiency. The position resolut...

  10. Readout Architecture for Hybrid Pixel Readout Chips

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)694170; Westerlund, Tomi; Wyllie, Ken

    The original contribution of this thesis to knowledge are novel digital readout architectures for hybrid pixel readout chips. The thesis presents asynchronous bus-based architecture, a data-node based column architecture and a network-based pixel matrix architecture for data transportation. It is shown that the data-node architecture achieves readout efficiency 99 % with half the output rate as a bus-based system. The network-based solution avoids ``broken'' columns due to some manufacturing errors, and it distributes internal data traffic more evenly across the pixel matrix than column-based architectures. An improvement of $>$ 10 % to the efficiency is achieved with uniform and non-uniform hit occupancies. Architectural design has been done using transaction level modeling ($TLM$) and sequential high-level design techniques for reducing the design and simulation time. It has been possible to simulate tens of column and full chip architectures using the high-level techniques. A decrease of $>$ 10 in run-time...

  11. ATLAS ITk and new pixel sensors technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudiello, A

    2016-01-01

    During the 2023–2024 shutdown, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be upgraded to reach an instantaneous luminosity up to 7×10$^{34}$ cm$^{−2}$s$^{−1}$. This upgrade of the accelerator is called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The ATLAS detector will be changed to meet the challenges of HL-LHC: an average of 200 pile-up events in every bunch crossing, and an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb $^{−1}$ over ten years. The HL-LHC luminosity conditions are too extreme for the current silicon (pixel and strip) detectors and straw tube transition radiation tracker (TRT) of the current ATLAS tracking system. Therefore the ATLAS inner tracker is being completely rebuilt for data-taking and the new system is called Inner Tracker (ITk). During this upgrade the TRT will be removed in favor of an all-new all-silicon tracker composed only by strip and pixel detectors. An overview of new layouts in study will be reported and the new pixel sensor technologies in development will be explained.

  12. Characterisation of Vanilla—A novel active pixel sensor for radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Laing, A.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Arvanitis, C.; Bohndiek, S.

    2007-10-01

    Novel features of a new monolithic active pixel sensor, Vanilla, with 520×520 pixels ( 25 μm square) has been characterised for the first time. Optimisation of the sensor operation was made through variation of frame rates, integration times and on-chip biases and voltages. Features such as flushed reset operation, ROI capturing and readout modes have been fully tested. Stability measurements were performed to test its suitablility for long-term applications. These results suggest the Vanilla sensor—along with bio-medical and space applications—is suitable for use in particle physics experiments.

  13. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  14. Study of sub-pixel position resolution with time-correlated transient signals in 3D pixelated CdZnTe detectors with varying pixel sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo Giraldo, L.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gul, R.; Hodges, D.; Hossain, A.; Ünlü, K.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2018-03-01

    We evaluated the sub-pixel position resolution achievable in large-volume CdZnTe pixelated detectors with conventional pixel patterns and for several different pixel sizes: 2.8 mm, 1.72 mm, 1.4 mm and 0.8 mm. Achieving position resolution below the physical dimensions of pixels (sub-pixel resolution) is a practical path for making high-granularity position-sensitive detectors, important for improving the imaging capability of CZT gamma cameras. It also allows for making more accurate corrections of response non-uniformities caused by crystal defects, thus enabling use of standard-grade (unselected) and less expensive CZT crystals for producing large-volume position-sensitive CZT detectors feasible for many practical applications. We analyzed the digitized charge signals from a representative 9 pixels and the cathode, generated using a pulsed-laser light beam focused down to 10 μm (650 nm) to scan over a selected 3 × 3 pixel area. We applied our digital pulse processing technique to the time-correlated signals captured from adjacent pixels to achieve and evaluate the capability for sub-pixel position resolution. As an example, we also demonstrated an application of 3D corrections to improve the energy resolution and positional information of the events for the tested detectors.

  15. A fast Stokes polarimeter: preliminary design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Israel J.; Alenin, Andrey S.; Tyo, J. Scott

    2017-09-01

    Designing polarimetric systems directly in the channel space has provided insight into how to design new types of polarimetric systems, including systems which use carriers in hybrid domains of space, time, or spectrum. Utilizing linear systems theory, we present a full Stokes imaging polarimeter design which has the potential to operate at half the frame rate of the imaging sensor of the system by utilizing a hybrid spatio-temporal carrier design. The design places channels on the faces and the edges of the Nyquist cube resulting in the potential for half the Nyquist limit to be achieved, provided that the spatial frequency of the objects being imaged are bandlimited to less than 0.25 cycles per pixel. If the objects are not spatially bandlimited, then the achievable temporal bandwidth is more difficult to analyze. However, a spatio-temporal tradeoff still exists allowing for increased temporal bandwidth. We present the design of a "Fast Stokes'' polarimeter and some simulated images using this design.

  16. Fabrication of X-ray Microcalorimeter Focal Planes Composed of Two Distinct Pixel Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassell, Edward J.; Adams, Joseph S.; Bandler, Simon R.; Betancour-Martinez, Gabriele L; Chiao, Meng P.; Chang, Meng Ping; Chervenak, James A.; Datesman, Aaron M.; Eckart, Megan E.; Ewin, Audrey J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We develop superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter focal planes for versatility in meeting the specifications of X-ray imaging spectrometers, including high count rate, high energy resolution, and large field of view. In particular, a focal plane composed of two subarrays: one of fine pitch, high count-rate devices and the other of slower, larger pixels with similar energy resolution, offers promise for the next generation of astrophysics instruments, such as the X-ray Integral Field Unit Instrument on the European Space Agencys ATHENA mission. We have based the subarrays of our current design on successful pixel designs that have been demonstrated separately. Pixels with an all-gold X-ray absorber on 50 and 75 micron pitch, where the Mo/Au TES sits atop a thick metal heatsinking layer, have shown high resolution and can accommodate high count rates. The demonstrated larger pixels use a silicon nitride membrane for thermal isolation, thinner Au, and an added bismuth layer in a 250-sq micron absorber. To tune the parameters of each subarray requires merging the fabrication processes of the two detector types. We present the fabrication process for dual production of different X-ray absorbers on the same substrate, thick Au on the small pixels and thinner Au with a Bi capping layer on the larger pixels to tune their heat capacities. The process requires multiple electroplating and etching steps, but the absorbers are defined in a single-ion milling step. We demonstrate methods for integrating the heatsinking of the two types of pixel into the same focal plane consistent with the requirements for each subarray, including the limiting of thermal crosstalk. We also discuss fabrication process modifications for tuning the intrinsic transition temperature (T(sub c)) of the bilayers for the different device types through variation of the bilayer thicknesses. The latest results on these 'hybrid' arrays will be presented.

  17. 4T CMOS Active Pixel Sensors under Ionizing Radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, J.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the ionizing radiation effects on 4T pixels and the elementary in-pixel test devices with regard to the electrical performance and the optical performance. In addition to an analysis of the macroscopic pixel parameter degradation, the radiation-induced degradation mechanisms

  18. Vectors and submicron precision: redundancy and 3D stacking in silicon pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijne, E H M; Ballabriga, R; Campbell, M; Llopart, X; Tlustos, L; Plackett, R; Wong, W; Boltje, D; Vermeulen, J; Visschers, J; Visser, J; Idarraga, J; Leroy, C; Jakubek, J; PospIsil, S; Turecek, D; Vykydal, Z

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are shown of GeV pions and muons in two 300μm thick, Si Medipix pixel detector assemblies that are stacked on top of each other, with a 25μm thick brass foil in between. In such a radiation imaging semiconductor matrix with a large number of pixels along the particle trail, one can determine local space vectors for the particle trajectory instead of points. This improves pattern recognition and track reconstruction, especially in a crowded environment. Stacking of sensor planes is essential for resolving directional ambiguities. Signal charge sharing can be employed for measuring positions with submicron precision. In the measurements one notices accompanying 'delta' electrons that emerge outside the particle trail, far beyond the boundaries of the 55μm pixel cells. The frequency of such corrupted position measurements is ∼ one per 2.5mm of traversed Si.

  19. Realization and application of a 111 million pixel backside-illuminated detector and camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Norbert; Dorland, Bryan; Bredthauer, Richard; Boggs, Kasey; Bredthauer, Greg; Lesser, Mike

    2007-09-01

    A full-wafer, 10,580 × 10,560 pixel (95 × 95 mm) CCD was designed and tested at Semiconductor Technology Associates (STA) with 9 μm square pixels and 16 outputs. The chip was successfully fabricated in 2006 at DALSA and some performance results are presented here. This program was funded by the Office of Naval Research through a Small Business Innovation in Research (SBIR) program requested by the U.S. Naval Observatory for its next generation astrometric sky survey programs. Using Leach electronics, low read-noise output of the 111 million pixels requires 16 seconds at 0.9 MHz. Alternative electronics developed at STA allow readout at 20 MHz. Some modifications of the design to include anti-blooming features, a larger number of outputs, and use of p-channel material for space applications are discussed.

  20. Vectors and submicron precision: redundancy and 3D stacking in silicon pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, E H M; Wong, W; Idarraga, J; Visser, J; Jakubek, J; Leroy, C; Turecek, D; Visschers, J; Pospisil, S; Ballabriga, R; Vykydal, Z; Vermeulen, J; Plackett, R; Heijne, E H M; Llopart, X; Boltje, D; Campbell, M

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are shown of GeV pions and muons in two 300 mu m thick, Si Medipix pixel detector assemblies that are stacked on top of each other, with a 25 mu m thick brass foil in between. In such a radiation imaging semiconductor matrix with a large number of pixels along the particle trail, one can determine local space vectors for the particle trajectory instead of points. This improves pattern recognition and track reconstruction, especially in a crowded environment. Stacking of sensor planes is essential for resolving directional ambiguities. Signal charge sharing can be employed for measuring positions with submicron precision. In the measurements one notices accompanying `delta' electrons that emerge outside the particle trail, far beyond the boundaries of the 55 mu m pixel cells. The frequency of such corrupted position measurements is similar to one per 2.5mm of traversed Si.

  1. ACS/WFC Pixel History, Bringing the Pixels Back to Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, David; Grogin, Norman; Bourque, Matthew; Ogaz, Sara

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy within a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) results in excess electrical current that is trapped within the lattice structure of the electronics. This excess signal from the CCD itself can be present through multiple exposures, which will have an adverse effect on its science performance unless it is corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed. These images, generally referred to as ``dark'' images, allow for the measurement of thermal-electron contamination at each pixel of the CCD. This so-called ``dark current'' can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling to the science exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain value are traditionally marked as ``hot'' and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these pixels as being bad. However, these pixels may not be bad in the sense that they cannot be reliably dark-subtracted; if these pixels are shown to be stable over a given anneal period, the charge can be properly subtracted and the extra Poisson noise from this dark current can be taken into account and put into the error arrays.

  2. A 400 KHz line rate 2048-pixel stitched SWIR linear array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchlia, Ankur; Vinella, Rosa M.; Gielen, Daphne; Wouters, Kristof; Vervenne, Vincent; Hooylaerts, Peter; Deroo, Pieter; Ruythooren, Wouter; De Gaspari, Danny; Das, Jo; Merken, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Xenics has developed a family of stitched SWIR long linear arrays that operate up to 400 KHz of line rate. These arrays serve medical and industrial applications that require high line rates as well as space applications that require long linear arrays. The arrays are based on a modular ROIC design concept: modules of 512 pixels are stitched during fabrication to achieve 512, 1024 and 2048 pixel arrays. Each 512-pixel module has its own on-chip digital sequencer, analog readout chain and 4 output buffers. This modular concept enables a long array to run at a high line rates irrespective of the array length, which limits the line rate in a traditional linear array. The ROIC is flip-chipped with InGaAs detector arrays. The FPA has a pixel pitch of 12.5μm and has two pixel flavors: square (12.5μm) and rectangular (250μm). The frontend circuit is based on Capacitive Trans-impedance Amplifier (CTIA) to attain stable detector bias, and good linearity and signal integrity, especially at high speeds. The CTIA has an input auto-zero mechanism that allows to have low detector bias (clock rate of 60MHz and a minimum integration time of 1.4μs, achieves the highest line rate of 400 KHz. In this paper, design details and measurements results are presented in order to demonstrate the array performance.

  3. Recent Results of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project

    CERN Document Server

    Weigell, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    To cope with the higher occupancy and radiation damage at the HL-LHC also the LHC experiments will be upgraded. The ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project (PPS) is an international collaboration of 17 institutions and more than 80 scientists, exploring the feasibility of employing planar pixel sensors for this scenario. Depending on the radius, different pixel concepts are investigated using laboratory and beam test measurements. At small radii the extreme radiation environment and strong space constraints are addressed with very thin pixel sensors active thickness in the range of (75-150) mum, and the development of slim as well as active edges. At larger radii the main challenge is the cost reduction to allow for instrumenting the large area of (7-10) m^2. To reach this goal the pixel productions are being transferred to 6 inch production lines. Additionally, investigated are more cost-efficient and industrialised interconnection techniques as well as the n-in-p technology, which, being a single-sided pr...

  4. Monolithic pixel development in TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS for the outer pixel layers in the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdalovic, I.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Cardella, R.; Egidos Plaja, N.; Hemperek, T.; Hiti, B.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Kugathasan, T.; Mandic, I.; Maneuski, D.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Moustakas, K.; Musa, L.; Pernegger, H.; Riedler, P.; Riegel, C.; Schaefer, D.; Schioppa, E. J.; Sharma, A.; Snoeys, W.; Solans Sanchez, C.; Wang, T.; Wermes, N.

    2018-01-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS tracking detector (ITk) for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires the development of novel radiation hard silicon sensor technologies. Latest developments in CMOS sensor processing offer the possibility of combining high-resistivity substrates with on-chip high-voltage biasing to achieve a large depleted active sensor volume. We have characterised depleted monolithic active pixel sensors (DMAPS), which were produced in a novel modified imaging process implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS process in the framework of the monolithic sensor development for the ALICE experiment. Sensors fabricated in this modified process feature full depletion of the sensitive layer, a sensor capacitance of only a few fF and radiation tolerance up to 1015 neq/cm2. This paper summarises the measurements of charge collection properties in beam tests and in the laboratory using radioactive sources and edge TCT. The results of these measurements show significantly improved radiation hardness obtained for sensors manufactured using the modified process. This has opened the way to the design of two large scale demonstrators for the ATLAS ITk. To achieve a design compatible with the requirements of the outer pixel layers of the tracker, a charge sensitive front-end taking 500 nA from a 1.8 V supply is combined with a fast digital readout architecture. The low-power front-end with a 25 ns time resolution exploits the low sensor capacitance to reduce noise and analogue power, while the implemented readout architectures minimise power by reducing the digital activity.

  5. Pixel-by-pixel analysis of DCE-MRI curve shape patterns in knees of active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina; Maas, Mario; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Berg, J.M. van den; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Dolman, Koert M.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van

    2014-01-01

    To compare DCE-MRI parameters and the relative number of time-intensity curve (TIC) shapes as derived from pixel-by-pixel DCE-MRI TIC shape analysis between knees of clinically active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. DCE-MRI data sets were prospectively obtained. Patients were classified into two clinical groups: active disease (n = 43) and inactive disease (n = 34). Parametric maps, showing seven different TIC shape types, were created per slice. Statistical measures of different TIC shapes, maximal enhancement (ME), maximal initial slope (MIS), initial area under the curve (iAUC), time-to-peak (TTP), enhancing volume (EV), volume transfer constant (K trans ), extravascular space fractional volume (V e ) and reverse volume transfer constant (k ep ) of each voxel were calculated in a three-dimensional volume-of-interest of the synovial membrane. Imaging findings from 77 JIA patients were analysed. Significantly higher numbers of TIC shape 4 (P = 0.008), median ME (P = 0.015), MIS (P = 0.001) and iAUC (P = 0.002) were observed in clinically active compared with inactive patients. TIC shape 5 showed higher presence in the clinically inactive patients (P = 0.036). The pixel-by-pixel DCE-MRI TIC shape analysis method proved capable of differentiating clinically active from inactive JIA patients by the difference in the number of TIC shapes, as well as the descriptive parameters ME, MIS and iAUC. (orig.)

  6. Radiation resistance of the ATLAS pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Auria, S D

    1999-01-01

    This work describes the R and D work on radiation resistant silicon sensors for the ATLAS pixel detector: the technological choices and the design will be illustrated. Some sensor prototypes have been characterised and tested with unirradiated front-end electronics before and after high energy proton irradiation, showing that we can achieve the required radiation resistance to fluences of 1*10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ using n/sup +/ on n sensors with the p-spray isolation technology. (16 refs).

  7. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The ISPA tube is a position-sensitive photon detector. It belongs to the family of hybrid photon detectors (HPD), recently developed by CERN and INFN with leading photodetector firms. HPDs confront in a vacuum envelope a photocathode and a silicon detector. This can be a single diode or a pixelized detector. The electrons generated by the photocathode are efficiently detected by the silicon anode by applying a high-voltage difference between them. ISPA tube can be used in high-energy applications as well as bio-medical and imaging applications.

  8. ATLAS Tracker and Pixel Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00222525; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on the silicon and gaseous tracking subsystems that form the ATLAS Inner Detector. Those subsystems have undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pile-up and luminosity that are being delivered by the LHC during Run2. The key status and performance metrics of the Pixel Detector and the Semi Conductor Tracker, are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described.

  9. Effets de rayonnement sur les detecteurs au silicium a pixels du detecteur ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lebel, Celine

    2007-01-01

    Two detection systems are using pixel silicon detectors in the ATLAS detector: the Pixel, which is the subdetector closest to the interaction point, and the MPX network. The activation of the materials present in the Pixel produced by radiation has been measured in two experiments which we performed at CERF (CERN) and NPI-ASCR (Czech Republic). These experimental studies of activation are com- pared with GEANT4 simulations. The results of these comparisons show that the simulation can predict the activities with a precision of an order of magnitude. They also show that GEANT4 fails to produce certain radioisotopes seen in the experimental activation studies. The contribution to background and the resid- ual doses due to the desintegration of the radioisotopes produced by fast neutrons (category in which falls the expected average neutron energy of 1 MeV in ATLAS) are extrapolated to ATLAS conditions. It is found that this background in the AT- LAS Pixel subdetector will be negligible and that the doses are we...

  10. Pixel-by-pixel local dimming for high-dynamic-range liquid crystal displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiwei; Zhu, Ruidong; Li, Ming-Chun; Lee, Seok-Lyul; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2017-02-06

    We propose a high dynamic range (HDR) liquid crystal display (LCD) with pixel-level local dimming. The device structure consists of a pixelated LCD dimming panel to control the backlight intensity entering the master LCD panel. According to our analysis and test cell experiment, this dual-panel display system possesses exceedingly high contrast ratio (> 1,000,000:1) and high bit-depth (> 14 bits) at merely 5 volts. Meanwhile, to mitigate the Moiré effect induced by the cascaded thin-film transistor (TFT) backplanes, we separate the two LCD panels with a polarization-dependent scattering film. The pros and cons of this HDR display are discussed.

  11. Pixel 2010: A résumé

    CERN Document Server

    Wermes, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The Pixel 2010 conference focused on semiconductor pixel detectors for particle tracking/vertexing as well as for imaging, in particular for synchrotron light sources and XFELs. The big LHC hybrid pixel detectors have impressively started showing their capabilities. X-ray imaging detectors, also using the hybrid pixel technology, have greatly advanced the experimental possibilities for diffraction experiments. Monolithic or semi-monolithic devices like CMOS active pixels and DEPFET pixels have now reached a state such that complete vertex detectors for RHIC and superKEKB are being built with these technologies. Finally, new advances towards fully monolithic active pixel detectors, featuring full CMOS electronics merged with efficient signal charge collection, exploiting standard CMOS technologies, SOI and/or 3D integration, show the path for the future. This résumé attempts to extract the main statements of the results and developments presented at this conference.

  12. OMI/Aura Global Ground Pixel Corners 1-Orbit L2 Swath 13x24km V003 (OMPIXCOR) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Version-3 Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Pixel Corner Product, OMPIXCOR, is now available from the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information...

  13. OMI/Aura Zoom-in Ground Pixel Corners 1-Orbit L2 Swath 13x12km V003 (OMPIXCORZ) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Version-3 Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Pixel Corner Product in zoom-in mode, OMPIXCORZ, is now available from the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and...

  14. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, Tobias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the “ITk” (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m2, depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Four layout options are being investigated at the moment, two with forward coverage to |eta| < 3.2 and two to |eta| < 4. For each coverage option, a layout with long barrel staves and a layout with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region are considered. All potential layouts include modules mounted on ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions...

  15. The Phase II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the "ITk" (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m$^2$ , depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as $|\\eta| < 4$. Supporting structures will be ...

  16. The Pixels system: last but not late!

    CERN Multimedia

    Kevin Einsweiler

    The Pixel Detector for ATLAS is one of the smallest, but most challenging components of the experiment. It lives in the dangerous territory directly outside the beampipe, where the radiation environment is particularly fierce, and it must be roughly one million times more radiation-hard than its human designers. Starting at a radius of just 5cm from the interaction point where the proton beams collide, it occupies a volume of slightly more than one meter in length and a half meter in diameter. In this compact region, there are eighty million channels of electronics (most of the electronics channels in ATLAS!), each capable of measuring the charge deposited by a track in a silicon pixel measuring only 50 microns by 400 microns in size (a volume of 0.005 cubic millimeters). A total cooling capacity of 15 KWatts is available to keep it operating comfortably at -5C. This detector is built around, and provides the support for, the central beampipe of ATLAS. It is supported on carbon fiber rails inside of the Pix...

