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Sample records for fast emotional reactions

  1. Unseen Facial and Bodily Expressions Trigger Fast Emotional Reactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marco Tamietto; Lorys Castelli; Sergio Vighetti; Paola Perozzo; Giuliano Geminiani; Lawrence Weiskrantz; Beatrice de Gelder

    2009-01-01

    .... It has been suggested either that emotional contagion is driven by motor imitation (i.e., mimicry), or that it is one observable aspect of the emotional state arising when we see the corresponding emotion in others...

  2. Emotional reactions to crime across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, David; Hwang, Hyisung C

    2015-10-01

    Information about the emotions experienced by observers when they witness crimes would have important theoretical and practical implications, but to date no study has broadly assessed such emotional reactions. This study addressed this gap in the literature. Observers in seven countries viewed seven videos portraying actual crimes and rated their emotional reactions to each using 14 emotion scales. Observers reported significantly high levels of negative emotions including anger, contempt, disgust, fear and sadness-related emotions, and anger, contempt and disgust were the most salient emotions experienced by viewers across all countries. Witnesses also reported significantly high levels of positive emotions as well (compared to not feeling the emotion at all), which was unexpected. Country moderated the emotion ratings; post-hoc analyses indicated that masculine-oriented cultures reported less nervousness, surprise, excitement, fear and embarrassment than feminine cultures.

  3. Emotional reactions to human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Extant surveys of people's attitudes towards human reproductive cloning focus on moral judgements alone, not emotional reactions or sentiments. This is especially important given that some (especially Leon Kass) have argued against such cloning on the ground that it engenders widespread negative emotions, like disgust, that provide a moral guide. To provide some data on emotional reactions to human cloning, with a focus on repugnance, given its prominence in the literature. This brief mixed-method study measures the self-reported attitudes and emotions (positive or negative) towards cloning from a sample of participants in the USA. Most participants condemned cloning as immoral and said it should be illegal. The most commonly reported positive sentiment was by far interest/curiosity. Negative emotions were much more varied, but anxiety was the most common. Only about a third of participants selected disgust or repugnance as something they felt, and an even smaller portion had this emotion come to mind prior to seeing a list of options. Participants felt primarily interested and anxious about human reproductive cloning. They did not primarily feel disgust or repugnance. This provides initial empirical evidence that such a reaction is not appropriately widespread. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia and Emotional Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmir Gračanin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA, which is considered to reflect parasympathetic activity, has received an increased scientific interest during the last several decades. Research on RSA in psychophysiology was especially focused on its relationship with the emotional process and related individual differences. This contribution starts with a short description of parasympathetic nervous system function and its influences on heart activity. This is followed by the description of the Polyvagal Theory and the model of neurovisceral integration, which represent a broad framework for an understanding of the relations between parasympathetic activity, workings of the central nervous system functions, cognitive processes, and emotional reactions. After a brief explanation of the way the RSA is typically measured, a short overview of experimental research directed to RSA changes that accompany emotional reactions and correlational research of the relations between baseline measures of RSA and emotional traits is presented. This research shows that different hypotheses derived from the Polyvagal theory and the Model of neurovisceral integration are confirmed primarily in the context of vagal withdrawal and decreased vagal tone that are related to stress reactions, emotion of fear and trait anxiety, and to a lesser extent to trait hostility. The final section includes a brief discussion on the sources of inconsistency in the results of experimental research of relations between basic emotions and RSA changes, such as the neglected role of cognitive processes and somatic activity.

  5. Adolescents' emotional reactions to parental cancer : effect on emotional and behavioral problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donofrio, Stacey; Hoekstra, Harald J.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.; Visser, Annemieke; Huizinga, Gea A.; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We examined adolescents' emotional reactions to parental cancer and explored relationships between emotional reactions and adolescents' emotional/behavioral problems. METHODS: Two studies were performed: retrospective and prospective. A total of 221 adolescents (105 sons) of 138 patients

  6. Vanishing, moving and immovable interfaces in fast reaction limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, M.; Monobe, H.; Murakawa, H.; Ninomiya, H.

    2017-09-01

    We consider a type of singular limit problem called the fast reaction limit. The problem of the fast reaction limit involves studying the behaviour of solutions of reaction-diffusion systems when the reaction speeds are very fast. Fast reaction limits of two-component systems have been studied in recent decades. In most of these systems, the fast reaction terms of each component are represented by the same function. Fast reaction limits of systems with different fast reaction terms are still far from being well understood. In this paper, we focus on a reaction-diffusion system for which the reaction terms consist of monomial functions of various powers. The behaviour of interfaces arising in the fast reaction limit of this system is studied. Depending on the powers, three types of behaviour are observed: (i) the initial interface vanishes instantaneously, (ii) the interface propagates at a finite speed, and (iii) the interface does not move.

  7. The effect of Ramadan fasting on spatial attention through emotional stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molavi M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Maziyar Molavi, Jasmy Yunus, Nugraha P Utama Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering (FBME, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM, Johor Bahru, Johor, MalaysiaAbstract: Fasting can influence psychological and mental states. In the current study, the effect of periodical fasting on the process of emotion through gazed facial expression as a realistic multisource of social information was investigated for the first time. The dynamic cue-target task was applied via behavior and event-related potential measurements for 40 participants to reveal the temporal and spatial brain activities – before, during, and after fasting periods. The significance of fasting included several effects. The amplitude of the N1 component decreased over the centroparietal scalp during fasting. Furthermore, the reaction time during the fasting period decreased. The self-measurement of deficit arousal as well as the mood increased during the fasting period. There was a significant contralateral alteration of P1 over occipital area for the happy facial expression stimuli. The significant effect of gazed expression and its interaction with the emotional stimuli was indicated by the amplitude of N1. Furthermore, the findings of the study approved the validity effect as a congruency between gaze and target position, as indicated by the increment of P3 amplitude over centroparietal area as well as slower reaction time from behavioral response data during incongruency or invalid condition between gaze and target position compared with those during valid condition. Results of this study proved that attention to facial expression stimuli as a kind of communicative social signal was affected by fasting. Also, fasting improved the mood of practitioners. Moreover, findings from the behavioral and event-related potential data analyses indicated that the neural dynamics of facial emotion are processed faster than that of gazing, as the participants

  8. Parental reactions to children's negative emotions: relationships with emotion regulation in children with an anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Katherine E; Hudson, Jennifer L; Schniering, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that parental reactions to children's emotions play a significant role in the development of children's emotion regulation (ER) and adjustment. This study compared parent reactions to children's negative emotions between families of anxious and non-anxious children (aged 7-12) and examined associations between parent reactions and children's ER. Results indicated that children diagnosed with an anxiety disorder had significantly greater difficulty regulating a range of negative emotions and were regarded as more emotionally negative and labile by their parents. Results also suggested that mothers of anxious children espoused less supportive parental emotional styles when responding to their children's negative emotions. Supportive and non-supportive parenting reactions to children's negative emotions related to children's emotion regulation skills, with father's non-supportive parenting showing a unique relationship to children's negativity/lability.

  9. Emotional Reactions of Rescue Workers Following a Tornado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, Susan L.; And Others

    Rescue and medical workers may be at risk for negative emotional experience following intervention efforts in disaster situations. To examine this possibility, 120 rescue and hospital personnel responded to a survey of their emotional reactions and coping behaviors 3 months after a devastating tornado. Twenty-eight subjects had been involved in…

  10. Maternal Emotional Signals, Social Referencing, and Infants' Reactions to Strangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maria; Campos, Joseph J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the significance of emotional communication and social referencing of the mother by her infant as determinants of the infant's affective reactions to other social figures in the environment. (PCB)

  11. Substance abusers' personality disorders and staff members' emotional reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    workshops completed a self-report inventory of emotional reactions to patients, the Feeling Word Checklist-58, and substance abusers completed a self-report of DSM-IV personality disorder, the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Disorder Questionnaire. Correlational analysis and multiple regression analysis...... impact on emotional reactions. Conclusion The findings confirm clinical experiences that personality disorder features in patients with substance abuse have an impact on staff members reactions to them. These reactions should be considered in supervision of staff, and in treatment models for patients...... with co-morbid personality disorders and substance abuse....

  12. The effects of measuring emotion: physiological reactions to emotional situations depend on whether someone is asking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Karim S; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2013-01-01

    Measurement effects exist throughout the sciences-the act of measuring often changes the properties of the observed. We suggest emotion research is no exception. The awareness and conscious assessment required by self-report of emotion may significantly alter emotional processes. In this study, participants engaged in a difficult math task designed to induce anger or shame while their cardiovascular responses were measured. Half of the participants were asked to report on their emotional states and appraise their feelings throughout the experiment, whereas the other half completed a control questionnaire. Among those in the anger condition, participants assigned to report on their emotions exhibited qualitatively different physiological responses from those who did not report. For participants in the shame condition, there were no significant differences in physiology based on the self-report manipulation. The study demonstrates that the simple act of reporting on an emotional state may have a substantial impact on the body's reaction to an emotional situation.

  13. Substance abusers' personality disorders and staff members' emotional reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    workshops completed a self-report inventory of emotional reactions to patients, the Feeling Word Checklist-58, and substance abusers completed a self-report of DSM-IV personality disorder, the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Disorder Questionnaire. Correlational analysis and multiple regression analysis......Background Previous research has indicated that aggressive behaviour and DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders (PD) may be associated with professionals' emotional reactions to clients, and that cluster C PD may be associated with positive emotional reactions. Methods Staff members recruited from...... was used to assess the associations between personality disorders and emotional reations. Results Cluster B disorder features were associated with feeling distance to patients, and cluster C disorder features were associated with feeling helpful towards patients. Cluster A disorders had no significant...

  14. Organic chemistry - Fast reactions 'on water'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, JE; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    Efficient reactions in aqueous organic chemistry do not require soluble reactants, as had been thought. A newly developed ‘on-water’ protocol is characterized by short reaction times, and the products are easy to isolate.

  15. Emotional Reactions to Frightening and Neutral Scenes in Story Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Judith B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Children's reactions to emotionally neutral and frightening scenes were compared using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children. Differences in the reactions of boys and girls were interpreted as reflecting both their identification with different characters in the play and their perceptions of the physical danger and psychological threat to…

  16. Quantum Theory of Fast Chemical Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, John C

    2007-07-30

    The aims of the research under this grant were to develop a theoretical understanding and predictive abiility for a variety of processes occurring in the gas phase. These included bimolecular chemical exchange reactions, photodissociation, predissociation resonances, unimolecular reactions and recombination reactions. In general we assumed a knowledge, from quantum chemistry, of the interactions of the atoms and molecular fragments involved. Our focus was primarily on the accurate (quantum) dynamics of small molecular systems. This has been important for many reactions related to combustion and atmospheric chemistry involving light atom transfer reactions and, for example, resonances in dissociation and recombination reactions. The rates of such reactions, as functions of temperature, internal states, and radiation (light), are fundamental for generating models of overall combustion processes. A number of new approaches to these problems were developed inclluding the use of discrete variable representations (DVR's) for evaluating rate constants with the flux-flux correlation approach, finite range approaches to exact quantum scattering calculations, energy selected basis representations, transition state wave packet approaches and improved semiclassical approaches. These (and others) were applied to a number of reactive systems and molecular systems of interest including (many years ago) the isotopic H + H2 exchange reactions, the H2 + OH (and H + H2O) systems, Ozone resonances, van der Waals molecule reactions, etc. A total of 7 graduate students, and 5 post-doctoral Research Associates were supported, at least in part, under this grant and seven papers were published with a total of 10 external collaborators. The majority of the 36 publications under this grant were supported entirely by DOE.

  17. Emotional reactions of peers influence decisions about fairness in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard T. Klapwijk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During adolescence, peers take on increasing importance, while social skills are still developing. However, how emotions of peers influence social decisions during that age period is insufficiently known. We therefore examined the effects of three different emotional responses (anger, disappointment, happiness on decisions about fairness in a sample of 156 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years. Participants received written emotional responses from peers in a version of the Dictator Game to a previous unfair offer. Adolescents reacted with more generous offers after disappointed reactions compared to angry and happy reactions. Additionally, we found preliminary evidence for developmental differences over adolescence, since older adolescents differentiated more between the three emotions than younger adolescents. In addition, individual differences in social value orientation played a role in decisions after happy reactions of peers to a previous unfair offer, such that participants with a ‘proself’ orientation made more unfair offers to happy peers than ‘prosocial’ participants. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that adolescents take emotions of peers into account when making social decisions, while individual differences in social value orientation affect these decisions, and age seems to influence the nature of the reaction.

  18. Electrified emotions: Modulatory effects of transcranial direct stimulation on negative emotional reactions to social exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Paolo; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Vergallito, Alessandra; DeWall, C Nathan; Bushman, Brad J

    2015-01-01

    Social exclusion, ostracism, and rejection can be emotionally painful because they thwart the need to belong. Building on studies suggesting that the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) is associated with regulation of negative emotions, the present experiment tests the hypothesis that decreasing the cortical excitability of the rVLPFC may increase negative emotional reactions to social exclusion. Specifically, we applied cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the rVLPFC and predicted an increment of negative emotional reactions to social exclusion. In Study 1, participants were either socially excluded or included, while cathodal tDCS or sham stimulation was applied over the rVLPFC. Cathodal stimulation of rVLPFC boosted the typical negative emotional reaction caused by social exclusion. No effects emerged from participants in the inclusion condition. To test the specificity of tDCS effects over rVLPFC, in Study 2, participants were socially excluded and received cathodal tDCS or sham stimulation over a control region (i.e., the right posterior parietal cortex). No effects of tDCS stimulation were found. Our results showed that the rVLPFC is specifically involved in emotion regulation and suggest that cathodal stimulation can increase negative emotional responses to social exclusion.

  19. Controlling the emotional heart: heart rate biofeedback improves cardiac control during emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Fredrikson, Mats; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    When regulating negative emotional reactions, one goal is to reduce physiological reactions. However, not all regulation strategies succeed in doing that. We tested whether heart rate biofeedback helped participants reduce physiological reactions in response to negative and neutral pictures. When viewing neutral pictures, participants could regulate their heart rate whether the heart rate feedback was real or not. In contrast, when viewing negative pictures, participants could regulate heart rate only when feedback was real. Ratings of task success paralleled heart rate. Participants' general level of anxiety, emotion awareness, or cognitive emotion regulation strategies did not influence the results. Our findings show that accurate online heart rate biofeedback provides an efficient way to down-regulate autonomic physiological reactions when encountering negative stimuli.

  20. Quantum dynamics of fast chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, J.C. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The aims of this research are to explore, develop, and apply theoretical methods for the evaluation of the dynamics of gas phase collision processes, primarily chemical reactions. The primary theoretical tools developed for this work have been quantum scattering theory, both in time dependent and time independent forms. Over the past several years, the authors have developed and applied methods for the direct quantum evaluation of thermal rate constants, applying these to the evaluation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions, applied wave packet propagation techniques to the dissociation of Rydberg H{sub 3}, incorporated optical potentials into the evaluation of thermal rate constants, evaluated the use of optical potentials for state-to-state reaction probability evaluations, and, most recently, have developed quantum approaches for electronically non-adiabatic reactions which may be applied to simplify calculations of reactive, but electronically adiabatic systems. Evaluation of the thermal rate constants and the dissociation of H{sub 3} were reported last year, and have now been published.

  1. Security market reaction to FDA fast track designations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher W; Zhang, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Pharmaceutical firms can apply for the Food and Drug Administration to 'fast track' research and de velopment on new drugs, accelerating clinical trials and expediting regulatory review required prior to marketing to consumers. We investigate security market reaction to more than 100 fast track designations from 1998 to 2004. Fast track designation appears to enhance investor recognition of firm value. Specifically, fast track designation coincides with abnormal trading volume and excess daily stock returns for sponsoring firms. Institutional ownership and analyst attention also increase. Market response is more pronounced for firms that are smaller, do not yet market products, and have low institutional ownership.

  2. A semi-quantitative equivalence for abstracting from fast reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galpin, Vashti; Ciocchetta, Federica; 10.4204/EPTCS.67.5

    2011-01-01

    Semantic equivalences are used in process algebra to capture the notion of similar behaviour, and this paper proposes a semi-quantitative equivalence for a stochastic process algebra developed for biological modelling. We consider abstracting away from fast reactions as suggested by the Quasi-Steady-State Assumption. We define a fast-slow bisimilarity based on this idea. We also show congruence under an appropriate condition for the cooperation operator of Bio-PEPA. The condition requires that there is no synchronisation over fast actions, and this distinguishes fast-slow bisimilarity from weak bisimilarity. We also show congruence for an operator which extends the reactions available for a species. We characterise models for which it is only necessary to consider the matching of slow transitions and we illustrate the equivalence on two models of competitive inhibition.

  3. The effects of measuring emotion: physiological reactions to emotional situations depend on whether someone is asking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim S Kassam

    Full Text Available Measurement effects exist throughout the sciences-the act of measuring often changes the properties of the observed. We suggest emotion research is no exception. The awareness and conscious assessment required by self-report of emotion may significantly alter emotional processes. In this study, participants engaged in a difficult math task designed to induce anger or shame while their cardiovascular responses were measured. Half of the participants were asked to report on their emotional states and appraise their feelings throughout the experiment, whereas the other half completed a control questionnaire. Among those in the anger condition, participants assigned to report on their emotions exhibited qualitatively different physiological responses from those who did not report. For participants in the shame condition, there were no significant differences in physiology based on the self-report manipulation. The study demonstrates that the simple act of reporting on an emotional state may have a substantial impact on the body's reaction to an emotional situation.

  4. Emotional reactions in patients after frontal lobe stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zlatan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Emotional reactions have been documented after tumor lesions and the other damages of the brain. The aim of this paper was to examine the correlation between frontal lobe lesions and emotional reactions in patients with stroke. Methods. The research included 118 patients after stroke. Lesion localization was defined on computed axial tomography records, whereas the area and perimeter of lesion were measured by AutoCAD 2004 software. Examinations by means of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety and Depression (HRSA and HRSD were carried out 11-40 days after stroke. Statistic data were processed by simple linear/nonlinear regression, Cox's and the generalized linear model. Results. A higher frequency of emotional reactions, i.e. anxiety, was determined in women after stroke (p = 0.024. A negative correlation between the lesion size and the intensity of anxiety manifestations was determined (Spearman’s r = -0.297; p = 0.001. Anxiety was more frequent in patients with frontal lobe lesions in the dominant hemisphere (interaction: frontal lesion * hand dominant hemisphere, p = 0.017. Also, HRSD score values showed the tendency for lesser decline in case of greater frontal lobe lesions in relation to lesions of other regions of prosencephalon (interaction: frontal lesion * lesion area, p = 0.001. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate the correlation between evolutionary younger structures of the central nervous system and emotional reactions of man. Therefore, it is necessary to undertake proper early psychopharmacotherapy in the vulnerable group of patients.

  5. Temperament in the Classroom: Children Low in Surgency are More Sensitive to Teachers' Reactions to Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Hideko Hamada; Denham, Susanne A.; Fettig, Nicole B.; Curby, Timothy W.; Mohtasham, Mandana; Austin, Nila

    2017-01-01

    Based on the emotion socialization and bioecological models, the present study examined the contributions of teacher emotion socialization (i.e., teacher reactions to child emotions) on children's social-emotional behaviors, and the moderating effect of child temperamental surgency on these relations in the preschool context. A total of 337…

  6. Reaction times and face discrimination with emotional content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA MARTÍNEZ

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Sixty-two university subjects students located in two groups, with a stocking of age of 21.6 for thegroup of women and 22 for the group of men with the purpose to carry out a study upon visual timesof reaction TRV with emotional content keeping in mind the position: start, half and end; the emotionalcontent: neutral, friendly and threatening; and the combinations of the stimuli. The group of womenI present TR more prolonged than that of the men in all the experimental conditions. Also it wasobserved, that more are prolonged when the stimulus to discriminate this located in the half so muchin men as women.

  7. Self-similar fast-reaction limits for reaction-diffusion systems on unbounded domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, E. C. M.; Hilhorst, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a unified approach to characterising fast-reaction limits of systems of either two reaction-diffusion equations, or one reaction-diffusion equation and one ordinary differential equation, on unbounded domains, motivated by models of fast chemical reactions where either one or both reactant(s) is/are mobile. For appropriate initial data, solutions of four classes of problems each converge in the fast-reaction limit k → ∞ to a self-similar limit profile that has one of four forms, depending on how many components diffuse and whether the spatial domain is a half or whole line. For fixed k, long-time convergence to these same self-similar profiles is also established, thanks to a scaling argument of Kamin. Our results generalise earlier work of Hilhorst, van der Hout and Peletier to a much wider class of problems, and provide a quantitative description of the penetration of one substance into another in both the fast-reaction and long-time regimes.

  8. Influence of cosmetics on emotional, autonomous, endocrinological, and immune reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pössel, P; Ahrens, S; Hautzinger, M

    2005-12-01

    Recent findings indicate that cosmetics increase positive valence of emotions and thereby influence the autonomous nerve system. Other studies showed the effects of emotions on the endocrinological and the immune system. Based on this preliminary conclusion, the aim of the present study was to prove whether cosmetics are able to decrease the level of the stress hormone cortisol and strengthen the immune system. Four slides of made up or unvarnished women each, integrated in another 16 slides each of equivalent valence and arousal, were presented to 60 women. During stimulus presentation, subjective (valence), autonomous (heart rate), endocrinological (salivary cortisol) as well as immunological reactions [secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA)] were recorded. As expected subjective ratings concerning the slides of made up women reported more positive valence than those concerning unvarnished women. Furthermore, heart rate decreased under presentation of made up women, which indicates the positive influence of these slides on the autonomous nerve system. Furthermore, in half of the volunteers a decrease of cortisol and an increase of sIgA level while presenting the made up women was measurable in contrast to the presentation of unvarnished women. Maybe this is due to a short presentation time and the endocrinological as well as the immune system can be hardly influenced that quick. Another explanation could be that the volunteers were in part so called psychophysiological non-responders who show no reaction to emotional stimuli in the endocrinological and the immune system. It has to be considered that only the influence of visual stimuli and not the influence of social care (e.g. positive statements of other, etc.), which is normally connected with the use of cosmetics, was assessed, so that these delineated positive results show the lower limit of cosmetic effects.

  9. Thermally safe operation of a semibatch reactor for liquid-liquid reactions-fast reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensma, Metske; Westerterp, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    Accumulation of the reactant supplied to a cooled semibatch reactor (SBR) will occur if the mass transfer rate across the interface is insufficient to keep pace with the supply rate. Then, due to a low starting temperature or supercooling, the reaction temperature does not rise fast enough to the de

  10. Emotional processing affects movement speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hälbig, Thomas D; Borod, Joan C; Frisina, Pasquale G; Tse, Winona; Voustianiouk, Andrei; Olanow, C Warren; Gracies, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-01

    Emotions can affect various aspects of human behavior. The impact of emotions on behavior is traditionally thought to occur at central, cognitive and motor preparation stages. Using EMG to measure the effects of emotion on movement, we found that emotional stimuli differing in valence and arousal elicited highly specific effects on peripheral movement time. This result has conceptual implications for the emotion-motion link and potentially practical implications for neurorehabilitation and professional environments where fast motor reactions are critical.

  11. Self-relevance appraisal influences facial reactions to emotional body expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Grèzes

    Full Text Available People display facial reactions when exposed to others' emotional expressions, but exactly what mechanism mediates these facial reactions remains a debated issue. In this study, we manipulated two critical perceptual features that contribute to determining the significance of others' emotional expressions: the direction of attention (toward or away from the observer and the intensity of the emotional display. Electromyographic activity over the corrugator muscle was recorded while participants observed videos of neutral to angry body expressions. Self-directed bodies induced greater corrugator activity than other-directed bodies; additionally corrugator activity was only influenced by the intensity of anger expresssed by self-directed bodies. These data support the hypothesis that rapid facial reactions are the outcome of self-relevant emotional processing.

  12. Understanding Students' Emotional Reactions to Entrepreneurship Education: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sally; Underwood, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on approaches that acknowledge and make explicit the role of emotion in the entrepreneurship education classroom. As entrepreneurship educators, the authors are aware of the affective impacts that entrepreneurship education has on the students and the authors continuously reflect on and support the…

  13. Art Therapists' Emotional Reactions to the Demands of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asawa, Paige

    2009-01-01

    Art therapists increasingly are turning to educational and presentation technology to expand awareness of their field and to inform others in mental health care. This trend supports inquiry into how art therapists interact with and emotionally respond to the demands of technology. This paper presents a qualitative study that used 3 art-based focus…

  14. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  15. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Peira

    Full Text Available Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  16. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Pourtois, Gilles; Fredrikson, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i) short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii) the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  17. Facial expressions of emotions: recognition accuracy and affective reactions during late childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Giacomo; Agnoli, Sergio; Baldaro, Bruno; Bitti, Pio E Ricci; Surcinelli, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the development of recognition ability and affective reactions to emotional facial expressions in a large sample of school-aged children (n = 504, ages 8-11 years of age). Specifically, the study aimed to investigate if changes in the emotion recognition ability and the affective reactions associated with the viewing of facial expressions occur during late childhood. Moreover, because small but robust gender differences during late-childhood have been proposed, the effects of gender on the development of emotion recognition and affective responses were examined. The results showed an overall increase in emotional face recognition ability from 8 to 11 years of age, particularly for neutral and sad expressions. However, the increase in sadness recognition was primarily due to the development of this recognition in boys. Moreover, our results indicate different developmental trends in males and females regarding the recognition of disgust. Last, developmental changes in affective reactions to emotional facial expressions were found. Whereas recognition ability increased over the developmental time period studied, affective reactions elicited by facial expressions were characterized by a decrease in arousal over the course of late childhood.

  18. Kinetic Studies of Reactions in Solution Using Fast Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    REPORT Directorate of Chemistry and Materials Research NUMBER(S) AFOSR/RSA, 875 Randolph St., Suite 325, Rm 3112, Arlington, VA 222C 3 12...Mass Spectrometry to detect transient intermediates and decomposition products of catalyzed organometallic reactions Identifying intermediates is...in organometallic catalysis. HV N2 45o 5 mm 2 mm Reagent A Reagent B MS Secondary microdroplets Surface ~2-5 ms reaction time

  19. Negativity is the main cause of reaction-time delay in an emotional Stroop study with picture/word stimuli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutmuller, A.D.; Brokken, D.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if the emotion triggered by viewing a picture can be determined by measuring reaction times. We investigated this by using the emotional Stroop task. Emotional Stroop entails presenting two stimuli, in our case pictures and superimposed words, with different em

  20. Emotional reactions to involuntary psychiatric hospitalization and stigma-related stress among people with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Müller, Mario; Lay, Barbara; Corrigan, Patrick W; Zahn, Roland; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-02-01

    Compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient treatment can be experienced as disempowering and stigmatizing by people with serious mental illness. However, quantitative studies of stigma-related emotional and cognitive reactions to involuntary hospitalization and their impact on people with mental illness are scarce. Among 186 individuals with serious mental illness and a history of recent involuntary hospitalization, shame and self-contempt as emotional reactions to involuntary hospitalization, the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor, self-stigma, empowerment as well as quality of life and self-esteem were assessed by self-report. Psychiatric symptoms were rated by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. In multiple linear regressions, more self-stigma was predicted independently by higher levels of shame, self-contempt and stigma stress. A greater sense of empowerment was related to lower levels of stigma stress and self-contempt. These findings remained significant after controlling for psychiatric symptoms, diagnosis, age, gender and the number of lifetime involuntary hospitalizations. Increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment in turn predicted poorer quality of life and reduced self-esteem. The negative effect of emotional reactions and stigma stress on quality of life and self-esteem was largely mediated by increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment. Shame and self-contempt as reactions to involuntary hospitalization as well as stigma stress may lead to self-stigma, reduced empowerment and poor quality of life. Emotional and cognitive reactions to coercion may determine its impact more than the quantity of coercive experiences. Interventions to reduce the negative effects of compulsory admissions should address emotional reactions and stigma as a stressor.

  1. An Introduction to Fast Fourier Transforms through the Study of Oscillating Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, M. P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses an experiment designed to introduce students to the basic principles of the fast Fourier transform and Fourier smoothing through transformation of time-dependent optical absorption data from an oscillating reaction. Uses the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction. Describes the experimental setup and data analysis techniques.

  2. Egocentric Fairness Perception: Emotional Reactions and Individual Differences in Overt Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediou, Benoit; Scherer, Klaus R.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research documents the existence of egocentric biases in the perception and application of justice norms. The origin of these biases remains poorly understood. We investigated both inter- and intra-individual differences in egocentric justice biases. Participants played an ultimatum game presumably with different anonymous players (simulated by a computer) in which they contributed differentially to the joint production of the initial endowment. We examined how contributions (low vs. high) affect proposers' offers and responders' acceptance decisions, as well as their fairness judgments and their emotional reactions to different types of offers (equal, equitable, unfair, and hyperfair). An egocentric bias in proposers' offers (indicating more flexible preferences) was found only in individualists and not in prosocials, suggesting differences in the motivations (or cognitions) underlying their choice of justice norms. Responders also showed egocentric biases in their judgments of fairness and in their emotional reactions to equal and equitable offers, but not in their acceptance decisions. Such dissociation might suggest that some form of emotion regulation occurred. Responders may evaluate offers on valence dimensions (e.g., goal conduciveness/outcome favorability and norm compatibility/justice) that are multiply interacting and potentially conflicting. The individual's acceptance/rejection decision reflects the relative weight attributed to competing appraisals. For this overt behavioral decision, the (personal) appraisal of outcome favorability that drives (analytical) acceptance of goal-conducive outcome seems to be stronger than the (social) appraisal of outcome fairness, which may trigger covert (emotional) rejection of offers that are incompatible with justice norms. Our data show that the emotional reaction patterns provide a more fine-grained readout of the overall evaluation of the proposer's action, the underlying emotional dynamics of which may

  3. Measuring Consumer Reactions to Sponsoring Partnerships Based upon Emotional and Attitudinal Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis Christensen, Sverre

    2004-01-01

    Consumers' reactions from being exposed to sponsorships has primarily been measured and docu-mented applying cognitive information processing models to the phenomenon. In the paper it is argued that such effects are probably better modelled applying models of peripheral information processing...... to the measurements, and it is suggested that the effects can be measured on the atti-tudes-towards-the sponsor and on the emotion-towards-the sponsor levels. This type of modelling is known as the ELAM model, however the types of independent variables involved is new to research into sponsorship effects. Two...... in consumer reactions towards sponsored objects of different natures as well as towards potential sponsoring organisations. For instance, the charitable institutions measured in the study elicit larger negative emotional re-sponses than positive responses, corresponding to a negative Net Emotional Response...

  4. Use of Competition Kinetics with Fast Reactions of Grignard Reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    2000-01-01

    may account for almost all the product even when present as only 1 part in 100 parts of the competing agent. In this way allylmagnesium bromide is estimated to react with acetone, benzophenone, benzaldehyde, and diethylacetaldehyde ca. 1.5 x 105 times faster than does butylmagnesium bromide. The rates...... or effects of polar substituents with isotopically or otherwise substituted benzophenones. A recently reported a-deuterium secondary KIE for the reaction of benzaldehyde with allylmagnesium bromide was observed at -78 °C , but was absent at room temperature. It is suggested that the reaction of benzophenone...... and benzaldehyde with allylmagnesium bromide has a radical-concerted mechanism since no radical type products are produced and since no colour from an intermediate ketyl is observed even at -78 °C....

  5. Regiocontrol in the Heck-reaction and fast fluorous chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Kristofer

    2001-01-01

    The palladium-catalysed Heck-reaction has been utilised in organic synthesis, where the introduction of aryl groups at the internal, β-carbon of different allylic substrates has been achieved with high regioselectivity. The β-stabilising effect of silicon enhances the regiocontrol in the internal arylation of allyltrimethylsilane, while a coordination between palladium and nitrogen induces very high regioselectivities in the arylation of N,N-dialkylallylamines and the Boc-protected allylamine...

  6. Reactions with fast radioactive beams of neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumann, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    The neutron dripline has presently been reached only for the lightest nuclei up to the element oxygen. In this region of light neutron-rich nuclei, scattering experiments are feasible even for dripline nuclei by utilizing high-energy secondary beams produced by fragmentation. In the present article, reactions of high-energy radioactive beams will be exemplified using recent experimental results mainly derived from measurements of breakup reactions performed at the LAND and FRS facilities at GSI and at the S800 spectrometer at the NSCL. Nuclear and electromagnetically induced reactions allow probing different aspects of nuclear structure at the limits of stability related to the neutron-proton asymmetry and the weak binding close to the dripline. Properties of the valence-neutron wave functions are studied in the one-neutron knockout reaction, revealing the changes of shell structure when going from the beta-stability line to more asymmetric loosely bound neutron-rich systems. The vanishing of the N=8 shell gap for neutron-rich systems like {sup 11}Li and {sup 12}Be, or the new closed N=14, 16 shells for the oxygen isotopes are examples. The continuum of weakly bound nuclei and halo states can be studied by inelastic scattering. The dipole response, for instance, is found to change dramatically when going away from the valley of stability. A redistribution of the dipole strength towards lower excitation energies is observed for neutron-rich nuclei, which partly might be due to a new collective excitation mode related to the neutron-proton asymmetry. Halo nuclei in particular show strong dipole transitions to the continuum at the threshold, being directly related to the ground-state properties of the projectile. Finally, an outlook on future experimental prospects is given. (orig.)

  7. The impact of perception and presence on emotional reactions: a review of research in virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Julia; Alpers, Georg W; Peperkorn, Henrik M; Shiban, Youssef; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has made its way into mainstream psychological research in the last two decades. This technology, with its unique ability to simulate complex, real situations and contexts, offers researchers unprecedented opportunities to investigate human behavior in well controlled designs in the laboratory. One important application of VR is the investigation of pathological processes in mental disorders, especially anxiety disorders. Research on the processes underlying threat perception, fear, and exposure therapy has shed light on more general aspects of the relation between perception and emotion. Being by its nature virtual, i.e., simulation of reality, VR strongly relies on the adequate selection of specific perceptual cues to activate emotions. Emotional experiences in turn are related to presence, another important concept in VR, which describes the user's sense of being in a VR environment. This paper summarizes current research into perception of fear cues, emotion, and presence, aiming at the identification of the most relevant aspects of emotional experience in VR and their mutual relations. A special focus lies on a series of recent experiments designed to test the relative contribution of perception and conceptual information on fear in VR. This strand of research capitalizes on the dissociation between perception (bottom-up input) and conceptual information (top-down input) that is possible in VR. Further, we review the factors that have so far been recognized to influence presence, with emotions (e.g., fear) being the most relevant in the context of clinical psychology. Recent research has highlighted the mutual influence of presence and fear in VR, but has also traced the limits of our current understanding of this relationship. In this paper, the crucial role of perception on eliciting emotional reactions is highlighted, and the role of arousal as a basic dimension of emotional experience is discussed. An interoceptive attribution model of

  8. Characterization of hot spots in microstructured reactors for fast and exothermic reactions in mixing regime

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Julien; Kashid, Madhavanand N.; Borhani, Navid; Jiang, Bo; Maeder, Thomas; Thome, John Richard; Renken, Albert; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2012-01-01

    The intensification of fast exothermic reactions can be achieved by using microstructured reactors (MSR) which provide improved mass & heat transfer rates leading to higher overall reaction kinetics. But for highly exothermic reactions the heat evacuation becomes not efficient enough and unwanted hot spots are formed. In this study, first the mixing in MSR is quantified for different geometries and then temperature profiles are measured using a novel quantitative IR-thermometry method. The re...

  9. From Sound to Significance: Exploring the Mechanisms Underlying Emotional Reactions to Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juslin, Patrik N; Barradas, Gonçalo; Eerola, Tuomas

    2015-01-01

    A common approach to studying emotional reactions to music is to attempt to obtain direct links between musical surface features such as tempo and a listener's responses. However, such an analysis ultimately fails to explain why emotions are aroused in the listener. In this article we explore an alternative approach, which aims to account for musical emotions in terms of a set of psychological mechanisms that are activated by different types of information in a musical event. This approach was tested in 4 experiments that manipulated 4 mechanisms (brain stem reflex, contagion, episodic memory, musical expectancy) by selecting existing musical pieces that featured information relevant for each mechanism. The excerpts were played to 60 listeners, who were asked to rate their felt emotions on 15 scales. Skin conductance levels and facial expressions were measured, and listeners reported subjective impressions of relevance to specific mechanisms. Results indicated that the target mechanism conditions evoked emotions largely as predicted by a multimechanism framework and that mostly similar effects occurred across the experiments that included different pieces of music. We conclude that a satisfactory account of musical emotions requires consideration of how musical features and responses are mediated by a range of underlying mechanisms.

  10. [Coping of cybervictimization in adolescence - emotional and behavioral reactions to cyberbullying ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittel, Angela; Müller, Christin R; Pfetsch, Jan; Walk, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The experience of cybervictimization is related to health, psychological, and behavioral problems among children and adolescents. Up to today research is scarce, how the persons affected by cybervictimization react and which determinants influence the choice for social, problem-focused, technical, or helpless coping behavior. The current online study with 428 adolescents considers age, sex, mean internet use, frequency of victimization, roles in cyberbullying, and emotional reactions to cybervictimization as potential determinants of the mentioned coping strategies. Based on the participant role approach, roles of cyberbullies, cybervictims, defenders or outsiders are frequently changing. Logistic regression analyses point out the important relevance of emotional reactions like anger or helplessness and the roles as cyberbully-victim or outsider. Further, younger participants reported cybervictimization more often, while the frequency of cybervictimization and sex did not and internet use only partially predict coping strategies. These findings corroborate the relevance of emotional reactions and the roles in the process of cyberbullying. As a starting point for prevention and intervention of cybervictimization, we suggest emotion regulation, teaching of technical coping behaviors as well as reflexion of roles in the context of cyberbullying. If feasible, different stakeholders should be engaged in this process: adolescents, parents, educational staff inside and outside of schools, experts from counseling and therapy as well as internet and mobile phone service providers.

  11. Emotional reactions of different interface formats: Comparing digital and traditional board games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Fang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Some games provide both traditional board games and digital versions at the same time in the market. Why the rise of virtual games has not forced traditional physical board games to disappear? Do traditional physical games evoke different emotional reactions and interpersonal relationships? This article explored the subjects’ preferences toward traditional and digital versions of the same game and investigated social interaction while playing games. Based on Norman’s three emotional design levels—visceral, behavioral, and reflective levels—this study examined players’ satisfaction degree. This study also applied Positive and Negative Affect Schedule to measure subjects’ emotional reactions. Monopoly and Jenga games were selected as stimuli. A total of 77 subjects received tests of three different interface formats (physical, desktop, and tablet and then filled out the questionnaire. The findings successfully evidenced the significant differences between digital and traditional board games. The statistical results indicated that satisfaction degrees of digital games declined in visceral, behavioral, and reflective levels. Traditional games not only evoked users’ stronger emotional reactions but also received higher preferences. Traditional games could improve interpersonal relationships as well.

  12. Emotional reaction facilitates the brain and behavioral impact of graphic cigarette warning labels in smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, An-Li; Lowen, Steven B; Romer, Daniel; Giorno, Mario; Langleben, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Background Warning labels on cigarette packages are an important venue for information about the hazards of smoking. The 2009 US Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act mandated replacing the current text-only labels with graphic warning labels. However, labels proposed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were challenged in court by the tobacco companies, who argued successfully that the proposed labels needlessly encroached on their right to free speech, in part because they included images of high emotional salience that indiscriminately frightened rather than informed consumers. Methods We used functional MRI to examine the effects of graphic warning labels' emotional salience on smokers' brain activity and cognition. Twenty-four smokers viewed a random sequence of blocks of graphic warning labels that have been rated high or low on an ‘emotional reaction’ scale in previous research. Results We found that labels rated high on emotional reaction were better remembered, associated with reduction in the urge to smoke, and produced greater brain response in the amygdala, hippocampi, inferior frontal gyri and the insulae. Conclusions Recognition memory and craving are, respectively, correlates of effectiveness of addiction related public health communications and interventions, and amygdala activation facilitates the encoding of emotional memories. Thus, our results suggest that emotional reaction to graphic warning labels contributes to their public health impact and may be an integral part of the neural mechanisms underlying their effectiveness. Given the urgency of the debate about the constitutional risks and public health benefits of graphic warning labels, these preliminary findings warrant consideration while longitudinal clinical studies are underway PMID:25564288

  13. Acute Psychosocial Stress and Emotion Regulation Skills Modulate Empathic Reactions to Pain in Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eBuruck

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test, an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via pain intensity ratings during a pain-picture task. Self-reported emotion regulation skills were measured as predictors using an established questionnaire. Stressed individuals scored significantly lower on the appraisal of pain pictures. A regression model was chosen to find variables that further predict the pain ratings. These findings implicate that acute psychosocial stress might impair empathic processes to observed pain in another person and the ability to accept one’s emotion additionally predicts the empathic reaction. Furthermore, the ability to tolerate negative emotions modulated the relation between stress and pain judgments, and thus influenced core cognitive-affective functions relevant for coping with environmental challenges. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the necessity of reducing negative emotions in terms of empathic distress when confronted with pain of another person under psychosocial stress, in order to be able to retain pro-social behavior.

  14. Acute psychosocial stress and emotion regulation skills modulate empathic reactions to pain in others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruck, Gabriele; Wendsche, Johannes; Melzer, Marlen; Strobel, Alexander; Dörfel, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via pain intensity ratings during a pain-picture task. Self-reported emotion regulation skills were measured as predictors using an established questionnaire. Stressed individuals scored significantly lower on the appraisal of pain pictures. A regression model was chosen to find variables that further predict the pain ratings. These findings implicate that acute psychosocial stress might impair empathic processes to observed pain in another person and the ability to accept one's emotion additionally predicts the empathic reaction. Furthermore, the ability to tolerate negative emotions modulated the relation between stress and pain judgments, and thus influenced core cognitive-affective functions relevant for coping with environmental challenges. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the necessity of reducing negative emotions in terms of empathic distress when confronted with pain of another person under psychosocial stress, in order to be able to retain pro-social behavior.

  15. The influences of sociosexuality and attachment style on reactions to emotional versus sexual infidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treger, Stanislav; Sprecher, Susan

    2011-09-01

    Although numerous studies have empirically supported the evolutionary-based prediction of sex differences in reactions to infidelity (men being more distressed by sexual infidelity and women being more distressed by emotional infidelity), little attention has been given to within-sex individual differences in the type of infidelity found to be more distressing. This article considers the effects of sociosexuality (Simpson & Gangestad, 1991 ) and attachment style (e.g., Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991 ) with data from 3,879 college students collected over 14 years. In addition to replicating the robust sex differences, some evidence that sociosexuality and attachment style were related to infidelity reactions was found. Greater sexual permissiveness (i.e., high scores on sociosexuality) was associated with greater distress to sexual infidelity. In addition, a preoccupied attachment style was found to increase men's odds of selecting emotional infidelity, whereas an avoidant attachment style was found to increase women's odds of selecting sexual infidelity.

  16. ATTITUDE AND EMOTIONAL REACTIONS OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS CADAVER DISSECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaraman; Bharathi Prabakaran; Ismail; Thirumalaikolundu Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    : INTRODUCTION: Cadaver dissection is mandatory for medical education. The cadaver dissection develops the knowledge and skill of the students regarding human anatomy to understand and fulfill the requirement of medical education. AIM: This study was conducted with objective of observing attitude and emotional reactions of first year Medical students to the dissecting cadavers. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The attitude and view of students on cadaver dissection was assessed by a ...

  17. Emotions over time: synchronicity and development of subjective, physiological, and facial affective reactions to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Oliver; Nagel, Frederik; Kopiez, Reinhard; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2007-11-01

    Most people are able to identify basic emotions expressed in music and experience affective reactions to music. But does music generally induce emotion? Does it elicit subjective feelings, physiological arousal, and motor reactions reliably in different individuals? In this interdisciplinary study, measurement of skin conductance, facial muscle activity, and self-monitoring were synchronized with musical stimuli. A group of 38 participants listened to classical, rock, and pop music and reported their feelings in a two-dimensional emotion space during listening. The first entrance of a solo voice or choir and the beginning of new sections were found to elicit interindividual changes in subjective feelings and physiological arousal. Quincy Jones' "Bossa Nova" motivated movement and laughing in more than half of the participants. Bodily reactions such as "goose bumps" and "shivers" could be stimulated by the "Tuba Mirum" from Mozart's Requiem in 7 of 38 participants. In addition, the authors repeated the experiment seven times with one participant to examine intraindividual stability of effects. This exploratory combination of approaches throws a new light on the astonishing complexity of affective music listening.

  18. Modulation of facial reactions to avatar emotional faces by nonconscious competition priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, Peter; Mühlberger, Andreas; Kund, Anja; Hess, Ursula; Pauli, Paul

    2009-03-01

    To investigate whether subliminally priming for competition influences facial reactions to facial emotional displays, 49 participants were either subliminally competition primed or neutrally primed. Thereafter, they viewed computer generated avatar faces with happy, neutral, and sad expressions while Corrugator supercilii and Zygomaticus major reactions were recorded. Results revealed facial mimicry to happy and sad faces in the neutrally primed group but not the competition primed group. Furthermore, subliminal competition priming enhanced Corrugator supercilii activity after an initial relaxation while viewing happy faces. An impression formation task revealed counter empathic effects confirming successful competition priming. Overall, results indicate that nonconscious processes influence a presumably nonconscious behavior.

  19. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil : Model Studies on Reaction Pathways for the Carbohydrate Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, J.; Arentz, J.; Rasrendra, C. B.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil can be upgraded by a catalytic hydrotreatment (250-400 degrees C, 100-200 bar) using heterogeneous catalysts such as Ru/C to hydrocarbon-like products that can serve as liquid transportation fuels. Insight into the complex reaction pathways of the various component fractions durin

  20. A catalytically active membrane reactor for fast, exothemic, heterogeneously catalysed reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldsink, J.W.; Damme, R.M.J. van; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1992-01-01

    A membrane reactor with separated feed of reactants is demonstrated as a promising contactor type when dealing with heterogeneously catalysed, very fast and exothermic gas phase reactions. Due to the separation of reactants a good control of the system is obtained, because process variables can be v

  1. Rapid Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions in Typically Developing Children and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Paula M.; Moody, Eric J.; McIntosh, Daniel N.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Reed, Catherine L.

    2008-01-01

    Typical adults mimic facial expressions within 1000ms, but adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do not. These rapid facial reactions (RFRs) are associated with the development of social-emotional abilities. Such interpersonal matching may be caused by motor mirroring or emotional responses. Using facial electromyography (EMG), this study…

  2. Emotional, Cognitive and Behavioral Reactions to Paranoid Symptoms in Clinical and Nonclinical Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Célia Barreto; da Motta, Carolina; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Peixoto, Ermelindo Manuel Bernardo

    Paranoia is a disruptive belief that can vary across a continuum, ranging from persecutory delusions presented in clinical settings to paranoid cognitions that are highly prevalent in the general population. The literature suggests that paranoid thoughts derive from the activation of a paranoid schema or information processing biases that can be sensitive to socially ambiguous stimuli and influence the processing of threatening situations. Four groups (schizophrenic participants in active psychotic phases, n=61; stable participants in remission, n=30; participants' relatives, n=32; and, healthy controls, n=64) were assessed with self-report questionnaires to determine how the reactions to paranoia of clinical patients differ from healthy individuals. Cognitive, emotional and behavioral dimensions of their reactions to these paranoid thoughts were examined. Paranoid individuals were present in all groups. Most participants referred to the rejection by others as an important trigger of paranoid ideations, while active psychotics were unable to identify triggering situations to their thoughts and reactions. This may be a determinant to the different reactions and the different degree of invalidation caused by paranoid thoughts observed across groups. Clinical and nonclinical expressions of paranoid ideations differ in terms of their cognitive, emotional and behavioral components. It is suggested that, in socially ambiguous situations, paranoid participants (presenting lower thresholds of paranoid schema activation) lose the opportunity to disconfirm their paranoid beliefs by resourcing to more maladaptive coping strategies. Consequently, by dwelling on these thoughts, the amount of time spent thinking about their condition and the disability related to the disease increases.

  3. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    DESIG: E 263 09 ^TITLE: Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron ^SIGNUSE: Refer to Guide E 844 for guidance on the selection, irradiation, and quality control of neutron dosimeters. Refer to Practice E 261 for a general discussion of the determination of fast-neutron fluence rate with threshold detectors. Pure iron in the form of foil or wire is readily available and easily handled. Fig. 1 shows a plot of cross section as a function of neutron energy for the fast-neutron reaction 54Fe(n,p)54Mn (1). This figure is for illustrative purposes only to indicate the range of response of the 54Fe(n,p)54Mn reaction. Refer to Guide E 1018 for descriptions of recommended tabulated dosimetry cross sections. 54Mn has a half-life of 312.13 days (3) (2) and emits a gamma ray with an energy of 834.845 keV (5). (2) Interfering activities generated by neutron activation arising from thermal or fast neutron interactions are 2.57878 (46)-h 56Mn, 44.95-d (8) 59Fe, and 5.27...

  4. ATTITUDE AND EMOTIONAL REACTIONS OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS CADAVER DISSECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Cadaver dissection is mandatory for medical education. The cadaver dissection develops the knowledge and skill of the students regarding human anatomy to understand and fulfill the requirement of medical education. AIM: This study was conducted with objective of observing attitude and emotional reactions of first year Medical students to the dissecting cadavers. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The attitude and view of students on cadaver dissection was assessed by a modified structured pretested Questionnaire. Also the emotional reactions at the time of doing dissection were assessed by a standard questionnaire ALE (Appraisal of Life Events scale. RESULTS: Of the 141 participants, 49% were female and 51% were Male. The attitude and emotional status of students varied in cadaver dissection and even among sex. Altogether 83.68% had experienced the excitement, 85.82% sympathized for the cadaver. However, 92.90% expressed confidence over cadaver dissection and 98.57 % answered cadaver dissection was the best method for Medical Education to understand human anatomy. CONCLUSION: Majority of Medical students viewed Cadaver dissection was the best method for medical education to understand Human anatomy. They do not report their first exposure to cadaver dissection as an aversive experience. Instead, as per ALE (Appraisal of Life Events scale, they found it to be a positive and a challenging life event.

