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Sample records for fascicularis dose range

  1. Gene expression profiling in the Cynomolgus macaque Macaca fascicularis shows variation within the normal birth range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Mark H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although an adverse early-life environment has been linked to an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, the molecular mechanisms underlying altered disease susceptibility as well as their relevance to humans are largely unknown. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that these effects operate within the normal range of birth weights and involve mechanisms of developmental palsticity rather than pathology. Method To explore this further, we utilised a non-human primate model Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque which shares with humans the same progressive history of the metabolic syndrome. Using microarray we compared tissues from neonates in the average birth weight (50-75th centile to those of lower birth weight (5-25th centile and studied the effect of different growth trajectories within the normal range on gene expression levels in the umbilical cord, neonatal liver and skeletal muscle. Results We identified 1973 genes which were differentially expressed in the three tissue types between average and low birth weight animals (P Conclusion These differences in gene expression levels between animals in the upper and lower percentiles of the normal birth weight range may point towards early life metabolic adaptations that in later life result in differences in disease risk.

  2. Urban primate ranging patterns: GPS-collar deployments for Macaca fascicularis and M. sylvanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klegarth, Amy R; Hollocher, Hope; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Shaw, Eric; Lee, Benjamin P Y-H; Feeney, Tessa; Holmes, Damian; Laguea, Dale; Fuentes, Agustín

    2017-05-01

    The global increase in urbanization is leading to heavier interface between humans and wildlife. Within these anthropogenic landscapes, little is known about ranging patterns, particularly with regard to urban primates. Here we present the results of the first long-term deployment of multiple GPS collars on two species of macaques to investigate the impacts of urbanization on urban primate ranging patterns in Singapore and Gibraltar. Collars data acquisition were excellent with respect to the amount, quality, and accuracy of data collected; however, remote connectivity and drop-off functionality was poor across all deployments. Analyses highlighted high variability in ranging patterns between individuals within each species that aligned with access to human food resources and patterns of tourism. Individuals from troops with less access to human food had much larger home, core, and day ranges relative to those with regular provisioning or raiding opportunities. Almost no temporal range overlap was observed between any focal individuals at either site and spatial overlap was low for all but two troops at each site. We found no relationship between anthropogenic schedules and changes in ranging patterns. Significant seasonal variation existed for daily path length and day range size for both the Singapore long-tailed and the Gibraltar Barbary macaques, with long-tailed macaques increasing their range during the equatorial monsoon season and Barbary macaques increasing their range during drier, summer months. This study highlights how the behavioral plasticity found within the genus Macaca is reflected in ranging pattern variability within urban environments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA and two Y-chromosome genes of common long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis fascicularis) throughout Thailand and vicinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunlungsup, Srichan; Imai, Hiroo; Hamada, Yuzuru; Matsudaira, Kazunari; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2017-02-01

    Macaca fascicularis fascicularis is distributed over a wide area of Southeast Asia. Thailand is located at the center of their distribution range and is the bridge connecting the two biogeographic regions of Indochina and Sunda. However, only a few genetic studies have explored the macaques in this region. To shed some light on the evolutionary history of M. f. fascicularis, including hybridization with M. mulatta, M. f. fascicularis and M. mulatta samples of known origins throughout Thailand and the vicinity were analyzed by molecular phylogenetics using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), including the hypervariable region 1, and Y-chromosomal DNA, including SRY and TSPY genes. The mtDNA phylogenetic analysis divided M. f. fascicularis into five subclades (Insular Indonesia, Sundaic Thai Gulf, Vietnam, Sundaic Andaman sea coast, and Indochina) and revealed genetic differentiation between the two sides of the Thai peninsula, which had previously been reported as a single group of Malay peninsular macaques. From the estimated divergence time of the Sundaic Andaman sea coast subclade, it is proposed that after M. f. fascicularis dispersed throughout Southeast Asia, some populations on the south-easternmost Indochina (eastern Thailand, southern Cambodia and southern Vietnam at the present time) migrated south-westwards across the land bridge, which was exposed during the glacial period of the late Pleistocene epoch, to the southernmost Thailand/northern peninsular Malaysia. Then, some of them migrated north and south to colonize the Thai Andaman sea coast and northern Sumatra, respectively. The SRY-TSPY phylogenetic analysis suggested that male-mediated gene flow from M. mulatta southward to M. f. fascicularis was restricted south of, but close to, the Isthmus of Kra. There was a strong impact of the geographical factors in Thailand, such as the Isthmus of Kra, Nakhon Si Thammarat, and Phuket ranges and Sundaland, on M. f. fascicularis biogeography and their hybridization

  4. Analytical probabilistic proton dose calculation and range uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Hennig, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce the concept of analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) to calculate the mean and the standard deviation of intensity-modulated proton dose distributions under the influence of range uncertainties in closed form. For APM, range uncertainties are modeled with a multivariate Normal distribution p(z) over the radiological depths z. A pencil beam algorithm that parameterizes the proton depth dose d(z) with a weighted superposition of ten Gaussians is used. Hence, the integrals ∫ dz p(z) d(z) and ∫ dz p(z) d(z)2 required for the calculation of the expected value and standard deviation of the dose remain analytically tractable and can be efficiently evaluated. The means μk, widths δk, and weights ωk of the Gaussian components parameterizing the depth dose curves are found with least squares fits for all available proton ranges. We observe less than 0.3% average deviation of the Gaussian parameterizations from the original proton depth dose curves. Consequently, APM yields high accuracy estimates for the expected value and standard deviation of intensity-modulated proton dose distributions for two dimensional test cases. APM can accommodate arbitrary correlation models and account for the different nature of random and systematic errors in fractionated radiation therapy. Beneficial applications of APM in robust planning are feasible.

  5. Identification and Characterization of MicroRNAs in Macaca fascicularis by EST Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which repress gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. In this study, an expressed sequence tag (EST-based combined method was applied for the detection of miRNAs in Macaca fascicularis which is used as a model animal extensively in medical experiments, particularly those involved with neuroscience and disease. Initially, previously known miRNA sequences from metazoans were used to blast with the EST databases of Macaca fascicularis, and then a range of filtering criteria was conducted to remove some pseudo ones. At last a total of 8 novel conserved miRNAs were identified; their functions were further predicted and analyzed. Together, our study provides insight into miRNAs and their functions in Macaca fascicularis, indicating that the EST analysis is an efficient and affordable alternative approach for identifying novel miRNA candidates.

  6. Upgrading NASA/DOSE laser ranging system control computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklefs, Randall L.; Cheek, Jack; Seery, Paul J.; Emenheiser, Kenneth S.; Hanrahan, William P., III; Mcgarry, Jan F.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ranging systems now managed by the NASA Dynamics of the Solid Earth (DOSE) and operated by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation, the University of Hawaii, and the University of Texas have produced a wealth on interdisciplinary scientific data over the last three decades. Despite upgrades to the most of the ranging station subsystems, the control computers remain a mix of 1970's vintage minicomputers. These encompass a wide range of vendors, operating systems, and languages, making hardware and software support increasingly difficult. Current technology allows replacement of controller computers at a relatively low cost while maintaining excellent processing power and a friendly operating environment. The new controller systems are now being designed using IBM-PC-compatible 80486-based microcomputers, a real-time Unix operating system (LynxOS), and X-windows/Motif IB, and serial interfaces have been chosen. This design supports minimizing short and long term costs by relying on proven standards for both hardware and software components. Currently, the project is in the design and prototyping stage with the first systems targeted for production in mid-1993.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of 2 Formulations of Buprenorphine in Macaques (Macaca mulatta and Macaca fascicularis)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Buprenorphine is the cornerstone of pain management in nonhuman primates, but the pharmacokinetics of this widely used drug are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine (0.01 and 0.03 mg/kg IM) and sustained-release buprenorphine (0.2 mg/kg SC) in 2 macaque species (M. mulatta and M. fascicularis) by using mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetics did not differ significantly between species, and buprenorphine was dose-proportional at the ...

  8. Osseointegration of dental implants in Macaca fascicularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, R. S.; Odang, R. W.; Odelia, L.

    2017-08-01

    Osseointegration is an important factor in determining the success of a dental implant. It can be assessed from the osseointegration that occurs between the implant and the bone. The implant stability is determined by the osseous support at the implant-bone interface, which is commonly evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. This study aimed to evaluate whether the osseointegration level measured by a Low Resonance Frequency Analyzer (LRFA) gave results as good as those obtained by histomorphometric examination. Six male Macaca fascicularis were used in this study. In each animal, two types of loading were performed: immediate and delayed loading. Clinical examination and LRFA measurement were performed to determine osseointegration at the first and second weeks and at the first, second, third, and fourth months. After four months, histomorphometric examination was performed. The relationship between the histomorphometric examination and LRFA measurement was compared using the Pearson correlation coefficient. There was no significant difference in the osseointegration between immediate loading and delayed loading (p > 0.05) The bone-implant contact percentage in the first group did not differ significantly from that in the second group. Statistical analysis showed that there was a strong correlation between LRFA measurement and histomorphometric examination. Osseointegration could be evaluated through LRFA measurement as well as through histomorphometric examination.

  9. NOTE: Study of Gafchromic® EBT film response over a large dose range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martišíková, Mária; Jäkel, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Presently Gafchromic EBT films are widely used for relative dose verification in standard radiation therapy using high-energy photons, inclusive IMRT. The use of films for dosimetry in medical ion beams is more complicated due to the strongly inhomogeneous dose deposition by ions on microscopic level. Track structure models, presently used to describe dosimeter response as a function of the ion field properties, are based on input information which can be obtained from the film response in photon beams. We therefore studied the performance of Gafchromic EBT films, ancestors of currently available EBT2 films, in 60Co photon beams. The dose-response curve was measured from 7.5 × 10-2 Gy to 3 × 104 Gy. The dynamic range, linearity and dose rate dependence of this calibration curve were studied. A high saturation dose of 3 × 103 Gy, and thus a large dynamic range, was observed. No signs of supralinearity and bleaching due to radiation were found. No dependence of the response on the dose rate at high dose rates and high doses was found. All those properties justify the use of simplified models of the film response to ions. Furthermore, fits of the calibration data by predictions of different models for signal creation mechanism of dosimetric materials were performed. The best description was found for the recently published gamma-distributed single-hit model which takes into account different sizes of the active centres.

  10. Range shift and dose perturbation with high-density materials in proton beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichiporov, D., E-mail: nichipor@indiana.edu [Indiana University Integrated Science and Technology Hall, 2401 Milo B. Sampson La, Bloomington, IN 47408-1398 (United States); Moskvin, V. [Indiana University School of Medicine, 535 Barnhill Dr., RT 041, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, 2425 Milo B. Sampson La, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Fanelli, L. [Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, 2425 Milo B. Sampson La, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Das, I.J. [Indiana University School of Medicine, 535 Barnhill Dr., RT 041, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, 2425 Milo B. Sampson La, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Radiotherapy with proton beams requires accurate knowledge of the proton range. When materials with high atomic numbers (Z) and densities (e.g. prostheses or implants) are present in the patient, they give rise to pronounced uncertainties in computed tomography data and to large errors in proton range and dose calculations. A modified analytical expression is proposed for the observed range shift in water in the presence of a high-density material of known thickness and density. The expression was verified experimentally in a clinical beam with various thicknesses and materials in a water phantom, at several beam ranges and at different depths. Measurements were also made behind the medium-to-water interface to evaluate dose perturbation using a thin window parallel plate ion chamber. Primary particle fluence variations due to the range shift were studied in a separate experiment. The measured range shift was in good agreement ({+-}0.3 mm) with the analytical expression for most of the materials studied. A small, but consistent dependence of range shift on the energy of impinging protons was found. Dose perturbation factor in water downstream of the material is less than +5% for thicknesses up to 8 g/cm{sup 2}. The proposed analytical expression can be used in clinical situations to determine the range shift in patient caused by an implanted material. Dose perturbation in the presence of an implant is due to the changes in primary particle fluence resulting from several physical processes.

  11. Diagnostic reference ranges and the American College of Radiology Dose Index Registry: the pediatric experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goske, Marilyn J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-10-15

    CT scans are powerful tools used in the care of pediatric patients daily. Yet the increased use of CT warrants careful monitoring. This article defines diagnostic reference levels and how they can be used to guide practice. Once a facility has adapted its techniques and protocols to fall within diagnostic reference levels or target values, the facility can expand its quality-improvement efforts to include a new concept, diagnostic reference ranges (DRRs). DRRs take into account the subjective image quality of the examination and provide a minimum estimated patient dose, below which accurate interpretation of an image might be difficult, and an upper estimated dose, above which the patient dose may be higher than necessary. This paper also describes how the American College of Radiology Dose Index Registry can be used by a facility as a continuous quality improvement tool to monitor and manage appropriate patient dose. (orig.)

  12. [Physical image properties of digital radiography systems in low dose range].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitomo, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Higashide, Ryo; Ohashi, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    We measured physical image properties of a flat panel detector (FPD) system and a computed radiography (CR) system, targeting to a low dose range (reference dose: 2.58×10(-7) C/kg: to 1/20 dose). Input-output properties, pre-sampled modulation transfer functions (pre-sampled MTFs), and normalized noise power spectra for an FPD system equipped with a CsI scintillator (FPDcsi) and a CR system with an imaging plate coated with storage phosphor (CR) were measured at the low dose range for radiation quality of RQA3 (≍50 skV) and RQA5 (≍70 kV), and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were calculated. In addition, in order to validate the DQE results, component fractions of Poisson and multiplicative and additive noise were analyzed using relative standard deviation analysis. The DQE values of FPDcsi were decreased with dose decrease, and contrarily to these, those of CR were increased. At the 1/10 and 1/20 doses for RQA3, the DQEs of FPDcsi and CR became almost the same. From the results of RSD analysis, it was proved that the main cause of DQE deterioration on FPDcsi are non-negligible additive (electronic) noise, and the DQE improvement on CR was caused by both of significant multiplicative (structure) noise and very low electronic noise. The DQE results were validated by comparing burger phantom images of each dose and radiation quality.

  13. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Deuk Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm{sup 3} which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way.

  14. Dynamic dose assessment by Large Eddy Simulation of the near-range atmospheric dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervecken, Lieven; Camps, Johan; Meyers, Johan

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the simulation of the near-range atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides, computational fluid dynamics is becoming increasingly popular. In the current study, Large-Eddy Simulation is used to examine the time-evolution of the turbulent dispersion of radioactive gases in the atmospheric boundary layer, and it is coupled to a gamma dose rate model that is based on the point-kernel method with buildup factors. In this way, the variability of radiological dose rate from cloud shine due to instantaneous turbulent mixing processes can be evaluated. The steady release in an open field of (41)Ar and (133)Xe for 4 different release heights is studied, thus covering radionuclides that decay with a high-energy gamma and a low-energy gamma, respectively. Based on these simulations, the variability of dose rates at ground level for different averaging times in the dose measurements is analyzed. It is observed that turbulent variability in the wind field can lead to dose estimates that are underestimated by up to a factor of four when conventional long-term measurements are used to estimate the dose from short-term exposures.

  15. Measurement of a wide-range of X-ray doses using specialty doped silica fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Sani, S. F.; Hammond, R.; Jafari, S. M.; Wahab, Norfadira; Amouzad Mahdiraji, G.; Siti Shafiqah, A. S.; Abdul Rashid, H. A.; Maah, M. J.; Aldousari, H.; Alkhorayef, M.; Alzimami, M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    Using six types of tailor-made doped optical fibres, we carry out thermoluminescent (TL) studies of X-rays, investigating the TL yield for doses from 20 mGy through to 50 Gy. Dosimetric parameters were investigated for nominal 8 wt% Ge doped fibres that in two cases were co-doped, using B in one case and Br in the other. A comparative measurement of surface analysis has also been made for non-annealed and annealed capillary fibres, use being made of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Comparison was made with the conventional TL phosphor LiF in the form of the proprietary product TLD-100, including dose response and glow curves investigated for X-rays generated at 60 kVp over a dose range from 2 cGy to 50 Gy. The energy response of the fibres was also performed for X-rays generated at peak accelerating potentials of 80 kVp, 140 kVp, 250 kVp and 6 MV photons for an absorbed dose of 2 Gy. Present results show the samples to be suitable for use as TL dosimeters, with good linearity of response and a simple glow curve (simple trap) distribution. It has been established that the TL performance of an irradiated fibre is not only influenced by radiation parameters such as energy, dose-rate and total dose but also the type of fibre.

  16. Range and modulation dependencies for proton beam dose per monitor unit calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Schreuder, Andries N.; Moyers, Michael F.; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of dose per monitor unit (D∕MU) are required in addition to measurements to increase patient safety in the clinical practice of proton radiotherapy. As in conventional photon and electron therapy, the D∕MU depends on several factors. This study focused on obtaining range and modulation dependence factors used in D∕MU calculations for the double scattered proton beam line at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute. Three dependencies on range and one dependency on modulation were found. A carefully selected set of measurements was performed to discern these individual dependencies. Dependencies on range were due to: (1) the stopping power of the protons passing through the monitor chamber; (2) the reduction of proton fluence due to nuclear interactions within the patient; and (3) the variation of proton fluence passing through the monitor chamber due to different source-to-axis distances (SADs) for different beam ranges. Different SADs are produced by reconfigurations of beamline elements to provide different field sizes and ranges. The SAD effect on the D∕MU varies smoothly as the beam range is varied, except at the beam range for which the first scatterers are exchanged and relocated to accommodate low and high beam ranges. A geometry factor was devised to model the SAD variation effect on the D∕MU. The measured D∕MU variation as a function of range can be predicted within 1% using the three modeled dependencies on range. Investigation of modulated beams showed that an analytical formula can predict the D∕MU dependency as a function of modulation to within 1.5%. Special attention must be applied when measuring the D∕MU dependence on modulation to avoid interplay between range and SAD effects. PMID:19292004

  17. Range and modulation dependencies for proton beam dose per monitor unit calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Schreuder, Andries N.; Moyers, Michael F.; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E. [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, California 92324 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum, Universitaetsklinikum, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45147 Essen (Germany); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Calculations of dose per monitor unit (D/MU) are required in addition to measurements to increase patient safety in the clinical practice of proton radiotherapy. As in conventional photon and electron therapy, the D/MU depends on several factors. This study focused on obtaining range and modulation dependence factors used in D/MU calculations for the double scattered proton beam line at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute. Three dependencies on range and one dependency on modulation were found. A carefully selected set of measurements was performed to discern these individual dependencies. Dependencies on range were due to: (1) the stopping power of the protons passing through the monitor chamber; (2) the reduction of proton fluence due to nuclear interactions within the patient; and (3) the variation of proton fluence passing through the monitor chamber due to different source-to-axis distances (SADs) for different beam ranges. Different SADs are produced by reconfigurations of beamline elements to provide different field sizes and ranges. The SAD effect on the D/MU varies smoothly as the beam range is varied, except at the beam range for which the first scatterers are exchanged and relocated to accommodate low and high beam ranges. A geometry factor was devised to model the SAD variation effect on the D/MU. The measured D/MU variation as a function of range can be predicted within 1% using the three modeled dependencies on range. Investigation of modulated beams showed that an analytical formula can predict the D/MU dependency as a function of modulation to within 1.5%. Special attention must be applied when measuring the D/MU dependence on modulation to avoid interplay between range and SAD effects.

  18. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of ammonium bicarbonate over a large dose range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Sehested, K.

    1991-01-01

    of formaldehyde and an unidentified polymer. A large initial yield of formate in the gamma-radiolysis, G(HCOO-) = 2.2, is due to the reaction COO- + HCO3- reversible HCOO- + CO3-. The efficiency of organic synthesis within the large dose range studied is low and is explained by efficient pathways leading......Oxygen-free aqueous solutions of 0.05 mol dm-3 ammonium and sodium bicarbonate were studied after receiving various doses of Co-60 gammas (0.01-400 kGy) or 0.5-20 Gy pulses of 10 Mev electrons. Formate and oxalate were found to be the main radiolytic products, in addition to trace amounts...

  19. Fundamental investigations of natural and laboratory generated SAR dose response curves for quartz OSL in the high dose range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timar-Gabor, Alida; Constantin, Daniela; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter;

    2015-01-01

    SAR-OSL investigations on quartz from Romanian loess resulted in non concordant fine and coarse-grain ages for equivalent doses higher than ~100 Gy. The laboratory dose response for both grain sizes is well represented by a sum of two saturating exponential functions, fine and coarse grains chara...

  20. Preclinical dose-ranging studies of a novel dry powder norovirus vaccine formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Michael J; Ni, Yawei; Finger-Baker, Isaac; Ball, Jordan P; Hahn, Jessica; DiMarco, Ashley V; Kobs, Dean; Horne, Bobbi; Talton, James D; Cobb, Ronald R

    2016-03-14

    Norovirus is the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans with multiple genotypes currently circulating worldwide. The development of a successful norovirus vaccine is contingent on its ability to induce both systemic and mucosal antibody responses against a wide range of norovirus genotypes. Norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs) are known to elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses when delivered intranasally. Incorporation of these VLPs into an intranasal powder vaccine offers the advantage of simplicity and induction of neutralizing systemic and mucosal antibodies. Nasal immunization, which provides the advantage of ease of administration and a mucosal delivery mechanism, faces the real issue of limited nasal residence time due to mucociliary clearance. Herein, we describe a novel dry powder (GelVac™) formulation of GI or GII.4 norovirus VLPs, two dominant circulating genotypes, to identify the optimal antigen dosages based on systemic and mucosal immune responses in guinea pigs. Systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of each of the VLPs was observed in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, a boosting effect was observed after the second dosing of each VLP antigen. With the GelVac™ formulation, a total antigen dose of ≥ 15 μg was determined to be the maximally immunogenic dose for both GI and GII.4 norovirus VLPs based on evaluation for 56 days. Taken together, these results indicate that norovirus VLPs could be used as potential vaccine candidates without using an immunostimulatory adjuvant and provide a basis for the development of a GelVac™ bivalent GI/GII.4 norovirus VLP vaccine.