  17. ATLAS rewards two pixel detector suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, presented the ATLAS supplier award to Herbert Reichl, IZM director, and to Simonetta Di Gioia, from the SELEX company.Two of ATLAS’ suppliers were awarded prizes at a ceremony on Wednesday 13 June attended by representatives of the experiment’s management and of CERN. The prizes went to the Fraunhofer Institut für Zuverlässigkeit und Mikrointegration (IZM) in Berlin and the company SELEX Sistemi Integrati in Rome for the manufacture of modules for the ATLAS pixel detector. SELEX supplied 1500 of the modules for the tracker, while IZM produced a further 1300. The modules, each made up of 46080 channels, form the active part of the ATLAS pixel detector. IZM and SELEX received the awards for the excellent quality of their work: the average number of faulty channels per module was less than 2.10-3. They also stayed within budget and on schedule. The difficulty they faced was designing modules based on electronic components and sensor...

  18. Pixel-Tilecal-MDT Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Di Girolamo

    A test with many expectations When an additional week of running (from September 11th to 18th) was allocated for the test-beam, it was decided to give priority to a combined run with the participation of the Pixel, Tilecal and MDT sub-detectors. The integration of these three sub-detectors was possible as they all use the baseline (DAQ-1/EF based) DAQ for test beams (as reported in a previous e-news). The tests and the addition of a common trigger and busy were organized in a short timescale by experts from the three sub-detectors and DAQ/EF. The expectations were many; both looking for problems and finding solutions. The setup The setup, shown in the figure, consisted of the Pixel telescope normally used during the sub-detector tests, two Tilecal barrel modules, two Tilecal extended barrel modules, and six MDT barrel chambers. This fully occupied a length of some 30 meters in the H8 line of the SPS North Area. Each sub-detector used their own specialized front-end electronics. The data collected by modu...

  19. Alignment of the upgraded CMS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schroder, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    The all-silicon tracking system of the CMS experiment provides excellent resolution for charged tracks and an efficient tagging of heavy-flavour jets. After a new pixel detector has been installed during the LHC technical stop at the beginning of 2017, the positions, orientations, and surface curvatures of the sensors needed to be determined with a precision at the order of a few micrometres to ensure the required physics performance. This is far beyond the mechanical mounting precision but can be achieved using a track-based alignment procedure that minimises the track-hit residuals of reconstructed tracks. The results are carefully validated with data-driven methods. In this article, results of the CMS tracker alignment in 2017 from the early detector-commissioning phase and the later operation are presented, that were derived using several million reconstructed tracks in pp-collision and cosmic-ray data. Special emphasis is put on the alignment of the new pixel detector.

  20. Semiconductor pixel detectors for digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novelli, M.; Amendolia, S.R.; Bisogni, M.G.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M.E.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Venturelli, L.; Zucca, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present some results obtained with silicon and gallium arsenide pixel detectors to be applied in the field of digital mammography. Even though GaAs is suitable for medical imaging applications thanks to its atomic number, which allows a very good detection efficiency, it often contains an high concentrations of traps which decrease the charge collection efficiency (CCE). So we have analysed both electrical and spectroscopic performance of different SI GaAs diodes as a function of concentrations of dopants in the substrate, in order to find a material by which we can obtain a CCE allowing the detection of all the photons that interact in the detector. Nevertheless to be able to detect low contrast details, efficiency and CCE are not the only parameters to be optimized; also the stability of the detection system is fundamental. In the past we have worked with Si pixel detectors; even if its atomic number does not allow a good detection efficiency at standard thickness, it has a very high stability. So keeping in mind the need to increase the Silicon detection efficiency we performed simulations to study the behaviour of the electrical potential in order to find a geometry to avoid the risk of electrical breakdown

  1. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Fadmar Osmic, FO

    2006-01-01

    The European Organization for Particle Physics (CERN) in Geneva is currently constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will allow the study of the subnuclear ranges of physics with an accuracy never achieved before. Within the LHC project, ALICE is to the study of strongly interacting matter at extreme densities and high temperatures. ALICE as many other modern High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments uses silicon pixel detectors for tracking close to the interaction point (IP). The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) will constitute the two innermost layers of ALICE, and will due to its high granularity provide precise tracking information. In heavy ion collisions, the track density could be as high as 80 tracks/cm2 in the first SPD layer. The SPD will provide tracking information at radii of 3.9 and 7.6 cm from the IP. It is a fundamental element for the study of the weak decays of the particles carrying heavy flavour, whose typical signature will be a secondary vertex separated from the primary verte...

  2. Window Regression: A Spatial-Temporal Analysis to Estimate Pixels Classified as Low-Quality in MODIS NDVI Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar de Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data are largely used in multitemporal analysis of various Earth-related phenomena, such as vegetation phenology, land use/land cover change, deforestation monitoring, and time series analysis. In general, the MODIS products used to undertake multitemporal analysis are composite mosaics of the best pixels over a certain period of time. However, it is common to find bad pixels in the composition that affect the time series analysis. We present a filtering methodology that considers the pixel position (location in space and time (position in the temporal data series to define a new value for the bad pixel. This methodology, called Window Regression (WR, estimates the value of the point of interest, based on the regression analysis of the data selected by a spatial-temporal window. The spatial window is represented by eight pixels neighboring the pixel under evaluation, and the temporal window selects a set of dates close to the date of interest (either earlier or later. Intensities of noises were simulated over time and space, using the MOD13Q1 product. The method presented and other techniques (4253H twice, Mean Value Iteration (MVI and Savitzky–Golay were evaluated using the Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE and Akaike Information Criteria (AIC. The tests revealed the consistently superior performance of the Window Regression approach to estimate new Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI values irrespective of the intensity of the noise simulated.

  3. Pixel readout electronics development for the ALICE pixel vertex and LHCb RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W; Cantatore, E; Cencelli, V; Dinapoli, R; Heijne, Erik H M; Jarron, Pierre; Lamanna, P; Minervini, D; O'Shea, V; Quiquempoix, V; San Segundo-Bello, D; Van Koningsveld, B; Wyllie, Ken H

    2001-01-01

    The ALICE1LHCB pixel readout chip emerged from previous experience at CERN. The RD-19 collaboration provided the basis for the installation of a pixel system in the WA97 and NA57 experiments. Operation in these experiments was key in the understanding of the system issues. In parallel the RD-49 collaboration provided the basis to obtain radiation tolerance in commercial submicron CMOS through special circuit layout. The new ALICE1LMB chip was developed to serve two different applications: particle tracking in the ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector and particle identification in the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. To satisfy the different needs for these two experiments, the chip can be operated in two different modes. In tracking mode all the 50 mu m*435 mu m pixel cells in the 256*32 array are read out individually, whilst in particle identification mode they are combined in groups of 8 to form a 32*32 array of 400 mu m*425 mu m cells. The circuit is currently being manufactured in a commercial 0.25 mu m CMO...

  4. Three-dimensional cascaded system analysis of a 50 µm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C; Vassiljev, N; Konstantinidis, A C; Speller, R D; Kanicki, J

    2017-03-07

    High-resolution, low-noise x-ray detectors based on the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been developed and proposed for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this study, we evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) imaging performance of a 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). The two-dimensional (2D) angle-dependent modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were experimentally characterized and modeled using the cascaded system analysis at oblique incident angles up to 30°. The cascaded system model was extended to the 3D spatial frequency space in combination with the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction method to calculate the 3D and in-plane MTF, NNPS and DQE parameters. The results demonstrate that the beam obliquity blurs the 2D MTF and DQE in the high spatial frequency range. However, this effect can be eliminated after FBP image reconstruction. In addition, impacts of the image acquisition geometry and detector parameters were evaluated using the 3D cascaded system analysis for DBT. The result shows that a wider projection angle range (e.g.  ±30°) improves the low spatial frequency (below 5 mm -1 ) performance of the CMOS APS detector. In addition, to maintain a high spatial resolution for DBT, a focal spot size of smaller than 0.3 mm should be used. Theoretical analysis suggests that a pixelated scintillator in combination with the 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS detector could further improve the 3D image resolution. Finally, the 3D imaging performance of the CMOS APS and an indirect amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) detector was simulated and compared.

  5. On-Orbit Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Star Tracker Warm Pixel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felikson, Denis; Ekinci, Matthew; Hashmall, Joseph A.; Vess, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the process of identification and analysis of warm pixels in two autonomous star trackers on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. A brief description of the mission orbit and attitude regimes is discussed and pertinent star tracker hardware specifications are given. Warm pixels are defined and the Quality Index parameter is introduced, which can be explained qualitatively as a manifestation of a possible warm pixel event. A description of the algorithm used to identify warm pixel candidates is given. Finally, analysis of dumps of on-orbit star tracker charge coupled devices (CCD) images is presented and an operational plan going forward is discussed. SDO, launched on February 11, 2010, is operated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). SDO is in a geosynchronous orbit with a 28.5 inclination. The nominal mission attitude points the spacecraft X-axis at the Sun, with the spacecraft Z-axis roughly aligned with the Solar North Pole. The spacecraft Y-axis completes the triad. In attitude, SDO moves approximately 0.04 per hour, mostly about the spacecraft Z-axis. The SDO star trackers, manufactured by Galileo Avionica, project the images of stars in their 16.4deg x 16.4deg fields-of-view onto CCD detectors consisting of 512 x 512 pixels. The trackers autonomously identify the star patterns and provide an attitude estimate. Each unit is able to track up to 9 stars. Additionally, each tracker calculates a parameter called the Quality Index, which is a measure of the quality of the attitude solution. Each pixel in the CCD measures the intensity of light and a warns pixel is defined as having a measurement consistently and significantly higher than the mean background intensity level. A warns pixel should also have lower intensity than a pixel containing a star image and will not move across the field of view as the attitude changes (as would a dim star image). It should be noted that the maximum error introduced in the star tracker

  6. Charge Gain, Voltage Gain, and Node Capacitance of the SAPHIRA Detector Pixel by Pixel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrana, Izabella M.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Baker, Ian M.; Jacobson, Shane M.; Goebel, Sean B.

    2018-01-01

    The University of Hawai`i Institute for Astronomy has partnered with Leonardo (formerly Selex) in the development of HgCdTe linear mode avalanche photodiode (L-APD) SAPHIRA detectors. The SAPHIRA (Selex Avalanche Photodiode High-speed Infra-Red Array) is ideally suited for photon-starved astronomical observations, particularly near infrared (NIR) adaptive optics (AO) wave-front sensing. I have measured the stability, and linearity with current, of a 1.7-um (10% spectral bandpass) infrared light emitting diode (IR LED) used to illuminate the SAPHIRA and have then utilized this source to determine the charge gain (in e-/ADU), voltage gain (in uV/ADU), and node capacitance (in fF) for each pixel of the 320x256@24um SAPHIRA. These have previously only been averages over some sub-array. Determined from the ratio of the temporal averaged signal level to variance under constant 1.7-um LED illumination, I present the charge gain pixel-by-pixel in a 64x64 sub-array at the center of the active area of the SAPHIRA (analyzed separately as four 32x32 sub-arrays) to be about 1.6 e-/ADU (σ=0.5 e-/ADU). Additionally, the standard technique of varying the pixel reset voltage (PRV) in 10 mV increments and recording output frames for the same 64x64 subarray found the voltage gain per pixel to be about 11.7 uV/ADU (σ=0.2 uV/ADU). Finally, node capacitance was found to be approximately 23 fF (σ=6 fF) utilizing the aforementioned charge and voltage gain measurements. I further discuss the linearity measurements of the 1.7-um LED used in the charge gain characterization procedure.

  7. Moving from pixel to object scale when inverting radiative transfer models for quantitative estimation of biophysical variables in vegetation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzberger, C.

    2013-12-01

    The robust and accurate retrieval of vegetation biophysical variables using RTM is seriously hampered by the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. The contribution presents our object-based inversion approach and evaluate it against measured data. The proposed method takes advantage of the fact that nearby pixels are generally more similar than those at a larger distance. For example, within a given vegetation patch, nearby pixels often share similar leaf angular distributions. This leads to spectral co-variations in the n-dimensional spectral features space, which can be used for regularization purposes. Using a set of leaf area index (LAI) measurements (n=26) acquired over alfalfa, sugar beet and garlic crops of the Barrax test site (Spain), it is demonstrated that the proposed regularization using neighbourhood information yields more accurate results compared to the traditional pixel-based inversion. Principle of the ill-posed inverse problem and the proposed solution illustrated in the red-nIR feature space using (PROSAIL). [A] spectral trajectory ('soil trajectory') obtained for one leaf angle (ALA) and one soil brightness (αsoil), when LAI varies between 0 and 10, [B] 'soil trajectories' for 5 soil brightness values and three leaf angles, [C] ill-posed inverse problem: different combinations of ALA × αsoil yield an identical crossing point, [D] object-based RTM inversion; only one 'soil trajectory' fits all nine pixelswithin a gliding (3×3) window. The black dots (plus the rectangle=central pixel) represent the hypothetical position of nine pixels within a 3×3 (gliding) window. Assuming that over short distances (× 1 pixel) variations in soil brightness can be neglected, the proposed object-based inversion searches for one common set of ALA × αsoil so that the resulting 'soil trajectory' best fits the nine measured pixels. Ground measured vs. retrieved LAI values for three crops. Left: proposed object-based approach. Right: pixel-based inversion

  8. Hyperspectral single-pixel imaging with dual optical combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Kyuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Takeshi; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    Dual comb spectroscopy (DCS) is based on the combination of Fourier transform spectroscopy with an optical frequency comb (OFC), and has a spectral resolution below MHz order over a spectral range over several tens THz. Furthermore, non-mechanical time-delay scanning enables the rapid data acquisition. However, in order to expand DCS into spectral imaging, a CCD or a CMOS camera cannot be used because a high-speed, point detector is indispensable to acquire the fast interferogram signal in DCS. Therefore, the first demonstration of DCS imaging was based on the mechanical scanning of the sample position. If DCS imaging can be achieved without the need for mechanical scanning, the application field of the DCS imaging will be largely expanded. One promising method to achieve the scan-less 2D imaging is a single-pixel imaging (SPI), enabling scan-less 2D imaging by use of pattern illumination on the sample and a point detector. Also, the accumulation effect in the random pattern illumination increases a signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper, we present combination of DCS with SPI, namely a scan-less DCS imaging. Spectral imaging of a sample indicated the effectiveness and potential of scan-less DCS imaging.

  9. CMOS Pixel Development for the ATLAS Experiment at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ristic, Branislav; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the rate and radiation environment expected at the HL-LHC new approaches are being developed on CMOS pixel detectors, providing charge collection in a depleted layer. They are based on technologies that allow to use high depletion voltages (HV-MAPS) and high resistivity wafers (HR-MAPS) for large depletion depths; radiation hard processed with multiple nested wells to allow CMOS electronics to be embedded safely into the sensor substrate. We are investigating depleted CMOS pixels with monolithic or hybrid designs concerning their suitability for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at LHC. This paper will discuss recent results on the main candidate technologies and the current development towards a monolithic solution.

  10. CMOS pixel sensor development for the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, M.

    2017-12-01

    The current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a fully silicon based detector called Inner Tracker (ITk) before the start of the High Luminosity-LHC project (HL-LHC) in 2026. To cope with the harsh environment expected at the HL-LHC, new approaches are being developed for pixel detectors based on CMOS technology. Such detectors can provide charge collection, analog amplification and digital processing in the same silicon wafer. The radiation hardness is improved thanks to multiple nested wells which give the embedded CMOS electronics sufficient shielding. The goal of this programme is to demonstrate that depleted CMOS pixels are suitable for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at the LHC . A number of alternative solutions have been explored and characterised. In this document, test results of the sensors fabricated in different CMOS processes are reported.

  11. Ion-ion coincidence imaging at high event rate using an in-vacuum pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jingming; Furch, Federico J.; Durá, Judith; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John; Schulz, Claus Peter; Rouzée, Arnaud; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2017-07-01

    A new ion-ion coincidence imaging spectrometer based on a pixelated complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector has been developed for the investigation of molecular ionization and fragmentation processes in strong laser fields. Used as a part of a velocity map imaging spectrometer, the detection system is comprised of a set of microchannel plates and a Timepix detector. A fast time-to-digital converter (TDC) is used to enhance the ion time-of-flight resolution by correlating timestamps registered separately by the Timepix detector and the TDC. In addition, sub-pixel spatial resolution (principle experiment on strong field dissociative double ionization of carbon dioxide molecules (CO2), using a 400 kHz repetition rate laser system. The experimental results demonstrate that the spectrometer can detect multiple ions in coincidence, making it a valuable tool for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules in strong laser fields.

  12. DEPFET: A silicon pixel detector for future colliders. Fundamentals, characterization and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Marinas Pardo, Carlos Manuel; Vos, Marcel Andre

    2011-01-01

    The future electron-positron colliders, either breaking the energy frontier (like ILC or CLIC) or the luminosity frontier (SuperKEKB), impose unprecedented constraints over the new generation of detectors that will be operated in those facilities. In particular, the vertex detectors must be designed for an efficient flavour tagging and excellent vertex reconstruction. To cope with these requirements, highly pixelated sensors with a fast readout, very low material budget and low power consumption must be developed. Although the combination of these factors is a substantial challenge, the DEPFET Collaboration has developed a new generation of sensors that can be operated in such a harsh environment. The DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) is a pixel sensor that combines detection and internal amplification at the same time. With such configuration, thin detectors with good signal-to-noise ratio and low power consumption can be produced. In this thesis, the optimization and performance of two gen...

  13. NEW LENSLET BASED IFS WITH HIGH DETECTOR PIXEL EFFICIENCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian

    2018-01-01

    Three IFS types currently used for optical design are: lenslet array, imager slicer, and lenslet array and fiber combined. Lenslet array based Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is very popular for many astrophysics applications due to its compactness, simplicity, as well as cost and mass savings. The disadvantage of lenslet based IFS is its low detector pixel efficiency. Enough spacing is needed between adjacent spectral traces in cross dispersion direction to avoid wavelength cross-talk, because the same wavelength is not aligned to the same column on detector. Such as on a recent exoplanet coronagraph instrument study to support the coming astrophysics decadal survey (LUVOIR), to cover a 45 λ/D Field of View (FOV) with a spectral resolving power of 200 at shortest wavelength, a 4k x 4k detector array is needed. This large format EMCCD pushes the detector into technology development area with a low TRL. Besides the future mission, it will help WFIRST coronagraph IFS by packing all spectra into a smaller area on detector, which will reduce the chance for electrons to be trapped in pixels, and slow the detector degradation during the mission.The innovation we propose here is to increase the detector packing efficiency by grouping a number of lenslets together to form many mini slits. In other words, a number of spots (Point Spread Function at lenslet focus) are aligned into a line to resemble a mini slit. Therefore, wavelength cross-talk is no longer a concern anymore. This combines the advantage of lenslet array and imager slicer together. The isolation rows between spectral traces in cross dispersion direction can be reduced or removed. So the packing efficiency is greatly increased. Furthermore, the today’s microlithography and etching technique is capable of making such a lenslet array, which will relax the detector demand significantly. It will finally contribute to the habitable exoplanets study to analyzing their spectra from direct images. Detailed theory

  14. Edge effects in a small pixel CdTe for X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, D. D.; Bell, S. J.; Lipp, J.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.; Kachkanov, V.; Sawhney, K. J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Large area detectors capable of operating with high detection efficiency at energies above 30 keV are required in many contemporary X-ray imaging applications. The properties of high Z compound semiconductors, such as CdTe, make them ideally suitable to these applications. The STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory has developed a small pixel CdTe detector with 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch. Historically, these detectors have included a 200 μm wide guard band around the pixelated anode to reduce the effect of defects in the crystal edge. The latest version of the detector ASIC is capable of four-side butting that allows the tiling of N × N flat panel arrays. To limit the dead space between modules to the width of one pixel, edgeless detector geometries have been developed where the active volume of the detector extends to the physical edge of the crystal. The spectroscopic performance of an edgeless CdTe detector bump bonded to the HEXITEC ASIC was tested with sealed radiation sources and compared with a monochromatic X-ray micro-beam mapping measurements made at the Diamond Light Source, U.K. The average energy resolution at 59.54 keV of bulk and edge pixels was 1.23 keV and 1.58 keV, respectively. 87% of the edge pixels present fully spectroscopic performance demonstrating that edgeless CdTe detectors are a promising technology for the production of large panel radiation detectors for X-ray imaging.

  15. 3D Cloud Tomography, Followed by Mean Optical and Microphysical Properties, with Multi-Angle/Multi-Pixel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.; von Allmen, P. A.; Marshak, A.; Bal, G.