  5. Thermostatted micro-reactor NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brächer, A.; Hoch, S.; Albert, K.; Kost, H. J.; Werner, B.; von Harbou, E.; Hasse, H.

    2014-05-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe head for monitoring fast chemical reactions is described. It combines micro-reaction technology with capillary flow NMR spectroscopy. Two reactants are fed separately into the probe head where they are effectively mixed in a micro-mixer. The mixed reactants then pass through a capillary NMR flow cell that is equipped with a solenoidal radiofrequency coil where the NMR signal is acquired. The whole flow path of the reactants is thermostatted using the liquid FC-43 (perfluorotributylamine) so that exothermic and endothermic reactions can be studied under almost isothermal conditions. The set-up enables kinetic investigation of reactions with time constants of only a few seconds. Non-reactive mixing experiments carried out with the new probe head demonstrate that it facilitates the acquisition of constant highly resolved NMR signals suitable for quantification of different species in technical mixtures. Reaction kinetic measurements on a test system are presented that prove the applicability of the novel NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

  6. Thermostatted micro-reactor NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brächer, A; Hoch, S; Albert, K; Kost, H J; Werner, B; von Harbou, E; Hasse, H

    2014-05-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe head for monitoring fast chemical reactions is described. It combines micro-reaction technology with capillary flow NMR spectroscopy. Two reactants are fed separately into the probe head where they are effectively mixed in a micro-mixer. The mixed reactants then pass through a capillary NMR flow cell that is equipped with a solenoidal radiofrequency coil where the NMR signal is acquired. The whole flow path of the reactants is thermostatted using the liquid FC-43 (perfluorotributylamine) so that exothermic and endothermic reactions can be studied under almost isothermal conditions. The set-up enables kinetic investigation of reactions with time constants of only a few seconds. Non-reactive mixing experiments carried out with the new probe head demonstrate that it facilitates the acquisition of constant highly resolved NMR signals suitable for quantification of different species in technical mixtures. Reaction kinetic measurements on a test system are presented that prove the applicability of the novel NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

  7. Regulating emotions uniquely modifies reaction time, rate of force production, and accuracy of a goal-directed motor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Garrett F; Fawver, Bradley; Hancock, Gabriella M; Janelle, Christopher M

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how emotion regulation (ER) strategies influence the execution of a memory guided, ballistic pinch grip. Participants (N=33) employed ER strategies (expressive suppression, emotional expression, and attentional deployment) while viewing emotional stimuli (IAPS images). Upon stimulus offset, participants produced a targeted pinch force aimed at 10% of their maximum voluntary contraction. Performance measures included reaction time (RT), rate of force production, and performance accuracy. As hypothesized, attentional deployment resulted in the slowest RT, largest rate of force production, and poorest performance accuracy. In contrast, expressive suppression reduced the rate of force production and increased performance accuracy relative to emotional expression and attentional deployment. Findings provide evidence that emotion regulation strategies uniquely influence human movement. Future work should further delineate the interacting role that emotion regulation strategies have in modulating both affective experience and motor performance.

  8. Speech anxiety and rapid emotional reactions to angry and happy facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimberg, Ulf; Thunberg, Monika

    2007-08-01

    The aim was to explore whether people high as opposed to low in speech anxiety react with a more pronounced differential facial response when exposed to angry and happy facial stimuli. High and low fear participants were selected based on their scores on a fear of public speaking questionnaire. All participants were exposed to pictures of angry and happy faces while facial electromyographic (EMG) activity from the Corrugator supercilii and the Zygomaticus major muscle regions was recorded. Skin conductance responses (SCR), heart rate (HR) and ratings were also collected. Participants high as opposed to low in speech anxiety displayed a larger differential corrugator responding, indicating a larger negative emotional reaction, between angry and happy faces. They also reacted with a larger differential zygomatic responding, indicating a larger positive emotional reaction, between happy and angry faces. Consistent with the facial reaction patterns, the high fear group rated angry faces as more unpleasant and as expressing more disgust, and further rated happy faces as more pleasant. There were no differences in SCR or HR responding between high and low speech anxiety groups. The present results support the hypothesis that people high in speech anxiety are disposed to show an exaggerated sensitivity and facial responsiveness to social stimuli.

  9. Fast Adomian decomposition method for the Cauchy problem of the time-fractional reaction diffusion equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Chao Shi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The fractional reaction diffusion equation is one of the popularly used fractional partial differential equations in recent years. The fast Adomian decomposition method is used to obtain the solution of the Cauchy problem. Also, the analytical scheme is extended to the fractional one where the Taylor series is employed. In comparison with the classical Adomian decomposition method, the ratio of the convergence is increased. The method is more reliable for the fractional partial differential equations.

  10. Emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Observing science classroom activities presents an opportunity to observe the emotional aspect of interactions, and this chapter presents how this can be done and why. Drawing on ideas proposed by French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, emotions are theorized as publicly embodied enactments......, where differences in behavior between people shape emotional responses. Merleau-Ponty’s theorization of the body and feelings is connected to embodiment while examining central concepts such as consciousness and perception. Merleau-Ponty describes what he calls the emotional atmosphere and how it shapes...... the ways we experience events and activities. We use our interpretation of his understanding of emotions to examine an example of a group of year 8 science students who were engaged in a physics activity. Using the analytical framework of analyzing bodily stance by Goodwin, Cekaite, and Goodwin...

  11. The effects of symptom recognition and diagnostic labels on public beliefs, emotional reactions, and stigma [corrected] associated with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Theresa; Williams, Janice; Scior, Katrina

    2013-05-01

    Labels are firmly rejected by the disability rights movement, yet the complex effects of labeling on lay beliefs are poorly understood. This study examined the effects of labeling on the general public's reactions to people with intellectual disabilities. A sample of 1,233 adult members of the UK general population were randomly presented with either a diagnostically labeled or unlabeled case vignette, and their emotional reactions, causal beliefs, and social distance were assessed. Providing a label reduced social distance, increased biomedical attributions, and had a small positive direct effect on emotional reactions. Making a diagnosis of mild intellectual disability known may prevent misattribution to more stigmatizing causes and thus reduce social distance. Some undesirable effects were observed though on causal beliefs and associated emotional reactions.

  12. Cataract surgery: emotional reactions of patients with monocular versus binocular vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Ferrari Marback

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze emotional reactions related to cataract surgery in two groups of patients (monocular vision - Group 1; binocular vision - Group 2. METHODS: A transversal comparative study was performed using a structured questionnaire from a previous exploratory study before cataract surgery. RESULTS: 206 patients were enrolled in the study, 96 individuals in Group 1 (69.3 ± 10.4 years and 110 in Group 2 (68.2 ± 10.2 years. Most patients in group 1 (40.6% and 22.7% of group 2, reported fear of surgery (p<0.001. The most important causes of fear were: possibility of blindness, ocular complications and death during surgery. The most prevalent feelings among the groups were doubts about good results and nervousness. CONCLUSION: Patients with monocular vision reported more fear and doubts related to surgical outcomes. Thus, it is necessary that phisycians considers such emotional reactions and invest more time than usual explaining the risks and the benefits of cataract surgery.Ouvir

  13. Fast and unintentional evaluation of emotional sounds: evidence from brief segment ratings and the affective Simon task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folyi, Tímea; Wentura, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we raised the question of whether valence information of natural emotional sounds can be extracted rapidly and unintentionally. In a first experiment, we collected explicit valence ratings of brief natural sound segments. Results showed that sound segments of 400 and 600 ms duration-and with some limitation even sound segments as short as 200 ms-are evaluated reliably. In a second experiment, we introduced an auditory version of the affective Simon task to assess automatic (i.e. unintentional and fast) evaluations of sound valence. The pattern of results indicates that affective information of natural emotional sounds can be extracted rapidly (i.e. after a few hundred ms long exposure) and in an unintentional fashion.

  14. Determination of Cross-Sections of Fast-Muon-Induced Reactions to Cosmogenic Radionuclides

    CERN Multimedia

    Hagner, T; Heisinger, B; Niedermayer, M; Nolte, E; Oberauer, L; Schonert, S; Kubik, P W

    2002-01-01

    %NA54 %title\\\\ \\\\We propose to measure cross-sections for fast muon-induced production of radionuclides. Firstly to study the contribution of fast-muon-induced reactions to the in-situ production of cosmogenic radionuclides in the lithosphere. Concrete is used to simulate the rock and to generate a secondary particle shower. The reaction channels to be measured are: C to $^{10}$Be, O to $^{10}$Be and $^{14}$C, Si to $^{26}$Al, S to $^{26}$Al, Ca to $^{36}$Cl, Fe to $^{53}$Mn and $^{205}$Tl to $^{205}$Pb. The energy dependent cross-section can be described by one single parameter $\\sigma_0$ and the energy dependence $\\rm\\overline{E}^{0.7}$ on the mean energy $\\rm\\overline{E}$. The irradiations of the targets is done at CERN. The produced radionuclides are measured by accelerator mass spectrometry in Munich and Zurich.\\\\ \\\\Secondly, muon induced signals can be a major source of background in experiments with low event rates located deep underground. We intent to study the produced radioactivity by fast-muon-ind...

  15. Improving Nuclear Safety of Fast Reactors by Slowing Down Fission Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Kulikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Light materials with small atomic mass (light or heavy water, graphite, and so on are usually used as a neutron reflector and moderator. The present paper proposes using a new, heavy element as neutron moderator and reflector, namely, “radiogenic lead” with dominant content of isotope 208Pb. Radiogenic lead is a stable natural lead. This isotope is characterized by extremely low micro cross-section of radiative neutron capture (~0.23 mb for thermal neutrons, which is smaller than graphite and deuterium cross-sections. The reflector-converter for a fast reactor core is the structure capable of transforming some part of prompt neutrons leaked from the core into the reflected neutrons with properties similar to those of delayed neutrons, that is, sufficiently large contribution to reactivity at the level of effective fraction of delayed neutrons and relatively long lifetime, comparable with lifetimes of radionuclides-emitters of delayed neutrons. It is evaluated that the use of radiogenic lead makes it possible to slow down the chain fission reaction on prompt neutrons in the fast reactor. This can improve the fast reactor safety and reduce some requirements to the technologies used to fabricate fuel for the fast reactor.

  16. Deuterium–tritium catalytic reaction in fast ignition: Optimum parameters approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Khanbabaei; A Ghasemizad; S Khoshbinfar

    2014-09-01

    One of the main concerns about the currentworking on nuclear power reactors is the potential hazard of their radioactive waste. There is hope that this issue will be reduced in next generation nuclear fusion power reactors. Reactors will release nuclear energy through microexplosions that occur in a mixture of hydrogen isotopes of deuterium and tritium. However, there exist radiological hazards due to the accumulation of tritium in the blanket layer. A catalytic fusion reaction of DT mixture may stand between DD and an equimolar DT approach in which the fusion process continues with a small amount of tritium seed. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of DT reaction in the fast ignition (FI) scheme. The kinematic study of the main mechanism of the energy gain–loss term, which may disturb the ignition and burn process, was performed in FI and the optimum values of precompressed fuel and proton beam driver were derived. The recommended values of fuel parameters are: areal density $ρ R ≥ 5\\cdot$cm-2 and initial tritium fraction ≤ 0.025. For the proton beam, the corresponding optimum interval values are proton average energy $3≤ E_p ≤ 10$ MeV, pulse duration $5 ≤ t_p ≤ 15$ ps and power $5≤ W_p ≤ 12 × 10^{22}$ (keV$\\cdot$cm3$\\cdot$ps-1). It was proved that under the above conditions, a fast ignition DT reaction stays in the catalytic regime.

  17. The influence of cricket fast bowlers' front leg technique on peak ground reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Peter; King, Mark; Ranson, Craig

    2013-01-01

    High ground reaction forces during the front foot contact phase of the bowling action are believed to be a major contributor to the high prevalence of lumbar stress fractures in fast bowlers. This study aimed to investigate the influence of front leg technique on peak ground reaction forces during the delivery stride. Three-dimensional kinematic data and ground reaction forces during the front foot contact phase were captured for 20 elite male fast bowlers. Eight kinematic parameters were determined for each performance, describing run-up speed and front leg technique, in addition to peak force and time to peak force in the vertical and horizontal directions. There were substantial variations between bowlers in both peak forces (vertical 6.7 ± 1.4 body weights; horizontal (braking) 4.5 ± 0.8 body weights) and times to peak force (vertical 0.03 ± 0.01 s; horizontal 0.03 ± 0.01 s). These differences were found to be linked to the orientation of the front leg at the instant of front foot contact. In particular, a larger plant angle and a heel strike technique were associated with lower peak forces and longer times to peak force during the front foot contact phase, which may help reduce the likelihood of lower back injuries.

  18. The facial and subjective emotional reaction in response to a video game designed to train emotional regulation (Playmancer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Santamaría, Juan J; Moussa, Maher B; Sánchez, Isabel; Forcano, Laura; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Konstantas, Dimitri; Overby, Mikkel L; Nielsen, Jeppe; Bults, Richard G A; Granero, Roser; Lam, Tony; Kalapanidas, Elias; Treasure, Janet; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2012-11-01

    Several aspects of social and emotional functioning are abnormal in people with eating disorders. The aim of the present study was to measure facial emotional expression in patients with eating disorders and healthy controls whilst playing a therapeutic video game (Playmancer) designed to train individuals in emotional regulation. Participants were 23 ED patients (11 AN, 12 BN) and 11 HCs. ED patients self reported more anger at baseline but expressed less facial expression of anger during the Playmancer game. The discrepancy between self-report and non-verbal expression may lead to problems in social communication.

  19. Dissociation between back pain and bone stress reaction as measured by CT scan in young cricket fast bowlers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Millson, H B; Gray, J; Stretch, R A; Lambert, M I

    2004-01-01

    Bone stress reaction is prevalent among cricket fast bowlers. Few studies have addressed the sensitivity and specificity of imaging for diagnosis, and follow up assessment has been poorly investigated...

  20. Front propagation in cellular flows for fast reaction and small diffusivity

    CERN Document Server

    Tzella, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the influence of fluid flows on the propagation of chemical fronts arising in FKPP type models. For the cellular flows we consider, the front propagation speed can be determined numerically by solving an eigenvalue problem; this is however difficult for small molecular diffusivity and fast reaction, i.e., when the P\\'eclet (Pe) and Damk\\"ohler (Da) numbers are large. Here, we employ a WKB approach to obtain the front speed for a broad range of Pe,Da$\\gg 1$ in terms of a periodic path -- an instanton -- that minimizes a certain functional, and to derive closed-form results for Da$\\ll$Pe and for Da$\\gg$Pe. Our theoretical predictions are compared with (i) numerical solutions of the eigenvalue problem and (ii) simulations of the advection--diffusion--reaction equation.

  1. Hybrid stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems with slow and fast dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strehl, Robert; Ilie, Silvana, E-mail: silvana@ryerson.ca [Department of Mathematics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2015-12-21

    In this paper, we present a novel hybrid method to simulate discrete stochastic reaction-diffusion models arising in biochemical signaling pathways. We study moderately stiff systems, for which we can partition each reaction or diffusion channel into either a slow or fast subset, based on its propensity. Numerical approaches missing this distinction are often limited with respect to computational run time or approximation quality. We design an approximate scheme that remedies these pitfalls by using a new blending strategy of the well-established inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm and the tau-leaping simulation method. The advantages of our hybrid simulation algorithm are demonstrated on three benchmarking systems, with special focus on approximation accuracy and efficiency.

  2. Front propagation in cellular flows for fast reaction and small diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzella, Alexandra; Vanneste, Jacques

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the influence of fluid flows on the propagation of chemical fronts arising in Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piskunov (FKPP) type models. We develop an asymptotic theory for the front speed in a cellular flow in the limit of small molecular diffusivity and fast reaction, i.e., large Péclet (Pe) and Damköhler (Da) numbers. The front speed is expressed in terms of a periodic path—an instanton—that minimizes a certain functional. This leads to an efficient procedure to calculate the front speed, and to closed-form expressions for (logPe)-1≪Da≪Pe and for Da≫Pe. Our theoretical predictions are compared with (i) numerical solutions of an eigenvalue problem and (ii) simulations of the advection-diffusion-reaction equation.

  3. Emotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian; Vetner, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    En emotion er en evaluerende respons på en betydningsfuld hændelse, som har affektiv valens og motiverer organismen i forhold til objektverdenen (omverden). Emotioner fører til affekt: til smerte (negativ) eller glæde (positiv affekt). Både positive og negative emotioner påvirker organismens...

  4. The Effect of the Negotiator's Social Power as a Function of the Counterpart's Emotional Reactions in a Computer Mediated Negotiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomo Hareli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A negotiator’s own power and their counterpart’s emotional reaction to the negotiation both influence the outcome of negotiations. The present research addressed the question of their relative importance. On one hand, social power should be potent regardless of the other’s emotions. On the other hand, the counterpart’s emotional reactions inform about the ongoing state of the negotiation, and as such are more diagnostic than the more distal power cue. In a simulated computer mediated negotiation, 248 participants assumed the role of a vendor of computerized avionics test equipment and their objective was to negotiate the price, the warranty period, and the number of software updates that the buyer will receive free of charge. Participants negotiated the sale after being primed with either high or low power or not primed at all (control condition. They received information that their counterpart was either happy or angry or emotionally neutral. The findings showed that even though power was an important factor at the start of negotiations, the informative value of emotion information took precedence over time. This implies that emotional information may erase any advantage that counterparts have in a negotiation thanks to their higher social power.

  5. Fast copper-free click DNA ligation by the ring-strain promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelbourne, Montserrat; Chen, Xiong; Brown, Tom; El-Sagheer, Afaf H

    2011-06-14

    Templated DNA strand ligation by the ring-strain promoted alkyne-azide [3+2] cycloaddition reaction is very fast; with dibenzocyclooctyne, the reaction is essentially complete in 1 min. It is inhibited by the presence of a single mismatched base pair suggesting applications in genetic analysis. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  6. Variation in oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphisms is associated with emotional and behavioral reactions to betrayal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Benjamin A; McCullough, Michael E; Carver, Charles S; Pedersen, Eric J; Cuccaro, Michael L

    2014-06-01

    Variations in the gene that encodes the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) have been associated with many aspects of social cognition as well as several prosocial behaviors. However, potential associations of OXTR variants with reactions to betrayals of trust while cooperating for mutual benefit have not yet been explored. We examined how variations in 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms on OXTR were associated with behavior and emotional reactions after a betrayal of trust in an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma Game. After correction for multiple testing, one haplotype (C-rs9840864, T-rs2268494) was significantly associated with faster retaliation post-betrayal-an association that appeared to be due to this haplotype's intermediate effect of exacerbating people's anger after they had been betrayed. Furthermore, a second haplotype (A-rs237887, C-rs2268490) was associated with higher levels of post-betrayal satisfaction, and a third haplotype (G-rs237887, C-rs2268490) was associated with lower levels of post-betrayal satisfaction.

  7. Health-related quality of life in children and emotional reactions of parents following completion of cancer treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, H.; Grootenhuis, M.A.; Brons, P.P.T.; Caron, H.N.; Last, B.F.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Completing therapy is one of the major transitions in care in the practice of pediatric oncology and, therefore, deserves special consideration. The purpose of the study was to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of pediatric patients, and emotional reactions of their

  8. Health-related quality of life in children and emotional reactions of parents following completion of cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Stam; M.A. Grootenhuis; P.P.T. Brons; H.N. Caron; B.F. Last

    2006-01-01

    Background. Completing therapy is one of the major transitions in care in the practice of pediatric oncology and, therefore, deserves special consideration. The purpose of the study was to investigate health-related quality of life. (HRQOL) of pediatric patients, and emotional reactions of their par

  9. Health-related quality of life in children and emotional reactions of parents following completion of cancer treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, H.; Grootenhuis, M.A.; Brons, P.P.T.; Caron, H.N.; Last, B.F.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Completing therapy is one of the major transitions in care in the practice of pediatric oncology and, therefore, deserves special consideration. The purpose of the study was to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of pediatric patients, and emotional reactions of their pare

  10. Are Irrational Reactions to Unfairness Truly Emotionally-Driven? Dissociated Behavioural and Emotional Responses in the Ultimatum Game Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civai, Claudia; Corradi-Dell'Acqua, Corrado; Gamer, Matthias; Rumiati, Raffaella I.

    2010-01-01

    The "irrational" rejections of unfair offers by people playing the Ultimatum Game (UG), a widely used laboratory model of economical decision-making, have traditionally been associated with negative emotions, such as frustration, elicited by unfairness ([Sanfey et al., 2003] and [van't Wout et al., 2006]). We recorded skin conductance responses as…

  11. Vibrational control of electron-transfer reactions: a feasibility study for the fast coherent transfer regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, P; Ma, Z; Zhang, P; Beratan, D N; Skourtis, S S

    2015-12-14

    Molecular vibrations and electron-vibrational interactions are central to the control of biomolecular electron and energy-transfer rates. The vibrational control of molecular electron-transfer reactions by infrared pulses may enable the precise probing of electronic-vibrational interactions and of their roles in determining electron-transfer mechanisms. This type of electron-transfer rate control is advantageous because it does not alter the electronic state of the molecular electron-transfer system or irreversibly change its molecular structure. For bridge-mediated electron-transfer reactions, infrared (vibrational) excitation of the bridge linking the electron donor to the electron acceptor was suggested as being capable of influencing the electron-transfer rate by modulating the bridge-mediated donor-to-acceptor electronic coupling. This kind of electron-transfer experiment has been realized, demonstrating that bridge-mediated electron-transfer rates can be changed by exciting vibrational modes of the bridge. Here, we use simple models and ab initio computations to explore the physical constraints on one's ability to vibrationally perturb electron-transfer rates using infrared excitation. These constraints stem from the nature of molecular vibrational spectra, the strengths of the electron-vibrational coupling, and the interaction between molecular vibrations and infrared radiation. With these constraints in mind, we suggest parameter regimes and molecular architectures that may enhance the vibrational control of electron transfer for fast coherent electron-transfer reactions.

  12. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with aqu......ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  13. Fast and stable redox reactions of MnO₂/CNT hybrid electrodes for dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Taoli; Wei, Bingqing

    2015-07-21

    Pseudocapacitors, which are energy storage devices that take advantage of redox reactions to store electricity, have a different charge storage mechanism compared to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), and they could realize further gains if they were used as stretchable power sources. The realization of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors and understanding of the underlying fundamentals of their mechanical-electrochemical relationship have become indispensable. We report herein the electrochemical performance of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors using buckled MnO2/CNT hybrid electrodes. The extremely small relaxation time constant of less than 0.15 s indicates a fast redox reaction at the MnO2/CNT hybrid electrodes, securing a stable electrochemical performance for the dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors. This finding and the fundamental understanding gained from the pseudo-capacitive behavior coupled with mechanical deformation under a dynamic stretching mode would provide guidance to further improve their overall performance including a higher power density than LIBs, a higher energy density than EDLCs, and a long-life cycling stability. Most importantly, these results will potentially accelerate the applications of stretchable pseudocapacitors for flexible and biomedical electronics.

  14. Reaction time and movement duration influence on end point accuracy in a fast reaching task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurvidas, A; Mickevichiene, D; Cesnavichiene, V; Gutnik, B; Nash, D

    2012-01-01

    In labor and sport physiology a great deal of interest concerns the conceptual model of governance of both rapid and precise target-directed movements. Widely known in the theory of motor control, Fitts' paradigm determines the time of motion, calculated from the distance to the target and the diameter of the target. However this paradigm does not take into account the time of preparation for movement, which can have a significant impact on accuracy. In addition, the literature highlights little evidence of temporal and spatial asymmetry in the production of fast and accurate movements. The aim of our work was to investigate the influence of the duration of the preparatory phase (reaction time - T(R)) and duration of protractile motion of the arm (T(M)) on the speed and accuracy of movement. Also, the in-dividual asymmetry of the temporal characteristics and accuracy of performance of movements were studied. We measured three aspects of translational motion of the arm to the computerized target: reaction time (T(R), s), time of motion of the arm (T(M), s), and error in the achievement of the target (deltaL, mm). The group of participants consisted of 12 healthy, right-handed, untrained girls, each of whom completed 5 series of 10 discrete movements by each of the left and right arms. Mathematical analysis of the results revealed the existence of five models of performance. Each model was represented in the participant's performance with different probability. The combination of high speed and high precision when the arm moved towards the target was found only in model 5, which combines a long period of preparation for the movement (T(R)) and a short time of motion (T(M)). The probability of its occurrence in the untrained subjects was very low (2-3%). We suggest that it may be possible to develop special methods of training, geared towards the ability to increase the probability of appearance of this model. Asymmetry of motor action appeared clearly evident only in

  15. The impact of coping style, self-efficacy, emotional reaction and resilience on trauma related intrusive thoughts

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, Hazel; Ireland, Carol Ann

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – This study aims to explore the impact of coping style, self-efficacy, resilience and emotional reaction of trauma related intrusions in young offenders. \\ud Design/methodology - This is a quantitative study using questionnaires. The sample was 152 young offenders in custody who were approached in their residential hall. Upon agreeing to participate they were given 24 hours to complete the questionnaire pack and returned these to the researcher at a designated time and place. \\ud Fin...

  16. Gender and Parents' Reactions to Children's Emotion during the Preschool Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Amy Kennedy; Rubin, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors examine the differences between mothers and fathers in the socialization of specific emotions in preschool-aged boys and girls. They argue that mothers and fathers play both distinct and complementary roles in the development of children's emotional competence; these roles are influenced both by parents' own gender, as…

  17. Emotional Reactions Mediate the Effect of Music Listening on Creative Thinking: Perspective of the Arousal-and-Mood Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Jing He

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of music listening on creative thinking through the lens of the arousal-and-mood hypothesis, which posits that emotional reactions (i.e., arousal and valence mediate the effect of music listening on cognitive functioning. Participants were randomly assigned to three groups: a positive music group (n = 198, a negative music group (n = 195, and a control group (n = 191. Creative thinking and emotional reactions were assessed with the Test for Creative Thinking-Drawing Production and the Affect Grid, respectively. The results showed that both positively and negatively arousing music enhanced creative thinking. The results further revealed that arousal, regardless of valence, significantly mediated the music-creativity relationship. This study enriches the research on the arousal-and-mood hypothesis by (1 providing direct empirical testing on the mediating roles of emotional reactions; (2 including both positively and negatively arousing music in the study design; and (3 identifying that only arousal, and not valence, was a significant mediator in the music-creativity link.

  18. Emotional reaction to diagnosis of infertility in Kuwait and successful clients' perception of nurses' role during treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omu Alexander E

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfulfilled desire of millions of infertile couples worldwide to have their own biological children results in emotional distress. This study evaluated the emotional reactions of couples attending a combined infertility clinic in Kuwait and successful clients' perception of nurses. Methods Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. The first phase was by structured interview using two standardized psychological scales: the 25-item Hopkins Symptom Checklist and Modified Fertility Adjustment Scale. Data were collected from 268 couples attending the combined infertility clinic, between October 2002 and September 2007. The second phase was a semi-structured interview of 10 clients who got pregnant following treatment. The interview explored their feelings and perception of the nurses' role. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed. Results The average duration of infertility was 4 years; 65.7% of the women and 76.1% of men suffered from primary infertility. Emotional reactions experienced were: anxiety in women (12.7% and men (6%, depression in women (5.2% and men (14.9% and reduced libido in women (6.7% and men (29.9%. Also in men, 14.9% experienced premature ejaculation, 5.2% weak ejaculation and 7.9% had impotence although 4.9% were transient. In the semi-structured interviews, the emotions expressed were similar and in addition to anger, feelings of devastation, powerlessness, sense of failure and frustration. In the survey, 12.7% of the men were found to show more anxiety than women (6%. Although all the 10 women interviewed confirmed they were anxious; only 4 of their partners were reported to be sad or anxious. Successful clients' perception of nurses' roles included nurses carrying out basic nursing procedures, communicating, educating about investigative and treatment procedures, providing emotional support by listening, encouraging, reassuring and being empathetic. Conclusions This study illuminates

  19. [Caring for a stroke victim: the emotional reactions of male and female caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucki, Barbara; Spitz, Elisabeth; Baumann, Michèle

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the emotional response to caregiving among stroke caregivers and to assess the social and psychological impact of strokes on households two years after the event. Questionnaires were administered to 62 patient (64.4 years old)/caregiver (59.3 years old) dyads. The survey focused on: 1) residual impairments, based on the American Heart Association Stroke Outcome Classification; 2) the Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA ? 24 items ? 5 dimensions); and 3) changes in the division of household tasks (seven items). Although male and female caregivers care for patients with similar residual impairments, the study found that female caregivers were more likely to be affected by the impact of caregiving on their health and schedule and by lack of family support. Women were more likely to feel "tired all the time" (50% vs. 12.5%), to struggle to "find time to relax" (35.7% vs. 6.3%) and to feel that "others dumped caring onto them" (35.7% vs. 11.8%). Since the onset of stroke, women had also taken on more responsibilities in the household (37.5% vs. 5.9%), while men were more likely to "enjoy caring" for patients (93.8% vs. 67.9%) and to have become more involved in organizing holidays (29% vs. 5.6%) and seeing friends (20.6% vs. 10.5%). Because of the high level of exhaustion, particularly among women, caregivers are a high-risk population for the healthcare system. Interventions such as trialogue and counseling are required to meet the needs of male and female caregivers.

  20. Fast chemical reaction in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow: initial regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Bourqui, Michel S; Bartello, Peter

    2012-04-01

    This paper studies an infinitely fast bimolecular chemical reaction in a two-dimensional biperiodic Navier-Stokes flow. The reactants in stoichiometric quantities are initially segregated by infinite gradients. The focus is placed on the initial stage of the reaction characterized by a well-defined one-dimensional material contact line between the reactants. Particular attention is given to the effect of the diffusion κ of the reactants. This study is an idealized framework for isentropic mixing in the lower stratosphere and is motivated by the need to better understand the effect of resolution on stratospheric chemistry in climate-chemistry models. Adopting a Lagrangian straining theory approach, we relate theoretically the ensemble mean of the length of the contact line, of the gradients along it, and of the modulus of the time derivative of the space-average reactant concentrations (here called the chemical speed) to the joint probability density function of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent λ with two times τ and τ[over ̃]. The time 1/λ measures the stretching time scale of a Lagrangian parcel on a chaotic orbit up to a finite time t, while τ measures it in the recent past before t, and τ[over ̃] in the early part of the trajectory. We show that the chemical speed scales like κ(1/2) and that its time evolution is determined by rare large events in the finite-time Lyapunov exponent distribution. The case of smooth initial gradients is also discussed. The theoretical results are tested with an ensemble of direct numerical simulations (DNSs) using a pseudospectral model.

  1. Measuring the Cosmic Ray Muon-Induced Fast Neutron Spectrum by (n,p) Isotope Production Reactions in Underground Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Galbiati, C; Galbiati, Cristiano; Beacom, John. F.

    2005-01-01

    While cosmic ray muons themselves are relatively easy to veto in underground detectors, their interactions with nuclei create more insidious backgrounds via: (i) the decays of long-lived isotopes produced by muon-induced spallation reactions inside the detector, (ii) spallation reactions initiated by fast muon-induced neutrons entering from outside the detector, and (iii) nuclear recoils initiated by fast muon-induced neutrons entering from outside the detector. These backgrounds, which are difficult to veto or shield against, are very important for solar, reactor, dark matter, and other underground experiments, especially as increased sensitivity is pursued. We used fluka to calculate the production rates and spectra of all prominent secondaries produced by cosmic ray muons, in particular focusing on secondary neutrons, due to their importance. Since the neutron spectrum is steeply falling, the total neutron production rate is sensitive just to the relatively soft neutrons, and not to the fast-neutron compon...

  2. Comparison of inhibition in two timed reaction tasks: the color and emotion Stroop tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, D Lisa; Larsen, Randy

    2008-07-01

    The authors examined the cross-task consistency of the ability to inhibit the processing of irrelevant information. They compared interference scores on 2 widely used inhibition tasks and found that color word Stroop interference scores correlated with emotion word Stroop interference scores. An examination of physiological reactivity showed that, in general, the color Stroop was more arousing than was the emotion Stroop, most likely due to increased response conflict.

  3. An experience sampling study of emotional reactions to music: listener, music, and situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juslin, Patrik N; Liljeström, Simon; Västfjäll, Daniel; Barradas, Gonçalo; Silva, Ana

    2008-10-01

    The Experience Sampling Method was used to explore emotions to music as they naturally occurred in everyday life, with a focus on the prevalence of different musical emotions and how such emotions are related to various factors in the listener, the music, and the situation. Thirty-two college students, 20 to 31 years old, carried a palmtop that emitted a sound signal seven times per day at random intervals for 2 weeks. When signaled, participants were required to complete a questionnaire on the palmtop. Results showed that music occurred in 37% of the episodes, and in 64% of the music episodes, the participants reported that the music affected how they felt. Comparisons showed that happiness-elation and nostalgia-longing were more frequent in episodes with musical emotions, whereas anger-irritation, boredom-indifference, and anxiety-fear were more frequent in episodes with nonmusical emotions. The prevalence of specific musical emotions correlated with personality measures and also varied depending on the situation (e.g., current activity, other people present), thus highlighting the need to use representative samples of situations to obtain valid estimates of prevalence.

  4. A fast-and-robust profiler for improving polymerase chain reaction diagnostics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J Besseris

    Full Text Available Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is an in vitro technology in molecular genetics that progressively amplifies minimal copies of short DNA sequences in a fast and inexpensive manner. However, PCR performance is sensitive to suboptimal processing conditions. Compromised PCR conditions lead to artifacts and bias that downgrade the discriminatory power and reproducibility of the results. Promising attempts to resolve the PCR performance optimization issue have been guided by quality improvement tactics adopted in the past for industrial trials. Thus, orthogonal arrays (OAs have been employed to program quick-and-easy structured experiments. Profiling of influences facilitates the quantification of effects that may counteract the detectability of amplified DNA fragments. Nevertheless, the attractive feature of reducing greatly the amount of work and expenditures by planning trials with saturated-unreplicated OA schemes is known to be relinquished in the subsequent analysis phase. This is because of an inherent incompatibility of ordinary multi-factorial comparison techniques to convert small yet dense datasets. Treating unreplicated-saturated data with either the analysis of variance (ANOVA or regression models destroys the information extraction process. Both of those mentioned approaches are rendered blind to error since the examined effects absorb all available degrees of freedom. Therefore, in lack of approximating an experimental uncertainty, any outcome interpretation is rendered subjective. We propose a profiling method that permits the non-linear maximization of amplicon resolution by eliminating the necessity for direct error estimation. Our approach is distribution-free, calibration-free, simulation-free and sparsity-free with well-known power properties. It is also user-friendly by promoting rudimentary analytics. Testing our method on published amplicon count data, we found that the preponderant effect is the concentration of MgCl2 (p0

  5. Longitudinal relations among parents' reactions to children's negative emotions, effortful control, and math achievement in early elementary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jodi; Valiente, Carlos; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Bradley, Robert H; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D

    2014-01-01

    Panel mediation models and fixed-effects models were used to explore longitudinal relations among parents' reactions to children's displays of negative emotions, children's effortful control (EC), and children's math achievement (N = 291; M age in fall of kindergarten = 5.66 years, SD = .39 year) across kindergarten through second grade. Parents reported their reactions and children's EC. Math achievement was assessed with a standardized achievement test. First-grade EC mediated the relation between parents' reactions at kindergarten and second-grade math achievement, beyond stability in constructs across study years. Panel mediation model results suggested that socialization of EC may be one method of promoting math achievement in early school; however, when all omitted time-invariant covariates of EC and math achievement were controlled, first-grade EC no longer predicted second-grade math achievement. © 2014 The Authors. Child Development © 2014 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  6. Sleep debt elicits negative emotional reaction through diminished amygdala-anterior cingulate functional connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Motomura

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Sleep debt reportedly increases emotional instability, such as anxiety and confusion, in addition to sleepiness and psychomotor impairment. However, the neural basis of emotional instability due to sleep debt has yet to be elucidated. This study investigated changes in emotional responses that are elicited by the simulation of short-term sleep loss and the brain regions responsible for these changes. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Fourteen healthy adult men aged 24.1±3.3 years (range, 20-32 years participated in a within-subject crossover study consisting of 5-day sessions of both sleep debt (4 h for time in bed and sleep control (8 h for time in bed. On the last day of each session, participants underwent polysomnography and completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Profile of Mood States questionnaires. In addition, functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while performing an emotional face viewing task. RESULTS: Restricted sleep over the 5-day period increased the activity of the left amygdala in response to the facial expression of fear, whereas a happy facial expression did not change the activity. Restricted sleep also resulted in a significant decrease in the functional connectivity between the amygdala and the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC in proportion to the degree of sleep debt (as indicated by the percentage of slow wave sleep and δ wave power. This decrease was significantly correlated with activation of the left amygdala and deterioration of subjective mood state. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that continuous and accumulating sleep debt that can be experienced in everyday life can downregulate the functional suppression of the amygdala by the vACC and consequently enhance the response of the amygdala to negative emotional stimuli. Such functional alteration in emotional control may, in part, be attributed to the neural basis of emotional instability during sleep debt.

  7. PROBLEM OF FORMATION OF EMOTIONAL REACTION IN PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN WITH MULTIPLE DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS IN SUBJECT-COMMUNICATIVE ACTIVITY IN THE CONDITIONS OF KINDERGARTEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Валентиновна Шохова

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of emotional response in children with developmental disorders in subject-communicative activity . The characteristic of the particularities of emotional reaction in children with divelopmental disorders is given. The author proves that it is necessary to develop emotional response as the base for further social adaptation of children with multiple disorders in development; mechanisms of formation of emotional reaction in communicative activity are described: contents, methods used for multiple diorders. Experimental data has proved the effectiveness of pedagogical thechnology on forming of emotional reaction in subject-communicative activity. Corrective and development work used in this technology is based on principles of integrity, complexness; the interralated series of thematical studies is organized intended for develoment of motor, sensor, communicative and emotional sphere in different activities of children. All this facilitate gradual interiorization of emotional reactions, their automatization in communicative activity.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-10-7

  8. Perceived control, voluntariness and emotional reactions. A study conducted in relocated areas of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, C.J. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Psychology

    1999-12-01

    This paper use data from a pilot study to analyse relationships between type of resettlement (voluntary or involuntary) and individuals' everyday feelings, perceptions of risk, health status and control. The data were collected in 1995, within the Joint Study Project 2, i.e., a collaborative research project of the European Union and the Commonwealth of Independent States of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, 1991/92 - 95/96. The aim of the study was to investigate reactions to change and new life conditions of people who had been resettled due to the Chernobyl accident. Participants from the respective countries included adult individuals sampled from two age groups of less than 45 years and 45 years and older, with approximately the same number of men and women. The questionnaire presented various topics to which responses were indicated on quantitative response scales, as well as in open ended response formats. The results presented here focus on emotional reactions, perceived risk and self-rated health among resettled people. The effects of type of resettlement on emotional reactions, Perceived risk and control are discussed.

  9. One-Dimensional Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Model with Reaction Kinetics Integrated in an Aspen Plus Biorefinery Process Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbird, David; Trendewicz, Anna; Braun, Robert; Dutta, Abhijit

    2017-01-27

    A biomass fast pyrolysis reactor model with detailed reaction kinetics and one-dimensional fluid dynamics was implemented in an equation-oriented modeling environment (Aspen Custom Modeler). Portions of this work were detailed in previous publications; further modifications have been made here to improve stability and reduce execution time of the model to make it compatible for use in large process flowsheets. The detailed reactor model was integrated into a larger process simulation in Aspen Plus and was stable for different feedstocks over a range of reactor temperatures. Sample results are presented that indicate general agreement with experimental results, but with higher gas losses caused by stripping of the bio-oil by the fluidizing gas in the simulated absorber/condenser. This integrated modeling approach can be extended to other well-defined, predictive reactor models for fast pyrolysis, catalytic fast pyrolysis, as well as other processes.

  10. Invited Reaction: Developing Emotional Intelligence (EI) Abilities through Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimbach, Michael P.; Maringka, Jane

    2010-01-01

    The preceding article (Clarke, 2010) examines an important and interesting question; that is, under what conditions can learning contribute to the development of emotional intelligence (EI)? Despite the controversy surrounding the definition and construct of EI, its prevalence for the human resources development (HRD) field and its implications…

  11. Multiple Deficits in ADHD: Executive Dysfunction, Delay Aversion, Reaction Time Variability, and Emotional Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjowall, Douglas; Roth, Linda; Lindqvist, Sofia; Thorell, Lisa B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The notion that ADHD constitutes a heterogeneous disorder is well accepted. However, this study contributes with new important knowledge by examining independent effects of a large range of neuropsychological deficits. In addition, the study investigated whether deficits in emotional functioning constitute a dissociable component of…

  12. Children's Emotional and Behavioral Reactions Following the Disclosure of Extrafamilial Sexual Abuse: Initial Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligezinska, Malgorzata; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated the emotional and behavioral adjustment of 41 children (ages 5-15) within the first 3 months following disclosure of extrafamilial sexual abuse. Findings indicated that children's perceptions of self-blame and guilt for the abuse and the extent of traumatization predicted their self-reported symptomatology of depression,…

  13. Emotional Reactions and Moral Judgment: the Effects of Morally Challenging Interactions in Military Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.C.; Schut, M; Verweij, D.E.M.; Vermetten, H.G.J.M.; Giebels, E.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the association between different types of morally challenging interactions during military deployment and response strategies (e.g., moral justification), as well as the mediating role of moral emotions. Interviews with Dutch servicemen who participated in military operations (e

  14. Smoking, Cardiac Symptoms, and an Emergency Care Visit: A Mixed Methods Exploration of Cognitive and Emotional Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyn A. Tappe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency departments and hospitals are being urged to implement onsite interventions to promote smoking cessation, yet little is known about the theoretical underpinnings of behavior change after a healthcare visit. This observational pilot study evaluated three factors that may predict smoking cessation after an acute health emergency: perceived illness severity, event-related emotions, and causal attribution. Fifty smokers who presented to a hospital because of suspected cardiac symptoms were interviewed, either in the emergency department (ED or, for those who were admitted, on the cardiac inpatient units. Their data were analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies to capture the individual, first-hand experience and to evaluate trends over the illness chronology. Reported perceptions of the event during semistructured interview varied widely and related to the individual’s intentions regarding smoking cessation. No significant differences were found between those interviewed in the ED versus the inpatient unit. Although the typical profile was characterized by a peak in perceived illness severity and negative emotions at the time the patient presented in the ED, considerable pattern variation occurred. Our results suggest that future studies of event-related perceptions and emotional reactions should consider using multi-item and multidimensional assessment methods rated serially over the event chronology.

  15. Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Crocker

    2005-09-30

    This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3

  16. Acute psychosocial stress and emotion regulation skills modulate empathic reactions to pain in others

    OpenAIRE

    Buruck, Gabriele; Wendsche, Johannes; Melzer, Marlen; Strobel, Alexander; Dörfel, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via...

  17. Emotional reactions to deviance in groups: the relation between number of angry reactions, felt rejection, and conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerdink, Marc W.; van Kleef, Gerben A.; Homan, Astrid C.; Fischer, Agneta H.

    2015-01-01

    How many members of a group need to express their anger in order to influence a deviant group member’s behavior? In two studies, we examine whether an increase in number of angry group members affects the extent to which a deviant individual feels rejected, and we investigate downstream effects on conformity. We show that each additional angry reaction linearly increases the extent to which a deviant individual feels rejected, and that this relation is independent of the total number of majority members (Study 1). This felt rejection is then shown to lead to anti-conformity unless two conditions are met: (1) the deviant is motivated to seek reacceptance in the group, and (2) conformity is instrumental in gaining reacceptance because it is observable by the majority (Study 2). These findings show that angry reactions are likely to trigger anti-conformity in a deviant, but they are also consistent with a motivational account of conformity, in which conformity is strategic behavior aimed at gaining reacceptance from the group. PMID:26124742

  18. Emotional reactions to deviance in groups: the relation between number of angry reactions, felt rejection, and conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerdink, Marc W; van Kleef, Gerben A; Homan, Astrid C; Fischer, Agneta H

    2015-01-01

    How many members of a group need to express their anger in order to influence a deviant group member's behavior? In two studies, we examine whether an increase in number of angry group members affects the extent to which a deviant individual feels rejected, and we investigate downstream effects on conformity. We show that each additional angry reaction linearly increases the extent to which a deviant individual feels rejected, and that this relation is independent of the total number of majority members (Study 1). This felt rejection is then shown to lead to anti-conformity unless two conditions are met: (1) the deviant is motivated to seek reacceptance in the group, and (2) conformity is instrumental in gaining reacceptance because it is observable by the majority (Study 2). These findings show that angry reactions are likely to trigger anti-conformity in a deviant, but they are also consistent with a motivational account of conformity, in which conformity is strategic behavior aimed at gaining reacceptance from the group.

  19. Emotional Reactions to Deviance in Groups: The Relation between Number of Angry Reactions, Felt Rejection, and Conformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc W. Heerdink

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How many members of a group need to express their anger in order to influence a deviant group member's behavior? In two studies, we examine whether an increase in number of angry group members affects the extent to which a deviant individual feels rejected, and we investigate downstream effects on conformity. We show that each additional angry reaction linearly increases the extent to which a deviant individual feels rejected, and that this relation is independent of the total number of majority members (Study 1. This felt rejection is then shown to lead to anti-conformity unless two conditions are met: (1 the deviant is motivated to seek reacceptance in the group, and (2 conformity is instrumental in gaining reacceptance because it is observable by the majority (Study 2. These findings show that angry reactions are likely to trigger anti-conformity in a deviant, but they are also consistent with a motivational account of conformity, in which conformity is strategic behavior aimed at gaining reacceptance from the group.

  20. Children's Physiological and Emotional Reactions to Witnessing Bullying Predict Bystander Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhight, Lydia R.; Hubbard, Julie A.; Hyde, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Study goals were to explore whether children clustered into groups based on reactions to witnessing bullying and to examine whether these reactions predicted bullying intervention. Seventy-nine children ("M" = 10.80 years) watched bullying videos in the laboratory while their heart rate (HR) was measured, and they self-reported on negative emotion…

  1. Generalized Temporal Acceleration Scheme for Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Surface Catalytic Processes by Scaling the Rates of Fast Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybeck, Eric Christopher; Plaisance, Craig Patrick; Neurock, Matthew

    2017-02-14

    A novel algorithm has been developed to achieve temporal acceleration during kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of surface catalytic processes. This algorithm allows for the direct simulation of reaction networks containing kinetic processes occurring on vastly disparate timescales which computationally overburden standard KMC methods. Previously developed methods for temporal acceleration in KMC have been designed for specific systems and often require a priori information from the user such as identifying the fast and slow processes. In the approach presented herein, quasi-equilibrated processes are identified automatically based on previous executions of the forward and reverse reactions. Temporal acceleration is achieved by automatically scaling the intrinsic rate constants of the quasi-equilibrated processes, bringing their rates closer to the timescales of the slow kinetically relevant non-equilibrated processes. All reactions are still simulated directly, although with modified rate constants. Abrupt changes in the underlying dynamics of the reaction network are identified during the simulation and the reaction rate constants are rescaled accordingly. The algorithm has been utilized here to model the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction over ruthenium nanoparticles. This reaction network has multiple timescale-disparate processes which would be intractable to simulate without the aid of temporal acceleration. The accelerated simulations are found to give reaction rates and selectivities indistinguishable from those calculated by an equivalent mean-field kinetic model. The computational savings of the algorithm can span many orders of magnitude in realistic systems and the computational cost is not limited by the magnitude of the timescale disparity in the system processes. Furthermore, the algorithm has been designed in a generic fashion and can easily be applied to other surface catalytic processes of interest.

  2. Fast-ion energy resolution by one-step reaction gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.;

    2016-01-01

    The spectral broadening of γ-rays from fusion plasmas can be measured in high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (GRS). We derive weight functions that determine the observable velocity space and quantify the velocity-space sensitivity of one-step reaction high-resolution GRS measurements in magne...... general formalism using reactions with and without intrinsic broadening of the γ-rays for the GRS diagnostic at JET....

  3. Fast carbon dioxide recycling by reaction with γ-Mg(BH4)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitillo, Jenny G; Groppo, Elena; Bardají, Elisa Gil; Baricco, Marcello; Bordiga, Silvia

    2014-11-07

    γ-Mg(BH4)2 was found to be a promising material for CO2 recycling (mainly to formate and alkoxide-like compounds). CO2 conversion occurs with unprecedented fast kinetics at 30 °C and 1 bar. A multi-technique approach allowed to attribute the superior performance of γ-Mg(BH4)2 to its large specific surface area.

  4. The Daughter-Guarding Hypothesis: Parental Influence on, and Emotional Reactions to, Offspring's Mating Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carin Perilloux

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Scant research has examined how individuals attempt to influence others' mating decisions. Parents are a special case because of their genetic relatedness to, and power over, their children. This paper tests the Daughter-Guarding Hypothesis: humans possess adaptations that motivate (1 protecting their daughter's sexual reputation, (2 preserving their daughter's mate value, and (3 preventing their daughters from being sexually exploited. Using two data sources, young adults and their parents, we found that parents were more likely to control their daughters' mating decisions. Parents were more likely to control their daughters' sexual behavior; parents reported more emotional upset over daughters' sexual activity; parents controlled their daughters' mate choice more than their sons'. The results support several hypothesized design features of the Daughter-Guarding hypothesis.