  1. /sup 210/Po in marine organisms: a wide range of natural radiation dose domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    Marine biota is able to concentrate /sup 210/Po to high levels, as 10/sup 3/-10/sup 5/ relative to sea water concentration. /sup 210/Po concentrations in mixed zooplankton reaches 34-51 Bq.kg/sup -1/ (fresh wt), special groups such as copepods reaching even higher concentrations /similar to/ 90 Bq.kg/sup -1/, whereas gelatinous zooplankton display /similar to/ 1 Bq.kg/sup -1/. Epipelagic teleosts feeding on plankton displayed the highest concentrations found in fish muscle, 2-21 Bq.kg/sup -1/. Contrasting with this, demersal teleosts and elasmobranchs display lower /sup 210/Po concentrations, in the ranges 0.5-7 Bq.kg/sup -1/ and 0.2-1.7 Bq.kg/sup -1/, respectively. Much higher concentrations can, however, be measured in fish liver, gonad, bone and piloric caecca, and small mesopelagic fish can reach /similar to/ 800 Bq.kg/sup -1/ on a whole-body basis. Due to these /sup 210/Po activity concentrations, dose equivalent rates delivered to biological tissues in marine organisms can vary widely, from 0.4 mSv.y/sup -1/ in gelatinous plankton up to 5.6 x 10/sup 3/ mSv.y/sup -1/ in the gut wall of sardines. It is concluded that in organisms living in the same ocean layer a wide range of internal radiation doses exists and it is essentially sustained by /sup 210/Po food-chain transfer. (author).

  2. Pharmacokinetics of 2 formulations of buprenorphine in macaques (Macaca mulatta and Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Halliday, Lisa C; Moody, David E; Fang, Wenfang B; Lindeblad, Matthew; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2013-01-01

    Buprenorphine is the cornerstone of pain management in nonhuman primates, but the pharmacokinetics of this widely used drug are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine (0.01 and 0.03 mg/kg IM) and sustained-release buprenorphine (0.2 mg/kg SC) in 2 macaque species (M. mulatta and M. fascicularis) by using mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetics did not differ significantly between species, and buprenorphine was dose-proportional at the tested doses. The low and high doses of buprenorphine had elimination half-lives of 2.6 ± 0.7 and 5.3 ± 2.0 h, respectively, but the low-dose data were constrained by the sensitivity of the analytical method. Sustained-release buprenorphine had an elimination half-life of 42.6 ± 26.2 h. The AUC0-Tlast of buprenorphine were 9.1 ± 4.3 and 39.0 ± 25.1 ng × h/mL for the low and high doses, respectively, and sustained-release buprenorphine had an AUC0-Tlast of 177 ± 74 ng × h/mL. Assuming a hypothesized therapeutic buprenorphine plasma concentration threshold of 0.1 ng/mL in macaques, these results suggest that buprenorphine doses of 0.01 mg/kg IM should be administered every 6 to 8 h, whereas doses of 0.03 mg/kg IM can be administered every 12 h. These results further demonstrate that a single 0.2-mg/kg SC injection of sustained-release buprenorphine maintains plasma concentrations above 0.1 ng/mL for 5 d in macaques. These findings support a new dosing strategy using sustained-release buprenorphine to improve pain management, decrease animal stress, improve animal welfare, and simplify the postoperative management of nonhuman primates in laboratory animal and zoological settings.

  3. Radiation dose response estimation with emphasis on low dose range using restricted cubic splines: application to all solid cancer mortality data, 1950-2003, in atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Eiji

    2015-07-01

    Using the all solid cancer mortality data set of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort from 1950 to 2003 (LSS Report 14) data among atomic bomb survivors, excess relative risk (ERR) statistical analyses were performed using the second degree polynomial and the threshold and restricted cubic spline (RCS) dose response models. For the RCS models with 3 to 7 knots of equally spaced percentiles with margins in the dose range greater than 50 mGy, the dose response was assumed to be linear at less than 70 to 90 mGy. Due to the skewed dose distribution of atomic bomb survivors, the current knot system for the RCS analysis results in a detailed depiction of the dose response as less than approximately 0.5 Gy. The 6 knot RCS models for the all-solid cancer mortality dose response of the whole dose or less than 2 Gy were selected with the AIC model selection criterion and fit significantly better (p < 0.05) than the linear (L) model. The usual RCS includes the L-global model but not the quadratic (Q) nor linear-quadratic (LQ) global models. The authors extended the RCS to include L or LQ global models by putting L or LQ constraints on the cubic spline in the lower and upper tails, and the best RCS model selected with AIC criterion was the usual RCS with L-constraints in both the lower and upper tails. The selected RCS had a linear dose-response model in the lower dose range (i.e., < 0.2-0.3 Gy) and was compatible with the linear no-threshold (LNT) model in this dose range. The proposed method is also useful in describing the dose response of a specific cancer or non-cancer disease incidence/mortality.

  4. Fundamental investigations of natural and laboratory generated SAR dose response curves for quartz OSL in the high dose range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timar-Gabor, Alida; Constantin, Daniela; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01

    SAR-OSL investigations on quartz from Romanian loess resulted in non concordant fine and coarse-grain ages for equivalent doses higher than ~100 Gy. The laboratory dose response for both grain sizes is well represented by a sum of two saturating exponential functions, fine and coarse grains chara...... equivalent dose of 2000e2500 Gy were found to be below the saturation level of the laboratory dose response curve for both grain sizes; this also applied to the luminescence signals measured after >5000 Gy given on top of natural doses. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....... characterised by D01 and D02 values of ~140 and ~1400 Gy and ~65 and ~650 Gy respectively. Pulsed OSL experiments confirmed that this behaviour is almost certainly inherent to quartz and not caused by contamination with another mineral. Natural doseeresponse curves do not follow the same pattern and enter...... saturation much earlier. Analysis of time resolved spectra indicated similar luminescence lifetimes for both fine and coarse quartz grains, and natural and laboratory generated OSL signals seem to use the same non-dosedependent recombination pathways. The natural signals of a sample with an expected...

  5. Construction and validation of a systematic ethogram of Macaca fascicularis in a free enclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Xie, Liang; Li, Xin; Li, Qi; Wang, Tao; Ji, Yongjia; Kong, Fei; Zhan, Qunlin; Cheng, Ke; Fang, Liang; Xie, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral studies in non-human primates have become ideal models for further investigations into advanced cognitive function in humans. To date, there is no systematic ethogram of the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) in a free enclosure. In a field observation of 6012 subjects, 107 distinct behaviors of M. fascicularis were preliminarily described. 83 of these behaviors were then independently validated through a randomized cohort and classified into 12 behavioral categories. 53 of these behaviors were then selected to accurately reflect the daily mundane activity of the species in a free enclosure. These findings systematically document the behavior of M. fascicularis in a free enclosure for use in further investigations.

  6. Construction and validation of a systematic ethogram of Macaca fascicularis in a free enclosure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xu

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies in non-human primates have become ideal models for further investigations into advanced cognitive function in humans. To date, there is no systematic ethogram of the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis in a free enclosure. In a field observation of 6012 subjects, 107 distinct behaviors of M. fascicularis were preliminarily described. 83 of these behaviors were then independently validated through a randomized cohort and classified into 12 behavioral categories. 53 of these behaviors were then selected to accurately reflect the daily mundane activity of the species in a free enclosure. These findings systematically document the behavior of M. fascicularis in a free enclosure for use in further investigations.

  7. Daily rifapentine for treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. A randomized, dose-ranging trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Susan E; Savic, Radojka M; Goldberg, Stefan; Stout, Jason E; Schluger, Neil; Muzanyi, Grace; Johnson, John L; Nahid, Payam; Hecker, Emily J; Heilig, Charles M; Bozeman, Lorna; Feng, Pei-Jean I; Moro, Ruth N; MacKenzie, William; Dooley, Kelly E; Nuermberger, Eric L; Vernon, Andrew; Weiner, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Rifapentine has potent activity in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy but its optimal dose and exposure in humans are unknown. We conducted a randomized, partially blinded dose-ranging study to determine tolerability, safety, and antimicrobial activity of daily rifapentine for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were assigned rifapentine 10, 15, or 20 mg/kg or rifampin 10 mg/kg daily for 8 weeks (intensive phase), with isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. The primary tolerability end point was treatment discontinuation. The primary efficacy end point was negative sputum cultures at completion of intensive phase. A total of 334 participants were enrolled. At completion of intensive phase, cultures on solid media were negative in 81.3% of participants in the rifampin group versus 92.5% (P = 0.097), 89.4% (P = 0.29), and 94.7% (P = 0.049) in the rifapentine 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg groups. Liquid cultures were negative in 56.3% (rifampin group) versus 74.6% (P = 0.042), 69.7% (P = 0.16), and 82.5% (P = 0.004), respectively. Compared with the rifampin group, the proportion negative at the end of intensive phase was higher among rifapentine recipients who had high rifapentine areas under the concentration-time curve. Percentages of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiologic ineligibility were similar across groups (rifampin, 8.2%; rifapentine 10, 15, or 20 mg/kg, 3.4, 2.5, and 7.4%, respectively). Daily rifapentine was well-tolerated and safe. High rifapentine exposures were associated with high levels of sputum sterilization at completion of intensive phase. Further studies are warranted to determine if regimens that deliver high rifapentine exposures can shorten treatment duration to less than 6 months. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00694629).

  8. Large-scale analysis of Macaca fascicularis transcripts and inference of genetic divergence between M. fascicularis and M. mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugano Sumio

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis are widely used as experimental animals in biomedical research and are closely related to other laboratory macaques, such as rhesus macaques (M. mulatta. We isolated 85,721 clones and determined 9407 full-insert sequences from cynomolgus monkey brain, testis, and liver. These sequences were annotated based on homology to human genes and stored in a database, QFbase http://genebank.nibio.go.jp/qfbase/. Results We found that 1024 transcripts did not represent any public human cDNA sequence and examined their expression using M. fascicularis oligonucleotide microarrays. Significant expression was detected for 544 (51% of the unidentified transcripts. Moreover, we identified 226 genes containing exon alterations in the untranslated regions of the macaque transcripts, despite the highly conserved structure of the coding regions. Considering the polymorphism in the common ancestor of cynomolgus and rhesus macaques and the rate of PCR errors, the divergence time between the two species was estimated to be around 0.9 million years ago. Conclusion Transcript data from Old World monkeys provide a means not only to determine the evolutionary difference between human and non-human primates but also to unveil hidden transcripts in the human genome. Increasing the genomic resources and information of macaque monkeys will greatly contribute to the development of evolutionary biology and biomedical sciences.

  9. Construction and Validation of a Systematic Ethogram of Macaca fascicularis in a Free Enclosure

    OpenAIRE

    Fan Xu; Liang Xie; Xin Li; Qi Li; Tao Wang; Yongjia Ji; Fei Kong; Qunlin Zhan; Ke Cheng; Liang Fang; Peng Xie

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral studies in non-human primates have become ideal models for further investigations into advanced cognitive function in humans. To date, there is no systematic ethogram of the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) in a free enclosure. In a field observation of 6012 subjects, 107 distinct behaviors of M. fascicularis were preliminarily described. 83 of these behaviors were then independently validated through a randomized cohort and classified into 12 behavioral categories. 53 of th...

  10. Water Flow Affects Zooplankton Feeding by the Scleractinian Coral Galaxea fascicularis on a Polyp and Colony Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Wijgerde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several factors may affect heterotrophic feeding of benthic marine invertebrates, including water flow rate and polyp context (i.e., the presence of neighbouring polyps. We tested the interactive effects of water flow rate and polyp context on zooplankton feeding by the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis. Single polyps and colonies were incubated in a flow cell for 30 minutes with an ambient Artemia nauplii concentration of 10,000 L−1 and water flow rates ranging from 1.25 to 40 cm s−1. Water flow rate and polyp context showed significant main and interactive effects on feeding rates of G. fascicularis polyps. More specifically, feeding rates were optimal at flow rates of 1.25 cm s−1 for single polyps and 5 to 10 cm s−1 for polyps inhabiting colonies. The presence of epizoic acoelomorph flatworms may have negatively affected the observed feeding rates, especially at high flow. Our results demonstrate that water flow affects coral feeding and thus heterotrophic nutrient input at both a polyp and colony level. These findings are of relevance to our understanding of how biotic and abiotic factors interact on coral heterotrophy and may serve to optimise coral aquaculture.

  11. Optimal antiproteinuric dose of losartan in nondiabetic patients with nephrotic range proteinuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, GD; Henning, RH; de Jong, PE; Navis, G; de Zeeuw, D

    2001-01-01

    Although the antiproteinuric response to antihypertensive treatment is the main predictor of renoprotective efficacy in long-term renal disease, to date, dose-finding studies of anti hypertensives have been based only on blood pressure. We aimed to find the optimal antiproteinuric dose of the angiot

  12. Cycloartane triterpenes from marine green alga Cladophora fascicularis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xinping; ZHU Xiaobin; DENG Liping; DENG Zhiwei; LIN Wenhan

    2006-01-01

    Six cycloartanes were isolated from ethanol extract of marine green alga Cladophora fascicularis by column chromatography. Procedure of isolation and description of these compounds are given in this paper. The structures were elucidated as (1). 24-hydroperoxycycloart-25- en-3β-ol; (2).cycloart-25-en-3β 24-diol; (3). 25-hydroperoxycycloart-23-en-3β-ol; (4). cycloart-23-en-3β, 25-diol; (5).cycloart-23, 25-dien-3β-ol; and (6). cycloart-24-en-3β-ol by spectroscopic (MS, 1D and 2D NMR) data analysis. Cycloartane derivatives are widely distributed in terrestrial plants, but only few were obtained in the alga. All these compounds that have been isolated from terrestrial plants, were found in the marine alga for the first time.

  13. Cycloartane triterpenes from marine green alga Cladophora fascicularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinping; Zhu, Xiaobin; Deng, Liping; Deng, Zhiwei; Lin, Wenhan

    2006-12-01

    Six cycloartanes were isolated from ethanol extract of marine green alga Cladophora fascicularis by column chromatography. Procedure of isolation and description of these compounds are given in this paper. The structures were elucidated as (1). 24-hydroperoxycycloart-25- en-3β-ol; (2). cycloart-25-en-3β 24-diol; (3). 25-hydroperoxycycloart-23-en-3β-ol; (4). cycloart-23-en-3β, 25-diol; (5). cycloart-23, 25-dien-3β-ol; and (6). cycloart-24-en-3β-ol by spectroscopic (MS, ID and 2D NMR) data analysis. Cycloartane derivatives are widely distributed in terrestrial plants, but only few were obtained in the alga. All these compounds that have been isolated from terrestrial plants, were found in the marine alga for the first time.

  14. Vitamin D supplement doses and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the range associated with cancer prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garland, Cedric F; French, Christine B; Baggerly, Leo L; Heaney, Robert P

    2011-01-01

    ...] from 60-80 ng/ml may be needed to reduce cancer risk. Few community-based studies allow estimation of the dose-response relationship between oral intake of vitamin D and corresponding serum 25(OH...

  15. The basic study of a bi-material range compensator for improving dose uniformity for proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yoshihisa; Himukai, Takeshi; Takizawa, Kenji; Terashita, Yohsuke; Kamimura, Satoshi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Hotta, Kenji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Komori, Masataka; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2008-10-01

    A range compensator (abbreviated as a RC hereafter) is used to form a conformal dose distribution for heavy-charged-particle therapy. However, it induces distortion of the dose distribution. The induced inhomogeneity may result in a calibration error of a monitor unit (MU) assigned to a transmission ionization chamber. By using a bi-material RC made from a low-Z material and a high-Z material instead of the regular RC, the dose inhomogeneity has been obviously reduced by equalizing the lateral dose distributions formed by pencil beams traversing elements of the RC with different base thicknesses at the same water-equivalent depth. We designed and manufactured a 4 x 4 matrix-shaped single-material RC and a bi-material RC with the same range losses at corresponding elements of the RCs. The bi-material RC is made from chemical wood (the main chemical component is an ABS resin) as a low-Z material and from brass as a high-Z material. Sixteen segments of the RC are designed so that the range-loss differences of the adjacent segments of the RC range from 0 to 50 mm in steps of 5 mm. We measured dose distributions in water formed by a 160 MeV proton beam traversing the single-material RC or the bi-material RC, using the HIMAC biology beam port. Large dips and bumps were observed in the dose distribution formed by the use of the single-material RC; the dose uniformity has been significantly improved in the target region by the use of the bi-material RC. The improvement has been obtained at the expense of blurring lateral penumbra. For clinical application of this method to a patient with large density inhomogeneity, a simple modification method of the original calculation model has been given.

  16. Dose comparison according to Smooth Thickness application of Range compensator during proton therapy for brain tumor patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tase Woan; Kim, Dae Woong; Kim, Jae Weon; Jeong, Kyeong Sik [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Range Compensator used for proton therapy compensates the proton beam dose which delivers to the normal tissues according to the Target's Distal Margin dose. We are going to check the improvement of dose on the target part by comparing the dose of PTV and OAR according to applying in different method of Smooth Thickness of Range Compensator which is used in brain tumor therapy. For 10 brain tumor patients taking proton therapy in National Cancer Center, Apply Smooth Thickness applied in Range Compensator in order from one to five by using Compensator Editor of Eclipse Proton Planning System(Version 10.0, Varian, USA). The therapy plan algorithm used Proton Convolution Superposition(version 8.1.20 or 10.0.28), and we compared Dmax, Dmin, Homogeneity Index, Conformity Index and OAR dose around tumor by applying Smooth Thickness in phase. When Smooth Thickness was applied from one to five, the Dmax of PTV was decreased max 4.3%, minimum at 0.8 and average of 1.81%. Dmin increased max 1.8%, min 1.8% and average. Difference between max dose and minimum dose decreased at max 5.9% min 1.4% and average 2.6%. Homogeneity Index decreased average of 0.018 and Conformity Index didn't had a meaningful change. OAR dose decreased in Brain Stem at max 1.6%, min 0.1% and average 0.6% and in Optic Chiasm max 1.3%, min 0.3%, and average 0.5%. However, patient C and patient E had an increase each 0.3% and 0.6%. Additionally, in Rt. Optic Nerve, there was a decrease at max 1.5%, min 0.3%, and average 0.8%, however, patient B had 0.1% increase. In Lt. Optic Nerve, there was a decrease at max 1.8%, min 0.3%, and average 0.7%, however, patient H had 0.4 increase. As Smooth Thickness of Range Compensator which is used as the proton treatment for brain tumor patients is applied in stages, the resolution of Compensator increased and as a result the most optimized amount of proton beam dose can be delivered. This is considered to be able to irradiate the equal amount at PTV and

  17. Pharmacokinetics and dose requirements of factor VIII over the age range 3-74 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Sven; Folkesson, Anna; Jönsson, Siv

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The three aims of this investigation were (1) to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for factor VIII (FVIII) in haemophilia A patients, with estimates of inter-occasion and inter-individual variance, (2) to investigate whether appropriate dosing of FVIII for regular prophylaxis...... can be calculated according to patient characteristics, and (3) to present dosing recommendations for initiating prophylactic treatment. METHODS: A population PK model was developed using data from four PK studies on patients aged 7-74 years. The model was tested on sparse FVIII data from 42...... outpatient visits by haemophilia prophylaxis patients aged 3-66 years. Dose requirements for prophylaxis were calculated both according to the population model and from empirical Bayesian estimates of FVIII PK in the individual patients. RESULTS: The study data were well characterised by a two-compartment PK...

  18. Two Week Oral Dose Range-Finding Toxicity Study of WR269410 in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-09

    male receiving 30.0 mg/kg/day, and in one high dose (18.0 mg/kg/day) female. Cyanosis characterized as blue feet was seen in treatment group 3...8.5 Change Test Article Vehicle Ŕ.5% Na+ carboxymethylcellulose /0.3% Tween 80" to ŕ% Methylcellulose/0.2% Tween 80". Reason: Better

  19. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of ammonium bicarbonate over a large dose range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Sehested, K.;

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen-free aqueous solutions of 0.05 mol dm-3 ammonium and sodium bicarbonate were studied after receiving various doses of Co-60 gammas (0.01-400 kGy) or 0.5-20 Gy pulses of 10 Mev electrons. Formate and oxalate were found to be the main radiolytic products, in addition to trace amounts of form...