    2010-12-01

    The geometrical assumption in all operational cloud remote sensing algorithms is that clouds are plane-parallel slabs, which applies relatively well to the most uniform stratus layers. Its benefit is to justify using classic 1D radiative transfer (RT) theory, where angular details (solar, viewing, azimuthal) are fully accounted for and precise phase functions can be used, to generate the look-up tables used in the retrievals. Unsurprisingly, these algorithms catastrophically fail when applied to cumulus-type clouds, which are highly 3D. This is unfortunate for the cloud-process modeling community that may thrive on in situ airborne data, but would very much like to use satellite data for more than illustrations in their presentations and publications. So, how can we obtain quantitative information from space-based observations of finite aspect ratio clouds? Cloud base/top heights, vertically projected area, mean liquid water content (LWC), and volume-averaged droplet size would be a good start. Motivated by this science need, we present a new approach suitable for sparse cumulus fields where we turn the tables on the standard procedure in cloud remote sensing. We make no a priori assumption about cloud shape, save an approximately flat base, but use brutal approximations about the RT that is necessarily 3D. Indeed, the first order of business is to roughly determine the cloud's outer shape in one of two ways, which we will frame as competing initial guesses for the next phase of shape refinement and volume-averaged microphysical parameter estimation. Both steps use multi-pixel/multi-angle techniques amenable to MISR data, the latter adding a bi-spectral dimension using collocated MODIS data. One approach to rough cloud shape determination is to fit the multi-pixel/multi-angle data with a geometric primitive such as a scalene hemi-ellipsoid with 7 parameters (translation in 3D space, 3 semi-axes, 1 azimuthal orientation); for the radiometry, a simple radiosity

  16. A Data Formatter for the ATLAS Fast Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Liu, Ted; Okumura, Y; Penning, B

    2012-01-01

    The Fast TracKer (FTK) is an upgrade to the ATLAS level-2 trigger. The FTK system will reconstruct tracks using data from the inner Pixel and SCT silicon detector modules at trigger rates up to 100 kHz. We present an overview of the Data Formatter system, which is designed to remap, share and reformat the Pixel and SCT module data to match the geometry of the FTK trigger towers.

  17. Sensor Development for the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rohe, T; Chiochia, V; Cremaldi, L M; Cucciarelli, S; Dorkhov, A; Konecki, M; Prokofiev, K; Regenfus, C; Sanders, D A; Son, S; Speer, T; Swartz, M

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a current R&D activity for the sensor part of the CMS pixel detector. Devices featuring several design and technology options have been irradiated up to a proton fluence of 1E15 (1MeV Neutron)/cm**2 at the CERN PS. Afterwards they have been bump bonded to unirradiated readout chips. The chip allows a non zero suppressed full analogue readout and therefore a good characterization of the sensors in terms of noise and charge collection properties. The samples have been tested using high energy pions in the H2 beam line of the CERN SPS in June and September 2003. The results of this test beam are presented and the differences between the sensor options are discussed.

  18. Operational Experience with the ALICE Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mastroserio, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) constitutes the two innermost layers of the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment and it is the closest detector to the interaction point. As a vertex detector, it has the unique feature of generating a trigger signal that contributes to the L0 trigger of the ALICE experiment. The SPD started collecting data since the very first pp collisions at LHC in 2009 and since then it has taken part in all pp, Pb-Pb and p-Pb data taking campaigns. This contribution will present the main features of the SPD, the detector performance and the operational experience, including calibration and optimization activities from Run 1 to Run 2.

  19. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging.

  20. Irradiation and beam tests qualification for ATLAS IBL Pixel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, I

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will have different steps towards HL-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will consist in the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (foreseen for 2013–2014). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing Pixel Detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase in the radiation damage and the pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance, which will be achieved by reduction of the pixel size and of the material budget. Two different promising silicon sensor technologies (Planar n-in-n and 3D) are currently under investigation for the Pixel Detector. An overview of the sensor technologies' qualification with particular emphasis on irradiation and beam tests is presented.

  1. Irradiation and beam tests qualification for ATLAS IBL Pixel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will have different steps towards HL-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will consist in the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (foreseen for 2013-14). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing pixel detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase of the radiation damage and the pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance, which will be achieved by reduction of the pixel size and of the material budget. Two different promising silicon sensor technologies (Planar n-in-n and 3D) are currently under investigation for the pixel detector. An overview of the sensor technologies’ qualification with particular emphasis on irradiation and beam tests are presented.

  2. Imaging performance with DEPFET pixel matrices for autoradiographic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrici, J.

    2003-03-01

    DEPFET Pixel Sensors offer a very good spatial, time and energy resolution at the same time, thus opening new possibilities in low noise biomedical imaging as well as in particle physics and astronomy. In the DEPFET pixel concept a p-JFET is integrated into a fully depleted high ohmic silicon substrate in every pixel cell such that the absorbed radiation directly modulates the channel current. This leads to a very low noise operation at room temperature. A DEPFET Pixel Bioscope system based on a 64 x 64 DEPFET Pixel matrix has been developed for real time digital autoradiography and well be described here. Studies on the imaging performance of DEPFET pixels such as spatial and energy resolution and first measurements with tritium labeled biological samples are presented. (orig.)

  3. Modulation transfer function of a triangular pixel array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Ayatollah

    2014-07-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is the main parameter that is used to evaluate image quality in electro-optical systems. Detector sampling MTF in most electro-optical systems determines the cutoff frequency of the system. The MTF of the detector depends on its pixel shape. In this work, we calculated the MTF of a detector with an equilateral triangular pixel shape. Some new results were found in deriving the MTF for the equilateral triangular pixel shape.

  4. Dichromatic Gray Pixel for Camera-agnostic Color Constancy

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Yanlin; Chen, Ke; Nikkanen, Jarno; Kämäräinen, Joni-Kristian; Matas, Jiri

    2018-01-01

    We propose a novel statistical color constancy method, especially suitable for the Camera-agnostic Color Constancy, i.e. the scenario where nothing is known a priori about the capturing devices. The method, called Dichromatic Gray Pixel, or DGP, relies on a novel gray pixel detection algorithm derived using the Dichromatic Reflection Model. DGP is suitable for camera-agnostic color constancy since varying devices are set to make achromatic pixels look gray under standard neutral illumination....

  5. Steganography on quantum pixel images using Shannon entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurel, Carlos Ortega; Dong, Shi-Hai; Cruz-Irisson, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a steganographical algorithm based on least significant bit (LSB) from the most significant bit information (MSBI) and the equivalence of a bit pixel image to a quantum pixel image, which permits to make the information communicate secretly onto quantum pixel images for its secure transmission through insecure channels. This algorithm offers higher security since it exploits the Shannon entropy for an image.

  6. Bier and Pastis, a pixel readout prototype chip for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, C; Bonzom, V; Delpierre, P A; Desch, Klaus; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Meuser, S; Raith, B A; Wermes, N

    2000-01-01

    The 12*63 pixel readout prototype chip Bieu&Pastis, designed to cope with the environment imposed on a pixel detector by high-energy proton-proton collisions as expected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), is described. The chip contains the full pixel cell functionality, but not yet the full peripheral architecture for data transfer and readout with LHC speed. Design considerations and lab tests to characterize the performance as well as some test beam results are described. (7 refs).

  7. SOI Pixel Sensor for Gamma-Ray Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Shimazoe, Kenji; Atiqah, Fairuz; Yoshihara, Yuri; Koyama, Akihiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Orita, Tadashi; Kamada, Kei; Takeda, Ayaki; Tsuru, Takeshi; Arai, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    SOI (Silicon-On-Insulator) pixel sensor is promising technology for developing the high position resolution detector by integrating the small pixels and circuits in the monolithic way. The event driven (trigger mode) SOI based pixel sensor has also been developed for the application of X-ray astronomy with the purpose of reducing the noise using anti-coincidence event. This trigger mode SOI pixel sensor working with in the rate of kilo Hz is also a promising scatter detector for advanced Comp...

  8. Suitability of the RGB Channels for a Pixel Manipulation in a Spatial Domain Data Hiding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ante Poljicak

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine which channel in rgb color space is the most suitable (regarding perceptibility for a pixel manipulation in a spatial domain data  hiding techniques. For this purpose three custom test targets were generated. The research also shows the behavior of two closely related colors in the ps (Print-Scan process. The results are interpreted using both a quantitative method (statistical comparison and a qualitative method (visual comparison.

  9. Fast discriminative latent Dirichlet allocation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the code for fast discriminative latent Dirichlet allocation, which is an algorithm for topic modeling and text classification. The related paper is at...

  10. SPIDR, a general-purpose readout system for pixel ASICs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijden, B. van der; Visser, J.; Beuzekom, M. van; Boterenbrood, H.; Munneke, B.; Schreuder, F.; Kulis, S.

    2017-01-01

    The SPIDR (Speedy PIxel Detector Readout) system is a flexible general-purpose readout platform that can be easily adapted to test and characterize new and existing detector readout ASICs. It is originally designed for the readout of pixel ASICs from the Medipix/Timepix family, but other types of ASICs or front-end circuits can be read out as well. The SPIDR system consists of an FPGA board with memory and various communication interfaces, FPGA firmware, CPU subsystem and an API library on the PC . The FPGA firmware can be adapted to read out other ASICs by re-using IP blocks. The available IP blocks include a UDP packet builder, 1 and 10 Gigabit Ethernet MAC's and a 'soft core' CPU . Currently the firmware is targeted at the Xilinx VC707 development board and at a custom board called Compact-SPIDR . The firmware can easily be ported to other Xilinx 7 series and ultra scale FPGAs. The gap between an ASIC and the data acquisition back-end is bridged by the SPIDR system. Using the high pin count VITA 57 FPGA Mezzanine Card (FMC) connector only a simple chip carrier PCB is required. A 1 and a 10 Gigabit Ethernet interface handle the connection to the back-end. These can be used simultaneously for high-speed data and configuration over separate channels. In addition to the FMC connector, configurable inputs and outputs are available for synchronization with other detectors. A high resolution (≈ 27 ps bin size) Time to Digital converter is provided for time stamping events in the detector. The SPIDR system is frequently used as readout for the Medipix3 and Timepix3 ASICs. Using the 10 Gigabit Ethernet interface it is possible to read out a single chip at full bandwidth or up to 12 chips at a reduced rate. Another recent application is the test-bed for the VeloPix ASIC, which is developed for the Vertex Detector of the LHCb experiment. In this case the SPIDR system processes the 20 Gbps scrambled data stream from the VeloPix and distributes it over four

  11. SPIDR, a general-purpose readout system for pixel ASICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, B.; Visser, J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Kulis, S.; Munneke, B.; Schreuder, F.

    2017-02-01

    The SPIDR (Speedy PIxel Detector Readout) system is a flexible general-purpose readout platform that can be easily adapted to test and characterize new and existing detector readout ASICs. It is originally designed for the readout of pixel ASICs from the Medipix/Timepix family, but other types of ASICs or front-end circuits can be read out as well. The SPIDR system consists of an FPGA board with memory and various communication interfaces, FPGA firmware, CPU subsystem and an API library on the PC . The FPGA firmware can be adapted to read out other ASICs by re-using IP blocks. The available IP blocks include a UDP packet builder, 1 and 10 Gigabit Ethernet MAC's and a "soft core" CPU . Currently the firmware is targeted at the Xilinx VC707 development board and at a custom board called Compact-SPIDR . The firmware can easily be ported to other Xilinx 7 series and ultra scale FPGAs. The gap between an ASIC and the data acquisition back-end is bridged by the SPIDR system. Using the high pin count VITA 57 FPGA Mezzanine Card (FMC) connector only a simple chip carrier PCB is required. A 1 and a 10 Gigabit Ethernet interface handle the connection to the back-end. These can be used simultaneously for high-speed data and configuration over separate channels. In addition to the FMC connector, configurable inputs and outputs are available for synchronization with other detectors. A high resolution (≈ 27 ps bin size) Time to Digital converter is provided for time stamping events in the detector. The SPIDR system is frequently used as readout for the Medipix3 and Timepix3 ASICs. Using the 10 Gigabit Ethernet interface it is possible to read out a single chip at full bandwidth or up to 12 chips at a reduced rate. Another recent application is the test-bed for the VeloPix ASIC, which is developed for the Vertex Detector of the LHCb experiment. In this case the SPIDR system processes the 20 Gbps scrambled data stream from the VeloPix and distributes it over four 10 Gigabit

  12. A hybrid 3D LIDAR imager based on pixel-by-pixel scanning and DS-OCDMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Yongwan

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new hybrid 3D light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system, which measures a scene with 1280 x 600 pixels at a refresh rate of 60fps. The emitted pulses of each pixel are modulated by direct sequence optical code division multiple access (DS-OCDMA) techniques. The modulated pulses include a unique device identification number, the pixel position in the line, and a checksum. The LIDAR emits the modulated pulses periodically without waiting to receive returning light at the detector. When all the pixels are completely through the process, the travel time, amplitude, width, and speed are used by the pixel-by-pixel scanning LIDAR imager to generate point cloud data as the measured results. We programmed the entire hybrid 3D LIDAR operation in a simulator to observe the functionality accomplished by our proposed model.

  13. Study of plasma charging-induced white pixel defect increase in CMOS active pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokashiki, Ken; Bai, KeunHee; Baek, KyeHyun; Kim, Yongjin; Min, Gyungjin; Kang, Changjin; Cho, Hanku; Moon, Jootae

    2007-01-01

    Plasma process-induced 'white pixel defect' (WPD) of CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) is studied for Si3N4 spacer etch back process by using a magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE) system. WPD preferably takes place at the wafer edge region when the magnetized plasma is applied to Si3N4 etch. Plasma charging analysis reveals that the plasma charge-up characteristic is well matching the edge-intensive WPD generation, rather than the UV radiation. Plasma charging on APS transfer gate might lead to a gate leakage, which could play a role in generation of signal noise or WPD. In this article the WPD generation mechanism will be discussed from plasma charging point of view

  14. Improved Space Object Observation Techniques Using CMOS Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, T.; Hinze, A.; Schlatter, P.; Silha, J.; Peltonen, J.; Santti, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2013-08-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contain their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. Presently applied and proposed optical observation strategies for space debris surveys and space surveillance applications had to be analyzed. The major design drivers were identified and potential benefits from using available and future CMOS sensors were assessed. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, the characteristics of a particular CMOS sensor available at the Zimmerwald observatory were analyzed by performing laboratory test measurements.

  15. Testing and Integration of the Service Cylinders for the CMS Phase 1 pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ngadiuba, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The present 3-layer CMS pixel detector will be replaced with a new 4-layer pixel system, referred to as Phase~1 upgrade, during the LHC extended technical stop in winter 2016/2017. The upgraded detector will allow to maintain the excellent tracking performance of CMS at the upcoming higher luminosity conditions at the LHC. The addition of an extra layer, closer to the beam pipe, demands a complete redesign of its services. The barrel pixel detector is attached to four half cylinders which carry the services along the beam pipe, accommodate the cooling lines and house the electronics for detector readout and control. The service cylinders are a complex system in design as well as in production due to the large number of channels and tight space requirements. In this document we present the design of the system and discuss the construction and testing of the service cylinders for the barrel pixel detector. Furthermore, we present results of the testing and calibrations carried out with a set of new digital dete...

  16. Pixel detector modules performance for ATLAS IBL and future pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00355104; Pernegger, Heinz

    2015-11-06

    The ATLAS Detector is one of the four big particle physics experiments at CERN’s LHC. Its innermost tracking system consisted of the 3-Layer silicon Pixel Detector (~80M readout channels) in the first run (2010-2012). Over the past two years it was refurbished and equipped with new services as well as a new beam monitor. The major upgrade, however, was the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). It adds ~12M readout channels for improved vertexing, tracking robustness and b-tagging performance for the upcoming runs, before the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will take place. This thesis covers two main aspects of Pixel detector performance studies: The main work was the planning, commissioning and operation of a test bench that meets the requirements of current pixel detector components. Each newly built ATLAS IBL stave was thoroughly tested, following a specifically developed procedure, and initially calibrated in that setup. A variety of production accompanying measurements as well as preliminary results after integ...

  17. A semi-analytic approximation of charge induction in monolithic pixelated CdZnTe radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bale, Derek S.

    2010-01-01

    A semi-analytic approximation to the weighting potential within monolithic pixelated CdZnTe radiation detectors is presented. The approximation is based on solving the multi-dimensional Laplace equation that results upon replacing rectangular pixels with equal-area circular pixels. Further, we utilize the simplicity of the resulting approximate weighting potential to extend the well-known Hecht equation, describing charge induction in a parallel plate detector, to that approximating the multi-dimensional charge induction within a pixelated detector. These newly found expressions for the weighting potential and charge induction in a pixelated detector are compared throughout to full 3D electrostatic and monte carlo simulations using eVDSIM (eV Microelectronics Device SIMulator). The semi-analytic expressions derived in this paper can be evaluated quickly, and can therefore be used to efficiently reduce the size and dimensionality of the parameter space on which a detailed 3D numerical analysis is needed for pixelated detector design in a wide range of applications.

  18. A 20 Mfps high frame-depth CMOS burst-mode imager with low power in-pixel NMOS-only passive amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; San Segundo Bello, D.; Coppejans, P.; Craninckx, J.; Wambacq, P.; Borremans, J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a 20 Mfps 32 × 84 pixels CMOS burst-mode imager featuring high frame depth with a passive in-pixel amplifier. Compared to the CCD alternatives, CMOS burst-mode imagers are attractive for their low power consumption and integration of circuitry such as ADCs. Due to storage capacitor size and its noise limitations, CMOS burst-mode imagers usually suffer from a lower frame depth than CCD implementations. In order to capture fast transitions over a longer time span, an in-pixel CDS technique has been adopted to reduce the required memory cells for each frame by half. Moreover, integrated with in-pixel CDS, an in-pixel NMOS-only passive amplifier alleviates the kTC noise requirements of the memory bank allowing the usage of smaller capacitors. Specifically, a dense 108-cell MOS memory bank (10fF/cell) has been implemented inside a 30μm pitch pixel, with an area of 25 × 30μm2 occupied by the memory bank. There is an improvement of about 4x in terms of frame depth per pixel area by applying in-pixel CDS and amplification. With the amplifier's gain of 3.3, an FD input-referred RMS noise of 1mV is achieved at 20 Mfps operation. While the amplification is done without burning DC current, including the pixel source follower biasing, the full pixel consumes 10μA at 3.3V supply voltage at full speed. The chip has been fabricated in imec's 130nm CMOS CIS technology.

  19. A Fast Color Image Segmentation Approach Using GDF with Improved Region-Level Ncut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Color image segmentation is fundamental in image processing and computer vision. A novel approach, GDF-Ncut, is proposed to segment color images by integrating generalized data field (GDF and improved normalized cuts (Ncut. To start with, the hierarchy-grid structure is constructed in the color feature space of an image in an attempt to reduce the time complexity but preserve the quality of image segmentation. Then a fast hierarchy-grid clustering is performed under GDF potential estimation and therefore image pixels are merged into disjoint oversegmented but meaningful initial regions. Finally, these regions are presented as a weighted undirected graph, upon which Ncut algorithm merges homogenous initial regions to achieve final image segmentation. The use of the fast clustering improves the effectiveness of Ncut because regions-based graph is constructed instead of pixel-based graph. Meanwhile, during the processes of Ncut matrix computation, oversegmented regions are grouped into homogeneous parts for greatly ameliorating the intermediate problems from GDF and accordingly decreasing the sensitivity to noise. Experimental results on a variety of color images demonstrate that the proposed method significantly reduces the time complexity while partitioning image into meaningful and physically connected regions. The method is potentially beneficial to serve object extraction and pattern recognition.

  20. Label-Free Biomedical Imaging Using High-Speed Lock-In Pixel Sensor for Stimulated Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Kamel; Lioe, De Xing; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2017-11-09

    Raman imaging eliminates the need for staining procedures, providing label-free imaging to study biological samples. Recent developments in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) have achieved fast acquisition speed and hyperspectral imaging. However, there has been a problem of lack of detectors suitable for MHz modulation rate parallel detection, detecting multiple small SRS signals while eliminating extremely strong offset due to direct laser light. In this paper, we present a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering that is capable of obtaining the difference of Stokes-on and Stokes-off signal at modulation frequency of 20 MHz in the pixel before reading out. The generated small SRS signal is extracted and amplified in a pixel using a high-speed and large area lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) employing two-step ion implantation and an in-pixel pair of low-pass filter, a sample and hold circuit and a switched capacitor integrator using a fully differential amplifier. A prototype chip is fabricated using 0.11 μm CMOS image sensor technology process. SRS spectra and images of stearic acid and 3T3-L1 samples are successfully obtained. The outcomes suggest that hyperspectral and multi-focus SRS imaging at video rate is viable after slight modifications to the pixel architecture and the acquisition system.

  1. Label-Free Biomedical Imaging Using High-Speed Lock-In Pixel Sensor for Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Mars

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Raman imaging eliminates the need for staining procedures, providing label-free imaging to study biological samples. Recent developments in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS have achieved fast acquisition speed and hyperspectral imaging. However, there has been a problem of lack of detectors suitable for MHz modulation rate parallel detection, detecting multiple small SRS signals while eliminating extremely strong offset due to direct laser light. In this paper, we present a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering that is capable of obtaining the difference of Stokes-on and Stokes-off signal at modulation frequency of 20 MHz in the pixel before reading out. The generated small SRS signal is extracted and amplified in a pixel using a high-speed and large area lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM employing two-step ion implantation and an in-pixel pair of low-pass filter, a sample and hold circuit and a switched capacitor integrator using a fully differential amplifier. A prototype chip is fabricated using 0.11 μm CMOS image sensor technology process. SRS spectra and images of stearic acid and 3T3-L1 samples are successfully obtained. The outcomes suggest that hyperspectral and multi-focus SRS imaging at video rate is viable after slight modifications to the pixel architecture and the acquisition system.