  5. Are emotions contagious? Evoked emotions while viewing emotionally expressive faces: quality, quantity, time course and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, B; Erb, M; Bartels, M

    2001-06-01

    In human interactions, frequently one individual becomes 'infected' with emotions displayed by his or her partner. We tested the predictions by Hatfield et al. (1992) (Primitive emotional contagion. Review of Personal and Social Psychology 14, 151-177) that the automatic, mostly unconscious component of this process, called 'primitive emotional contagion', is repeatable and fast, that stronger facial expressions of the sender evoke stronger emotions in the viewer and that women are more susceptible to emotional contagion than men. We presented photos from the Pictures of Facial Affect (Ekman and Friesen, 1976). (Pictures of Facial Affect. Consulting Psychologists Press, Palo Alto) on a PC varying the affective content (happy and sad), the expressive strength and the duration of presentation. After each photo, subjects rated the strength of experienced happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, fear and pleasure. Feelings of happiness or sadness were significantly, specifically and repeatedly evoked in the viewer - even with presentations lasting only 500 ms. Stronger expressions evoked more emotion. The gender of the viewer had weak effects. We hypothesize that this fast and repeatable reaction is likely to have a 'prewired' neural basis. We propose that the induction of emotional processes within a subject by the perception of emotionally expressive faces is a powerful instrument in the detection of emotional states in others and as the basis for one's own reactions. Detailed knowledge of emotional reactions to faces is also valuable as a basis for psychiatric studies of disorders in affect and/or communication and in studies using functional imaging (fMRI or PET) where faces are increasingly used as stimuli.

  6. Personality, threat, and cognitive and emotional reactions to stressful intercultural situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, K; van Oudenhoven, JP; de Grijs, E

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in appraisal of and affective reactions to intercultural situations. A sample of 160 students filled out the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) and participated in an experiment in which they received a description of an intercultural situ

  7. Personality, threat, and cognitive and emotional reactions to stressful intercultural situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, K; van Oudenhoven, JP; de Grijs, E

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in appraisal of and affective reactions to intercultural situations. A sample of 160 students filled out the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) and participated in an experiment in which they received a description of an intercultural

  8. Aromatic nitrations by mixed acid. Fast liquid-liquid reaction regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaldivar, J.M.; Molga, E.J.; Alos, M.A.; Hernandez, H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic nitration by mixed acid was selected as a specific case of heterogeneous liquid-liquid reaction. An extensive experimental programme was followed using adiabatic and heat flow calorimetry and pilot reactor experiments, supported by chemical analysis. A series of nitration experiments was ca

  9. Fast-ion energy resolution by one-step reaction gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-01-01

    The spectral broadening of γ-rays from fusion plasmas can be measured in high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (GRS). We derive weight functions that determine the observable velocity space and quantify the velocity-space sensitivity of one-step reaction high-resolution GRS measurements in magne...

  10. Secondary vapor phase reactions of lignin-derived oligomers obtained by fast pyrolysis of pine wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Pecha, Brennan; McDonald, Armando G.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Westerhof, Roel J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of secondary reactions in vapor phase on the yield and composition of pyrolytic lignin (PL) oligomers was investigated. The Pine wood material was pyrolyzed at 500 °C in a fluidized bed reactor, and the vapors were transferred to a downstream tubular reactor operated at res

  11. Moderating effects of empathic concern and personal distress on the emotional reactions of disaster volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Ioana A; Legge, Emanuele; Prosperi, Marta; Guazzelli, Mario; David, Daniel; Gentili, Claudio

    2014-10-01

    This study examines stress and mood outcomes in community volunteers who undertook one week's worth of post-disaster relief work in L'Aquila, Italy, which had been hit by an earthquake four months earlier. The study team obtained pre- and post-relief work data from 130 volunteers involved in activities such as preparing food for the displaced, cleaning the camps and distributing clean linen. The Perceived Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Profile of Mood States were administered at the start and at the end of the aid activities. Psychopathological symptoms and empathy were assessed in the beginning, using the Symptom Checklist 90 Revised and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, respectively. The results show that, following the assistance work, volunteers displayed decreases in perceived stress, general distress, anxiety and anger, as well as increases in positive emotions. The empathy facets empathic concern and personal distress showed different patterns in modulating the post-disaster relief work adaptation for some of the mood outcomes.

  12. Disclosing Whole Reaction Pathways of Photochromic 3H-Naphthopyrans with Fast Color Fading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazevic, Sabina; Sliwa, Michel; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Abe, Jiro; Burdzinski, Gotard

    2017-03-02

    Instantaneous coloration with large absorbance and quick color fading in the dark are desired properties for thermally reversible photochromic compounds. In the case of naphthopyran derivatives, which have been employed to commercial ophthalmic lenses, the quick color fading has been recently achieved by suppression of the generation of the transoid-trans (TT) form by steric hindrance of bulky substituents. However, there are still open questions whether the steric hindrance decreases the photochromic reaction efficiency, which is a crucial problem for industrial applications. Herein, we apply a wide range of electronic and vibrational time-resolved spectroscopies and reveal that the photochromic reaction yields of the naphthopyrans with bulky substituents are almost comparable (∼0.7) to that of nonsubstituted naphthopyran. The suppression of the formation of the TT form and the effect of solvent polarity on the photodynamics are systematically investigated. These findings are important for fundamental photochemistry and developing naphthopyran-based optimal photofunctional materials.

  13. Intensification of highly exothermic fast reaction by multi-injection microstructured reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Julien; Jiang, Bo; Maeder, Thomas; Borhani, Navid; Thome, John; Renken, Albert; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2014-01-01

    Microstructured reactors (MSR) with characteristic dimensions below 100 μm are warranted to maintain close to isothermal conditions when carrying out quasi-instantaneous highly exothermic reactions. Unfortunately, such small dimensions increase the risk of clogging, create high pressure drop and are costly to number-up. The multi-injection (MI) MSR, where one of the reactants is added stepwise along the reactor length, allows working with larger dimensions (diameter >500 μm) while maintaining...

  14. Education and the public's desire for social distance from people with depression and schizophrenia: the contribution of emotional reactions and causal attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von dem Knesebeck, Olaf; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Kofahl, Christopher; Makowski, Anna Christin; Mnich, Eva

    2014-08-01

    Association between education and desire for social distance from people with mental illness is unclear. (1) Is there an association between education and social distance from people with a depression or schizophrenia? (2) Can this association be explained by beliefs about causes of and emotional reactions to the mental disorders? (3) Are there differences between the two mental disorders? Analyses are based on a telephone survey in two large German cities (Hamburg and Munich, N = 2,014, response rate 51%). Vignettes with typical signs and symptoms suggestive of depression and schizophrenia were presented. Respondents were asked about beliefs about causes of the mental disorders, their emotional reactions and their desire for social distance. Lower education is significantly associated with a stronger tendency for social distance in the case of depression but not in case of schizophrenia, when age and gender are controlled. In case of depression, the association decreases when beliefs about possible causes are additionally controlled. In terms of schizophrenia, associations between education and social distance become stronger when emotional reactions are introduced. Our results underline that campaigns aimed at reducing stigma and social distance should consider specific emotional reactions and information needs of people with low education regarding different mental disorders. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. It's all in the timing : Measuring emotional reactions to stereotype threat before and after taking a test (Retracted article. See vol. 42, pg. 933, 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marx, David M.; Stapel, Diederik A.

    2006-01-01

    Stereotype threat is often described as resulting from increased anxiety over confirming a negative stereotype about one's group (Steele, 1997). However, variations in the type of emotional reactions targets experience as a function of stereotype threat has never been examined systematically before

  16. It's all in the timing : Measuring emotional reactions to stereotype threat before and after taking a test (Retracted article. See vol. 42, pg. 933, 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marx, David M.; Stapel, Diederik A.

    2006-01-01

    Stereotype threat is often described as resulting from increased anxiety over confirming a negative stereotype about one's group (Steele, 1997). However, variations in the type of emotional reactions targets experience as a function of stereotype threat has never been examined systematically before

  17. Fast stochastic simulation of biochemical reaction systems by alternative formulations of the chemical Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mélykúti, Bence; Burrage, Kevin; Zygalakis, Konstantinos C

    2010-04-28

    The Chemical Langevin Equation (CLE), which is a stochastic differential equation driven by a multidimensional Wiener process, acts as a bridge between the discrete stochastic simulation algorithm and the deterministic reaction rate equation when simulating (bio)chemical kinetics. The CLE model is valid in the regime where molecular populations are abundant enough to assume their concentrations change continuously, but stochastic fluctuations still play a major role. The contribution of this work is that we observe and explore that the CLE is not a single equation, but a parametric family of equations, all of which give the same finite-dimensional distribution of the variables. On the theoretical side, we prove that as many Wiener processes are sufficient to formulate the CLE as there are independent variables in the equation, which is just the rank of the stoichiometric matrix. On the practical side, we show that in the case where there are m(1) pairs of reversible reactions and m(2) irreversible reactions there is another, simple formulation of the CLE with only m(1) + m(2) Wiener processes, whereas the standard approach uses 2(m(1) + m(2)). We demonstrate that there are considerable computational savings when using this latter formulation. Such transformations of the CLE do not cause a loss of accuracy and are therefore distinct from model reduction techniques. We illustrate our findings by considering alternative formulations of the CLE for a human ether a-go-go related gene ion channel model and the Goldbeter-Koshland switch.

  18. Fast and efficient synthesis of microporous polymer nanomembranes via light-induced click reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Hassan, Youssef; Yan, Xiaotong; Krolla-Sidenstein, Peter; Mohammed, Tawheed; Lang, Mathias; Bräse, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) are materials of low density and high intrinsic porosity. This is due to the use of rigid building blocks consisting only of lightweight elements. These materials are usually stable up to temperatures of 400 °C and are chemically inert, since the networks are highly crosslinked via strong covalent bonds, making them ideal candidates for demanding applications in hostile environments. However, the high stability and chemical inertness pose problems in the processing of the CMP materials and their integration in functional devices. Especially the application of these materials for membrane separation has been limited due to their insoluble nature when synthesized as bulk material. To make full use of the beneficial properties of CMPs for membrane applications, their synthesis and functionalization on surfaces become increasingly important. In this respect, we recently introduced the solid liquid interfacial layer-by-layer (LbL) synthesis of CMP-nanomembranes via Cu catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). However, this process featured very long reaction times and limited scalability. Herein we present the synthesis of surface grown CMP thin films and nanomembranes via light induced thiol–yne click reaction. Using this reaction, we could greatly enhance the CMP nanomembrane synthesis and further broaden the variability of the LbL approach.

  19. Fast and efficient synthesis of microporous polymer nanomembranes via light-induced click reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Hassan, Youssef; Yan, Xiaotong; Krolla-Sidenstein, Peter; Mohammed, Tawheed; Lang, Mathias; Bräse, Stefan; Tsotsalas, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) are materials of low density and high intrinsic porosity. This is due to the use of rigid building blocks consisting only of lightweight elements. These materials are usually stable up to temperatures of 400 °C and are chemically inert, since the networks are highly crosslinked via strong covalent bonds, making them ideal candidates for demanding applications in hostile environments. However, the high stability and chemical inertness pose problems in the processing of the CMP materials and their integration in functional devices. Especially the application of these materials for membrane separation has been limited due to their insoluble nature when synthesized as bulk material. To make full use of the beneficial properties of CMPs for membrane applications, their synthesis and functionalization on surfaces become increasingly important. In this respect, we recently introduced the solid liquid interfacial layer-by-layer (LbL) synthesis of CMP-nanomembranes via Cu catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). However, this process featured very long reaction times and limited scalability. Herein we present the synthesis of surface grown CMP thin films and nanomembranes via light induced thiol-yne click reaction. Using this reaction, we could greatly enhance the CMP nanomembrane synthesis and further broaden the variability of the LbL approach.

  20. Children's reaction to depictions of healthy foods in fast-food television advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Amy M; Wilking, Cara; Gottlieb, Mark; Emond, Jennifer; Sargent, James D

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009, quick-service restaurant chains, or fast-food companies, have agreed to depict healthy foods in their advertising targeted at children. To determine how children interpreted depictions of milk and apples in television advertisements for children's meals by McDonald's and Burger King (BK) restaurants. Descriptive qualitative study in a rural pediatric practice setting in Northern New England. A convenience sample of 99 children (age range, 3-7 years) was shown depictions of healthy foods in fast-food advertisements that aired from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011. The images from McDonald's and BK showed milk and apples. Children were asked what they saw and not prompted to respond specifically to any aspect of the images. Two still images drawn from advertisements for healthy meals at McDonald's and BK. Children's responses were independently content coded to food category by 2 researchers. Among the 99 children participating, only 51 (52%) and 69 (70%) correctly identified milk from the McDonald's and BK images, respectively, with a significantly greater percentage correct (P = .02 for both) among older children. The children's recall of apples was significantly different by restaurant, with 79 (80%) mentioning apples when describing the McDonald's image and only 10 (10%) for the BK image (P advertisement. Of the 4 healthy food images, only depiction of apples by McDonald's was communicated adequately to the target audience. Representations of milk were inadequately communicated to preliterate children. Televised depictions of apple slices by BK misled the children in this study, although no action was taken by government or self-regulatory bodies.

  1. Ultrasonics in isocyanide-based multicomponent reactions: a new, efficient and fast method for the synthesis of fully substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives under ultrasound irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Morteza; Ramazani, Ali; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-01-01

    A fast and convenient approach to the synthesis of fully substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazoles via three-component reaction of aromatic carboxylic acids, acenaphthoquinone, and (N-isocyanimino)triphenylphosphorane under ultrasound irradiation is described. Furthermore, a series of compounds were synthesized and characterized by melting point, IR, NMR and MS. Utilization of easy reaction conditions, very high to excellent yields, and short reaction times makes this manipulation potentially very useful.

  2. Fast stochastic simulation of biochemical reaction systems by alternative formulations of the chemical Langevin equation

    KAUST Repository

    Mélykúti, Bence

    2010-01-01

    The Chemical Langevin Equation (CLE), which is a stochastic differential equation driven by a multidimensional Wiener process, acts as a bridge between the discrete stochastic simulation algorithm and the deterministic reaction rate equation when simulating (bio)chemical kinetics. The CLE model is valid in the regime where molecular populations are abundant enough to assume their concentrations change continuously, but stochastic fluctuations still play a major role. The contribution of this work is that we observe and explore that the CLE is not a single equation, but a parametric family of equations, all of which give the same finite-dimensional distribution of the variables. On the theoretical side, we prove that as many Wiener processes are sufficient to formulate the CLE as there are independent variables in the equation, which is just the rank of the stoichiometric matrix. On the practical side, we show that in the case where there are m1 pairs of reversible reactions and m2 irreversible reactions there is another, simple formulation of the CLE with only m1 + m2 Wiener processes, whereas the standard approach uses 2 m1 + m2. We demonstrate that there are considerable computational savings when using this latter formulation. Such transformations of the CLE do not cause a loss of accuracy and are therefore distinct from model reduction techniques. We illustrate our findings by considering alternative formulations of the CLE for a human ether a-go-go related gene ion channel model and the Goldbeter-Koshland switch. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Quantum non-equilibrium approach for fast electron transport in open systems: photosynthetic reaction centers

    CERN Document Server

    Pudlak, M; Nazmitdinov, R G; Pincak, R

    2011-01-01

    Creation of electron or exciton by external fields in a system with initially statistically independent unrelaxed vibrational modes leads to an initial condition term. The contribution of this term in the time convolution generalized master equation approach is studied in second order of the perturbation theory for electron-phonon coupling in the parth integral formalism. The developed approach, applied for analysis of dynamics in the photosynthetic reaction center, exhibits the key role of the initial condition term at the primary stage of electron transfer.

  4. Reappraisal, Suppression and Reactions to Affect-Inducing Images: The Moderating Role of Gender in Different Emotion Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mai Bjørnskov; Mehlsen, Mimi Yung; OToole, Mia Skytte

    The present study explored the moderating effect of gender on the relationship between emotion regulation and affective states following exposure to emotion inducing images. Results revealed that gender moderated the association between reappraisal and affect. In addition, the moderating effect...... of gender varied according to category of emotion....

  5. Fast LiH destruction in reaction with H: quantum calculations and astrophysical consequences

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, S; Gianturco, F A; 10.1088/0004-637X/699/1/383

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantum-mechanical study of the exothermic 7LiH reaction with H. Accurate reactive probabilities and rate coefficients are obtained by solving the Schrodinger equation for the motion of the three nuclei on a single Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface (PES) and using a coupled-channel hyperspherical coordinate method. Our new rates indeed confirm earlier, qualitative predictions and some previous theoretical calculations, as discussed in the main text. In the astrophysical domain we find that the depletion process largely dominates for redshift (z) between 400 and 100, a range significant for early Universe models. This new result from first-principle calculations leads us to definitively surmise that LiH should be already destroyed when the survival processes become important. Because of this very rapid depletion reaction, the fractional abundance of LiH is found to be drastically reduced, so that it should be very difficult to manage to observe it as an imprinted species in the cosmic back...

  6. Fast and stable redox reactions of MnO2/CNT hybrid electrodes for dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Taoli; Wei, Bingqing

    2015-07-01

    Pseudocapacitors, which are energy storage devices that take advantage of redox reactions to store electricity, have a different charge storage mechanism compared to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), and they could realize further gains if they were used as stretchable power sources. The realization of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors and understanding of the underlying fundamentals of their mechanical-electrochemical relationship have become indispensable. We report herein the electrochemical performance of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors using buckled MnO2/CNT hybrid electrodes. The extremely small relaxation time constant of less than 0.15 s indicates a fast redox reaction at the MnO2/CNT hybrid electrodes, securing a stable electrochemical performance for the dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors. This finding and the fundamental understanding gained from the pseudo-capacitive behavior coupled with mechanical deformation under a dynamic stretching mode would provide guidance to further improve their overall performance including a higher power density than LIBs, a higher energy density than EDLCs, and a long-life cycling stability. Most importantly, these results will potentially accelerate the applications of stretchable pseudocapacitors for flexible and biomedical electronics.Pseudocapacitors, which are energy storage devices that take advantage of redox reactions to store electricity, have a different charge storage mechanism compared to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), and they could realize further gains if they were used as stretchable power sources. The realization of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors and understanding of the underlying fundamentals of their mechanical-electrochemical relationship have become indispensable. We report herein the electrochemical performance of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors using buckled MnO2/CNT hybrid

  7. Knowledge, attitudes, practices and emotional reactions among residents of avian influenza (H5N1 hit communities in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshie Manabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Awareness of individuals' knowledge and predicting their behavior and emotional reactions is crucial when evaluating clinical preparedness for influenza pandemics with a highly pathogenic virus. Knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP relating to avian influenza (H5N1 virus infection among residents in communities where H5N1 patients occurred in Vietnam has not been reported. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Face-to-face interviews including KAP survey were conducted in Bac Kan province, located in the northeast mountainous region of Vietnam. Participants were residents who lived in a community where H5N1 cases have ever been reported (event group, n = 322 or one where cases have not been reported (non-event group, n = 221. Data on emotional reactions of participants and healthcare-seeking behavior after the event in neighboring areas were collected as well as information on demographics and environmental measures, information sources, and KAP regarding H5N1. These data were compared between two groups. Higher environmental risk of H5N1 and improper poultry-handling behaviors were identified in the event group. At the time of the event, over 50% of the event group sought healthcare for flu-like symptoms or because they were scared. Awareness of the event influenced KAP scores. Healthcare-seeking behavior and attention to H5N1 poultry outbreaks diminished in the event group as time passed after the outbreak compared with the non-event group. Factors that motivated participants to seek healthcare sooner were knowledge of early access to healthcare and the risk of eating sick/dead poultry, and perception of the threat of H5N1. CONCLUSIONS: Awareness of H5N1 patients in neighboring areas can provoke panic in residents and influence their healthcare-seeking behavior. Periodic education to share experiences on the occurrence of H5N1 patients and provide accurate information may help prevent panic and infection and reduce mortality

  8. Detection of fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction using a 4H-SiC radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatko, Bohumir; Sagatova, Andrea; Sedlackova, Katarina; Necas, Vladimir; Dubecky, Frantisek; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    The particle detector based on a high purity epitaxial layer of 4H-SiC exhibits promising properties in detection of various types of ionizing radiation. Due to the wide band gap of 4H-SiC semiconductor material, the detector can reliably operate at room and also elevated temperatures. In this work we focused on detection of fast neutrons generated the by D-T (deuterium-tritium) nuclear reaction. The epitaxial layer with a thickness of 105 μm was used as a detection part. A circular Schottky contact of a Au/Ni double layer was evaporated on both sides of the detector material. The detector structure was characterized by current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements, at first. The results show very low current density (SiC detector is caused by the elastic and inelastic scattering on the silicon or carbide component of the detector material. Another possibility that increases the detection efficiency is the use of a conversion layer. In our measurements, we glued a HDPE (high density polyethylene) conversion layer on the detector Schottky contact to transform fast neutrons to protons. Hydrogen atoms contained in the conversion layer have a high probability of interaction with neutrons through elastic scattering. Secondary generated protons flying to the detector can be easily detected. The detection properties of detectors with and without the HDPE conversion layer were compared.

  9. Emotional and behavioural reactions to moral transgressions: cross-cultural and individual variations in India and Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laham, Simon M; Chopra, Sonavi; Lalljee, Mansur; Parkinson, Brian

    2010-02-01

    Reactions to moral transgressions are subject to influence at both the cultural and individual levels. Transgressions against an individual's rights or against social conventions of hierarchy may elicit different reactions in individualistic and collectivistic cultures. In the current study, affective and behavioural reactions to transgressions of autonomy (rights) and community (hierarchy) were examined in India and Britain. Results revealed that although reactions to autonomy transgressions are similar in India and Britain, Indian participants express more moral outrage than do Britons in response to transgressions of community. Results also supported the contention of emotion-specificity in affective moral reaction: Participants in both India and Britain reported anger in response to autonomy transgressions, but contempt in response to violations of community. Importantly, these results extend previous research by demonstrating the importance of emotion specificity in moral reactions, as opposed to categorization or dilemma resolution. In addition, an individual difference measure of respect for persons was shown to moderate reactions to moral transgressions. Specifically, participants with high respect for persons were less negative to violators of the community ethic, but not the autonomy ethic. These findings highlight the importance of examining emotion-specific responses in the moral domain and introduce a significant individual difference variable, respect for persons, into the psychology of morality. Les réactions aux transgressions morales sont susceptibles d'influence à la fois aux niveaux culturel et individuel. Les transgressions contre les droits d'un individu ou contre les conventions sociales d'hiérarchie peuvent susciter de différentes réactions dans les cultures individualiste et collectiviste. Dans la présente étude, les réactions affective et comportementale aux transgressions de l'autonomie (droits) et de la communauté (hi

  10. Rethinking fast and slow based on a critique of reaction-time reverse inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajbich, Ian; Bartling, Björn; Hare, Todd; Fehr, Ernst

    2015-07-02

    Do people intuitively favour certain actions over others? In some dual-process research, reaction-time (RT) data have been used to infer that certain choices are intuitive. However, the use of behavioural or biological measures to infer mental function, popularly known as 'reverse inference', is problematic because it does not take into account other sources of variability in the data, such as discriminability of the choice options. Here we use two example data sets obtained from value-based choice experiments to demonstrate that, after controlling for discriminability (that is, strength-of-preference), there is no evidence that one type of choice is systematically faster than the other. Moreover, using specific variations of a prominent value-based choice experiment, we are able to predictably replicate, eliminate or reverse previously reported correlations between RT and selfishness. Thus, our findings shed crucial light on the use of RT in inferring mental processes and strongly caution against using RT differences as evidence favouring dual-process accounts.

  11. Social trauma : consequences of emotional maltreatment on physiological reactions to social rejection in subjects with social anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Iffland, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    A history of child maltreatment is associated with psychopathology, predominantly affective and anxiety disorders as well as substance abuse. In the past, research has primarily focused on the consequences of physical abuse, sexual abuse, physical neglect or combinations of these types of maltreatment. However, besides physical and sexual transgressions, child maltreatment does also involve emotional abuse and emotional neglect. Although it was suggested that the consequences of emotional mal...

  12. 情绪调节内隐态度和无意识目标对消极情绪反应的影响%The Effects of Implicit Attitude towards Emotion Regulation and Unconscious Goal on Negative Emotion Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马伟娜; 桑标

    2014-01-01

    To explore the effects of implicit attitude towards emotion regulation and unconscious goal on individual's emotion reaction , the experiment primes implicit attitude towards emotion regulation via the subliminal paradigm and unconscious emotion regulation goal via the sentence sorting task .The results show that implicit attitude towards emotion regulation has main effect ,while the main effect of unconscious goal is not significant (p> 0 .05) .There is no significant interaction between unconscious goal and implicit attitude towards emotion regulation (p>0 .05) .Whatever unconscious goal starts or not ,the individuals ,who prime control implicit attitude ,reduce negative emotional experience (p< 0 .05) and autonomic nervous system activities(p<0 .05) ,and produce good results .The individuals ,who prime expressive implicit attitude ,increase negative emotional experience (p<0 .05) and autonomic nervous system activities (p<0 .05) ,and produce bad results .The results support the applicability of automatic target seeking theory in emotion regulation domain to some extent .%分别采用阈下范式启动情绪调节内隐态度、句子整理任务启动无意识情绪调节目标,动态考察情绪调节内隐态度和无意识情绪调节目标对情绪反应的影响。结果发现,情绪调节内隐态度存在主效应;无意识目标启动的主效应不存在;有无启动无意识目标与情绪调节内隐态度类型之间不存在交互作用,无论无意识目标有无启动,启动控制型内隐态度的个体降低消极情绪体验,减少自主神经系统活动,产生适应良好的结果;启动表达型内隐态度的个体则升高消极情绪体验,增加自主神经系统活动,产生适应不良的结果。这从一定程度上支持了自动目标追求理论在情绪调节领域的适用性。

  13. Longitudinal Relations among Parents' Reactions to Children's Negative Emotions, Effortful Control, and Math Achievement in Early Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jodi; Valiente, Carlos; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Bradley, Robert H.; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D.

    2014-01-01

    Panel mediation models and fixed-effects models were used to explore longitudinal relations among parents' reactions to children's displays of negative emotions, children's effortful control (EC), and children's math achievement (N = 291; M age in fall of kindergarten = 5.66 years, SD = 0.39 year) across kindergarten through…

  14. NH3-SCR performance of fresh and hydrothermally aged Fe-ZSM-5 in standard and fast selective catalytic reduction reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Liu, Fudong; Xie, Lijuan; Shan, Wenpo; He, Hong

    2013-04-02

    Hydrothermal stability is one of the challenges for the practical application of Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 (NH(3)-SCR) for diesel engines. The presence of NO(3) in the exhaust gases can enhance the deNOx activity because of the fast SCR reaction. In this work, a Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst was prepared by a solid-state ion-exchange method and was hydrothermally deactivated at 800 °C in the presence of 10% H(2)O. The activity of fresh and hydrothermal aged Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts was investigated in standard SCR (NO(2)/NOx = 0) and in fast SCR with NO(2)/NOx = 0.3 and 0.5. In standard SCR, hydrothermal aging of Fe-ZSM-5 resulted in a significant decrease of low-temperature activity and a slight increase in high-temperature activity. In fast SCR, NOx conversion over aged Fe-ZSM-5 was significantly increased but was still lower than that over fresh catalyst. Additionally, production of N(2)O in fast SCR was much more apparent over aged Fe-ZSM-5 than over fresh catalyst. We propose that, in fast SCR, the rate of key reactions related to NO is slower over aged Fe-ZSM-5 than over fresh catalyst, thus increasing the probabilities of side reactions involving the formation of N(2)O.

  15. MCNPX simulations of the silicon carbide semiconductor detector response to fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlačková, Katarína; Šagátová, Andrea; Zat'ko, Bohumír; Nečas, Vladimír; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) has been long recognized as a suitable semiconductor material for use in nuclear radiation detectors of high-energy charged particles, gamma rays, X-rays and neutrons. The nuclear interactions occurring in the semiconductor are complex and can be quantified using a Monte Carlo-based computer code. In this work, the MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was employed to support detector design and analysis. MCNPX is widely used to simulate interaction of radiation with matter and supports the transport of 34 particle types including heavy ions in broad energy ranges. The code also supports complex 3D geometries and both nuclear data tables and physics models. In our model, monoenergetic neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction were assumed as a source of fast neutrons. Their energy varied between 16 and 18.2 MeV, according to the accelerating voltage of the deuterons participating in D-T reaction. First, the simulations were used to calculate the optimum thickness of the reactive film composed of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE), which converts neutral particles to charged particles and thusly enhancing detection efficiency. The dependency of the optimal thickness of the HDPE layer on the energy of the incident neutrons has been shown for the inspected energy range. Further, from the energy deposited by secondary charged particles and recoiled ions, the detector response was modeled and the effect of the conversion layer on detector response was demonstrated. The results from the simulations were compared with experimental data obtained for a detector covered by a 600 and 1300 μm thick conversion layer. Some limitations of the simulations using MCNPX code are also discussed.

  16. Fast removal of the antibiotic flumequine from aqueous solution by ozonation: Influencing factors, reaction pathways, and toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mingbao; Yan, Liqing; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Ping; Yang, Shaogui; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2016-01-15

    As one of the first generation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, flumequine (FLU) has been detected ubiquitously in surface waters and municipal wastewaters. In light of FLU's possible adverse effects on aquatic species, the removal of this antibiotic has received worldwide attention. In this study, the kinetics, transformation products, mechanisms and toxicity variations of the ozonation process for FLU were systematically determined. The possible effects of solution pH, addition of inorganic ions, dissolved organic matter, and tert-butyl-alcohol (a radical scavenger), as well as the type of water matrices on FLU removal by ozonation, were studied from the perspective of the degradation kinetics. The data obtained suggested that ozone can be used as an effective oxidant for the fast removal of FLU from natural waters. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, a total of thirteen transformation products of FLU during ozonation were identified, and their specific reaction mechanisms were also proposed. The degradation pathways involving the hydroxylation, decarboxylation and defluorination were tentatively proposed. Meanwhile, the generation of three low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids was also observed. In addition, the potential toxicity of the transformation mixtures of FLU by ozone was evaluated. Overall, this paper can be a unique contribution to the systematic elucidation of the ozonation process of this antibiotic in water.

  17. Patient information leaflets: informing or frightening? A focus group study exploring patients' emotional reactions and subsequent behavior towards package leaflets of commonly prescribed medications in family practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herber, Oliver Rudolf; Gies, Verena; Schwappach, David; Thürmann, Petra; Wilm, Stefan

    2014-10-02

    The purpose of patient information leaflets (PILs) is to inform patients about the administration, precautions and potential side effects of their prescribed medication. Despite European Commission guidelines aiming at increasing readability and comprehension of PILs little is known about the potential risk information has on patients. This article explores patients' reactions and subsequent behavior towards risk information conveyed in PILs of commonly prescribed drugs by general practitioners (GPs) for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension or hypercholesterolemia; the most frequent cause for consultations in family practices in Germany. We conducted six focus groups comprising 35 patients which were recruited in GP practices. Transcripts were read and coded for themes; categories were created by abstracting data and further refined into a coding framework. Three interrelated categories are presented: (i) The vast amount of side effects and drug interactions commonly described in PILs provoke various emotional reactions in patients which (ii) lead to specific patient behavior of which (iii) consulting the GP for assistance is among the most common. Findings show that current description of potential risk information caused feelings of fear and anxiety in the reader resulting in undesirable behavioral reactions. Future PILs need to convey potential risk information in a language that is less frightening while retaining the information content required to make informed decisions about the prescribed medication. Thus, during the production process greater emphasis needs to be placed on testing the degree of emotional arousal provoked in patients when reading risk information to allow them to undertake a benefit-risk-assessment of their medication that is based on rational rather than emotional (fearful) reactions.

  18. Predicting the Onset of PTSD: An Analysis of Facial Expression of Emotion in Reaction to Aggressive Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    for this phenomenon is able to be defined by objective measures through scientific theories. For psychologists on the other hand, some of the...facial expression of emotion is relatively new , it is necessary to incorporate additional measures in developing an assessment strategy to ensure... cortisol data from 109 Soldiers during designated stressful events revealed that cortisol levels significantly increased during captivity and was

  19. Responding to emotional scenes: effects of response outcome and picture repetition on reaction times and the late positive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, Nina N; Keil, Andreas; Freund, Alexandra M

    2016-12-06

    Processing the motivational relevance of a visual scene and reacting accordingly is crucial for survival. Previous work suggests the emotional content of naturalistic scenes affects response speed, such that unpleasant content slows responses whereas pleasant content accelerates responses. It is unclear whether these effects reflect motor-cognitive processes, such as attentional orienting, or vary with the function/outcome of the motor response itself. Four experiments manipulated participants' ability to terminate the picture (offset control) and, thereby, the response's function and motivational value. Attentive orienting was manipulated via picture repetition, which diminishes orienting. A total of N = 81 participants completed versions of a go/no-go task, discriminating between distorted versus intact pictures drawn from six content categories varying in positive, negative, or neutral valence. While all participants responded faster with repetition, only participants without offset control exhibited slower responses to unpleasant and accelerated responses to pleasant content. Emotional engagement, measured by the late positive potential, was not modulated by attentional orienting (repetition), suggesting that the interaction between repetition and offset control is not due to altered emotional engagement. Together, results suggest that response time changes as a function of emotional content and sensitivity to attention orienting depends on the motivational function of the motor response.

  20. Emotional distraction and bodily reaction: Modulation of autonomous responses by anodal tDCS to the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Alexander Schroeder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prefrontal electric stimulation has been demonstrated to effectively modulate cognitive processing. Specifically, the amelioration of cognitive control over emotional distraction by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS points towards targeted therapeutic applications in various psychiatric disorders. In addition to behavioral measures, autonomous nervous system (ANS responses are fundamental bodily signatures of emotional information processing. However, interactions between the modulation of cognitive control by tDCS and ANS responses have received limited attention. We here report on ANS data gathered in healthy subjects that performed an emotional cognitive control task parallel to the modulation of left prefrontal cortical activity by 1mA anodal or sham tDCS. Skin conductance responses (SCRs to negative and neutral pictures of human scenes were reduced by anodal as compared to sham tDCS. Individual SCR amplitude variations were associated with the amount of distraction. Moreover, the stimulation-driven performance- and SCR-modulations were related in form of a quadratic, inverse-U function. Thus, our results indicate that non-invasive brain stimulation (i.e., anodal tDCS can modulate autonomous responses synchronous to behavioral improvements, but the range of possible concurrent improvements from prefrontal stimulation is limited. Interactions between cognitive, affective, neurophysiological, and vegetative responses to emotional content can shape brain stimulation effectiveness and require theory-driven integration in potential treatment protocols.

  1. Fast neutron spectrum unfolding of a TRIGA Mark II reactor and measurement of spectrum-averaged cross sections. Integral tests of differential cross sections of neutron threshold reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M.S.; Hossain, S.M.; Khan, R. [Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology (INST); Sudar, S. [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Inst. of Experimental Physics; Zulquarnain, M.A. [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Qaim, S.M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM-5)

    2013-07-01

    The spectrum of fast neutrons having energies from 0.5 to 20 MeV in the core of the 3MW TRIGA Mark II reactor at Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh, was unfolded by activating several metal foils to induce threshold nuclear reactions covering the whole spectrum, and then doing necessary iterative calculations utilizing the activation results and the code SULSA. The analysed shape of the spectrum in the TRIGA core was found to be similar to that of the pure {sup 235}U-fission spectrum, except for the energies between 0.5 and 1.5 MeV, where it was slightly higher than the fission spectrum. Spectrum-averaged cross sections were determined by integral measurements. The integral values measured in this work were compared with the recommended values for a pure fission spectrum as well as with the integrated data deduced from measured and evaluated excitation functions of a few reactions given in some data files. The good agreement between integral measurements and integrated data in case of well-investigated reactions shows that the fast neutron field at the TRIGA Mark II reactor can be used for validation of evaluated data of neutron threshold reactions. (orig.)

  2. Simple and fast fluorescence detection of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by N-methoxy rhodamine-6G spirolactam based on consecutive chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wei; Shi Wen; Li Zhao [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Ma Huimin, E-mail: mahm@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu Yang; Zhang Jinghua; Liu Qingjun [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China)

    2011-12-05

    Graphical abstract: A simple and fast method for fluorescence detection of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by N-methoxy rhodamine-6G spirolactam (1) is proposed based on consecutive chemical reactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Benzoyl peroxide can oxidize Fe{sup 2+} into Fe{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 3+} selectively induces the opening of rhodamine spirolactam ring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two reactions led to the development of a new fluorescent method for benzoyl peroxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method is simple and fast, and is used to detect benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour. - Abstract: Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a brightener is often added to wheat flour, and excessive use of this food additive is receiving increasing concern. Herein, a simple and fast method for fluorescence detection of BPO is proposed based on consecutive chemical reactions. In this approach, BPO first oxidizes Fe{sup 2+} into Fe{sup 3+} and the resulting Fe{sup 3+} then induces the opening of the spirolactam ring of a new rhodamine derivative, N-methoxy rhodamine-6G spirolactam, switching on fluorescence of the detection system. More importantly, the fluorescence response of the reaction system to BPO is rather rapid and sensitive, with a detection limit of 6 mg kg{sup -1} (k = 3), which makes it to be of great potential use in food safety analysis. The applicability of the proposed method has been successfully demonstrated on the determination of BPO in wheat flour samples.

  3. Fast and convenient synthesis of new symmetric pyrano[2,3-d:6,5-d']dipyrimidinones by an organocatalyzed annulation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Rimaz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A fast and facile one-pot procedure for the preparation of symmetric 5-Aryloyl-1,9-dimethyl-5,9-dihydro-2H-pyrano[2,3-d:6,5-d']dipyrimidine-2,4,6,8(1H,3H,7H-tetraone derivatives by two-component reaction of N-methylbarbituric acid and arylglyoxalmonohydrates catalyzed by DABCO in ethanol at 50 ºC is described. This protocol has the advantages of environmental friendless, very simple operation, high regio- and chemoselectivity and moderate to excellent yields.

  4. Health care students' reactions towards HIV patients: examining prejudice, emotions, attribution of blame and willingness to interact with HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Jannel; Chadee, Derek; Yearwood, Rosana Patricia

    2014-01-01

    One of the most pervasive stigmatising conditions in society today is HIV/AIDS. In Trinidad and Tobago, stigma and discrimination are still pervasive especially against persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) and at-risk groups. HIV stigmatisation takes place at all levels including health care institutions, and is a major obstacle to effective HIV/AIDS prevention and care. This study examined health care students' reactions towards HIV patients. A stratified random sample of 339 health care students from Trinidad was used. A 2 × 2 factorial design using vignettes manipulated a male patient's sexual orientation (heterosexual/homosexual) and HIV onset controllability (high/low). Multivariate analysis of variance and discriminant function analysis were used to analyse the data. There was a significant main effect of HIV onset controllability on participants' attribution of blame, emotions, prejudicial evaluation and willingness to interact with PLHIV, Λ (.64) F(6, 330) = 31.44, p <.001, [Formula: see text] = .37. Attribution of blame and prejudicial evaluation discriminated between reactions to patients in low onset control and high onset control vignettes. Cognitive-affective appraisal processes are instrumental in determining health care providers' reaction towards PLHIV.

  5. Development of a multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in steam generators of sodium-cooled fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchibori, Akihiro; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    A multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors was newly developed. The analysis system consists of the mechanistic numerical analysis codes, SERAPHIM, TACT, and RELAP5. The SERAPHIM code calculates the multicomponent multiphase flow and sodium-water chemical reaction caused by discharging of pressurized water vapor. Applicability of the SERAPHIM code was confirmed through the analyses of the experiment on water vapor discharging in liquid sodium. The TACT code was developed to calculate heat transfer from the reacting jet to the adjacent tube and to predict the tube failure occurrence. The numerical models integrated into the TACT code were verified through some related experiments. The RELAP5 code evaluates thermal hydraulic behavior of water inside the tube. The original heat transfer correlations were corrected for the tube rapidly heated by the reacting jet. The developed system enables evaluation of the wastage environment and the possibility of the failure propagation.

  6. [The modulatory influence of moxonidine on the different link of sympatho-adrenal system and hemodynamic reactions in normo and hypertensive rats during emotional stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakuridze, K A; Gongadze, N V

    2006-04-01

    Effect of moxonidine on hemodynamic parameters, baroreflex sensitivity (BS) and sympatho-adrenal system was studied on the model of emotional stress in normotensive (N) and hypertensive (H) rats. Moxonidine was administered intravenously in daily dose 100 mcg/kg during one week prior to stress condition. It was shown that moxonidine reduced pressor reactions of arterial pressure, tachycardia and have increased BS especially in H animals, which was blunted during aversive stimulation. Moxonidine also revealed the effect of pharmacological correction of catecholamine - norepinephrine and epinephrine content in the myocardium and adrenals in stress and post stress period more markedly in H rats. The data obtained indicate the preventive antistress activity of the moxonidine.

  7. Emotional Reactions and the Pulse of Public Opinion: Measuring the Impact of Political Events on the Sentiment of Online Discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Bailon, Sandra; Kaltenbrunner, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses changes in public opinion by tracking political discussions in which people voluntarily engage online. Unlike polls or surveys, our approach does not elicit opinions but approximates what the public thinks by analysing the discussions in which they decide to take part. We measure the emotional content of online discussions in three dimensions (valence, arousal and dominance), paying special attention to deviation around average values, which we use as a proxy for disagreement and polarisation. We show that this measurement of public opinion helps predict presidential approval rates, suggesting that there is a point of connection between online discussions (often deemed not representative of the overall population) and offline polls. We also show that this measurement provides a deeper understanding of the individual mechanisms that drive aggregated shifts in public opinion. Our data spans a period that includes two US presidential elections, the attacks of September 11, and the start of mi...

  8. The Effects of Symptom Recognition and Diagnostic Labels on Public Beliefs, Emotional Reactions, and Stigmas Associated with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scior, Katrina; Connolly, Theresa; Williams, Janice

    2013-01-01

    Labels are firmly rejected by the disability rights movement, yet the complex effects of labeling on lay beliefs are poorly understood. This study examined the effects of labeling on the general public's reactions to people with intellectual disabilities. A sample of 1,233 adult members of the UK general population were randomly presented with…

  9. The fast C(3P) + CH3OH reaction as an efficient loss process for gas-phase interstellar methanol

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, Robin J; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Caubet, Philippe; Balucani, Nadia; Seakins, Paul W; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Rate constants for the C(3P) + CH3OH reaction have been measured in a continuous supersonic flow reactor over the range 50 K to 296 K. C(3P) was created by the in-situ pulsed laser photolysis of CBr4, a multiphoton process which also produced some C(1D), allowing us to investigate simultaneously the low temperature kinetics of the C(1D) + CH3OH reaction. C(1D) atoms were followed by an indirect chemiluminescent tracer method in the presence of excess CH3OH. C(3P) atoms were detected by the same chemiluminescence technique and also by direct vacuum ultra-violet laser induced fluorescence (VUV LIF). Secondary measurements of product H(2S) atom formation have been undertaken allowing absolute H atom yields to be obtained by comparison with a suitable reference reaction. In parallel, statistical calculations have been performed based on ab-initio calculations of the complexes, adducts and transition states (TSs) relevant to the title reaction. By comparison with the experimental H atom yields, the preferred react...

  10. A Fast Assembly of (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate [(-)-EGCG] via Intra-and Inter-molecular Mitsunobu Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Tong-Jian; WANG Xiao-Long; CAO Xiao-Ping

    2006-01-01

    This paper described a concise construction of (-)-EGCG (1f) (with an overall yield of 20% for seven steps based on the starting cinnamyl alcohol derivative 3), featuring asymmetric dihydroxylation (ADH), intra- and intermolecular Mitsunobu reaction as key steps. Our strategy disclosed herein constitutes a new effective general synthetic approach toward the analogues of (-)-EGCG (1f).

  11. Regulating deviance with emotions: Emotional expressions as signals of acceptance and rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerdink, M.W.

    2015-01-01

    An individual group member’s deviant behavior can provoke strong emotional reactions from other group members. I have investigated the role of such emotional reactions in regulating deviance by investigating how the deviant is influenced by these emotional reactions. The idea that angry reactions si

  12. Emotional reactions of mothers facing premature births: study of 100 mother-infant dyads 32 gestational weeks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Eutrope

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This current study has been conducted to clarify the relationship between the mother's post-traumatic reaction triggered by premature birth and the mother-infant interactions. In this article, the precocious maternal feelings are described. METHODS: A multicenter prospective study was performed in three French hospitals. 100 dyads with 100 very premature infants and their mothers were recruited. Mothers completed, at two different times self-questionnaires of depression/anxiety, trauma and social support. The quality of interactions in the dyads was evaluated. RESULTS: Thirty-nine percent of the mothers obtained a score at HADS suggesting a high risk of depression at the first visit and approximately one-third at visit two. Seventy-five percent of the mothers were at risk of suffering from an anxiety disorder at visit one and half remained so at visit two. A "depressed" score at visits one and two correlated with a hospitalization for a threatened premature labor. We noted a high risk of trauma for 35% of the mothers and high interactional synchrony was observed for approximately two-thirds of the dyads. The mothers' psychological reactions such as depression and anxiety or postnatal depression correlate strongly with the presence of an initial trauma. At visit one and visit two, a high score of satisfaction concerning social support correlates negatively with presence of a trauma. A maternal risk of trauma is more frequent with a C-section delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Mothers' psychological reactions such as depression and anxiety correlate greatly with the presence of an initial trauma. The maternal traumatic reaction linked to premature birth does not correlate with the term at birth, but rather with the weight of the baby. Social support perceived by the mother is correlated with the absence of maternal trauma before returning home, and also seems to inhibit from depressive symptoms from the time of the infant's premature birth.

  13. Emotional Reactions of Mothers Facing Premature Births: Study of 100 Mother-Infant Dyads 32 Gestational Weeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eutrope, Julien; Thierry, Aurore; Lempp, Franziska; Aupetit, Laurence; Saad, Stéphanie; Dodane, Catherine; Bednarek, Nathalie; De Mare, Laurence; Sibertin-Blanc, Daniel; Nezelof, Sylvie; Rolland, Anne-Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This current study has been conducted to clarify the relationship between the mother's post-traumatic reaction triggered by premature birth and the mother-infant interactions. In this article, the precocious maternal feelings are described. Methods A multicenter prospective study was performed in three French hospitals. 100 dyads with 100 very premature infants and their mothers were recruited. Mothers completed, at two different times self-questionnaires of depression/anxiety, trauma and social support. The quality of interactions in the dyads was evaluated. Results Thirty-nine percent of the mothers obtained a score at HADS suggesting a high risk of depression at the first visit and approximately one-third at visit two. Seventy-five percent of the mothers were at risk of suffering from an anxiety disorder at visit one and half remained so at visit two. A “depressed” score at visits one and two correlated with a hospitalization for a threatened premature labor. We noted a high risk of trauma for 35% of the mothers and high interactional synchrony was observed for approximately two-thirds of the dyads. The mothers' psychological reactions such as depression and anxiety or postnatal depression correlate strongly with the presence of an initial trauma. At visit one and visit two, a high score of satisfaction concerning social support correlates negatively with presence of a trauma. A maternal risk of trauma is more frequent with a C-section delivery. Conclusions Mothers' psychological reactions such as depression and anxiety correlate greatly with the presence of an initial trauma. The maternal traumatic reaction linked to premature birth does not correlate with the term at birth, but rather with the weight of the baby. Social support perceived by the mother is correlated with the absence of maternal trauma before returning home, and also seems to inhibit from depressive symptoms from the time of the infant's premature birth. PMID:25153825

  14. A Fast Stable Discretization of the Constant-Convection-Diffusion-Reaction Equations of Kinetic Capillary Electrophoresis (KCE)

    CERN Document Server

    Vass, József

    2016-01-01

    A discretization scheme is introduced for a set of convection-diffusion equations with a non-linear reaction term, where the convection velocity is constant for each reactant. This constancy allows a transformation to new spatial variables, which ensures the global stability of discretization. Convection-diffusion equations are notorious for their lack of stability, arising from the algebraic interaction of the convection and diffusion terms. Unexpectedly, our implemented numerical algorithm proves to be faster than computing exact solutions derived for a special case, while remaining reasonably accurate, as demonstrated in our runtime and error analysis.

  15. Fast and selective determination of total protein in milk powder via titration of moving reaction boundary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Cheng-ye; Wang, Hou-yu; Liu, Xiao-ping; Fan, Liu-yin; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Cheng-xi

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, moving reaction boundary titration (MRBT) was developed for rapid and accurate quantification of total protein in infant milk powder, from the concept of moving reaction boundary (MRB) electrophoresis. In the method, the MRB was formed by the hydroxide ions and the acidic residues of milk proteins immobilized via cross-linked polyacrylamide gel (PAG), an acid-base indicator was used to denote the boundary motion. As a proof of concept, we chose five brands of infant milk powders to study the feasibility of MRBT method. The calibration curve of MRB velocity versus logarithmic total protein content of infant milk powder sample was established based on the visual signal of MRB motion as a function of logarithmic milk protein content. Weak influence of nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) reagents (e.g., melamine and urea) on MRBT method was observed, due to the fact that MRB was formed with hydroxide ions and the acidic residues of captured milk proteins, rather than the alkaline residues or the NPN reagents added. The total protein contents in infant milk powder samples detected via the MRBT method were in good agreement with those achieved by the classic Kjeldahl method. In addition, the developed method had much faster measuring speed compared with the Kjeldahl method.