  20. Determination of prey capture rates in the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis: a critical reconsideration of the clearance rate concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, R.; Delft, van S.; Lewaru, M.W.; Janse, M.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine optimal feeding regimes for captive corals, prey capture by the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis was determined by measuring clearance of prey items from the surrounding water. Colonies of G. fascicularis (sized between 200 and 400 polyps) were incubated in 1300 ml incu

  1. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20 to 250 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Justus, Alan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, S Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olsher, Richard H [RP-2; Devine, Robert T [RP-2

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  2. Feasibility of radiation dose range capable to cause subacute course of radiation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnyuk V.I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There had been analysed cases of radiation syndrome which clinical picture takes an intermediate place between the acute radiation syndrome (ARS and the chronic radiation syndrome (CRS, and differs from them because of a subacute. This variant of disease can develop as a result of the fractioned or prolonged radiation lasting from several days to several weeks. Development of primary reaction took place only in the extremely hard cases which ends with an early fatality. After the general radiation the marrow failure was characterized by directly expressed formation and restoration period, specific features of which were defined by the radiation duration, a total dose and dose derivative. The most typical outcomes of a subacute radiation syndrome are death from infectious complications in the period of an eruptive phase or leukosis development in the remote period.

  3. A Dose-Ranging Study of Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatment for Children with ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Pelham, William E.; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Coles, Erika K.; Wymbs, Brian T.; Chacko, Anil; Walker, Kathryn S.; Wymbs, Frances; Garefino, Allison; Hoffman, Martin T.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Placebo and 3 doses of methylphenidate (MPH) were crossed with 3 levels of behavioral modification (no behavioral modification, NBM; low-intensity behavioral modification, LBM; and high-intensity behavior modification, HBM) in the context of a summer treatment program (STP). Participants were 48 children with ADHD, aged 5–12. Behavior was examined in a variety of social settings (sports activities, art class, lunch) that are typical of elementary school, neighborhood, and after-school setting...

  4. Dietary Variation of Long Tailed Macaques (Macaca fascicularis in Telaga Warna, Bogor, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Nila

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Macaca, member of sub-family Cercopithecinae, is the most widely distributed non-human primates in Asian countries. The habitats are strongly influence the dietary variation of the populations. The dietary variation of the macaques reflect ecological plasticity in coping with differences both in availability and abundance of food. The macaques are plastic in taking any kind of food that available in their home range and adjust their behaviour according to its abundance. Here, we present the dietary variation of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis in the high altitude rain forest of Telaga Warna, West Java, Indonesia. The proportion of their food from natural sources is greater than those from visitors. The natural food consisted of plants, small animals (insects and earthworm, fungi and water from lake. The plant food comprised of 29 species plus a few mosses. The frequency of eating artificial food was influenced by visitors who come for picnic. In this site, the macaques learned that the visiting of tourists is identical with food.

  5. Preliminary evaluation of second harmonic direct detection scheme for low-dose range in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Felipe [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Exactas y Tecnologia, Universidad de Panama (Panama); Departamento de Salud Radiologica, Caja de Seguro Social (Panama); Graeff, Carlos F.O.; Baffa, Oswaldo [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: baffa@ffclrp.usp.br

    2002-04-21

    The usefulness of a direct detection scheme of the second harmonic (2h) overmodulated signal from irradiated alanine in EPR dosimetry was studied. For this purpose, a group of DL-alanine/paraffin cylindrical pellets was produced. The dosimeters were irradiated with a {sup 60}Co radiotherapy gamma source with doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Gy. The EPR measurements were carried out in a VARIAN-E4 spectrometer operating in X-band with optimized parameters to obtain highest amplitude signals of both harmonics. The 2h signal was detected directly at twice the modulation frequency. In preliminary results, the 2h showed some advantages over the 1h such as better resolution for doses below 1 Gy, better repeatability results and better linear behaviour in the dose range indicated. (author)

  6. Turritopsis fascicularis Fraser, 1943 (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa): redescription and discussion of its phylogenetic position within the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglietta, Maria Pia

    2016-03-31

    Turritopsis fascicularis Fraser, 1943 was first described off Alligator Reef, Florida, USA, at a depth of 216 m. Presumably a deep-sea species, its validity has often been questioned due to the scarcity of available records. In this paper, T. fascicularis is re-described from some mature colonies from the upper slope of the Gulf of Mexico. Furthermore, new pictures of the colony, polyps, and medusa buds, are provided. A ~600bp sequence of the large ribosomal subunit of the mitochondrial RNA (lsu-rRNA, 16S), also known as the Hydrozoan barcoding molecule, is used for the first time to confirm the validity of T. fascicularis as a species, and analyze its phylogenetic position within the genus Turritopsis.

  7. Evaluation of Infrared Thermometry in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffins, Michael M; Mellal, Nacera; Almlie, Cynthia L; Regalia, Douglas E

    2017-01-01

    Recording an accurate body temperature is important to assess an animal's health status. We compared temperature data from sedated cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to evaluate differences between rectal, infrared (inguinal and chest), and implanted telemetry techniques with the objective of demonstrating the diagnostic equivalence of the infrared device with other approaches. Infrared thermometer readings are instantaneous and require no contact with the animal. Body temperature data were obtained from 205 (137 male, 68 female) cynomolgus macaques under ketamine (10 mg/kg IM) sedation over a 3-mo period during scheduled physical examinations. Infrared measurements were taken 5 cm from the chest and inguinal areas. We evaluated 10 (9 functional devices) sedated cynomolgus macaques (5 male, 5 female) implanted with telemetry units in a muscular pouch between the internal and external abdominal oblique muscles. We determined that the mean body temperature acquired by using telemetry did not differ from either the mean of inguinal and chest infrared measurements but did differ from the mean of temperature obtained rectally. In addition, the mean rectal temperature differed from the mean of the inguinal reading but not the mean of the chest temperature. The results confirm our hypothesis that the infrared thermometer can be used to replace standard rectal thermometry. PMID:28905720

  8. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to deeply characterize the humoral immune response. However, the IG locus organization for the animal is required to completely dissect IG repertoires. Here, we describe the localization and organization of the rearranging IG heavy (IGH) genes on chromosome 7 of the cynomolgus macaque draft genome. Our annotation comprises 108 functional genes which include 63 variable (IGHV), 38 diversity (IGHD), and 7 joining (IGHJ) genes. For validation, we provide RNA transcript data for most of the IGHV genes and all of the annotated IGHJ genes, as well as proteomic data to validate IGH constant genes. The description and annotation of the rearranging IGH genes for the cynomolgus macaques will significantly facilitate scientific research. This is particularly relevant to dissect the immune response during vaccination or infection with dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Marburg and other emerging pathogens where non-human primate models play a significant role for countermeasure development.

  9. Software to compute and conduct sequential Bayesian phase I or II dose-ranging clinical trials with stopping rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Latouche, Aurelien; Taconnet, Mathieu; Chevret, Sylvie

    2003-10-01

    The aim of dose-ranging phase I (resp. phase II) clinical trials is to rapidly identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) (resp., minimal effective dose (MED)) of a new drug or combination. For the conduct and analysis of such trials, Bayesian approaches such as the Continual Reassessment Method (CRM) have been proposed, based on a sequential design and analysis up to a completed fixed sample size. To optimize sample sizes, Zohar and Chevret have proposed stopping rules (Stat. Med. 20 (2001) 2827), the computation of which is not provided by available softwares. We present in this paper a user-friendly software for the design and analysis of these Bayesian Phase I (resp. phase II) dose-ranging Clinical Trials (BPCT). It allows to carry out the CRM with stopping rules or not, from the planning of the trial, with choice of model parameterization based on its operating characteristics, up to the sequential conduct and analysis of the trial, with estimation at stopping of the MTD (resp. MED) of the new drug or combination.

  10. Experimental oral toxicity of domoic acid in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) and rats. Preliminary investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryphonas, L; Truelove, J; Todd, E; Nera, E; Iverson, F

    1990-10-01

    A recent outbreak of marine food poisoning in humans was attributed to the consumption of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) contaminated with domoic acid (DA) that was produced by the diatom Nitzschia pungens. The clinical and morphological effects of single oral doses of extracts of mussels contaminated with DA or of DA isolated from toxic mussels were investigated in small groups (one to six) of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis; 0.5-10 mg DA/kg body weight) and of Sprague-Dawley rats (60 to 80 mg DA/kg body weight). Control animals were either given saline or were not treated. To test whether monosodium glutamate, present in the food consumed by some affected humans, and dimethylsulphoxide, suspected of being present in the plankton, enhanced the response, monosodium glutamate (at 0.25% of mussel extract bolus) or dimethylsulphoxide (at 1 g per bolus) were co-administered to two (one each) of the DA-treated monkeys. DA-treated monkeys developed transient excitation characterized by vomiting. DA-treated rats showed withdrawal followed by hyperexcitation and death (in one case). Mild to moderate central nervous system lesions consistent with neuroexcitation were present in both monkeys and rats. The addition of monosodium glutamate and dimethylsulphoxide had no significant effect on the appearance and severity of central nervous system clinical signs and lesions. The wide variations in the response of test animals to orally administered DA were attributed to the protective effect of vomiting, and to suspected incomplete or slow gastro-intestinal absorption of the toxic agent. The results reinforce the view that DA is an emetic and that under appropriate conditions may also inflict excitotoxic central nervous system damage.

  11. Effects elicited by toxaphene in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, F; Iverson, F; Andrews, P; Barker, M; Cherry, W; Mueller, R; Pulido, O; Hayward, S; Fernie, S; Arnold, D L

    2001-12-01

    Toxaphene, which was added to glycerol/corn oil, was administered at a level of 1 mg/kg body weight/day in gelatin capsules to four healthy young adult cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) monkeys for 52 weeks. Four control monkeys ingested capsules containing only glycerol/corn oil. Each group had two males and two females. On a daily basis, each monkey's feed and water consumption was determined, its health was monitored and the females were swabbed to evaluate menstrual status. On a weekly basis, each monkey's body weight was determined and a detailed clinical evaluation was performed. At 4-week intervals, blood samples were taken for serum biochemistry, haematology and toxaphene analysis. Also, a local anaesthetic was administered to the nuchal fat pad area of each monkey, and adipose samples were obtained for toxaphene analysis. 1 day prior to the biopsies, a 24-h urine and faecal collection was obtained for toxaphene analysis. After 34 weeks of treatment, the immune system of the monkeys was evaluated. After 52 weeks of dosing, all treated and two control animals were necropsied. Liver samples were obtained and microsomal fractions were prepared immediately. A portion of liver and kidney was taken for toxaphene analysis. All of the major internal organs were weighed and bone marrow evaluations were conducted. Organ and tissue samples were fixed in 10% formalin and processed for light microscopy. There was no effect of treatment on body weight gain, feed consumption, water consumption or haematological parameters. Two major clinical findings were inflammation and/or enlargement of the tarsal gland and impacted diverticulae in the upper and lower eye lids. At necropsy, the relative spleen and thymus weights were greater for the treated monkeys than the controls. Toxaphene administration produced an increase in metabolism of aminopyrene, methoxyresorufin and ethoxyresorufin, three substrates that are altered specifically by cytochrome P450-based hepatic

  12. Clonidine as an adjunct to intravenous regional anesthesia: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled dose ranging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarence S Ivie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The addition of clonidine to lidocaine intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA has been previously reported to improve postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing upper extremity surgery. Our objective was to perform a dose ranging study in order to determine the optimal dose of clonidine used with lidocaine in IVRA. Design & Setting : We performed a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study with 60 patients scheduled for elective endoscopic carpal tunnel release under IVRA with 50 ml lidocaine 0.5%. University-affiliated outpatient surgery center. Data collected in operating rooms, recovery room, and by telephone after discharge from surgery center. Materials & Methods : Sixty adult ASA I or II patients undergoing outpatient endoscopic carpal tunnel release under intravenous regional anesthesia.Patients were randomized into five study groups receiving different doses of clonidine in addition to 50 ml 0.5% lidocaine in their IVRA. Group A received 0 mcg/kg, group B 0.25 mcg/kg, group C 0.5 mcg/kg, group D 1.0 mcg/kg and group E 1.5 mcg/kg of clonidine.Intraoperative fentanyl, recovery room pain scores, time to first postsurgical analgesic, total number of acetaminophen/codeine tablets consumed postsurgery, incidence of sedation, hypotension and bradycardia. Results & Conclusions : There was no benefit from any dose of clonidine compared to placebo. There were no clonidine-related side effects seen within the dose range studied. In short duration minor hand surgery, the addition of clonidine to lidocaine-based intravenous regional anesthesia provides no measurable benefit.

  13. Analgesic dose range finding of lornoxicam compared to diclofenac. Crossover double blind study in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Di Munno

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic action and safety of lornoxicam, a new non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in 2 oral daily dose regimens of 8 and 16 mg in comparison with oral diclofenac 150 mg/day in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Double blind double-dummy cross-over, controlled trial. The two treatments were given for ten-day periods, separated by a three-day wash-out interval. Patients of both sexes with classical or definite rheumatoid arthritis according to the A.R.A. criteria were enrolled in the study. Results: Fourteen patients (12F, 2M were admitted, mean age 61.6 years ± 6.7 (±SD, duration of illness 12.7 years ± 11.9. Lornoxicam 8 and 16 mg/day showed a good therapeutic activity, comparable with diclofenac 150 mg/day. Two patients complained adverse events with diclofenac. Conclusions: Lornoxicam 16 mg/day was associated with a more sharp action and a better tolerability than diclofenac in rheumatoid arthritis. The twice a day dosage of lornoxicam revealed to be appropriate.

  14. Blonanserin extensively occupies rat dopamine D3 receptors at antipsychotic dose range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Satoko; Enomoto, Takeshi; Horisawa, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Ono, Michiko

    2015-03-01

    Antagonism of the dopamine D3 receptor has been hypothesized to be beneficial for schizophrenia cognitive deficits, negative symptoms and extrapyramidal symptoms. However, recent animal and human studies have shown that most antipsychotics do not occupy D3 receptors in vivo, despite their considerable binding affinity for this receptor in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the D3 receptor binding of blonanserin, a dopamine D2/D3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors antagonist, in vitro and in vivo. Blonanserin showed the most potent binding affinity for human D3 receptors among the tested atypical antipsychotics (risperidone, olanzapine and aripiprazole). Our GTPγS-binding assay demonstrated that blonanserin acts as a potent full antagonist for human D3 receptors. All test-drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like efficacy in methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats. Treatment with blonanserin at its effective dose blocked the binding of [(3)H]-(+)-PHNO, a D2/D3 receptor radiotracer, both in the D2 receptor-rich region (striatum) and the D3 receptor-rich region (cerebellum lobes 9 and 10). On the other hand, the occupancies of other test-drugs for D3 receptors were relatively low. In conclusion, we have shown that blonanserin, but not other tested antipsychotics, extensively occupies D3 receptors in vivo in rats. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Blonanserin extensively occupies rat dopamine D3 receptors at antipsychotic dose range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Baba

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Antagonism of the dopamine D3 receptor has been hypothesized to be beneficial for schizophrenia cognitive deficits, negative symptoms and extrapyramidal symptoms. However, recent animal and human studies have shown that most antipsychotics do not occupy D3 receptors in vivo, despite their considerable binding affinity for this receptor in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the D3 receptor binding of blonanserin, a dopamine D2/D3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors antagonist, in vitro and in vivo. Blonanserin showed the most potent binding affinity for human D3 receptors among the tested atypical antipsychotics (risperidone, olanzapine and aripiprazole. Our GTPγS-binding assay demonstrated that blonanserin acts as a potent full antagonist for human D3 receptors. All test-drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like efficacy in methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats. Treatment with blonanserin at its effective dose blocked the binding of [3H]-(+-PHNO, a D2/D3 receptor radiotracer, both in the D2 receptor-rich region (striatum and the D3 receptor-rich region (cerebellum lobes 9 and 10. On the other hand, the occupancies of other test-drugs for D3 receptors were relatively low. In conclusion, we have shown that blonanserin, but not other tested antipsychotics, extensively occupies D3 receptors in vivo in rats.

  16. The dual-dose imaging technique: a way to enhance the dynamic range of X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsinos, E; Matsinos, Evangelos; Kaissl, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    We describe a method aiming at increasing the dynamic range of X-ray detectors. Two X-ray exposures of an object are acquired at different dose levels and constitute the only input data. The values of the parameters which are needed to process these images are determined from information contained in the images themselves; the values of two parameters are extracted from the input data. The two input images are finally merged in such a way as to create one image containing useful information in all its entirety. This selective use of parts of each image allows both the contour of the irradiated object to be visible and the high-attenuation areas to retain their image quality corresponding to the information contained in the high-dose image. The benefits of the method are demonstrated with an example involving a head phantom.

  17. Computerized Dose Range Checking Using Hard and Soft Stop Alerts Reduces Prescribing Errors in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Lilanthi; Vyles, David; Bakerman, Paul; Holton, Vanessa; Vaidya, Vinay; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Westdorp, Joan; Sanchez, Christine; Kurz, Rhonda

    2017-09-01

    An enhanced dose range checking (DRC) system was developed to evaluate prescription error rates in the pediatric intensive care unit and the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. An enhanced DRC system incorporating "soft" and "hard" alerts was designed and implemented. Practitioner responses to alerts for patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit and the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit were retrospectively reviewed. Alert rates increased from 0.3% to 3.4% after "go-live" (P < 0.001). Before go-live, all alerts were soft alerts. In the period after go-live, 68% of alerts were soft alerts and 32% were hard alerts. Before go-live, providers reduced doses only 1 time for every 10 dose alerts. After implementation of the enhanced computerized physician order entry system, the practitioners responded to soft alerts by reducing doses to more appropriate levels in 24.7% of orders (70/283), compared with 10% (3/30) before go-live (P = 0.0701). The practitioners deleted orders in 9.5% of cases (27/283) after implementation of the enhanced DRC system, as compared with no cancelled orders before go-live (P = 0.0774). Medication orders that triggered a soft alert were submitted unmodified in 65.7% (186/283) as compared with 90% (27/30) of orders before go-live (P = 0.0067). After go-live, 28.7% of hard alerts resulted in a reduced dose, 64% resulted in a cancelled order, and 7.4% were submitted as written. Before go-live, alerts were often clinically irrelevant. After go-live, there was a statistically significant decrease in orders that were submitted unmodified and an increase in the number of orders that were reduced or cancelled.

  18. Beneficial Insect Attraction to Milkweeds (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis) in Washington State, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, David G; Seymour, Lorraine; Lauby, Gerry; Buckley, Katie

    2016-06-29

    Native plant and beneficial insect associations are relatively unstudied yet are important in native habitat restoration programs for improving and sustaining conservation biological control of arthropod pests in agricultural crops. Milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) are currently the focus of restoration programs in the USA aimed at reversing a decline in populations of the milkweed-dependent monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus); however, little is known of the benefits of these plants to other beneficial insects. Beneficial insects (predators, parasitoids, pollinators) attracted to two milkweed species (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis) in central Washington State, WA, USA were identified and counted on transparent sticky traps attached to blooms over five seasons. Combining all categories of beneficial insects, means of 128 and 126 insects per trap were recorded for A. speciosa and A. fascicularis, respectively. Predatory and parasitic flies dominated trap catches for A. speciosa while parasitic wasps were the most commonly trapped beneficial insects on A. fascicularis. Bees were trapped commonly on both species, especially A. speciosa with native bees trapped in significantly greater numbers than honey bees. Beneficial insect attraction to A. speciosa and A. fascicularis was substantial. Therefore, these plants are ideal candidates for habitat restoration, intended to enhance conservation biological control, and for pollinator conservation. In central Washington, milkweed restoration programs for enhancement of D. plexippus populations should also provide benefits for pest suppression and pollinator conservation.

  19. Beneficial Insect Attraction to Milkweeds (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis in Washington State, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. James

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Native plant and beneficial insect associations are relatively unstudied yet are important in native habitat restoration programs for improving and sustaining conservation biological control of arthropod pests in agricultural crops. Milkweeds (Asclepias spp. are currently the focus of restoration programs in the USA aimed at reversing a decline in populations of the milkweed-dependent monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus; however, little is known of the benefits of these plants to other beneficial insects. Beneficial insects (predators, parasitoids, pollinators attracted to two milkweed species (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis in central Washington State, WA, USA were identified and counted on transparent sticky traps attached to blooms over five seasons. Combining all categories of beneficial insects, means of 128 and 126 insects per trap were recorded for A. speciosa and A. fascicularis, respectively. Predatory and parasitic flies dominated trap catches for A. speciosa while parasitic wasps were the most commonly trapped beneficial insects on A. fascicularis. Bees were trapped commonly on both species, especially A. speciosa with native bees trapped in significantly greater numbers than honey bees. Beneficial insect attraction to A. speciosa and A. fascicularis was substantial. Therefore, these plants are ideal candidates for habitat restoration, intended to enhance conservation biological control, and for pollinator conservation. In central Washington, milkweed restoration programs for enhancement of D. plexippus populations should also provide benefits for pest suppression and pollinator conservation.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  1. Achieving a Linear Dose Rate Response in Pulse-Mode Silicon Photodiode Scintillation Detectors Over a Wide Range of Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Lewis

    2014-02-01

    We are developing a new dose calibrator for nuclear pharmacies that can measure radioactivity in a vial or syringe without handling it directly or removing it from its transport shield “pig”. The calibrator's detector comprises twin opposing scintillating crystals coupled to Si photodiodes and current-amplifying trans-resistance amplifiers. Such a scheme is inherently linear with respect to dose rate over a wide range of radiation intensities, but accuracy at low activity levels may be impaired, beyond the effects of meager photon statistics, by baseline fluctuation and drift inevitably present in high-gain, current-mode photodiode amplifiers. The work described here is motivated by our desire to enhance accuracy at low excitations while maintaining linearity at high excitations. Thus, we are also evaluating a novel “pulse-mode” analog signal processing scheme that employs a linear threshold discriminator to virtually eliminate baseline fluctuation and drift. We will show the results of a side-by-side comparison of current-mode versus pulse-mode signal processing schemes, including perturbing factors affecting linearity and accuracy at very low and very high excitations. Bench testing over a wide range of excitations is done using a Poisson random pulse generator plus an LED light source to simulate excitations up to ˜106 detected counts per second without the need to handle and store large amounts of radioactive material.