  2. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P. L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Puggioni, C.; Rousset, J.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W.; Siddhanta, S.; Usai, G.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Yi, J.

    2015-06-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  3. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P.L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C.A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.

    2015-01-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented

  4. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, P., E-mail: yangping0710@126.com [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Chalmet, P.L. [MIND, Archamps (France); Chanlek, N. [Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand); Collu, A. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Gao, C. [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kofarago, M. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kim, D. [Dongguk and Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lattuca, A. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); Marin Tobon, C.A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marras, D. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Mager, M.; Martinengo, P. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mazza, G. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); and others

    2015-06-11

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  5. Pixel size and pitch measurements of liquid crystal spatial light ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 65; Issue 2. Pixel size and pitch ... Liquid crystal displays; spatial light modulator; optical diffraction. Abstract. We present a simple technique for the determination of pixel size and pitch of liquid crystal (LC) based spatial light modulator (SLM). The proposed method is ...

  6. Novel integrated CMOS pixel structures for vertex detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Matis, Howard S.; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans Georg; Wieman, Howard H.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2003-10-29

    Novel CMOS active pixel structures for vertex detector applications have been designed and tested. The overriding goal of this work is to increase the signal to noise ratio of the sensors and readout circuits. A large-area native epitaxial silicon photogate was designed with the aim of increasing the charge collected per struck pixel and to reduce charge diffusion to neighboring pixels. The photogate then transfers the charge to a low capacitance readout node to maintain a high charge to voltage conversion gain. Two techniques for noise reduction are also presented. The first is a per-pixel kT/C noise reduction circuit that produces results similar to traditional correlated double sampling (CDS). It has the advantage of requiring only one read, as compared to two for CDS, and no external storage or subtraction is needed. The technique reduced input-referred temporal noise by a factor of 2.5, to 12.8 e{sup -}. Finally, a column-level active reset technique is explored that suppresses kT/C noise during pixel reset. In tests, noise was reduced by a factor of 7.6 times, to an estimated 5.1 e{sup -} input-referred noise. The technique also dramatically reduces fixed pattern (pedestal) noise, by up to a factor of 21 in our tests. The latter feature may possibly reduce pixel-by-pixel pedestal differences to levels low enough to permit sparse data scan without per-pixel offset corrections.

  7. Comparing three spaceborne optical sensors via fine scale pixel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User @

    Geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA), as opposed to pixel-based image processing, is also emerging as a popular classification method. (Thunig et al., 2011; Tehrany et al., 2013). The process involves segmentation during which the pixels in an image are grouped into homogeneous interlocking regions as ...

  8. CMOS monolithic pixel sensors research and development at LBNL

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper summarizes the recent progress in the design and characterization of CMOS pixel sensors at LBNL. Results of lab tests, beam tests and radiation hardness tests carried out at LBNL on a test structure with pixels of various sizes are reported. The first results of the characterization of back-thinned CMOS ...

  9. Pixel Strength and Digitization of Radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Aarthi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a pilot study to compare the digitized images of panoramic radiographs with the original film images for perceived clarity and diagnostic quality, and to make comparison amongst the digitized film images captured by a digital camera at different resolution settings to assess if differences in clarity and/or diagnostic quality existed. Eight orthopantomograms were photographed using a digital camera, Nikon Finepix S7000, at four different resolution settings - 1 M pix, 3 M pix, 6M pix and 12 M pix respectively. These thirty two digital images were transferred to a laptop computer, Acer Travelmate 290 E, saved as JPEG files and viewed using ′Planmeca Dimaxis′ software. Five observers made comparison between the film and digitized images and also amongst the images digitized with various pixel strengths. Images were ranked for clarity and diagnostic quality. Data was analyzed using statistical tests. Results indicated no significant difference in clarity and diagnostic quality between conventional radiographs and their corresponding digitized images. The images digitized with the highest resolution were better than those digitized with the other lower resolutions.

  10. The ALICE silicon pixel detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is again reaching its startup phase at the European Organization for Particle Physics (CERN). The LHC started its operation on the 10 th of September, 2008 with huge success managing to sent the the first beam successfully around the entire ring in less than an hour after the first injection in one direction, and later that day in the opposite direction. Unfortunately, on the 19 th of September, an accident occurred during the 5.5 TeV magnet commissioning in Sector 34, which will significantly delay the operation of the LHC. The ALICE experiment will exploit the collisions of accelerated ions produced at the LHC to study strongly interacting matter at extreme densities and high temperatures. e ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) represents the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Traing System (ITS) located at radii of 3.9 cm and 7.6 cm from the Interaction Point (IP). One of the main tasks of the SPD is to provide precise traing information. is information is fundamental for the study of weak decays of heavy flavor particles, since the corresponding signature is a secondary vertex separated from the primary vertex only by a few hundred micrometers. e tra density could be as high as 80 tracks per cm 2 in the innermost SPD layer as a consequence of a heavy ion collision. The SPD will provide a spatial resolution of around ≅12 μm in the rφ direction and ≅70 μm in the z direction. The expected occupancy of the SPD ranges from 0.4% to 1.5% which makes it an excellent charged particle multiplicity detector in the pseudorapidity region |η| < 2. Furthermore, by combining all possible hits in the SPD, one can get a rough estimate of the position of the primary interaction. One of the challenges is the tight material budget constraint (<1% radiation length per layer) in order to limit the scattering of the traversing particles. e silicon sensor and its readout chip have a total thickness of only 350 μm and the signal lines from the

  11. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Benoit, Mathieu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the “ITk” (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of the ITk will consist of a pixel detector with stave-like support structures in the most central region and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions; there may also be novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap regions. The new detector could have as much as 14 m2 of sensitive silicon. Support structures will be based on low mass, highly stable and highly thermally conductive carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide. The ITk will be instrumented with new sensors and readout electronics to provide improved tracking performance compared to the current detector. All the module components must be performant enough and robust enough to cope with the expected high particle multiplicity and severe radiation background of the High-Luminosity LHC. Readout...

  12. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced in 2025 during the LHC Phase-II shutdown by an all-silicon detector called the “ITk” (Inner Tracker). The innermost part of ITk will be a pixel detector containing about 12.5m2 of sensitive silicon. The silicon modules are arranged on 5 layers of stave-like support structures in the most central region and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions covering out to |η| < 4; a mid-eta region (~1 < |η| < ~2) will be occupied by novel inclined support structures which keep the angle of incidence of high-momentum tracks more closely normal to the sensitive silicon. All supports will be based on low mass, highly stable and highly thermally-conductive carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide flowing in thin-walled titanium pipes. An extensive prototyping programme, including thermal, mechanical and electrical studies, is being carried out on all the types of support structures. The HL-LHC is expected to deliver up t...

  13. P.I.X.S.C.A.N.: a micro-CT scanner for small animal based on hybrid pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, R.

    2008-03-01

    Since more than a dozen years, efforts were led in the field of X-ray tomography for small animals, principally for the improvement of spatial resolution and the diminution of the absorbed dose. The C.P.P.M. developed the micro-CT P.I.X.S.C.A.N. based on the hybrid pixel detector X.P.A.D.2. In this context, my thesis work consists in studying the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 and the contribution of the hybrid pixels in the imaging of small animals. A fast analytical simulation, FastSimu, was developed. An extrapolation of the performance of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N, as well as the validation of the results obtained with the measured data, were led by means of the analytical simulator FastSimu. The demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 allowed to obtain reconstructed images with a rather good quality for a relatively weak absorbed dose. Its spatial resolution is degraded by the high number of defective pixels of the detector X.P.A.D.2. Beyond this study, a new version of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 is under construction. This latter, characterized by two and a half times smaller pixels and about no defective pixels will bring a considerable improvement on spatial resolution. (author)

  14. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented, including calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: ~96 % of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency e...

  15. Commissioning the CMS pixel detector with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Heyburn, Bernadette

    2009-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of two general purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. The CMS experiment prides itself on an ambitious, all silicon based, tracking system. After almost 20 years of design and construction the CMS tracker detector has been installed and commissioned. The tracker detector consists of ten layers of silicon microstrip detectors while three layers of pixel detector modules are situated closest to the interaction point. The pixel detector consists of 66 million pixels of 100mm 150mm size, and is designed to use the shape of the actual charge distribution of charged particles to gain hit resolutions down to 12mm. This paper will focus on commissioning activities in the CMS pixel detector. Results from cosmic ray studies will be presented, in addition to results obtained from the integration of the pixel detector within the CMS detector and various calibration and alignment analyses.

  16. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  17. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschbuehl, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.7% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  18. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lapoire, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  19. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lapoire, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as B-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification.

  20. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: approximately 97% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  1. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.8% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  2. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deluca, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5\\% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, ...

  3. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump- bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, a...

  4. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deluca, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  5. Status of the CMS Phase I Pixel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon

    2016-09-21

    A new pixel detector for the CMS experiment is being built, owing to the instantaneous luminosities anticipated for the Phase~I Upgrade of the LHC. The new CMS pixel detector provides four-hit tracking while featuring a significantly reduced material budget as well as new cooling and powering schemes. A new front-end readout chip mitigates buffering and bandwidth limitations, and comprises a low-threshold comparator. These improvements allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve the efficiency of the current pixel tracker at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. This contribution gives an overview of the design of the upgraded pixel detector and the status of the upgrade project, and presents test beam performance measurements of the production read-out chip.

  6. DAQ Hardware and software development for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment was extended by about 12 million pixels with the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Data-taking and tuning procedures have been implemented by employing newly designed read-out hardware, which supports the full detector bandwidth even for calibration. The hardware is supported by an embedded software stack running on the read-out boards. The same boards will be used to upgrade the read-out bandwidth for the two outermost layers of the ATLAS Pixel Barrel (54 million pixels). We present the IBL read-out hardware and the supporting software architecture used to calibrate and operate the 4-layer ATLAS Pixel detector. We discuss the technical implementations and status for data taking, validation of the DAQ system in recent cosmic ray data taking, in-situ calibrations, and results from additional tests in preparation for Run 2 at the LHC.

  7. Realistic full wave modeling of focal plane array pixels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Jorgenson, Roy E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Davids, Paul [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Photonic Microsystems Dept.; Peters, David W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Photonic Microsystems Dept.

    2017-11-01

    Here, we investigate full-wave simulations of realistic implementations of multifunctional nanoantenna enabled detectors (NEDs). We focus on a 2x2 pixelated array structure that supports two wavelengths of operation. We design each resonating structure independently using full-wave simulations with periodic boundary conditions mimicking the whole infinite array. We then construct a supercell made of a 2x2 pixelated array with periodic boundary conditions mimicking the full NED; in this case, however, each pixel comprises 10-20 antennas per side. In this way, the cross-talk between contiguous pixels is accounted for in our simulations. We observe that, even though there are finite extent effects, the pixels work as designed, each responding at the respective wavelength of operation. This allows us to stress that realistic simulations of multifunctional NEDs need to be performed to verify the design functionality by taking into account finite extent and cross-talk effects.

  8. Development of radiation hardened pixel sensors for charged particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Koziel, Michal

    2014-01-01

    CMOS Pixel Sensors are being developed since a few years to equip vertex detectors for future high-energy physics experiments with the crucial advantages of a low material budget and low production costs. The features simultaneously required are a short readout time, high granularity and high tolerance to radiation. This thesis mainly focuses on the radiation tolerance studies. To achieve the targeted readout time (tens of microseconds), the sensor pixel readout was organized in parallel columns restricting in addition the readout to pixels that had collected the signal charge. The pixels became then more complex, and consequently more sensitive to radiation. Different in-pixel architectures were studied and it was concluded that the tolerance to ionizing radiation was limited to 300 krad with the 0.35- m fabrication process currently used, while the targeted value was several Mrad. Improving this situation calls for implementation of the sensors in processes with a smaller feature size which naturally imp...

  9. Readout of TPC Tracking Chambers with GEMs and Pixel Chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadyk, John; Kim, T.; Freytsis, M.; Button-Shafer, J.; Kadyk, J.; Vahsen, S.E.; Wenzel, W.A.

    2007-12-21

    Two layers of GEMs and the ATLAS Pixel Chip, FEI3, have been combined and tested as a prototype for Time Projection Chamber (TPC) readout at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The double-layer GEM system amplifies charge with gain sufficient to detect all track ionization. The suitability of three gas mixtures for this application was investigated, and gain measurements are presented. A large sample of cosmic ray tracks was reconstructed in 3D by using the simultaneous timing and 2D spatial information from the pixel chip. The chip provides pixel charge measurement as well as timing. These results demonstrate that a double GEM and pixel combination, with a suitably modified pixel ASIC, could meet the stringent readout requirements of the ILC.

  10. 8-spot smFRET analysis using two 8-pixel SPAD arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingargiola, Antonino; Panzeri, Francesco; Sarkosh, Niusha; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2013-02-22

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) techniques are now widely used to address outstanding problems in biology and biophysics. In order to study freely diffusing molecules, current approaches consist in exciting a low concentration (pixel Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs). A large enough number of single-molecule bursts must be accumulated in order to compute FRET efficiencies with sufficient statistics. As a result, the minimum timescale of observable phenomena is set by the minimum acquisition time needed for accurate measurements, typically a few minutes or more, limiting this approach mostly to equilibrium studies. Increasing smFRET analysis throughput would allow studying dynamics with shorter timescales. We recently demonstrated a new multi-spot excitation approach, employing a novel multi-pixel SPAD array, using a simplified dual-view setup in which a single 8-pixel SPAD array was used to collect FRET data from 4 independent spots. In this work we extend our results to 8 spots and use two 8-SPAD arrays to collect donor and acceptor photons and demonstrate the capabilities of this system by studying a series of doubly labeled dsDNA samples with different donor-acceptor distances ranging from low to high FRET efficiencies. Our results show that it is possible to enhance the throughput of smFRET measurements in solution by almost one order of magnitude, opening the way for studies of single-molecule dynamics with fast timescale once larger SPAD arrays become available.

  11. A 65 nm CMOS analog processor with zero dead time for future pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaioni, L., E-mail: luigi.gaioni@unibg.it [Università di Bergamo, I-24044 Dalmine (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Braga, D.; Christian, D.C.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia IL (United States); Nodari, B. [Università di Bergamo, I-24044 Dalmine (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, APC/IN2P3, Paris (France); Ratti, L. [Università di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Re, V. [Università di Bergamo, I-24044 Dalmine (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Zimmerman, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia IL (United States)

    2017-02-11

    Next generation pixel chips at the High-Luminosity (HL) LHC will be exposed to extremely high levels of radiation and particle rates. In the so-called Phase II upgrade, ATLAS and CMS will need a completely new tracker detector, complying with the very demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity (up to 5×10{sup 34} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} in the next decade). This work is concerned with the design of a synchronous analog processor with zero dead time developed in a 65 nm CMOS technology, conceived for pixel detectors at the HL-LHC experiment upgrades. It includes a low noise, fast charge sensitive amplifier featuring a detector leakage compensation circuit, and a compact, single ended comparator that guarantees very good performance in terms of channel-to-channel dispersion of threshold without needing any pixel-level trimming. A flash ADC is exploited for digital conversion immediately after the charge amplifier. A thorough discussion on the design of the charge amplifier and the comparator is provided along with an exhaustive set of simulation results.

  12. The MOS-type DEPFET pixel sensor for the ILC environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andricek, L.; Fischer, P.; Heinzinger, K.; Herrmann, S.; Herz, D.; Karagounis, M.; Kohrs, R.; Krueger, H.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Moser, H.-G.; Peric, I.; Reuen, L.; Richter, R.H.; Sandow, C.; Schnecke, M.; Schopper, F.; Strueder, L.; Toerne, E.V.; Treis, J.; Trimpl, M.; Velthuis, J.; Wermes, N.; Woelfel, S.

    2006-01-01

    A new generation of MOS-type DEPFET active pixel sensors in double metal/double poly technology with ∼25 μm pixel size has been developed to meet the requirements of the vertex detector at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The paper presents the design and technology of the new linear MOS-type DEPFET sensors including a module concept and results of a feasibility study on how to build ultra-thin fully depleted sensors. One of the major challenges at the ILC is the dominant e + e - pair background from beam-beam interactions. The resulting high occupancy in the first layer of the vertex detector can be reduced by an extremely fast read out of the pixel arrays but the pair-produced electrons will also damage the sensor by ionization. Like all MOS devices, the DEPFET is inherently susceptible to ionizing radiation. The predominant effect of this kind of irradiation is the shift of the threshold voltage to more negative values due to the build up of positive oxide charges. The paper presents the first results of the irradiation of such devices with hard X-rays and gamma rays from a 60 Co source up to 1 Mrad(Si) under various biasing conditions

  13. System test and noise performance studies at the ATLAS pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingarten, J.

    2007-09-15

    The central component of the ATLAS Inner Tracker is the pixel detector. It consists of three barrel layers and three disk-layers in the end-caps in both forward directions. The innermost barrel layer is mounted at a distance of about 5 cm from the interaction region. With its very high granularity, truly two-dimensional hit information, and fast readout it is well suited to cope with the high densities of charged tracks, expected this close to the interaction region. The huge number of readout channels necessitates a very complex services infrastructure for powering, readout and safety. After a description of the pixel detector and its services infrastructure, key results from the system test at CERN are presented. Furthermore the noise performance of the pixel detector, crucial for high tracking and vertexing efficiencies, is studied. Measurements of the single-channel random noise are presented together with studies of common mode noise and measurements of the noise occupancy using a random trigger generator. (orig.)

  14. Experiment on digital CDS with 33-M pixel 120-fps super hi-vision image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonai, J.; Yasue, T.; Kitamura, K.; Hayashida, T.; Watabe, T.; Shimamoto, H.; Kawahito, S.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a CMOS image sensor with 33 million pixels and 120 frames per second (fps) for Super Hi-Vision (SHV:8K version of UHDTV). There is a way to reduce the fixed pattern noise (FPN) caused in CMOS image sensors by using digital correlated double sampling (digital CDS), but digital CDS methods need high-speed analog-to-digital conversion and are not applicable to conventional UHDTV image sensors due to their speed limit. Our image sensor, on the other hand, has a very fast analog-to-digital converter (ADC) using "two-stage cyclic ADC" architecture that is capable of being driven at 120-fps, which is double the normal frame rate for TV. In this experiment, we performed experimental digital CDS using the high-frame rate UHDTV image sensor. By reading the same row twice at 120-fps and subtracting dark pixel signals from accumulated pixel signals, we obtained a 60-fps equivalent video signal with digital noise reduction. The results showed that the VFPN was effectively reduced from 24.25 e-rms to 0.43 e-rms.

  15. The SHARC II 350-Micron Bolometer Array: 384 Pixels Read in "Total Power" Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Charles; Allen, Christine A.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Phillips, Thomas G.; Voellmer, George

    SHARC II is a facility 350 micron camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory expected to come online in 2002. The key component of SHARC II is a 12x32 array of doped silicon "pop-up" bolometers developed at NASA/Goddard and to be completed by March 2002. Each pixel is 1 mm X 1 mm, coated with a 400 ohms/square bismuth film, and located lambda/4 above a reflective backshort to maximize radiation absorption. The pixels cover the focal plane with >95% filling factor. Each doped thermistor occupies nearly the full area of the pixel, which results in a 1/f knee of the detector noise at 0.01 Hz under load at the bath temperature of 0.32K. To take advantage of the low 1/f noise, the bolometers are ACbiased and read in "total power" mode (B. Crill et. al., in preparation, 2002). The readout allows slow modulation of astrophysical signals (nodding or scanning), in principle without the need for fast modulation (chopping). The total power capability makes possible continuous correction for atmospheric transmission. In the best 25% of winter nights on Mauna Kea, SHARC II is expected to have an NEFD at 350 microns of 1 Jy s1/2 or better. The new camera should be 4 times faster at detecting known point sources and 30 times faster at mapping large areas compared to its predecessor.

  16. Response of a hybrid pixel detector (MEDIPIX3) to different radiation sources for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumacero, E. Miguel; De Celis Alonso, B.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Vargas, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E., E-mail: emoreno.emb@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Av. San Claudio y Rio Verde, Puebla (Mexico); Moreno Barbosa, F. [Hospital General del Sur Hospital de la Mujer, Puebla (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The development in semiconductor CMOS technology has enabled the creation of sensitive detectors for a wide range of ionizing radiation. These devices are suitable for photon counting and can be used in imaging and tomography X-ray diagnostics. The Medipix[1] radiation detection system is a hybrid silicon pixel chip developed for particle tracking applications in High Energy Physics. Its exceptional features (high spatial and energy resolution, embedded ultra fast readout, different operation modes, etc.) make the Medipix an attractive device for applications in medical imaging. In this work the energy characterization of a third-generation Medipix chip (Medipix3) coupled to a silicon sensor is presented. We used different radiation sources (strontium 90, iron 55 and americium 241) to obtain the response curve of the hybrid detector as a function of energy. We also studied the contrast of the Medipix as a measure of pixel noise. Finally we studied the response to fluorescence X rays from different target materials (In, Pd and Cd) for the two data acquisition modes of the chip; single pixel mode and charge summing mode.