  16. Applications of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) for fast ion and fusion reaction product measurements in TEXTOR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydlowski, A.; Malinowski, K.; Malinowska, A. [Association EURTOM-IPPLM Warsaw, The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Wassenhove, G. Van [EURATOM-Belgium State Association, LPP, ERM/KMS, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Schweer, B. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Institutte of Plasma Physicx, Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The paper reports on measurements of fusion reaction protons which were performed on TEXTOR facility in January 2009. The basic experimental scheme was similar to that applied in the previous measurements [1, 2]. The main experimental tool equipment was a small ion pinhole camera which was equipped with a PM-355 detector sample and was attached to a water cooled manipulator. The camera was placed below the plasma ring in the direction of ion drifts, at a distance of 4.4 cm from LCFS. However, in the described experiment it was aligned at an angle to the mayor TEXTOR radius (contrary to previous experiments), so that the input pinhole was oriented first at {gamma} = 45 degrees (shots 108799 - 108818) and then {gamma} = 600 (shots 108832 - 108847). The discharges were executed with one neutral beam of the total power 0.6 - 1.0 MW. In the first series (Nos 108799 - 108818) the plasma was additionally heated by ICRH of frequency 38 MHz. The irradiated detector samples were subjected to the same interrupted etching procedure as the samples used in the CR-39/PM-355 detector calibration measurements [1, 2]. After that, track density distributions and track diameter histograms were measured under an optical microscope. By the use of the calibration curves, it was possible to distinguish craters produced by protons from other craters and to convert the obtained histograms into proton energy spectra. The craters induced by lower energy ions appeared to be concentrated in narrower areas, whereas higher energy ions were registered in a more diffused detector fields. The paper shows again that the CR-39/PM-355 detector is an useful diagnostic tool for tokamak experiments, for measurement of charged ions. References: [1] A. Szydlowski, A. Malinowska, M. Jaskola, A. Korman, M.J. Sadowski, G. Van Wassenhove, B. Schweer and the TEXTOR team, A. Galkowski, 'Application of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors in TEXTOR Experiment for Measurements

  17. Uncertainty study of nuclear model parameters for the n+ ^{56}Fe reactions in the fast neutron region below 20 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Junfeng; Sjöstrand, Henrik; Alhassan, Erwin; Gustavsson, Cecilia; Österlund, Michael; Koning, Arjan; Rochman, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we study the uncertainty of nuclear model parameters for neutron induced ^{56}Fe reactions in fast neutron region by using the Total Monte Carlo method. We perform a large number of TALYS runs and compare the calculated results with the experimental data of the cross sections to obtain the uncertainties of the model parameters. Based on the derived uncertainties another 1000 TALYS runs have been performed to create random cross section files. For comparison with the experimental data we calculate a weighted \\chi^2 value for each random file as well as the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF3.1, JENDL4.0 and CENDL3.1 data libraries. Furthermore, we investigate the optical model parameters correlation obtained by way of this procedure.

  18. Rigorous Derivation of a Nonlinear Diffusion Equation as Fast-Reaction Limit of a Continuous Coagulation-Fragmentation Model with Diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Carrillo, J. A.

    2009-10-30

    Weak solutions of the spatially inhomogeneous (diffusive) Aizenmann-Bak model of coagulation-breakup within a bounded domain with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions are shown to converge, in the fast reaction limit, towards local equilibria determined by their mass. Moreover, this mass is the solution of a nonlinear diffusion equation whose nonlinearity depends on the (size-dependent) diffusion coefficient. Initial data are assumed to have integrable zero order moment and square integrable first order moment in size, and finite entropy. In contrast to our previous result [5], we are able to show the convergence without assuming uniform bounds from above and below on the number density of clusters. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  19. [Optimization of reaction conditions and methodological investigation on microtox-based fast testing system for traditional Chinese medicine injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Li; Li, Xiao-Rong; Yan, Liang-Chun; Zhao, Jun-Ning

    2016-05-01

    Vibrio fischeri CS234 was used to establish and optimize microtox assay system, laying a foundation for the application of this method in comprehensive acute toxicity test of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injections. Firstly, the Plackett-Burman method was carried out to optimize the factors which would affect Vibrio fischeri CS234 luminescence. Secondly, ZnSO4•7H2O was chosen as reference substance to establish its reaction system with quality control samples. The optimal luminescence conditions were achieved as follows: ①At a temperature of (15±1) ℃, Vibrio fischeri CS234 lyophilized powders were balanced for 15 min, then, 1 mL resuscitation fluid was added and blended for 10 min. 100 μL bacteria suspension was taken to measure the initial luminescence intensity, and then 1 mL resuscitation fluid or test sample was immediately added; after reaction for 10 min, corresponding luminescence intensity was measured again. Resuscitation diluent, osmotic pressure regulator and ZnSO4•7H2O stock solution showed no interference to the determination of Vibrio fischeri CS234 luminescence intensity, so this method was of good specificity. The within-and between-batch precisions of quality controls and the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) samples were testing needs of the vast majority of traditional Chinese medicine injections. The Vibrio fischeri strain CS234 assay system was specific, stable, sensitive, accurate and adaptable after optimization, so it was suitable for the comprehensive acute toxicity assessment of TCM injections. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  20. Do women tend while men fight or flee? Differential emotive reactions of stressed men and women while viewing newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Fabian; Meng-Hentschel, Juliane; Golle, Jessika; Stucki, Sylvia; Akyildiz-Kunz, Carola; Lobmaier, Janek S

    2017-01-01

    Infant care often is carried out under stressful circumstances. Little is known about differences in caretaking motivation between men and women under stress. In the present study, stress was induced in 40 participants (21 women, 19 men) by means of the cold pressor stress test, 40 (22 women, 18 men) serving as controls. Participants then rated their urge to care for newborn infants shown on 20 short video clips. The infants in the videos were either crying (N=10) or were showing typical neonatal facial movements (N=10). Skin conductance was obtained while participants viewed the videos and salivary cortisol was measured to capture stress responses. We found sex differences in caretaking motivation, such that stress led to decreased caretaking motivation in men but not in women. Furthermore, stressed men elicited a stronger skin conductance change while viewing infant videos than stressed women. These findings provide further evidence for differential stress reactions in men and women and may have crucial implications for parental care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Emotions and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Stoier, Louise; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Serious illness will inevitably lead to a fundamental emotional reaction. Traditionally, in interventional treatment or rehabilitation trials, the psychological status of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators has been evaluated with anxiety and depression as outcome measures. In c....... In caring for these patients, the aim of nursing is to help patients manage life with complex heart disease. The early detection and management of negative emotional response might prevent the development of pathological conditions such as depression.......Serious illness will inevitably lead to a fundamental emotional reaction. Traditionally, in interventional treatment or rehabilitation trials, the psychological status of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators has been evaluated with anxiety and depression as outcome measures...

  2. A simple fast microwave-assisted synthesis of thermoelectric bismuth telluride nanoparticles from homogeneous reaction-mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Susmita; Das, Rashmita; Bhar, Radhaballabh; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2017-02-01

    A new simple chemical method for synthesis of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) has been developed by microwave assisted reduction of homogeneous tartrate complexes of bismuth and tellurium metal ions with hydrazine. The reaction is performed at pH 10. The nano-crystallites have rhombohedral phase identified by XRD. The size distribution of nanoparticle is narrow and it ranges between 50 to 70 nm. FESEM shows that the fine powders are composed of small crystallites. The TEM micrographs show mostly deformed spherical particles and the lattice fringes are found to be 0.137 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis shows the atomic composition ratio between bismuth and tellurium is 2:3. Thermoelectric properties of the materials are studied after sintering by spark plasma sintering method (SPS). The grain size of the material after sintering is in the nanometer range. The material shows enhanced Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity value at 300 K. The figure of merit is found to be 1.18 at 300 K.

  3. Essential corrections of interference reactions in the determination of protein contents of Nigeria foodstuffs using fast neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adesanmi, C.A.; Essiett, A.A.; Balogun, F.A. E-mail: fbalogun@oauife.edu.ng

    2003-06-01

    Using the {sup 14}N(n, zn){sup 13}N reaction, the protein contents of some Nigeria staple foods were estimated. The contribution of some elements in these foods such as Br, P, K and the recoil proton to the 511 KeV photopeak commonly used in this technique was investigated. While Br was found absent from the high carbohydrate foods such as the cassava tuber based 'gari', maize and rice, this element was shown to produce significant interference in broad beans and soya beans. The contribution of Br to the 511 Kev line in protein measurement in the latter set of food materials ranged between 12% and 62%. Proton recoil were found to be a significant source of interference in virtually all the food stuffs investigated. The result of protein contents using 14 MeV compared favourably, within experimental errors, with that of the wet kjeldahl method, except in the case of soya beans which indicates an underestimation of the contribution from the recoil proton.

  4. Essential corrections of interference reactions in the determination of protein contents of Nigeria foodstuffs using fast neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesanmi, C. A.; Essiett, A. A.; Balogun, F. A.

    2003-06-01

    Using the 14N(n, zn) 13N reaction, the protein contents of some Nigeria staple foods were estimated. The contribution of some elements in these foods such as Br, P, K and the recoil proton to the 511 KeV photopeak commonly used in this technique was investigated. While Br was found absent from the high carbohydrate foods such as the cassava tuber based "gari', maize and rice, this element was shown to produce significant interference in broad beans and soya beans. The contribution of Br to the 511 Kev line in protein measurement in the latter set of food materials ranged between 12% and 62%. Proton recoil were found to be a significant source of interference in virtually all the food stuffs investigated. The result of protein contents using 14 MeV compared favourably, within experimental errors, with that of the wet kjeldahl method, except in the case of soya beans which indicates an underestimation of the contribution from the recoil proton.

  5. Evaluation of a sodium-water reaction event caused by steam generator tubes break in the prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang June; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Kang, Seok Hun; Lee, Kwi Lim; Choi, Chi Woong; Lee, Seung Won; Yoo, Jin; Jeong, Jae Ho; Jeong, Tae Kyeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. This reactor uses sodium as a reactor coolant to transfer the core heat energy to the turbine. Sodium has chemical characteristics that allow it to violently react with materials such as a water or steam. When a sodium–water reaction (SWR) occurs due to leakage or breakage of steam generator tubes, high-pressure waves and corrosive reaction products are produced, which threaten the structural integrity of the components of the intermediate heat-transfer system (IHTS) and the safety of the primary heat-transfer system (PHTS). In the PGSFR, SWR events are included in the design-basis event. This event should be analyzed from the viewpoint of the integrities of the IHTS and fuel rods. To evaluate the integrity of the IHTS based on the consequences of the SWR, the behaviors of the generated high-pressure waves are analyzed at the major positions of a failed IHTS loop using a sodium–water advanced analysis method-II code. The integrity of the fuel rods must be consistently maintained below the safety acceptance criteria to avoid the consequences of the SWR. The integrity of the PHTS is evaluated using the multidimensional analysis of reactor safety-liquid metal reactor code to model the whole plant.

  6. Facial reactions in response to dynamic emotional stimuli in different modalities in patients suffering from schizophrenia: a behavioral and EMG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariateresa eSestito

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Emotional facial expression is an important low-level mechanism contributing to the experience of empathy, thereby lying at the core of social interaction. Schizophrenia is associated with pervasive social cognitive impairments, including emotional processing of facial expressions. In this study we test a novel paradigm in order to investigate the evaluation of the emotional content of perceived emotions presented through dynamic expressive stimuli, facial mimicry evoked by the same stimuli, and their functional relation. Fifteen healthy controls and 15 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia were presented with stimuli portraying positive (laugh, negative (cry and neutral (control emotional stimuli in visual, auditory modalities in isolation, and congruently or incongruently associated. Participants where requested to recognize and quantitatively rate the emotional value of the perceived stimuli, while electromyographic activity of Corrugator and Zygomaticus muscles was recorded. All participants correctly judged the perceived emotional stimuli and prioritized the visual over the auditory modality in identifying the emotion when they were incongruently associated (Audio-Video Incongruent condition. The neutral emotional stimuli did not evoke any muscle responses and were judged by all participants as emotionally neutral. Control group responded with rapid and congruent mimicry to emotional stimuli, and in Incongruent condition muscle responses were driven by what participants saw rather than by what they heard. Patient group showed a similar pattern only with respect to negative stimuli, whereas showed a lack of or a non-specific Zygomaticus response when positive stimuli were presented. Finally, we found that only patients with reduced facial mimicry (Internalizers judged both positive and negative emotions as significantly more neutral than controls. The relevance of these findings for studying emotional deficits in schizophrenia is discussed.

  7. Immediacy bias in emotion perception: current emotions seem more intense than previous emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Boven, Leaf; White, Katherine; Huber, Michaela

    2009-08-01

    People tend to perceive immediate emotions as more intense than previous emotions. This immediacy bias in emotion perception occurred for exposure to emotional but not neutral stimuli (Study 1), when emotional stimuli were separated by both shorter (2 s; Studies 1 and 2) and longer (20 min; Studies 3, 4, and 5) delays, and for emotional reactions to pictures (Studies 1 and 2), films (Studies 3 and 4), and descriptions of terrorist threats (Study 5). The immediacy bias may be partly caused by immediate emotion's salience, and by the greater availability of information about immediate compared with previous emotion. Consistent with emotional salience, when people experienced new emotions, they perceived previous emotions as less intense than they did initially (Studies 3 and 5)-a change in perception that did not occur when people did not experience a new immediate emotion (Study 2). Consistent with emotional availability, reminding people that information about emotions naturally decays from memory reduced the immediacy bias by making previous emotions seem more intense (Study 4). Discussed are implications for psychological theory and other judgments and behaviors.

  8. Cataract surgery: emotional reactions of patients with monocular versus binocular vision Cirurgia de catarata: aspectos emocionais de pacientes com visão monocular versus binocular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Ferrari Marback

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze emotional reactions related to cataract surgery in two groups of patients (monocular vision - Group 1; binocular vision - Group 2. METHODS: A transversal comparative study was performed using a structured questionnaire from a previous exploratory study before cataract surgery. RESULTS: 206 patients were enrolled in the study, 96 individuals in Group 1 (69.3 ± 10.4 years and 110 in Group 2 (68.2 ± 10.2 years. Most patients in group 1 (40.6% and 22.7% of group 2, reported fear of surgery (pOBJETIVO: Verificar reações emocionais relacionadas à cirurgia de catarata entre pacientes com visão monocular (Grupo 1 e binocular (Grupo 2. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo tranversal, comparativo por meio de um questionário estruturado respondido por pacientes antes da cirurgia de catarata. RESULTADOS: A amostra foi composta de 96 pacientes no Grupo 1 (69.3 ± 10.4 anos e 110 no Grupo 2 (68.2 ± 10.2 anos. Consideravam apresentar medo da cirugia 40.6% do Grupo 1 e 22.7% do Grupo 2 (p<0.001 e entre as principais causas do medo, a possibilidade de perda da visão, complicações cirúrgicas e a morte durante o procedimento foram apontadas. Os sentimentos mais comuns entre os dois grupos foram dúvidas a cerca dos resultados da cirurgia e o nervosismo diante do procedimento. CONCLUSÃO: Pacientes com visão monocular apresentaram mais medo e dúvidas relacionadas à cirurgia de catarata comparados com aqueles com visão binocular. Portanto, é necessário que os médicos considerem estas reações emocionais e invistam mais tempo para esclarecer os riscos e benefícios da cirurgia de catarata.

  9. Emotional reactions and positive responses to occupational stress by teachers of political theory%政治理论教员职业压力的情绪反应与积极应对

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席琴

    2012-01-01

    Through the investigations and interviews, it is found that teachers of political theory have to shoulder various stresses from teaching, research, career development and so on. Excessive occupational stress will lead to passive emotional reactions, affect teachers' career performance and health, and cause a series of problems like job burnout. This paper points out that teachers of political theory should deal with their emotional reactions resulting from occupational stress through effective emotional management and public support.%通过调查和访谈发现,政治理论教员承担着来自教学、科研、成长进步等各个方面的压力,过度的职业压力会引起消极的情绪反应,从而影响教员的教学效果、身心健康以及职业倦怠等一系列问题。政治理论教员应有效管理情绪和寻求社会支持来应对职业压力带来的情绪反应。

  10. Specific Reaction Patterns to Distinct Positive Emotional Cues Related to Incentive Motivation in Dependence of the Taq1A-Polymorphism: Molecular Genetic Associations of Early and Late Event-Related Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Aisha J L; Wielpuetz, Catrin; Osinsky, Roman; Müller, Erik M; Grant, Phillip; Hennig, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Early and late event-related potential (ERP) responses, representing early subconscious and late motivational processes, were recorded for positive emotional words related to 'wanting' and 'liking', in dependence of the dopamine-related Taq1A genotype (ANKK1/DRD2). Research suggests that 'wanting' as opposed to 'liking' is related to dopaminergic processes. Therefore, it was hypothesized that risk allele carriers of the Taq1A polymorphism exhibit late ERP changes in reaction to words representing incentive motivation, i.e. 'wanting' (word categories 'lust' and 'anticipation'), but not to words representing 'liking' ('closeness'). Seventy-two male participants performed an emotional-word Stroop task during EEG recording and were genotyped according to the Taq1A polymorphism of ANKK1/DRD2. Positive emotional words related to anticipation and lust revealed blunted responses in the late positive potential (LPP) in carriers of the A1 allele, an effect absent in response to 'liking'-related words. These differences were not evident in the earlier posterior negativity (EPN). As no differences in dependence of the Taq1A genotype were observed in reaction to 'wanting'- and 'liking'-related words in the EPN, but merely in the LPP, it can be assumed that incentive-motivational stimuli only modify motivation-related ERP responses in carriers of the A1 allele of the Taq1A polymorphism, indicating the role of dopamine in late ERP components. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Computer Scoring of Emotional Awareness in a Nonclinical Population of Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchard, Kimberly A; Picker, Caleb J

    2017-03-13

    The Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS; Lane, Quinlan, Schwartz, Walker, & Zeitlin, 1990 ) is an open-ended measure of the ability to describe emotional reactions. Scoring the LEAS by hand is complex and time consuming (Barchard, Bajgar, Leaf, & Lane, 2010 ). Therefore, Program for Open-Ended Scoring (POES; Leaf & Barchard, 2010 ) was designed to score the LEAS quickly and easily. Using 268 undergraduates, this article compares traditional LEAS hand scoring to 6 POES methods, 2 of which are holistic methods that have never before been examined. Based on split-half reliability, correlations with measures of emotional and social intelligence, and partial correlations once response length and vocabulary were partialed out, we recommend 3 of the POES methods when testing nonclinical samples of young adults. Because POES scoring is fast and efficient, it allows more researchers and clinicians to use the LEAS, thus moving away from self-report measures of emotional awareness.

  12. Hippocampal brain volume is associated with faster facial emotion identification in older adults: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Szymkowicz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fast correct identification of facial emotions is highly relevant for successful social interactions. Research suggests that older, compared to young, adults experience increased difficulty with face and emotion processing skills. While functional neuroimaging studies suggest age differences in neural processing of faces and emotions, evidence about age-associated structural brain changes and their involvement in face and emotion processing is scarce. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging, this study investigated the extent to which volumes of frontal and temporal brain structures were related to reaction time in accurate identification of facial emotions in 30 young and 30 older adults. Volumetric segmentation was performed using FreeSurfer and gray matter volumes from frontal and temporal regions were extracted. Analyses of covariance models with response time as the dependent variable and age group and regional volume, and their interaction, as independent variables were conducted, controlling for total intracranial volume. Results indicated that, in older adults, larger hippocampal volumes were associated with faster correct facial emotion identification. These preliminary observations suggest that greater volume in brain regions associated with face and emotion processing contributes to improved facial emotion identification performance in aging.

  13. Weather and emotional state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasova, Z.

    2010-09-01

    Introduction Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychic and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio-tonus, working ability and concentration, hence their significance in various domains of economic life, such as health care, education, transportation, tourism, etc. Data and methods The research has been made in Sofia City within a period of 8 months, using 5 psychological methods (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state (developed by Wessman and Ricks), Test for evaluation of moods and Test "Self-confidence - Activity - Mood" (developed by the specialists from the Military Academy in Saint Petersburg). The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions because of the purpose to include in the analysis a maximal number of meteorological elements. 16 weather types are defined in dependence of the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were considered as well. Results and discussions The results obtained by t-test show that the different categories of weather lead to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effect on human emotions but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as "unfavourable" has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension "neuroticism", has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more "protected" to the weather influence on their emotions

  14. Rejection elicits emotional reactions but neither causes immediate distress nor lowers self-esteem: a meta-analytic review of 192 studies on social exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhart, Ginette C; Nelson, Brian C; Knowles, Megan L; Baumeister, Roy F

    2009-11-01

    Competing predictions about the effect of social exclusion were tested by meta-analyzing findings from studies of interpersonal rejection, ostracism, and similar procedures. Rejection appears to cause a significant shift toward a more negative emotional state. Typically, however, the result was an emotionally neutral state marked by low levels of both positive and negative affect. Acceptance caused a slight increase in positive mood and a moderate increase in self-esteem. Self-esteem among rejected persons was no different from neutral controls. These findings are discussed in terms of belongingness motivation, sociometer theory, affective numbing, and self-esteem defenses.

  15. Personality and Emotion Regulation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esti Hayu Purnamaningsih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The emotions has many important functions in our life such as in relation of interpersonal communication, and health. In interpersonal communicative function aimed to signal to other information about internal state. Emotions manifests in specific cognitive, behavioural, and physiological reactions, thus closely related to health. There is wide variety of ways for individuals to regulate their emotion. In this regard, there are two kinds of emotion regulation strategy; first Antecedent-focused emotion regulation consisting of situation selection, situation modification, attentional deployment, cognitive change and second, Response-focused emotion regulation consisting of suppression. The purpose of this research is to investigate personality factors relate with emotion regulation strategies. 339 students from Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Gadjah Mada were participating in this study and given The Big Five Personality Factors (Ramdhani, 2012, adaptation, and the modified version of the Emotion Regulation Scale was used, Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (John & Gross, 2004 which measure personality and emotion regulation respectively. Using multiple regression analysis, the study indicated that personality predicts emotion regulation strategies.

  16. Emotion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiberg, Daniel; Elenius, Kjell; Burger, Susanne

    Studies of expressive speech have shown that discrete emotions such as anger, fear, joy, and sadness can be accurately communicated, also cross-culturally, and that each emotion is associated with reasonably specific acoustic characteristics [8]. However, most previous research has been conducted on acted emotions. These certainly have something in common with naturally occurring emotions but may also be more intense and prototypical than authentic, everyday expressions [6, 13]. Authentic emotions are, on the other hand, often a combination of different affective states and occur rather infrequently in everyday life.

  17. Effects of Low-Dose Sufentanil Preemptive Analgesia on Children′s Pain and Emotion after Fast-Channel Laparoscopic Surgery%小剂量舒芬太尼超前镇痛对小儿快通道腹腔镜术后疼痛及情绪的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓铸强; 林红; 钟海清; 卢少红; 程俭; 杨广生; 陈日胜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of low-dose sufentanil preemptive analgesia on children′s pain and emotion after fast-channel laparoscopic surgery .Methods Eighty children scheduled for fast-channel laparoscopic surgery were divided into two groups according to the random number table ,40 cases in each group .The observation group received intravenous injection of sulfentanil ( 0 .25 -0 .5 μg/kg ) 30 minutes before skin incision while the control group received equal volume of normal saline .Four,12 and 24 hours after operation ,the Wong-Banker FACES pain rating scale-revised ( FPS-R ) was used to assess the subjective analgesia effect , the pain observation scale for young children(POCIS) was used to assess objective analgesia effect ,and Ramsay scale was used to assess sedation effect.Results After operation,the FPS-R,POCIS and Ramsay scores decreased with increasing time in two groups (P<0.01),the FPS-R and POCIS scores in the observation group were lower than those in the control group (P<0.05), the Ramsay score in the observation group was higher than that in the control group (P<0.05).There were no significant adverse reactions in two groups .Conclusion Low-dose sufentanil preemptive analgesia applied to children undergoing fast-channel laparoscopic surgery can significantly alleviate postoperative pain ,stabilize the children′s emotion,and with high safety .%目的:观察小剂量舒芬太尼超前镇痛对小儿腹腔镜术后疼痛及情绪的影响。方法80例择期行快通道腹腔镜手术患儿按随机数字表分为两组,每组40例。切皮前30 min,观察组静脉注射舒芬太尼0.25~0.5μg/kg,对照组静脉注射相同容量的生理盐水。分别于术后4 h、12 h、24 h,用Wong-Banker面部表情量表法(FPS-R)评价主观镇痛效果,用儿童疼痛观察评分量表(POCIS)评价客观镇痛效果;用Ramsay法评价镇静效果。结果两者患儿术后镇痛效

  18. Time course of implicit processing and explicit processing of emotional faces and emotional words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühholz, Sascha; Jellinghaus, Anne; Herrmann, Manfred

    2011-05-01

    Facial expressions are important emotional stimuli during social interactions. Symbolic emotional cues, such as affective words, also convey information regarding emotions that is relevant for social communication. Various studies have demonstrated fast decoding of emotions from words, as was shown for faces, whereas others report a rather delayed decoding of information about emotions from words. Here, we introduced an implicit (color naming) and explicit task (emotion judgment) with facial expressions and words, both containing information about emotions, to directly compare the time course of emotion processing using event-related potentials (ERP). The data show that only negative faces affected task performance, resulting in increased error rates compared to neutral faces. Presentation of emotional faces resulted in a modulation of the N170, the EPN and the LPP components and these modulations were found during both the explicit and implicit tasks. Emotional words only affected the EPN during the explicit task, but a task-independent effect on the LPP was revealed. Finally, emotional faces modulated source activity in the extrastriate cortex underlying the generation of the N170, EPN and LPP components. Emotional words led to a modulation of source activity corresponding to the EPN and LPP, but they also affected the N170 source on the right hemisphere. These data show that facial expressions affect earlier stages of emotion processing compared to emotional words, but the emotional value of words may have been detected at early stages of emotional processing in the visual cortex, as was indicated by the extrastriate source activity.

  19. Emotions in robot psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsch, V; Popp, M

    2014-10-01

    In his famous thought experiments on synthetic vehicles, Valentino Braitenberg stipulated that simple stimulus-response reactions in an organism could evoke the appearance of complex behavior, which, to the unsuspecting human observer, may even appear to be driven by emotions such as fear, aggression, and even love (Braitenberg, Vehikel. Experimente mit künstlichen Wesen, Lit Verlag, 2004). In fact, humans appear to have a strong propensity to anthropomorphize, driven by our inherent desire for predictability that will quickly lead us to discern patterns, cause-and-effect relationships, and yes, emotions, in animated entities, be they natural or artificial. But might there be reasons, that we should intentionally "implement" emotions into artificial entities, such as robots? How would we proceed in creating robot emotions? And what, if any, are the ethical implications of creating "emotional" robots? The following article aims to shed some light on these questions with a multi-disciplinary review of recent empirical investigations into the various facets of emotions in robot psychology.

  20. Impact of emotional stability and attitude on consumption decisions under risk: the Coca-Cola crisis in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Wim; Van Kenhove, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    This article focuses on consumer reactions during and after the Coca-Cola crisis of June 1999 in Belgium. The research tests for associations between the personality trait "emotional stability," attitude toward the brand, and self-reported behavior. Cross-sectional data are collected from a sample of Coca-Cola drinkers between 19 and 22 years old. The data are analyzed through the specification and estimation of a structural equation model and ANOVA. A direct and positive effect of attitude toward the brand on the behavioral response is found. No direct effect of emotional stability on behavior is revealed. However, indirect effects of personality mediated by attitude are discovered. Further, emotional stability is found to correlate negatively with importance attached to information during the crisis. Fast and transparent communication with specific attention to lower emotional stability groups, as well as the inclusion of personality and attitude measurements in future health and food safety studies, are recommended.

  1. Emotional engineering

    CERN Document Server

    In an age of increasing complexity, diversification and change, customers expect services that cater to their needs and to their tastes. Emotional Engineering vol 2. describes how their expectations can be satisfied and managed throughout the product life cycle, if producers focus their attention more on emotion. Emotional engineering provides the means to integrate products to create a new social framework and develops services beyond product realization to create of value across a full lifetime.  14 chapters cover a wide range of topics that can be applied to product, process and industry development, with special attention paid to the increasing importance of sensing in the age of extensive and frequent changes, including: • Multisensory stimulation and user experience  • Physiological measurement • Tactile sensation • Emotional quality management • Mental model • Kansei engineering.   Emotional Engineering vol 2 builds on Dr Fukuda’s previous book, Emotional Engineering, and provides read...

  2. Extended Emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krueger, Joel; Szanto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, philosophers and psychologists conceived of emotions as brain- and body-bound affairs. But researchers have started to challenge this internalist and individualist orthodoxy. A rapidly growing body of work suggests that some emotions incorporate external resources and thus extend...... beyond the neurophysiological confines of organisms; some even argue that emotions can be socially extended and shared by multiple agents. Call this the extended emotions thesis (ExE). In this article, we consider different ways of understanding ExE in philosophy, psychology, and the cognitive sciences....... First, we outline the background of the debate and discuss different argumentative strategies for ExE. In particular, we distinguish ExE from cognate but more moderate claims about the embodied and situated nature of cognition and emotion (Section 1). We then dwell upon two dimensions of ExE: emotions...

  3. (How) do medical students regulate their emotions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulougeri, Karolina; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Montgomery, Anthony

    2016-12-12

    Medical training can be a challenging and emotionally intense period for medical students. However the emotions experienced by medical students in the face of challenging situations and the emotion regulation strategies they use remains relatively unexplored. The aim of the present study was to explore the emotions elicited by memorable incidents reported by medical students and the associated emotion regulation strategies. Peer interviewing was used to collect medical students' memorable incidents. Medical students at both preclinical and clinical stage of medical school were eligible to participate. In total 104 medical students provided memorable incidents. Only 54 narratives included references to emotions and emotion regulation and thus were further analyzed. The narratives of 47 clinical and 7 preclinical students were further analyzed for their references to emotions and emotion regulation strategies. Forty seven out of 54 incidents described a negative incident associated with negative emotions. The most frequently mentioned emotion was shock and surprise followed by feelings of embarrassment, sadness, anger and tension or anxiety. The most frequent reaction was inaction often associated with emotion regulation strategies such as distraction, focusing on a task, suppression of emotions and reappraisal. When students witnessed mistreatment or disrespect exhibited towards patients, the regulation strategy used involved focusing and comforting the patient. The present study sheds light on the strategies medical students use to deal with intense negative emotions. The vast majority reported inaction in the face of a challenging situation and the use of more subtle strategies to deal with the emotional impact of the incident.

  4. Wordsworthian Emotion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏

    2010-01-01

    As a great poet in British Romanticism.Wordsworth is not the practioner of an artistic craft designed tO satisfy "taste" of a literary connoisseur.He is,instead."a man speaking to men" with his uniqueness in emotion.This paper tempts to demonstrate how Wordsworth conveys emotion with poetic language.Wordsworthian "emotion recollected in tranquility" is simple,pure and genuine,which is the true art in wordsworth's poems.

  5. Individual Differences in Infants' Emotional Resonance to a Peer in Distress: Self-Other Awareness and Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geangu, Elena; Benga, Oana; Stahl, Daniel; Striano, Tricia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, relations between emotional resonance responses to another's distress, emotion regulation, and self-other discrimination were investigated in infants three-, six-, and nine-months-old. We measured the emotional reactions to the pain cry of a peer, along with the ability to regulate emotions and to discriminate between self and other…

  6. Photochemistry with fast sample renewal using cluster beams: formation of rare-gas halides in charge-transfer reactions in NF 3-doped rare-gas clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavizadeh, L.; von Haeften, K.; Museur, L.; Kanaev, A. V.; Castex, M. C.; von Pietrowski, R.; Möller, T.

    1999-05-01

    Charge transfer reactions in free clusters are observed in a photoluminescence study on doped rare-gas clusters (Rg clusters, Rg=Ar, Kr and Xe). Following photoexcitation into the first absorption bands of Rg clusters, fluorescence from free RgF* excimers ejected from the clusters and from Rg 2F* excimers localized in the interior of the clusters is observed. The results show that the reaction dynamics in clusters differs considerably from that in the gas and solid phase.

  7. Development and characterization of "push-pull" sampling device with fast reaction quenching coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for pharmaceutical process analytical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisolm, Claire N; Evans, Charles R; Jennings, Colin; Black, Will A; Antosz, Frederick J; Qiang, Yangqiao; Diaz, Angel R; Kennedy, Robert T

    2010-11-26

    A push-pull sampling system interfaced on-line to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for micro-volume real-time monitoring of reaction mixtures. The device consists of concentric tubes wherein sample was continuously withdrawn through the outer tube and reaction quenchant continuously delivered through a recessed inner tube. The device allowed sampling rates of 0.1-6.0 μL/min from a reaction vessel and stopped the reaction by passive mixing with quenchant to preserve the conditions observed in the reaction vessel. A finite element model of the system showed that reaction mixtures could be completely mixed with quenchant within 4.3s at a flow rate of 1.0 μL/min. The model also showed that an offset distance of 1mm between the push capillary and sample capillary tips is sufficient to avoid leakage of quenchant/diluent into the bulk sample for push flow rates up to 95% of the pull flow rate. The maximum relative push flow rate was determined to be 90% of the pull flow rate experimentally. Delay between sampling and delivery to the HPLC was from 111±3s to 317±9s for pull flow rates from 1.0 to 3.0 μL/min in agreement with expected delays based on tubing volume. Response times were from 27±1s to 52±6s over the same flow rate range. The sampler was tested to determine the effects of sample viscosity. The sampler was also used to demonstrate periodic sampling capabilities. As a test of the system, it was used to monitor the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of aspirin for 1.5h, demonstrating its utility for monitoring an ongoing reaction.

  8. Emotion and goal-directed behavior: ERP evidence on cognitive and emotional conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Artyom; Kanske, Philipp; Obermeier, Christian; Schröger, Erich; Kotz, Sonja A

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive control supports goal-directed behavior by resolving conflict among opposing action tendencies. Emotion can trigger cognitive control processes, thus speeding up conflict processing when the target dimension of stimuli is emotional. However, it is unclear what role emotionality of the target dimension plays in the processing of emotional conflict (e.g. in irony). In two EEG experiments, we compared the influence of emotional valence of the target (emotional, neutral) in cognitive and emotional conflict processing. To maximally approximate real-life communication, we used audiovisual stimuli. Participants either categorized spoken vowels (cognitive conflict) or their emotional valence (emotional conflict), while visual information was congruent or incongruent. Emotional target dimension facilitated both cognitive and emotional conflict processing, as shown in a reduced reaction time conflict effect. In contrast, the N100 in the event-related potentials showed a conflict-specific reversal: the conflict effect was larger for emotional compared with neutral trials in cognitive conflict and smaller in emotional conflict. Additionally, domain-general conflict effects were observed in the P200 and N200 responses. The current findings confirm that emotions have a strong influence on cognitive and emotional conflict processing. They also highlight the complexity and heterogeneity of the interaction of emotion with different types of conflict. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Emotional facial expression detection in the peripheral visual field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri J Bayle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In everyday life, signals of danger, such as aversive facial expressions, usually appear in the peripheral visual field. Although facial expression processing in central vision has been extensively studied, this processing in peripheral vision has been poorly studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using behavioral measures, we explored the human ability to detect fear and disgust vs. neutral expressions and compared it to the ability to discriminate between genders at eccentricities up to 40°. Responses were faster for the detection of emotion compared to gender. Emotion was detected from fearful faces up to 40° of eccentricity. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the human ability to detect facial expressions presented in the far periphery up to 40° of eccentricity. The increasing advantage of emotion compared to gender processing with increasing eccentricity might reflect a major implication of the magnocellular visual pathway in facial expression processing. This advantage may suggest that emotion detection, relative to gender identification, is less impacted by visual acuity and within-face crowding in the periphery. These results are consistent with specific and automatic processing of danger-related information, which may drive attention to those messages and allow for a fast behavioral reaction.

  10. Regulation of emotions in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Monika; Harvey, Martin; McGowan, John; Agrawal, Niruj

    2014-08-01

    Despite the long history of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), relatively little is known about the mechanisms that cause and maintain this condition. Emerging research evidence suggests that patients with PNES might have difficulties in regulating their emotions. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of these difficulties and the emotional responses of individuals with PNES. This study aimed to gain a detailed understanding of emotion regulation processes in patients with PNES by examining differences between patients with PNES and a healthy control group with regard to intensity of emotional reactions, understanding of one's emotional experience, beliefs about emotions, and managing emotions by controlling emotional expression. A cross-sectional design was used to compare the group with PNES (n=56) and the healthy control group (n=88) on a range of self-report measures. Participants with a diagnosis of PNES reported significantly poorer understanding of their emotions, more negative beliefs about emotions, and a greater tendency to control emotional expression compared to the control group. While intensity of emotions did not discriminate between the groups, poor understanding and negative beliefs about emotions were found to be significant predictors of PNES, even after controlling for age, education level, and emotional distress. Furthermore, the presence of some emotion regulation difficulties was associated with self-reported seizure severity. The results of this study are largely consistent with previous literature and provide evidence for difficulties in emotion regulation in patients with PNES. However, this research goes further in bringing together different aspects of emotion regulation, including beliefs about emotions, which have not been examined before. As far as it is known, this is the first study to suggest that levels of alexithymia in a population with PNES are positively associated with self-reported seizure severity. The

  11. Aging, Emotion, Attention, and Binding in the Taboo Stroop Task: Data and Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Donald G; Johnson, Laura W; Graham, Elizabeth R; Burke, Deborah M

    2015-10-14

    How does aging impact relations between emotion, memory, and attention? To address this question, young and older adults named the font colors of taboo and neutral words, some of which recurred in the same font color or screen location throughout two color-naming experiments. The results indicated longer color-naming response times (RTs) for taboo than neutral base-words (taboo Stroop interference); better incidental recognition of colors and locations consistently associated with taboo versus neutral words (taboo context-memory enhancement); and greater speed-up in color-naming RTs with repetition of color-consistent than color-inconsistent taboo words, but no analogous speed-up with repetition of location-consistent or location-inconsistent taboo words (the consistency type by repetition interaction for taboo words). All three phenomena remained constant with aging, consistent with the transmission deficit hypothesis and binding theory, where familiar emotional words trigger age-invariant reactions for prioritizing the binding of contextual features to the source of emotion. Binding theory also accurately predicted the interaction between consistency type and repetition for taboo words. However, one or more aspects of these phenomena failed to support the inhibition deficit hypothesis, resource capacity theory, or socio-emotional selectivity theory. We conclude that binding theory warrants further test in a range of paradigms, and that relations between aging and emotion, memory, and attention may depend on whether the task and stimuli trigger fast-reaction, involuntary binding processes, as in the taboo Stroop paradigm.

  12. Aging, Emotion, Attention, and Binding in the Taboo Stroop Task: Data and Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald G. MacKay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available How does aging impact relations between emotion, memory, and attention? To address this question, young and older adults named the font colors of taboo and neutral words, some of which recurred in the same font color or screen location throughout two color-naming experiments. The results indicated longer color-naming response times (RTs for taboo than neutral base-words (taboo Stroop interference; better incidental recognition of colors and locations consistently associated with taboo versus neutral words (taboo context-memory enhancement; and greater speed-up in color-naming RTs with repetition of color-consistent than color-inconsistent taboo words, but no analogous speed-up with repetition of location-consistent or location-inconsistent taboo words (the consistency type by repetition interaction for taboo words. All three phenomena remained constant with aging, consistent with the transmission deficit hypothesis and binding theory, where familiar emotional words trigger age-invariant reactions for prioritizing the binding of contextual features to the source of emotion. Binding theory also accurately predicted the interaction between consistency type and repetition for taboo words. However, one or more aspects of these phenomena failed to support the inhibition deficit hypothesis, resource capacity theory, or socio-emotional selectivity theory. We conclude that binding theory warrants further test in a range of paradigms, and that relations between aging and emotion, memory, and attention may depend on whether the task and stimuli trigger fast-reaction, involuntary binding processes, as in the taboo Stroop paradigm.

  13. Detection of aggressiveness in immature rats and study of partly modified passive avoidance reaction based on negative emotion according to Buresh method and neurochemical correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Nikolaishvili

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on these facts, noradrenalin must be considered the main endogenous inductor of aggressive behavior. It takes part in behavior genesis and at the same time it synthesis increasesright when aggressive behavior is essential in order to adapt to environmental factors. Thus Noradrenalin could be the stimulating factor for aggressive behavior , although we should note that specific aggressive agent is not discovered yet. And it seems that the component carrying only this function is not produced in organism. Hence, anatomical, behavioral and pharmacological studies showed, that CNS structures such as almond-shapes structure , hippocampus, prefrontal cortex influence on the decrease of memory based on negative emotions that was more shown in less aggressive animals, than is non-aggressive. We can conclude that the difference in both aggressive animals is very little than in non aggressive. That suggests the high quality of memory and consolidation of aggressive animal.

  14. The Role of Left Hemispheric Structures for Emotional Processing as a Monitor of Bodily Reaction and Felt Chill – a Case-Control Functional Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunkina, Viktoria; Holtz, Katharina; Klepzig, Kai; Neubert, Jörg; Horn, Ulrike; Domin, Martin; Hamm, Alfons O.; Lotze, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background: The particular function of the left anterior human insula on emotional arousal has been illustrated with several case studies. Only after left hemispheric insula lesions, patients lose their pleasure in habits such as listening to joyful music. In functional magnetic resonance imaging studies (fMRI) activation in the left anterior insula has been associated with both processing of emotional valence and arousal. Tight interactions with different areas of the prefrontal cortex are involved in bodily response monitoring and cognitive appraisal of a given stimulus. Therefore, a large left hemispheric lesion including the left insula should impair the bodily response of chill experience (objective chill response) but leave the cognitive aspects of chill processing (subjective chill response) unaffected. Methods: We investigated a patient (MC) with a complete left hemispheric media cerebral artery stroke, testing fMRI representation of pleasant (music) and unpleasant (harsh sounds) chill response. Results: Although chill response to both pleasant and unpleasant rated sounds was confirmed verbally at passages also rated as chilling by healthy participants, skin conductance response was almost absent in MC. For a healthy control (HC) objective and subjective chill response was positively associated. Bilateral prefrontal fMRI-response to chill stimuli was sustained in MC whereas insula activation restricted to the right hemisphere. Diffusion imaging together with lesion maps revealed that left lateral tracts were completely damaged but medial prefrontal structures were intact. Conclusion: With this case study we demonstrate how bodily response and cognitive appraisal are differentially participating in the internal monitor of chill response. PMID:28111546

  15. A new palladium precatalyst allows for the fast Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions of unstable polyfluorophenyl and 2-heteroaryl boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Tom; Zhang, Yong; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2010-10-13

    Boronic acids which quickly deboronate under basic conditions, such as polyfluorophenylboronic acid and five-membered 2-heteroaromatic boronic acids, are especially challenging coupling partners for Suzuki-Miyaura reactions. Nevertheless, being able to use these substrates is highly desirable for a number of applications. Having found that monodentate biarylphosphine ligands can promote these coupling processes, we developed a precatalyst that forms the catalytically active species under conditions where boronic acid decomposition is slow. With this precatalyst, Suzuki-Miyaura reactions of a wide range of (hetero)aryl chlorides, bromides, and triflates with polyfluorophenyl, 2-furan, 2-thiophene, and 2-pyrroleboronic acids and their analogues proceed at room temperature or 40 °C in short reaction times to give the desired products in excellent yields.

  16. Measurement of the $^{232}$Th (n, $\\gamma$ )/$^{58}$Ni (n, p) reaction rate ratio in the leakage neutron field of CFBR-II fast burst reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Wang; Zihui, Ai; Chun, Zheng; Jian, Gong

    2016-01-01

    A ThO$_{2}$ sample with a nickel activation foil attached was irradiated in the leakage neutron field of CFBR-II reactor. The activities of the active products were measured after irradiation to obtain the reaction rates. The normalized reaction rates were also calculated based on the ENDF/B-VII.1, CENDL-3.1, JENDL-4.0, BROND-2.2 databases. The experimental reaction rate ratio is 4.37 with an uncertainty of 3.9\\% which is coincident with the ratios calculated based on the ENDFB-VII. 1, JENDL-4.0, BROND-2.2 databases, but is 11.2\\% larger than that based on CENDL-3.1 database.

  17. Sleep and the processing of emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Gaétane; Gilson, Médhi; Peigneux, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    How emotions interact with cognitive processes has been a topic of growing interest in the last decades, as well as studies investigating the role of sleep in cognition. We review here evidence showing that sleep and emotions entertain privileged relationships. The literature indicates that exposure to stressful and emotional experiences can induce changes in the post-exposure sleep architecture, whereas emotional disturbances are likely to develop following sleep alterations. In addition, post-training sleep appears particularly beneficial for the consolidation of intrinsically emotional memories, suggesting that emotions modulate the off-line brain activity patterns subtending memory consolidation processes. Conversely, sleep contributes unbinding core memories from their affective blanket and removing the latter, eventually participating to habituation processes and reducing aversive reactions to stressful stimuli. Taken together, these data suggest that sleep plays an important role in the regulation and processing of emotions, which highlight its crucial influence on human's abilities to manage and respond to emotional information.

  18. Emotional Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming; Christensen, Sverre Riis; Lundsteen, Steen

    2007-01-01

    Recent neurological research has pointed to the importance of fundamental emotional processes for most kinds of human behaviour. Measures of emotional response tendencies towards brands seem to reveal intangible aspects of brand equity, particularly in a marketing context. In this paper a procedure...... for estimating such emotional brand equity is presented and findings from two successive studies of more than 100 brands are reported. It demonstrates how changes that occur between two years are explainable in terms of factors identifiable in the markets, and that the measures otherwise are stable over time...

  19. Maternal emotion socialization differentially predicts third-grade children's emotion regulation and lability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Megan L; Halberstadt, Amy G; Castro, Vanessa L; MacCormack, Jennifer K; Garrett-Peters, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    Numerous parental emotion socialization factors have been implicated as direct and indirect contributors to the development of children's emotional competence. To date, however, no study has combined parents' emotion-related beliefs, behaviors, and regulation strategies in one model to assess their cumulative-as well as unique-contributions to children's emotion regulation. We considered the 2 components that have recently been distinguished: emotion regulation and emotional lability. We predicted that mothers' beliefs about the value of and contempt for children's emotions, mothers' supportive and nonsupportive reactions to their children's emotions, as well as mothers' use of cognitive reappraisal and suppression of their own emotions would each contribute unique variance to their children's emotion regulation and lability, as assessed by children's teachers. The study sample consisted of an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse group of 165 mothers and their third-grade children. Different patterns emerged for regulation and lability: Controlling for family income, child gender, and ethnicity, only mothers' lack of suppression as a regulatory strategy predicted greater emotion regulation in children, whereas mothers' valuing of children's emotions, mothers' lack of contempt for children's emotions, mothers' use of cognitive reappraisal to reinterpret events, and mothers' lack of emotional suppression predicted less lability in children. These findings support the divergence of emotion regulation and lability as constructs and indicate that, during middle childhood, children's lability may be substantially and uniquely affected by multiple forms of parental socialization.

  20. Emotional collectives: How groups shape emotions and emotions shape groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Gerben A; Fischer, Agneta H

    2016-01-01

    Group settings are epicentres of emotional activity. Yet, the role of emotions in groups is poorly understood. How do group-level phenomena shape group members' emotional experience and expression? How are emotional expressions recognised, interpreted and shared in group settings? And how do such expressions influence the emotions, cognitions and behaviours of fellow group members and outside observers? To answer these and other questions, we draw on relevant theoretical perspectives (e.g., intergroup emotions theory, social appraisal theory and emotions as social information theory) and recent empirical findings regarding the role of emotions in groups. We organise our review according to two overarching themes: how groups shape emotions and how emotions shape groups. We show how novel empirical approaches break important new ground in uncovering the role of emotions in groups. Research on emotional collectives is thriving and constitutes a key to understanding the social nature of emotions.

  1. Emotional Development of Autistic Child in the Family

    OpenAIRE

    BARBARA WINCZURA

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed in population of children with an autism spectrum a big diversity of emotional disorders symptoms – both as a quality diversity and as substantial diversity in strain. The most important symptoms of the disorder are considered to be: lack of ability of expressing and communicating the emotions, lack of ability of emotional signals perception, not understanding and lack of correct reaction for others emotions, oblivion of emotions and expectances of other pe...

  2. Self-related awareness and emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Uwe; Kaffenberger, Tina; Jäncke, Lutz; Brühl, Annette B

    2010-04-01

    The regulation of emotions is an ongoing internal process and often a challenge. Current related neural models concern the intended control of reactions towards external events, mediated by prefrontal cortex regions upon basal emotion processing as in the amygdala. Cognitive strategies to regulate emotions in the context of affective disorders or stress reduction, increasingly applied in clinical practice, are also related to mindfulness techniques. We questioned their effects on neural emotion processing and investigated brain activity during purely internal mental self-referential processes of making current emotions and self-related cognitions aware. Thirty healthy subjects performed a task comprising periods of cognitive self-reflection, of introspection for actual own emotions and feelings, and of a neutral condition, while they were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Brain activations of twenty-seven subjects during emotion-introspection and self-reflection, and also a conjunction of both, were compared with the neutral condition. The conditions of self-reflection and emotion-introspection showed distinguishable activations in medial and ventrolateral prefrontal areas, in parietal regions and in the amygdala. Notably, amygdala activity decreased during emotion-introspection and increased compared to 'neutral' during self-reflection. The results indicate that already the self-referential mental state of making the actual emotional state aware is capable of attenuating emotional arousal. This extends current theories of emotion regulation and has implications for the application of mindfulness techniques as a component of psychotherapeutic strategies in affective disorders and also for possible everyday emotion regulation.