  2. Otilonium bromide in irritable bowel syndrome: a dose-ranging randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska-Wilkoń, Danuta; Reggiardo, Giorgio; Egan, Colin Gerard

    2014-09-14

    To examine the efficacy and safety of otilonium bromide (OB) in treatment-sensitive functional irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) clinical parameters. Ninety-three patients (44.8 ± 12.6 years, 69% female) with IBS symptoms complying with Rome II criteria participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, dose-ranging phase I/II study. Patients were administered OB 20 mg (n = 24), 40 mg (n = 23) and 80 mg (n = 23) tid or placebo (n = 23) in 4 parallel groups for 4 wk. Primary efficacy variables included abdominal discomfort, intestinal habits, number of daily evacuations and stool consistency. Secondary efficacy measures included return to regular intestinal habits and global discomfort. Safety was also assessed. Baseline clinical characteristics were similar among the 4 groups. Although individual parameters such as intensity and frequency of abdominal discomfort, bloating or pain were reduced by OB over the 4 wk, no significant differences were observed between groups. Similarly, no difference was observed between OB treatment or placebo for mucus in stool and incomplete or difficulty of evacuation. However, evacuation frequency was significantly reduced after 4 wk by 80 mg OB compared to placebo (-8.36% for placebo vs -41.9% for 80 mg OB, P < 0.01). While 21.7% of patients in the placebo group experienced regular intestinal habits after 4 wk, this improvement was greater for patients treated with 40 mg OB (P < 0.01 vs placebo). Furthermore, a dose-dependent reduction in frequency of diarrhoea (χ(2)-test for trend = 11.5, P < 0.001) and an increase in normal stool frequency was observed. Combining individual variables into a global discomfort index revealed significant improvement among increasing OB doses, favouring 40 mg (P = 0.013) and 80 mg OB (P = 0.001) over placebo. No difference was observed between frequency of adverse events for placebo vs OB. This dose-ranging study demonstrates that OB at 40 and 80 mg can improve individual and global

  3. Dose-response relationships for the onset of avoidance of sonar by free-ranging killer whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patrick J O; Antunes, Ricardo N; Wensveen, Paul J; Samarra, Filipa I P; Alves, Ana Catarina; Tyack, Peter L; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Kleivane, Lars; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Ainslie, Michael A; Thomas, Len

    2014-02-01

    Eight experimentally controlled exposures to 1-2 kHz or 6-7 kHz sonar signals were conducted with four killer whale groups. The source level and proximity of the source were increased during each exposure in order to reveal response thresholds. Detailed inspection of movements during each exposure session revealed sustained changes in speed and travel direction judged to be avoidance responses during six of eight sessions. Following methods developed for Phase-I clinical trials in human medicine, response thresholds ranging from 94 to 164 dB re 1 μPa received sound pressure level (SPL) were fitted to Bayesian dose-response functions. Thresholds did not consistently differ by sonar frequency or whether a group had previously been exposed, with a mean SPL response threshold of 142 ± 15 dB (mean ± s.d.). High levels of between- and within-individual variability were identified, indicating that thresholds depended upon other undefined contextual variables. The dose-response functions indicate that some killer whales started to avoid sonar at received SPL below thresholds assumed by the U.S. Navy. The predicted extent of habitat over which avoidance reactions occur depends upon whether whales responded to proximity or received SPL of the sonar or both, but was large enough to raise concerns about biological consequences to the whales.

  4. Construction of a cytogenetic dose-response curve for low-dose range gamma-irradiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using three-color FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Yumiko; Akiyama, Miho; Noda, Takashi; Hirai, Momoki

    2015-12-01

    In order to estimate biological doses after low-dose ionizing radiation exposure, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using three differentially colored chromosome painting probes was employed to detect exchange-type chromosome aberrations. A reference dose response curve was constructed using blood samples from a female donor whose lymphocytes consistently exhibited a low frequency of cells at the second mitosis under routine culture conditions. Aberration yields were studied for a total of about 155 thousand metaphases obtained from seven dose-points of gamma irradiations (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300mGy). In situ hybridization was performed using commercially available painting probes for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. With the aid of an automated image-capturing method, exchange-type aberrations involving painted chromosomes were detected with considerable accuracy and speed. The results on the exchange-type aberrations (dicentrics plus translocations) at the seven dose-points showed a good fit to the linear-quadratic model (y=0.0023+0.0015x+0.0819x(2), P=0.83). A blind test proved the reproducibility of the reference dose-response relationship. In the control experiments using blood samples from another donor, the estimated doses calculated on the basis of the present reference curve were proved to be in good agreement with the actual physical doses applied. The present dose-response curve may serve as a means to assess the individual differences in cytogenetical radio-sensitivities.

  5. Biosorption and desorption of Cd2+ from wastewater by dehydrated shreds of Cladophora fascicularis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Liping; ZHU Xiaobin; SU Yingying; SU Hua; WANG Xinting

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of algae Cladophora fascicularis and their relation with initial Cd2+ concentration,initial pH,and co-existing ions were studied.Adsorption equilibrium and biosorption kinetics were established from batch experiments.The adsorption equilibrium was adequately described by the Langmuir isotherm,and biosorption kinetics was in pseudo-second order model.The experiment on co-existing ions showed that the biosorption capacity of biomass decreased with an increasing concentration of competing ions.Desorption experiments indicated that EDTA was efficient desorbent for recovery from Cd2+.With high capacities of metal biosorption and desorption,the biomass of Cladophora fascicularis is promising as a cost-effective biosorbent for the removal of Cd2+ from wastewater.

  6. AKTIVITAS HARIAN KERA EKOR PANJANG (Macaca fascicularis DI TAMAN WISATA ALAM SANGEH, KABUPATEN BADUNG, BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Gede Wahyu Saputra

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian tentang aktivitas harian kera ekor panjang (Macaca fascicularis telah dilakukan di Taman Wisata Alam Sangeh, Kabupaten Badung, Bali dari bulan Oktober – Desember 2012. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui perilaku harian kera ekor panjang (M.  fascicularis di Taman Wisata Alam Sangeh. Penelitian perilaku harian kera dilakukan dengan metode Focal Animal Sampling. Data yang terkumpul dari berbagai jenis perilaku di analisa secara deskriptif kuantitatif. Hasil penelitian menunjukan bahwa frekuensi aktivitas harian kera ekor panjang didominasi oleh perilaku bergerak, kemudian berturut-turut diikuti oleh perilaku istirahat, makan, grooming, mendekap di dada, objek manipulasi, cuddling, agresif. sedangkan perilaku yang paling jarang dilakukan adalah kawin. Berdasarkan jenis kelamin individu dewasa, perilaku istirahat, makan, bergerak, agresif, objek manipulasi dan kawin didominasi oleh jantan sedangkan perilaku mendekap di dada, cuddling, dan grooming di dominasi oleh betina.

  7. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  8. Epizoic acoelomorph flatworms impair zooplankton feeding by the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis

    OpenAIRE

    Wijgerde, T.H.M.; Schots, P.; Onselen, van, E.; Karruppannan, E.W.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Osinga, R.

    2013-01-01

    Many scleractinian coral species host epizoic acoelomorph flatworms, both in aquaculture and in situ. These symbiotic flatworms may impair coral growth and health through light-shading, mucus removal and disruption of heterotrophic feeding. To quantify the effect of epizoic flatworms on zooplankton feeding, we conducted video analyses of single polyps of Galaxea fascicularis (Linnaeus 1767) grazing on Artemia nauplii in the presence and absence of symbiotic flatworms. 18S DNA analysis reveale...

  9. Epizoic acoelomorph flatworms impair zooplankton feeding by the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis

    OpenAIRE

    Tim Wijgerde; Pauke Schots; Eline Van Onselen; Max Janse; Eric Karruppannan; Verreth, Johan A. J.; Ronald Osinga

    2012-01-01

    Summary Many scleractinian coral species host epizoic acoelomorph flatworms, both in aquaculture and in situ. These symbiotic flatworms may impair coral growth and health through light-shading, mucus removal and disruption of heterotrophic feeding. To quantify the effect of epizoic flatworms on zooplankton feeding, we conducted video analyses of single polyps of Galaxea fascicularis (Linnaeus 1767) grazing on Artemia nauplii in the presence and absence of symbiotic flatworms. 18S DNA analysis...

  10. STEREOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE COCHLEAR NUCLEI OF MONKEY (MACACA FASCICULARIS AFTER DEAFFERENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Insausti

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cochlear nuclei (CN in the brainstem receive the input signals from the inner ear through the cochlear nerve, and transmit these signals to higher auditory centres. A variety of lesions of the cochlear nerve cause deafness. As reported in the literature, artificial removal of auditive input, or 'deafferentation', induces structural alterations in the CN. The purpose of this study was to estimate a number of relevant stereological parameters of the CN in control and deafferented Macaca fascicularis monkeys.

  11. Phytochemical and pharmacological evaluation of prop roots of Pandanus fascicularis Lam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jothimani Rajeswari; Karthikeyan Kesavan; Balasundaram Jayakar

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the ethanol and aqueous extracts of prop roots of Pandanus fascicularis (P. fascicularis) Lam (pandanaceae). And provide experimental evidence for its traditional use such as rheumatoid arthritis and spasmodic. Methods:The anti-inflammatory activity was observed by carrageenan-induced edema of the hind paw of rats. Analgesic activities of prop roots ofP. fascicularis were determined using acetic acid induced writhing model and tail clip method in mice and rat, respectively. The ethanol fraction was then subjected to chromatographic analysis and a compound has been isolated and characterized byIR,1H-NMR and mass spectroscopy.Results: Edema suppressant effect of ethanol extract was found to be37.03% inhibition whereas aqueous extract was found to be 63.22% inhibition after 3 h which was nearly equivalent to that of 10mg/kg of indomethacin (67.81%). Percentage inhibition of writhing compared to control were63.15%, 54.38%, 14.90%for aspirin, aqueous extract and ethanolic extract, respectively. Both ethanol and aqueous extracts show significant activity against appropriate controls after60 min of treatment on tail clip method. The structure of the isolated compound is may be characterized as Hepta deca-5-ene-1-ol by analysis it’sIR,1H-NMR and mass spectroscopy data.Conclusions: The extracts of prop roots ofP. fascicularis produce significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities, supporting the traditional application of this herb in treating various diseases associated with inflammation and pain.

  12. ANTIDIURETIC ACTIVITY OF AQUEOUS AND ETHANOLIC EXTRACTS OF PROP ROOTS OF PANDANUS FASCICULARIS LAM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothimani Rajeswari et al.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The extracts of the prop roots of Pandanus fascicularis Lam (Family: Pandanaceae is claimed as an antidiuretic by some traditional practitioners. However, the validity of this claim has not been scientifically proven or refuted. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antidiuretic potential of ethanol and aqueous extracts of prop roots of P. fascicularis in rats following oral administration. Ethanol and aqueous extracts were prepared from P. facicularis by percolation and cold maturation, respectively. Furosemide was used as a diuretic agent to induce diuresis. Vasopressin (ADH was used as a standard. The results demonstrated both the ethanol and aqueous extracts of P. facicularis and ADH significantly impaired the total urine output. However, antidiuretic potential of ethanolic extract was similar to that of ADH. The extracts caused a significant decrease in natriuresis and kaliuresis. From this study, we can conclude that ethanol extract of prop roots of Pandanus fascicularis has beneficial effects on anti diuretic activity. It has the potential to impart therapeutic effect in diuretic.

  13. 宽量程放射性剂量检测装置%A Radioactive Dose Detector with Wide Range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊华; 施一生; 张开明; 张飞

    2012-01-01

    设计了一种智能化、功耗低、量程宽、剂量线性好、使用便捷的微型建材放射性检测仪,硬件由89S51单片机、显示控制器、时钟电路、存储器、按键、探测电路及电源等组成.该装置达到高、低档自动转换,满足量程高、低端线性要求.该剂量仪成本低廉、准确度高、抗干扰能力强,而且性能稳定,达到了预期的设计目的,可方便地检测住宅放射性剂量是否安全,也可用于核辐射实验室、核工业等常规监测.%A micro intelligent building material radioactive detector was designed in the paper, which features low power consumption, wide range, and good dose linearity. The hardware of the detector is composed of an 89S51 MCU, a display controller, clock circuits, a memory unit, a keypad, and power detection circuit. It can not only be used in the nuclear industry, the routine monitoring of radioactive in laboratories, but also facilitates the detection of radioactive dose of indoor decoration and building materials.

  14. Metronidazole Vaginal Gel 1.3% in the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis: A Dose-Ranging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavoustie, Steven E.; Jacobs, Mark; Reisman, Howard A.; Waldbaum, Arthur S.; Levy, Sharon F.; Hillier, Sharon L.; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metronidazole vaginal gel (MVG) 0.75% is a US Food and Drug Administration–approved, 5-day treatment for bacterial vaginosis (BV). This study tested the hypothesis that a shorter treatment course at a higher dose (MVG 1.3%) would yield similar efficacy to 5 days of MVG 0.75%. Materials and Methods This phase 2, multicenter, randomized, controlled, investigator-blinded, dose-ranging study enrolled women with a clinical diagnosis of BV. Patients were assigned to MVG 1.3% once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days or MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days. The therapeutic cure rate, requiring clinical and bacteriological cure, at the end-of-study visit was determined for the per-protocol population. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate median time-to-symptom resolution. Results In total, 255 women (mean age = 35 y) were enrolled. The per-protocol population included 189 patients. The therapeutic cure rate was higher in the 1-day (13/43, 30.2%), 3-day (12/48, 25.0%), and 5-day (16/49, 32.7%) MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group (10/49, 20.4%). Median time-to-resolution of fishy odor was shorter in the 3 MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group. The 5-day MVG 1.3% group had the lowest rate of symptom return. No clinically important differences were observed in adverse events across treatment groups; most events were mild or moderate in intensity and considered unrelated to treatment. Similar results were found in the modified intent-to-treat population. Conclusions Metronidazole vaginal gel 1.3% applied once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days showed similar efficacy, safety, and tolerability as MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days. PMID:24983350

  15. Probing around implants and teeth with healthy or inflamed peri-implant mucosa/gingival. A histologic comparison in cynomolgus monkeys. (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Søren; Holmstrup, Palle; Stoltze, K.

    2002-01-01

    Osseointegrated oral implants; teeth; phathology; peri-implant mucositis; gingivitis; peri-implantitis; periodontitis; diagnosis; probing depth; non-human primates; cynomolgus monkeys: Macaca fascicularis......Osseointegrated oral implants; teeth; phathology; peri-implant mucositis; gingivitis; peri-implantitis; periodontitis; diagnosis; probing depth; non-human primates; cynomolgus monkeys: Macaca fascicularis...

  16. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yakun [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Li, Xiang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  17. The response of TL lithium fluoride detectors to 24 GeV/c protons for doses ranging up to 1 MGy

    CERN Document Server

    Obryk, B; Olko, P; Pajor, A; Glaser, M; Budzanowski, M; Bilski, P

    2010-01-01

    A new method of thermoluminescent (TL) measurement of radiation doses ranging from micrograys up to a megagray has been recently developed at IFJ. This method is based on a newly discovered behavior of LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors at doses exceeding 1 kGy. Significant changes in their glow-curves are observed at higher doses; of special importance is occurrence of a new, well separated peak for doses above 50 kGy, thus these detectors can be used for measurements of doses at ultra-high dose range. In order to check the glow-curve features in the high dose region for different types of LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Ti detectors after irradiation with heavy charged particles, tests at the 24 GeV/c proton beam of IRRAD1 irradiation zone at the CERN Proton Synchrotron accelerator up to 1 MGy were performed. The occurrence of the high dose peak in the glow-curve of LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors resulting from heavy particles irradiation was confirmed. Results of this investigation are presented in this paper. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All...

  18. Total Body Irradiation in the "Hematopoietic" Dose Range Induces Substantial Intestinal Injury in Non-Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junru; Shao, Lijian; Hendrickson, Howard P; Liu, Liya; Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Seng, John; Pouliot, Mylene; Authier, Simon; Zhou, Daohong; Allaben, William; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The non-human primate has been a useful model for studies of human acute radiation syndrome (ARS). However, to date structural changes in various parts of the intestine after total body irradiation (TBI) have not been systematically studied in this model. Here we report on our current study of TBI-induced intestinal structural injury in the non-human primate after doses typically associated with hematopoietic ARS. Twenty-four non-human primates were divided into three groups: sham-irradiated control group; and total body cobalt-60 (60Co) 6.7 Gy gamma-irradiated group; and total body 60Co 7.4 Gy gamma-irradiated group. After animals were euthanized at day 4, 7 and 12 postirradiation, sections of small intestine (duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum and ileum) were collected and fixed in 10% formalin. The intestinal mucosal surface length, villus height and crypt depths were assessed by computer-assisted image analysis. Plasma citrulline levels were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Total bone marrow cells were counted and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow were analyzed by flow cytometer. Histopathologically, all segments exhibited conspicuous disappearance of plicae circulares and prominent atrophy of crypts and villi. Intestinal mucosal surface length was significantly decreased in all intestinal segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P 0.05). Crypt depth was also significantly reduced in all segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P irradiation, consistent with intestinal mucosal injury. Both 6.7 and 7.4 Gy TBI reduced total number of bone marrow cells. And further analysis showed that the number and function of CD45(+)CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitors in bone marrow decreased significantly. In summary, TBI in the hematopoietic ARS dose range induces substantial intestinal injury in all segments of the small bowel. These findings underscore the importance of maintaining the

  19. The suitable dose range for the calibration of EBT2 film by the PDD method with a comparison of two curve fitting algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Liyun, E-mail: cliyun2000@gmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Sheng-Yow [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tsair-Fwu [Medical Physics and Informatics Laboratory, Department of Electronics Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Shyh-An [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Ding, Hueisch-Jy [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pang-Yu, E-mail: pangyuchen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sinlau Christian Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-21

    EBT2 film is a convenient dosimetry quality-assurance (QA) tool with high 2D dosimetry resolution and a self-development property for use in verifications of radiation therapy treatment planning and special projects; however, the user will suffer from a relatively higher degree of uncertainty (more than ±6% by Hartmann et al. [29]), and the trouble of cutting one piece of film into small pieces and then reintegrating them each time. To prevent this tedious cutting work, and save calibration time and budget, a dose range analysis is presented in this study for EBT2 film calibration using the Percentage–Depth–Dose (PDD) method. Different combinations of the three dose ranges, 9–26 cGy, 33–97 cGy and 109–320 cGy, with two types of curve fitting algorithms, film pixel values and net optical densities converting into doses, were tested and compared. With the lowest error and acceptable inaccuracy of less than 3 cGy for the clinical dose range (9–320 cGy), a single film calibrated by the net optical density algorithm with the dose range 109–320 cGy was suggested for routine calibration.

  20. Calorimetry for dose measurement at electron accelerators in the 80-120 keV energy range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Miller, A.; Duane, S.

    2005-01-01

    Calorimeters for dose measurement at low-energy electron accelerator energies (80-120 keV) are described. Three calorimeters with different characteristics were designed and their dose response and measurement uncertainties were characterized. The heated air between the beam exit window and the c...

  1. SU-E-J-138: On the Ion Beam Range and Dose Verification in Hadron Therapy Using Sound Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourkal, E [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Veltchev, I [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gayou, O [Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nahirnyak, V [Bukovinian State Medical University, Chernivtsi (Ukraine)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate range verification is of great importance to fully exploit the potential benefits of ion beam therapies. Current research efforts on this topic include the use of PET imaging of induced activity, detection of emerging prompt gamma rays or secondary particles. It has also been suggested recently to detect the ultrasound waves emitted through the ion energy absorption process. The energy absorbed in a medium is dissipated as heat, followed by thermal expansion that leads to generation of acoustic waves. By using an array of ultrasound transducers the precise spatial location of the Bragg peak can be obtained. The shape and intensity of the emitted ultrasound pulse depend on several variables including the absorbed energy and the pulse length. The main objective of this work is to understand how the ultrasound wave amplitude and shape depend on the initial ion energy and intensity. This would help guide future experiments in ionoacoustic imaging. Methods: The absorbed energy density for protons and carbon ions of different energy and field sizes were obtained using Fluka Monte Carlo code. Subsequently, the system of coupled equations for temperature and pressure is solved for different ion pulse intensities and lengths to obtain the pressure wave shape, amplitude and spectral distribution. Results: The proposed calculations show that the excited pressure wave amplitude is proportional to the absorbed energy density and for longer ion pulses inversely proportional to the ion pulse duration. It is also shown that the resulting ionoacoustic pressure distribution depends on both ion pulse duration and time between the pulses. Conclusion: The Bragg peak localization using ionoacoustic signal may eventually lead to the development of an alternative imaging method with sub-millimeter resolution. It may also open a way for in-vivo dose verification from the measured acoustic signal.