  17. System test and noise performance studies at the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weingarten, J.

    2007-09-01

    The central component of the ATLAS Inner Tracker is the pixel detector. It consists of three barrel layers and three disk-layers in the end-caps in both forward directions. The innermost barrel layer is mounted at a distance of about 5 cm from the interaction region. With its very high granularity, truly two-dimensional hit information, and fast readout it is well suited to cope with the high densities of charged tracks, expected this close to the interaction region. The huge number of readout channels necessitates a very complex services infrastructure for powering, readout and safety. After a description of the pixel detector and its services infrastructure, key results from the system test at CERN are presented. Furthermore the noise performance of the pixel detector, crucial for high tracking and vertexing efficiencies, is studied. Measurements of the single-channel random noise are presented together with studies of common mode noise and measurements of the noise occupancy using a random trigger generator. (orig.)

  18. Beam test measurements on GaAs pixel detectors at various angles of incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunschweig, W.; Breibach, J.; Graessel, D.; Koenig, St.; Kubicki, Th.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Rente, C.; Roeper, Ch.; Siedling, R.; Syben, O.; Tenbusch, F.; Toporowski, M.; Xiao, W.J

    1999-08-01

    A GaAs pixel detector constructed in Aachen has been tested in a 4 GeV electron beam at DESY. The experimental setup allowed tilting the detector with respect to the beam line with angles of incidence from 0 deg. to 45 deg. . The sensor-array consisted of 8 x 16 pixels with a size of 125 x 125{mu}m{sup 2} each. The detector was made of a 250{mu}m thick Freiberger SI-GaAs wafer. An improved contact was formed on the backside, allowing safe operation of the detector in the soft breakdown regime. A double metal technique allowed bonding the single pixels linearly to the readout-chip. Using the the fast PreMux128 preamplifier multiplexer chip ({tau}{sub p} = 40ns) a signal to noise ratio of 29 was obtained for a beam angle of incidence of 0 deg. increasing up to 38 for 45 deg. The spatial resolution obtained with an angle of incidence of 45 deg. was (9.0 {+-} 6.0){mu}m while the resolution of the untilted detector is equal to the digital one (36.1{mu}m). For these testbeam-measurements the detector was connected to the electronics via wire-bonds. For future experiments bump-bonding connections are required. The results of a process for the formation of bump-bond connections on GaAs pixeldetectors are shown.

  19. SiC 10um-Pitch UV Imaging Array and APD with Active Pixel Readout, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CoolCAD Electronics, LLC, proposes to design and fabricate a SiC UV detector array with a 10μm pixel pitch, sensitive to EUV, VUV and Deep UV. SiC is a visible-blind...

  20. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  1. Development of a cadmium telluride pixel detector for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Walter R.; Mao, Peter H.; Rana, Vikram R.; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Ushio, Masayoshi; Aono, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shin; Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2009-08-01

    We are developing imaging Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) pixel detectors optimized for astrophysical hard X-ray applications. Our hybrid detector consist of a CdTe crystal 1mm thick and 2cm × 2cm in area with segmented anode contacts directly bonded to a custom low-noise application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CdTe sensor, fabricated by ACRORAD (Okinawa, Japan), has Schottky blocking contacts on a 605 micron pitch in a 32 × 32 array, providing low leakage current and enabling readout of the anode side. The detector is bonded using epoxy-gold stud interconnects to a custom low noise, low power ASIC circuit developed by Caltech's Space Radiation Laboratory. We have achieved very good energy resolution over a wide energy range (0.62keV FWHM @ 60keV, 10.8keV FWHM @ 662keV). We observe polarization effects at room temperature, but they are suppressed if we operate the detector at or below 0°C degree. These detectors have potential application for future missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO).

  2. Field-portable pixel super-resolution colour microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Greenbaum

    Full Text Available Based on partially-coherent digital in-line holography, we report a field-portable microscope that can render lensfree colour images over a wide field-of-view of e.g., >20 mm(2. This computational holographic microscope weighs less than 145 grams with dimensions smaller than 17×6×5 cm, making it especially suitable for field settings and point-of-care use. In this lensfree imaging design, we merged a colorization algorithm with a source shifting based multi-height pixel super-resolution technique to mitigate 'rainbow' like colour artefacts that are typical in holographic imaging. This image processing scheme is based on transforming the colour components of an RGB image into YUV colour space, which separates colour information from brightness component of an image. The resolution of our super-resolution colour microscope was characterized using a USAF test chart to confirm sub-micron spatial resolution, even for reconstructions that employ multi-height phase recovery to handle dense and connected objects. To further demonstrate the performance of this colour microscope Papanicolaou (Pap smears were also successfully imaged. This field-portable and wide-field computational colour microscope could be useful for tele-medicine applications in resource poor settings.

  3. Electronic dosimetry and neutron metrology by CMOS active pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanstalle, M.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims at demonstrating the possibility to use active pixel sensors as operational neutron dosemeters. To do so, the sensor that has been used has to be γ-transparent and to be able to detect neutrons on a wide energy range with a high detection efficiency. The response of the device, made of the CMOS sensor MIMOSA-5 and a converter in front of the sensor (polyethylene for fast neutron detection and 10 B for thermal neutron detection), has been compared with Monte Carlo simulations carried out with MCNPX and GEANT4. These codes have been before-hand validated to check they can be used properly for our application. Experiments to characterize the sensor have been performed at IPHC and at IRSN/LMDN (Cadarache). The results of the sensor irradiation to photon sources and mixed field ( 241 AmBe source) show the γ-transparency of the sensor by applying an appropriate threshold on the deposited energy (around 100 keV). The associated detection efficiency is satisfactory with a value of 10 -3 , in good agreement with MCNPX and GEANT4. Other features of the device have been tested with the same source, like the angular response. The last part of this work deals with the detection of thermal neutrons (eV-neutrons). Assays have been done in Cadarache (IRSN) with a 252 Cf source moderated with heavy water (with and without cadmium shell). Results asserted a very high detection efficiency (up to 6*10 -3 for a pure 10 B converter) in good agreement with GEANT4. (author)

  4. Survey of on-road image projection with pixel light systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sadiq; Knöchelmann, Marvin; Ley, Peer-Phillip; Lachmayer, Roland

    2017-12-01

    HID, LED and laser-based high resolution automotive headlamps, as of late known as `pixel light systems', are at the forefront of the developing technologies paving the way for autonomous driving. In addition to light distribution capabilities that outperform Adaptive Front Lighting and Matrix Beam systems, pixel light systems provide the possibility of image projection directly onto the street. The underlying objective is to improve the driving experience, in any given scenario, in terms of safety, comfort and interaction for all road users. The focus of this work is to conduct a short survey on this state-of-the-art image projection functionality. A holistic research regarding the image projection functionality can be divided into three major categories: scenario selection, technological development and evaluation design. Consequently, the work presented in this paper is divided into three short studies. Section 1 provides a brief introduction to pixel light systems and a justification for the approach adopted for this study. Section 2 deals with the selection of scenarios (and driving maneuvers) where image projection can play a critical role. Section 3 discusses high power LED and LED array based prototypes that are currently under development. Section 4 demonstrates results from an experiment conducted to evaluate the illuminance of an image space projected using a pixel light system prototype developed at the Institute of Product Development (IPeG). Findings from this work can help to identify and advance future research work relating to: further development of pixel light systems, scenario planning, examination of optimal light sources, behavioral response studies etc.

  5. A Novel Line Space Voting Method for Vanishing-Point Detection of General Road Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zongsheng; Fu, Weiping; Xue, Ru; Wang, Wen

    2016-06-23

    Vanishing-point detection is an important component for the visual navigation system of an autonomous mobile robot. In this paper, we present a novel line space voting method for fast vanishing-point detection. First, the line segments are detected from the road image by the line segment detector (LSD) method according to the pixel's gradient and texture orientation computed by the Sobel operator. Then, the vanishing-point of the road is voted on by considering the points of the lines and their neighborhood spaces with weighting methods. Our algorithm is simple, fast, and easy to implement with high accuracy. It has been experimentally tested with over hundreds of structured and unstructured road images. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is effective and can meet the real-time requirements of navigation for autonomous mobile robots and unmanned ground vehicles.

  6. Effects of future space vehicle operations on a single day in the National Airspace System : a fast-time computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This document describes the objectives, methods, analyses, and results of a study used to quantify the effects of future space operations : on the National Airspace System (NAS), and to demonstrate the possible benefits of one proposed strategy to mi...

  7. A Study of Monolithic CMOS Pixel Sensors Back-thinning and their Application for a Pixel Beam Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Giubilato, Piero; Greiner, Leo; Glesener, Lindsay; Hooberman, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports results on a detailed study of charge collection and signal-to-noise performance of CMOS monolithic pixel sensors before and after back-thinning and their application in a pixel beam telescope for the ALS 1.5 GeV $e^-$ beam test facility.

  8. High resolution color raster computer animation of space filling molecular models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    The ATOMLLL system efficiently produces realistic photographs of ball-and-stick or space-filling molecular models, with color shading, highlights, shadows, and transparency. The hidden surface problem for a scene composed of intersecting spheres and cylinders is solved on a CDC-7600, which outputs onto magnetic tape the outlines of the visible parts of each object. The outlines are then rendered, at up to 4096 x 4096 resolution, by a Dicomed D-48 color film recorder, controlled by a Varian V-75 minicomputer. The Varian computes the shading and highlights for each pixel in a fast microcoded loop. Recent modifications to give shadows and transparency are described

  9. Fast Picometer Mirror Mount, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a 6DOF controllable mirror mount with high dynamic range and fast tip/tilt capability for space based applications. It will enable the...

  10. A 400 KHz line rate 2048 pixel modular SWIR linear array for earth observation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchlia, Ankur; Vinella, Rosa M.; Wouters, Kristof; Gielen, Daphne; Hooylaerts, Peter; Deroo, Pieter; Ruythooren, Wouter; van der Zanden, Koen; Vermeiren, Jan; Merken, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report about a family of linear imaging FPAs sensitive in the [0.9 - 1.7um] band, developed for high speed applications such as LIDAR, wavelength references and OCT analyzers and also for earth observation applications. Fast linear FPAs can also be used in a wide variety of terrestrial applications, including high speed sorting, electro- and photo-luminesce and medical applications. The arrays are based on a modular ROIC design concept: modules of 512 pixels are stitched during fabrication to achieve 512, 1024 and 2048 pixel arrays. In principle, this concept can be extended to any multiple of 512 pixels, the limiting factor being the pixel yield of long InGaAs arrays and the CTE differences in the hybrid setup. Each 512-pixel module has its own on-chip digital sequencer, analog readout chain and 4 output buffers. This modular concept enables a long-linear array to run at a high line rate of 400 KHz irrespective of the array length, which limits the line rate in a traditional linear array. The pixel has a pitch of 12.5um. The detector frontend is based on CTIA (Capacitor Trans-impedance Amplifier), having 5 selectable integration capacitors giving full well from 62x103e- (gain0) to 40x106e- (gain4). An auto-zero circuit limits the detector bias non-uniformity to 5-10mV across broad intensity levels, limiting the input referred dark signal noise to 20e-rms for Tint=3ms at room temperature. An on-chip CDS that follows the CTIA facilitates removal of Reset/KTC noise, CTIA offsets and most of the 1/f noise. The measured noise of the ROIC is 35e-rms in gain0. At a master clock rate of 60MHz and a minimum integration time of 1.4us, the FPAs reach the highest line rate of 400 KHz.

  11. International Workshop on Semiconductor Pixel Detectors for Particles and Imaging (PIXEL2016)

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Leonardo; PIXEL2016

    2016-01-01

    The workshop will cover various topics related to pixel detector technology. Development and applications will be discussed for charged particle tracking in High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and for X-ray imaging in Astronomy, Biology, Medicine and Material Science. The conference program will also include reports on front and back end electronics, radiation effects, low mass mechanics, environmental control and construction techniques. Emerging technologies, such as monolithic and HV&HR CMOS, will also be treated. Will be published in: http://pos.sissa.it/

  12. Fast beam condition monitor for CMS. Performance and upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Jessica L.; Bell, Alan; Burtowy, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The CMS beam and radiation monitoring subsystem BCM1F (Fast Beam Condition Monitor) consists of 8 individual diamond sensors situated around the beam pipe within the pixel detector volume, for the purpose of fast bunch-by-bunch monitoring of beam background and collision products. In addition, effort is ongoing to use BCM1F as an online luminosity monitor. BCM1F will be running whenever there is beam in LHC, and its data acquisition is independent from the data acquisition of the CMS detector, hence it delivers luminosity even when CMS is not taking data. A report is given on the performance of BCM1F during LHC run I, including results of the van der Meer scan and on-line luminosity monitoring done in 2012. In order to match the requirements due to higher luminosity and 25 ns bunch spacing, several changes to the system must be implemented during the upcoming shutdown, including upgraded electronics and precise gain monitoring. First results from Run II preparation are shown.

  13. Fast Beam Condition Monitor for CMS: performance and upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00009152; Bell, Alan; Burtowy, Piotr; Dabrowski, Anne; Hempel, Maria; Henschel, Hans; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Odell, Nathaniel; Penno, Marek; Pollack, Brian; Przyborowski, Dominik; Ryjov, Vladimir; Stickland, David; Walsh, Roberval; Warzycha, Weronika; Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka

    2014-11-21

    The CMS beam and radiation monitoring subsystem BCM1F (Fast Beam Condition Monitor) consists of 8 individual diamond sensors situated around the beam pipe within the pixel detector volume, for the purpose of fast bunch-by-bunch monitoring of beam background and collision products. In addition, effort is ongoing to use BCM1F as an online luminosity monitor. BCM1F will be running whenever there is beam in LHC, and its data acquisition is independent from the data acquisition of the CMS detector, hence it delivers luminosity even when CMS is not taking data. A report is given on the performance of BCM1F during LHC run I, including results of the van der Meer scan and on-line luminosity monitoring done in 2012. In order to match the requirements due to higher luminosity and 25 ns bunch spacing, several changes to the system must be implemented during the upcoming shutdown, including upgraded electronics and precise gain monitoring. First results from Run II preparation are shown.

  14. Measurement of the space potential of a high-temperature plasma by fast atomic beam scattering on an ion probe beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabantsev, A. A.; Taskayev, S. Yu. [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1988-06-01

    In this work we carry out an analysis of the possibility of measuring the potential distribution of a high-temperature plasma by scattering fast atoms on an ion probe beam. The proposed method is based on the idea of determining the energy of the ion beam, which depends on the plasma potential, from the energy spectrum of the scattered atoms. Application of this method allows one to avoid a number of fundamental difficulties characteristic of plasma potential measurements which make use of heavy-ion probe beams. 34 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Measurement of the space potential of a high-temperature plasma by fast atomic beam scattering on an ion probe beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabantsev, A.A.; Taskayev, S.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    In this work we carry out an analysis of the possibility of measuring the potential distribution of a high-temperature plasma by scattering fast atoms on an ion probe beam. The proposed method is based on the idea of determining the energy of the ion beam, which depends on the plasma potential, from the energy spectrum of the scattered atoms. Application of this method allows one to avoid a number of fundamental difficulties characteristic of plasma potential measurements which make use of heavy-ion probe beams. 34 refs., 1 fig

  16. Monolithic pixels on moderate resistivity substrate and sparsifying readout architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubilato, P.; Battaglia, M.; Bisello, D.; Caselle, M.; Chalmet, P.; Demaria, L.; Ikemoto, Y.; Kloukinas, K.; Mansuy, S.C.; Mattiazzo, S.; Marchioro, A.; Mugnier, H.; Pantano, D.; Potenza, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rousset, J.; Silvestrin, L.; Snoeys, W.

    2013-01-01

    The LePix projects aim realizing a new generation monolithic pixel detectors with improved performances at lesser cost with respect to both current state of the art monolithic and hybrid pixel sensors. The detector is built in a 90 nm CMOS process on a substrate of moderate resistivity. This allows charge collection by drift while maintaining the other advantages usually offered by MAPS, like having a single piece detector and using a standard CMOS production line. The collection by drift mechanism, coupled to the low capacitance design of the collecting node made possible by the monolithic approach, provides an excellent signal to noise ratio straight at the pixel cell together with a radiation tolerance far superior to conventional un-depleted MAPS. The excellent signal-to-noise performance is demonstrated by the device ability to separate the 6 keV 55 Fe double peak at room temperature. To achieve high granularity (10–20 µm pitch pixels) over large detector areas maintaining high readout speed, a completely new compressing architecture has been devised. This architecture departs from the mainstream hybrid pixel sparsification approach, which uses in-pixel logic to reduce data, by using topological compression to minimize pixel area and power consumption

  17. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  18. Data processing and image reconstruction methods for pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubek, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor single-particle-counting pixel detectors offer many advantages for radiation imaging: high detection efficiency, energy discrimination, noiseless digital integration (counting), high frame rate and virtually unlimited dynamic range. All these properties allow to achieve high quality images. Examples of transmission images and 3D tomographic reconstruction using X-rays and slow neutrons are presented demonstrating effects that can affect the quality of images. A number of obstacles can limit detector performance if not handled. The pixel detector is in fact an array of individual detectors (pixels), each of them has its own efficiency, energy calibration and also noise. The common effort is to make all these parameters uniform for all pixels. However, an ideal uniformity can be never reached. Moreover, it is often seen that the signal in one pixel affects neighboring pixels due to various reasons (charge sharing, crosstalk, etc.). All such effects have to be taken into account during data processing to avoid false data interpretation. The main intention of this contribution is to summarize techniques of data processing and image correction to eliminate residual drawbacks of pixel detectors. It is shown how to extend these methods to handle further physical effects such as hardening of the beam and edge enhancement by deflection. Besides, more advanced methods of data processing such as tomographic 3D reconstruction are discussed. All methods are demonstrated on real experiments from biology and material science performed mostly with the Medipix2 pixel device. A brief view to the future of pixel detectors and their applications also including spectroscopy and particle tracking is given too

  19. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  20. Linear pixel shuffling for image processing: an introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter G.

    1993-04-01

    We investigate a method of ordering pixels (the elements of a rectangular matrix) based on an arithmetic progression with wrap-around (modular arithmetic). For appropriate choices of the progression's parameters, based on a generalization of Fibonacci numbers and the golden mean, we find equidistributed collections of pixels formed by subintervals of the pixel progression of 'shuffle.' We illustrate this equidistributivity with a novel approach to progressive rendering of a synthetic image, and we suggest several opportunities for its application to other areas of image processing.

  1. Pixel Detectors for Particle Physics and Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wermes, N

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor pixel detectors offer features for the detection of radiation which are interesting for particle physics detectors as well as for imaging e.g. in biomedical applications (radiography, autoradiography, protein crystallography) or in Xray astronomy. At the present time hybrid pixel detectors are technologically mastered to a large extent and large scale particle detectors are being built. Although the physical requirements are often quite different, imaging applications are emerging and interesting prototype results are available. Monolithic detectors, however, offer interesting features for both fields in future applications. The state of development of hybrid and monolithic pixel detectors, excluding CCDs, and their different suitability for particle detection and imaging, is reviewed.

  2. The ATLAS Pixel nSQP Readout Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel New Service Quarter Panel (nSQP) project aims to deliver replacements for all on-detector services of the ATLAS Pixel Detector. The nSQPs will have replacements for the electro-optical converters. The replacement devices are LVDS transceiver boards (E-Boards) and they communicate with the existing ATLAS Pixel MCC chips over the original type 0 cables. In the other direction the E-Boards communicate over a 6.6 meter long transmission line with the VCSEL driver chips in the new electro-optical converters. These converters have been relocated to a region that is much more accessible.

  3. Second Generation Small Pixel Technology Using Hybrid Bond Stacking †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezia, Vincent C.; Hsiung, Alan Chih-Wei; Yang, Wu-Zang; Zhang, Yuying; Zhao, Cheng; Lin, Zhiqiang; Grant, Lindsay A.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, OmniVision’s second generation (Gen2) of small-pixel BSI stacking technologies is reviewed. The key features of this technology are hybrid-bond stacking, deeper back-side, deep-trench isolation, new back-side composite metal-oxide grid, and improved gate oxide quality. This Gen2 technology achieves state-of-the-art low-light image-sensor performance for 1.1, 1.0, and 0.9 µm pixel products. Additional improvements on this technology include less than 100 ppm white-pixel process and a high near-infrared (NIR) QE technology. PMID:29495272

  4. Second Generation Small Pixel Technology Using Hybrid Bond Stacking

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent C. Venezia; Alan Chih-Wei Hsiung; Wu-Zang Yang; Yuying Zhang; Cheng Zhao; Zhiqiang Lin; Lindsay A. Grant

    2018-01-01

    In this work, OmniVision’s second generation (Gen2) of small-pixel BSI stacking technologies is reviewed. The key features of this technology are hybrid-bond stacking, deeper back-side, deep-trench isolation, new back-side composite metal-oxide grid, and improved gate oxide quality. This Gen2 technology achieves state-of-the-art low-light image-sensor performance for 1.1, 1.0, and 0.9 µm pixel products. Additional improvements on this technology include less than 100 ppm white-pixel process a...