  3. Intellectual emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilyev, Igor A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the laboratory of O.K. Tikhomirov, the phenomenon of the acute emotional regulation of productive thinking was justified. This regulation is realized by means of the elaboration of the axiological profile of cognition. The following definition of intellectual emotions can be given: intellectual emotions are the appraisals of specific cognitive objects — contradictions, assumptions, probabilities, and the intermediate and final results of operations. The main aspect of the method used in the research consisted of the synchronous registration of an external (tactile elaboration of problems, skin galvanic response and verbal utterances regarding tasks to be completed in a game of chess. The principle position in Tikhomirov`s group is the following: intellectual emotions represent not only the energetic resource or catalysts for the thinking process, but also the determinants of its structure.

  4. Emotional Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skills, and increase self-awareness, self-control, and self-esteem. A large body of research exists regarding methods ... not. Back to top Other Considerations Children and adolescents with an emotional disturbance should receive services based ...

  5. Emotion-oriented systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pelachaud, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The Affective Computing domain, term coined by Rosalind Picard in 1997, gathers several scientific areas such as computer science, cognitive science, psychology, design and art. The humane-machine interaction systems are no longer solely fast and efficient. They aim to offer to users affective experiences: user's affective state is detected and considered within the interaction; the system displays affective state; it can reason about their implication to achieve a task or resolve a problem. In this book, we have chosen to cover various domains of research in emotion-oriented systems. Our aim

  6. Patterns of emotion-specific appraisal, coping, and cardiovascular reactivity during an ongoing emotional episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrald, Mary M; Tomaka, Joe

    2002-08-01

    The authors examined emotion-specific patterns of appraisal, coping, and cardiovascular reactivity during real ongoing emotional episodes. In this study, 109 participants performed a neutral opinion-expression task, where a confederate elicited anger, shame, or pride using verbal and nonverbal behavior. The authors assessed cognitive appraisals, emotional reactions, coping, outcomes (state self-esteem and outcome satisfaction), and cardiovascular reactivity. Results indicated substantial and theoretically consistent differences between the 3 emotions (and differences from a nonemotion condition) for cognitive appraisals, self-reported coping, behavioral coping, self-esteem, and cardiovascular reactivity. The results are discussed in relation to their implications for emotion theory and for psychological and physical health. Overall, the results suggest that researchers can study emotion-related issues using authentic emotional reactions.

  7. Language and emotions: emotional Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2009-01-01

    An emotional version of Sapir-Whorf hypothesis suggests that differences in language emotionalities influence differences among cultures no less than conceptual differences. Conceptual contents of languages and cultures to significant extent are determined by words and their semantic differences; these could be borrowed among languages and exchanged among cultures. Emotional differences, as suggested in the paper, are related to grammar and mostly cannot be borrowed. The paper considers conceptual and emotional mechanisms of language along with their role in the mind and cultural evolution. Language evolution from primordial undifferentiated animal cries is discussed: while conceptual contents increase, emotional reduced. Neural mechanisms of these processes are suggested as well as their mathematical models: the knowledge instinct, the dual model connecting language and cognition, neural modeling fields. Mathematical results are related to cognitive science, linguistics, and psychology. Experimental evidence and theoretical arguments are discussed. Dynamics of the hierarchy-heterarchy of human minds and cultures is formulated using mean-field approach and approximate equations are obtained. The knowledge instinct operating in the mind heterarchy leads to mechanisms of differentiation and synthesis determining ontological development and cultural evolution. These mathematical models identify three types of cultures: "conceptual" pragmatic cultures in which emotionality of language is reduced and differentiation overtakes synthesis resulting in fast evolution at the price of uncertainty of values, self doubts, and internal crises; "traditional-emotional" cultures where differentiation lags behind synthesis, resulting in cultural stability at the price of stagnation; and "multi-cultural" societies combining fast cultural evolution and stability. Unsolved problems and future theoretical and experimental directions are discussed.

  8. Fast-neutron induced pre-equilibrium reactions on 55Mn and 63,65Cu at energies up to 40 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Avrigeanu, M; Filatenkov, A A; Forrest, R A; Herman, M; Köning, A J; Plompen, A J M; Roman, F L; Avrigeanu, V

    2007-01-01

    Excitation functions were measured for the $^{55}$Mn(n,2n)$^{54}$Mn, $^{55}$Mn(n,$\\alpha$)$^{52}$V, $^{63}$Cu(n,$\\alpha$)$^{60}$Co, $^{65}$Cu(n,2n)$^{64}$Cu, and $^{65}$Cu(n,p)$^{65}$Ni reactions from 13.47 to 14.83 MeV. The experimental cross sections are compared with the results of calculations including all activation channels for the stable isotopes of Mn and Cu, for neutron incident energies up to 50 MeV. Within the energy range up to 20 MeV the model calculations are most sensitive to the parameters related to nuclei in the early stages of the reaction, while the model assumptions are better established by analysis of the data in the energy range 20-40 MeV. While the present analysis has taken advantage of both a new set of accurate measured cross sections around 14 MeV and the larger data basis fortunately available between 20 and 40 MeV for the Mn and Cu isotopes, the need of additional measurements below as well as above 40 MeV is pointed out. Keywords: 55Mn, 63,65Cu, E$\\leq$40 MeV, Neutron activati...

  9. Influence of reaction conditions and the char separation system on the production of bio-oil from radiata pine sawdust by fast pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Ju; Park, Young-Kwon; Kim, Joo Sik [Faculty of Environmental Engineering, University of Seoul, 90 Jeonnong-Dong, Dondaemun-Gu, Seoul 130-743 (Korea)

    2008-08-15

    Radiata pine sawdust was pyrolyzed in a bubbling fluidized bed equipped with a char separation system. The influence of the reaction conditions on the production of bio-oil was investigated through the establishment of mass balance, and the examination of the products' chemical and physical characteristics. The optimal reaction temperature for the production of bio-oil was between 673 and 723 K, and the yield was above 50 wt.% of the product. An optimal feed size also existed. In a particle with a size that was less than 0.3 mm, the bio-oil yield decreased due to overheating, which led to gas formation. A higher flow rate and feeding rate were found to be more effective for the production of bio-oil, but did not significantly affect it. The main compounds of bio-oil were phenolics, including cresol, guaiacol, eugenol, benzendiol and their derivatives, ketones, and aldehydes. In addition, high-quality bio-oils, which contained less than 0.005 wt.% of solid, no ash and low concentrations of alkali and alkaline earth metals, were produced due to the char removal system. (author)

  10. Fast quantitative analysis of boric acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with a simple and selective derivatization reaction using triethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li-Min; Wang, Hao-Yang; Guo, Yin-Long

    2010-03-01

    A fast, selective, and sensitive GC-MS method has been developed and validated for the determination of boric acid in the drinking water by derivatization with triethanolamine. This analytic strategy successfully converts the inorganic, nonvolatile boric acid B(OH)(3) present in the drinking water to a volatile triethanolamine borate B(OCH(2)CH(2))(3)N in a quantitative manner, which facilitates the GC measurement. The SIM mode was applied in the analysis and showed high accuracy, specificity, and reproducibility, as well as reducing the matrix effect effectively. The calibration curve was obtained from 0.01 microg/mL to 10.0 microg/mL with a satisfactory correlation coefficient of 0.9988. The limit of detection for boric acid was 0.04 microg/L. Then the method was applied for detection of the amount of boric acid in bottled drinking water and the results are in accordance with the reported concentration value of boric acid. This study offers a perspective into the utility of GC-MS as an alternate quantitative tool for detection of B(OH)(3), even for detection of boron in various other samples by digesting the boron compounds to boric acid. Copyright 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mother’s Emotional and Posttraumatic Reactions after a Preterm Birth: The Mother-Infant Interaction Is at Stake 12 Months after Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Anne-Cécile; Eutrope, Julien; Thierry, Aurore; Bednarek, Nathalie; Aupetit, Laurence; Saad, Stéphanie; Vulliez, Lauriane; Sibertin-Blanc, Daniel; Nezelof, Sylvie; Rolland, Anne-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Very preterm infants are known to be at risk of developmental disabilities and behavioural disorders. This condition is supposed to alter mother-infant interactions. Here we hypothesize that the parental coping with the very preterm birth may greatly influence mother-infant interactions. Methods 100 dyads were included in 3 university hospitals in France. Preterm babies at higher risk of neurodevelopmental sequelae (PRI>10) were excluded to target the maternal determinants of mother-infant interaction. We report the follow-up of this cohort during 1 year after very preterm birth, with regular assessment of infant somatic state, mother psychological state and the assessment of mother-infant interaction at 12 months by validated scales (mPPQ, HADS, EPDS, PRI, DDST and PIPE). Results We show that the intensity of post-traumatic reaction of the mother 6 months after birth is negatively correlated with the quality of mother-infant interaction at 12 months. Moreover, the anxious and depressive symptoms of the mother 6 and 12 months after birth are also correlated with the quality of mother-infant interaction at 12 months. By contrast, this interaction is not influenced by the initial affective state of the mother in the 2 weeks following birth. In this particular population of infants at low risk of sequelae, we also show that the quality of mother-infant interaction is not correlated with the assessment of the infant in the neonatal period but is correlated with the fine motor skills of the baby 12 months after birth. Conclusions This study suggests that mothers’ psychological condition has to be monitored during the first year of very preterm infants’ follow-up. It also suggests that parental interventions have to be proposed when a post-traumatic, anxious or depressive reaction is suspected. PMID:27022953

  12. It's a bittersweet symphony: simultaneously mixed emotional responses to music with conflicting cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jeff T; Stastny, Bradley J

    2011-12-01

    Some evidence indicates that emotional reactions to music can be organized along a bipolar valence dimension ranging from pleasant states (e.g., happiness) to unpleasant states (e.g., sadness), but songs can contain some cues that elicit happiness (e.g., fast tempos) and others that elicit sadness (e.g., minor modes). Some models of emotion contend that valence is a basic building block of emotional experience, which implies that songs with conflicting cues cannot make people feel happy and sad at the same time. Other models contend that positivity and negativity are separable in experience, which implies that music with conflicting cues might elicit simultaneously mixed emotions of happiness and sadness. Hunter, Schellenberg, and Schimmack (2008) tested these possibilities by having subjects report their happiness and sadness after listening to music with conflicting cues (e.g., fast songs in minor modes) and consistent cues (e.g., fast songs in major modes). Results indicated that music with conflicting cues elicited mixed emotions, but it remains unclear whether subjects simultaneously felt happy and sad or merely vacillated between happiness and sadness. To examine these possibilities, we had subjects press one button whenever they felt happy and another button whenever they felt sad as they listened to songs with conflicting and consistent cues. Results revealed that subjects spent more time simultaneously pressing both buttons during songs with conflicting, as opposed to consistent, cues. These findings indicate that songs with conflicting cues can simultaneously elicit happiness and sadness and that positivity and negativity are separable in experience.

  13. Emotionally Speaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Murphy, Kristin Marie

    In this presentation, we demonstrate how qualitative methods help us to explore barriers and facilitators to teacher emotional well-being in school settings serving students identified as being at-risk in the US and Denmark. Through a hermeneutical lens (Gadamer, 2004) and collective narrative (R......, and their relationships with colleagues and students? Finally, what can the two groups of teachers learn from each others_ experiences?......In this presentation, we demonstrate how qualitative methods help us to explore barriers and facilitators to teacher emotional well-being in school settings serving students identified as being at-risk in the US and Denmark. Through a hermeneutical lens (Gadamer, 2004) and collective narrative...... (Richardson, 1987), we begin by identifying each country_s educational model, teacher preparation and teacher support for serving at-risk students. Next, we explore the experience of teachers working with students defined as being at-risk. Inspired by the concept of emotional labor (Hochschild, 1983) we...

  14. Gamma-ray fast-timing coincidence measurements from the {sup 18}O+{sup 18}O fusion-evaporation reaction using a mixed LaBr{sub 3}-HPGe array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alharbi, T., E-mail: t.alharbi@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Almajmaah University, P.O. Box 66, 11952 (Saudi Arabia); Mason, P.J.R.; Regan, P.H.; Podolyak, Zs. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Marginean, N. [Horia Hulubei-National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); Nakhostin, M.; Bowry, M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Deleanu, D.; Filipescu, D.; Glodariu, T.; Ghita, D.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L. [Horia Hulubei-National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania)

    2012-07-15

    We report on a gamma-ray coincidence analysis using a mixed array of hyperpure germanium and cerium-doped lanthanum tri-bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce) scintillation detectors to study nuclear electromagnetic transition rates in the pico-to-nanosecond time regime in {sup 33,34}P and {sup 33}S following fusion-evaporation reactions between an {sup 18}O beam and an isotopically enriched {sup 18}O implanted tantalum target. Energies from decay gamma-rays associated with the reaction residues were measured in event-by-event coincidence mode, with the measured time difference information between the pairs of gamma-rays in each event also recorded using the ultra-fast coincidence timing technique. The experiment used the good full-energy peak resolution of the LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detectors coupled with their excellent timing responses in order to determine the excited state lifetime associated with the lowest lying, cross-shell, I{sup {pi}=}4{sup -} 'intruder' state previously reported in the N=19 isotone {sup 34}P. The extracted lifetime is consistent with a mainly single-particle M2 multipolarity associated with a f{sub 7/2}{yields}d{sub 5/2} single particle transition. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Half-life measurements of nuclear states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using fast-timing properties of (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce) scintillator detectors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce) scintillation detectors have an excellent timing resolution.

  15. Cultural differences in hedonic emotion regulation after a negative event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuri; Ma, Xiaoming; Petermann, Amelia G

    2014-08-01

    Beliefs about emotions can influence how people regulate their emotions. The present research examined whether Eastern dialectical beliefs about negative emotions lead to cultural differences in how people regulate their emotions after experiencing a negative event. We hypothesized that, because of dialectical beliefs about negative emotions prevalent in Eastern culture, Easterners are less motivated than Westerners to engage in hedonic emotion regulation-up-regulation of positive emotions and down-regulation of negative emotions. By assessing online reactions to a recent negative event, Study 1 found that European Americans are more motivated to engage in hedonic emotion regulation. Furthermore, consistent with the reported motivation to regulate emotion hedonically, European Americans show a steeper decline in negative emotions 1 day later than do Asians. By examining retrospective memory of reactions to a past negative event, Study 2 further showed that cultural differences in hedonic emotion regulation are mediated by cultural differences in dialectical beliefs about motivational and cognitive utility of negative emotions, but not by personal deservingness or self-efficacy beliefs. These findings demonstrate the role of cultural beliefs in shaping emotion regulation and emotional experiences.

  16. Emotion Talk: Helping Caregivers Facilitate Emotion Understanding and Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on two aspects of emotional intelligence, emotion understanding and emotion regulation. These abilities are important because of their impact on social communication and the way in which they influence a child's access to knowledge. Caregivers who engage their children in emotion talk may strengthen the ability of their…

  17. Emotional collectives : How groups shape emotions and emotions shape groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kleef, G.A.; Fischer, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Group settings are epicentres of emotional activity. Yet, the role of emotions in groups is poorly understood. How do group-level phenomena shape group members’ emotional experience and expression? How are emotional expressions recognised, interpreted and shared in group settings? And how do such ex

  18. Fast capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence analysis of ligase chain reaction products: human mitochondrial DNA point mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, J; Williams, P M; Williams, S J; Brown, M D; Wallace, D C; Karger, B L

    1996-12-01

    High speed capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) has been used to separate and detect point mutations using the ligase chain reaction (LCR). The method utilizes short capillary columns (7.5 cm effective length) and fields of 400 V/cm to analyze DNA-ethidium bromide complexes using an He/Ne laser. The method was first demonstrated with a commercially available kit for LCR based on a lacI gene fragment inserted in a Bluescript II phagemid. LCR-CE-LIF was then applied to detect point mutations in human mitochondrial DNA, resulting in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Three severe mutations were analyzed in which the original base is substituted by a thymidine base at positions 3460, 11778 and 14459. Appropriate primers were designed with polyT tails for length discrimination of pooled samples. Successful detection of mutated samples was achieved, with appropriate correction for small amounts of nonspecific ligated product. The method is rapid, easy to implement, and automatable.

  19. [What is an emotion? An introduction to the study of emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouesné, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Human emotions are hypothetic constructs based on psychological and physiological data. According to the psychoevolutionnist theories, all emotions derive from a set of discrete basic emotions, common to human and animals, genetically determined. Basic emotions are thus considered as physiological processes based on specific neuronal circuits. On the contrary, for appraisal and social theories, emotions are psychological processes resulting from the cognitive appraisal of the stimulus-event for the well-being and objectives of the subject, and are of social origin. They develop during life, especially in childhood, from interactions between the individual and his environement. According to the appraisal or constructivist theories, no sharp distinction is to be made between emotions and other manifestations of the affective life. Emotions require the global functioning of the brain, even if more specialized regions are involved. They play a fundamental role in the development of the child's psychological and social life. They mediate the subject's response to the stimulus-event, allowing more appropriate reactions than fixed instinctive ones. Nevertheless, the adaptative function of every emotion or their every component can be questioned. Emotional disturbances are major consequences of psychiatric or neurological disorders. The link between the results of neuropsychological studies of emotions based on the recognition of emotional facal expression according to the basic emotion theory, and the emotional disturbances experienced in daily life is highly questionable on account of the high complexity of human affective life.

  20. Consequences of emotional stimuli: age differences on pure and mixed blocks of the emotional Stroop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swick Diane

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of aging and emotion suggest that older adults show diminished responsiveness to negative information, possibly resulting from increased emotion regulation, but the mechanisms accounting for this effect are uncertain. Methods To examine whether aging affects the allocation of attention to negative stimuli, we compared 20 younger and 20 older adults on 2 versions of the emotional Stroop task: "pure blocks," in which all words in each block were either emotional or neutral, and "mixed blocks," a pseudorandomized design in which either a negative emotional or a neutral category word was always followed by six neutral words. The emotional Stroop task typically elicits slower reaction times for naming the font color of negative emotional words compared to neutral, but no studies have examined the effects of aging on the immediate and sustained components of the emotional Stroop effect. Results Both groups showed an emotional Stroop effect on pure blocks manifest as slower RTs on the emotional, relative to the neutral, block. However, only younger adults showed persistent slowing that carried over from emotional words onto subsequent neutral words in mixed blocks. Conclusion These results suggest that the consequences of emotional stimuli may differ with age. Younger and older adults showed equivalent interference from the emotional words themselves, but older adults did not show a sustained effect of negative information.

  1. Priming Macho Attitudes and Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Erik D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated the effects of reading one of four priming stimuli stories (control, consenting sex, rape, or family) on males' evaluations of, and emotional reactions to, two videotaped date-rape scenarios. Results supported the concepts of a macho personality and revealed interactive effects for both the rape and family prime. (RJM)

  2. Moral Emotions during Military Deployments of Dutch Forces: A Qualitative Study on Moral Emotions in Intercultural Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, M; de Graaff, Miriam; Verweij, D.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Which emotions are generated by the behavior of “the other” in intercultural interactions that Dutch soldiers perceive as conflicting with their own values? How are these emotions related to types of behavioral reactions of Dutch military personnel? This preliminary study explores the emotional and

  3. Moral Emotions during Military Deployments of Dutch Forces. A Qualitative Study on Moral Emotions in Intercultural Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, M.; Graaff, M.D. de; Verweij, D.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Which emotions are generated by the behavior of “the other” in intercultural interactions that Dutch soldiers perceive as conflicting with their own values? How are these emotions related to types of behavioral reactions of Dutch military personnel? This preliminary study explores the emotional and

  4. From everyday emotions to aesthetic emotions: towards a unified theory of musical emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juslin, Patrik N

    2013-09-01

    The sound of music may arouse profound emotions in listeners. But such experiences seem to involve a 'paradox', namely that music--an abstract form of art, which appears removed from our concerns in everyday life--can arouse emotions - biologically evolved reactions related to human survival. How are these (seemingly) non-commensurable phenomena linked together? Key is to understand the processes through which sounds are imbued with meaning. It can be argued that the survival of our ancient ancestors depended on their ability to detect patterns in sounds, derive meaning from them, and adjust their behavior accordingly. Such an ecological perspective on sound and emotion forms the basis of a recent multi-level framework that aims to explain emotional responses to music in terms of a large set of psychological mechanisms. The goal of this review is to offer an updated and expanded version of the framework that can explain both 'everyday emotions' and 'aesthetic emotions'. The revised framework--referred to as BRECVEMA--includes eight mechanisms: Brain Stem Reflex, Rhythmic Entrainment, Evaluative Conditioning, Contagion, Visual Imagery, Episodic Memory, Musical Expectancy, and Aesthetic Judgment. In this review, it is argued that all of the above mechanisms may be directed at information that occurs in a 'musical event' (i.e., a specific constellation of music, listener, and context). Of particular significance is the addition of a mechanism corresponding to aesthetic judgments of the music, to better account for typical 'appreciation emotions' such as admiration and awe. Relationships between aesthetic judgments and other mechanisms are reviewed based on the revised framework. It is suggested that the framework may contribute to a long-needed reconciliation between previous approaches that have conceptualized music listeners' responses in terms of either 'everyday emotions' or 'aesthetic emotions'.

  5. Emotions in Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampe, Debra; Quoidbach, Jordi; Taquet, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research establishing the causes and consequences of emotions in the laboratory, we know surprisingly little about emotions in everyday life. We developed a smartphone application that monitored real-time emotions of an exceptionally large (N = 11,000+) and heterogeneous participants sample. People's everyday life seems profoundly emotional: participants experienced at least one emotion 90% of the time. The most frequent emotion was joy, followed by love and anxiety. People experienced positive emotions 2.5 times more often than negative emotions, but also experienced positive and negative emotions simultaneously relatively frequently. We also characterized the interconnections between people's emotions using network analysis. This novel approach to emotion research suggests that specific emotions can fall into the following categories 1) connector emotions (e.g., joy), which stimulate same valence emotions while inhibiting opposite valence emotions, 2) provincial emotions (e.g., gratitude), which stimulate same valence emotions only, or 3) distal emotions (e.g., embarrassment), which have little interaction with other emotions and are typically experienced in isolation. Providing both basic foundations and novel tools to the study of emotions in everyday life, these findings demonstrate that emotions are ubiquitous to life and can exist together and distinctly, which has important implications for both emotional interventions and theory.

  6. Emotions in Everyday Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Trampe

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research establishing the causes and consequences of emotions in the laboratory, we know surprisingly little about emotions in everyday life. We developed a smartphone application that monitored real-time emotions of an exceptionally large (N = 11,000+ and heterogeneous participants sample. People's everyday life seems profoundly emotional: participants experienced at least one emotion 90% of the time. The most frequent emotion was joy, followed by love and anxiety. People experienced positive emotions 2.5 times more often than negative emotions, but also experienced positive and negative emotions simultaneously relatively frequently. We also characterized the interconnections between people's emotions using network analysis. This novel approach to emotion research suggests that specific emotions can fall into the following categories 1 connector emotions (e.g., joy, which stimulate same valence emotions while inhibiting opposite valence emotions, 2 provincial emotions (e.g., gratitude, which stimulate same valence emotions only, or 3 distal emotions (e.g., embarrassment, which have little interaction with other emotions and are typically experienced in isolation. Providing both basic foundations and novel tools to the study of emotions in everyday life, these findings demonstrate that emotions are ubiquitous to life and can exist together and distinctly, which has important implications for both emotional interventions and theory.

  7. Emotion models for textual emotion classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, O.; Avetisyan, H.; Holub, J.

    2016-11-01

    This paper deals with textual emotion classification which gained attention in recent years. Emotion classification is used in user experience, product evaluation, national security, and tutoring applications. It attempts to detect the emotional content in the input text and based on different approaches establish what kind of emotional content is present, if any. Textual emotion classification is the most difficult to handle, since it relies mainly on linguistic resources and it introduces many challenges to assignment of text to emotion represented by a proper model. A crucial part of each emotion detector is emotion model. Focus of this paper is to introduce emotion models used for classification. Categorical and dimensional models of emotion are explained and some more advanced approaches are mentioned.

  8. Cognitions as determinants of (mal)adaptive emotions and emotionally intelligent behavior in an organizational context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörrle, Matthias; Welpe, Isabell M; Försterling, Friedrich

    2006-01-01

    This study applies the theoretical concepts of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT; Ellis, 1962, 1994) to the analysis of functional and dysfunctional behaviour and emotions in the workplace and tests central assumptions of REBT in an organizational setting. We argue that Ellis' appraisal theory of emotion sheds light on some of the cognitive and emotional antecedents of emotional intelligence and emotionally intelligent behaviour. In an extension of REBT, we posit that adaptive emotions resulting from rational cognitions reflect more emotional intelligence than maladaptive emotions which result from irrational cognitions, because the former lead to functional behaviour. We hypothesize that semantically similar emotions (e.g. annoyance and rage) lead to different behavioural reactions and have a different functionality in an organizational context. The results of scenario experiments using organizational vignettes confirm the central assumptions of Ellis' appraisal theory and support our hypotheses of a correspondence between adaptive emotions and emotionally intelligent behaviour. Additionally, we find evidence that irrational job-related attitudes result in reduced work (but not life) satisfaction.

  9. Drug Design and Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkers, Gerd; Wittwer, Amrei

    2007-11-01

    "Geteiltes Leid ist halbes Leid." The old German proverb reflects the fact that sharing a bad emotion or feeling with someone else may lower the psychological strain of the person experiencing sorrow, mourning or anger. On the other hand the person showing empathy will take literally a load from its counterpart, up to physiological reaction of the peripheral and central nervous pain system. Though subjective, mental and physical states can be shared. Visual perception of suffering may be important but also narrative description plays a role, all our senses are mixing in. It is hypothetized that literature, art and humanities allow this overlap. A change of mental states can lead to empirically observable effects as it is the case for the effect of role identity or placebo on pain perception. Antidepressants and other therapeutics are another choice to change the mental and bodily states. Their development follows today's notion of "rationality" in the design of therapeutics and is characterized solely by an atomic resolution approach to understand drug activity. Since emotional states and physiological states are entangled, given the difficulty of a physical description of emotion, the future rational drug design should encompass mental states as well.

  10. [Role of interoceptive signalization in modulating emotional-behavioral responses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'ianenko, I V; Raĭtses, V S

    1976-03-01

    Chronic experiments were conducted on rabbits; electrodes were implanted into the deep structures of the brain. Stimulation of gastric receptors led to modulation of the emotional-behavioristic reactions induced by electric stimulation of the hypothalamus, the amygdala and the hypocampus. The effect depended on the intensity of interoceptive stimulation and peculiarities of the emotional reaction with own cerebral control systems.

  11. Emotional intelligence and emotional creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivcevic, Zorana; Brackett, Marc A; Mayer, John D

    2007-04-01

    Three studies examined the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and emotional creativity (EC) and whether each construct was predictive of creative behavior. It was hypothesized that the relationship between EI and EC corresponds to the relationship between cognitive intelligence and creative ability. Therefore, EI and EC were expected to be two distinct sets of abilities. Intercorrelations and confirmatory factor analyses supported the hypothesis. Furthermore, it was hypothesized that EC, but not EI, would correlate with behavioral creativity. Self-report measures of EC significantly correlated with laboratory and self-reported creativity measures in both studies, while ability measures of EC only correlated with self-reported artistic activity. EI was uncorrelated with creative behavior.

  12. Differentiating emotional hotel experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, P.M.A.; Guiza Caicedo, D.; Van Hout, M.

    2009-01-01

    Emotions experienced in response to hotel services were examined with an online questionnaire. The study resulted in 348 cases of hotel service emotions. The frequency of reported pleasant emotions was similar to the frequency of reported unpleasant emotions. Often reported pleasant emotions were sa

  13. Differentiating emotional hotel experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, P.M.A.; Guiza Caicedo, D.; Van Hout, M.

    2009-01-01

    Emotions experienced in response to hotel services were examined with an online questionnaire. The study resulted in 348 cases of hotel service emotions. The frequency of reported pleasant emotions was similar to the frequency of reported unpleasant emotions. Often reported pleasant emotions were

  14. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavar, A R; Sarmani, S B; Wood, A K; Fadzil, S M; Radir, M H; Khoo, K S

    2011-05-01

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f(fast)) and fast neutron flux (ϕ(fast)) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f(fast) and subsequently ϕ(fast) were determined using the absolute method. The f(fast) ranged from 48 to 155, and the ϕ(fast) was found in the range 1.03×10(10)-4.89×10(10) n cm(-2) s(-1). These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  15. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings of support staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, Linda J M; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-11-01

    Working with clients who show challenging behavior can be emotionally demanding and stressful for support staff, because this behavior may cause a range of negative emotional reactions and feelings. These reactions are of negative influence on staff wellbeing and behavior. Research has focused on negative emotions of staff. However, a distinction between emotions and feelings has never been made in the research field of intellectual disabilities. Negative emotions and feelings may be regulated by emotional intelligence, a psychological construct that takes into account personal style and individual differences. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence on the one hand and emotions and feelings on the other. Participants were 207 support staff serving clients with moderate to borderline intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings were measured with questionnaires. The results show that emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings are related. However, found relationships were weak. Most significant relations were found between feelings and stress management and adaptation elements of emotional intelligence. Because the explored variables can change over time they call for a longitudinal research approach.

  16. Fast Reactions of Aluminum - A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-21

    were not analyzed. Sexton42 described methods developed over the last 40 years, for calorimetric determination of the heat of detonation and for the...307-312, 1966. A bomb calorimeter for measuring the heat of detonation of 25 gram charges of high explosive is described. Calorimetric measurements and...determination of the heat of detonation and ,for the analyses of detonation products, This report is divided into three parts: 1. The calorimetry of

  17. Emotional Components of Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J Hale

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current definitions of pain suggest that emotion is an essential component of pain, however, the presumed relationship between emotion and pain, and the specific emotions that are involved in pain experiences have yet to be clarified.

  18. 音乐声的情感属性与听者的情绪反应%Emotional Attributes of the Musical Sound and Mood Reactions of the Listeners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨倩; 孟子厚

    2013-01-01

    以音乐声的情感为目标进行标注与分类,考察不同情感类别的音乐声对听者情绪的影响,分析听者情绪分量和音乐声情感属性之间的关联。%The musical sound was labelled and classified according to the different emotions, in the purpose of observation on the emotional influence that different types of music have on listeners, and analysis of the correlation between the mood components of the listeners and the emotional attributes of the musical sound.

  19. Novel acoustic features for speech emotion recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ROH Yong-Wan; KIM Dong-Ju; LEE Woo-Seok; HONG Kwang-Seok

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on acoustic features that effectively improve the recognition of emotion in human speech. The novel features in this paper are based on spectral-based entropy parameters such as fast Fourier transform (FFT) spectral entropy, delta FFT spectral entropy, Mel-frequency filter bank (MFB)spectral entropy, and Delta MFB spectral entropy. Spectral-based entropy features are simple. They reflect frequency characteristic and changing characteristic in frequency of speech. We implement an emotion rejection module using the probability distribution of recognized-scores and rejected-scores.This reduces the false recognition rate to improve overall performance. Recognized-scores and rejected-scores refer to probabilities of recognized and rejected emotion recognition results, respectively.These scores are first obtained from a pattern recognition procedure. The pattern recognition phase uses the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). We classify the four emotional states as anger, sadness,happiness and neutrality. The proposed method is evaluated using 45 sentences in each emotion for 30 subjects, 15 males and 15 females. Experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to the existing emotion recognition methods based on GMM using energy, Zero Crossing Rate (ZCR),linear prediction coefficient (LPC), and pitch parameters. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. One of the proposed features, combined MFB and delta MFB spectral entropy improves performance approximately 10% compared to the existing feature parameters for speech emotion recognition methods. We demonstrate a 4% performance improvement in the applied emotion rejection with low confidence score.

  20. Emotional eating: eating when emotional or emotional about eating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaanse, Marieke A; de Ridder, Denise T D; Evers, Catharine

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which self-reported emotional eating is a predictor of unhealthy snack consumption or, alternatively, an expression of beliefs about the relation between emotions and eating derived from concerns about eating behaviour. Three studies were conducted. Study 1 (N = 151) and Study 2 (N = 184) investigated the predictive validity of emotional eating compared to habit strength in snack consumption, employing 7-day snack diaries. Both studies demonstrated that snack consumption was not predicted by emotional eating but depended on the habit of unhealthy snacking and on restraint eating. As emotional eating was not a significant predictor of snack intake, Study 3 addressed the alternative hypothesis of emotional eating being an expression of concerns about eating behaviour. Results from this cross-sectional survey (N = 134) showed that emotional eating was significantly associated with several concerns. Together, these studies show that snack intake is better predicted by habit strength and restraint eating than by emotional eating. Additionally, the results suggest that in normal-weight women the concept of emotional eating may not capture the tendency to eat under emotional conditions, but rather reflects beliefs about the relation between emotions and eating.

  1. Emotion, decision-making and the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, L.J.; Sanfey, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Initial explorations in the burgeoning field of neuroeconomics have highlighted evidence supporting a potential dissociation between a fast automatic system and a slow deliberative controlled system. Growing research in the role of emotion in decision-making has attempted to draw parallels

  2. Emotion scents: a method of representing user emotions on GUI widgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernea, Daniel; Weber, Christopher; Ebert, Achim; Kerren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The world of desktop interfaces has been dominated for years by the concept of windows and standardized user interface (UI) components. Still, while supporting the interaction and information exchange between the users and the computer system, graphical user interface (GUI) widgets are rather one-sided, neglecting to capture the subjective facets of the user experience. In this paper, we propose a set of design guidelines for visualizing user emotions on standard GUI widgets (e.g., buttons, check boxes, etc.) in order to enrich the interface with a new dimension of subjective information by adding support for emotion awareness as well as post-task analysis and decision making. We highlight the use of an EEG headset for recording the various emotional states of the user while he/she is interacting with the widgets of the interface. We propose a visualization approach, called emotion scents, that allows users to view emotional reactions corresponding to di erent GUI widgets without in uencing the layout or changing the positioning of these widgets. Our approach does not focus on highlighting the emotional experience during the interaction with an entire system, but on representing the emotional perceptions and reactions generated by the interaction with a particular UI component. Our research is motivated by enabling emotional self-awareness and subjectivity analysis through the proposed emotionenhanced UI components for desktop interfaces. These assumptions are further supported by an evaluation of emotion scents.

  3. Positive Psychology: Positive Emotions and Emotional Intelegence

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The paper focuses on the and emotional intelligence. We try to answer on some questions regarding the role which positive emotions have in our life’s. The broaden-and-build theory (Fredrickson, 1998; 2001) predicts that positive emotions are useful in several ways. They guide present behavior, by broadening one’s attention and cognition, setting the stage for creative, explorative, and innovative pursuits. As well, positive emotions build personal and social resources to help individuals achi...

  4. Emotional Diathesis, Emotional Stress, and Childhood Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dahye; Conture, Edward G.; Walden, Tedra A.; Jones, Robin M.; Kim, Hanjoe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine (a) whether emotional reactivity and emotional stress of children who stutter (CWS) are associated with their stuttering frequency, (b) when the relationship between emotional reactivity and stuttering frequency is more likely to exist, and (c) how these associations are mediated by a 3rd…

  5. Emotional Diathesis, Emotional Stress, and Childhood Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dahye; Conture, Edward G.; Walden, Tedra A.; Jones, Robin M.; Kim, Hanjoe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine (a) whether emotional reactivity and emotional stress of children who stutter (CWS) are associated with their stuttering frequency, (b) when the relationship between emotional reactivity and stuttering frequency is more likely to exist, and (c) how these associations are mediated by a 3rd…

  6. Facial emotion recognition in remitted depressed women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyik, Utku; Keskin, Duygu; Oguz, Kaya; Akdeniz, Fisun; Gonul, Ali Saffet

    2015-10-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) is primarily characterized by mood symptoms, depressed patients have impairments in facial emotion recognition in many of the basic emotions (anger, fear, happiness, surprise, disgust and sadness). On the other hand, the data in remitted MDD (rMDD) patients is inconsistent and it is not clear that if those impairments persist in remission. To extend the current findings, we applied facial emotion recognition test to a group of remitted depressed women and compared to those of controls. Analyses of variance results showed a significant emotion and group interaction, and in the post hoc analyses, rMDD patients had higher accuracy rate for recognition of sadness compared to those of controls. There were no differences in the reaction time among the patients and controls across the all the basic emotions. The higher recognition rates for sad faces in rMDD patients might contribute to the impairments in social communication and the prognosis of the disease.

  7. Measuring and Communicating Emotions Through Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores how emotion research may inform the design of a playful interactive tool for emotion measurement and communication, called Child Patient Game (CPgame) that has been developed for paediatric patients at a Danish hospital. The CPgame differs from other instruments in that it uses...... digital narrative and game play as means for self-report. In so doing it integrate play, communication and measurement in one and the same device. First it gives 4-6 year old hospitalized children an opportunity to learn how to cope with their own emotional reactions to medical treatment through game play....... Second, healthcare personal and design researchers can use the CPgame to gain knowledge of this patient group as it measures the children’s subjective feelings about their emotions. In the paper we discuss how key theoretical concepts of emotion may help the designer to identify the basic building blocks...

  8. Japanese and American folk vocabularies for emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Futoshi; Schallert, Diane L; Ogren, Holly A

    2003-08-01

    The authors investigated how emotions are labeled and conceptualized by individuals representing widely varying ages and educational backgrounds, who live in rural areas of Japan and the United States. The authors gathered data in 2 phases: 30 participants in each country first produced emotion terms, and another 2 groups of 28 (1 group from each country) sorted out those emotion terms by similarities. Results indicated that these laypersons' emotion vocabularies were larger than those typically studied in psychological research; both American and Japanese participants produced many terms referring to physical sensations or evaluative reactions. Also, the authors found both similarities and differences in how speakers of American English and Japanese conceptualized emotions, bringing into question the often simplistic notions of cultural differences reported in the previous literature (P. Ekman, 1994; P. Ekman & W. V. Friesen, 1971; P. Ekman et al., 1987).

  9. Fast to forgive, slow to retaliate: intuitive responses in the ultimatum game depend on the degree of unfairness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn Ferguson

    Full Text Available Evolutionary accounts have difficulty explaining why people cooperate with anonymous strangers they will never meet. Recently models, focusing on emotional processing, have been proposed as a potential explanation, with attention focusing on a dual systems approach based on system 1 (fast, intuitive, automatic, effortless, and emotional and system 2 (slow, reflective, effortful, proactive and unemotional. Evidence shows that when cooperation is salient, people are fast (system 1 to cooperate, but with longer delays (system 2 they show greed. This is interpreted within the framework of the social heuristic hypothesis (SHH, whereby people overgeneralize potentially advantageous intuitively learnt and internalization social norms to 'atypical' situations. We extend this to explore intuitive reactions to unfairness by integrating the SHH with the 'fast to forgive, slow to anger' (FFSA heuristic. This suggests that it is advantageous to be prosocial when facing uncertainty. We propose that whether or not someone intuitively shows prosociality (cooperation or retaliation is moderated by the degree (certainty of unfairness. People should intuitively cooperate when facing mild levels of unfairness (fast to forgive but when given longer to decide about another's mild level of unfairness should retaliate (slow to anger. However, when facing severe levels of unfairness, the intuitive response is always retaliation. We test this using a series of one-shot ultimatum games and manipulate level of offer unfairness (50:50 60:40, 70:30, 80:20, 90:10 and enforced time delays prior to responding (1s, 2s, 8s, 15s. We also measure decision times to make responses after the time delays. The results show that when facing mildly unfair offers (60:40 people are fast (intuitive to cooperate but with longer delays reject these mildly unfair offers: 'fast to forgive, and slow to retaliate'. However, for severely unfair offers (90:10 the intuitive and fast response is to

  10. FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, A.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

  11. Fictional Emotions within Emotion Driven Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to address imaginative experiences of emotions by drawing Kendall Walton’s theory of make-believe. Moreover, we use a design case as means for investigating how a child’s felt emotions towards a hospital situation relates to his or her imaginative experiences of emotions ...... towards a fictive character in a computer game simulating the real-world situation. In so doing, we contribute with new insights to existing theories of emotions in design, which tend to focus narrowly on felt and measurable emotions....

  12. Fast and Loud Background Music Disrupts Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William Forde; Schellenberg, E. Glenn; Letnic, Adriana Katharine

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effect of background music on reading comprehension. Because the emotional consequences of music listening are affected by changes in tempo and intensity, we manipulated these variables to create four repeated-measures conditions: slow/low, slow/high, fast/low, fast/high. Tempo and intensity manipulations were selected to be…

  13. Unconscious emotional effects of packaging design elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Lewis; Corsi, Armando; Lockshin, Larry;

    This research investigates consumers’ unconscious emotional responses to packaging elements such as image, colour and font. The intensity and valence of the emotional response, in reaction to these packaging elements, is established by the use of skin conductance tests and facial electromyography...... on a convenience sample of 120 participants. The results suggest that image is the only element able to generate a significant effect on consumers’ unconscious emotional response. In addition, the results also suggest the interaction between image and colour has a significant effect on consumers’ unconscious...

  14. Decreased pain perception by unconscious emotional pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Peláez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pain perception arises from a complex interaction between a nociceptive stimulus and different emotional and cognitive factors, which appear to be mediated by both automatic and controlled systems. Previous evidence has shown that whereas conscious processing of unpleasant stimuli enhances pain perception, emotional influences on pain under unaware conditions are much less known. The aim of the present study was to investigate the modulation of pain perception by unconscious emotional pictures through an emotional masking paradigm. Two kinds of both somatosensory (painful and non-painful and emotional stimulation (negative and neutral pictures were employed. Fifty pain-free participants were asked to rate the perception of pain they were feeling in response to laser-induced somatosensory stimuli as faster as they can. Data from pain intensity and reaction times were measured. Statistical analyses revealed a significant effect for the interaction between pain and emotional stimulation, but surprisingly this relationship was opposite to expected. In particular, lower pain intensity scores and longer reaction times were found in response to negative images being strengthened this effect for painful stimulation. Present findings suggest a clear pain perception modulation by unconscious emotional contexts. Attentional capture mechanisms triggered by unaware negative stimulation could explain this phenomenon leading to a withdrawal of processing resources from pain.

  15. Emotional expression of high school students with visual impairments and their typically developing peers

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić Vesna; Jablan Branka; Stanimirović Dragana; Drinčić Natalija

    2015-01-01

    Emotions are adaptive reaction to events from the environment and they represent the central part of every person's life. Willing emotional expression influences people from the environment according to our expectations if they recognize our emotions. Studies on expressing emotions in persons with visual impairments indicate the existence of the same type of spontaneous emotional expressions as in typically developing population. Also, these studies point to difficulties in presenting willing...

  16. Theorizing Emotional Capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottingham, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Theorizing a sociology of emotion that links micro-level resources to macro-level forces, this article extends previous work on emotional capital in relation to emotional experiences and management. Emerging from Bourdieu’s theory of social practice, emotional capital is a form of cultural capital t

  17. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  18. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  19. Theorizing Emotional Capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottingham, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Theorizing a sociology of emotion that links micro-level resources to macro-level forces, this article extends previous work on emotional capital in relation to emotional experiences and management. Emerging from Bourdieu’s theory of social practice, emotional capital is a form of cultural capital

  20. Bodily maps of emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K

    2014-01-14

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions.

  1. Disentangling attention from action in the emotional spatial cueing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulckhuyse, Manon; Crombez, Geert

    2014-01-01

    In the emotional spatial cueing task, a peripheral cue--either emotional or non-emotional--is presented before target onset. A stronger cue validity effect with an emotional relative to a non-emotional cue (i.e., more efficient responding to validly cued targets relative to invalidly cued targets) is taken as an indication of emotional modulation of attentional processes. However, results from previous emotional spatial cueing studies are not consistent. Some studies find an effect at the validly cued location (shorter reaction times compared to a non-emotional cue), whereas other studies find an effect at the invalidly cued location (longer reaction times compared to a non-emotional cue). In the current paper, we explore which parameters affect emotional modulation of the cue validity effect in the spatial cueing task. Results from five experiments in healthy volunteers led to the conclusion that a threatening spatial cue did not affect attention processes but rather indicate that motor processes are affected. A possible mechanism might be that a strong aversive cue stimulus decreases reaction times by means of stronger action preparation. Consequently, in case of a spatially congruent response with the peripheral cue, a stronger cue validity effect could be obtained due to stronger response priming. The implications for future research are discussed.

  2. The emotion paradox in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Mara

    2012-03-01

    This paper reviews age differences in emotion processing and how they may relate to age-related changes in the brain. Compared with younger adults, older adults react less to negative situations, ignore irrelevant negative stimuli better, and remember relatively more positive than negative information. Older adults' ability to insulate their thoughts and emotional reactions from negative situations is likely due to a number of factors, such as being less influenced by interoceptive cues, selecting different emotion regulation strategies, having less age-related decline in prefrontal regions associated with emotional control than in other prefrontal regions, and engaging in emotion regulation strategies as a default mode in their everyday lives. Healthy older adults' avoidance of processing negative stimuli may contribute to their well-maintained emotional well-being. However, when cardiovascular disease leads to additional prefrontal white matter damage, older adults have fewer cognitive control mechanisms available to regulate their emotions, making them more vulnerable to depression. In general, although age-related changes in the brain help shape emotional experience, shifts in preferred strategies and goal priorities are also important influences.

  3. Emotional priming effects during Stroop task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sarah J; Green, Steven R; Casp, Michael; Belger, Aysenil

    2010-02-01

    The ability to make decisions within an emotional context requires a balance between two functionally integrated neural systems that primarily support executive control and affective processing. Several studies have demonstrated effects of emotional interference presented during an ongoing cognitive task, but it is unclear how activating the emotional circuitry prior to a cognitive task may enhance or disrupt the executive system. In this study we used fMRI to examine the effects of emotional priming on executive processing during a number Stroop task. Our results indicated that during trials with less executive requirements, there was a greater aversive emotional attenuation effect in a network of regions including the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), insula and cingulate gyrus. This attenuation effect was counteracted during trials with increased executive demand, suggesting that while pre-activation of the emotional system may lead to an automatic attenuation of activity in multiple regions, requirements for executive function may override the aversive emotional attenuation effect. Furthermore, this override effect was found to be associated with faster reaction times during executive processing. These findings demonstrate that activity in the vlPFC, cingulate and insula is dynamically adjusted in order to optimize performance, and illustrate the importance of the timing of each system's engagement in determining how competing cognitive and emotional information is processed.

  4. Nonverbal signals speak up: association between perceptual nonverbal dominance and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Heike; Kreifelts, Benjamin; Brück, Carolin; Nizielski, Sophia; Schütz, Astrid; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Emotional communication uses verbal and nonverbal means. In case of conflicting signals, nonverbal information is assumed to have a stronger impact. It is unclear, however, whether perceptual nonverbal dominance varies between individuals and whether it is linked to emotional intelligence. Using audiovisual stimulus material comprising verbal and nonverbal emotional cues that were varied independently, perceptual nonverbal dominance profiles and their relations to emotional intelligence were examined. Nonverbal dominance was found in every participant, ranging from 55 to 100%. Moreover, emotional intelligence, particularly the ability to understand emotions, correlated positively with nonverbal dominance. Furthermore, higher overall emotional intelligence as well as a higher ability to understand emotions were linked to smaller reaction time differences between emotionally incongruent and congruent stimuli. The association between perceptual nonverbal dominance and emotional intelligence, and more specifically the ability to understand emotions, might reflect an adaptive process driven by the experience of higher authenticity in nonverbal cues.

  5. [Consciousness and emotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Solange

    2007-12-01

    This article focuses on the processes that lead to awareness of our own emotions, which deserve particular attention in contemporary models of emotional consciousness. The subjective component of emotion, or emotional experience, was for a long time the most neglected aspect in the study of emotions although it already constituted the initial point of discussion in the famous William James still asked question : What is an emotion? More than a century later, contemporary theories debate about this heritage. We examine the successive historic contributions to the question of the determinants of our own emotional experience: from James-Lange bodily changes to cognitive appraisal theories, also relating the major role that the fundamental emotions theory attributed to facial expressions. Twenty years after the debate about primacy of cognition or emotion, both physiological-somatic and cognitive components are integrated in contemporary approaches to emotions. However, their respective degree of implication varies according to the different levels of emotional consciousness which are modelized. It is on the last level that present models focus, level that leads to consciousness of our emotional experience, benefiting from the contributions of cognitive neurosciences. Models differ according to the role devoted to neuronal substrates in determining emotional experience, but they converge on the specification of a last level of consciousness, which is the only one that allows the subject to be conscious of emotion as it is experienced (feeling) and that what he is experiencing is an emotion. Then, different models of emotional consciousness account for different varieties of emotion experience and also for various cases of emotions, that is occurrence of emotion with a lack of awareness.

  6. Olfactory-visual integration facilitates perception of subthreshold negative emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Lucas R; Gitelman, Darren R; Schuyler, Brianna; Li, Wen

    2015-10-01

    A fast growing literature of multisensory emotion integration notwithstanding, the chemical senses, intimately associated with emotion, have been largely overlooked. Moreover, an ecologically highly relevant principle of "inverse effectiveness", rendering maximal integration efficacy with impoverished sensory input, remains to be assessed in emotion integration. Presenting minute, subthreshold negative (vs. neutral) cues in faces and odors, we demonstrated olfactory-visual emotion integration in improved emotion detection (especially among individuals with weaker perception of unimodal negative cues) and response enhancement in the amygdala. Moreover, while perceptual gain for visual negative emotion involved the posterior superior temporal sulcus/pSTS, perceptual gain for olfactory negative emotion engaged both the associative olfactory (orbitofrontal) cortex and amygdala. Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) analysis of fMRI timeseries further revealed connectivity strengthening among these areas during crossmodal emotion integration. That multisensory (but not low-level unisensory) areas exhibited both enhanced response and region-to-region coupling favors a top-down (vs. bottom-up) account for olfactory-visual emotion integration. Current findings thus confirm the involvement of multisensory convergence areas, while highlighting unique characteristics of olfaction-related integration. Furthermore, successful crossmodal binding of subthreshold aversive cues not only supports the principle of "inverse effectiveness" in emotion integration but also accentuates the automatic, unconscious quality of crossmodal emotion synthesis.