  2. Effect of Elevated Carbon Dioxide on Two Scleractinian Corals: Porites cylindrica (Dana, 1846 and Galaxea fascicularis (Linnaeus, 1767

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yii-Siang Hii

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reveals the effect of elevated pCO2 on Porites cylindrica and Galaxea fascicularis. The corals responded differently under elevated pCO2. Zooxanthellae cell density, cell mitotic index, and photosynthesis rate of P. cylindrica decreased drastically under the elevated pCO2. At the end of the experiment, P. cylindrica suffered from a declining calcium carbonate precipitation rate. G. fascicularis increased its respiration rate and expelled 71% of its symbiotic zooxanthellae algae under elevated pCO2. Photosynthetic pigments in the remaining zooxanthellae algae increased from 1.85 to 11.5 times to sustain its photosynthetic outputs. At the end of the experiment, G. fascicularis managed to increase the rate of its calcium carbonate precipitation. Increase pCO2 in the atmosphere may affect species diversity of coral reefs.

  3. A Broad Range of Dose Optima Achieve High-level, Long-term Gene Expression After Hydrodynamic Delivery of Sleeping Beauty Transposons Using Hyperactive SB100x Transposase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M; Olson, Erik R; Somia, Nikunj V; Russell, Stephen J; McIvor, R Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been shown to enable long-term gene expression by integrating new sequences into host cell chromosomes. We found that the recently reported SB100x hyperactive transposase conferred a surprisingly high level of long-term expression after hydrodynamic delivery of luciferase-encoding reporter transposons in the mouse. We conducted dose-ranging studies to determine the effect of varying the amount of SB100x transposase-encoding plasmid (pCMV-SB100x) at a set dose of luciferase transposon and of varying the amount of transposon-encoding DNA at a set dose of pCMV-SB100x in hydrodynamically injected mice. Animals were immunosuppressed using cyclophosphamide in order to prevent an antiluciferase immune response. At a set dose of transposon DNA (25 µg), we observed a broad range of pCMV-SB100x doses (0.1–2.5 µg) conferring optimal levels of long-term expression (>1011 photons/second/cm2). At a fixed dose of 0.5 μg of pCMV-SB100x, maximal long-term luciferase expression (>1010 photons/second/cm2) was achieved at a transposon dose of 5–125 μg. We also found that in the linear range of transposon doses (100 ng), co-delivering the CMV-SB100x sequence on the same plasmid was less effective in achieving long-term expression than delivery on separate plasmids. These results show marked flexibility in the doses of SB transposon plus pCMV-SB100x that achieve maximal SB-mediated gene transfer efficiency and long-term gene expression after hydrodynamic DNA delivery to mouse liver. PMID:26784638

  4. Dose-ranging evaluation of intravitreal siRNA PF-04523655 for diabetic macular edema (the DEGAS study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; Schachar, Ronald A; Nduaka, Chudy I;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of three doses of PF-04523655, a 19-nucleotide methylated double stranded siRNA targeting the RTP801 gene, for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) compared to focal/grid laser photocoagulation.......To evaluate the safety and efficacy of three doses of PF-04523655, a 19-nucleotide methylated double stranded siRNA targeting the RTP801 gene, for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) compared to focal/grid laser photocoagulation....

  5. Novel Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers Reveal Genetic Differentiation between Two Sympatric Types of Galaxea fascicularis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Nakajima

    Full Text Available The reef-building, scleractinian coral, Galaxea fascicularis, is classified into soft and hard types, based on nematocyst morphology. This character is correlated with the length of the mitochondrial non-coding region (mt-Long: soft colony type, and nematocysts with wide capsules and long shafts; mt-Short: hard colony type, and nematocysts with thin capsules and short shafts. We isolated and characterized novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for G. fascicularis using next-generation sequencing. Based upon the mitochondrial non-coding region, 53 of the 97 colonies collected were mt-Long (mt-L and 44 were mt-Short (mt-S. Among the 53 mt-L colonies, 27 loci were identified as amplifiable, polymorphic microsatellite loci, devoid of somatic mutations and free of scoring errors. Eleven of those 27 loci were also amplifiable and polymorphic in the 44 mt-S colonies; these 11 are cross-type microsatellite loci. The other 16 loci were considered useful only for mt-L colonies. These 27 loci identified 10 multilocus lineages (MLLs among the 53 mt-L colonies (NMLL/N = 0.189, and the 11 cross-type loci identified 7 MLLs in 44 mt-S colonies (NMLL/N = 0.159. Significant genetic differentiation between the two types was detected based on the genetic differentiation index (FST = 0.080, P = 0.001. Bayesian clustering also indicated that these two types are genetically isolated. While nuclear microsatellite genotypes also showed genetic differentiation between mitochondrial types, the mechanism of divergence is not yet clear. These markers will be useful to estimate genetic diversity, differentiation, and connectivity among populations, and to understand evolutionary processes, including divergence of types in G. fascicularis.

  6. SU-E-J-146: A Research of PET-CT SUV Range for the Online Dose Verification in Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Moyers, M [Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Colton, CA (China); Zhao, J [Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Hsi, W [Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Positron-emitting isotope distributions can be used for the image fusion of the carbon ion planning CT and online target verification PETCT, after radiation in the same decay period,the relationship between the same target volume and the SUV value of different every single fraction dose can be found,then the range of SUV for the radiation target could be decided.So this online range also can provide reference for the correlation and consistency in planning target dose verification and evaluation for the clinical trial. Methods: The Rando head phantom can be used as real body,the 10cc cube volume target contouring is done,beam ISO Center depth is 7.6cm and the 90 degree fixed carbon ion beams should be delivered in single fraction effective dose of 2.5GyE,5GyE and 8GyE.After irradiation,390 seconds later the 30 minutes PET-CT scanning is performed,parameters are set to 50Kg virtual weight,0.05mCi activity.MIM Maestro is used for the image processing and fusion,five 16mm diameter SUV spheres have been chosen in the different direction in the target.The average SUV in target for different fraction dose can be found by software. Results: For 10cc volume target,390 seconds decay period,the Single fraction effective dose equal to 2.5Gy,Ethe SUV mean value is 3.42,the relative range is 1.72 to 6.83;Equal to 5GyE,SUV mean value is 9.946,the relative range is 7.016 to 12.54;Equal or above to 8GyE,SUV mean value is 20.496,the relative range is 11.16 to 34.73. Conclusion: Making an evaluation for accuracy of the dose distribution using the SUV range which is from the planning CT with after treatment online PET-CT fusion for the normal single fraction carbon ion treatment is available.Even to the plan which single fraction dose is above 2GyE,in the condition of other parameters all the same,the SUV range is linearly dependent with single fraction dose,so this method also can be used in the hyper-fraction treatment plan.

  7. SU-E-T-117: Dose to Organs Outside of CT Scan Range- Monte Carlo and Hybrid Phantom Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Epidemiological study of second cancer risk for cancer survivors often requires the dose to normal tissues located outside the anatomy covered by radiological imaging, which is usually limited to tumor and organs at risk. We have investigated the feasibility of using whole body computational human phantoms for estimating out-of-field organ doses for patients treated by Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). Methods: Identical 7-field IMRT prostate plans were performed using X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC), a radiotherapy-specific Monte Carlo transport code, on the computed tomography (CT) images of the torso of an adult male patient (175 cm height, 66 kg weight) and an adult male hybrid computational phantom with the equivalent body size. Dose to the liver, right lung, and left lung were calculated and compared. Results: Considerable differences are seen between the doses calculated by XVMC for the patient CT and the hybrid phantom. One major contributing factor is the treatment method, deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), used for this patient. This leads to significant differences in the organ position relative to the treatment isocenter. The transverse distances from the treatment isocenter to the inferior border of the liver, left lung, and right lung are 19.5cm, 29.5cm, and 30.0cm, respectively for the patient CT, compared with 24.3cm, 36.6cm, and 39.1cm, respectively, for the hybrid phantom. When corrected for the distance, the mean doses calculated using the hybrid phantom are within 28% of those calculated using the patient CT. Conclusion: This study showed that mean dose to the organs located in the missing CT coverage can be reconstructed by using whole body computational human phantoms within reasonable dosimetric uncertainty, however appropriate corrections may be necessary if the patient is treated with a technique that will significantly deform the size or location of the organs relative to the hybrid phantom.

  8. A randomized, controlled, dose-ranging study investigating single doses of GW406381, naproxen sodium, or placebo in patients with acute pain after third molar tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, Julie; Lomax, Mark; Blum, David; Quessy, Steve

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 4 doses of GW406381, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, compared with placebo in a standard model of acute inflammatory pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-center study compared single doses of GW406381 (10 to 70 mg) or naproxen sodium 550 mg with placebo in patients after extraction of 2 or more partially bony impacted third molar teeth. A total of 300 patients were randomized (50 per group). The primary efficacy variable was the pain relief intensity difference score at each time point, which was calculated as the sum of the pain intensity difference and pain relief categorical scores at each time point. Each treatment was compared with placebo at each time point using an ordered hierarchical approach with closed testing procedures and last observation carried forward imputation methods. Pain relief intensity differences from placebo were statistically significant beginning at 1.5 hours postdosing for GW406381 70 and 50 mg and at 2-hour postdosing for GW406381 25 and 10 mg. The median time to onset of analgesia was 71 minutes for GW406381 50 mg, 72 minutes for GW406381 70 mg, and 36 minutes for naproxen. The median duration of analgesia was 5.9 hours for GW406381 50 mg, 7.9 hours for GW406391 70 mg, and 11.3 hours for naproxen. All treatments were well tolerated. GW406381 50 and 70 mg demonstrated clinically meaningful analgesia in this acute pain setting, although the onset of analgesia was greater than 1 hour.

  9. Electrophysical properties of silicon layers implanted with erbium and oxygen ions over a wide dose range and heat treated with different temperature regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, O V; Sobolev, N A; Nikolaev, Y A

    2002-01-01

    The electrophysical properties of silicon implanted with erbium and oxygen ions over a wide dose range have been studied. The electron mobility dependence on the electrically active center concentration has been obtained in erbium-doped silicon with a concentration varied over 9 x 10 sup 1 sup 5 - 8 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 3 range. In the concentration profiles of electrically active centers n(x) and erbium atoms C(x), irregularities related to some peculiarities of the Er segregation during solid phase epitaxial recrystallization were found. They are regarded as peculiar to erbium ion implantation doses higher than the amorphization thresholds. A linear increase of a maximum concentration of electrically active centers and practically constant effective coefficient k of their activation have been observed at the erbium ion implantation doses higher than the amorphization threshold. An increase in the electrically active center concentration gains saturation and k drops at the erbium concentration highe...

  10. The impact of uncertainties in the CT conversion algorithm when predicting proton beam ranges in patients from dose and PET-activity distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Samuel; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-12-21

    The advantages of a finite range of proton beams can only be partly exploited in radiation therapy unless the range can be predicted in patient anatomy with proton-induced PET imaging aims at ∼2 mm accuracy in range verification. The latter is done using Monte Carlo predicted PET images. Monte Carlo methods are based on CT images to describe patient anatomy. The dose calculation algorithm and the CT resolution/artifacts might affect dose calculation accuracy. Additionally, when using Monte Carlo for PET range verification, the biological decay model and the cross sections for positron emitter production affect predicted PET images. The goal of this work is to study the effect of uncertainties in the CT conversion on the proton beam range predicted by Monte Carlo dose calculations and proton-induced PET signals. Conversion schemes to assign density and elemental composition based on a CT image of the patient define a unique Hounsfield unit (HU) to tissue parameters relationship. Uncertainties are introduced because there is no unique relationship between HU and tissue parameters. In this work, different conversion schemes based on a stoichiometric calibration method as well as different numbers of tissue bins were considered in three head and neck patients. For Monte Carlo dose calculation, the results show close to zero (proton dose distributions based on Monte Carlo calculation are only slightly affected by the uncertainty on density and elemental composition introduced by unique assignment to each HU if a stoichiometric calibration is used. Calculated PET images used for range verification are more sensitive to conversion uncertainties causing an intrinsic limitation due to CT conversion alone of at least 1 mm.

  11. Dose-ranging study of the performance of the natural oxygen transporter HEMO2 Life in organ preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Vanessa; Dutheil, Delphine; Polard, Valérie; Rousselot, Morgane; Leize, Elisabeth; Hauet, Thierry; Goujon, Jean Michel; Zal, Franck

    2014-08-01

    The intensity of ischemia-reperfusion injury of the donor organ during the preservation phase and after anastomosis is acknowledged as being a key factor for long-term graft outcome. We previously showed that the addition of 5 g/L of the natural oxygen carrier HEMO2 Life was beneficial for the cold static preservation of kidney grafts in both University of Wisconsin (UW) and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solutions. Herein, we refined these findings by evaluating HEMO2 Life at various dose levels in UW, both in vitro with endothelial cells and in vivo in a pig kidney autotransplantation preclinical model. We showed in vitro that cells were significantly better preserved with HEMO2 Life in a dose-dependent manner, with benefits in terms of survival, metabolic activity, and cellular integrity. In vivo, serum creatinine measurements at reperfusion confirmed the important benefits of HEMO2 Life treatment on function recovery at the dose levels of 1, 2, and 5 g/L. Likewise, histological analysis of kidney parenchyma biopsies from day 7 confirmed the superiority of HEMO2 Life-supplemented UW over UW alone, and there was no difference between the doses. Three months' follow-up confirmed the trend of the first 2 weeks, with creatinine and fibrosis levels similar to those in pretransplant kidneys. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Optimum dose range for the amelioration of tong term radiation-induced hyposalivation using prophylactic pilocarpine treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burlage, Fred Ronald; Roesink, Judith M.; Faber, Hette; Vissink, Arjan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Coppes, Rob P.

    Background: To determine dose and time dependency of pilocarpine pre-treatment protection from late damage after unilateral irradiation of the rat parotid gland. Methods and materials: The right parotid gland of saline (1 mg/ml) or pilocarpine (4 mg/kg) pre-treated rats was irradiated with 10, 15

  13. Biological activity of two botulinum toxin type A complexes (Dysport and Botox) in volunteers: a double-blind, randomized, dose-ranging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, K; Schwandt, I; Wegner, F; Jürgens, T; Gelbrich, G; Wagner, A; Bogdahn, U; Schulte-Mattler, W

    2008-12-01

    Despite extensive clinical experience and published data regarding botulinum toxin, questions remain about the clinical substitution of one botulinum toxin formulation for another. In the case of Dysport and Botox, dose-equivalence ratios ranging from 1:1 to 6:1 (Dysport:Botox) have been advocated. This dose-ranging, electroneurographic study investigated the dose equivalence, diffusion characteristics (spread) and safety of these two type-A toxins in 79 volunteers. Dysport and Botox caused significant and similar reductions in compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude in the target muscle (extensor digitorum brevis, EDB) 2 weeks after injection, with effects persisting to the 12-week timepoint. For both products, the reduction in amplitude was increased with increasing doses and with increasing concentration. The effects of toxin on neighbouring muscles were much smaller and of a shorter duration than those on the target muscle, implying a modest spread of toxin. Unlike the target muscle, the effects were greater with the higher volume, suggesting this volume led to greater diffusion from the EDB. No adverse events were reported. Statistical modelling with CMAP amplitude data from the target muscle gave a bioequivalence of 1.57 units of Dysport:1 unit of Botox (95 % CI: 0.77-3.20 units). The data indicate that a dose-equivalence ratio of 3:1 was within the statistical error limits, but ratios over 3:1 are too high.

  14. Infeksi Cacing Saluran Pencernaan Monyet Ekor Panjang (Macaca fascicularis Yang Diperdagangkan Di Pasar Satria Denpasar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadek Ari Dwipayanti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui jenis dan intensitas serta prevalensi infeksi cacing saluran pencernaan pada monyet ekor panjang (Macaca fascicularis yang diperdagangkan di Pasar Satria Denpasar. Empat puluh lima sampel feses M. fascicularis (24 ekor monyet betina dan 21 ekor monyet jantan diambil secara aseptis, diberi label dan selanjutnya diperiksa di laboratorium Parasitologi FKH Universitas Udayana. Sampel diperiksa menggunakan metode konsentrasi sedimentasi untuk mengidentifikasi jenis cacing dan modifikasi McMaster untuk mengetahui intensitas infeksi. Jenis cacing saluran pencernaan yang berhasil diidentifikasi berturut-turut adalah Ancylostoma sp. (91,1%, Trichostrongylus sp./Oesophagostonum sp. (73,3%, Trichuris sp. (22,2%, Ascaris sp. dan Taenia sp. (4,4%. Rataan intensitas infeksi cacing      Ancylostoma sp. 4913 ± 4849 telur per gram tinja, Thrichostrongylus sp./ Oesophagostonum sp. 871 ± 816 telur per gram tinja, Trichuris sp. berkisar      171 ± 111 telur per gram tinja. Ascaris sp. dan Taenia sp. memiliki intensitas terendah yakni <100 telur per gram tinja. Secara umum prevalensi kecacingan adalah 93,3%. Prevalensi kecacingan pada monyet betina (52,2% sedangkan pada monyet jantan (48,8%. Berdasarkan umur, prevalensi kecacingan pada anakan, bayi, dan dewasa berturut-turut (72,1%, (25,6%, dan (2,3%. Pola infeksi umumnya tipe infeksi campuran (82,3% dibandingkan infeksi tunggal (17,7%.

  15. Alanine-EPR dosimetry for measurements of ionizing radiation absorbed doses in the range 0.5-10 kGy

    CERN Document Server

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of two, easy accessible alanine dosimeters (ALANPOL from IChTJ and foil dosimeter from Gamma Service, Radeberg, Germany) to radiation dose measurement in the range of 0.5-10 kGy, were investigated. In both cases, the result of the test was positive. The foil dosemeter from Gamma Service is recommended for dose distribution measurements in fantoms or products, ALANPOL - for routine measurements. The EPR-alanine method based on the described dosimeters can be successfully used, among others, in the technology of radiation protection of food.

  16. A simple dose regimen of artesunate and amodiaquine based on arm span- or age range for childhood falciparum malaria: a preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowunmi, Akintunde; Akinrinola, Ibukun A; Gbotosho, Grace O; Okuboyejo, Titilope M; Happi, Christian T

    2012-08-01

    A dose regimen of artesunate and amodiaquine based on arm span- or age range (DRAAAS), derived from a study of 1674 children, was compared with standard dose regimen of the same drugs calculated according to body weight (SDRAA) in 68 malarious children. Children on DRAAAS received 0.8-1.0 of artesunate/kg and 0.9-1.2 times amodiaquine/kg compared with those receiving SDRAA. Parasite and fever clearance and fall in hematocrit in the first 3 days were similar; both regimens were well tolerated. DRAAAS is simple and is efficacious.

  17. DINAMIKA PROFIL HEMATOLOGI DAN RASIO NETROFIL:LIMFOSIT MONYET EKOR PANJANG (MACACA FASCICULARIS PADA PENGATURAN MIKROKLIMAT RUANGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridzki M.F. Binol

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to obtain the profile of physiological hematology (erythrocyte, PCV, Hb, MCV, MCH, MCHC, and leukocyte and the profile of ratio between neutrophil and lymphocyte of long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis in different microclimate conditions due to the room’s temperature and humidity setting. The symptom of stress was also observed in this study. The research used 10 male macaques aged of 4 until 5 years old which placed in room temperature and humidity of 29,00±1,95°C and 79,52±1,57% respectively 7 days for adaptation period. Further more, the room temperature and humidity were set into 25,79±1,16°C and 80,19±9,05% during 14 days for treatment period. For the last treatment, macaques were reconditioned in room temperature and humidity of 29,00±1,95°C and 79,52±1,57% during 14 days for post-treatment period. Blood samplings were collected through femoralis vein on last day of adaptation period, continued with treatment and post-treatment periods as the day 1, 4, 7, 14, and 28. The results showed that there were not significant difference by room temperature and humidity setting to hematology and neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio. It could be proven by all parameters score obtained were still in normal ranges compared to literatures. There was also no stress symptom based on neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio measurement. Condition with room temperature and humidity of 25,79±1,16°C dan 80,19±9,05% regarded as the most suitable condition for long-tailed macaque’s life

  18. Evaluation of GAFCHROMIC EBT2 dosimetry for the low dose range using a flat-bed scanner with the reflection mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotanda, Tatsuhiro; Katsuda, Toshizo; Akagawa, Takuya; Gotanda, Rumi; Tabuchi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenyu; Kuwano, Tadao; Yatake, Hidetoshi; Yabunaka, Koichi; Takeda, Yoshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Recently developed radiochromic films can easily be used to measure absorbed doses because they do not need development processing and indicate a density change that depends on the absorbed dose. However, in GAFCHROMIC EBT2 dosimetry (GAF-EBT2) as a radiochromic film, the precision of the measurement was compromised, because of non-uniformity problems caused by image acquisition using a flat-bed scanner with a transmission mode. The purpose of this study was to improve the precision of the measurement using a flat-bed scanner with a reflection mode at the low absorbed dose dynamic range of GAF-EBT2. The calibration curves of the absorbed dose versus the film density for GAF-EBT2 were provided. X-rays were exposed in the range between ~0 and 120 mGy in increments of about 12 mGy. The results of the method using a flat-bed scanner with the transmission mode were compared with those of the method using the same scanner with the reflection mode. The results should that the determination coefficients (r (2) ) for the straight-line approximation of the calibration curve using the reflection mode were higher than 0.99, and the gradient using the reflection mode was about twice that of the one using the transmission mode. The non-uniformity error that is produced by a flat-bed scanner with the transmission mode setting could be almost eliminated by converting from the transmission mode to the reflection mode. In light of these findings, the method using a flat-bed scanner with the reflection mode (only using uniform white paper) improved the precision of the measurement for the low absorbed dose range.