  5. Second Generation Small Pixel Technology Using Hybrid Bond Stacking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent C. Venezia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, OmniVision’s second generation (Gen2 of small-pixel BSI stacking technologies is reviewed. The key features of this technology are hybrid-bond stacking, deeper back-side, deep-trench isolation, new back-side composite metal-oxide grid, and improved gate oxide quality. This Gen2 technology achieves state-of-the-art low-light image-sensor performance for 1.1, 1.0, and 0.9 µm pixel products. Additional improvements on this technology include less than 100 ppm white-pixel process and a high near-infrared (NIR QE technology.

  6. Second Generation Small Pixel Technology Using Hybrid Bond Stacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezia, Vincent C; Hsiung, Alan Chih-Wei; Yang, Wu-Zang; Zhang, Yuying; Zhao, Cheng; Lin, Zhiqiang; Grant, Lindsay A

    2018-02-24

    In this work, OmniVision's second generation (Gen2) of small-pixel BSI stacking technologies is reviewed. The key features of this technology are hybrid-bond stacking, deeper back-side, deep-trench isolation, new back-side composite metal-oxide grid, and improved gate oxide quality. This Gen2 technology achieves state-of-the-art low-light image-sensor performance for 1.1, 1.0, and 0.9 µm pixel products. Additional improvements on this technology include less than 100 ppm white-pixel process and a high near-infrared (NIR) QE technology.

  7. Pixels detectors and silicon X-rays detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Delpierre, P.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are beginning to be used in large particle physics experiments. The hybrid technique (detector and electronics on two separate wafers) allows large surfaces to be built. For ATLAS at LHC it is proposed to cover areas of more than 1 m2 with 5000 to 10000 pixels/cm2. Each pixel has a full electronic chain directly connected which means very low input capacitance and no integration of dark current. Furthermore, silicon strip detectors and CCD's have been successfully test...

  8. Pixel CdTe semiconductor module to implement a sub-MeV imaging detector for astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Álvarez, J.-M.; Ullán, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2017-03-01

    Stellar explosions are relevant and interesting astrophysical phenomena. Since long ago we have been working on the characterization of nova and supernova explosions in X and gamma rays, with the use of space missions such as INTEGRAL, XMM-Newton and Swift. We have been also involved in feasibility studies of future instruments in the energy range from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes, such as GRI, DUAL and e-ASTROGAM. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). In order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial module prototype based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. The detector dimensions are 12.5mm x 12.5mm x 2mm, with a pixel pitch of 1mm x 1mm. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fanout board made of Sapphire substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC, to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. An ohmic CdTe pixel detector has been characterised by means of 57Co, 133Ba and 22Na sources. Based on this, its spectroscopic performance and the influence of charge sharing is reported here. The pixel study is complemented by the simulation of the CdTe module performance using the GEANT 4 and MEGALIB tools, which will help us to optimise the pixel size selection.

  9. Sub-pixel radiometry: a three-part study in generating synthetic imagery that incorporates sub-pixel variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sarah; Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2010-04-01

    A pixel represents the limit of spatial knowledge that can be represented in an image. It is represented as a single (perhaps spectral) digital count value that represents the energy propagating from a spatial portion of a scene. In any captured image, that single value is the result of many factors including the composition of scene optical properties within the projected pixel, the characteristic point spread function (or, equivalently, modulation transfer function) of the system, and the sensitivity of the detector element itself. This presentation examines the importance of sub-pixel variability in the context of generating synthetic imagery for remote sensing applications. The study was performed using the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool, an established ray-tracing based synthetic modeling system whose approach to sub-pixel computations was updated during this study. The paper examines three aspects of sub-pixel variability of interest to the remote sensing community. The first study simply looks at sampling frequency relative to structural frequency in a scene and the effects of aliasing on an image. The second considers the task of modeling a sub-pixel target whose signature would be mixed with background clutter, such as a small, hot target in a thermal image. The final study looks at capturing the inherent spectral variation in a single class of material, such as grass in hyperspectral imagery. Through each study we demonstrate in a quantitative fashion, the improved capabilities of DIRSIG's sub-pixel rendering algorithms.

  10. FAST scan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anna

    FAST-skanning er en metode, der har til formål at hurtigt diagnosticere fri væske i bughulen hos traumapatienter og andre akutte patienter. Denne skanningsteknik blev først introduceret til hunde i 2004, og omfatter ultralydsskanning af specifikke punkter i bughulen, hvor der er stor chance....../sorte) områder. I dag bruges FAST-skanning meget hyppigt indenfor human og veterinær akutmedicin. Det kan ses som et værktøj for dyrlæger som ikke arbejder med ultralyd til daglig. FAST-skanning har mange fordele; proceduren er effektiv og kan tage under 3 minutter, men har alligevel høj diagnostisk værdi. Det...... nødvendigt. Det skal dog understreges, at de abdominale organer ikke undersøges specifikt. Det kan være svært at skelne mellem væske i peritonealhulen og i det retroperitoneale rum. Man kan heller ikke karakterisere væsken og derved skelne mellem f.eks. blod, pus eller urin. Siden FAST-skanning blev...

  11. Fast ejendom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Peter

    Bogen omfatter en gennemgang af lovgivning, praksis og teori vedrørende køb af fast ejendom og offentligretlig og privatretlig regulering. Bogen belyser bl.a. de privatretlige emner: købers misligholdelsesbeføjelser, servitutter, naboret, hævd og erstatningsansvar for miljøskader samt den...

  12. Characterization of a three side abuttable CMOS pixel sensor with digital pixel and data compression for charged particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloux, F.; Değerli, Y.; Flouzat, C.; Lachkar, M.; Monmarthe, E.; Orsini, F.; Venault, P.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS monolithic pixel sensor technology has been chosen to equip the new ALICE trackers for HL-LHC . PIXAM is the final prototype from an R&D program specific to the Muon Forward Tracker which intends to push significantly forward the performances of the mature rolling shutter architecture. By implementing a digital pixel allowing to readout of a group of rows in parallel, the PIXAM sensor increases the rolling shutter readout speed while keeping the same power consumption as that of analogue pixel sensors. This paper will describe shortly the ASIC architecture and will focus on the analogue and digital performances of the sensor, obtained from laboratory measurements.

  13. The Phase-1 Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lipinski, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The innermost tracking device of the CMS experiment is a silicon pixel detector. It has to cope with high particle fluxes and radiation damage, and was built to withstand the LHC design luminosity of 1$\\times10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. This luminosity was already exceeded in 2016 and it is foreseen that it will increase further, potentially reaching two times the design value before 2018. Under such conditions the inefficiencies due to a limited readout bandwidth will increase by as much as 16\\% in the innermost layer. To maintain high tracking efficiency, the CMS collaboration has built a new pixel detector that was installed in March 2017. In this paper, the design of this so-called Phase-1 pixel detector is summarised, the production and the qualification of the pixel modules is described and the current status of the project is reported.

  14. Status of the digital pixel array detector for protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Datte, P; Beuville, E; Endres, N; Druillole, F; Luo, L; Millaud, J E; Xuong, N H

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional photon counting digital pixel array detector is being designed for static and time resolved protein crystallography. The room temperature detector will significantly enhance monochromatic and polychromatic protein crystallographic through-put data rates by more than three orders of magnitude. The detector has an almost infinite photon counting dynamic range and exhibits superior spatial resolution when compared to present crystallographic phosphor imaging plates or phosphor coupled CCD detectors. The detector is a high resistivity N-type Si with a pixel pitch of 150x150 mu m, and a thickness of 300 mu m, and is bump bonded to an application specific integrated circuit. The event driven readout of the detector is based on the column architecture and allows an independent pixel hit rate above 1 million photons/s/pixel. The device provides energy discrimination and sparse data readout which yields minimal dead-time. This type of architecture allows a continuous (frameless) data acquisition, a f...

  15. Digital column readout architectures for hybrid pixel detector readout chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poikela, T; Plosila, J; Westerlund, T; Buytaert, J; Campbell, M; Gaspari, M De; Llopart, X; Wyllie, K; Gromov, V; Kluit, R; Beuzekom, M van; Zappon, F; Zivkovic, V; Brezina, C; Desch, K; Fu, Y; Kruth, A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, two digital column architectures suitable for sparse readout of data from a pixel matrix in trigger-less applications are presented. Each architecture reads out a pixel matrix of 256 x 256 pixels with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. The first architecture has been implemented in the Timepix3 chip, and this is presented together with initial measurements. Simulation results and measured data are compared. The second architecture has been designed for Velopix, a readout chip planned for the LHCb VELO upgrade. Unlike Timepix3, this has to be tolerant to radiation-induced single-event effects. Results from post-layout simulations are shown with the circuit architectures

  16. Projection computation based on pixel in simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xu; Chen Zhiqiang; Xiong Hua; Zhang Li

    2005-01-01

    SART is an important arithmetic of image reconstruction, in which the projection computation takes over half of the reconstruction time. An efficient way to compute projection coefficient matrix together with memory optimization is presented in this paper. Different from normal method, projection lines are located based on every pixel, and the following projection coefficient computation can make use of the results. Correlation of projection lines and pixels can be used to optimize the computation. (authors)

  17. Content Progressive Coding of Limited Bits/pixel Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Riis; Forchhammer, Søren

    1999-01-01

    A new lossless context based method for content progressive coding of limited bits/pixel images is proposed. Progressive coding is achieved by separating the image into contelnt layers. Digital maps are compressed up to 3 times better than GIF.......A new lossless context based method for content progressive coding of limited bits/pixel images is proposed. Progressive coding is achieved by separating the image into contelnt layers. Digital maps are compressed up to 3 times better than GIF....

  18. A silicon pixel detector prototype for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Vicente Barreto Pinto, Mateus

    2017-01-01

    A silicon pixel detector prototype for CLIC, currently under study for the innermost detector surrounding the collision point. The detector is made of a High-Voltage CMOS sensor (top) and a CLICpix2 readout chip (bottom) that are glued to each other. Both parts have a size of 3.3 x 4.0 $mm^2$ and consist of an array of 128 x 128 pixels of 25 x 25 $\\micro m^2$ size.

  19. Pixels Intensity Evolution to Describe the Plastic Films Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Briñez-De León

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes an approach for mechanical behavior description in the plastic film deformation using techniques for the images analysis, which are based on the intensities evolution of fixed pixels applied to an images sequence acquired through polarizing optical assembly implemented around the platform of the plastic film deformation. The pixels intensities evolution graphs, and mechanical behavior graphic of the deformation has dynamic behaviors zones which could be associated together.

  20. Information quantity in a pixel of digital image

    OpenAIRE

    Kharinov, M.

    2014-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the problem of integer-valued estimating of information quantity in a pixel of digital image. The definition of an integer estimation of information quantity based on constructing of the certain binary hierarchy of pixel clusters is proposed. The methods for constructing hierarchies of clusters and generating of hierarchical sequences of image approximations that minimally differ from the image by a standard deviation are developed. Experimental results on integer-valu...

  1. Pixel readout electronics for LHC and biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blanquart, L; Comes, G; Delpierre, P A; Fischer, P; Hausmann, J C; Keil, M; Lindner, Manfred; Meuser, S; Wermes, N

    2000-01-01

    The demanding requirements for pixel readout electronics for high- energy physics experiments and biomedical applications are reviewed. Some examples of the measured analog performance of prototype chips are given. The readout architectures of the PIxel readout for the ATlas experiment (PIRATE) chip suited for LHC experiments and of the multi-picture element counter (MPEC) counting chip targeted for biomedical applications are presented. First results with complete chip-sensor assemblies are also shown. (12 refs).

  2. Small pitch pixel sensors for the CMS Phase II upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069790

    2015-01-01

    The CMS collaboration has undertaken two sensor R\\&D programs on thin n-in-p planar and 3D silicon sensor technologies. To cope with the increase in instantaneous luminosity, the pixel area has to be reduced to approximately 2500 $\\mu$m$^{2}$ to keep the occupancy at the percent level. Suggested pixel cell geometries to match this requirement are {50$\\times$50 }$\\mu$...

  3. New results on diamond pixel sensors using ATLAS frontend electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Markus; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; de Boer, Wim; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Dulinski, W

    2003-01-01

    Diamond is a promising sensor material for future collider experiments due to its radiation hardness. Diamond pixel sensors have been bump bonded to an ATLAS pixel readout chip using PbSn solder bumps. Single chip devices have been characterised by lab measurements and in a high-energy pion beam at CERN. Results on charge collection, spatial resolution, efficiency and the charge carrier lifetime are presented.

  4. FPIX2, the BTeV pixel readout chip

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, D C; Chiodini, G; Hoff, J; Kwan, S; Mekkaoui, A; Yarema, R; 10.1016/j.nima.2005.04.046

    2005-01-01

    A radiation tolerant pixel readout chip, FPIX2, has been developed at Fermilab for use by BTeV. Some of the requirements of the BTeV pixel readout chip are reviewed and contrasted with requirements for similar devices in LHC experiments. A description of the FPIX2 is given, and results of initial tests of its performance are presented, as is a summary of measurements planned for the coming year.

  5. 4+1-transistor pixel architecture for high-speed, high-resolution CMOS image sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Xhakoni, Adi; San Segundo Bello, David; De Wit, Pieter; Gielen, Georges

    2011-01-01

    A pixel architecture is introduced which allows a drastic reduction of the column capacitance of a monolithic pixel array. It consists of a classic 4T pixel architecture together with an extra switch added at regular positions in the column array and shared by a group of pixels of the column. In this way, each pixel will see an output capacitance proportional to the number of pixels sharing the extra switch and the total number of extra switches.

  6. Challenges of small-pixel infrared detectors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A; Martyniuk, P; Kopytko, M

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, several new concepts for improving the performance of infrared detectors have been proposed. These new concepts particularly address the drive towards the so-called high operating temperature focal plane arrays (FPAs), aiming to increase detector operating temperatures, and as a consequence reduce the cost of infrared systems. In imaging systems with the above megapixel formats, pixel dimension plays a crucial role in determining critical system attributes such as system size, weight and power consumption (SWaP). The advent of smaller pixels has also resulted in the superior spatial and temperature resolution of these systems. Optimum pixel dimensions are limited by diffraction effects from the aperture, and are in turn wavelength-dependent. In this paper, the key challenges in realizing optimum pixel dimensions in FPA design including dark current, pixel hybridization, pixel delineation, and unit cell readout capacity are outlined to achieve a sufficiently adequate modulation transfer function for the ultra-small pitches involved. Both photon and thermal detectors have been considered. Concerning infrared photon detectors, the trade-offs between two types of competing technology-HgCdTe material systems and III-V materials (mainly barrier detectors)-have been investigated.

  7. An Augmented Fast Marching Method for Computing Skeletons and Centerlines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple and robust method for computing skeletons for arbitrary planar objects and centerlines for 3D objects. We augment the Fast Marching Method (FMM) widely used in level set applications by computing the paramterized boundary location every pixel came from during the boundary

  8. Active Pixel Sensors in ams H18/H35 HV-CMOS Technology for the ATLAS HL-LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ristic, Branislav

    2016-09-21

    Deep sub micron HV-CMOS processes offer the opportunity for sensors built by industry standard techniques while being HV tolerant, making them good candidates for drift-based, fast collecting, thus radiation-hard pixel detectors. For the upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel Detector towards the HL-LHC requirements, active pixel sensors in HV-CMOS technology were investigated. These implement amplifier and discriminator stages directly in insulating deep n-wells, which also act as collecting electrodes. The deep n-wells allow for bias voltages up to 150V leading to a depletion depth of several 10um. Prototype sensors in the ams H18 180nm and H35 350nm HV-CMOS processes have been manufactured, acting as a potential drop-in replacement for the current ATLAS Pixel sensors, thus leaving higher level processing such as trigger handling to dedicated read-out chips. Sensors were thoroughly tested in lab measurements as well as in testbeam experiments. Irradiation with X-rays and protons revealed a tolerance to ionizing doses o...

  9. Design of a current based readout chip and development of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimpl, M.

    2005-12-15

    The future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) offers a large variety of precision measurements complementary to the discovery potential of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). To fully exploit its physics potential, a vertex detector with unprecedented performance is needed. One proposed technology for the ILC vertex detector is the DEPFET active pixel sensor. The DEPFET sensor offers particle detection with in-pixel amplification by incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted high-ohmic silicon substrate. The device provides an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and a good spatial resolution at the same time. To establish a very fast readout of a DEPFET pixel matrix with row rates of 20 MHz and more, the 128 channel CURO II ASIC has been designed and fabricated. The architecture of the chip is completely based on current mode techniques (SI) perfectly adapted to the current signal of the sensor. For the ILC vertex detector a prototype system with a 64 x 128 DEPFET pixel matrix read out by the CURO II chip has been developed. The design issues and the standalone performance of the readout chip as well as first results with the prototype system will be presented. (orig.)

  10. Design of a current based readout chip and development of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimpl, M.

    2005-12-01

    The future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) offers a large variety of precision measurements complementary to the discovery potential of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). To fully exploit its physics potential, a vertex detector with unprecedented performance is needed. One proposed technology for the ILC vertex detector is the DEPFET active pixel sensor. The DEPFET sensor offers particle detection with in-pixel amplification by incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted high-ohmic silicon substrate. The device provides an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and a good spatial resolution at the same time. To establish a very fast readout of a DEPFET pixel matrix with row rates of 20 MHz and more, the 128 channel CURO II ASIC has been designed and fabricated. The architecture of the chip is completely based on current mode techniques (SI) perfectly adapted to the current signal of the sensor. For the ILC vertex detector a prototype system with a 64 x 128 DEPFET pixel matrix read out by the CURO II chip has been developed. The design issues and the standalone performance of the readout chip as well as first results with the prototype system will be presented. (orig.)

  11. A New Neighboring Pixels Method for Reducing Aerosol Effects on the NDVI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm was developed in this research to minimize aerosol effects on the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI. Simulation results show that in red-NIR reflectance space, variations in red and NIR channels to aerosol optical depth (AOD follow a specific pattern. Based on this rational, the apparent reflectance in these two bands of neighboring pixels were used to reduce aerosol effects on NDVI values of the central pixel. We call this method the neighboring pixels (NP algorithm. Validation was performed over vegetated regions in the border area between China and Russia using Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI imagery. Results reveal good agreement between the aerosol corrected NDVI using our algorithm and that derived from the Landsat 8 surface reflectance products. The accuracy is related to the gradient of NDVI variation. This algorithm can achieve high accuracy in homogeneous forest or cropland with the root mean square error (RMSE being equal to 0.046 and 0.049, respectively. This algorithm can also be applied to atmospheric correction and does not require any information about atmospheric conditions. The use of the moving window analysis technique reduces errors caused by the spatial heterogeneity of aerosols. Detections of regions with homogeneous NDVI are the primary sources of biases. This new method is operational and can prove useful at different aerosol concentration levels. In the future, this approach may also be used to examine other indexes composed of bands attenuated by noises in remote sensing.

  12. High-speed x-ray imaging with the Keck pixel array detector (Keck PAD) for time-resolved experiments at synchrotron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Chamberlain, Darol; Gruner, Sol M. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Modern storage rings are readily capable of providing intense x-ray pulses, tens of picoseconds in duration, millions of times per second. Exploiting the temporal structure of these x-ray sources opens avenues for studying rapid structural changes in materials. Many processes (e.g. crack propagation, deformation on impact, turbulence, etc.) differ in detail from one sample trial to the next and would benefit from the ability to record successive x-ray images with single x-ray sensitivity while framing at 5 to 10 MHz rates. To this end, we have pursued the development of fast x-ray imaging detectors capable of collecting bursts of images that enable the isolation of single synchrotron bunches and/or bunch trains. The detector technology used is the hybrid pixel array detector (PAD) with a charge integrating front-end, and high-speed, in-pixel signal storage elements. A 384×256 pixel version, the Keck-PAD, with 150 µm × 150 µm pixels and 8 dedicated in-pixel storage elements is operational, has been tested at CHESS, and has collected data for compression wave studies. An updated version with 27 dedicated storage capacitors and identical pixel size has been fabricated.

  13. FE-I2 a front-end readout chip designed in a commercial 025- mu m process for the ATLAS pixel detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Blanquart, L; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Fischer, P; Mandelli, E; Meddeler, G; Peric, I

    2004-01-01

    A new front-end chip (FE-I2) has been developed for the ATLAS pixel detector at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator facility of the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). This chip has been submitted in a commercial 0.25- mu m CMOS process using special layout techniques for radiation tolerance. It comprises 2880 pixels arranged into 18 columns of 160 channels. Each pixel element of dimension 50 mu m * 400 mu m is composed of a charge- sensitive amplifier followed by a fast discriminator with a detection threshold adjustable within a range of 0-6000 electrons and slow control logic incorporating a wired-hit-Or, preamplifier-kill, readout mask, and automatic threshold tuning circuitry. There are two single-event- upset (SEU)-tolerant DACs for reducing threshold (7-b) and recovery- time (3-b) mismatches from pixel to pixel along with digital hit emulation and a differential readout circuit aimed at transporting time-stamped data from each pixel to buffers at the bottom of the chip. In c...