  7. The Language, Tone and Prosody of Emotions: Neural Substrates and Dynamics of Spoken-Word Emotion Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenthal, Einat; Silbersweig, David A.; Stern, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Rapid assessment of emotions is important for detecting and prioritizing salient input. Emotions are conveyed in spoken words via verbal and non-verbal channels that are mutually informative and unveil in parallel over time, but the neural dynamics and interactions of these processes are not well understood. In this paper, we review the literature on emotion perception in faces, written words, and voices, as a basis for understanding the functional organization of emotion perception in spoken words. The characteristics of visual and auditory routes to the amygdala—a subcortical center for emotion perception—are compared across these stimulus classes in terms of neural dynamics, hemispheric lateralization, and functionality. Converging results from neuroimaging, electrophysiological, and lesion studies suggest the existence of an afferent route to the amygdala and primary visual cortex for fast and subliminal processing of coarse emotional face cues. We suggest that a fast route to the amygdala may also function for brief non-verbal vocalizations (e.g., laugh, cry), in which emotional category is conveyed effectively by voice tone and intensity. However, emotional prosody which evolves on longer time scales and is conveyed by fine-grained spectral cues appears to be processed via a slower, indirect cortical route. For verbal emotional content, the bulk of current evidence, indicating predominant left lateralization of the amygdala response and timing of emotional effects attributable to speeded lexical access, is more consistent with an indirect cortical route to the amygdala. Top-down linguistic modulation may play an important role for prioritized perception of emotions in words. Understanding the neural dynamics and interactions of emotion and language perception is important for selecting potent stimuli and devising effective training and/or treatment approaches for the alleviation of emotional dysfunction across a range of neuropsychiatric states. PMID

  8. Language Analysis as a Window to Bereaved Parents' Emotions During a Parent-Physician Bereavement Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggly, Susan; Manning, Mark A; Slatcher, Richard B; Berg, Robert A; Wessel, David L; Newth, Christopher J L; Shanley, Thomas P; Harrison, Rick; Dalton, Heidi; Dean, J Michael; Doctor, Allan; Jenkins, Tammara; Meert, Kathleen L

    2015-03-01

    Parent-physician bereavement meetings may benefit parents by facilitating sense making, which is associated with healthy adjustment after a traumatic event. Prior research suggests a reciprocal relationship between sense making and positive emotions. We analyzed parents' use of emotion words during bereavement meetings to better understand parents' emotional reactions during the meeting and how their emotional reactions related to their appraisals of the meeting. Parents' use of positive emotion words increased, suggesting the meetings help parents make sense of the death. Parents' use of positive emotion words was negatively related to their own and/or their spouse's appraisals of the meeting, suggesting that parents who have a positive emotional experience during the meeting may also have a short-term negative reaction. Language analysis can be an effective tool to understand individuals' ongoing emotions and meaning making processes during interventions to reduce adverse consequences of a traumatic event, such as a child's death.

  9. Are leftists more emotion-driven than rightists? The interactive influence of ideology and emotions on support for policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliskin, Ruthie; Bar-Tal, Daniel; Sheppes, Gal; Halperin, Eran

    2014-12-01

    Although emotions and ideology are important factors guiding policy support in conflict, their interactive influence remains unclear. Based on prior findings that ideological leftists' beliefs are more susceptible to change than rightists' beliefs, we tested a somewhat counterintuitive extension that leftists would be more susceptible to influence by their emotional reactions than rightists. In three laboratory studies, inducing positive and negative emotions affected Jewish-Israeli leftists', but not rightists', support for conciliatory policies toward an adversarial (Studies 1 and 3) and a non-adversarial (Study 2) outgroup. Three additional field studies showed that positive and negative emotions were related to leftists', but not rightists', policy support in positive as well as highly negative conflict-related contexts, among both Jewish (Studies 4 and 5) and Palestinian (Study 6) citizens of Israel. Across different conflicts, emotions, conflict-related contexts, and even populations, leftists' policy support changed in accordance with emotional reactions more than rightists' policy support.

  10. Personalidade e reações afetivas à exploração de carreira Personalidad y reacciones afectivas a la explotación de carrera Personality and emotional reactions to career exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana da Costa Faria

    2013-01-01

    aims to assess relations between the personality dimensions and the emotional reactions to career exploration in college students. The sample comprised a total of 115 college students, 72 women (63% and 43 men (37% aged between 23 and 65 years (M = 31.28, SD = 10.58. The participants completed a measure of personality (NEOPI-R and a measure of satisfaction with information, anticipated stress with subsequent career exploration, and anticipated stress with subsequent career decision-making (Career Exploration Survey. Regression analysis results indicated a significant negative relation between satisfaction with information and neuroticism, and a significant negative relation between stress with decision and age. Finally, the implications for career interventions are discussed.

  11. Emotion regulation and sport performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Christopher R D

    2014-08-01

    This study used a single-blind, within-participant, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design to examine the relationship between emotional self-regulation and sport performance. Twenty competitive athletes completed four laboratory-based conditions; familiarization, control, emotion suppression, and nonsuppression. In each condition participants completed a 10-km cycling time trial requiring self-regulation. In the experimental conditions participants watched an upsetting video before performing the cycle task. When participants suppressed their emotional reactions to the video (suppression condition) they completed the cycling task slower, generated lower mean power outputs, and reached a lower maximum heart rate and perceived greater physical exertion than when they were given no self-regulation instructions during the video (nonsuppression condition) and received no video treatment (control condition). The findings suggest that emotional self-regulation resource impairment affects perceived exertion, pacing and sport performance and extends previous research examining the regulation of persistence on physical tasks. The results are discussed in line with relevant psychophysiological theories of self-regulation and fatigue and pertinent potential implications for practice regarding performance and well-being are suggested.

  12. Zones of emotional labour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2011-01-01

    is put forth among 25 Danish public family law caseworkers. The study points to personal, professional, and social zones of emotional labour through which the caseworkers carry out their work. Emotional labour zones mark emotion structures that may be challenging due to complex emotional intersections......The paper suggests that due to the difficult nature of their work public family law caseworkers are to be included in the definition of emotional labour even though they are omitted by Hochschild. Based upon a review of the structures involved in emotional labour an explorative qualitative study...

  13. Emotion and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Jennifer S; Li, Ye; Valdesolo, Piercarlo; Kassam, Karim S

    2015-01-01

    A revolution in the science of emotion has emerged in recent decades, with the potential to create a paradigm shift in decision theories. The research reveals that emotions constitute potent, pervasive, predictable, sometimes harmful and sometimes beneficial drivers of decision making. Across different domains, important regularities appear in the mechanisms through which emotions influence judgments and choices. We organize and analyze what has been learned from the past 35 years of work on emotion and decision making. In so doing, we propose the emotion-imbued choice model, which accounts for inputs from traditional rational choice theory and from newer emotion research, synthesizing scientific models.

  14. Unconscious and conscious processing of negative emotions examined through affective priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Chisa; Ogawa, Toshiki

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated unconscious and conscious processes by which negative emotions arise. Participants (26 men, 47 women; M age = 20.3 yr.) evaluated target words that were primed with subliminally or supraliminally presented emotional pictures. Stimulus onset asynchrony was either 200 or 800 msec. With subliminal presentations, reaction times to negative targets were longer than reaction times to positive targets after negative primes for the 200-msec. stimulus onset asynchrony. Reaction times to positive targets after negative or positive primes were shorter when the stimulus onset asynchrony was 800 msec. For supraliminal presentations, reaction times were longer when evaluating targets that followed emotionally opposite primes. When emotional stimuli were consciously distinguished, the evoked emotional states might lead to emotional conflicts, although the qualitatively different effects might be caused when subliminally presented emotion evoking stimulus was appraised unconsciously; that possibility was discussed.

  15. Orbitofrontal cortex biases attention to emotional events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartikainen, Kaisa M; Ogawa, Keith H; Knight, Robert T

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of orbitofrontal (OF) cortex in regulating emotion-attention interaction and the balance between involuntary and voluntary attention allocation. We studied patients with OF lesion applying reaction time (RT) and event-related potential (ERP) measures in a lateralized visual discrimination task with novel task-irrelevant affective pictures (unpleasant, pleasant, or neutral) preceding a neutral target. This allowed for comparing the effects of automatic attention allocation to emotional versus neutral stimuli on subsequent voluntary attention allocation to target stimuli. N2-P3a and N2-P3b ERP components served as measures of involuntary and voluntary attention allocation correspondingly. Enhanced N2-P3a amplitudes to emotional distractors and reduced N2-P3b amplitudes to targets preceded by emotional distractors were observed in healthy subjects, suggesting automatic emotional orienting interfered with subsequent voluntary orienting. OF patients showed an opposite pattern with tendency towards reduced N2-P3a responses to emotional distractors, suggesting impaired automatic orienting to emotional stimuli due to orbitofrontal damage. Enhanced N2-P3b responses to targets preceded by any affective distractor were observed in OF patients, suggesting bias towards voluntary target-related attention allocation due to orbitofrontal lesion. Behavioral evidence indicated that left visual field (LVF) attention performance was modulated by emotional stimuli. Specifically, OF patients responded faster to LVF targets subsequent to pleasant emotional distractors. We suggest that damage to the orbitofrontal circuitry leads to dysbalance between voluntary and involuntary attention allocation in the context of affective distractors with predisposition to posterior target-related processing over frontal novelty and affect-related processing. Furthermore, we suggest that orbitofrontal influence on emotion-attention interaction is valence and hemisphere dependent.

  16. Inferior Frontal Gyrus Activation Underlies the Perception of Emotions, While Precuneus Activation Underlies the Feeling of Emotions during Music Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    While music triggers many physiological and psychological reactions, the underlying neural basis of perceived and experienced emotions during music listening remains poorly understood. Therefore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), I conducted a comparative study of the different brain areas involved in perceiving and feeling emotions during music listening. I measured fMRI signals while participants assessed the emotional expression of music (perceived emotion) and their emotional responses to music (felt emotion). I found that cortical areas including the prefrontal, auditory, cingulate, and posterior parietal cortices were consistently activated by the perceived and felt emotional tasks. Moreover, activity in the inferior frontal gyrus increased more during the perceived emotion task than during a passive listening task. In addition, the precuneus showed greater activity during the felt emotion task than during a passive listening task. The findings reveal that the bilateral inferior frontal gyri and the precuneus are important areas for the perception of the emotional content of music as well as for the emotional response evoked in the listener. Furthermore, I propose that the precuneus, a brain region associated with self-representation, might be involved in assessing emotional responses.

  17. Understanding emotional responses to breast/ovarian cancer genetic risk assessment: an applied test of a cognitive theory of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Ceri; Bennett, Paul; Brain, Kate

    2008-10-01

    This study explored whether Smith and Lazarus' (1990, 1993) cognitive theory of emotion could predict emotional responses to an emotionally ambiguous real-life situation. Questionnaire data were collected from 145 women upon referral for cancer genetic risk assessment. These indicated a mixed emotional reaction of both positive and negative emotions to the assessment. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that the hypothesised models explained between 20% and 33% of the variance of anxiety, hope and gratitude scores, but only 10% of the variance for challenge scores. For the previously unmodelled emotion of relief, 31% of the variance was explained by appraisals and core relational themes. The findings help explain why emotional responses to cancer genetic risk assessment vary and suggest that improving the accuracy of individuals' beliefs and expectations about the assessment process may help subsequent adaptation to risk information.

  18. Emotional Modulation of Cognition in Recent Onset Schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Dieleman (Sieds)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The current thesis describes a number of important findings on the interaction between emotion and cognition in male recent onset schizophrenia patients. In healthy controls a general effect of emotional expressions on sustained attention is that it improves reaction ti

  19. Providing feedback on emotional experiences and decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machajdik, J.; Stöttinger, J.; Danelova, E.; Pongratz, M.; Kavicky, L.; Valenti, R.; Hanbury, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel lifelog system concept created to provide a human user with feedback on their conscious and unconscious emotional reactions and encourage the process of self-reflection by looking into an affective mirror. The emotion of the user is deduced from biometric data and enhanced by affe

  20. Using Physical Activity for Emotional Recovery after a Natural Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl-Alexander, Zachary; Sinelnikov, Oleg A.

    2013-01-01

    After traumatic events, such as a natural disaster, children who are directly or indirectly affected by the event often have a number of intense emotional reactions. It is important for educators to understand common emotional and psychological responses to disastrous events and to try to help. This article describes a physical activity program…

  1. Rational Emotive Education and the Developmental Stages of Jean Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Janet M.

    Rational-Emotive Therapy (RET) is predicated on a theory of causality. According to Ellis (1962), beliefs regarding an event, and not the event itself, cause emotional reactions. Mentally healthy persons practice this reational theory of causality. Neurotic persons accept an irrational theory of causality based on coincidental or correlational…

  2. The Effect of Reappraising Social Exclusion on Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchens, Michael B.; Gohm, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether reappraisal, which is a strategy where the personal meaning of an event is reevaluated, would influence participants' emotional reactions to social exclusion feedback. It was expected that reappraising this event would reduce the emotional distress that accompanies social exclusion, but…

  3. Will They Like Me? Adolescents' Emotional Responses to Peer Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Amanda E.; Caouette, Justin D.; Lee, Clinton C.; Ruiz, Sarah K.

    2014-01-01

    Relative to children and adults, adolescents are highly focused on being evaluated by peers. This increased attention to peer evaluation has implications for emotion regulation in adolescence, but little is known about the characteristics of the evaluatee and evaluator that influence emotional reactions to evaluative outcomes. The present study…

  4. Emotional Scene Content Drives the Saccade Generation System Reflexively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Hyona, Jukka; Calvo, Manuel G.

    2009-01-01

    The authors assessed whether parafoveal perception of emotional content influences saccade programming. In Experiment 1, paired emotional and neutral scenes were presented to parafoveal vision. Participants performed voluntary saccades toward either of the scenes according to an imperative signal (color cue). Saccadic reaction times were faster…

  5. Visceral Pedagogy: Teaching Challenging Topics Emotionally as Well as Cognitively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Joseph; Widen, Holly

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the pedagogical implications of students' embodied and emotional reactions to difficult course material inside and outside of the classroom. Scholarship on teaching typically focuses on dimensions of students' cognitive engagement and development, yet geographical coursework often involves emotionally fraught topics:…

  6. Fast Food Problems and Responsibilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang; Jing

    2015-01-01

    <正>People are living in a world that acquires almost everyone to chase efficiency and speed.The real inner quality of daily life is not approximately taken into people’s consideration.Fast food is one of the common model reactions of this rapid developing society.Recently,it’s getting popular that people would rather have fast food to save time for other extra work.Problems and public concern are following that kind of life condition and someone or something should be put blame on for this.

  7. The College Students' Stressful Events, Emotional Reaction and Coping Styles%大学生压力事件、情绪反应及应对方式——基于武汉高校的问卷调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建文; 王滔

    2012-01-01

    Using the self-developing questionnaire, it investigated the stressful events, emotional reactions and coping styles of 724 college students from 4 universities. The results showed that the frequency of college students' stressful events was related to their daily life, most of which were enduring stressful events; college students in the stressful situation were given priority to negative emotional experience, and also had dynamic positive emotions; col- lege students in the stressful situation were given priority to emotion-based coping styles. Fi- nally, the proposals for mental health education were that the educators should pay attention to the college students' exhausting events in their daily life, attach importance to the role of positive emotions in coping with stress, play the active function of emotion-based coping strategies, and instruct college students to try to avoid using the unhealthy stress coping strategms.%对武汉4所高校724名本科生经历的压力事件、情绪反应及应对方式的调查结果表明:大学生经历压力事件的频率与其日常生活密切相关,且多数是持久性压力事件;大学生在压力情境下以消极情绪体验为主,但也有动力性的积极情绪;大学生在压力情境下主要以情绪应对方式为主。为此,大学生心理健康教育工作者应关注大学生日常生活中的消耗性事件,重视积极情绪在压力应对中的作用,发挥情绪应对策略的积极功能,并引导大学生尽量避免使用非健康的压力应对策略。

  8. In sync: gamma oscillations and emotional memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Battenfield Headley

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Emotional experiences leave vivid memories that can last a lifetime. The emotional facilitation of memory has been attributed to the engagement of diffusely projecting neuromodulatory systems that enhance the consolidation of synaptic plasticity in regions activated by the experience. This process requires the propagation of signals between brain regions, and for those signals to induce long-lasting synaptic plasticity. Both of these demands are met by gamma oscillations, which reflect synchronous population activity on a fast timescale (35-120 Hz. Regions known to participate in the formation of emotional memories, such as the basolateral amygdala, also promote gamma-band activation throughout cortical and subcortical circuits. Recent studies have demonstrated that gamma oscillations are enhanced during emotional situations, coherent between regions engaged by salient stimuli, and predict subsequent memory for cues associated with aversive stimuli. Furthermore, neutral stimuli that come to predict emotional events develop enhanced gamma oscillations, reflecting altered processing in the brain, which may underpin how past emotional experiences color future learning and memory.

  9. Music, memory and emotion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music...

  10. Emotionally Colorful Reflexive Games

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasenko, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the matter of reflexive control of the emotional states by means of Reflexive Game Theory (RGT). It is shown how to build a bridge between RGT and emotions. For this purpose the Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance (PAD) model is adopted. The major advantages of RGT are its ability to predict human behavior and unfold the entire spectra of reflexion in the human mind. On the other hand, PAD provides ultimate approach to model emotions. It is illustrated that emotions are reflexive processes and, consequently, RGT fused with PAD model is natural solution to model emotional interactions between people. The fusion of RGT and PAD, called Emotional Reflexive Games (ERG), inherits the key features of both components. Using ERG, we show how reflexive control can be successfully applied to model human emotional states. Up to date, EGR is a unique methodology capable of modeling human reflexive processes and emotional aspects simultaneously.

  11. Sensing Emotion in Voices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Katherine S; Parsons, Christine E; LeBeau, Richard T;

    2016-01-01

    Emotional expressions are an essential element of human interactions. Recent work has increasingly recognized that emotional vocalizations can color and shape interactions between individuals. Here we present data on the psychometric properties of a recently developed database of authentic...

  12. Working memory of emotional stimuli: Electrophysiological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Dominique; García-Rubio, María J; González, E Kirstin; Tapia, Manuel; López-Martín, Sara; Román, Francisco J; Capilla, Almudena; Martínez, Kenia; Colom, Roberto; Carretié, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Memorizing emotional stimuli in a preferential way seems to be one of the adaptive strategies brought on by evolution for supporting survival. However, there is a lack of electrophysiological evidence on this bias in working memory. The present study analyzed the influence of emotion on the updating component of working memory. Behavioral and electrophysiological indices were measured from a 3-back task using negative, neutral, and positive faces. Electrophysiological data evidenced an emotional influence on the working memory sensitive P3 component, which presented larger amplitudes for negative matching faces compared to neutral ones. This effect originated in the superior parietal cortex, previously reported to be involved in N-back tasks. Additionally, P3 results showed a correlation with reaction times, where higher amplitudes were associated with faster responses for negative matching faces. These findings indicate that electrophysiological measures seem to be very suitable indices of the emotional influence on working memory.

  13. Emotion and Implicit Timing: The Arousal Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Berthon, Mickaël

    2017-01-01

    This study tested the effects of emotion on implicit time judgment. The participants did not receive any overt temporal instructions. They were simply trained to respond as quickly as possible after a response signal, which was separated from a warning signal by a reference temporal interval. In the testing phase, the inter-signal interval was shorter, equal or longer than the reference interval and was filled by emotional pictures (EP) of different arousal levels: high, moderate, and low. The results showed a U-shaped curve of reaction time plotted against the interval duration, indicating an implicit processing of time. However, this RT-curve was shifted toward the left, with a significantly lower peak time for the high-arousal than for the low-arousal EP. This emotional time distortion in an implicit timing task suggests an automatic effect of emotion on the internal clock rate. PMID:28261125

  14. Construct of emotional intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja Pečjak in Andreja Avsec

    2003-01-01

    The article highlights the construct of emotional intelligence, that has appeared about then years ago. We present the popular and scientific comprehension of emotional intelligence, briefly describe the development of the concept and than in detail we propose the existing comprehension of emotional intelligence: through the models of Goleman (1995) and Bar-On (1997) we present the comprehension of emotional intelligence as a non-cognitive (personality) traits.

  15. Construct of emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Pečjak in Andreja Avsec

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the construct of emotional intelligence, that has appeared about then years ago. We present the popular and scientific comprehension of emotional intelligence, briefly describe the development of the concept and than in detail we propose the existing comprehension of emotional intelligence: through the models of Goleman (1995 and Bar-On (1997 we present the comprehension of emotional intelligence as a non-cognitive (personality traits.

  16. Emotion Detection from Text

    CERN Document Server

    Shivhare, Shiv Naresh

    2012-01-01

    Emotion can be expressed in many ways that can be seen such as facial expression and gestures, speech and by written text. Emotion Detection in text documents is essentially a content - based classification problem involving concepts from the domains of Natural Language Processing as well as Machine Learning. In this paper emotion recognition based on textual data and the techniques used in emotion detection are discussed.

  17. Emotion, Cognition, and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, R. J.

    2002-11-01

    Emotion is central to the quality and range of everyday human experience. The neurobiological substrates of human emotion are now attracting increasing interest within the neurosciences motivated, to a considerable extent, by advances in functional neuroimaging techniques. An emerging theme is the question of how emotion interacts with and influences other domains of cognition, in particular attention, memory, and reasoning. The psychological consequences and mechanisms underlying the emotional modulation of cognition provide the focus of this article.

  18. Emotions in Litigation Contests

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, Florian; Friehe, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of emotions into the standard litigation contest. Positive (negative) emotions emerge when litigants win (lose) at trial and are dependent in particular on the level of defendant fault. Our findings establish that standard results of litigation contests change significantly when emotions are taken into account. We show that emotions may increase or decrease individual and total equilibrium contest effort, introduce an asymmetry into the contest, and reinforce...

  19. Priming Ability Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined whether priming self-schemas relating to successful emotional competency results in better emotional intelligence performance. In the first study participants were randomly assigned to a successful emotional competency self-schema prime condition or a control condition and then completed an ability measure of emotional…

  20. Programming Agents with Emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dastani, Mehdi; Floor, Chr.; Meyer, John-Jules Charles

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we show how a cognitive agent programming language can be endowed with ways to program emotions. In particular we show how the programming language 2APL can be augmented so that it can work together with the computational emotion model ALMA to deal with appraisal, emotion/mood generati

  1. Music, memory and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-08-08

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory.

  2. Priming Ability Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined whether priming self-schemas relating to successful emotional competency results in better emotional intelligence performance. In the first study participants were randomly assigned to a successful emotional competency self-schema prime condition or a control condition and then completed an ability measure of emotional…

  3. Up with Emotional Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Carolyn R.

    1997-01-01

    Daniel Goleman, author of the bestseller "Emotional Intelligence," spoke at the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development annual conference about children's declining emotional health indicators. He noted that emotional well-being predicts success in academic achievement, employment, marriage, and physical health; and that…

  4. Emotional Intelligence and Giftedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, John D.; Perkins, Donna M.; Caruso, David R.; Salovey, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Emotional intelligence and social behavior were explored in a study with 11 adolescents. Results found that those with higher emotional intelligence were better able to identify their own and others' emotions in situations, use that information to guide their actions, and resist peer pressure than others. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  5. Comparison of histopathology, acid fast bacillus smear and real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in anal fistula in 161 patients: A prospective controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj; Garg, Mohinder K; Agarwal, Narinder

    2016-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a known cause of refractory and recurrent fistula-in-ano. Histopathology of fistula tract and acid fast bacillus (AFB) smear of the pus are the standard procedures employed to diagnose MTB. However, they have some drawbacks. Nontubercular mycobacteria (NTM) has also been detected to cause fistula-in-ano and these methods cannot differentiate between MTB and NTM. Secondly, as these methods have low sensitivity, they could possibly be missing out MTB patients. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has high sensitivity in detecting mycobacteria. The aim of the study was to compare the sensitivity of RT-PCR, histopathology, and AFB smear in detecting MTB in fistula-in-ano. The histopathology and RT-PCR of tissue (fistula tract) was done along with AFB smear and RT-PCR of the pus was done in all the cases as per the availability of the specimen. The histopathology, AFB smear and RT-PCR was done by same pathologists in all the cases and all the patients were operated by a single surgeon. A total of 286 samples were tested in 161 patients of fistula-in-ano who were operated over a period of 1year. The mean age was 38.6±10.5 and male/female ratio was 153/8. Histopathology and RT-PCR of tissue (fistula tract) was done in 131 patients and 141 patients respectively. AFB smear and RT-PCR of pus (fistula) was done in 14 patients. Overall, MTB was detected in total of 17/161 (10.63%) patients. Out of these, MTB was detected in tissue (fistula tract) in 1/131 (0.76%) by histopathology and 14/141 (10%) by RT-PCR tissue. In pus samples, AFB smear was negative in all cases (0/14), whereas RT-PCR detected MTB in four of 14 (28.6%) patients. In 17 patients detected to have MTB, four-drug antitubercular therapy (ATT) was recommended. ATT was started in 15 patients. Nine of 17 patients completed 6months ATT and were cured. Six of 17 patients are currently taking ATT. Two patients did not take ATT; both of these have persistent symptoms of pus

  6. The Emotional Challenge of Ethnic Studies Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Paul R.

    1992-01-01

    Many ethnic-majority college students have strong emotional reactions to ethnic-American literature and the conflict of social myth with social reality. Teachers can guide students through the seven stages leading from disillusionment to understanding (shock, denial, anger, rejection, examination, understanding, and acceptance) in part by…

  7. Your heart might give away your emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laundav, David Kristian; Jensen, Camilla Birgitte Falk; Bækgaard, Per

    2014-01-01

    Estimating emotional responses to pictures based on heart rate measurements: Variations in Heart Rate serves as an important clinical health indicator, but potentially also as a window into cognitive reactions to presented stimuli, as a function of both stimuli, context and previous cognitive state...

  8. Infants’ Temperament and Mothers’, and Fathers’ Depression Predict Infants’ Attention to Objects Paired with Emotional Faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Aktar; D.J. Mandell; W. de Vente; M. Majdandžić; M.E.J. Raijmakers; S.M. Bögels

    2015-01-01

    Between 10 and 14 months, infants gain the ability to learn about unfamiliar stimuli by observing others’ emotional reactions to those stimuli, so called social referencing (SR). Joint processing of emotion and head/gaze direction is essential for SR. This study tested emotion and head/gaze directio

  9. Emotion-Eliciting Qualities of Television Campaign Advertising as a Predictor of Voting Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, John T.; Biggers, Thompson

    1986-01-01

    Relates political candidates' television advertising to voters' emotional reactions and voting behavior. Suggests that television campaign advertising elicits emotion along three continua: pleasure-displeasure, arousal-nonarousal, and dominance-submissiveness. Suggests that emotional response to such advertising is systematically related to voting…

  10. Examination of Parenting Styles of Processing Emotions and Differentiation of Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jonathan P.; Thigpen, Sally E.; Montgomery, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    Gottman and associates theorized emotion coaching, parents' processing of negative emotions with children, as important for children's later development. Bowen viewed differentiation, the balance between emotional and cognitive reactions to one's family of origin, as an important developmental process. However, research has not specified parenting…

  11. Infants’ Temperament and Mothers’, and Fathers’ Depression Predict Infants’ Attention to Objects Paired with Emotional Faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aktar, E.; Mandell, D.J.; de Vente, W.; Majdandžić, M.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.; Bögels, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Between 10 and 14 months, infants gain the ability to learn about unfamiliar stimuli by observing others’ emotional reactions to those stimuli, so called social referencing (SR). Joint processing of emotion and head/gaze direction is essential for SR. This study tested emotion and head/gaze

  12. The Emotional Experience of People with Intellectual Disability: An Analysis Using the International Affective Pictures System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Belen G.; Mateos, Pedro M.; Sanchez-Mateos, Juan Degado

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides information on the emotional experience of people with intellectual disability. To evaluate this emotional experience, we have used the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS). The most important result from this study is that the emotional reaction of people with intellectual disability to affective stimuli is…

  13. Infants’ Temperament and Mothers’, and Fathers’ Depression Predict Infants’ Attention to Objects Paired with Emotional Faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aktar, E.; Mandell, D.J.; de Vente, W.; Majdandžić, M.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.; Bögels, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Between 10 and 14 months, infants gain the ability to learn about unfamiliar stimuli by observing others’ emotional reactions to those stimuli, so called social referencing (SR). Joint processing of emotion and head/gaze direction is essential for SR. This study tested emotion and head/gaze directio

  14. The Role of Body Sensations in Understanding One's Own Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balueva O.V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There are at least three different viewpoints among all theories of emotions that attempt to explain the role of body sensations in understanding one's own emotions. In order to compare the explanatory resources of these viewpoints we conducted a research in which the subjects (n=59 were shown a series of neutral and emotionally significant slides (taken from the IAPS database. During the slideshow we registered the subjects' pulse and galvanic skin response. The subjects were asked to assess the intensity of their emotional reactions and body sensations in response to the emotionally significant slides, and also filled in a questionnaire on emotional intelligence that enabled us to measure their ability to understand their own emotions as well as those of other people. The outcomes of our research show that sensations accompanying emotional experiences are not the result of interoception as they do not correspond with objective indicators of the changes in physiological arousal, whereas they do correspond in many ways with the subjects' emotional appraisal of the stimuli and selfassessment of sensations. These outcomes also revealed that subjective evaluations of body sensations correlate with emotional valence, while heart rate (the objective indicator of arousal correlates with modality of the emotion

  15. Face Recognition, Musical Appraisal, and Emotional Crossmodal Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invitto, Sara; Calcagnì, Antonio; Mignozzi, Arianna; Scardino, Rosanna; Piraino, Giulia; Turchi, Daniele; De Feudis, Irio; Brunetti, Antonio; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; de Tommaso, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Recent research on the crossmodal integration of visual and auditory perception suggests that evaluations of emotional information in one sensory modality may tend toward the emotional value generated in another sensory modality. This implies that the emotions elicited by musical stimuli can influence the perception of emotional stimuli presented in other sensory modalities, through a top-down process. The aim of this work was to investigate how crossmodal perceptual processing influences emotional face recognition and how potential modulation of this processing induced by music could be influenced by the subject's musical competence. We investigated how emotional face recognition processing could be modulated by listening to music and how this modulation varies according to the subjective emotional salience of the music and the listener's musical competence. The sample consisted of 24 participants: 12 professional musicians and 12 university students (non-musicians). Participants performed an emotional go/no-go task whilst listening to music by Albeniz, Chopin, or Mozart. The target stimuli were emotionally neutral facial expressions. We examined the N170 Event-Related Potential (ERP) and behavioral responses (i.e., motor reaction time to target recognition and musical emotional judgment). A linear mixed-effects model and a decision-tree learning technique were applied to N170 amplitudes and latencies. The main findings of the study were that musicians' behavioral responses and N170 is more affected by the emotional value of music administered in the emotional go/no-go task and this bias is also apparent in responses to the non-target emotional face. This suggests that emotional information, coming from multiple sensory channels, activates a crossmodal integration process that depends upon the stimuli emotional salience and the listener's appraisal.

  16. Face Recognition, Musical Appraisal, and Emotional Crossmodal Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Invitto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on the crossmodal integration of visual and auditory perception suggests that evaluations of emotional information in one sensory modality may tend toward the emotional value generated in another sensory modality. This implies that the emotions elicited by musical stimuli can influence the perception of emotional stimuli presented in other sensory modalities, through a top-down process. The aim of this work was to investigate how crossmodal perceptual processing influences emotional face recognition and how potential modulation of this processing induced by music could be influenced by the subject's musical competence. We investigated how emotional face recognition processing could be modulated by listening to music and how this modulation varies according to the subjective emotional salience of the music and the listener's musical competence. The sample consisted of 24 participants: 12 professional musicians and 12 university students (non-musicians. Participants performed an emotional go/no-go task whilst listening to music by Albeniz, Chopin, or Mozart. The target stimuli were emotionally neutral facial expressions. We examined the N170 Event-Related Potential (ERP and behavioral responses (i.e., motor reaction time to target recognition and musical emotional judgment. A linear mixed-effects model and a decision-tree learning technique were applied to N170 amplitudes and latencies. The main findings of the study were that musicians' behavioral responses and N170 is more affected by the emotional value of music administered in the emotional go/no-go task and this bias is also apparent in responses to the non-target emotional face. This suggests that emotional information, coming from multiple sensory channels, activates a crossmodal integration process that depends upon the stimuli emotional salience and the listener's appraisal.

  17. Face Recognition, Musical Appraisal, and Emotional Crossmodal Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invitto, Sara; Calcagnì, Antonio; Mignozzi, Arianna; Scardino, Rosanna; Piraino, Giulia; Turchi, Daniele; De Feudis, Irio; Brunetti, Antonio; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; de Tommaso, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Recent research on the crossmodal integration of visual and auditory perception suggests that evaluations of emotional information in one sensory modality may tend toward the emotional value generated in another sensory modality. This implies that the emotions elicited by musical stimuli can influence the perception of emotional stimuli presented in other sensory modalities, through a top-down process. The aim of this work was to investigate how crossmodal perceptual processing influences emotional face recognition and how potential modulation of this processing induced by music could be influenced by the subject's musical competence. We investigated how emotional face recognition processing could be modulated by listening to music and how this modulation varies according to the subjective emotional salience of the music and the listener's musical competence. The sample consisted of 24 participants: 12 professional musicians and 12 university students (non-musicians). Participants performed an emotional go/no-go task whilst listening to music by Albeniz, Chopin, or Mozart. The target stimuli were emotionally neutral facial expressions. We examined the N170 Event-Related Potential (ERP) and behavioral responses (i.e., motor reaction time to target recognition and musical emotional judgment). A linear mixed-effects model and a decision-tree learning technique were applied to N170 amplitudes and latencies. The main findings of the study were that musicians' behavioral responses and N170 is more affected by the emotional value of music administered in the emotional go/no-go task and this bias is also apparent in responses to the non-target emotional face. This suggests that emotional information, coming from multiple sensory channels, activates a crossmodal integration process that depends upon the stimuli emotional salience and the listener's appraisal. PMID:28824392

  18. Novel acoustic features for speech emotion recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ROH; Yong-Wan; KIM; Dong-Ju; LEE; Woo-Seok; HONG; Kwang-Seok

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on acoustic features that effectively improve the recognition of emotion in human speech.The novel features in this paper are based on spectral-based entropy parameters such as fast Fourier transform(FFT) spectral entropy,delta FFT spectral entropy,Mel-frequency filter bank(MFB) spectral entropy,and Delta MFB spectral entropy.Spectral-based entropy features are simple.They reflect frequency characteristic and changing characteristic in frequency of speech.We implement an emotion rejection module using the probability distribution of recognized-scores and rejected-scores.This reduces the false recognition rate to improve overall performance.Recognized-scores and rejected-scores refer to probabilities of recognized and rejected emotion recognition results,respectively.These scores are first obtained from a pattern recognition procedure.The pattern recognition phase uses the Gaussian mixture model(GMM).We classify the four emotional states as anger,sadness,happiness and neutrality.The proposed method is evaluated using 45 sentences in each emotion for 30 subjects,15 males and 15 females.Experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to the existing emotion recognition methods based on GMM using energy,Zero Crossing Rate(ZCR),linear prediction coefficient(LPC),and pitch parameters.We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.One of the proposed features,combined MFB and delta MFB spectral entropy improves performance approximately 10% compared to the existing feature parameters for speech emotion recognition methods.We demonstrate a 4% performance improvement in the applied emotion rejection with low confidence score.

  19. What do emotions do?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    analyses how emotions of annoyance, hostility, shame and empathy circulate between the researcher, the gatekeepers and the studied people. Asking what do emotions do? the chapter looks into how the circulation of emotions establish both distance and proximity among the subjects. Spanger argues...... that such circulations of emotions springs from particular discourses of feminism and social policy. From this stance, emotions are approached as discursive practices that establish hierarchies among the implied subjects that forms the premises for producing knowledge. The chapter is based on empirical examples from...

  20. Recognition of facial expressions of emotion in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liqiang; Chen, Wanzhen; Shen, Yuedi; Wang, Xinling; Wei, Lili; Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Wei; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Whether patients with panic disorder behave differently or not when recognizing the facial expressions of emotion remains unsettled. We tested 21 outpatients with panic disorder and 34 healthy subjects, with a photo set from the Matsumoto and Ekman Japanese and Caucasian facial expressions of emotion, which includes anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise. Compared to the healthy subjects, patients showed lower accuracies when recognizing disgust and fear, but a higher accuracy when recognizing surprise. These results suggest that the altered specificity to these emotions leads tso self-awareness mechanisms to prevent further emotional reactions in panic disorder patients. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Travis J; Kauffman, Kyle T; Amrine, Katherine C H; Carper, Dana L; Lee, Raymond S; Becich, Peter J; Canales, Claudia J; Ardell, David H

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  2. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J. Lawrence

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU’s Not Unix Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics makes FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format. Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  3. The effect of emotion-focused orientation at retrieval on emotional memory in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lixia; Ornstein, Tisha J

    2011-04-01

    This study examines how emotion-focused orientation at retrieval affects memory for emotional versus neutral images in young and older adults. A total of 44 older adults (ages 61-84 years, M=70.00, SD=5.54) and 43 young adults (ages 17-33 years, M=20.58, SD=3.72) were tested on their free recall and forced-choice recognition of images. At retrieval the emotion-focused orientation was manipulated by instructing participants to focus on emotion-related information (i.e., emotional content of images and the emotional reactions evoked by the images). In the control conditions participants were either instructed to focus on visual information or not provided any specific orientation instruction. In free recall but not forced-choice recognition, the emotion-focused orientation increased young adults' positivity bias and thus wiped out their superior negativity bias. However, the emotion-focused orientation did not affect older adults' emotional memory. The data suggest that young adults activate and prioritise emotional goals in response to external demand during intentional information processing whereas older adults seem to spontaneously tune themselves to emotional goals.

  4. The emotionally competent leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goleman, D

    1998-01-01

    Aristotle once challenged man "to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way" (The Nicomachean Ethics). Daniel Goleman, Ph.D., a journalist for the New York Times, expands on this statement in his new book, "Emotional Intelligence." He defines emotional intelligence as the ability to rein in emotional impulses, to read another's innermost feelings and to handle relationships and conflict smoothly. This new model of intelligence puts emotions at the center of our aptitudes for living. Goleman asserts that these emotional aptitudes can preserve relationships, protect our health and improve our success at work. The following adaptation from "Emotional Intelligence" (Bantam Books, 1995) offers suggestions to managers and supervisors on how they can create a more cost-effective and healthier workplace for their employees by becoming more aware of their own emotional. intelligence.

  5. How emotions change time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett eSchirmer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental evidence suggests that emotions can both speed-up and slow-down the internal clock. Speeding-up has been observed for to-be-timed emotional stimuli that have the capacity to sustain attention, whereas slowing-down has been observed for to-be-timed neutral stimuli that are presented in the context of emotional distractors. These effects have been explained by mechanisms that involve changes in bodily arousal, attention or sentience. A review of these mechanisms suggests both merits and difficulties in the explanation of the emotion-timing link. Therefore, a hybrid mechanism involving stimulus-specific sentient representations is proposed as a candidate for mediating emotional influences on time. According to this proposal, emotional events enhance sentient representations, which in turn support temporal estimates. Emotional stimuli with a larger share in ones sentience are then perceived as longer than neutral stimuli with a smaller share.

  6. Papéis de autocuidado: subsídios para enfermagem diante das reações emocionais dos portadores de diabetes Mellitus Papeles de autocuidado: subsídios para enfermería en las reacciones emocionales de los portadores de diabetes Mellitus Self-care roles: subsidy to the nursing before the emotional reactions of the diabetes Mellitus carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Victor dos Santos Filho

    2008-03-01

    was elaborated based on the study of the two thesis master of degrees (Study 1 and 2 and of a doctorate thesis (Study 3. Had been identified reactions emotional common and frequency in the patients with Diabetes Mellitus (DM, being able to compromise the action performance of papers of self-care. We have as objective: to present reactions emotional identified in patients with DM they intervene with the action performance of papers of self-care and arguing the emotional the interferences of for the self-care. Of the results the emotional categories of reactions had emerged: fear; anger, bad behavior, depressive feelings and stress/ anxiety. Evidencing to be independent DM an illness of the type and the age band it is the cause of a biopsychosocial negative impact. It is concluded the necessity of a larger approaching related to the emotional reaction and the action performance of self-care roles of patients with DM.

  7. Emotional expressions beyond facial muscle actions. A call for studying autonomic signals and their impact on social perception.

    OpenAIRE

    Mariska Esther Kret

    2015-01-01

    Humans are well adapted to quickly recognize and adequately respond to another’s emotions. Different theories propose that mimicry of emotional expressions (facial or otherwise) mechanistically underlies, or at least facilitates, these swift adaptive reactions. When people unconsciously mimic their interaction partner’s expressions of emotion, they come to feel reflections of those companions’ emotions, which in turn influence the observer’s own emotional and empathic behavior. The majority o...

  8. Facial Emotion Recognition and Expression in Parkinson's Disease: An Emotional Mirror Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Visco-Comandini, Federica; Erro, Roberto; Morgante, Francesca; Bologna, Matteo; Fasano, Alfonso; Ricciardi, Diego; Edwards, Mark J; Kilner, James

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have impairment of facial expressivity (hypomimia) and difficulties in interpreting the emotional facial expressions produced by others, especially for aversive emotions. We aimed to evaluate the ability to produce facial emotional expressions and to recognize facial emotional expressions produced by others in a group of PD patients and a group of healthy participants in order to explore the relationship between these two abilities and any differences between the two groups of participants. Twenty non-demented, non-depressed PD patients and twenty healthy participants (HC) matched for demographic characteristics were studied. The ability of recognizing emotional facial expressions was assessed with the Ekman 60-faces test (Emotion recognition task). Participants were video-recorded while posing facial expressions of 6 primary emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear and anger). The most expressive pictures for each emotion were derived from the videos. Ten healthy raters were asked to look at the pictures displayed on a computer-screen in pseudo-random fashion and to identify the emotional label in a six-forced-choice response format (Emotion expressivity task). Reaction time (RT) and accuracy of responses were recorded. At the end of each trial the participant was asked to rate his/her confidence in his/her perceived accuracy of response. For emotion recognition, PD reported lower score than HC for Ekman total score (pemotions sub-scores happiness, fear, anger, sadness (pemotion expressivity task, PD and HC significantly differed in the total score (p = 0.05) and in the sub-scores for happiness, sadness, anger (all pemotions. There was a significant positive correlation between the emotion facial recognition and expressivity in both groups; the correlation was even stronger when ranking emotions from the best recognized to the worst (R = 0.75, p = 0.004). PD patients showed difficulties in recognizing emotional facial

  9. Facial Emotion Recognition and Expression in Parkinson’s Disease: An Emotional Mirror Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Visco-Comandini, Federica; Erro, Roberto; Morgante, Francesca; Bologna, Matteo; Fasano, Alfonso; Ricciardi, Diego; Edwards, Mark J.; Kilner, James

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have impairment of facial expressivity (hypomimia) and difficulties in interpreting the emotional facial expressions produced by others, especially for aversive emotions. We aimed to evaluate the ability to produce facial emotional expressions and to recognize facial emotional expressions produced by others in a group of PD patients and a group of healthy participants in order to explore the relationship between these two abilities and any differences between the two groups of participants. Methods Twenty non-demented, non-depressed PD patients and twenty healthy participants (HC) matched for demographic characteristics were studied. The ability of recognizing emotional facial expressions was assessed with the Ekman 60-faces test (Emotion recognition task). Participants were video-recorded while posing facial expressions of 6 primary emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear and anger). The most expressive pictures for each emotion were derived from the videos. Ten healthy raters were asked to look at the pictures displayed on a computer-screen in pseudo-random fashion and to identify the emotional label in a six-forced-choice response format (Emotion expressivity task). Reaction time (RT) and accuracy of responses were recorded. At the end of each trial the participant was asked to rate his/her confidence in his/her perceived accuracy of response. Results For emotion recognition, PD reported lower score than HC for Ekman total score (pemotions sub-scores happiness, fear, anger, sadness (pemotion expressivity task, PD and HC significantly differed in the total score (p = 0.05) and in the sub-scores for happiness, sadness, anger (all pemotions. There was a significant positive correlation between the emotion facial recognition and expressivity in both groups; the correlation was even stronger when ranking emotions from the best recognized to the worst (R = 0.75, p = 0.004). Conclusions PD patients

  10. From Speech to Emotional Interaction: EmotiRob Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tallec, Marc; Saint-Aimé, Sébastien; Jost, Céline; Villaneau, Jeanne; Antoine, Jean-Yves; Letellier-Zarshenas, Sabine; Le-Pévédic, Brigitte; Duhaut, Dominique

    This article presents research work done in the domain of nonverbal emotional interaction for the EmotiRob project. It is a component of the MAPH project, the objective of which is to give comfort to vulnerable children and/or those undergoing long-term hospitalisation through the help of an emotional robot companion. It is important to note that we are not trying to reproduce human emotion and behavior, but trying to make a robot emotionally expressive. This paper will present the different hypotheses we have used from understanding to emotional reaction. We begin the article with a presentation of the MAPH and EmotiRob project. Then, we quickly describe the speech undestanding system, the iGrace computational model of emotions and integration of dynamics behavior. We conclude with a description of the architecture of Emi, as well as improvements to be made to its next generation.

  11. Anticipated and experienced emotions in environmental risk perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Bohm

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective forecasting with respect to two environmental risks (ozone depletion, air pollution was investigated by studying tourists who travelled to either Australia or Bangkok and were thus confronted with one of these risks. We measured anticipated outcome and anticipated emotions before the journey, actually experienced outcome and actually experienced emotions during the journey, and anticipated outcome and emotions concerning a future encounter with the same risk after the journey. Results indicate that tourists underestimate (air pollution or correctly predict (ozone depletion both the seriousness of the outcome and their emotional reactions. The relationship between actual outcome and actual emotions is stronger than that between anticipated outcome and anticipated emotions. Furthermore, tourists learn from their travel experience and adjust their anticipations concerning future encounters with the environmental risk. Findings suggest that the domain of environmental risks differs from personal outcomes with respect to the process of affective forecasting.

  12. Responder fast steering mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Andrew; Shawki, Islam

    2013-10-01

    Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) has designed, built and tested a 3.3-inch diameter fast steering mirror (FSM) for space application. This 2-axis FSM operates over a large angle (over 10 degree range), has a very high servo bandwidth (over 3.3 Khz closed loop bandwidth), has nanoradian-class noise, and is designed to support microradian class line of sight accuracy. The FSM maintains excellent performance over large temperature ranges (which includes wave front error) and has very high reliability with the help of fully redundant angle sensors and actuator circuits. The FSM is capable of achieving all its design requirements while also being reaction-compensated. The reaction compensation is achieved passively and does not need a separate control loop. The FSM has undergone various environmental testing which include exported forces and torques and thermal vacuum testing that support the FSM design claims. This paper presents the mechanical design and test results of the mechanism which satisfies the rigorous vacuum and space application requirements.

  13. Faces and bodies: perception and mimicry of emotionally congruent and incongruent facial and bodily expressions

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Traditional emotion theories stress the importance of the face in the expression of emotions but bodily expressions are becoming increasingly important. Here we tested the hypothesis that similar physiological responses can be evoked by observing emotional face and body signals and that the reaction to angry signals is amplified in anxious individuals. We designed three experiments in which participants categorized emotional expressions from isolated facial and bodily expressions and from emo...

  14. Grima: A Distinct Emotion Concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Fernández-Dols, José-Miguel; Gollwitzer, Peter M.; Keil, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    People experience an unpleasant sensation when hearing a scratch on a board or plate. The present research focuses on this aversive experience known in Spanish as ‘grima’ with no equivalent term in English and German. We hypothesized that this aversive experience constitutes a distinctive, separate emotional concept. In Study 1, we found that the affective meaning of ‘grima’ was closer to disgust than to other emotion concepts. Thus, in Study 2 we explored the features of grima and compared them with disgust. As grima was reported to be predominantly elicited by certain auditory stimuli and associated with a distinctive physiological pattern, Study 3 used direct measures of physiological arousal to test the assumption of a distinctive pattern of physiological responses elicited by auditory stimuli of grima and disgust, and found different effects on heart rate but not on skin conductance. In Study 4, we hypothesized that only participants with an implementation intention geared toward down-regulating grima would be able to successfully weaken the grima- but not disgust- experience. Importantly, this effect was specific as it held true for the grima-eliciting sounds only, but did not affect disgust-related sounds. Finally, Study 5 found that English and German speakers lack a single accessible linguistic label for the pattern of aversive reactions termed by Spanish speaking individuals as ‘grima’, whereas the elicitors of other emotions were accessible and accurately identified by German, English, as well as Spanish speakers. PMID:28217102

  15. Emotional Aging: A Discrete Emotions Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute eKunzmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Perhaps the most important single finding in the field of emotional aging has been that the overall quality of affective experience steadily improves during adulthood and can be maintained into old age. Recent lifespan developmental theories have provided motivation- and experience-based explanations for this phenomenon. These theories suggest that, as individuals grow older, they become increasingly motivated and able to regulate their emotions, which could result in reduced negativity and enhanced positivity. The objective of this paper is to expand existing theories and empirical research on emotional aging by presenting a discrete emotions perspective. To illustrate the usefulness of this approach, we focus on a discussion of the literature examining age differences in anger and sadness. These two negative emotions have been subsumed under the singular concept of negative affect. From a discrete emotions perspective, however, they are highly distinct. Sadness is elicited by an irreversible loss and associated with low situational control, high goal adjustment tendencies, and the motivation to search for social support. The experience of anger, by contrast, is typically triggered by other individuals who intentio

  16. [Neuroarchitecture of musical emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sel, Alejandra; Calvo-Merino, Beatriz

    2013-03-01

    The emotional response to music, or musical emotion, is a universal response that draws on diverse psychological processes implemented in a large array of neural structures and mechanisms. Studies using electroencephalography, functional magnetic resonance, lesions and individuals with extent musical training have begun to elucidate some of these mechanisms. The objective of this article is reviewing the most relevant studies that have tried to identify the neural correlates of musical emotion from the more automatic to the more complex processes, and to understand how these correlates interact in the brain. The article describes how the presentation of music perceived as emotional is associated with a rapid autonomic response in thalamic and subthalamic structures, accompanied by changes in the electrodermal and endocrine responses. It also explains how musical emotion processing activates auditory cortex, as well as a series of limbic and paralimbic structures, such as the amygdala, the anterior cingulate cortex or the hippocampus, demonstrating the relevant contribution of the limbic system to musical emotion. Further, it is detailed how musical emotion depends to a great extent on semantic and syntactic process carried out in temporal and parietofrontal areas, respectively. Some of the recent works demonstrating that musical emotion highly relies on emotional simulation are also mentioned. Finally, a summary of these studies, their limitations, and suggestions for further research on the neuroarchitecture of musical emotion are given.