  19. A 24-week multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, dose-ranging study of rufinamide in adults and adolescents with inadequately controlled partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, Christian E; Stefan, Hermann; Mann, Allison; Narurkar, Milind; Sun, Yijun; Perdomo, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    To assess the efficacy, safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of adjunctive rufinamide in adults and adolescents with inadequately controlled partial seizures receiving treatment with one to three concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). A 24-week multicenter Phase II clinical study was conducted (n=647), comprising a 12-week prospective baseline phase and a 12-week randomized double-blind, parallel-group, five-arm (placebo and rufinamide 200, 400, 800, and 1600mg/day) treatment phase. The linear trend of dose response for seizure frequency per 28 days in the double-blind treatment phase - the primary efficacy outcome measure - was statistically significant in favor of rufinamide (estimated slope=-0.049, P=0.003; minimally efficacious dose, 400mg/day). Response rates, defined as a >or=50% reduction in seizure frequency per 28 days, also revealed a significant linear trend of dose response (P=0.0019, logistic regression analysis). Adverse events were comparable between placebo and all rufinamide groups except the 1600mg/day group; no safety signals were observed. These results suggest that in the dose range of 400-1600mg/day, add-on rufinamide therapy may benefit patients with inadequately controlled partial seizures and is generally well tolerated. These data also suggest that higher doses may confer additional efficacy without adversely affecting safety and tolerability.

  20. High resolution karyotype of Thai crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative chromosome banding analysis and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies are established approaches to compare human and ape chromosomes. FISH banding is a relatively new and not routinely applied method very well suited to provide to a better understanding of the evolutionary history of primate and human phylogeny. Here multicolor banding (MCB-applying probes derived from Homo sapiens were used to analyze the chromosomes of Thai crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis. The results agree with those of previous studies in other macaques, e.g. Macaca sylvanus or Macaca nemestrina. This result highlights that morphological differences within the Cercopithecoidea must be found rather in subchromosomal changes or even in epigenetics than in gross structural alterations.

  1. High resolution karyotype of thai crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative chromosome banding analysis and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies are established approaches to compare human and ape chromosomes. FISH-banding is a relatively new and not routinely applied method suited very well to provide to a better understanding of the evolutionary history of primate and human phylogeny. Here multicolor banding (MCB applying probes derived from Homo sapiens was used to analyze the chromosomes of Thai crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis. The results agree with those of previous studies in other macaques, e.g. Macaca sylvanus or Macaca nemestrina. This result pinpoints, that morphological differences within the Ceropithecoidae must be founded rather in subchromosomal changes or even in epigenetics than in gross structural alterations.

  2. Physiological and behavioural stress responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to noise associated with construction work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlund, K; Fernström, A-L; Wergård, E-M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the behavioural and physiological responses to environmental disturbances (live and recorded dynamite explosions) in laboratory non-human primates in preparation for a future tunnel construction underneath our animal facility. In a pilot study (A) on 20...... detonations on the behaviour and CICM in 16 M. fascicularis. In the latter study we introduced a predictive signal, serving as a conditional stimulus, to half of the animals. We found no significant effects of the noise in the Signal group; while the Control groups' CICM values were affected. The behaviour...... was largely unaffected in the two groups. It was decided not to introduce a research moratorium on biomedical research planned to be conducted during the future tunnel construction, and that a conditional stimulus ('warning signal') will be used....

  3. Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, P; Vogel, J S; Rose, M J; Ubick, E A; Brunner, J E; Wallace, M A; Adelsberger, J K; Baker, M P; Henderson, P T; Pearson, P G; Baillie, T A

    2004-04-22

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was validated successfully and utilized to study the pharmacokinetics and disposition in dogs of a preclinical drug candidate (Compound A), after oral and intravenous administration. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether Compound A displayed linear kinetics across sub-pharmacological (microdose) and pharmacological dose ranges in an animal model, prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The AMS-derived disposition properties of Compound A were comparable to data obtained via conventional techniques such as LC-MS/MS and liquid scintillation counting analyses. Thus, Compound A displayed multiphasic kinetics and possessed low plasma clearance (4.4 mL/min/kg), a long terminal elimination half-life (19.4 hr) and high oral bioavailability (82%). Currently there are no published comparisons of the kinetics of a pharmaceutical compound at pharmacological versus sub-pharmacological doses employing microdosing strategies. The present study thus provides the first description of the pharmacokinetics of a drug candidate assessed under these two dosing regimens. The data demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic properties of Compound A were similar following dosing at 0.02 mg/kg as at 1 mg/kg, indicating that in the case of Compound A, the kinetics of absorption, distribution and elimination in the dog appear to be linear across this 50-fold dose range. Moreover, the exceptional sensitivity of AMS provided a pharmacokinetic profile of Compound A, even following a microdose, which revealed aspects of the disposition of this agent that were inaccessible by conventional techniques. The applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are broad ranging and vary from studying environmental and ecological issues such as the isotopic composition of the atmosphere, soil and water (Hughen et al., 2000; Beck et al., 2001; Keith-Roach et al., 2001; Mironov et al., 2002), to archaeology and volcanology

  4. Radiological dose assessment for residual radioactive material in soil at the clean slate sites 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    A radiological dose assessment has been performed for Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 at the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The assessment demonstrated that the calculated dose to hypothetical individuals who may reside or work on the Clean Slate sites, subsequent to remediation, does not exceed the limits established by the US Department of Energy for protection of members of the public and the environment. The sites became contaminated as a result of Project Roller Coaster experiments conducted in 1963 in support of the US Atomic Energy Commission (Shreve, 1964). Remediation of Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 is being performed to ensure that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works on a Clean Slate site should not exceed 100 millirems per year. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline (RESRAD) computer code was used to assess the dose. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines (Yu et al., 1993a). In May and June of 1963, experiments were conducted at Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 to study the effectiveness of earth-covered structures for reducing the dispersion of nuclear weapons material as a result of nonnuclear explosions. The experiments required the detonation of various simulated weapons using conventional chemical explosives (Shreve, 1964). The residual radioactive contamination in the surface soil consists of weapons grade plutonium, depleted uranium, and their radioactive decay products.

  5. Epizoic acoelomorph flatworms impair zooplankton feeding by the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijgerde, Tim; Schots, Pauke; Van Onselen, Eline; Janse, Max; Karruppannan, Eric; Verreth, Johan A J; Osinga, Ronald

    2013-01-15

    Many scleractinian coral species host epizoic acoelomorph flatworms, both in aquaculture and in situ. These symbiotic flatworms may impair coral growth and health through light-shading, mucus removal and disruption of heterotrophic feeding. To quantify the effect of epizoic flatworms on zooplankton feeding, we conducted video analyses of single polyps of Galaxea fascicularis (Linnaeus 1767) grazing on Artemia nauplii in the presence and absence of symbiotic flatworms. 18S DNA analysis revealed that flatworms inhabiting G. fascicularis belonged to the genus Waminoa (Convolutidae), which were hosted at a density of 3.6±0.4 individuals polyp(-1). Polyps hosting flatworms exhibited prey capture rates of 2.2±2.5, 3.4±4.5 and 2.7±3.4 nauplii polyp(-1) 30 min(-1) at prey concentrations of 250, 500 and 1,000 nauplii L(-1), respectively. Polyps that had their flatworms removed displayed prey capture rates of 2.7±1.6, 4.8±4.1 and 16.9±10.3 nauplii polyp(-1) 30 min(-1). Significant main and interactive effects of flatworm presence and ambient prey concentration were found, reflected by the fact that flatworms significantly impaired host feeding rates at the highest prey density of 1,000 nauplii L(-1). In addition, flatworms displayed kleptoparasitism, removing between 0.1±0.3 and 0.6±1.1 nauplii 30 min(-1) from the oral disc of their host, or 5.3±3.3 to 50.0±2.1% of prey acquired by the coral. We suggest classifying the coral-associated Waminoa sp. as an epizoic parasite, as its presence may negatively affect growth and health of the host.

  6. Epizoic acoelomorph flatworms impair zooplankton feeding by the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Wijgerde

    2012-10-01

    Many scleractinian coral species host epizoic acoelomorph flatworms, both in aquaculture and in situ. These symbiotic flatworms may impair coral growth and health through light-shading, mucus removal and disruption of heterotrophic feeding. To quantify the effect of epizoic flatworms on zooplankton feeding, we conducted video analyses of single polyps of Galaxea fascicularis (Linnaeus 1767 grazing on Artemia nauplii in the presence and absence of symbiotic flatworms. 18S DNA analysis revealed that flatworms inhabiting G. fascicularis belonged to the genus Waminoa (Convolutidae, which were hosted at a density of 3.6±0.4 individuals polyp−1. Polyps hosting flatworms exhibited prey capture rates of 2.2±2.5, 3.4±4.5 and 2.7±3.4 nauplii polyp−1 30 min−1 at prey concentrations of 250, 500 and 1,000 nauplii L−1, respectively. Polyps that had their flatworms removed displayed prey capture rates of 2.7±1.6, 4.8±4.1 and 16.9±10.3 nauplii polyp−1 30 min−1. Significant main and interactive effects of flatworm presence and ambient prey concentration were found, reflected by the fact that flatworms significantly impaired host feeding rates at the highest prey density of 1,000 nauplii L−1. In addition, flatworms displayed kleptoparasitism, removing between 0.1±0.3 and 0.6±1.1 nauplii 30 min−1 from the oral disc of their host, or 5.3±3.3 to 50.0±2.1% of prey acquired by the coral. We suggest classifying the coral-associated Waminoa sp. as an epizoic parasite, as its presence may negatively affect growth and health of the host.

  7. Dose-ranging study of salmeterol using a novel fluticasone propionate/salmeterol multidose dry powder inhaler in patients with persistent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David S; Yiu, Gloria; Hellriegel, Edward T; Steinfeld, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    New inhalation devices with improved lung delivery may allow the use of lower salmeterol doses for treatment of asthma. To determine the dose of salmeterol administered from a novel fluticasone propionate/salmeterol (FS) inhalation-driven, multidose dry powder inhaler (MDPI), which provides comparable efficacy and safety to FS dry powder inhaler (DPI). This double-blind, six-period crossover, dose-ranging study randomized 72 patients (ages ≥12 years; with persistent asthma and predose maximum forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] of 40-85% of the predicted normal) to treatment sequences (one dose per treatment), which consisted of FS MDPI 100/6.25, 100/12.5, 100/25, 100/50 μg; fluticasone propionate (Fp) MDPI 100 μg; and open-label FS DPI 100/50 μg. The primary efficacy variable was the baseline-adjusted FEV1 area under the curve over 12 hours after the dose (AUC0-12). Pharmacokinetics and tolerability were also assessed. FEV1 AUC0-12 was significantly higher with all FS MDPI doses and FS DPI versus Fp MDPI (p < 0.0001), and with FS MDPI 100/50 μg versus FS DPI (least squares [LS] mean, 57.88 mL; p = 0.0017). FEV1 AUC0-12 trended toward higher efficacy with FS MDPI 100/25 μg (LS mean, 34.14 mL; p = 0.0624) and was comparable with FS MDPI 100/12.5 μg (LS mean, 3.42 mL; p = 0.8503) versus FS DPI. Salmeterol area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve from time 0 to the time of the last measurable concentration (AUC0-t) for FS MDPI 100/12.5 μg and 100/25 μg was lower versus FS DPI 100/50 μg; AUC0-t for FS MDPI 100/50 μg was higher than FS DPI 100/50 μg. All FS MDPI doses were generally well tolerated. All FS MDPI doses produced greater efficacy versus Fp MDPI. FS MDPI 100/12.5 μg demonstrated similar efficacy to FS DPI 100/50 μg with less salmeterol exposure. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02139644, NCT02175771, and NCT02141854.

  8. A simple dose regimen of artesunate and amodiaquine based on age or body weight range for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in children: comparison of therapeutic efficacy with standard dose regimen of artesunate and amodiaquine and artemether-lumefantrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbotosho, Grace O; Sowunmi, Akintunde; Okuboyejo, Titilope M; Happi, Christian T; Folarin, Onikepe O; Adewoye, Elsie O

    2012-07-01

    A new dose regimen of artesunate and amodiaquine (NDRAA) based on age or body weight range was compared with standard dose regimen of artesunate and amodiaquine (SDRAA) calculated according to body weight and with fixed-dose artesunate-amodiaquine (FDAA) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) in 304 children afflicted by malaria aged 15 years or younger. In initial comparison (n = 208), children on NDRAA received 1-3 times amodiaquine per kilogram of body weight and 1-1.5 times of artesunate per kilogram of body weight compared with those receiving SDRAA. Parasite but not fever clearance was significantly faster in children who received NDRAA (19.4 ± 8.4 hours vs. 24.6 ± 15.5 hours, P = 0.003). Polymerase chain reaction-uncorrected cure rates on days 28-42 were also significantly higher in children who received NDRAA (P < 0.02 in all cases). Therapeutic responses in children younger than 5 years (n = 96) treated with NDRAA, FDAA, and AL were similar. Changes in hematocrit values and reported adverse events after commencing therapy were similar in those who received NDRAA and SDRAA. All drug regimens were well tolerated. NDRAA based on age or body weight range is simple, is therapeutically superior to SDRAA calculated according to body weight, and is as efficacious as AL in children younger than 5 years.

  9. Reduced heterotrophy in the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis after life-long exposure to elevated carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joy N.; Strahl, Julia; Noonan, Sam H. C.; Schmidt, Gertraud M.; Richter, Claudio; Fabricius, Katharina E.

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification imposes many physiological, energetic, structural and ecological challenges to stony corals. While some corals may increase autotrophy under ocean acidification, another potential mechanism to alleviate some of the adverse effects on their physiology is to increase heterotrophy. We compared the feeding rates of Galaxea fascicularis colonies that have lived their entire lives under ocean acidification conditions at natural carbon dioxide (CO2) seeps with colonies living under present-day CO2 conditions. When provided with the same quantity and composition of zooplankton as food, corals acclimatized to high CO2 showed 2.8 to 4.8 times depressed rates of zooplankton feeding. Results were consistent over four experiments, from two expeditions and both in field and chamber measurements. Unless replenished by other sources, reduced zooplankton uptake in G. fascicularis acclimatized to ocean acidification is likely to entail a shortage of vital nutrients, potentially jeopardizing their health and survival in future oceans. PMID:27255977

  10. Transcriptome profiling of Galaxea fascicularis and its endosymbiont Symbiodinium reveals chronic eutrophication tolerance pathways and metabolic mutualism between partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenyue; Chen, Mingliang; Dong, Xu; Zheng, Xinqing; Huang, Haining; Xu, Xun; Chen, Jianming

    2017-02-01

    In the South China Sea, coastal eutrophication in the Beibu Gulf has seriously threatened reef habitats by subjecting corals to chronic physiological stress. To determine how coral holobionts may tolerate such conditions, we examined the transcriptomes of healthy colonies of the galaxy coral Galaxea fascicularis and its endosymbiont Symbiodinium from two reef sites experiencing pristine or eutrophied nutrient regimes. We identified 236 and 205 genes that were differentially expressed in eutrophied hosts and symbionts, respectively. Both gene sets included pathways related to stress responses and metabolic interactions. An analysis of genes originating from each partner revealed striking metabolic integration with respect to vitamins, cofactors, amino acids, fatty acids, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. The expression levels of these genes supported the existence of a continuum of mutualism in this coral-algal symbiosis. Additionally, large sets of transcription factors, cell signal transduction molecules, biomineralization components, and galaxin-related proteins were expanded in G. fascicularis relative to other coral species.

  11. Reduced heterotrophy in the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis after life-long exposure to elevated carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joy N.; Strahl, Julia; Noonan, Sam H. C.; Schmidt, Gertraud M.; Richter, Claudio; Fabricius, Katharina E.

    2016-06-01

    Ocean acidification imposes many physiological, energetic, structural and ecological challenges to stony corals. While some corals may increase autotrophy under ocean acidification, another potential mechanism to alleviate some of the adverse effects on their physiology is to increase heterotrophy. We compared the feeding rates of Galaxea fascicularis colonies that have lived their entire lives under ocean acidification conditions at natural carbon dioxide (CO2) seeps with colonies living under present-day CO2 conditions. When provided with the same quantity and composition of zooplankton as food, corals acclimatized to high CO2 showed 2.8 to 4.8 times depressed rates of zooplankton feeding. Results were consistent over four experiments, from two expeditions and both in field and chamber measurements. Unless replenished by other sources, reduced zooplankton uptake in G. fascicularis acclimatized to ocean acidification is likely to entail a shortage of vital nutrients, potentially jeopardizing their health and survival in future oceans.

  12. Jaw-muscle architecture and mandibular morphology influence relative maximum jaw gapes in the sexually dimorphic Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Claire E; Hylander, William L; Vinyard, Christopher J; Taylor, Andrea B

    2015-05-01

    Maximum jaw gape is a performance variable related to feeding and non-feeding oral behaviors, such as canine gape displays, and is influenced by several factors including jaw-muscle fiber architecture, muscle position on the skull, and jaw morphology. Maximum gape, jaw length, and canine height are strongly correlated across catarrhine primates, but relationships between gape and other aspects of masticatory apparatus morphology are less clear. We examine the effects of jaw-adductor fiber architecture, jaw-muscle leverage, and jaw form on gape in an intraspecific sample of sexually dimorphic crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis). As M. fascicularis males have relatively larger maximum gapes than females, we predict that males will have muscle and jaw morphologies that facilitate large gape, but these morphologies may come at some expense to bite force. Male crab-eating macaques have relatively longer jaw-muscle fibers, masseters with decreased leverage, and temporomandibular joint morphologies that facilitate the production of wide gapes. Because relative canine height is correlated with maximum gape in catarrhines, and males have relatively longer canines than females, these results support the hypothesis that male M. fascicularis have experienced selection to increase maximum gape. The sexes do not differ in relative masseter physiologic cross-sectional area (PCSA), but males compensate for a potential trade-off between muscle excursion versus muscle force with increased temporalis weight and PCSA. This musculoskeletal configuration is likely functionally significant for behaviors involving aggressive canine biting and displays in male M. fascicularis and provides additional evidence supporting the multifactorial nature of the catarrhine masticatory apparatus. Our results have implications for the evolution of craniofacial morphology in catarrhine primates and reinforce the importance of evaluating additional factors other than feeding behavior and diet

  13. Collection of Macaca fascicularis cDNAs derived from bone marrow, kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and thymus

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    Kameoka Yosuke

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consolidating transcriptome data of non-human primates is essential to annotate primate genome sequences, and will facilitate research using non-human primates in the genomic era. Macaca fascicularis is a macaque monkey that is commonly used for biomedical and ecological research. Findings We constructed cDNA libraries of Macaca fascicularis, derived from tissues obtained from bone marrow, liver, pancreas, spleen, and thymus of a young male, and kidney of a young female. In total, 5'-end sequences of 56,856 clones were determined. Including the previously established cDNA libraries from brain and testis, we have isolated 112,587 cDNAs of Macaca fascicularis, which correspond to 56% of the curated human reference genes. Conclusion These sequences were deposited in the public sequence database as well as in-house macaque genome database http://genebank.nibio.go.jp/qfbase/. These data will become valuable resources for identifying functional parts of the genome of macaque monkeys in future studies.

  14. Dose-ranging pilot randomized trial of amino acid mixture combined with physical activity promotion for reducing abdominal fat in overweight adults

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    Sasai H

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hiroyuki Sasai,1–3,* Keisuke Ueda,4,5,* Takehiko Tsujimoto,6,7 Hiroyuki Kobayashi,1 Chiaki Sanbongi,4 Shuji Ikegami,4 Yoshio Nakata1 1Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 2Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Chiyoda, Tokyo, 3Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo, 4Food Science Research Laboratories, Meiji Co., Ltd., Odawara, Kanagawa, 5Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, 6Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 7Faculty of Human Sciences, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effective dose of an amino acid mixture comprising arginine, alanine, and phenylalanine combined with physical activity promotion in reducing abdominal fat among overweight adults.Methods: A 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging, pilot trial was conducted in Mito, Japan, from January through April 2016, and the data were analyzed from May through November 2016. The study participants were 35 overweight adults, aged 20–64 years, with no regular exercise habit. Participants were randomly assigned to high-dose (3,000 mg/d, n=9, medium-dose (1,500 mg/d, n=9, low-dose (750 mg/d, n=8, or placebo (0 mg/d, n=9 groups, and the test beverage containing the amino acid mixture or placebo was administered for 12 weeks. All participants maintained a physically active lifestyle during the study period through monthly physical activity promotion sessions and smartphone-based self-monitoring with wearable trackers. Primary outcomes were changes in abdominal total, subcutaneous, and visceral fat areas, assessed by computed tomography.Results: Of the 35 enrolled participants, 32 completed the 12-week follow-up visit. The intention-to-treat analysis revealed that the changes in abdominal total fat

  15. Safety, immunogenicity and dose ranging of a new Vi-CRM₁₉₇ conjugate vaccine against typhoid fever: randomized clinical testing in healthy adults.