  14. High-speed x-ray imaging with the Keck pixel array detector (Keck PAD) for time-resolved experiments at synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Chamberlain, Darol; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-01

    Modern storage rings are readily capable of providing intense x-ray pulses, tens of picoseconds in duration, millions of times per second. Exploiting the temporal structure of these x-ray sources opens avenues for studying rapid structural changes in materials. Many processes (e.g. crack propagation, deformation on impact, turbulence, etc.) differ in detail from one sample trial to the next and would benefit from the ability to record successive x-ray images with single x-ray sensitivity while framing at 5 to 10 MHz rates. To this end, we have pursued the development of fast x-ray imaging detectors capable of collecting bursts of images that enable the isolation of single synchrotron bunches and/or bunch trains. The detector technology used is the hybrid pixel array detector (PAD) with a charge integrating front-end, and high-speed, in-pixel signal storage elements. A 384×256 pixel version, the Keck-PAD, with 150 µm × 150 µm pixels and 8 dedicated in-pixel storage elements is operational, has been tested at CHESS, and has collected data for compression wave studies. An updated version with 27 dedicated storage capacitors and identical pixel size has been fabricated.

  15. Modular pixelated detector system with the spectroscopic capability and fast parallel read-out

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Holík, M.; Jakůbek, J.; Jakůbek, M.; Kraus, V.; Krejčí, F.; Soukup, P.; Tureček, D.; Vacík, Jiří; Žemlička, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, June (2014), C06006 ISSN 1748-0221. [International workshop on radiation imaging detectors /15./. Paris, 23.06.2013-27.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01010237 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : particle tracking detectors * X-ray detectors * modular electronics * neutron detectors * solid- state detectors Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (UJF-V) Impact factor: 1.399, year: 2014 http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-0221/9/06/C06006

  16. Lagrange constraint neural networks for massive pixel parallel image demixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles C.

    2002-03-01

    We have shown that the remote sensing optical imaging to achieve detailed sub-pixel decomposition is a unique application of blind source separation (BSS) that is truly linear of far away weak signal, instantaneous speed of light without delay, and along the line of sight without multiple paths. In early papers, we have presented a direct application of statistical mechanical de-mixing method called Lagrange Constraint Neural Network (LCNN). While the BSAO algorithm (using a posteriori MaxEnt ANN and neighborhood pixel average) is not acceptable for remote sensing, a mirror symmetric LCNN approach is all right assuming a priori MaxEnt for unknown sources to be averaged over the source statistics (not neighborhood pixel data) in a pixel-by-pixel independent fashion. LCNN reduces the computation complexity, save a great number of memory devices, and cut the cost of implementation. The Landsat system is designed to measure the radiation to deduce surface conditions and materials. For any given material, the amount of emitted and reflected radiation varies by the wavelength. In practice, a single pixel of a Landsat image has seven channels receiving 0.1 to 12 microns of radiation from the ground within a 20x20 meter footprint containing a variety of radiation materials. A-priori LCNN algorithm provides the spatial-temporal variation of mixture that is hardly de-mixable by other a-posteriori BSS or ICA methods. We have already compared the Landsat remote sensing using both methods in WCCI 2002 Hawaii. Unfortunately the absolute benchmark is not possible because of lacking of the ground truth. We will arbitrarily mix two incoherent sampled images as the ground truth. However, the constant total probability of co-located sources within the pixel footprint is necessary for the remote sensing constraint (since on a clear day the total reflecting energy is constant in neighborhood receiving pixel sensors), we have to normalized two image pixel-by-pixel as well. Then, the

  17. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-12-15

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2} per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 {mu}m{sup 2} have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm{sup 2} and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm{sup 2}). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  18. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-12-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10 16 particles per cm 2 per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 μm 2 have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm 2 and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm 2 ). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  19. Optimization of CMOS active pixels for high resolution digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Soo

    2007-02-01

    CMOS image sensors have poorer performance compared to conventional charge coupled devices (CCDs). Since CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in general have higher temporal noise, higher dark current, smaller full well charge capacitance, and lower spectral response, they cannot provide the same wide dynamic range and superior signal-to-noise ratio as CCDs. In view of electronic noise, the main source for the CMOS APS is the pixel, along with other signal processing blocks such as row and column decoder, analog signal processor (ASP), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and timing and control logic circuitry. Therefore, it is important and necessary to characterize noise of the active pixels in CMOS APSs. We developed our theoretical noise model to account for the temporal noise in active pixels, and then found out the optimum design parameters such as fill actor, each size of the three transistors (source follower, row selection transistor, bias transistor) comprising active pixels, bias current, and load capacitance that can have the maximum signal-to-noise ratio. To develop the theoretical noise model in active pixels, we considered the integration noise of the photodiode and the readout noise of the transistors related to readout. During integration, the shot noise due to the dark current and photocurrent, during readout, the thermal and flicker noise were considered. The developed model can take the input variables such as photocurrent, capacitance of the photodiode, integration time, transconductance of the transistors, channel resistance of the transistors, gate-to-source capacitance of the follower, and load capacitance etc. To validate our noise model, two types of test structures have been realized. Firstly, four types of photodiodes (n diffusion /p substrate , n well /p substrate , n diffusion /p epitaxial /p substrate , n well /p epitaxial /p substrate ) used in CMOS active pixels were fabricated in order to choose the photodiode type having the best SNR

  20. Fast Light Optical Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation space missions are currently constrained by existing spacecraft navigation systems which are not fully autonomous. These systems suffer from accumulated dead-reckoning errors and must therefore rely on periodic corrections provided by supplementary technologies that depend on line-of-sight signals from Earth, satellites, or other celestial bodies for absolute attitude and position determination, which can be spoofed, incorrectly identified, occluded, obscured, attenuated, or insufficiently available. These dead-reckoning errors originate in the ring laser gyros themselves, which constitute inertial measurement units. Increasing the time for standalone spacecraft navigation therefore requires fundamental improvements in gyroscope technologies. One promising solution to enhance gyro sensitivity is to place an anomalous dispersion or fast light material inside the gyro cavity. The fast light essentially provides a positive feedback to the gyro response, resulting in a larger measured beat frequency for a given rotation rate as shown in figure 1. Game Changing Development has been investing in this idea through the Fast Light Optical Gyros (FLOG) project, a collaborative effort which began in FY 2013 between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), and Northwestern University. MSFC and AMRDEC are working on the development of a passive FLOG (PFLOG), while Northwestern is developing an active FLOG (AFLOG). The project has demonstrated new benchmarks in the state of the art for scale factor sensitivity enhancement. Recent results show cavity scale factor enhancements of approx.100 for passive cavities.

  1. CMS Fast Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rahmat, Rahmat

    2012-01-01

    A framework for Fast Simulation of particle interactions in the CMS detector has been developed and implemented in the overall simulation, reconstruction and analysis framework of CMS. It produces data samples in the same format as the one used by the Geant4-based (henceforth Full) Simulation and Reconstruction chain; the output of the Fast Simulation of CMS can therefore be used in the analysis in the same way as other ones. The Fast Simulation has been used already for several physics analyses in CMS, in particular those requiring a generation of many samples to scan an extended parameter space of the physics model (e.g. SUSY). Other use cases dealt with by the Fast Simulation of CMS are those involving the generation of large cross-section backgrounds, and samples of manageable size can only be produced by events skimming based on the final reconstructed objects, or those for which in general a large computation time is foreseen. An important issue, related with the high luminosity achieved by the LHC acce...

  2. PIXEL ANALYSIS OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRAL DATA. I. PLASMA DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James [Plasma Physics Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Pevtsov, Alexei A., E-mail: anthony.rasca.ctr@nrl.navy.mil [National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    Recent observations of the photosphere using high spatial and temporal resolution show small dynamic features at or below the current resolving limits. A new pixel dynamics method has been developed to analyze spectral profiles and quantify changes in line displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness of photospheric absorption lines. The algorithm evaluates variations of line profile properties in each pixel and determines the statistics of such fluctuations averaged over all pixels in a given region. The method has been used to derive statistical characteristics of pixel fluctuations in observed quiet-Sun regions, an active region with no eruption, and an active region with an ongoing eruption. Using Stokes I images from the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) of the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) telescope on 2012 March 13, variations in line width and peakedness of Fe i 6301.5 Å are shown to have a distinct spatial and temporal relationship with an M7.9 X-ray flare in NOAA 11429. This relationship is observed as stationary and contiguous patches of pixels adjacent to a sunspot exhibiting intense flattening in the line profile and line-center displacement as the X-ray flare approaches peak intensity, which is not present in area scans of the non-eruptive active region. The analysis of pixel dynamics allows one to extract quantitative information on differences in plasma dynamics on sub-pixel scales in these photospheric regions. The analysis can be extended to include the Stokes parameters and study signatures of vector components of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties.

  3. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. Methods: A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. Results: At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54

  4. A novel multi-aperture based sun sensor based on a fast multi-point MEANSHIFT (FMMS) algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zheng; Sun, Jian; Xing, Fei; Zhang, Gao-Fei

    2011-01-01

    With the current increased widespread interest in the development and applications of micro/nanosatellites, it was found that we needed to design a small high accuracy satellite attitude determination system, because the star trackers widely used in large satellites are large and heavy, and therefore not suitable for installation on micro/nanosatellites. A Sun sensor + magnetometer is proven to be a better alternative, but the conventional sun sensor has low accuracy, and cannot meet the requirements of the attitude determination systems of micro/nanosatellites, so the development of a small high accuracy sun sensor with high reliability is very significant. This paper presents a multi-aperture based sun sensor, which is composed of a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) mask with 36 apertures and an active pixels sensor (APS) CMOS placed below the mask at a certain distance. A novel fast multi-point MEANSHIFT (FMMS) algorithm is proposed to improve the accuracy and reliability, the two key performance features, of an APS sun sensor. When the sunlight illuminates the sensor, a sun spot array image is formed on the APS detector. Then the sun angles can be derived by analyzing the aperture image location on the detector via the FMMS algorithm. With this system, the centroid accuracy of the sun image can reach 0.01 pixels, without increasing the weight and power consumption, even when some missing apertures and bad pixels appear on the detector due to aging of the devices and operation in a harsh space environment, while the pointing accuracy of the single-aperture sun sensor using the conventional correlation algorithm is only 0.05 pixels.

  5. A Novel Multi-Aperture Based Sun Sensor Based on a Fast Multi-Point MEANSHIFT (FMMS Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao-Fei Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With the current increased widespread interest in the development and applications of micro/nanosatellites, it was found that we needed to design a small high accuracy satellite attitude determination system, because the star trackers widely used in large satellites are large and heavy, and therefore not suitable for installation on micro/nanosatellites. A Sun sensor + magnetometer is proven to be a better alternative, but the conventional sun sensor has low accuracy, and cannot meet the requirements of the attitude determination systems of micro/nanosatellites, so the development of a small high accuracy sun sensor with high reliability is very significant. This paper presents a multi-aperture based sun sensor, which is composed of a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS mask with 36 apertures and an active pixels sensor (APS CMOS placed below the mask at a certain distance. A novel fast multi-point MEANSHIFT (FMMS algorithm is proposed to improve the accuracy and reliability, the two key performance features, of an APS sun sensor. When the sunlight illuminates the sensor, a sun spot array image is formed on the APS detector. Then the sun angles can be derived by analyzing the aperture image location on the detector via the FMMS algorithm. With this system, the centroid accuracy of the sun image can reach 0.01 pixels, without increasing the weight and power consumption, even when some missing apertures and bad pixels appear on the detector due to aging of the devices and operation in a harsh space environment, while the pointing accuracy of the single-aperture sun sensor using the conventional correlation algorithm is only 0.05 pixels.

  6. Radio-contaminant behaviour in the cover-gas space and the containment building of a sodium-cooled fast reactor in accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathe, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the Generation IV initiative, the consequences of a severe-accident (SA) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor must be studied. A SFR (Sodium cooled Fast Reactor) severe accident involves the disruption of the core by super-criticality involving the destruction of a certain number of fuel assemblies. Subsequently the interaction between hot fuel and liquid sodium can lead to a vapor explosion which could create a breach in the primary system. Some contaminated liquid sodium would thus be ejected into the containment building. In this situation, the evaluation of potential releases to the environment (the source term) must forecast the quantity and the chemical speciation of the radio-contaminants likely to be released from the containment building. One critical risk of a SA is the production of contaminated aerosols in the containment building by spray ejection of primary-system sodium. Being pyrophoric, the sodium droplets react with oxygen first oxidizing then burning, with significant heat of combustion. As well as evaluating the consequences of a pressure rise inside the containment, the evolution of the sodium must be assessed since not only is it activated and contaminated but, in oxide form, very toxic. Ultimately, the aerosols are the main radiological risk acting as the vector for radionuclide transport to the environment in the event of a problem with the confinement. These aerosols could evolve and interact with the FP (Fissile Products) and these interactions could modify the physical and chemical nature of the PF. We model a large part of the events that occur during a SA inside a SFR from the sodium spray fire to the reaction between sodium aerosols and PF (iodine). At first, we develop a numerical model (NATRAC) that simulates the sodium spray fire, calculates the temperature and the pressure inside the containment as well as the mass of aerosols produced during this kind of fire. The simulation has been validated with different

  7. Determining the Pixel-to-Pixel Uncertainty in Satellite-Derived SST Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary measure of the quality of sea surface temperature (SST fields obtained from satellite-borne infrared sensors has been the bias and variance of matchups with co-located in-situ values. Because such matchups tend to be widely separated, these bias and variance estimates are not necessarily a good measure of small scale (several pixels gradients in these fields because one of the primary contributors to the uncertainty in satellite retrievals is atmospheric contamination, which tends to have large spatial scales compared with the pixel separation of infrared sensors. Hence, there is not a good measure to use in selecting SST fields appropriate for the study of submesoscale processes and, in particular, of processes associated with near-surface fronts, both of which have recently seen a rapid increase in interest. In this study, two methods are examined to address this problem, one based on spectra of the SST data and the other on their variograms. To evaluate the methods, instrument noise was estimated in Level-2 Visible-Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR SST fields of the Sargasso Sea. The two methods provided very nearly identical results for AVHRR: along-scan values of approximately 0.18 K for both day and night and along-track values of 0.21 K for day and night. By contrast, the instrument noise estimated for VIIRS varied by method, scan geometry and day-night. Specifically, daytime, along-scan (along-track, spectral estimates were found to be approximately 0.05 K (0.08 K and the corresponding nighttime values of 0.02 K (0.03 K. Daytime estimates based on the variogram were found to be 0.08 K (0.10 K with the corresponding nighttime values of 0.04 K (0.06 K. Taken together, AVHRR instrument noise is significantly larger than VIIRS instrument noise, along-track noise is larger than along-scan noise and daytime levels are higher than nighttime levels. Given the similarity of

  8. Landform classification using a sub-pixel spatial attraction model to increase spatial resolution of digital elevation model (DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Mokarrama

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is preparing a landform classification by using digital elevation model (DEM which has a high spatial resolution. To reach the mentioned aim, a sub-pixel spatial attraction model was used as a novel method for preparing DEM with a high spatial resolution in the north of Darab, Fars province, Iran. The sub-pixel attraction models convert the pixel into sub-pixels based on the neighboring pixels fraction values, which can only be attracted by a central pixel. Based on this approach, a mere maximum of eight neighboring pixels can be selected for calculating of the attraction value. In the mentioned model, other pixels are supposed to be far from the central pixel to receive any attraction. In the present study by using a sub-pixel attraction model, the spatial resolution of a DEM was increased. The design of the algorithm is accomplished by using a DEM with a spatial resolution of 30 m (the Advanced Space borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer; (ASTER and a 90 m (the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission; (SRTM. In the attraction model, scale factors of (S = 2, S = 3, and S = 4 with two neighboring methods of touching (T = 1 and quadrant (T = 2 are applied to the DEMs by using MATLAB software. The algorithm is evaluated by taking the best advantages of 487 sample points, which are measured by surveyors. The spatial attraction model with scale factor of (S = 2 gives better results compared to those scale factors which are greater than 2. Besides, the touching neighborhood method is turned to be more accurate than the quadrant method. In fact, dividing each pixel into more than two sub-pixels decreases the accuracy of the resulted DEM. On the other hand, in these cases DEM, is itself in charge of increasing the value of root-mean-square error (RMSE and shows that attraction models could not be used for S which is greater than 2. Thus considering results, the proposed model is highly capable of

  9. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus crucial for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via front-end chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-on-n silicon substrates. In this paper results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including calibration procedures, detector performance and measurements of radiation damage. The detector performance is excellent: more than 95% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the des...

  10. A low mass pixel detector upgrade for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kästli, H C

    2010-01-01

    The CMS pixel detector has been designed for a peak luminosity of 10^34cm-2s-1 and a total dose corresponding to 2 years of LHC operation at a radius of 4 cm from the interaction region. Parts of the pixel detector will have to be replaced until 2015. The detector performance will be degraded for two reasons: radiation damage of the innermost layers and the planned increase of the LHC peak luminosity by a factor of 2-3. Based on the experience in planning, constructing and commissioning of the present pixel detector, we intend to upgrade the whole pixel detector in 2015. The main focus is on lowering the material budget and adding more tracking points. We will present the design of a new low mass pixel system consisting of 4 barrel layers and 3 end cap disks on each side. The design comprises of thin detector modules and a lightweight mechanical support structure using CO2 cooling. In addition, large efforts have been made to move material from the services out of the tracking region.

  11. A self-cited pixel summation based image encryption algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Guo-Dong; Huang Xiao-Ling; Zhang Leo Yu; Wang Zheng-Xia

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel image encryption algorithm is presented based on self-cited pixel summation. With the classical mechanism of permutation plus diffusion, a pixel summation of the plain image is employed to make a gravity influence on the pixel positions in the permutation stage. Then, for each pixel in every step of the diffusion stage, the pixel summation calculated from the permuted image is updated. The values from a chaotic sequence generated by an intertwining logistic map are selected by this summation. Consequently, the keystreams generated in both stages are dependent on both the plain image and the permuted image. Because of the sensitivity of the chaotic map to its initial conditions and the plain-image-dependent keystreams, any tiny change in the secret key or the plain image would lead to a significantly different cipher image. As a result, the proposed encryption algorithm is immune to the known plaintext attack (KPA) and the chosen plaintext attack (CPA). Moreover, experimental simulations and security analyses show that the proposed permutation-diffusion encryption scheme can achieve a satisfactory level of security. (paper)

  12. Pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Liang; Zheng, Hong-Liang; Yang, Hong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Image segmentation remains an important, but hard-to-solve, problem since it appears to be application dependent with usually no a priori information available regarding the image structure. In recent years, many image segmentation algorithms have been developed, but they are often very complex and some undesired results occur frequently. In this paper, we propose a pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments. Firstly, the pixel-level image feature is extracted based on quaternion exponent moments (QEMs), which can capture effectively the image pixel content by considering the correlation between different color channels. Then, the pixel-level image feature is used as input of twin support vector machines (TSVM) classifier, and the TSVM model is trained by selecting the training samples with Arimoto entropy thresholding. Finally, the color image is segmented with the trained TSVM model. The proposed scheme has the following advantages: (1) the effective QEMs is introduced to describe color image pixel content, which considers the correlation between different color channels, (2) the excellent TSVM classifier is utilized, which has lower computation time and higher classification accuracy. Experimental results show that our proposed method has very promising segmentation performance compared with the state-of-the-art segmentation approaches recently proposed in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A 4096-pixel MAPS detector used to investigate the single-electron distribution in a Young–Feynman two-slit interference experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Bologna (Italy); Giorgi, F.M., E-mail: giorgi@bo.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Semprini, N.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Bologna (Italy); Matteucci, G.; Pozzi, G. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna (Italy); Frabboni, S. [Department of Physics, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Modena (Italy); Gazzadi, G.C. [CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Modena (Italy)

    2013-01-21

    A monolithic CMOS detector, made of 4096 active pixels developed for HEP collider experiments, has been used in the Young–Feynman two-slit experiment with single electrons. The experiment has been carried out by inserting two nanometric slits in a transmission electron microscope that provided the electron beam source and the electro-optical lenses for projecting and focusing the interference pattern on the sensor. The fast readout of the sensor, in principle capable to manage up to 10{sup 6} frames per second, allowed to record single-electron frames spaced by several empty frames. In this way, for the first time in a single-electron two-slit experiment, the time distribution of electron arrivals has been measured with a resolution of 165μs. In addition, high statistics samples of single-electron events were collected within a time interval short enough to be compatible with the stability of the system and coherence conditions of the illumination.

  14. Spectroscopic X-ray imaging with photon counting pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tlustos, L

    2010-01-01

    Single particle counting hybrid pixel detectors simultaneously provide low noise, high granularity and high readout speed and make it possible to build detector systems offering high spatial resolution paired with good energy resolution. A limiting factor for the spectroscopic performance of such detector systems is charge sharing between neighbouring pixels in the sensor part of the detector. The signal spectrum at the collection electrodes of the readout electronics deviates significantly from the photonic spectrum when planar segmented sensor geometries are used. The Medipix3 implements a novel, distributed signal processing architecture linking neighbouring pixels and aims at eliminating the spectral distortion produced in the sensor by charge sharing and at reducing the impact of fluorescence photons generated in the sensor itself. Preliminary results from the very first Medipix3 readouts bump bonded to 300 pm Si sensor are presented. Material reconstruction is a possible future application of spectrosco...