  17. Intermittent fasting: a "new" historical strategy for controlling seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Rubenstein, James E; Kossoff, Eric H

    2013-05-01

    In antiquity, fasting was a treatment for epilepsy and a rationale for the ketogenic diet (KD). Preclinical data indicate the KD and intermittent fasting do not share identical anticonvulsant mechanisms. We implemented an intermittent fasting regimen in six children with an incomplete response to a KD. Three patients adhered to the combined intermittent fasting/KD regimen for 2 months and four had transient improvement in seizure control, albeit with some hunger-related adverse reactions.

  18. Changing the working self alters the emotions prompted by recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, John J; Sedikides, Constantine; Xie, Wenwen; Zhou, Xinyue

    2015-01-01

    Results from three studies indicated that emotional responses to memories can be changed by altering the working self. In particular, these results showed that emotional reactions to memories: (1) were especially positive when memories were perceived to be central to the working self (Experiment 1); (2) were muted when the working self was changed by adopting a third-person perspective during recall (Experiment 1); (3) of an event in the life of each participant's mother weakened when an individual was induced to experience a self that felt less close to their mother (Experiment 2) and (4) of a childhood event provoked especially positive emotional reactions after exposure to a mortality salience manipulation that increased perceived self-worth (Experiment 3). The extent to which mother was included in the self (Experiment 2) and self-worth (Experiment 3) plausibly mediated the effects of the manipulations on participants' emotional reactions to recalled events.

  19. Facial emotion recognition in adolescents with personality pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenschot, Fleur; van Aken, Marcel A G; Hessels, Christel; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Pijl, Ysbrand; Montagne, Barbara; van Voorst, Guus

    2014-07-01

    It has been argued that a heightened emotional sensitivity interferes with the cognitive processing of facial emotion recognition and may explain the intensified emotional reactions to external emotional stimuli of adults with personality pathology, such as borderline personality disorder (BPD). This study examines if and how deviations in facial emotion recognition also occur in adolescents with personality pathology. Forty-two adolescents with personality pathology, 111 healthy adolescents and 28 psychiatric adolescents without personality pathology completed the Emotion Recognition Task, measuring their accuracy and sensitivity in recognizing positive and negative emotion expressions presented in several, morphed, expression intensities. Adolescents with personality pathology showed an enhanced recognition accuracy of facial emotion expressions compared to healthy adolescents and clients with various Axis-I psychiatric diagnoses. They were also more sensitive to less intensive expressions of emotions than clients with various Axis-I psychiatric diagnoses, but not more than healthy adolescents. As has been shown in research on adults with BPD, adolescents with personality pathology show enhanced facial emotion recognition.

  20. Event-related skin conductance responses to musical emotions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalfa, Stéphanie; Isabelle, Peretz; Jean-Pierre, Blondin; Manon, Robert

    2002-08-09

    While the reasons underlying musical emotions are unclear, music is nevertheless a powerful elicitor of emotion, and as such, may induce autonomic nervous system responses. One typical measure of this neural pathway is the skin conductance response (SCR). This response generally depends upon stimulus arousal, one of the two motivational determinants of emotion. The objective of the present study was to verify whether emotional reactions to music elicit such event-related autonomic responses. To this aim, four musical emotions varying in arousal were employed: fear, happiness, sadness and peacefulness. SCRs were found to be greater with the two more stimulating emotions, fear and happiness, as compared to the two more relaxing emotions, sadness and peacefulness (Pmusical emotional arousal, but are not sensitive to emotional clarity. While several studies have been performed with visual scenes and environmental sounds, the present study brings similar evidence from the musical domain.

  1. Stop feeling: Inhibition of emotional interference following stop-signal trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal eKalanthroff

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although a great deal of literature has been dedicated to the mutual links between emotion and the selective attention component of executive control, there is very little data regarding the links between emotion and the inhibitory component of executive control. In the current study we employed an emotional stop-signal task in order to examine whether emotion modulates and is modulated by inhibitory control. Results replicated previous findings showing reduced inhibitory control (longer stop-signal reaction time following negative, compared to neutral pictures. Most importantly, results show decreased emotional interference following stop-signal trials. These results show that the inhibitory control component of executive control can serve to decrease emotional effects. We suggest that inhibitory control and emotion have a two-way connection in which emotion disrupts inhibitory control and activation of inhibitory control disrupts emotion.

  2. Touch communicates distinct emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertenstein, Matthew J; Keltner, Dacher; App, Betsy; Bulleit, Brittany A; Jaskolka, Ariane R

    2006-08-01

    The study of emotional signaling has focused almost exclusively on the face and voice. In 2 studies, the authors investigated whether people can identify emotions from the experience of being touched by a stranger on the arm (without seeing the touch). In the 3rd study, they investigated whether observers can identify emotions from watching someone being touched on the arm. Two kinds of evidence suggest that humans can communicate numerous emotions with touch. First, participants in the United States (Study 1) and Spain (Study 2) could decode anger, fear, disgust, love, gratitude, and sympathy via touch at much-better-than-chance levels. Second, fine-grained coding documented specific touch behaviors associated with different emotions. In Study 3, the authors provide evidence that participants can accurately decode distinct emotions by merely watching others communicate via touch. The findings are discussed in terms of their contributions to affective science and the evolution of altruism and cooperation. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved

  3. Schizophrenia and emotional rubbernecking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, Teal S; Smith, Edward E

    2014-03-01

    Orienting toward emotionally salient information can be adaptive, as when danger needs to be avoided. Consistent with this idea, research has shown that emotionally valenced information draws attention more so than does neutral information in healthy individuals. However, at times this tendency is not adaptive, and it may distract the individual from goals. People with schizophrenia (PSZ), though they frequently show deficits in attentional control, have also been shown to exhibit diminished recognition of and attention to emotional information. In the present study, we investigated how the presentation of emotionally salient information affected performance on a working memory task for PSZ and healthy controls (HC). We found that although hit rates were equal to those of HCs for PSZ, the PSZ made fewer false alarms-resulting in overall better performance-than did the HCs. Deficits in emotional processing in PSZ appear to provide an advantage to them in situations in which salient emotional information competes with active cognitive goals.

  4. Emotion and autobiographical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Alisha C.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2010-03-01

    Autobiographical memory encompasses our recollections of specific, personal events. In this article, we review the interactions between emotion and autobiographical memory, focusing on two broad ways in which these interactions occur. First, the emotional content of an experience can influence the way in which the event is remembered. Second, emotions and emotional goals experienced at the time of autobiographical retrieval can influence the information recalled. We discuss the behavioral manifestations of each of these types of interactions and describe the neural mechanisms that may support those interactions. We discuss how findings from the clinical literature (e.g., regarding depression) and the social psychology literature (e.g., on emotion regulation) might inform future investigations of the interplay between the emotions experienced at the time of retrieval and the memories recalled, and we present ideas for future research in this domain.

  5. The multiplicity of emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Rudiger Pfister

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A four-fold classification of emotions with respect to their functions in decision making is proposed. It is argued that emotions are not homogenous concerning their role in decision making, but that four distinct functions can be distinguished concerning emotional phenomena. One function is to provide information about pleasure and pain for preference construction, a second function is to enable rapid choices under time pressure, a third function is to focus attention on relevant aspects of a decision problem, and a fourth function is to generate commitment concerning morally and socially significant decisions. The pertinent literature on the relationship between emotion and decision making is reviewed, and it is concluded that most approaches fit into the proposed framework. We argue that a precise conceptualization of emotional phenomena is required to advance our understanding of the complex role of emotions in decision making.

  6. Examining the effects of variation in emotional tone of voice on spoken word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krestar, Maura L; McLennan, Conor T

    2013-09-01

    Emotional tone of voice (ETV) is essential for optimal verbal communication. Research has found that the impact of variation in nonlinguistic features of speech on spoken word recognition differs according to a time course. In the current study, we investigated whether intratalker variation in ETV follows the same time course in two long-term repetition priming experiments. We found that intratalker variability in ETVs affected reaction times to spoken words only when processing was relatively slow and difficult, not when processing was relatively fast and easy. These results provide evidence for the use of both abstract and episodic lexical representations for processing within-talker variability in ETV, depending on the time course of spoken word recognition.

  7. 护理干预对出现药物不良反应人工流产妇女焦虑抑郁情绪的影响%Influence of Nursing Intervention on Anxiety and Depression Emotions of Early Pregnant Women with Adverse Drug Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢娟; 于晓兰; 董力; 王颖

    2015-01-01

    Objective To know anxiety and depression emotions of early pregnant women with adverse drug reactions and their inlfuencing factors, and to explore inlfuence of nursing intervention on anxiety and depression emotions. Method 148 cases of early terminated pregnant patients with adverse drug reactions were measured with self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS) and social support rating scale (SSRS). According to ages, they were divided into low-age group(≤30) and advanced-age group(>30). There were 74 cases in each group. General nursing intervention was applied to these cases. For patients of two groups, anxiety and depression emotions before and after drugs were taken as well as incidence of adverse drug reaction after drugs were taken were assessed and compared. Result Standard scores of anxiety and depression emotions prior to nursing intervention were higher than national norms. The comparison difference was statistically signiifcant(P0.01). There were statistically signiifcant differences between two groups in social support score, subjective support and objective support(P0.01). For low-age group, comparison differences between anxiety and depression emotions before and after nursing intervention were statistically signiifcant(P0.05). For advanced-age group, comparison differences between depression emotions before and after nursing intervention were statistically signiifcant(P<0.05). Conclusion It’s normal for early pregnant women with adverse drug reactions to appear anxiety and depression emotions. General nursing intervention can help to improve anxiety and depression emotions. Advanced-age group should be paid close attention.%目的:了解出现药物不良反应人工流产妇女流产前的焦虑抑郁状况及其影响因素,探索综合护理干预对焦虑抑郁情绪的影响。方法采用焦虑自评量表(SAS)、抑郁自评量表(SDS)、社会支持评定量表(SSRS),对

  8. Positive emotions in education

    OpenAIRE

    Pekrun, Reinhard; Götz, Thomas; Titz, Wolfram; Perry, Raymond P.

    2002-01-01

    In this chapter, we focus on the student side of educational settings. More specifically, we give an overview of our research addressing students' academic emotions, that is, their emotions relating to learning, instruction, and achievement in academic settings associate with attending class, studying, and taking tests and exams. In so doing, we address the following problems in turn: (1) How frequently are positive emotions experienced by students at school and university, and which positive...

  9. Music, memory and emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory. Music has a prominent role in the everyday life of many people. Whether it is for recreation, distraction or mood enhancement, a lot of people listen to music from early in t...

  10. Are there basic emotions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, P

    1992-07-01

    Ortony and Turner's (1990) arguments against those who adopt the view that there are basic emotions are challenged. The evidence on universals in expression and in physiology strongly suggests that there is a biological basis to the emotions that have been studied. Ortony and Turner's reviews of this literature are faulted, and their alternative theoretical explanations do not fit the evidence. The utility of the basic emotions approach is also shown in terms of the research it has generated.

  11. Drug Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well- ...

  12. Natural Language Description of Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Abe

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation studies how people describe emotions with language and how computers can simulate this descriptive behavior. Although many non-human animals can express their current emotions as social signals, only humans can communicate about emotions symbolically. This symbolic communication of emotion allows us to talk about emotions that we…

  13. Emotional genesis of philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyugashev E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the specificity of philosophy is considered as a path to spiritual-practical mastering of the world. The spiritual-practical structure of philosophy includes philosophic practice and philosophic consciousness. The latter actualizes in the forms of philosophic thinking and sensory-emotional reflection of reality. Philosophical sensuality has a wide range of manifestations, but its specificity is defined by the emotion of wonder. Wonder is a primal, basic emotion. Fear, curiosity (interest, joy and a number of other emotions also belong to the category of basic emotions. In religious studies the ’theory of fear’ attributes the origin of religion to experience of fear. In psychology of emotion the curiosity is considered as a source of cognitive interest and scientific cognition. Appropriately, it may be possible to propose the ‘theory of curiosity’ and the ‘theory of wonder’ to explain the origin of science and philosophy. In the context of the theories the science and the religion differ in their emotional sources from the philosophy. The status of wonder as a basic emotion defines the emotional sovereignty of philosophy, its independence from other ways of spiritual-practical mastering of the world. Author demonstrates the incapacity of interpretations of doubt and suffering (despair as emotional origins of philosophy. Doubt as uncertainty is a derivative of faith and lacks the status of basic emotion. The suffering is an emotional tone of every sensation, a pair of the emotional tone of pleasure. It is impossible to consider the suffering as an origin of philosophy due to both the effect of twoness of pleasure and suffering and their status of emotional tones. In addition, suffering (despair is an affect, the repetition and accumulation of which conduces to the emotional discharge, an affective explosion. Therefore, they cannot be the sources of cognitive motion. The cognitive potential of wonder is defined by its

  14. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-08-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of each lesson were analysed to identify individual student's emotions. Results from two representative students are presented as case studies. Using a theoretical perspective drawn from theories of emotions founded in sociology, two assertions emerged. First, during the demonstration activity, students experienced the emotions of wonder and surprise; second, during a laboratory activity, students experienced the intense positive emotions of happiness/joy. Characteristics of these activities that contributed to students' positive experiences are highlighted. The study found that choosing activities that evoked strong positive emotional experiences, focused students' attention on the phenomenon they were learning, and the activities were recalled positively. Furthermore, such positive experiences may contribute to students' interest and engagement in science and longer term memorability. Finally, implications for science teachers and pre-service teacher education are suggested.

  15. Risk, Affect and Emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens O. Zinn

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For a long time theorising has underestimated the importance of affect and emotion in decision making and the management of risk and uncertainty. In relatively one-sided interpretations emotions were often interpreted as threats for rational decision making, and could be triggered by uncertainties, which would go along with social change. Recent interdisciplinary research has shown the importance to acknowledge the more complex link between reasoning and emotions. The article outlines different perspectives on emotion in risk research of economics, psychology and sociology and argues for further research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0601293

  16. Emotions on the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Louise

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to discuss how including, and stressing, emotions in research enables us to understand the experience of commuting as an everyday practice that has more meaning than a journey from A to B. The paper shows how emotions are practiced and produced while commuting......, and how these emotions are crucial for the production of social space onboard trains. In doing so it draws on ethnographical research conducted while following various commuting communities and individual commuters. The paper concludes that the emotional practice of commuting produces an ever changing...

  17. Pitching Emotions : The Interpersonal Effects of Emotions in Baseball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheshin, A.; Heerdink, M.W.; Kossakowski, J.J.; van Kleef, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Sports games are inherently emotional situations, but surprisingly little is known about the social consequences of these emotions. We examined the interpersonal effects of emotional expressions in professional baseball. Specifically, we investigated whether pitchers’ facial displays influence how

  18. When getting angry is smart: emotional preferences and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Brett Q; Tamir, Maya

    2012-08-01

    People who prefer to feel useful emotions, even when they are unpleasant to experience, must understand emotions and seek to regulate them in strategic ways. Such people, therefore, may be more emotionally intelligent compared with people who prefer to feel emotions that may not be useful for the context at hand, even if those emotions are pleasant to experience. We tested this hypothesis by measuring emotional intelligence and preferences to feel pleasant and unpleasant emotions in contexts in which they are likely to be useful or not. We found significant positive associations between emotional intelligence and preferences for useful emotions, even when controlling for trait emotional experiences and cognitive intelligence. People who prefer to feel anger when confronting others tend to be higher in emotional intelligence, whereas people who prefer to feel happiness in such contexts tend to be lower in emotional intelligence. Such findings are consistent with the idea that wanting to feel bad may be good at times, and vice versa.

  19. Pitching Emotions : The Interpersonal Effects of Emotions in Baseball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheshin, A.; Heerdink, M.W.; Kossakowski, J.J.; van Kleef, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Sports games are inherently emotional situations, but surprisingly little is known about the social consequences of these emotions. We examined the interpersonal effects of emotional expressions in professional baseball. Specifically, we investigated whether pitchers’ facial displays influence how p

  20. Identification of parameters underlying emotions and a classification of emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, N. Arvind

    2008-01-01

    The standard classification of emotions involves categorizing the expression of emotions. In this paper, parameters underlying some emotions are identified and a new classification based on these parameters is suggested.

  1. Ambivalent Emotions in Music : We Like Sad Music When It Makes Us Happy

    OpenAIRE

    Weth, Karim; Kickinger, Max

    2013-01-01

    We often react ambivalently to a piece of music, simultaneously experiencing both sadness and happiness, and attributing both emotions to the musical content. Two experiments were conducted (1) to empirically test for ambivalent emotions and (2) to investigate the amount of musical information necessary to elicit such emotions. In experiment 1, synthesized musical excerpts were manipulated in tempo (fast/slow) and mode (major/minor). By using unipolar scales, listeners could independently rat...

  2. From everyday emotions to aesthetic emotions: Towards a unified theory of musical emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juslin, Patrik N.

    2013-09-01

    The sound of music may arouse profound emotions in listeners. But such experiences seem to involve a ‘paradox’, namely that music - an abstract form of art, which appears removed from our concerns in everyday life - can arouse emotions - biologically evolved reactions related to human survival. How are these (seemingly) non-commensurable phenomena linked together? Key is to understand the processes through which sounds are imbued with meaning. It can be argued that the survival of our ancient ancestors depended on their ability to detect patterns in sounds, derive meaning from them, and adjust their behavior accordingly. Such an ecological perspective on sound and emotion forms the basis of a recent multi-level framework that aims to explain emotional responses to music in terms of a large set of psychological mechanisms. The goal of this review is to offer an updated and expanded version of the framework that can explain both ‘everyday emotions’ and ‘aesthetic emotions’. The revised framework - referred to as BRECVEMA - includes eight mechanisms: Brain Stem Reflex, Rhythmic Entrainment, Evaluative Conditioning, Contagion, Visual Imagery, Episodic Memory, Musical Expectancy, and Aesthetic Judgment. In this review, it is argued that all of the above mechanisms may be directed at information that occurs in a ‘musical event’ (i.e., a specific constellation of music, listener, and context). Of particular significance is the addition of a mechanism corresponding to aesthetic judgments of the music, to better account for typical ‘appreciation emotions’ such as admiration and awe. Relationships between aesthetic judgments and other mechanisms are reviewed based on the revised framework. It is suggested that the framework may contribute to a long-needed reconciliation between previous approaches that have conceptualized music listeners' responses in terms of either ‘everyday emotions’ or ‘aesthetic emotions’.

  3. Individual differences in emotional expressivity predict oxytocin responses to cortisol administration : Relevance to breast cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Mattie; van Peer, Jacobien M.; Korf, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Reduced emotional expression has been consistently related to susceptibility or fast progression of breast cancer. Breast cancer development and reduced emotional expression have both been related to rejection- and separation-related conditions. The neuropeptide oxytocin is low in response to reject

  4. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D. [Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  5. Does vivid emotional imagery depend on body signals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Eduardo Paulo Morawski; Naqvi, Nasir; Bechara, Antoine; Tranel, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    The recall and re-experiencing of a personal emotional event (emotional imagery) are thought to evoke neural activity in the central nervous system that can affect the physiology of bodily states. It has been proposed that the more active the neural systems previously engaged in the emotional experience, and the more active the bodily state associated with that experience, the more vivid the emotional imagery is. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the gastrointestinal system (GI) are engaged in emotional reactions. On this basis, we hypothesized that vivid emotional imagery would be accompanied by strong increases in gastrointestinal and sympathetic nervous system activity. To test this hypothesis, 17 healthy participants performed emotional imagery of strong autobiographical memories involving various emotional states (happy, fear, disgust, sadness, anger). SNS and GI changes, measured by skin conductance and electrogastrogram, respectively, correlated positively with subjective ratings of arousal during the imagery. However, the SNS changes did not correlate with ratings of emotional imagery vividness, and even more intriguingly, the GI changes correlated strongly and negatively with vividness ratings. To account for these findings, we propose that in highly vivid imagery experience, the central nervous system is simulating the whole emotional experience strongly, and bodily information plays a lesser role. In low vivid imagery experience, the central nervous system is not simulating very strongly the emotional experience, and information coming from the body (including the GI system) plays a greater role. This interpretation is set forth in the context of Damasio's [Damasio, A., (1999) The feeling of what happens: body and emotion in the making of consciousness, Orlando, Fl, Harcourt.] theoretical framework, which predicts such a dissociation between a "body loop" and an "as if body loop" for the experiencing and re-experiencing of emotions and feelings.

  6. The MPI emotional body expressions database for narrative scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Ekaterina; de la Rosa, Stephan; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Mohler, Betty

    2014-01-01

    Emotion expression in human-human interaction takes place via various types of information, including body motion. Research on the perceptual-cognitive mechanisms underlying the processing of natural emotional body language can benefit greatly from datasets of natural emotional body expressions that facilitate stimulus manipulation and analysis. The existing databases have so far focused on few emotion categories which display predominantly prototypical, exaggerated emotion expressions. Moreover, many of these databases consist of video recordings which limit the ability to manipulate and analyse the physical properties of these stimuli. We present a new database consisting of a large set (over 1400) of natural emotional body expressions typical of monologues. To achieve close-to-natural emotional body expressions, amateur actors were narrating coherent stories while their body movements were recorded with motion capture technology. The resulting 3-dimensional motion data recorded at a high frame rate (120 frames per second) provides fine-grained information about body movements and allows the manipulation of movement on a body joint basis. For each expression it gives the positions and orientations in space of 23 body joints for every frame. We report the results of physical motion properties analysis and of an emotion categorisation study. The reactions of observers from the emotion categorisation study are included in the database. Moreover, we recorded the intended emotion expression for each motion sequence from the actor to allow for investigations regarding the link between intended and perceived emotions. The motion sequences along with the accompanying information are made available in a searchable MPI Emotional Body Expression Database. We hope that this database will enable researchers to study expression and perception of naturally occurring emotional body expressions in greater depth.

  7. Flash chemistry: fast chemical synthesis by using microreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Jun-ichi; Nagaki, Aiichiro; Yamada, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    This concept article provides a brief outline of the concept of flash chemistry for carrying out extremely fast reactions in organic synthesis by using microreactors. Generation of highly reactive species is one of the key elements of flash chemistry. Another important element of flash chemistry is the control of extremely fast reactions to obtain the desired products selectively. Fast reactions are usually highly exothermic, and heat removal is an important factor in controlling such reactions. Heat transfer occurs very rapidly in microreactors by virtue of a large surface area per unit volume, making precise temperature control possible. Fast reactions often involve highly unstable intermediates, which decompose very quickly, making reaction control difficult. The residence time can be greatly reduced in microreactors, and this feature is quite effective in controlling such reactions. For extremely fast reactions, kinetics often cannot be used because of the lack of homogeneity of the reaction environment when they are conducted in conventional reactors such as flasks. Fast mixing using micromixers solves such problems. The concept of flash chemistry has been successfully applied to various organic reactions including a) highly exothermic reactions that are difficult to control in conventional reactors, b) reactions in which a reactive intermediate easily decomposes in conventional reactors, c) reactions in which undesired byproducts are produced in the subsequent reactions in conventional reactors, and d) reactions whose products easily decompose in conventional reactors. The concept of flash chemistry can be also applied to polymer synthesis. Cationic polymerization can be conducted with an excellent level of molecular-weight control and molecular-weight distribution control.

  8. Unconsciously Triggered Emotional Conflict by Emotional Facial Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Jiang; Kira Bailey; Antao Chen; Qian Cui; Qinglin Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated whether emotional conflict and emotional conflict adaptation could be triggered by unconscious emotional information as assessed in a backward-masked affective priming task. Participants were instructed to identify the valence of a face (e.g., happy or sad) preceded by a masked happy or sad face. The results of two experiments revealed the emotional conflict effect but no emotional conflict adaptation effect. This demonstrates that emotional conflict can be trig...

  9. The role of the medial temporal limbic system in processing emotions in voice and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühholz, Sascha; Trost, Wiebke; Grandjean, Didier

    2014-12-01

    Subcortical brain structures of the limbic system, such as the amygdala, are thought to decode the emotional value of sensory information. Recent neuroimaging studies, as well as lesion studies in patients, have shown that the amygdala is sensitive to emotions in voice and music. Similarly, the hippocampus, another part of the temporal limbic system (TLS), is responsive to vocal and musical emotions, but its specific roles in emotional processing from music and especially from voices have been largely neglected. Here we review recent research on vocal and musical emotions, and outline commonalities and differences in the neural processing of emotions in the TLS in terms of emotional valence, emotional intensity and arousal, as well as in terms of acoustic and structural features of voices and music. We summarize the findings in a neural framework including several subcortical and cortical functional pathways between the auditory system and the TLS. This framework proposes that some vocal expressions might already receive a fast emotional evaluation via a subcortical pathway to the amygdala, whereas cortical pathways to the TLS are thought to be equally used for vocal and musical emotions. While the amygdala might be specifically involved in a coarse decoding of the emotional value of voices and music, the hippocampus might process more complex vocal and musical emotions, and might have an important role especially for the decoding of musical emotions by providing memory-based and contextual associations.

  10. Positive Emotion, Negative Emotion, and Emotion Control in the Externalizing Problems of School-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geunyoung; Walden, Tedra; Harris, Vicki; Karrass, Jan; Catron, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the role of emotion and emotion control in children's externalizing problems. Third- to sixth-grade children were administered a self-report measure of positive emotion, negative emotion, and emotion control. Peer- and teacher-reported adjustment problems were assessed. Structural equations modeling revealed that…

  11. Two novel nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction-based assays of dried blood spots, genomic DNA, or whole cells for fast, reliable detection of Z and S mutations in the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Knudsen, I; Jensen, P K;

    1992-01-01

    Two new nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays for the Z and S mutations in the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene are presented. The assays take advantage of PCR-mediated mutagenesis, creating new diagnostic restriction enzyme sites for unambiguous discrimination between test samples...

  12. Perceiving emotions through psychophysiological signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, J.; van den Broek, Egon; Drullman, R.; Schut, Marleen H.; Beintema, J.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; van Wijngaarden, S.; Tuinenbreijer, Kees; van Herk, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Emotions influence our cognitive functioning heavily. Therefore, it is interesting to develop measurement techniques that can record experienced emotions. Moreover, to improve user system interaction, computers need to recognize and respond properly to their user's emotional state. This would enable

  13. Stereotype Associations and Emotion Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlstra, Gijsbert; Holland, Rob W.; Dotsch, Ron; Hugenberg, Kurt; Wigboldus, Daniel H. J.

    We investigated whether stereotype associations between specific emotional expressions and social categories underlie stereotypic emotion recognition biases. Across two studies, we replicated previously documented stereotype biases in emotion recognition using both dynamic (Study 1) and static

  14. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  15. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  16. Beware Emotional Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret A.; Janson, Gregory R.

    2011-01-01

    Emotional maltreatment is a less visible form of abuse that frequently occurs in schools, but is often ignored or dismissed as an acceptable form of discipline or sanctioned classroom-management practice. The impact of emotional maltreatment on children is significant and impacts personality development, relationships, and learning. Principals, as…

  17. Darwin and Emotion Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ursula; Thibault, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    In his book "The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals," Charles Darwin (1872/1965) defended the argument that emotion expressions are evolved and adaptive (at least at some point in the past) and serve an important communicative function. The ideas he developed in his book had an important impact on the field and spawned rich domains of…

  18. Emotions "Unleashed" in Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Many painters use lines to express powerful emotions. Both Vincent van Gogh and Jean-Michel Basquiat had difficult lives filled with hardship, and died at a young age. They both used art to deal with their emotions. It seems like the stronger the feelings were in them, the faster the strokes were put down in their work. In this article,…

  19. Reasoning about emotional agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, J.-J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the role of emotions in artificial agent design, and the use of logic in reasoning about the emotional or affective states an agent can reside in. We do so by extending the KARO framework for reasoning about rational agents appropriately. In particular we formalize in this f

  20. Denying Medical Students' Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    USA Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Medical educators nationwide are questioning the process that leads to the denial of the emotional side of medicine by its practitioners. Emotional dilemmas are often verbally suppressed by most students, but they surface in many ways, such as depression, insomnia, loss of appetite, and anxiety. (RM)

  1. Genetics of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2011-09-01

    Emotion is critical to most aspects of human behavior, and individual differences in systems recruited to process emotional stimuli, expressed as variation in emotionality, are characteristic of several neuropsychiatric disorders. We examine the genetic origins of individual differences in emotion processing by focusing on functional variants at five genes: catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), serotonin transporter (SLC6A4), neuropeptide Y (NPY), a glucocorticoid receptor-regulating co-chaperone of stress proteins (FKBP5) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide receptor (ADCYAP1R1). These represent a range of effects of genes on emotion as well as the variety of mechanisms and factors, such as stress, that modify these effects. The new genomic era of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and deep sequencing may yield a wealth of new loci modulating emotion. The effects of these genes can be validated by neuroimaging, neuroendocrine and other studies accessing intermediate phenotypes, deepening our understanding of mechanisms of emotion and variation in emotionality.

  2. Music, Emotions, and Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packalen, Elina

    2008-01-01

    In this article Elina Packalen considers the notion of truth in connection with music. Her starting-point is the question of how music can be expressive of emotions; therefore she first summarizes some recent philosophical ideas of this issue. These ideas naturally raise the question of whether describing music in emotive terms has an epistemic…

  3. Multimodal recognition of emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datcu, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis proposes algorithms and techniques to be used for automatic recognition of six prototypic emotion categories by computer programs, based on the recognition of facial expressions and emotion patterns in voice. Considering the applicability in real-life conditions, the research is carried

  4. Darwin and Emotion Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ursula; Thibault, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    In his book "The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals," Charles Darwin (1872/1965) defended the argument that emotion expressions are evolved and adaptive (at least at some point in the past) and serve an important communicative function. The ideas he developed in his book had an important impact on the field and spawned rich domains of…

  5. Texture affects color emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.P.; Gevers, T.; Gijsenij, A.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have recorded color emotions in subjects viewing uniform color (UC) samples. We conduct an experiment to measure and model how these color emotions change when texture is added to the color samples. Using a computer monitor, our subjects arrange samples along four scales: warm-cool,

  6. Music, Emotions, and Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packalen, Elina

    2008-01-01

    In this article Elina Packalen considers the notion of truth in connection with music. Her starting-point is the question of how music can be expressive of emotions; therefore she first summarizes some recent philosophical ideas of this issue. These ideas naturally raise the question of whether describing music in emotive terms has an epistemic…

  7. Teachers' Emotions and Emotion Management: Integrating Emotion Regulation Theory with Emotional Labor Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mikyoung; Pekrun, Reinhard; Taxer, Jamie L.; Schutz, Paul A.; Vogl, Elisabeth; Xie, Xiyao

    2016-01-01

    While the similarities between emotion regulation (Gross in "J Personal Soc Psychol" 74:224-237, 1998a) and emotional labor (Hochschild in The managed heart: commercialization of human feeling. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1983) have been theoretically discussed, empirical research on their relation is lacking. We examined…

  8. Teachers' Emotions and Emotion Management: Integrating Emotion Regulation Theory with Emotional Labor Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mikyoung; Pekrun, Reinhard; Taxer, Jamie L.; Schutz, Paul A.; Vogl, Elisabeth; Xie, Xiyao

    2016-01-01

    While the similarities between emotion regulation (Gross in "J Personal Soc Psychol" 74:224-237, 1998a) and emotional labor (Hochschild in The managed heart: commercialization of human feeling. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1983) have been theoretically discussed, empirical research on their relation is lacking. We examined…

  9. Steroids facing emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, P.L.J.

    2006-01-01

    The studies reported in this thesis have been performed to gain a better understanding about motivational mediators of selective attention and memory for emotionally relevant stimuli, and about the roles that some steroid hormones play in regulation of human motivation and emotion. The stimuli used

  10. Texture affects color emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.P.; Gevers, T.; Gijsenij, A.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have recorded color emotions in subjects viewing uniform color (UC) samples. We conduct an experiment to measure and model how these color emotions change when texture is added to the color samples. Using a computer monitor, our subjects arrange samples along four scales: warm-cool,

  11. Basic emotions - self-awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Ana Almeida; Veiga-Branco, Augusta

    2011-01-01

    We start from basic emotions using Paul Ekman’s model (1999): joy, sadness, anger, surprise, disgust, fear and contempt, to study the concepts of Self- Awareness - Knowing our own emotions - (Goleman, 1995), and Emotional Awareness - Ability to become aware of one's own emotions - (Bisquerra, 2001). Objectives: To understand the levels of Emotional Self-awareness/ Emotional awareness of a group of preschool, primary and lower secondary school teachers through the identifi...

  12. A qualitative study into the impact of fasting within a large tertiary hospital in Australia--the patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Sharon K; Conchin, Simone; Bloomfield-Stone, Susan

    2015-07-01

    This qualitative study aims to explore the physical and emotional impact of fasting from the patients' perspective. Fasting patients in hospital is common practice and generally viewed as necessary for symptom management or for safety of healthcare provision. Negative impacts of repeated or prolonged fasting on nutritional status have been well researched, but little is documented as to how fasting impacts an individual patient's psyche. Qualitative descriptive design within a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia. Twelve patients having had prolonged periods of continuous or intermittent fasting were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview between January-September 2012. Questions for interview explored each patient's experience of fasting, including physical and emotional impacts, interpretation of communication regarding fasting and the process of recommencing on fluids or foods. An inductive thematic analysis approach was used. Analyses showed six main themes: physical impacts; emotional impacts; food as structure; nil by mouth as jargon; fear of food re-introduction; and dissatisfaction regarding unnecessary fasting. Overwhelmingly, thirst was reported as the worst physical effect of fasting. In the first few days of fasting, patients became emotionally fixated on food. This quickly dissipated leading to a lack of appetite and fear of starting to eat again. Discomfort experienced by patients coupled with lack of appetite resulting from prolonged fasting and difficulty with food re-introduction strengthens the argument for reducing fasting times in hospital. When patients are fasted, proper hydration and establishing alternate routes of medication administration should be a priority. It is well recognised that fasting for prolonged periods is detrimental to health outcomes, but this study also shows the distress that fasting can cause. Inadequate hospital systems and out-dated practices need to be replaced with evidence-based, patient

  13. Emotional intelligence: a theoretical framework for individual differences in affective forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Michael; Chapman, Benjamin P; Epstein, Ronald M; Duberstein, Paul R

    2012-08-01

    Only recently have researchers begun to examine individual differences in affective forecasting. The present investigation was designed to make a theoretical contribution to this emerging literature by examining the role of emotional intelligence in affective forecasting. Emotional intelligence was hypothesized to be associated with affective forecasting accuracy, memory for emotional reactions, and subsequent improvement on an affective forecasting task involving emotionally evocative pictures. Results from two studies (N = 511) supported our hypotheses. Emotional intelligence was associated with accuracy in predicting, encoding, and consolidating emotional reactions. Furthermore, emotional intelligence was associated with greater improvement on a second affective forecasting task, with the relationship explained by basic memory processes. Implications for future research on basic and applied decision making are discussed.

  14. Emotional intelligence: Part 1: the development of scales and psychometric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerjordet, Kristin; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2009-03-01

    This article, the first in a series of four, describes the development of two scales for deductive and inductive measurement of emotional intelligence (EI), based on the literature and the identification of the psychometric properties of the scales. The data collection comprised two parts: (i) a literature search on the subject of emotional intelligence; and (ii) psychometric testing of the scales. The Emotional Intelligence Scale, comprising 23 items, and the Emotional Reactions and Thoughts Scale, containing 25 items, were tested on a sample of 250 postnatal mothers. The response rate was 80%. An explorative factor analysis was used to investigate the construct validity of the underlying dimensions of emotional intelligence and yielded a three-factor solution for the Emotional Intelligence Scale and a four-factor solution for the Emotional Reactions and Thoughts Scale. The internal consistency of the scales was satisfactory. How well the factor solutions fit in clinical practice remains to be validated.

  15. Emotional Intelligence: A Theoretical Framework for Individual Differences in Affective Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Michael; Chapman, Benjamin P.; Epstein, Ronald M.; Duberstein, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Only recently have researchers begun to examine individual differences in affective forecasting. The present investigation was designed to make a theoretical contribution to this emerging literature by examining the role of emotional intelligence in affective forecasting. Emotional intelligence was hypothesized to be associated with affective forecasting accuracy, memory for emotional reactions, and subsequent improvement on an affective forecasting task involving emotionally-evocative pictures. Results from two studies (N = 511) supported our hypotheses. Emotional intelligence was associated with accuracy in predicting, encoding, and consolidating emotional reactions. Furthermore, emotional intelligence was associated with greater improvement on a second affective forecasting task, with the relationship explained by basic memory processes. Implications for future research on basic and applied decision making are discussed. PMID:22251053

  16. emotionVis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmerman, Chris; Stein, Mari-Klara; Hardt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    With increasingly high volumes of conversations across social media, the rapid detection of emotions is of significant strategic value to industry prac‐ titioners. Summarizing large volumes of text with computational linguistics and visual analytics allows for several new possibilities from general...... trend detection to specific applications in marketing practice, such as monitoring product launches, campaigns and public relations milestones. After collecting 1.6 million user-tagged feelings from 12 million online posts that mention emotions, we utilized machine learning techniques towards building...... an automatic ‘feelings meter’; a tool for both researchers and practitioners to automatically detect emotional dimensions from text. Following several iterations, the test version has now taken shape as emotionVis, a dashboard prototype for inferring emotions from text while presenting the results for visual...

  17. Cognitive approaches to emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatley, Keith; Johnson-Laird, P N

    2014-03-01

    Cognitive approaches offer clear links between how emotions are thought about in everyday life and how they are investigated psychologically. Cognitive researchers have focused on how emotions are caused when events or other people affect concerns and on how emotions influence processes such as reasoning, memory, and attention. Three representative cognitive theories of emotion continue to develop productively: the action-readiness theory, the core-affect theory, and the communicative theory. Some principles are common to them and divergences can be resolved by future research. Recent explanations have included how emotions structure social relationships, how they function in psychological illnesses, and how they are central to music and fiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Emotion Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbag Singh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of feature extraction of facial expressions with combination of neural network for the recognition of different facial emotions (happy, sad, angry, fear, surprised, neutral etc... Humans are capable of producing thousands of facial actions during communication that vary in complexity, intensity, and meaning. This paper analyses the limitations with existing system Emotion recognition using brain activity. In this paper by using an existing simulator I have achieved 97 percent accurate results and it is easy and simplest way than Emotion recognition using brain activity system. Purposed system depends upon human face as we know face also reflects the human brain activities or emotions. In this paper neural network has been used for better results. In the end of paper comparisons of existing Human Emotion Recognition System has been made with new one.

  19. Emotional clarity as a function of neuroticism and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Renee J; Kuppens, Peter; Mata, Jutta; Jaeggi, Susanne M; Buschkuehl, Martin; Jonides, John; Gotlib, Ian H

    2015-10-01

    Investigators have begun to document links between emotional clarity and forms of negative emotionality, including neuroticism and major depressive disorder (MDD). Researchers to date have relied almost exclusively on global self-reports of emotional clarity; moreover, no studies have examined emotional clarity as a function of valence, although this may prove to be crucial in understanding the relation of emotional clarity to maladjustment. In 2 studies, we used experience-sampling methodology and multilevel modeling to examine the associations between emotional clarity and 2 constructs that have been linked theoretically with emotional clarity: neuroticism and depression. In Study 1 we assessed 95 college students who completed a self-report measure of neuroticism. In Study 2 we examined 53 adults diagnosed with MDD and 53 healthy adults. Reaction times to negative and positive emotion ratings during the experience-sampling protocols were used as an indirect measure of emotional clarity. Neuroticism was related to lower clarity of negative, but not of positive, emotion. Similarly, compared with the healthy controls, individuals with MDD had lower clarity of negative, but not of positive, emotion. It is important to note, findings from both studies held after controlling for baseline RTs and current levels of negative and positive emotion. These findings highlight the importance of assessing valence when examining emotional clarity and increase our understanding of the nature of the emotional disturbances that characterize neuroticism and MDD.

  20. Memory for emotional material in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnera, Claudia P; Lomlomdjian, Carolina; Terpiluk, Verónica; Medel, Nancy; Solís, Patricia; Kochen, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Several studies suggest that highly emotional information could facilitate long-term memory encoding and consolidation processes via an amygdala-hippocampal network. Our aim was to assess emotional perception and episodic memory for emotionally arousing material in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who are candidates for surgical treatment. We did this by using an audiovisual paradigm. Forty-six patients with medically resistant TLE (26 with left TLE and 20 with right TLE) and 19 healthy controls were assessed with a standard narrative test of emotional memory. The experimental task consisted of sequential picture slides with an accompanying narrative depicting a story that has an emotional central section. Subjects were asked to rate their emotional arousal reaction to each stimulus after the story was shown, while emotional memory (EM) was assessed a week later with a multiple choice questionnaire and a visual recognition task. Our results showed that ratings for emotional stimuli for the patients with TLE were significantly higher than for neutral stimuli (p=0.000). It was also observed that patients with TLE recalled significantly less information from each slide compared with controls, with a trend to lower scores on the questionnaire task for the group with LTLE, as well as poorer performance on the visual recognition task for the group with RLTE. Emotional memory was preserved in patients with RTLE despite having generally poorer memory performance compared with controls, while it was found to be impaired in patients with LTLE.

  1. Emotional regulation and acute pain perception in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Aranda, Desireé; Salguero, José Martín; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2010-06-01

    Emotional regulation is an important variable in the experience of pain. Currently, there are no experimental investigations of the relation between emotional regulation and pain. The goal of the present study work was to analyze differences in pain perception and mood generated by the cold-pressor (CPT) experimental paradigm in women with high and low emotional regulation. Two groups of women were formed as a function of their level of emotional regulation: women with high emotional repair (N = 24) and women with low emotional repair (N = 28), all of whom performed the CPT. The results show that the women with a high score in emotional repair reported having experienced less sensory pain and affective pain during the immersion, as well as a more positive affective state before beginning the task. During the experimental task, they also reported a better mood, thus displaying lower impact of the experience of pain. Emotional regulation is proposed as a key element to manage the emotional reaction that accompanies the experience of acute pain experimentally induced by the CPT experimental paradigm in a sample of healthy women. Copyright (c) 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. HCUP Fast Stats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HCUP Fast Stats provides easy access to the latest HCUP-based statistics for health information topics. HCUP Fast Stats uses visual statistical displays in...

  3. Fast food (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated ...

  4. Fast food tips (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ...

  5. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavar, A.R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sarmani, S.B. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Wood, A.K. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Fadzil, S.M. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Radir, M.H. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Khoo, K.S., E-mail: khoo@ukm.m [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-05-15

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f{sub fast}) and fast neutron flux ({phi}{sub fast}) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f{sub fast} and subsequently {phi}{sub fast} were determined using the absolute method. The f{sub fast} ranged from 48 to 155, and the {phi}{sub fast} was found in the range 1.03x10{sup 10}-4.89x10{sup 10} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  6. [Emotional dysfunctions in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purper-Ouakil, D; Franc, N

    2011-06-01

    Inattention, motor instability, and impulsivity, associated in varying degrees of severity depending on the clinical subtype, constitute the key symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, emotional symptoms are frequent in patients with ADHD and may, in some cases, be responsible for a major part of the negative impact on functioning and outcome. Emotional problems have been described in ADHD even in the absence of characterized comorbid conditions such as depressive or anxiety disorders. They can manifest acutely in the form of severe tantrums and aggressive behaviour, generally in reaction to an environmental trigger, or show a more chronic course of irritable or labile mood. Symptoms of emotional undercontrol seem to occur more frequently when ADHD is associated with oppositional defiant behaviour, but they are not specific and may contribute to difficulties in making a differential diagnosis, especially with bipolar disorder and prodromal symptoms of personality disorders. The frequency and negative impact of emotional symptoms and the need to differentiate them from bipolar disorder has led some authors to the description of a novel clinical entity called "severe mood dysregulation" or "temper dysregulation with dysphoria." This article aims to review the recent literature on emotional symptoms associated with ADHD and to discuss relevant clinical and biological issues. Current research highlights the links between emotional self-regulation and executive functions and possible involvement of motivational systems. The role of environmental factors in the development of emotional regulation and self-control is another important issue, especially because environmental modification is the major focus of current preventive and therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Emotional Agents need Formal Models of Emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekens, Joost; DeGroot, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Embedding a computational model of emotion in virtual agents is beneficial in a variety of domains. These domains include gaming, VR training, HCI and electronic tutors. Although these domains have different motives for embedding such a model, they share the same overall approach. Once the requireme

  8. Emotional Self-Efficacy, Emotional Empathy and Emotional Approach Coping as Sources of Happiness

    OpenAIRE

    Tarık Totan; Tayfun Doğan; Fatma Sapmaz

    2013-01-01

    Among the many variables affecting happiness, there are those that arise from emotional factors. In this study, the hypothesis stating that happiness is affected by emotional self-efficacy, emotional empathy and emotional approach coping has been examined using the path model. A total of 334 university students participated in this study, 229 of whom were females and 105 being males. Oxford Happiness Questionnaire-Short Form, Emotional Self-efficacy Scale, Multi-Dimensional Emotional Empathy ...

  9. Binding Action and Emotion in Social Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Francesca; Ebisch, Sjoerd J. H.; Costantini, Marcello; Salone, Anatolia; Arciero, Giampiero; Mazzola, Viridiana; Ferro, Filippo Maria; Romani, Gian Luca; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    In social life actions are tightly linked with emotions. The integration of affective- and action-related information has to be considered as a fundamental component of appropriate social understanding. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study aimed at investigating whether an emotion (Happiness, Anger or Neutral) dynamically expressed by an observed agent modulates brain activity underlying the perception of his grasping action. As control stimuli, participants observed the same agent either only expressing an emotion or only performing a grasping action. Our results showed that the observation of an action embedded in an emotional context (agent’s facial expression), compared with the observation of the same action embedded in a neutral context, elicits higher neural response at the level of motor frontal cortices, temporal and occipital cortices, bilaterally. Particularly, the dynamic facial expression of anger modulates the re-enactment of a motor representation of the observed action. This is supported by the evidence that observing actions embedded in the context of anger, but not happiness, compared with a neutral context, elicits stronger activity in the bilateral pre-central gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus, besides the pre-supplementary motor area, a region playing a central role in motor control. Angry faces not only seem to modulate the simulation of actions, but may also trigger motor reaction. These findings suggest that emotions exert a modulatory role on action observation in different cortical areas involved in action processing. PMID:23349792

  10. Influence of emotional processing on working memory in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Karla; Barch, Deanna

    2011-09-01

    Research on emotional processing in schizophrenia suggests relatively intact subjective responses to affective stimuli "in the moment." However, neuroimaging evidence suggests diminished activation in brain regions associated with emotional processing in schizophrenia. We asked whether given a more vulnerable cognitive system in schizophrenia, individuals with this disorder would show increased or decreased modulation of working memory (WM) as a function of the emotional content of stimuli compared with healthy control subjects. In addition, we examined whether higher anhedonia levels were associated with a diminished impact of emotion on behavioral and brain activation responses. In the present study, 38 individuals with schizophrenia and 32 healthy individuals completed blocks of a 2-back WM task in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning session. Blocks contained faces displaying either only neutral stimuli or neutral and emotional stimuli (happy or fearful faces), randomly intermixed and occurring both as targets and non-targets. Both groups showed higher accuracy but slower reaction time for negative compared to neutral stimuli. Individuals with schizophrenia showed intact amygdala activity in response to emotionally evocative stimuli, but demonstrated altered dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and hippocampal activity while performing an emotionally loaded WM-task. Higher levels of social anhedonia were associated with diminished amygdala responses to emotional stimuli and increased DLPFC activity in individuals with schizophrenia. Emotional arousal may challenge dorsal-frontal control systems, which may have both beneficial and detrimental influences. Our findings suggest that disturbances in emotional processing in schizophrenia relate to alterations in emotion-cognition interactions rather than to the perception and subjective experience of emotion per se.

  11. Is fast food addictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations.

  12. Emotional Intensity Modulates the Integration of Bimodal Angry Expressions: ERP Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Pan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Integration of information from face and voice plays a central role in social interactions. The present study investigated the modulation of emotional intensity on the integration of facial-vocal emotional cues by recording EEG for participants while they were performing emotion identification task on facial, vocal, and bimodal angry expressions varying in emotional intensity. Behavioral results showed the rates of anger and reaction speed increased as emotional intensity across modalities. Critically, the P2 amplitudes were larger for bimodal expressions than for the sum of facial and vocal expressions for low emotional intensity stimuli, but not for middle and high emotional intensity stimuli. These findings suggested that emotional intensity modulates the integration of facial-vocal angry expressions, following the principle of Inverse Effectiveness (IE in multimodal sensory integration.