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    Pierre van Damme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Typhoid fever causes more than 21 million cases of disease and 200,000 deaths yearly worldwide, with more than 90% of the disease burden being reported from Asia. Epidemiological data show high disease incidence in young children and suggest that immunization programs should target children below two years of age: this is not possible with available vaccines. The Novartis Vaccines Institute for Global Health developed a conjugate vaccine (Vi-CRM₁₉₇ for infant vaccination concomitantly with EPI vaccines, either starting at 6 weeks with DTP or at 9 months with measles vaccine. We report the results from a Phase 1 and a Phase 2 dose ranging trial with Vi-CRM₁₉₇ in European adults. METHODOLOGY: Following randomized blinded comparison of single vaccination with either Vi-CRM₁₉₇ or licensed polysaccharide vaccines (both containing 25·0 µg of Vi antigen, a randomised observer blinded dose ranging trial was performed in the same center to compare three concentrations of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ (1·25 µg, 5·0 µg and 12·5 µg of Vi antigen with the polysaccharide vaccine. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All vaccines were well tolerated. Compared to the polysaccharide vaccine, Vi-CRM₁₉₇ induced a higher incidence of mild to moderate short lasting local pain. All Vi-CRM₁₉₇ formulations induced higher Vi antibody levels compared to licensed control, with clear dose response relationship. CONCLUSIONS: Vi-CRM₁₉₇ did not elicit safety concerns, was highly immunogenic and is therefore suitable for further clinical testing in endemic populations of South Asia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01123941 NCT01193907.

  16. Efficacy of a dose range of simulated sunlight exposures in raising vitamin D status in South Asian adults: implications for targeted guidance on sun exposure.

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    Farrar, Mark D; Webb, Ann R; Kift, Richard; Durkin, Marie T; Allan, Donald; Herbert, Annie; Berry, Jacqueline L; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2013-06-01

    Vitamin D is essential for bone health, and cutaneous synthesis is an important source. South Asians cannot attain adequate amounts of vitamin D by following general recommendations on summer sunlight exposure at northerly latitudes, and increased exposure may be appropriate for improving their vitamin D status. We examined the efficacy of a dose range of simulated summer sunlight exposures in raising vitamin D status in UK adults of South Asian ethnicity. In a dose-response study, healthy adults of South Asian ethnicity (n = 60; 20-60 y old) received 1 of 6 ultraviolet exposures ranging from 0.65 to 3.9 standard erythema doses (SEDs), which were equivalent to 15-90 min unshaded noontime summer sunlight at 53.5°N (Manchester, United Kingdom), 3 times/wk for 6 wk, while wearing casual clothes that revealed a 35% skin area. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured weekly, and dietary vitamin D was estimated. At baseline, all completing participants (n = 51) were vitamin D insufficient [25(OH)D concentrations exposures ≥1.95 SEDs (equivalent to 45 min unshaded sunlight; n = 33) attained a mean (±SD) 25(OH)D concentration of 15.7 ± 5 ng/mL (mean rise: 8.7 ± 5.7 ng/mL; 95% CI: 6.8, 10.6 ng/mL; P 10 ng/mL. Targeted guidance on sunlight exposure could usefully enhance vitamin D status to avoid deficiency [25(OH)D concentration >10 ng/mL] in South Asians living at latitudes distant from the equator. This trial was registered at the ISRCTN Register (www.isrctn.org) as 07565297.

  17. Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, P; Vogel, J S; Rose, M J; Ubick, E A; Brunner, J E; Wallace, M A; Adelsberger, J K; Baker, M P; Henderson, P T; Pearson, P G; Baillie, T A

    2004-04-22

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was validated successfully and utilized to study the pharmacokinetics and disposition in dogs of a preclinical drug candidate (Compound A), after oral and intravenous administration. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether Compound A displayed linear kinetics across sub-pharmacological (microdose) and pharmacological dose ranges in an animal model, prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The AMS-derived disposition properties of Compound A were comparable to data obtained via conventional techniques such as LC-MS/MS and liquid scintillation counting analyses. Thus, Compound A displayed multiphasic kinetics and possessed low plasma clearance (4.4 mL/min/kg), a long terminal elimination half-life (19.4 hr) and high oral bioavailability (82%). Currently there are no published comparisons of the kinetics of a pharmaceutical compound at pharmacological versus sub-pharmacological doses employing microdosing strategies. The present study thus provides the first description of the pharmacokinetics of a drug candidate assessed under these two dosing regimens. The data demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic properties of Compound A were similar following dosing at 0.02 mg/kg as at 1 mg/kg, indicating that in the case of Compound A, the kinetics of absorption, distribution and elimination in the dog appear to be linear across this 50-fold dose range. Moreover, the exceptional sensitivity of AMS provided a pharmacokinetic profile of Compound A, even following a microdose, which revealed aspects of the disposition of this agent that were inaccessible by conventional techniques. The applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are broad ranging and vary from studying environmental and ecological issues such as the isotopic composition of the atmosphere, soil and water (Hughen et al., 2000; Beck et al., 2001; Keith-Roach et al., 2001; Mironov et al., 2002), to archaeology and volcanology

  18. Engineering Macaca fascicularis cytochrome P450 2C20 to reduce animal testing for new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rua, Francesco; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Castrignanò, Silvia; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-12-01

    In order to develop in vitro methods as an alternative to P450 animal testing in the drug discovery process, two main requisites are necessary: 1) gathering of data on animal homologues of the human P450 enzymes, currently very limited, and 2) bypassing the requirement for both the P450 reductase and the expensive cofactor NADPH. In this work, P450 2C20 from Macaca fascicularis, homologue of the human P450 2C8 has been taken as a model system to develop such an alternative in vitro method by two different approaches. In the first approach called "molecular Lego", a soluble self-sufficient chimera was generated by fusing the P450 2C20 domain with the reductase domain of cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium (P450 2C20/BMR). In the second approach, the need for the redox partner and also NADPH were both obviated by the direct immobilization of the P450 2C20 on glassy carbon and gold electrodes. Both systems were then compared to those obtained from the reconstituted P450 2C20 monooxygenase in presence of the human P450 reductase and NADPH using paclitaxel and amodiaquine, two typical drug substrates of the human P450 2C8. The K(M) values calculated for the 2C20 and 2C20/BMR in solution and for 2C20 immobilized on electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles were 1.9 ± 0.2, 5.9 ± 2.3, 3.0 ± 0.5 μM for paclitaxel and 1.2 ± 0.2, 1.6±0.2 and 1.4 ± 0.2 μM for amodiaquine, respectively. The data obtained not only show that the engineering of M. fascicularis did not affect its catalytic properties but also are consistent with K(M) values measured for the microsomal human P450 2C8 and therefore show the feasibility of developing alternative in vitro animal tests. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of an extract of Ganoderma lucidum in men with lower urinary tract symptoms: a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized and dose-ranging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masanori Noguchi; Kei Matsuoka; Tatsuyuki Kakuma; Katsnro Tomiyasu; Yoshiko Kurita; Hiroko Kukihara; Fumiko Konishi; Shoichiro Kumamoto; Kuniyoshi Shimizu; Ryuichiro Kondo

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To conduct a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized and dose-ranging study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the extract of Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Methods: We enrolled male volunteers (> 50 years) with an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS; questions 1-7)≥ 5 and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value < 4 ng/mL. Volunteers were randomized into groups of placebo (n = 12), G. lucidum of 0.6 mg (n = 12), 6 mg (n = 12) or 60 mg (n = 14), administered once daily. Efficacy was measured as a change from baseline in IPSS and the peak urine flow rate (Qmax). Prostate volume and residual urine were estimated by ultrasonography, and blood tests, including PSA levels, were measured at baseline and at the end of the treatment. Results: The overall administration was well tolerated, with no major adverse effects. Statistical significances in the magnitude of changes between the experimental groups were observed at weeks 4 and 8. No changes were observed with respect to Qmax, residual urine, prostate volume or PSA levels. Conclusion: The extract of G. lucidum was well tolerated and an improvement in IPSS was observed. The recommended dose of the extract of G. lucidum is 6 mg in men with LUTS. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 651-658)

  20. Nutritional Composition of Fruits Selected by Long-Tailed Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Kuala Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Norazila; Hambali, Kamarul; Amir, Aainaa

    2017-01-01

    Proximate analysis of twelve species of fruits commonly consumed by long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis), i.e., Arenga pinnata, Areca catechu, Terminalia catappa, Elaeis guineensis, Lagerstroemia tomentosa, Mangifera indica, Cascabela thevetia, Muntingia calabura, Musa sp., Artocarpus heterophyllus, Ficus tinctoria ssp. gibbosa and Ficus microcarpa, was conducted with the specific objective to determine the nutritional composition of the foodstuffs of long-tailed macaques. The results showed the following order of nutrients: fibre, protein, fat and ash. Based on the results of the chemical analysis, the highest percentage of fibre content (52.7%), protein (9.9%), fat (77.2%) and ash (8.5%) were found in A. catechu, T. catappa, E. guineensis and C. thevetia, respectively. The nutrient composition of these twelve fruit species was found to differ (ANOVA test: crude protein, F (11,24) = 87.978, p < 0.05; crude fibre, F (11,24) = 28.886, p < 0.05; crude fat, F (11,24) = 2081.396, p < 0.05 and ash, F (11,24) = 41.011, p < 0.05). Fibre was found in the highest amount among the four types of nutrients studied. Here, A. catechu had the highest relative fibre content of all tested fruits, E. guineensis had the highest fat content, T. catappa had the highest protein content, and the total mineral content was highest in C. thevetia.

  1. Development of an integrative database with 499 novel microsatellite markers for Macaca fascicularis

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    Higashino Atsunori

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis are a valuable resource for linkage studies of genetic disorders, but their microsatellite markers are not sufficient. In genetic studies, a prerequisite for mapping genes is development of a genome-wide set of microsatellite markers in target organisms. A whole genome sequence and its annotation also facilitate identification of markers for causative mutations. The aim of this study is to establish hundreds of microsatellite markers and to develop an integrative cynomolgus macaque genome database with a variety of datasets including marker and gene information that will be useful for further genetic analyses in this species. Results We investigated the level of polymorphisms in cynomolgus monkeys for 671 microsatellite markers that are covered by our established Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC clones. Four hundred and ninety-nine (74.4% of the markers were found to be polymorphic using standard PCR analysis. The average number of alleles and average expected heterozygosity at these polymorphic loci in ten cynomolgus macaques were 8.20 and 0.75, respectively. Conclusion BAC clones and novel microsatellite markers were assigned to the rhesus genome sequence and linked with our cynomolgus macaque cDNA database (QFbase. Our novel microsatellite marker set and genomic database will be valuable integrative resources in analyzing genetic disorders in cynomolgus macaques.

  2. Allele frequency of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in wild-caught cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Higashino, Atsunori; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ikoma, Tomoko; Suzaki, Yuriko; Ami, Yasushi; Shioda, Tatsuo; Nakayama, Emi E.; Akari, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    A recent study showed that the frequency of an antiretroviral factor TRIM5 gene-derived isoform, TRIMCyp, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) varies widely according to the particular habitat examined. However, whether the findings actually reflect the prevalence of TRIMCyp in wild cynomolgus macaques is still uncertain because the previous data were obtained with captive monkeys in breeding and rearing facilities. Here, we characterized the TRIM5 gene in cynomolgus macaques captured in the wild, and found that the frequency of the TRIMCyp allele was comparable to those in captive monkeys. This suggests that the previous results with captive monkeys do indeed reflect the natural allele frequency and that breeding and rearing facilities may not affect the frequency of TRIM5 alleles. Interestingly, the prevalence of a minor haplotype of TRIMCyp in wild macaques from the Philippines was significantly lower than in captive ones, suggesting that it is advantageous for wild monkeys to possess the major haplotype of TRIMCyp. Overall, our results add to our understanding of the geographic and genetic prevalence of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp. PMID:22969754

  3. Genetic diversity and population structure of long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) populations in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Sonia; Tan, Soon Guan; Yong Seok Yien, Christina; Ng, Jillian; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Khan, Razib; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine J; Valdiani, Alireza; Khajeaian, Parastoo; Kanthaswamy, Sree

    2014-12-01

    The genetic diversity and structure of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Peninsular Malaysia, a widely used non-human primate species in biomedical research, have not been thoroughly characterized. Thirteen sites of wild populations of long-tailed macaques representing six states were sampled and analyzed with 18 STR markers. The Sunggala and Penang Island populations showed the highest genetic diversity estimates, while the Jerejak Island population was the most genetically discrete due to isolation from the mainland shelf. Concordant with pairwise F(st) estimates, STRUCTURE analyses of the seven PCA-correlated clusters revealed low to moderate differentiation among the sampling sites. No association between geographic and genetic distances exists, suggesting that the study sites, including island study sites, are genetically if not geographically contiguous. The status of the genetic structure and composition of long-tailed macaque populations require further scrutiny to develop this species as an important animal model in biomedical research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Population and landscape genetics of an introduced species (M. fascicularis) on the island of Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkoski Trask, Jessica; George, Debra; Houghton, Paul; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Smith, David Glenn

    2013-01-01

    The cynomolgus macaque, Macaca fascicularis, was introduced onto the island of Mauritius in the early 17(th) century. The species experienced explosive population growth, and currently exists at high population densities. Anecdotes collected from nonhuman primate trappers on the island of Mauritius allege that animals from the northern portion of the island are larger in body size than and superior in condition to their conspecifics in the south. Although previous genetic studies have reported Mauritian cynomolgus macaques to be panmictic, the individuals included in these studies were either from the southern/central or an unknown portion of the island. In this study, we sampled individuals broadly throughout the entire island of Mauritius and used spatial principle component analysis to measure the fine-scale correlation between geographic and genetic distance in this population. A stronger correlation between geographic and genetic distance was found among animals in the north than in those in the southern and central portions of the island. We found no difference in body weight between the two groups, despite anecdotal evidence to the contrary. We hypothesize that the increased genetic structure among populations in the north is related to a reduction in dispersal distance brought about by human habitation and tourist infrastructure, but too recent to have produced true genetic differentiation.

  5. Blood genomic profiles of exposures to Venezuelan equine encephalitis in Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis

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    Hammamieh Rasha

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphocytes provide invaluable whistle blowers of changes due to infections. We use the information registered by these cells using their mRNAs as they encounter the pathogen to develop patterns of expression that correspond to that specific pathogen. Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE is a mosquito-borne viral disease characterized by fever and one or more of the following: severe headache, back pain, myalgias, prostration, chills, nausea, vomiting, weakness and other flu-like symptoms. Screening for host mRNA obtained from blood samples after exposure to VEEV may provide the means for early detection of surrogate markers of the impending illness and provide appropriate strategies for treatment. Results We have been carrying out gene expression analysis of PBMC exposed to VEEV to extract signatures and diagnostic markers of early exposure to be used in non invasive blood analysis methods. In this study, we used high throughput gene expression analysis to identify markers of early and late exposures to VEEV in vivo in Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis. We carried out cDNA microarrays and real time PCR on blood samples obtained from the NHP model resulting in a panel of host genes that are altered in response to VEEV. Conclusion Screening for host mRNA obtained from blood samples after exposure to VEEV may provide the means for early detection of surrogate markers of the impending illness and provide appropriate strategies for treatment.

  6. Nutritional Composition of Fruits Selected by Long-Tailed Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Kuala Selangor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Norazila; Hambali, Kamarul; Amir, Aainaa

    2017-01-01

    Proximate analysis of twelve species of fruits commonly consumed by long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis), i.e., Arenga pinnata, Areca catechu, Terminalia catappa, Elaeis guineensis, Lagerstroemia tomentosa, Mangifera indica, Cascabela thevetia, Muntingia calabura, Musa sp., Artocarpus heterophyllus, Ficus tinctoria ssp. gibbosa and Ficus microcarpa, was conducted with the specific objective to determine the nutritional composition of the foodstuffs of long-tailed macaques. The results showed the following order of nutrients: fibre, protein, fat and ash. Based on the results of the chemical analysis, the highest percentage of fibre content (52.7%), protein (9.9%), fat (77.2%) and ash (8.5%) were found in A. catechu, T. catappa, E. guineensis and C. thevetia, respectively. The nutrient composition of these twelve fruit species was found to differ (ANOVA test: crude protein, F (11,24) = 87.978, p < 0.05; crude fibre, F (11,24) = 28.886, p < 0.05; crude fat, F (11,24) = 2081.396, p < 0.05 and ash, F (11,24) = 41.011, p < 0.05). Fibre was found in the highest amount among the four types of nutrients studied. Here, A. catechu had the highest relative fibre content of all tested fruits, E. guineensis had the highest fat content, T. catappa had the highest protein content, and the total mineral content was highest in C. thevetia. PMID:28228918

  7. Experimental and postexperimental effects of posteriorly directed extraoral traction in adult Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, H C; Shapiro, P A; Kokich, V G

    1979-03-01

    The experimental, postexperimental, and postretention effects of continuous high-pull headgear force application to the maxilla were evaluated in four adult, nongrowing Macaca fascicularis monkeys. Force was applied at 450 grams per side to face-bows attached to cast maxillary splints with an implanted occipital plug for anchorage. The active experimental phase lasted from 84 days to 205 days, and its effects were documented histologically, cephalometrically, and with dry skull preparations. Postexperimental, retention, and postretention responses were documented cephalometrically. The findings of the present investigation lead to the following conclusions: 1. The termination active sutural growth is of little significance to the remodeling potential of the sutural articulations and the morphologic adaptability of the facial skeletal complex. 2. The length of time necessary for resorptive remodeling of the sutural bony projections is partially responsible for the slower rate of detectable skeletal movement in adult animals. 3. The sutural ligament in adult animals is initially less responsive to the effects of extraoral force application, possibly because of a diminished level of cellular activity at older ages. 4. Increases in age do not appear to affect the osteogenic potential of the periosteal envelope. 5. Retention aids in establishing a maintainable equilibrium following experimentally induced sutural and skeletal remodeling, but it is of little importance in maintaining the altered position of the denition. 6. The amount of postexperimental skeletal reorientation following force application to the maxilla may be related to the force level and the duration of force.

  8. Influence of testosterone and a novel SARM on gene expression in whole blood of Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmaier, Irmgard; Tichopad, Ales; Reiter, Martina; Pfaffl, Michael W; Meyer, Heinrich H D

    2009-04-01

    Anabolic hormones, including testosterone, have been suggested as a therapy for aging-related conditions, such as osteoporosis and sarcopenia. These therapies are sometimes associated with severe androgenic side effects. A promising alternative to testosterone replacement therapy are selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). SARMs have the potential to mimic the desirable central and peripheral androgenic anabolic effects of testosterone without having its side effects. In this study we evaluated the effects of LGD2941, in comparison to testosterone, on mRNA expression of selected target genes in whole blood in an non-human model. The regulated genes can act as potential blood biomarker candidates in future studies with AR ligands. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were treated either with testosterone or LGD2941 for 90 days in order to compare their effects on mRNA expression in blood. Blood samples were taken before SARM application, on day 16 and on day 90 of treatment. Gene expression of 37 candidate genes was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) technology. Our study shows that both testosterone and LGD2941 influence mRNA expression of 6 selected genes out of 37 in whole blood. The apoptosis regulators CD30L, Fas, TNFR1 and TNFR2 and the interleukins IL-12B and IL-15 showed significant changes in gene expression between control and the treatment groups and represent potential biomarkers for androgen receptor ligands in whole blood.

  9. Telomere length of the colonial coral Galaxea fascicularis at different developmental stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuta, H.; Hidaka, M.

    2013-06-01

    The ability to estimate coral age using soft tissue would be useful for population biology or aging studies on corals. In this study, we investigated whether telomere length can be used to estimate coral age. We applied single telomere length analysis to a colonial coral, Galaxea fascicularis, and estimated telomere lengths of specific coral chromosomes at different developmental stages. If the telomere shortened at each cell division, the telomere length of the coral would be longest in sperm and shortest in adult colonies. However, the mean telomere length of sperm, planula larvae, and polyps was approximately 4 kb, with no significant differences among the developmental stages. The telomerase restriction fragment (TRF) analysis also showed no significant difference in the mean TRF length among the developmental stages. Our results suggested that telomere length is maintained during developmental stages and that estimating the age of colonial coral based on telomere length may not be possible. However, our findings can be used to examine avoidance of aging and rejuvenation during regeneration and asexual reproduction in colonial corals.