  15. Planar Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS Upgrade: Beam Tests results

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, J

    2012-01-01

    The performance of planar silicon pixel sensors, in development for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades, has been examined in a series of beam tests at the CERN SPS facilities since 2009. Salient results are reported on the key parameters, including the spatial resolution, the charge collection and the charge sharing between adjacent cells, for different bulk materials and sensor geometries. Measurements are presented for n+-in-n pixel sensors irradiated with a range of fluences and for p-type silicon sensors with various layouts from different vendors. All tested sensors were connected via bump-bonding to the ATLAS Pixel read-out chip. The tests reveal that both n-type and p-type planar sensors are able to collect significant charge even after the lifetime fluence expected at the HL-LHC.

  16. Integration of the CMS Phase 1 Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kornmayer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    During the extended year-end technical stop 2016/17 the CMS Pixel Detector has been replaced. The new Phase 1 Pixel Detector is designed for a luminosity that could exceed $\\text{L} = 2x10^{34} cm^{−2}s^{−1}$. With one additional layer in the barrel and the forward region of the new detector, combined with the higher hit rates as the LHC luminosity increases, these conditions called for an upgrade of the data acquisition system, which was realised based on the $\\mu$TCA standard. This contribution focuses on the experiences with integration of the new detector readout and control system and reports on the operational performance of the CMS Pixel detector.

  17. Digital Power Consumption Estimations for CHIPIX65 Pixel Readout Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotulli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    New hybrid pixel detectors with improved resolution capable of dealing with hit rates up to 3 GHz/cm2 will be required for future High Energy Physics experiments in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Given this, the RD53 collaboration works on the design of the next generation pixel readout chip needed for both the ATLAS and CMS detector phase 2 pixel upgrades. For the RD53 demonstrator chip in 65nm CMOS technology, different architectures are considered. In particular the purpose of this work is estimating the power consumption of the digital architecture of the readout ASIC developed by CHIPIX65 project of the INFN National Scientific Committee. This has been done with modern chip design tools integrated with the VEPIX53 simulation framework that has been developed within the RD53 collaboration in order to assess the performance of the system in very high rate, high energy physics experiments.

  18. Development of the ASICs for the NA62 pixel Gigatracker

    CERN Document Server

    Jarron, P

    2008-01-01

    We present the ASIC development for the readout electronics of the Gigatracker pixel detector of NA62. Specifications of this detector are challenging in terms of timing precision with a hit time stamp accuracy of 100 ps and a peak hit rate of 50 Mhits/cm2/s. A timing precision and hit rate are more than one order of magnitude faster than pixel LHC readout ASIC. The research for pixel cell design and the readout architectures are following two approaches, which are presented and discussed in this paper. Presently demonstrator prototypes are under development and SPICE simulation results of the frontend, the readout strategy and and the pixelcolumn are also presented and discussed.

  19. Online calibrations and performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately 80 M electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region, thus allowing measuring particle tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. The readout system of the Pixel Detector is based on a bi-directional optical data transmission system between the detector and the data acquisition system with an individual link for each of the 1744 modules. Signal conversion components are located on both ends, approximately 80 m apart. The talk will give an overview of the calibration and performance of both the detector and its optical readout. The most basic parameter to be tuned and calibrated for the detector electronics is the readout threshold of the individual pixel channels. These need to be carefully tuned to optimise position resolution a...

  20. PIXEL: Japanese InSAR community for crustal deformation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, M.; Shimada, M.; Ozawa, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Miyagi, Y.; Kitagawa, S.

    2007-12-01

    In anticipation of the launch of ALOS (Advanced Land Observation Satellite) by JAXA (Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency), and in order to expand and bolster the InSAR community for crustal deformation research in Japan, a couple of scientists established a consortium, PIXEL, in November 2005 in a completely bottom-up fashion. PIXEL stands for Palsar Interferometry Consortium to Study our Evolving Land. Formally, it is a research contract between JAXA and Earthquake Research Institute (ERI), University of Tokyo. As ERI is a shared institute of the Japanese universities and research institutes, every scientist at all Japanese universities and institutes can participate in this consortium. The activity of PIXEL includes information exchange by mailing list, tutorial workshop for InSAR software, research workshop, and PALSAR data sharing. After the launch of ALOS, we have already witnessed several earthquakes and volcanic activities using PALSAR interferometry. We will briefly show and digest some of those observation results.

  1. Performance of the INTPIX6 SOI pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Y.; Bugiel, Sz.; Dasgupta, R.; Idzik, M.; Kapusta, P.; Kucewicz, W.; Miyoshi, T.; Turala, M.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of the monolithic pixel detector INPTIX6, designed at KEK and fabricated in Lapis 0.2 μ m Fully-Depleted, Low-Leakage Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) CMOS technology, was performed. The INTPIX6 comprises a large area of 1408 × 896 integrating type squared pixels of 12 micron pitch. In this work the performance and measurement results of the prototypes produced on lower resistivity Czochralski type (CZ-n) and high resistivity floating zone (FZ-n) sensor wafers are presented. Using 241Am radioactive source the noise of INTPIX6 was measured, showing the ENC (Equivalent Noise Charge) of about 70 e-. The resolution calculated from the FWHM of the Iron-55 X-ray peak was about 100 e-. The radiation hardness of the SOI pixel detector was also investigated. The CZ-n type INTPIX6 received a dose of 60 krad and its performance has been continuously monitored during the irradiation.

  2. Calibration Analysis Software for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00372086; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The calibration of the ATLAS Pixel detector at LHC fulfils two main purposes: to tune the front-end configuration parameters for establishing the best operational settings and to measure the tuning performance through a subset of scans. An analysis framework has been set up in order to take actions on the detector given the outcome of a calibration scan (e.g. to create a mask for disabling noisy pixels). The software framework to control all aspects of the Pixel detector scans and analyses is called Calibration Console. The introduction of a new layer, equipped with new Front End-I4 Chips, required an update the Console architecture. It now handles scans and scans analyses applied together to chips with different characteristics. An overview of the newly developed Calibration Analysis Software will be presented, together with some preliminary result.

  3. Calibration Analysis Software for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The calibration of the Pixel detector fulfills two main purposes: to tune front-end registers for establishing the best operational settings and to measure the tuning performance through a subset of scans. An analysis framework has been set up in order to take actions on the detector given the outcome of a calibration scan (e.g. to create a mask for disabling noisy pixels). The software framework to control all aspects of the Pixel detector scans and analyses is called Calibration Console. The introduction of a new layer, equipped with new Front End-I4 Chips, required an update the Console architecture. It now handles scans and scans analyses applied toghether to chips with dierent characteristics. An overview of the newly developed Calibration Analysis Software will be presented, together with some preliminary result.

  4. Testbeam and laboratory characterization of CMS 3D pixel sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubna, M.; Bortoletto, D.; Alagoz, E.; Krzywda, A.; Arndt, K.; Shipsey, I.; Bolla, G.; Hinton, N.; Kok, A.; Hansen, T.-E.; Summanwar, A.; Brom, J. M.; Boscardin, M.; Chramowicz, J.; Cumalat, J.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Dinardo, M.; Godshalk, A.; Jones, M.; Krohn, M. D.; Kumar, A.; Lei, C. M.; Mendicino, R.; Moroni, L.; Perera, L.; Povoli, M.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Solano, A.; Obertino, M. M.; Kwan, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vigani, L.; Wagner, S.

    2014-07-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost tracking device in CMS, reconstructing interaction vertices and charged particle trajectories. The sensors located in the innermost layers of the pixel detector must be upgraded for the ten-fold increase in luminosity expected at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). As a possible replacement for planar sensors, 3D silicon technology is under consideration due to its good performance after high radiation fluence. In this paper, we report on pre- and post- irradiation measurements of CMS 3D pixel sensors with different electrode configurations from different vendors. The effects of irradiation on electrical properties, charge collection efficiency, and position resolution are discussed. Measurements of various test structures for monitoring the fabrication process and studying the bulk and surface properties of silicon sensors, such as MOS capacitors, planar and gate-controlled diodes are also presented.

  5. New pixelized Micromegas detector for the COMPASS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Neyret, Damien; Bedfer, Yann; Burtin, Etienne; d'Hose, Nicole; Giganon, Arnaud; Ketzer, Bernhard; Konorov, Igor; Kunne, Fabienne; Magnon, Alain; Marchand, Claude; Paul, Bernard; Platchkov, Stephane; Vandenbroucke, Maxence

    2009-01-01

    New Micromegas (Micro-mesh gaseous detectors) are being developed in view of the future physics projects planned by the COMPASS collaboration at CERN. Several major upgrades compared to present detectors are being studied: detectors standing five times higher luminosity with hadron beams, detection of beam particles (flux up to a few hundred of kHz/mm^2, 10 times larger than for the present detectors) with pixelized read-out in the central part, light and integrated electronics, and improved robustness. Studies were done with the present detectors moved in the beam, and two first pixelized prototypes are being tested with muon and hadron beams in real conditions at COMPASS. We present here this new project and report on two series of tests, with old detectors moved into the beam and with pixelized prototypes operated in real data taking condition with both muon and hadron beams.

  6. Depleted CMOS pixels for LHC proton–proton experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wermes, N.

    2016-01-01

    While so far monolithic pixel detectors have remained in the realm of comparatively low rate and radiation applications outside LHC, new developments exploiting high resistivity substrates with three or four well CMOS process options allow reasonably large depletion depths and full CMOS circuitry in a monolithic structure. This opens up the possibility to target CMOS pixel detectors also for high radiation pp-experiments at the LHC upgrade, either in a hybrid-type fashion or even fully monolithic. Several pixel matrices have been prototyped with high ohmic substrates, high voltage options, and full CMOS electronics. They were characterized in the lab and in test beams. An overview of the necessary development steps and different approaches as well as prototype results are presented in this paper.

  7. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV $n_\\mathrm{eq}/\\mathrm{cm}^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This talk presents a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS Pixel sensors for the first time. After a thorough description of the setup, predictions for basic Pixel cluster properties are presented alongside first validation studies with Run 2 collision data.

  8. Testbeam and Laboratory Characterization of CMS 3D Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Bubna, M.; Alagoz, E.; Krzywda, A.; Arndt, K.; Shipsey, I.; Bolla, G.; Hinton, N.; Kok, A.; Hansen, T.-E.; Summanwar, A.; Brom, J.M.; Boscardin, M.; Chramowicz, J.; Cumalat, J.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Dinardo, M.; Godshalk, A.; Jones, M.; Krohn, M.D.; Kumar, A.; Lei, C.M.; Mendicino, R.; Moroni, L.; Perera, L.; Povoli, M.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Solano, A.; Obertino, M.M.; Kwan, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vigani, L.; Wagner, S.

    2014-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost tracking device in CMS, reconstructing interaction vertices and charged particle trajectories. The sensors located in the innermost layers of the pixel detector must be upgraded for the ten-fold increase in luminosity expected with the High- Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) phase. As a possible replacement for planar sensors, 3D silicon technology is under consideration due to its good performance after high radiation fluence. In this paper, we report on pre- and post- irradiation measurements for CMS 3D pixel sensors with different electrode configurations. The effects of irradiation on electrical properties, charge collection efficiency, and position resolution of 3D sensors are discussed. Measurements of various test structures for monitoring the fabrication process and studying the bulk and surface properties, such as MOS capacitors, planar and gate-controlled diodes are also presented.

  9. Detector Modules for the CMS Pixel Phase 1 Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, De Hua; Berger, Pirmin; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Starodumov, Andrey; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Pixel phase 1 upgrade detector consists of 1184 modules with new design. An important part of the production is the module qualification and calibration, ensuring their proper functionality within the detector. This paper summarizes the qualification and calibration results of modules used in the innermost two detector layers with focus on methods using module-internal calibration signals. Extended characterizations on pixel level such as electronic noise and bump bond connectivity, optimization of operational parameters, sensor quality and thermal stress resistance were performed using a customized setup with controlled environment. It could be shown that the selected modules have on average $0.55 \\mathrm{ {}^{0\\!}\\!/\\!_{00} }\\, \\pm \\, 0.01 \\mathrm{ {}^{0\\!}\\!/\\!_{00} }\\,$ defective pixels and that all performance parameters stay within their specifications.

  10. Charge induction in semiconductor detectors with pixellated structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samedov, Victor V.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable interest is now being attracted to the next generation of compound semiconductor detectors with pixellated structure in application to x-ray and gamma-astronomy, nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear medicine. The spatial resolution of this type of detectors is mainly determined by the process of charge induction by carriers on electrodes with pixellated structure. Ramo-Shockley's theorem that uses only the conservation-of-energy argument is not applicable to segmented electrodes since it gives only the total charge induced on the electrode, not a fraction that induced on a single pixel. In this work a method for finding the exact analytical solution for the Green function, the electric potential and the induced charge is proposed. This method is applicable to detectors with any real configuration of electrodes. (author)

  11. Fast mutual-information-based contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Yu, Lifang; Tian, Huawei; Huang, Xianglin; Wang, Yongbin

    2017-07-01

    Recently, T. Celik proposed an effective image contrast enhancement (CE) method based on spatial mutual information and PageRank (SMIRANK). According to the state-of-the-art evaluation criteria, it achieves the best visual enhancement quality among existing global CE methods. However, SMIRANK runs much slower than the other counterparts, such as histogram equalization (HE) and adaptive gamma correction. Low computational complexity is also required for good CE algorithms. In this paper, we novelly propose a fast SMIRANK algorithm, called FastSMIRANK. It integrates both spatial and gray-level downsampling into the generation of pixel value mapping function. Moreover, the computation of rank vectors is speeded up by replacing PageRank with a simple yet efficient row-based operation of mutual information matrix. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed FastSMIRANK could accelerate the processing speed of SMIRANK by about 20 times, and is even faster than HE. Comparable enhancement quality is preserved simultaneously.

  12. Improved Space Object Orbit Determination Using CMOS Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, T.; Peltonen, J.; Sännti, T.; Silha, J.; Flohrer, T.

    2014-09-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contains their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, we simulated several observation scenarios for ground- and space-based sensor by assuming different observation and sensor properties. We will introduce the analyzed end-to-end simulations of the ground- and space-based strategies in order to investigate the orbit determination accuracy and its sensitivity which may result from different values for the frame-rate, pixel scale, astrometric and epoch registration accuracies. Two cases were simulated, a survey using a ground-based sensor to observe objects in LEO for surveillance applications, and a statistical survey with a space-based sensor orbiting in LEO observing small-size debris in LEO. The ground-based LEO survey uses a dynamical fence close to the Earth shadow a few hours after sunset. For the space-based scenario

  13. Fast imaging of visible phenomena in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqueda, R.J.; Wurden, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A commercial fast framing visible imaging system was used at TFTR to study edge plasma phenomena. This system was typically operated at 1000 frames/s, with exposures as short as 10 μs. These short exposures ar made possible by the image intensification of the camera, which also allows narrow band interference filters to be used. Sequences of over 1600 digital images (239 pixel x 192 pixel x 8 bit) can be captured into temporary memory banks for later slow play-back and/or storage into computer archives. Examples are shown illustrating plasma disruption, flying debris, lithium pellet injection, shallow deposition of lithium by laser outside the plasma (DOLLOP) and edge plasma turbulence. The characteristics of this system make it also very useful to the machine operator, since they provide slow motion video coverage of the interior of the device. (author)

  14. Development of readout system for FE-I4 pixel module using SiTCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, J. J.; Hanagaki, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Takubo, Y.; Terada, S.; Unno, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector will be replaced in the future High Luminosity-Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) upgrade to preserve or improve the detector performance at high luminosity environment. To meet the tight requirements of the upgrade, a new pixel Front-End (FE) Integrated Circuit (IC) called FE-I4 has been developed. We have then devised a readout system for the new FE IC. Our system incorporates Silicon Transmission Control Protocol (SiTCP) technology (Uchida, 2008 [1]) which utilizes the standard TCP/IP and UDP communication protocols. This technology allows direct data access and transfer between a readout hardware chain and PC via a high speed Ethernet. In addition, the communication protocols are small enough to be implemented in a single Field-Programable Gate Array (FPGA). Relying on this technology, we have been able to construct a very compact, versatile and fast readout system. We have developed a firmware and software together with the readout hardware chain. We also have established basic functionalities for reading out FE-I4.

  15. Thermal Characterization and Optimization of the Pixel Module Support Structure for the Phase-1 Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2094386; Feld, Lutz Werner

    2015-01-01

    The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) pixel detector is used in CMS for the vertex reconstruction of events in high-energy proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It is planned for the future years that the LHC will deliver significantly higher instantaneous and integrated luminosities. Therefore, also the demands and requirements for the participating detectors rise. Thus the current CMS pixel detector will be replaced by the CMS Phase-1 Upgrade Pixel Detector in the extended year-end technical stop in winter 2016/2017. As a vertex detector, the pixel detector is the innermost detector component and it is located at a short distance to the proton-proton interaction point. Therefore it has to cope with high particle hit rates and high irradiation. The heat produced due to power consumption has to be removed while using a low-mass detector design. The low-mass design of the Phase-1 Upgrade Pixel Detector will be implemented by utilizing a new two-phase CO2 cooling concept and an ultra l...

  16. Classification of multispectral image data by the Binary Diamond neural network and by nonparametric, pixel-by-pixel methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salu, Yehuda; Tilton, James

    1993-01-01

    The classification of multispectral image data obtained from satellites has become an important tool for generating ground cover maps. This study deals with the application of nonparametric pixel-by-pixel classification methods in the classification of pixels, based on their multispectral data. A new neural network, the Binary Diamond, is introduced, and its performance is compared with a nearest neighbor algorithm and a back-propagation network. The Binary Diamond is a multilayer, feed-forward neural network, which learns from examples in unsupervised, 'one-shot' mode. It recruits its neurons according to the actual training set, as it learns. The comparisons of the algorithms were done by using a realistic data base, consisting of approximately 90,000 Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper pixels. The Binary Diamond and the nearest neighbor performances were close, with some advantages to the Binary Diamond. The performance of the back-propagation network lagged behind. An efficient nearest neighbor algorithm, the binned nearest neighbor, is described. Ways for improving the performances, such as merging categories, and analyzing nonboundary pixels, are addressed and evaluated.

  17. Pixel-Level Tissue Classification for Ultrasound Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazinato, Daniel V; Stein, Bernardo V; de Almeida, Waldir R; Werneck, Rafael de O; Mendes Júnior, Pedro R; Penatti, Otávio A B; Torres, Ricardo da S; Menezes, Fábio H; Rocha, Anderson

    2016-01-01

    Pixel-level tissue classification for ultrasound images, commonly applied to carotid images, is usually based on defining thresholds for the isolated pixel values. Ranges of pixel values are defined for the classification of each tissue. The classification of pixels is then used to determine the carotid plaque composition and, consequently, to determine the risk of diseases (e.g., strokes) and whether or not a surgery is necessary. The use of threshold-based methods dates from the early 2000s but it is still widely used for virtual histology. We propose the use of descriptors that take into account information about a neighborhood of a pixel when classifying it. We evaluated experimentally different descriptors (statistical moments, texture-based, gradient-based, local binary patterns, etc.) on a dataset of five types of tissues: blood, lipids, muscle, fibrous, and calcium. The pipeline of the proposed classification method is based on image normalization, multiscale feature extraction, including the proposal of a new descriptor, and machine learning classification. We have also analyzed the correlation between the proposed pixel classification method in the ultrasound images and the real histology with the aid of medical specialists. The classification accuracy obtained by the proposed method with the novel descriptor in the ultrasound tissue images (around 73%) is significantly above the accuracy of the state-of-the-art threshold-based methods (around 54%). The results are validated by statistical tests. The correlation between the virtual and real histology confirms the quality of the proposed approach showing it is a robust ally for the virtual histology in ultrasound images.

  18. Extreme charge-trapping by pixels in Hubble's ACS/WFC detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryon, Jenna E.; Grogin, Norman A.; ACS Team

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the properties of sink pixels in the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) detector. These pixels likely contain extra charge traps and therefore appear anomalously low in images with relatively high backgrounds. We identify sink pixels in the average short (0.5-second) dark image from each monthly anneal cycle, which, since January 2015, have been post-flashed to a background of about 60 e-. Sink pixels can affect the pixels immediately above and below them in the same column, resulting in high downstream pixels and low trails of upstream pixels. We determine typical trail lengths for sink pixels of different depths at various background levels. We create a reference image, one for each anneal cycle since January 2015, that will be used by CALACS to flag sink pixels and the adjacent affected pixels in science images.

  19. Radiation damage monitoring in the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Sally

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to an integrated luminosity 5.6 fb −1 is presented along with a comparison to a model. -- Highlights: ► Radiation damage monitoring via silicon leakage current is implemented in the ATLAS (LHC) pixel detector. ► Leakage currents measured are consistent with the Hamburg/Dortmund model. ► This information can be used to validate the ATLAS simulation model.

  20. SLHC upgrade plans for the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicho, Petr

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is an 80 million channels silicon tracking system designed to detect charged tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. An upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector is presently being considered, enabling to cope with higher luminosity at Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC). The increased luminosity leads to extremely high radiation doses in the innermost region of the ATLAS tracker. Options considered for a new detector are discussed, as well as some important R and D activities, such as investigations towards novel detector geometries and novel processes.