  13. Emotion in Music: representation and computational modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aljanaki, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34570956X

    2016-01-01

    Music emotion recognition (MER) deals with music classification by emotion using signal processing and machine learning techniques. Emotion ontology for music is not well established yet. Musical emotion can be conceptualized through various emotional models: categorical, dimensional, or

  14. Go with Your Gut: Emotion and Evaluation in Job Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Lauren A

    2015-03-01

    This article presents hiring as an emotional process rooted in interpersonal evaluation. Drawing from Randall Collins's theory of interaction ritual, the author offers a qualitative case study of elite professional service firms to unpack how employers' emotional reactions to applicants in job interviews affect hiring evaluations. She finds that employers use subjective feelings of excitement and enthusiasm toward candidates-akin to Collins's concept of emotional energy--to-evaluate applicants and make hiring decisions. With these data, she constructs an original theoretical framework of emotional energy development, which highlights the qualities that tend to produce or inhibit the subjective experience of emotional energy in job interviews. Additionally, she outlines the particular phases of an encounter where energy gains and losses are most consequential for influencing hiring outcomes and inequalities. She discusses the implications of these findings for research on hiring, labor market stratification, and interaction rituals.

  15. Jealousy and emotion: how partners react to infidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M. Canto Ortiz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This present study explores the differences between women's and men's responses to (hypothetical infidelity,  and how these responses are influenced by the  characteristics of the couple's relationship. 372 subjects completed questionnaires (a itemising their jealous reaction to a partner´s hypothetical infidelity (emotional or sexual; and (b the state of their relationship. A survey of 250 women and 122 men revealed that the women reported higher intensity of emotional distress than the men. in regard to both emotional and sexual infidelity. There were no significant differences between men and women in their reports of which infidelity troubled them more: both genders are troubled more by emotional infidelity. We also report the influence that the type of relationship has on the emotions provoked by the infidelity.

  16. Emotional Intelligence and Social-Emotional Learning: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anamitra; Mermillod, Martial

    2011-01-01

    The term "EI (emotional intelligence)" was first used in 1990 by Salovey and Mayer. EI involves: (1) the ability to perceive accurately, appraise and express emotion; (2) the ability to access and/or generate feelings when they facilitate thought; (3) the ability to understand emotion and emotional knowledge; and (4) the ability to regulate…

  17. Do emotions drive psychosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Guilherme Ribeiro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: How important is the emotional life of persons who manifest psychotic symptoms? Aims: The aim of this paper is to review evidence on a causal role for emotions in psychotic processes. Methods: Selective review of literature on affective symptoms in psychoses, on emotions in the production of psychotic symptoms and on dopaminergic models of psychosis. Results: Affective symptoms are relevant across psychoses. Persons with schizophrenia have high levels of emotional reactivity and the intensification of negative affects not only is associated with but also precedes the intensification of psychotic symptoms, which is evidence that negative emotions drive the course of psychotic symptoms. Negative self‑representations are central in psychotic processes and can be the link between negative emotions and psychosis. Evidence favours the notion that persecutory delusions are consistent with negative affects and self‑representations, while grandiose delusions are consistent with a defensive amplification of positive affects and self‑representations. Shame has been proposed as the core emotional experience of psychosis, one in which the self becomes vulnerable to the external world, which is consistent with persecutory experiences. Assaults on the self, under the form of hostility in the family environment and society, are strong predictors of relapse and development of schizophrenia. Assaults on the self which induce social defeat are also strong stimulants of mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways, whose hyperactivity is associated with acute psychotic episodes and the experience of “aberrant salience”, put forward as a dopaminergic model of psychosis. Conclusions: The “defeat of the self” emerges as a central link that binds the experience of negative emotions to the expression of psychotic symptoms and its psychological and neurobiological correlates. The hypothesis gains support that the emotions related to that defeat control

  18. Do emotions drive psychosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João G. Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: How important is the emotional life of persons who manifest psychotic symptoms? Aims: The aim of this paper is to review evidence on a causal role for emotions in psychotic processes. Methods: Selective review of literature on affective symptoms in psychoses, on emotions in the production of psychotic symptoms and on dopaminergic models of psychosis. Results: Affective symptoms are relevant across psychoses. Persons with schizophrenia have high levels of emotional reactivity and the intensification of negative affects not only is associated with but also precedes the intensification of psychotic symptoms, which is evidence that negative emotions drive the course of psychotic symptoms. Negative self‑representations are central in psychotic processes and can be the link between negative emotions and psychosis. Evidence favours the notion that persecutory delusions are consistent with negative affects and self‑representations, while grandiose delusions are consistent with a defensive amplification of positive affects and self‑representations. Shame has been proposed as the core emotional experience of psychosis, one in which the self becomes vulnerable to the external world, which is consistent with persecutory experiences. Assaults on the self, under the form of hostility in the family environment and society, are strong predictors of relapse and development of schizophrenia. Assaults on the self which induce social defeat are also strong stimulants of mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways, whose hyperactivity is associated with acute psychotic episodes and the experience of “aberrant salience”, put forward as a dopaminergic model of psychosis. Conclusions: The “defeat of the self” emerges as a central link that binds the experience of negative emotions to the expression of psychotic symptoms and its psychological and neurobiological correlates. The hypothesis gains support that the emotions related to that defeat control

  19. Unconsciously triggered emotional conflict by emotional facial expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether emotional conflict and emotional conflict adaptation could be triggered by unconscious emotional information as assessed in a backward-masked affective priming task. Participants were instructed to identify the valence of a face (e.g., happy or sad preceded by a masked happy or sad face. The results of two experiments revealed the emotional conflict effect but no emotional conflict adaptation effect. This demonstrates that emotional conflict can be triggered by unconsciously presented emotional information, but participants may not adjust their subsequent performance trial-by trial to reduce this conflict.

  20. Unconsciously triggered emotional conflict by emotional facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Bailey, Kira; Chen, Antao; Cui, Qian; Zhang, Qinglin

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated whether emotional conflict and emotional conflict adaptation could be triggered by unconscious emotional information as assessed in a backward-masked affective priming task. Participants were instructed to identify the valence of a face (e.g., happy or sad) preceded by a masked happy or sad face. The results of two experiments revealed the emotional conflict effect but no emotional conflict adaptation effect. This demonstrates that emotional conflict can be triggered by unconsciously presented emotional information, but participants may not adjust their subsequent performance trial-by trial to reduce this conflict.

  1. Moral Emotions and Morals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Orsi Portalo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available My aim in this paper is to explore the ambivalent role played by the so called moral emotions in moral thinking, overall when the concept of responsibility is concerned. In the first part of this paper I show how moral emotions such as guilt and shame can appear in circumstances that are not under the agent’s control, and therefore the agent could be though of free or responsibility for them. By contrast, in the second part of this essay I put how the absence of moral emotions, or their twisted development, makes as well the flourishing of individual morality impossible.

  2. Constructing emotion through simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D

    2017-07-21

    Evidence increasingly suggests that simulations implement patterns of prior experience to construct one's current experience, whether that experience is oriented in the past, in the here and now, or in the future. Simulation is the mechanism by which the brain capitalizes on prior learning to efficiently navigate the situation at hand. This review examines the latest developments in theory and empirical research that address simulation during emotional phenomena. Integration of evidence across multiple literatures suggests that simulation accounts provide a unifying framework across many different emotional phenomena and highlights the importance of investigating dynamics, complexity, and variation in emotional experiences moving forward. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Emotional disorders in patients with cerebellar damage – case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Siuda, Katarzyna; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Starowicz-Filip, Anna; Tereszko,Anna; Dudek, Dominika

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Growing number of research shows the role of the cerebellum in the regulation of affect. Lesions of the cerebellum can lead to emotional disregulation, a significant part of the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome. The aim of this article is to analyze the most recent studies concerning the cerebellar participation in emotional reactions and to present three cases: two female and one male who suffered from cerebellar damage and presented post-traumatic affective and personality chang...

  4. Emotions, fear, and empathy: a design approach to human experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Polinedrio, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Fear is an intrinsic human emotion, which produces with variable intensity a bodily reaction as a response to a stimuli. It is considered one of the basic human emotions, and it is universal of all animal species. Despite its subjective quality, fear has gained a rather negativistic stereotype that this research intends to debate and readdress, proposing that “negative fear” is part of an evolutionary transition cultivated by social and cultural constructs. This thesis will analyze the contex...

  5. A qualitative analysis of emotional facilitators in exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Wienke, Benjamin; Jekauc, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research has shown that emotions are consistently associated with sport and exercise behavior, the working mechanisms are not understood to the extent of creating an intervention. The aim of this study is to identify situations and aspects of recreational sport and exercise, which lead to positive emotional reactions in people taking part in regular and long-term exercise. In this study, 24 adults (12 female, 12 male) distributed over three age groups (young, middle, and lat...

  6. A Qualitative Analysis of Emotional Facilitators in Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Wienke, Benjamin; Jekauc, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research has shown that emotions are consistently associated with sport and exercise behavior, the working mechanisms are not understood to the extent of creating an intervention. The aim of this study is to identify situations and aspects of recreational sport and exercise, which lead to positive emotional reactions in people taking part in regular and long-term exercise. In this study, 24 adults (12 female, 12 male) distributed over three age groups (young, middle, and lat...

  7. The Emotional Response to Everyday Involuntary and Voluntary Memories in Dysphoria and Non-Dysphoria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Palacio Gonzalez, Adriana; Watson, Lynn; Berntsen, Dorthe

    Retrieving personal memories may cause emotional reactions and thus a need for emotion regulation. Past research indicates that involuntary memories have a greater effect on mood that the voluntary counterparts. However, different dimensions of the emotional response (i.e., intensity and regulation......-depressed individuals completed a structured memory diary where the intensity of fear, sadness, happiness, and anger, as well as the employment of emotion regulation strategies (brooding, memory suppression, emotional suppression, and reflection) was recorded upon the retrieval of everyday autobiographical memories...

  8. Ramadan, fasting and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Urfan Zahoor; Lykke, Jacob Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In Islam, the month of Ramadan is a period of fasting lasting 29 or 30 days. Epidemiological studies among Muslims in Denmark have not been conducted, but studies show, that fasting among pregnant Muslim women is common. Fasting does not increase the risk of growth restriction or preterm delivery......, but there are reports of decreased foetal movements. Furthermore, the fasting may have long-term health consequences for the offspring, especially when they reach their middle age. According to Islam and the interpretation, pregnant and breast-feeding women are allowed to postpone the fasting of the month of Ramadan...

  9. Cognitive Function, Origin, and Evolution of Musical Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Perlovsky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive function of music, its origin, and evolution has been a mystery until recently. Here we discuss a theory of a fundamental function of music in cognition and culture. Music evolved in parallel with language. The evolution of language toward a semantically powerful tool required freeing from uncontrolled emotions. Knowledge evolved fast along with language. This created cognitive dissonances, contradictions among knowledge and instincts, which differentiated consciousness. To sustain evolution of language and culture, these contradictions had to be unified. Music was the mechanism of unification. Differentiated emotions are needed for resolving cognitive dissonances. As knowledge has been accumulated, contradictions multiplied and correspondingly more varied emotions had to evolve. While language differentiated psyche, music unified it. Thus the need for refined musical emotions in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of cognition. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music.

  10. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-03-15

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting.

  11. Empathy costs: Negative emotional bias in high empathisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikovani, George; Babuadze, Lasha; Iashvili, Nino; Gvalia, Tamar; Surguladze, Simon

    2015-09-30

    Excessive empathy has been associated with compassion fatigue in health professionals and caregivers. We investigated an effect of empathy on emotion processing in 137 healthy individuals of both sexes. We tested a hypothesis that high empathy may underlie increased sensitivity to negative emotion recognition which may interact with gender. Facial emotion stimuli comprised happy, angry, fearful, and sad faces presented at different intensities (mild and prototypical) and different durations (500ms and 2000ms). The parameters of emotion processing were represented by discrimination accuracy, response bias and reaction time. We found that higher empathy was associated with better recognition of all emotions. We also demonstrated that higher empathy was associated with response bias towards sad and fearful faces. The reaction time analysis revealed that higher empathy in females was associated with faster (compared with males) recognition of mildly sad faces of brief duration. We conclude that although empathic abilities were providing for advantages in recognition of all facial emotional expressions, the bias towards emotional negativity may potentially carry a risk for empathic distress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Emotional Design in Multimedia Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Eunjoon; Plass, Jan L.; Hayward, Elizabeth O.; Homer, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Can multimedia learning environments be designed to foster positive emotions that will improve learning and related affective outcomes? College students (N = 118) were randomly assigned to 4 conditions created by 2 factors related to learners' emotion: "external mood induction" (positive vs. neutral emotions) and "emotional design induction"…

  13. Studying Emotions in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, Stefanie; Uijl, den Louise

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of our current understanding of emotions and their measurement in older people. The first part briefly reviews our current understanding of both "the elderly" in general and various facets of emotional aging, such as emotional experiences, emotion regulation, emo

  14. Emotional Design in Multimedia Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Eunjoon; Plass, Jan L.; Hayward, Elizabeth O.; Homer, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Can multimedia learning environments be designed to foster positive emotions that will improve learning and related affective outcomes? College students (N = 118) were randomly assigned to 4 conditions created by 2 factors related to learners' emotion: "external mood induction" (positive vs. neutral emotions) and "emotional design induction"…

  15. FAST User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Clucas, Jean; McCabe, R. Kevin; Plessel, Todd; Potter, R.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Flow Analysis Software Toolkit, FAST, is a software environment for visualizing data. FAST is a collection of separate programs (modules) that run simultaneously and allow the user to examine the results of numerical and experimental simulations. The user can load data files, perform calculations on the data, visualize the results of these calculations, construct scenes of 3D graphical objects, and plot, animate and record the scenes. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) visualization is the primary intended use of FAST, but FAST can also assist in the analysis of other types of data. FAST combines the capabilities of such programs as PLOT3D, RIP, SURF, and GAS into one environment with modules that share data. Sharing data between modules eliminates the drudgery of transferring data between programs. All the modules in the FAST environment have a consistent, highly interactive graphical user interface. Most commands are entered by pointing and'clicking. The modular construction of FAST makes it flexible and extensible. The environment can be custom configured and new modules can be developed and added as needed. The following modules have been developed for FAST: VIEWER, FILE IO, CALCULATOR, SURFER, TOPOLOGY, PLOTTER, TITLER, TRACER, ARCGRAPH, GQ, SURFERU, SHOTET, and ISOLEVU. A utility is also included to make the inclusion of user defined modules in the FAST environment easy. The VIEWER module is the central control for the FAST environment. From VIEWER, the user can-change object attributes, interactively position objects in three-dimensional space, define and save scenes, create animations, spawn new FAST modules, add additional view windows, and save and execute command scripts. The FAST User Guide uses text and FAST MAPS (graphical representations of the entire user interface) to guide the user through the use of FAST. Chapters include: Maps, Overview, Tips, Getting Started Tutorial, a separate chapter for each module, file formats, and system

  16. Emotions and trait emotional intelligence among ultra-endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew M; Wilson, Mathew

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between trait emotional intelligence and emotional state changes over the course of an ultra-endurance foot race covering a route of approximately 175 miles (282 km) and held in set stages over six days. A repeated measures field design that sought to maintain ecological validity was used. Trait emotional intelligence was defined as a relatively stable concept that should predict adaptive emotional states experienced over the duration of the race and therefore associate with pleasant emotions during a 6-stage endurance event. Thirty-four runners completed a self-report measure of trait emotional intelligence before the event started. Participants reported emotional states before and after each of the six races. Repeated measures ANOVA results showed significant variations in emotions over time and a main effect for trait emotional intelligence. Runners high in self-report trait emotional intelligence also reported higher pleasant and lower unpleasant emotions than runners low in trait emotional intelligence. Findings lend support to the notion that trait emotional intelligence associates with adaptive psychological states, suggesting that it may be a key individual difference that explains why some athletes respond to repeated bouts of hard exercise better than others. Future research should test the effectiveness of interventions designed to enhance trait emotional intelligence and examine the attendant impact on emotional responses to intense exercise during multi-stage events. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Subjective experience of emotions and emotional empathy in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Anja; Bahçesular, Katja; Brockmann, Eva-Maria; Biederbick, Sarah-Elisabeth; Dziobek, Isabel; Gallinat, Jürgen; Montag, Christiane

    2014-12-30

    Unlike the cognitive dimensions, alterations of the affective components of empathy in schizophrenia are less well understood. This study explored cognitive and affective dimensions of empathy in the context of the subjective experience of aspects of emotion processing, including emotion regulation, emotional contagion, and interpersonal distress, in individuals with schizophrenia and healthy controls. In addition, the predictive value of these parameters on psychosocial function was investigated. Fifty-five patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 55 healthy controls were investigated using the Multifaceted Empathy Test and Interpersonal Reactivity Index, as well as the Subjective Experience of Emotions and Emotional Contagion Scales. Individuals with schizophrenia showed impairments of cognitive empathy, but maintained emotional empathy. They reported significantly more negative emotional contagion, overwhelming emotions, lack of emotions, and symbolization of emotions by imagination, but less self-control of emotional expression than healthy persons. Besides cognitive empathy, the experience of a higher extent of overwhelming emotions and of less interpersonal distress predicted psychosocial function in patients. People with schizophrenia and healthy controls showed diverging patterns of how cognitive and emotional empathy related to the subjective aspects of emotion processing. It can be assumed that variables of emotion processing are important moderators of empathic abilities in schizophrenia.

  18. Emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in persons with major depressive disorder (MDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Ellen L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Bartley, Emily J; Vincent, Ashley L; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2013-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with risk for chronic pain, but the mechanisms contributing to the MDD and pain relationship are unclear. To examine whether disrupted emotional modulation of pain might contribute, this study assessed emotional processing and emotional modulation of pain in healthy controls and unmedicated persons with MDD (14 MDD, 14 controls). Emotionally charged pictures (erotica, neutral, mutilation) were presented in 4 blocks. Two blocks assessed physiological-emotional reactions (pleasure/arousal ratings, corrugator electromyography (EMG), startle modulation, skin conductance) in the absence of pain and 2 blocks assessed emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception) evoked by suprathreshold electric stimulations. Results indicated pictures generally evoked the intended emotional responses; erotic pictures elicited pleasure, subjective arousal, and smaller startle magnitudes, whereas mutilation pictures elicited displeasure, corrugator EMG activation, and subjective/physiological arousal. However, emotional processing was partially disrupted in MDD, as evidenced by a blunted pleasure response to erotica and a failure to modulate startle according to a valence linear trend. Furthermore, emotional modulation of pain was observed in controls but not MDD, even though there were no group differences in NFR threshold or emotional modulation of NFR. Together, these results suggest supraspinal processes associated with emotion processing and emotional modulation of pain may be disrupted in MDD, but brain to spinal cord processes that modulate spinal nociception are intact. Thus, emotional modulation of pain deficits may be a phenotypic marker for future pain risk in MDD.

  19. Expressing emotions in blogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Hidalgo, Carmina Rodriguez-Hidalgo; Tan, Ed S.; Verlegh, Peeter

    2017-01-01

    Textual paralanguage cues (TPC) have been signaled as effective emotion transmitters online. Though several studies have investigated their properties and occurrence, there remains a gap concerning their communicative impact within specific psychological processes, such as the social sharing of e...

  20. Emotional Intelligence: Requiring Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Tudor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to highlight the need for emotional intelligence. Two methods of measurementare presented in this research, in order to better understand the necessity of a correct result. Theresults of research can lead to recommendations for improving levels of emotional intelligence andare useful for obtaining data to better compare past and present result. The papers presented inthis research are significant for future study of this subject. The first paper presents the evolutionof emotional intelligence in the past two years, more specifically its decrease concerning certaincharacteristics. The second one presents a research on the differences between generations. Thethird one shows a difference in emotional intelligence levels of children from rural versus urbanenvironments and the obstacles that they encounter in their own development.

  1. Emotion as morphofunctionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Carlos Herrera; Sanz, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    We argue for a morphofunctional approach to emotion modeling that can also aid the design of adaptive embodied systems. By morphofunctionality we target the online change in both structure and function of a system, and relate it to the notion of physiology and emotion in animals. Besides the biological intuition that emotions serve the function of preparing the body, we investigate the control requirements that any morphofunctional autonomous system must face. We argue that changes in morphology modify the dynamics of the system, thus forming a variable structure system (VSS). We introduce some of the techniques of control theory to deal with VSSs and derive a twofold hypothesis: first, the loose coupling between two control systems, in charge of action and action readiness, respectively; second, the formation of patterned metacontrol. Emotional phenomena can be seen as emergent from this control setup.

  2. Emotional Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Most people face some degree of depression, anxiety, fear or distress when cancer becomes part of their ... who has cancer. Distress in People With Cancer Anxiety, Fear, and Depression Depression Anxiety, Fear, and Emotional Distress ...

  3. Emotional Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Nutrition Information (AICR) Emotional Well-Being Patient Empowerment Support Get Answers To Your Questions Meet Patients ... with kidney cancer, you may wish to seek professional assistance. These services may be covered by your ...

  4. Conveying Music's Emotional Qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, Vance D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes ways in which choral directors may help performers understand and interpret the affective aspects of music. Offers suggestions for analyzing music scores and for teaching students about a composition's background and emotional message. (LS)

  5. Emotionalism Following Brain Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Allman

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotionalism is an heightened tendency to cry, or more rarely, laugh. It is commonly associated with brain damage and is often distressing to both patients and carers. Emotionalism is easily confused with depression, and when severe it can interfere with treatment. The aetiology is poorly understood but its response to drugs with different modes of action suggests that there is more than one underlying mechanism. When the components of emotionalism are studied separately a wide range is observed and they combine in a more complex and varied way than commonly held stereotyped views suggest. Most patients with emotionalism are helped by simple education and reassurance. Some severe cases respond dramatically to tricyclic antidepressants, levodopa or fluoxetine.

  6. Emotionally intelligent teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Cabello

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the importance of complementing teachers’ training with the learning and development of social and emotional aspects. It is in this way that Emotional Intelligence (EI –understood as a complement of the cognitive development of teachers and students– is to play a role in the educational context. We review Mayer & Salovey’s ability model (1997, some of the programmes of socio-emotional improvement that are also designed for teachers and several activities for the development of teachers’ EI. In addition, we examine the implications for teachers derived from the development of their EI to enhance their capacity to appropriately perceive, understand and manage one’s own emotions and those of others.

  7. Test Reactions to Study Efficiency of

    OpenAIRE

    Jasińska Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Effects of mixing on the course of fast chemical reactions are relatively well understood, especially in homogeneous systems. This enables to design and operate chemical reactors with the goal to achieve a high yield of a desired product and use systems of complex reactions as a chemical probe (chemical test reactions) to identify progress of mixing and quality of mixture. Recently, a number of studies have focused on the application of chemical test reactions to identify energy efficiency of...

  8. Emotional Communication in Finger Braille

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Matsuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe analyses of the features of emotions (neutral, joy, sadness, and anger expressed by Finger Braille interpreters and subsequently examine the effectiveness of emotional expression and emotional communication between people unskilled in Finger Braille. The goal is to develop a Finger Braille system to teach emotional expression and a system to recognize emotion. The results indicate the following features of emotional expression by interpreters. The durations of the code of joy were significantly shorter than the durations of the other emotions, the durations of the code of sadness were significantly longer, and the finger loads of anger were significantly larger. The features of emotional expression by unskilled subjects were very similar to those of the interpreters, and the coincidence ratio of emotional communication was 75.1%. Therefore, it was confirmed that people unskilled in Finger Braille can express and communicate emotions using this communication medium.

  9. Emotion Recognition using Speech Features

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, K Sreenivasa

    2013-01-01

    Emotion Recognition Using Speech Features” covers emotion-specific features present in speech and discussion of suitable models for capturing emotion-specific information for distinguishing different emotions.  The content of this book is important for designing and developing  natural and sophisticated speech systems. Drs. Rao and Koolagudi lead a discussion of how emotion-specific information is embedded in speech and how to acquire emotion-specific knowledge using appropriate statistical models. Additionally, the authors provide information about using evidence derived from various features and models. The acquired emotion-specific knowledge is useful for synthesizing emotions. Discussion includes global and local prosodic features at syllable, word and phrase levels, helpful for capturing emotion-discriminative information; use of complementary evidences obtained from excitation sources, vocal tract systems and prosodic features in order to enhance the emotion recognition performance;  and pro...

  10. Enhanced electrochemical properties of LiFePO4 by Mo-substitution and graphitic carbon-coating via a facile and fast microwave-assisted solid-state reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Huang, Yudai; Sharma, Neeraj; Chen, Zhixin; Jia, Dianzeng; Guo, Zaiping

    2012-03-14

    A composite cathode material for lithium ion battery applications, Mo-doped LiFePO(4)/C, is obtained through a facile and fast microwave-assisted synthesis method. Rietveld analysis of LiFePO(4)-based structural models using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data shows that Mo-ions substitute onto the Fe sites and displace Fe-ions to the Li sites. Supervalent Mo(6+) doping can act to introduce Li ion vacancies due to the charge compensation effect and therefore facilitate lithium ion diffusion during charging/discharging. Transmission electron microscope images demonstrate that the pure and doped LiFePO(4) nanoparticles were uniformly covered by an approximately 5 nm thin layer of graphitic carbon. Amorphous carbon on the graphitic carbon-coated pure and doped LiFePO(4) particles forms a three-dimensional (3D) conductive carbon network, effectively improving the conductivity of these materials. The combined effects of Mo-doping and the 3D carbon network dramatically enhance the electrochemical performance of these LiFePO(4) cathodes. In particular, Mo-doped LiFePO(4)/C delivers a reversible capacity of 162 mA h g(-1) at a current of 0.5 C and shows enhanced capacity retention compared to that of undoped LiFePO(4)/C. Moreover, the electrode exhibits excellent rate capability, with an associated high discharge capacity and good electrochemical reversibility.

  11. Geschlecht, Emotion und Politik

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Birgit

    1997-01-01

    "The women's movement and feminism tend to intimize, to destructure and therefore to depolitizise the public sphere. This accusation is quite popular in the german speaking feminist academic community. What happened to the politics of subjectivity, to the feminist political strategy of overcoming the split between public and privat as well as rationality and emotion? I argue that feminist political science as well as malestream political science is 'emotionblind'. This means that emotions are...

  12. Schizophrenia and Emotional Rubbernecking

    OpenAIRE

    Eich, Teal S.; Smith, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Orienting towards emotionally salient information can be adaptive, as when danger needs to be avoided. Consistent with this idea, research has shown that emotionally valenced information draws attention more than does neutral information in healthy individuals. However, there are times when this tendency is not adaptive, and it may distract the individual from their goals. People with schizophrenia (PSZ), though frequently showing deficits in attentional control, have also been shown to exhib...

  13. Evaluating music emotion recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do...... not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER system, and conclude with recommendations....

  14. 患者及其配偶同步心理干预对乳腺癌化疗负性情绪和胃肠道反应的影响%Effect of synchronous psychotherapy on negative emotion and gastrointestinal reactions in patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy and their spouses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢晓峰; 张俊英; 孙淑明; 谢舜峰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of patients and their spouses' synchronous psychotherapy on negative emotion and gastrointestinal reactions in patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy.Methods 86 cases with breast cancer and their husbands were randomly divided into psychotherapy group and control group.Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS),Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Qualily of Life Instrument ( FACT-B)were used to evaluate before and after treatment.And gastrointestinal reactions were recorded.Results ①The scores of SAS and SDS in the psychotherapy group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05).The scores of SAS and SDS after treatment were significantly lower than those before treatment (P<0.05).②he incidence of nausea and vomit in the psychotherapy group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05).③he emotional state of the psychotherapy group was superior to the control goup (P<0.05).Conclusions Synchronous psychotherapy can obviously decrease the negative emotions and the gastrointestinal reactions,and improve the life quality of patients.%目的 通过对患者及其配偶采取同步心理干预方法,分析由此对乳腺癌化疗负性情绪及胃肠道反应产生的影响.方法 选取本院86例乳腺癌化疗患者及其配偶,随机分为干预组和对照组,利用焦虑自评量表(SAS)、抑郁自评量表(SDS)以及乳腺癌生存质量测评量表(FACT-B)实行综合评定,同时记录胃肠道反应的发生率.结果 (1)干预组的SAS、SDS评分明显低于对照组(P<0.05);干预组经过治疗之后的SAS、SDS评分均比治疗前有所下降(P<0.05).(2)干预组恶心、呕吐发生率较对照组明显下降(P<0.05).(3)干预组在情感状况领域显著优于对照组.结论 患者及其配偶同步心理干预可改善化疗负性情绪和胃肠道反应,提高生存质量.

  15. Recognition of a Baby's Emotional Cry Towards Robotics Baby Caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Yamamoto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We developed a method for pattern recognition of baby’s emotions (discomfortable, hungry, or sleepy expressed in the baby’s cries. A 32‐dimensional fast Fourier transform is performed for sound form clips, detected by our reported method and used as training data. The power of the sound form judged as a silent region is subtracted from each power of the frequency element. The power of each frequency element after the subtraction is treated as one of the elements of the feature vector. We perform principal component analysis (PCA for the feature vectors of the training data. The emotion of the baby is recognized by the nearest neighbor criterion applied to the feature vector obtained from the test data of sound form clips after projecting the feature vector on the PCA space from the training data. Then, the emotion with the highest frequency among the recognition results for a sound form clip is judged as the emotion expressed by the baby’s cry. We successfully applied the proposed method to pattern recognition of baby’s emotions. The present investigation concerns the first stage of the development of a robotics baby caregiver that has the ability to detect babyʹs emotions. In this first stage, we have developed a method for detecting babyʹs emotions. We expect that the proposed method could be used in robots that can help take care of babies.

  16. Recognition of a Baby's Emotional Cry towards Robotics Baby Caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Yamamoto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We developed a method for pattern recognition of baby's emotions (discomfortable, hungry, or sleepy expressed in the baby's cries. A 32-dimensional fast Fourier transform is performed for sound form clips, detected by our reported method and used as training data. The power of the sound form judged as a silent region is subtracted from each power of the frequency element. The power of each frequency element after the subtraction is treated as one of the elements of the feature vector. We perform principal component analysis (PCA for the feature vectors of the training data. The emotion of the baby is recognized by the nearest neighbor criterion applied to the feature vector obtained from the test data of sound form clips after projecting the feature vector on the PCA space from the training data. Then, the emotion with the highest frequency among the recognition results for a sound form clip is judged as the emotion expressed by the baby's cry. We successfully applied the proposed method to pattern recognition of baby's emotions. The present investigation concerns the first stage of the development of a robotics baby caregiver that has the ability to detect baby's emotions. In this first stage, we have developed a method for detecting baby's emotions. We expect that the proposed method could be used in robots that can help take care of babies.

  17. Factors affecting emotional divorce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Said Shabanlou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emotional Divorce is the most important factor in the rupture of the most fundamental structures of society, the family.Due to the sensitivity and position of the familyAnd its functions specifically to investigate the factors underlying emotional divorce has of particular importance.Emotional Divorce phenomenon is not a single factor, but rather a set of related factors together led to Emotional Divorce.In this paper the role of psychological factors such as early maladaptive schemas, negative body image, perfectionism is discussed on an emotional divorce.Also quality of life and family relationships of couples with emotional divorce,Such as quality of health, sexual dissatisfaction, ignoring the needs, expectations and opinions of women by men or vice versa,And also social and economic factors such as subcultures families, couples, the quality of social relationships, social networks couple,Economic situation of the families of the couple, financial crisis, unemployment and economic revenues couples studied and some suggestions are presented based on the findings.

  18. Fast pyrolysis of biomass at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna

    This Ph.D. thesis describes experimental and modeling investigations of fast high temperature pyrolysis of biomass. Suspension firing of biomass is widely used for power generation and has been considered as an important step in reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by using less fossil fuels. Fast...... pyrolysis at high temperatures plays a significant role in the overall combustion process since the biomass type, the reaction kinetics and heat transfer rates during pyrolysis influence the volatile gas release. The solid residue yield and its properties in suspension firing, including particle size...... and shape, composition, reactivity and burnout depend significantly on the operating conditions of the fast pyrolysis. Biomass fast pyrolysis experiments were performed in a laboratory-scale wire mesh reactor and bench scale atmospheric pressure drop tube / entrained flow reactors with the aim...

  19. Study of Reaction Mechanism in Tracer Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    Regression Rates (Furnished by Frankford Arsenal) 35 13 Calculated Heat Fluxes and Energy Partitions 43 4 I NOMENCLATURE B = preexponential factor... anhydride disproportionates in a fast step: N2 0 3 - 2 + NO (4) so that the resulting dioxide can react with more nitrite in another fast reaction: Sr

  20. THE LANGUAGE, TONE AND PROSODY OF EMOTIONS: NEURAL DYNAMICS OF SPOKEN-WORD VALENCE PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat Liebenthal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid assessment of emotions is important for detecting and prioritizing salient input. Emotions are conveyed in spoken words via verbal and non-verbal channels that are mutually informative and unveil in parallel over time, but the neural dynamics and interactions of these processes are not well understood. In this paper, we review the literature on emotion perception in faces, written words, and voices, as a basis for understanding the functional organization of emotion perception in spoken words. The characteristics of visual and auditory routes to the amygdala – a subcortical center for emotion perception – are compared across these stimulus classes in terms of neural dynamics, hemispheric lateralization, and functionality. Converging results from neuroimaging, electrophysiological, and lesion studies suggest the existence of an afferent route to the amygdala and primary visual cortex for fast and subliminal processing of coarse emotional face cues. We suggest that a fast route to the amygdala may also function for brief non-verbal vocalizations (e.g., laugh, cry, in which emotional category is conveyed effectively by voice tone and intensity. However, emotional prosody which evolves on longer time scales and is conveyed by fine-grained spectral cues appears to be processed via a slower, indirect cortical route. For verbal emotional content, the bulk of current evidence, indicating predominant left lateralization of the amygdala response and timing of emotional effects attributable to speeded lexical access, appears more consistent with an indirect cortical route to the amygdala. Top-down linguistic modulation may play an important role for prioritized perception of emotions in words. Understanding the neural dynamics and interactions of emotion and language perception is important for selecting potent stimuli and devising effective training and/or treatment approaches for the alleviation of emotional dysfunction across a range of

  1. Emotions, Public Opinion, and U.S. Presidential Approval Rates: A 5-Year Analysis of Online Political Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bailon, Sandra; Banchs, Rafael E.; Kaltenbrunner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how emotional reactions to political events shape public opinion. We analyze political discussions in which people voluntarily engage online to approximate the public agenda: Online discussions offer a natural approach to the salience of political issues and the means to analyze emotional reactions as political events take…

  2. Effects of discrete emotions on young children's ability to discern fantasy and reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick, Nathalie; Quas, Jodi A

    2006-11-01

    This study examined 3- to 5-year-olds' (N = 128; 54% girls) ability to discriminate emotional fantasy and reality. Children viewed images depicting fantastic or real events that elicited several emotions, reported whether each event could occur, and rated their emotional reaction to the image. Children were also administered the Play Behavior Questionnaire and Pretend Action Tasks to assess play behaviors. Findings revealed age-related improvements in performance and biases in judgment based on the emotion depicted. Children reported that happy fantastic events could occur significantly more often than frightening and angry fantastic events and that happy real events could occur significantly more often than frightening and angry real events. Children's emotional reactions to the images but not play behaviors were significantly related to their fantasy-reality distinctions. Implications for the relation between emotions and children's fantasy-reality distinctions are discussed.

  3. Emotional Self-Efficacy, Emotional Empathy and Emotional Approach Coping as Sources of Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarık Totan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the many variables affecting happiness, there are those that arise from emotional factors. In this study, the hypothesis stating that happiness is affected by emotional self-efficacy, emotional empathy and emotional approach coping has been examined using the path model. A total of 334 university students participated in this study, 229 of whom were females and 105 being males. Oxford Happiness Questionnaire-Short Form, Emotional Self-efficacy Scale, Multi-Dimensional Emotional Empathy Scale, The Emotional Approach Coping Scale and personal information form have been used as data acquisition tools. As a result of path analysis, it was determined that the predicted path from emotional empathy to emotional approach coping was insignificant and thus it was taken out of the model. According to the modified path model, it was determined that there is a positive relationship between emotional self- efficacy and emotional empathy, that emotional self-efficacy positively affects emotional approach coping and happiness, that emotional empathy also positively affects happiness and that emotional approach coping also positively affects happiness.

  4. Reaction Graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅育熙

    1998-01-01

    The paper proposes reaction graphs as graphical representations of computational objects.A reaction graph is a directed graph with all its arrows and some of its nodes labeled.Computations are modled by graph rewriting of a simple nature.The basic rewriting rules embody the essence of both the communications among processes and cut-eliminations in proofs.Calculi of graphs are ideentified to give a formal and algebraic account of reaction graphs in the spirit of process algebra.With the help of the calculi,it is demonstrated that reaction graphs capture many interesting aspects of computations.

  5. Malaria over-diagnosis in Cameroon: diagnostic accuracy of Fluorescence and Staining Technologies (FAST) Malaria Stain and LED microscopy versus Giemsa and bright field microscopy validated by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsel, Sean M; Gustafson, Steven A; Friedlander, Edward; Shnyra, Alexander A; Adegbulu, Aderosoye J; Liu, Ying; Parrish, Nicole M; Jamal, Syed A; Lofthus, Eve; Ayuk, Leo; Awasom, Charles; Henry, Carolyn J; McArthur, Carole P

    2017-04-04

    Malaria is a major world health issue and its continued burden is due, in part, to difficulties in the diagnosis of the illness. The World Health Organization recommends confirmatory testing using microscopy-based techniques or rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) for all cases of suspected malaria. In regions where Plasmodium species are indigenous, there are multiple etiologies of fever leading to misdiagnoses, especially in populations where HIV is prevalent and children. To determine the frequency of malaria infection in febrile patients over an 8-month period at the Regional Hospital in Bamenda, Cameroon, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of the Flourescence and Staining Technology (FAST) Malaria stain and ParaLens Advance(TM) microscopy system (FM) and compared it with conventional bright field microscopy and Giemsa stain (GS). Peripheral blood samples from 522 patients with a clinical diagnosis of "suspected malaria" were evaluated using GS and FM methods. A nested PCR assay was the gold standard to compare the two methods. PCR positivity, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were determined. Four hundred ninety nine samples were included in the final analysis. Of these, 30 were positive via PCR (6.01%) with a mean PPV of 19.62% and 27.99% for GS and FM, respectively. The mean NPV was 95.01% and 95.28% for GS and FM, respectively. Sensitivity was 26.67% in both groups and specificity was 92.78% and 96.21% for GS and FM, respectively. An increased level of diagnostic discrepancy was observed between technicians based upon skill level using GS, which was not seen with FM. The frequency of malarial infections confirmed via PCR among patients presenting with fever and other symptoms of malaria was dramatically lower than that anticipated based upon physicians' clinical suspicions. A correlation between technician skill and accuracy of malaria diagnosis using GS was observed that was less pronounced using FM

  6. Spontaneous Emotional Facial Expression Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Zeng

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Change in a speaker’s emotion is a fundamental component in human communication. Automatic recognition of spontaneous emotion would significantly impact human-computer interaction and emotion-related studies in education, psychology and psychiatry. In this paper, we explore methods for detecting emotional facial expressions occurring in a realistic human conversation setting—the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI. Because non-emotional facial expressions have no distinct description and are expensive to model, we treat emotional facial expression detection as a one- class classification problem, which is to describe target objects (i.e., emotional facial expressions and distinguish them from outliers (i.e., non-emotional ones. Our preliminary experiments on AAI data suggest that one-class classification methods can reach a good balance between cost (labeling and computing and recognition performance by avoiding non-emotional expression labeling and modeling.

  7. Mixed emotions and coping: the benefits of secondary emotions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Braniecka

    Full Text Available The existing empirical literature suggests that during difficult situations, the concurrent experience of positive and negative affects may be ideal for ensuring successful adaptation and well-being. However, different patterns of mixed emotions may have different adaptive consequences. The present research tested the proposition that experiencing a pattern of secondary mixed emotion (i.e., secondary emotion that embrace both positive and negative affects more greatly promotes adaptive coping than experiencing two other patterns of mixed emotional experiences: simultaneous (i.e., two emotions of opposing affects taking place at the same time and sequential (i.e., two emotions of opposing affects switching back and forth. Support for this hypothesis was obtained from two experiments (Studies 1 and 2 and a longitudinal survey (Study 3. The results revealed that secondary mixed emotions predominate over sequential and simultaneous mixed emotional experiences in promoting adaptive coping through fostering the motivational and informative functions of emotions; this is done by providing solution-oriented actions rather than avoidance, faster decisions regarding coping strategies (Study 1, easier access to self-knowledge, and better narrative organization (Study 2. Furthermore, individuals characterized as being prone to feeling secondary mixed emotions were more resilient to stress caused by transitions than those who were characterized as being prone to feeling opposing emotions separately (Study 3. Taken together, the preliminary results indicate that the pattern of secondary mixed emotion provides individuals with a higher capacity to handle adversity than the other two patterns of mixed emotional experience.

  8. Mixed emotions and coping: the benefits of secondary emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braniecka, Anna; Trzebińska, Ewa; Dowgiert, Aneta; Wytykowska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    The existing empirical literature suggests that during difficult situations, the concurrent experience of positive and negative affects may be ideal for ensuring successful adaptation and well-being. However, different patterns of mixed emotions may have different adaptive consequences. The present research tested the proposition that experiencing a pattern of secondary mixed emotion (i.e., secondary emotion that embrace both positive and negative affects) more greatly promotes adaptive coping than experiencing two other patterns of mixed emotional experiences: simultaneous (i.e., two emotions of opposing affects taking place at the same time) and sequential (i.e., two emotions of opposing affects switching back and forth). Support for this hypothesis was obtained from two experiments (Studies 1 and 2) and a longitudinal survey (Study 3). The results revealed that secondary mixed emotions predominate over sequential and simultaneous mixed emotional experiences in promoting adaptive coping through fostering the motivational and informative functions of emotions; this is done by providing solution-oriented actions rather than avoidance, faster decisions regarding coping strategies (Study 1), easier access to self-knowledge, and better narrative organization (Study 2). Furthermore, individuals characterized as being prone to feeling secondary mixed emotions were more resilient to stress caused by transitions than those who were characterized as being prone to feeling opposing emotions separately (Study 3). Taken together, the preliminary results indicate that the pattern of secondary mixed emotion provides individuals with a higher capacity to handle adversity than the other two patterns of mixed emotional experience.

  9. The older the better?: age-related differences in emotion regulation after psychological contract breach

    OpenAIRE

    Bal, P. Matthijs; Smit, Priscilla

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of emotion regulation and age in reactions to psychological contract breach towards positive and negative affect. We expected that in the context of contract breach, reappraisal emotion regulation mitigate the negative relation with affect. Moreover, based on lifespan theory, suppression emotion regulation was expected to be important for younger workers, because older workers have learned how to express themselves appropriately at th...

  10. Emotion and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanac, M

    1999-02-01

    Gentle handling of mammals (rats, mice) and lizards (Iguana), but not of frogs (Rana) and fish (Carassius), elevated the set-point for body temperature (i.e., produced an emotional fever) achieved only behaviorally in lizards. Heart rate, another detector of emotion in mammals, was also accelerated by gentle handling, from ca. 70 beats/min to ca. 110 beats/min in lizards. This tachycardia faded in about 10 min. The same handling did not significantly modify the frogs' heart rates. The absence of emotional tachycardia in frogs and its presence in lizards (as well as in mammals), together with the emotional fever exhibited by mammals and reptiles, but not by frogs or fish, would suggest that emotion emerged in the evolutionary lineage between amphibians and reptiles. Such a conclusion would imply that reptiles possess consciousness with its characteristic affective dimension, pleasure. The role of sensory pleasure in decision making was therefore verified in iguanas placed in a motivational conflict. To be able to reach a bait (lettuce), the iguanas had to leave a warm refuge, provided with standard food, and venture into a cold environment. The results showed that lettuce was not necessary to the iguanas and that they traded off the palatability of the bait against the disadvantage of the cold. Thus, the behavior of the iguanas was likely to be produced, as it is in humans, through the maximization of sensory pleasure. Altogether, these results may indicate that the first elements of mental experience emerged between amphibians and reptiles.

  11. Diligence and Emotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schram Vejlby, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Wealthy ladies knitting provide a recurrent motif of Danish middle-class portraiture of the first half of the nineteenth century. This article explores the cultural and social significance of these images, and how they represent the central values of the Danish Golden Age (c.1810–1850). Since kni...... emotionally invested tokens of love. As a key marker of homemade love, the emotional warmth of these Golden Age portraits was carried by knitting as a textile symbol of emotion.......Wealthy ladies knitting provide a recurrent motif of Danish middle-class portraiture of the first half of the nineteenth century. This article explores the cultural and social significance of these images, and how they represent the central values of the Danish Golden Age (c.1810–1850). Since...... knitting was an essential skill for all women, this motif has traditionally been explained as part of the realist turn in Danish art. This article takes a new approach by arguing that the knitting carries an emotional value which has yet to be discussed by scholars. Displaying socially appropriate emotions...

  12. Oxytocin and emotion processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Simplicio, Martina; Harmer, Catherine J

    2016-11-01

    Since the observation that oxytocin has key effects on social decision making, research on this exciting neuropeptide has doubled in volume: hundreds of studies have pursued the promise of a specific oxytocin action on high-level cognition and social function with wide potential translational implications (from autism to social anxiety to dementia). Here we review the evidence on whether the complex behavioural effects observed in humans after exogenous oxytocin administration build on changes in basic emotional information processing, in particular emotional facial expressions recognition, and attention and memory for emotionally-valenced stimuli.We observe that recent studies confirm a facilitatory effect of oxytocin to more accurate emotion processing, irrespective of emotion type. However, it remains unclear whether this action precedes, is independent of or even secondary to the neuropeptide promoting a greater salience of social stimuli. Overall, this growing research area has shown that oxytocin produces behavioural and neurofunctional outcomes that are highly dependent on the experimental context and on individual differences (gender, personality, life experiences). This poses an exciting challenge for future experimental medicine designs to address and unpack complex interactions between individual and context characteristic, which is needed for the development of more precise clinical applications.

  13. Food and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti, Laura; Bachar, Eytan; Berry, Elliot M.

    2002-11-01

    The relationship between eating and emotion has always interested researchers of human behavior. This relationship varies according to the particular characteristics of the individual and according to the specific emotional state. We consider findings on the reciprocal interactions between, on the one hand, emotions and food intake, and, on the other, the psychological and emotional consequences of losing weight and dieting. Theories on the relationship between emotions and eating behaviors have their origin in the literature on obesity. The psychosomatic theory of obesity proposes that eating may reduce anxiety, and that the obese overeat in order to reduce discomfort. The internal/external theory of obesity hypothesizes that overweight people do not recognize physiological cues of hunger or satiety because of faulty learning. It thus predicts that normal weight people will alter (either increase or decrease) their eating when stressed, while obese people will eat regardless of their physiological state. The restraint hypothesis postulates that people who chronically restrict their food intake overeat in the presence of disinhibitors such as the perception of having overeaten, alcohol or stress. These theories are examined in the light of present research and their implications on eating disorders are presented.

  14. The relationship between emotional intelligence and learning outcomes, and the mediating role of emotional conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Hjertø, Kjell B.

    2010-01-01

    A field sample of 1100 employees in the army was investigated to study the relationship between the individuals’ self reported emotional intelligence and learning outcomes in work groups, with two dimensions of emotional conflict as mediators, emotional person conflict and emotional task conflict. Most importantly, emotional intelligence predicted positively learning outcomes and emotional task conflict, and predicted negatively emotional person conflict. Further, emotional task ...

  15. Emotion Eliciting in Affective Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Yoke Chin

    2014-01-01

    outlines the concept of an integrated design method that is developed to aid novice designer through the conceptual design stage. Multi-modal stimulation is used in this design method to induce user’s emotion, a key element in the user’s mental model. Visio-haptic Augmented Reality technology is integrated...... with 3D digital prototype as emotion stimulus. To form a closed loop reflective model, the emotion response from the user is assessed with an emotion assessment tool. Emotion ontology is established to form the backbone of the emotion assessment tool....

  16. Students Can Control Their Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Harati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available As emotional intelligence contributes extensively in people’s lives, it can also find some significance in language teaching. From this perspective, it is inevitable for teachers to know how to improve students’ emotional intelligence. This paper made an effort to provide procedures to develop emotional intelligence. Although success has various definitions from one theory to other, in this presented theory—emotional intelligence— success will be achieved when students can control their emotions. This paper attempts to mark a common perception of behaviors that the teachers can employ to enhance students ‘control over their emotions.

  17. Emotional intelligence and mental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Janine; Schütz, Astrid; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich

    2009-09-01

    Emotional abilities were measured with a performance test of emotional intelligence (The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso, 2002) in patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder, substance abuse disorder, or borderline personality disorder (BPD), and a nonclinical control group. Findings showed that all clinical groups differed from controls with respect to their overall emotional intelligence score, which dovetails with previous findings from self-report measures. Specifically, we found that the ability to understand emotional information and the ability to regulate emotions best distinguished the groups. Findings showed that patients with substance abuse disorder and BPD patients were most impaired.

  18. Tailoring ZSM-5 Zeolites for the Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass to Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Thomas C.; Gardner, David W.; Thilakaratne, Rajeeva

    2016-01-01

    The production of aromatic hydrocarbons from cellulose by zeolite-catalyzed fast pyrolysis involves a complex reaction network sensitive to the zeolite structure, crystallinity, elemental composition, porosity, and acidity. The interplay of these parameters under the reaction conditions represent...

  19. Fast growth in control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Rico (Zulay)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe focus of this paper is on the influence of the fast growth of organizations on the design process of management control systems. What are the management accounting and control problems that a fast growth organization encounters that can be ascribed to this growth. What are the circum

  20. Fast protein folding kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816