  10. The influence of exposure to UVβ of fluorescent light on the bone remodeling of hypoestrogenic Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Rachman

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevention of osteoporosis is a spesific problem that should be dealt with by increasing the women's lift expectation. The decrease of calcitriol and estrogen levels, which have a receptor in the osteoblast, will result in bone mineralization (due to calcitriol and the information of type 1 collagen (due to estrogen. The formation of calcitriol with the main basic materials from vitamin D3 is achieved with the aid of sunray UVβ, The changes in the lifestyle of women, which make them now accustomed to performing indoor activities and prevent them from being exposed to UVβ all day, have resulted in the decrease of vitamin D3 in calcitriol in women. In addition, when entering the menopausal age they will be threatened with early osteoporosis. The exposure to the UVβ of fluorescent light with the wave length identical to sun of 290-320 nm has long been known as a modality for treating skin diseases in the hope that the production of vitamin D3  will be increased. We exposed Macaca fascicularis, whose estrogen levels were set at normal, beginning low, beginning very low levels, to UVβ of fluorescent light. It showed that the Macaca fascicularis that were exposed to UVβ experienced an increase in osteocalcin with unchanged DPD which means that bone remodeling remains unchanged. By contrast, Macaca fascicularis with normal, beginning low, and beginning very low estrogen levels which were not exposed to UVβ were found to experience a decrease in osteocalcin and unchanged DPD levels. This means that a change has occurred in the bone remodeling toward bone resorption. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 63-8Keywords: UVβ, osteoporosis, estrogen, vitamin D3, calcitriol, osteocalcin, DPD

  11. Detection of Early Atherosclerosis in M. Fascicularis with Transcutaneous Ultrasonic Measurement of the Elastic Properties of the Common Carotid Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Farrar, David J; Riley, Ward A.; Bond, M Gene; Barnes, Ralph N.; Love, L. Alan

    1982-01-01

    The elastic properties of 22 common carotid arteries from 13 male cynomolgus monkeys (M. fascicularis) that were fed either a high cholesterol (test) diet or a standard monkey chow (control) diet for 18 months were measured noninvasively with 5MHz ultrasound. A B-mode image of the artery was obtained with a 32-element linear array transducer, and a single line of video ultrasonic information was selected for tracking the echoes from the adventitial side of the near wall to the lumen-intima in...

  12. Dose-Ranging Effects of Canagliflozin, a Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor, as Add-On to Metformin in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Julio; Aggarwal, Naresh; Polidori, David; Zhao, Yue; Arbit, Deborah; Usiskin, Keith; Capuano, George; Canovatchel, William

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, in type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter, dose-ranging study in 451 subjects randomized to canagliflozin 50, 100, 200, or 300 mg once daily (QD) or 300 mg twice daily (BID), sitagliptin 100 mg QD, or placebo. Primary end point was change in A1C from baseline through week 12. Secondary end points included change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), body weight, and overnight urinary glucose-to-creatinine ratio. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. RESULTS Canagliflozin was associated with significant reductions in A1C from baseline (7.6–8.0%) to week 12: −0.79, −0.76, −0.70, −0.92, and −0.95% for canagliflozin 50, 100, 200, 300 mg QD and 300 mg BID, respectively, versus −0.22% for placebo (all P canagliflozin (3–8%) versus placebo and sitagliptin (2%). Urinary tract infections were reported without dose dependency in 3–9% of canagliflozin, 6% of placebo, and 2% of sitagliptin arms. Overall incidence of hypoglycemia was low. CONCLUSIONS Canagliflozin added onto metformin significantly improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes and was associated with low incidence of hypoglycemia and significant weight loss. The safety/tolerability profile of canagliflozin was favorable except for increased frequency of genital infections in females. PMID:22492586

  13. Maxillary nerve compression in cynomolgus monkey Macaca fascicularis: altered somatic sensation and peripheral nerve firing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Ning

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal nerve is a major source of the sensory input of the face, and trigeminal neuropathology models have been reported in rodents with injury to branches of the maxillary or mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. Non-human primates are neuroanatomically more closely related to human than rodents; however, nerve injury studies in non-human primates are limited. Results We describe here a nerve injury model of maxillary nerve compression (MNC in the cynomolgus macaque monkey, Macaca fascicularis, and the initial characterization of the consequences of damage to this trigeminal nerve branch. The nerve injury from the compression appeared to be mild, as we did not observe overt changes in home-cage behavior in the monkeys. When mechanical stimulation was applied to the facial area, monkeys with MNC displayed increased mechanical sensitivity, as the avoidance response scores were lower than those from the control animals. Such a change in mechanical sensitivity appeared to be somewhat bilateral, as the contralateral side also showed increased mechanical sensitivity, although the change on the ipsilateral side was more robust. Multiple-unit recording of the maxillary nerve showed a general pattern of increasing responsiveness to escalating force in mechanical stimulation on the contralateral side. Ipsilateral side of the maxillary nerve showed a lack of responsiveness to escalating force in mechanical stimulation, possibly reflecting a maximum stimulation threshold effect from sensitized nerve due to MNC injury. Conclusions These results suggest that MNC may produce increased sensitivity of the ipsilateral maxillary nerve, and that this model may serve as a non-human primate model to evaluate the effect of injury to trigeminal nerve branches.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) and eradication regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Tetsufumi; Aoki, Wataru; Mizuno, Takashi; Wakazono, Kuniko; Ohno, Junki; Nakai, Tsunehiro; Nomiya, Takao; Fujii, Miki; Fusegawa, Keiichi; Kinoshita, Kazuya; Hamada, Takakazu; Ikeda, Yoshinori

    2017-02-01

    Campylobacter spp. are zoonotic pathogens, however, knowledge about their presence and antimicrobial resistance in nonhuman primates is limited. Our animal facility purchased cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) from various Asian countries: China, Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. Colonization by Campylobacter spp. was investigated in 238 of the monkeys from 2009 to 2012 and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out for these isolates. Furthermore, we eradicated these pathogens from these monkeys. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 47 monkeys from three specific countries: China, Cambodia, and Indonesia, with respective isolation rates of 15%, 36%, and 67%. Two monkeys, which were each infected with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, showed clinical symptoms of diarrhea and bloody feces. In total, 41 isolates of C. coli and 17 isolates of C. jejuni were detected. Antimicrobial susceptibility varied: in the monkeys from China, erythromycin (ERY)-, tetracycline (TET)-, and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli, in the monkeys from Cambodia, amoxicillin-intermediate, TET- and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli and amoxicillin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni, and in the monkeys from Indonesia, ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli and TET- and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni were common (>75%). Multiresistant isolates of C. coli were found in monkeys from all countries and multiresistant isolates of C. jejuni were found in monkeys from Indonesia. The eradication rate with azithromycin was comparable to that with gentamicin (GEN) by oral administration, and was higher than those with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) and chloramphenicol (CHL). From the perspective of zoonosis, we should acknowledge multiresistant Campylobacter spp. isolated from the monkeys as a serious warning. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. A natural model of behavioral depression in postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xun-Xun; Dominic Rizak, Joshua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Wang, Jian-Hong; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Hu, Xin-Tian

    2014-05-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a modified form of major depressive disorders (MDD) that can exert profound negative effects on both mothers and infants than MDD. Within the postpartum period, both mothers and infants are susceptible; but because PPD typically occurs for short durations and has moderate symptoms, there exists challenges in exploring and addressing the underlying cause of the depression. This fact highlights the need for relevant animal models. In the present study, postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) living in breeding groups were observed for typical depressive behavior. The huddle posture behavior was utilized as an indicator of behavioral depression postpartum (BDP) as it has been established as the core depressive-like behavior in primates. Monkeys were divided into two groups: A BDP group (n=6), which were found to spend more time huddling over the first two weeks postpartum than other individuals that formed a non-depression control group (n=4). The two groups were then further analyzed for locomotive activity, stressful events, hair cortisol levels and for maternal interactive behaviors. No differences were found between the BDP and control groups in locomotive activity, in the frequencies of stressful events experienced and in hair cortisol levels. These findings suggested that the postpartum depression witnessed in the monkeys was not related to external factors other than puerperium period. Interestingly, the BDP monkeys displayed an abnormal maternal relationship consisting of increased infant grooming. Taken together, these findings suggest that the adult female cynomolgus monkeys provide a natural model of behavioral postpartum depression that holds a number of advantages over commonly used rodent systems in PPD modeling. The cynomolgus monkeys have a highly-organized social hierarchy and reproductive characteristics without seasonal restriction-similar to humans-as well as much greater homology to humans

  16. Ferroquine and artesunate in African adults and children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a phase 2, multicentre, randomised, double-blind, dose-ranging, non-inferiority study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Jana; Supan, Christian; Salazar, Carmen L O; Tinto, Halidou; Bonkian, Léa N; Nahum, Alain; Moulero, Bancole; Sié, Ali; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Siribie, Mohamadou; Otsyula, Nekoye; Otieno, Lucas; Abdallah, Ahmed M; Kimutai, Robert; Bouyou-Akotet, Marielle; Kombila, Maryvonne; Koiwai, Kimiko; Cantalloube, Cathy; Din-Bell, Chantal; Djeriou, Elhadj; Waitumbi, John; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Ter-Minassian, Daniel; Lell, Bertrand; Kremsner, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Ferroquine is a new combination partner for fast-acting ACTs such as artesunate. We aimed to assess different doses of ferroquine in combination with artesunate against uncomplicated P falciparum malaria in a heterogeneous population in Africa. We did a phase 2, multicentre, parallel-group, double-blind, randomised, dose-ranging non-inferiority trial at eight African hospitals (two in Gabon, three in Burkina Faso, one in Benin, and two in Kenya). We recruited patients presenting with acute P falciparum monoinfection (1000-200,000 parasites per μL), and a central body temperature of at least 37·5°C or history of fever in the past 24 h. We assessed patients in two sequential cohorts: cohort 1 contained adults (bodyweight >50 kg) and adolescents (aged ≥14 years, >30 kg), and cohort 2 contained children (aged 2-13 years, 15-30 kg). We randomly assigned patients (1:1:1:1) to receive artesunate 4 mg/kg per day plus ferroquine 2 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg, or 6 mg/kg, given double-blind once per day for 3 days, or ferroquine monotherapy 4 mg/kg per day given single-blind (ie, allocation was only masked from the patient) once per day for 3 days. We did 14 patient visits (screening, 3 treatment days and 48 h post-treatment surveillance, a visit on day 7, then one follow-up visit per week until day 63). The primary endpoint was non-inferiority of treatment in terms of PCR-corrected cure rate against a reference value of 90%, with a 10% non-inferiority margin, assessed in patients treated without major protocol deviations for parasitologically confirmed malaria. We assessed safety in all treated patients. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00988507, and is closed. Between Oct 16, 2009, and Sept 22, 2010, we randomly assigned 326 eligible patients to treatment groups, with last follow-up visit on Dec 1, 2010. 284 patients

  17. Stimulus-Food Pairings Produce Stimulus-Directed Touch Screen Responding in Cynomolgus Monkeys ("Macaca Fascicularis") with or without a Positive Response Contingency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Christopher E.; Myers, Todd M.

    2009-01-01

    Acquisition and maintenance of touch-screen responding was examined in naive cynomolgus monkeys ("Macaca fascicularis") under automaintenance and classical conditioning arrangements. In the first condition of Experiment 1, we compared acquisition of screen touching to a randomly positioned stimulus (a gray square) that was either stationary or…

  18. [An evaluation of the biological action of increased doses of EMI in the UV range on the functional state and productivity of sheep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V L; Ipatova, A G; Zeĭnalov, A A; Kozlov, V A; Sarukhanov, V Ia

    2000-01-01

    The effect of increased UV-radiation doses modeling 25 and 50% of ozone layer depletion on sheep's organisms was studied in the field experiment. The character of changes in animal organisms was found to depend on irradiation doses, sensitivity of individual system of living organism to electromagnetic radiation and physiological peculiarities of protection.

  19. Creatine target engagement with brain bioenergetics: a dose-ranging phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of adolescent females with SSRI-resistant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Douglas G; Forrest, Lauren N; Shi, Xianfeng; Sung, Young-Hoon; Hellem, Tracy L; Huber, Rebekah S; Renshaw, Perry F

    2016-08-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) often begins during adolescence and is projected to become the leading cause of global disease burden by the year 2030. Yet, approximately 40 % of depressed adolescents fail to respond to standard antidepressant treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Converging evidence suggests that depression is related to brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Our previous studies of MDD in adult and adolescent females suggest that augmentation of SSRI pharmacotherapy with creatine monohydrate (CM) may improve MDD outcomes. Neuroimaging with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) can measure the high-energy phosphorus metabolites in vivo that reflect mitochondrial function. These include phosphocreatine (PCr), a substrate for the creatine kinase reaction that produces adenosine triphosphate. As part of the National Institute of Mental Health's experimental medicine initiative, we conducted a placebo-controlled dose-ranging study of adjunctive CM for adolescent females with SSRI-resistant MDD. Participants were randomized to receive placebo or CM 2, 4 or 10 g daily for 8 weeks. Pre- and post-treatment (31)P-MRS scans were used to measure frontal lobe PCr, to assess CM's target engagement with cerebral energy metabolism. Mean frontal lobe PCr increased by 4.6, 4.1 and 9.1 % in the 2, 4 and 10 g groups, respectively; in the placebo group, PCr fell by 0.7 %. There was no group difference in adverse events, weight gain or serum creatinine. Regression analysis of PCr and depression scores across the entire sample showed that frontal lobe PCr was inversely correlated with depression scores (p = 0.02). These results suggest that CM achieves target engagement with brain bioenergetics and that the target is correlated with a clinical signal. Further study of CM as a treatment for adolescent females with SSRI-resistant MDD is warranted.

  20. Dose rate range extension of the calibration of dosemeters at LNMRI, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Expansao da faixa de taxas de dose para a calibracao de instrumentos de medir radiacao no LNMRI, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, T.S.; Carlos, M.T.; Ramos, M.M.O., E-mail: tschirn@ird.gov.b, E-mail: marcia@ird.gov.b, E-mail: mmoramos@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present work has an objective the implantation of a experimental arrange for application of essays of instrument calibration for measurement of low dose rate, which measure rate less than 10 {mu}Sv/h

  1. Measurements of thermal- and slow-neutron dose distributions in ordinary concrete shield using a reactor neutron beam of different energy ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megahid, R.M.; Makarious, A.S.; El-Kolaly, M.A.; Afifi, Y.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental studies on the distribution and attenuation of thermal and slow neutron doses in ordinary concrete shield have been carried-out. A collimated beam of reactor neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor was used. Measurements were performed using, a direct beam, cadmium filtered beam and boron carbide filtered beam. The neutron doses were measured using thermolumin-escent Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ detectors. The measured data have been analyzed and a group of attenuation curves were given for beams of reactor neutrons of different energy. These curves show that cadmium and boron carbide filters tend to decrease the neutron doses specially at the beginning of penetration. The data were transformed to that which would be obtained using neutron sources of different geometries.

  2. Proteasome and NF-κB Inhibiting Phaeophytins from the Green Alga Cladophora fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhan Lin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical examination of the green alga Cladophora fascicularis resulted in the isolation and characterization of a new porphyrin derivative, porphyrinolactone (1, along with five known phaeophytins 2-6 and fourteen sterols and cycloartanes. The structure of 1 was determined on the basis of spectroscopic analyses and by comparison of its NMR data with those of known phaeophytins. Compounds 1-6 displayed moderate inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation, while 2 and 4 displayed potential inhibitory activity toward proteasome chymotripsin-like activation. The primary structure-activity relationship was also discussed.

  3. Estimated cardiovascular relative risk reduction from fixed-dose combination pill (polypill) treatment in a wide range of patients with a moderate risk of cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber, Melvin; Webster, Ruth; Visseren, Frank L J; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Spiering, W.; Rodgers, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Aims Recent data indicate that fixed-dose combination (FDC) pills, polypills, can produce sizeable risk factor reductions. There are very few published data on the consistency of the effects of a polypill in different patient populations. It is unclear for example whether the effects of the polypill

  4. The range of minimum provoking doses in hazelnut-allergic patients as determined by double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, M.; Penninks, A.H.; Hefle, S.L.; Akkerdaas, J.H.; Ree, R. van; Koppelman, S.J.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.F.M.; Knulst, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    Background: The risk for allergic reactions depends on the sensitivity of individuals and the quantities of offending food ingested. The sensitivity varies among allergic individuals, as does the threshold dose of a food allergen capable of inducing an allergic reaction. Objective: This study aimed

  5. A phase 2, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study of the calcium-sensing receptor antagonist MK-5442 in the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, Johan; Greenspan, Susan; Cosman, Felicia; Ellis, Graham; Santora, Arthur; Leung, Albert; Heyden, Norman; Samanta, Suvajit; Doleckyj, Steven; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Denker, Andrew E

    2014-11-01

    MK-5442 is an orally bioavailable calcium-sensing receptor antagonist that is hypothesized to stimulate bone formation by stimulating endogenous secretion of a pulse of PTH. Earlier clinical and preclinical studies demonstrated increased bone mineral density (BMD) after treatment. Our objective was to identify a dose of MK-5442 that produces osteoanabolic effects without excessive hypercalcemia. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial of private or institutional practice. In total, 383 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis were administered daily oral MK-5442 (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, or 15 mg) or placebo. Serum PTH and calcium, bone turnover markers, areal BMD, and safety were evaluated. A dose-dependent transient increase in PTH occurred after an MK-5442 dose and lasted more than 3.5 hours. Compared with placebo, significant increases in bone formation markers (serum procollagen 1 N-terminal peptide and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase) were observed by 6 months, whereas bone resorption markers (serum C-telopeptide of type 1 collagen, urine N-telopeptides of type 1 collagen) initially decreased but were also significantly increased by 6 months. Despite the biochemical marker changes suggestive of an anabolic response, there were no statistically significant differences between any dose of MK-5442 and placebo in percent change from baseline at month 6 in any of the BMD endpoints. The frequency of hypercalcemia (trough serum calcium ≥ 10.8 mg/dL) was greater with higher MK-5442 doses. In postmenopausal women with low bone mass, treatment with MK-5442 resulted in transient pulses of PTH. Bone formation markers increased quickly and bone resorption markers decreased temporarily, suggestive of an anabolic window. However, there were no increases in BMD versus placebo.

  6. Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Bortezomib in Pediatric Leukemia Patients: Model-Based Support for Body Surface Area-Based Dosing Over the 2- to 16-Year Age Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Michael J; Mould, Diane R; Taylor, Timothy J; Gupta, Neeraj; Suryanarayan, Kaveri; Neuwirth, Rachel; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Horton, Terzah M; Aplenc, Richard; Alonzo, Todd A; Lu, Xiaomin; Milton, Ashley; Venkatakrishnan, Karthik

    2017-09-01

    This population analysis described the pharmacokinetics of bortezomib after twice-weekly, repeat-dose, intravenous administration in pediatric patients participating in 2 clinical trials: the phase 2 AALL07P1 (NCT00873093) trial in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the phase 3 AAML1031 (NCT01371981) trial in de novo acute myelogenous leukemia. The sources of variability in the pharmacokinetic parameters were characterized and quantified to support dosing recommendations. Patients received intravenous bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) twice-weekly, on days 1, 4, and 8 during specific blocks or cycles of both trials and on day 11 of block 1 of study AALL07P1, in combination with multiagent chemotherapy. Blood samples were obtained and the plasma was harvested on day 8 over 0-72 hours postdose to measure bortezomib concentrations by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Concentration-time data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Covariates were examined using forward addition (P < .01)/backward elimination (P < .001). Data were included from 104 patients (49%/51% acute lymphoblastic leukemia/acute myelogenous leukemia; 60%/40% aged 2-11 years/12-16 years). Bortezomib pharmacokinetics were described by a 3-compartment model with linear elimination. Body surface area adequately accounted for variability in clearance (exponent 0.97), supporting body surface area-based dosing. Stratified visual predictive check simulations verified that neither age group nor patient population represented sources of meaningful pharmacokinetic heterogeneity not accounted for by the final population pharmacokinetic model. Following administration of 1.3 mg/m(2) intravenous bortezomib doses, body surface area-normalized clearance in pediatric patients was similar to that observed in adult patients, thereby indicating that this dose achieves similar systemic exposures in pediatric patients. © 2017, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by Wiley

  7. Studies on γ-ray induced structural changes in Nd{sup 3+} doped lead alumino silicate glasses by means of thermoluminescence for dosimetric applications in high dose ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundara Rao, M. [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522 510, Guntur, A.P. (India); Gandhi, Y. [Department of Physics, Kakani Venkata Ratnam College, Nandigama 521 185, A.P. (India); Sanyal, Bhaskar [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bhargavi, K. [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522 510, Guntur, A.P. (India); Piasecki, M. [Institute of Physics, J. Dlugosz University, Ul. Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-201 Czestochowa (Poland); Veeraiah, N., E-mail: nvr8@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522 510, Guntur, A.P. (India)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: TL glow curves of PbO–SiO{sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} glasses mixed with different concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposed to γ-rays of dose 5.0 kGy. - Highlights: • TL studies of Nd{sup 3+} ions doped lead alumino silicate glasses were carried out. • Highest TL output was observed in the glasses mixed with 10 mol% of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Different mechanisms responsible for TL emission were discussed. • Near linearity of the dose response was observed in the dose range of 1.0–3.0 kGy. • These glasses may be useful as dosimeters in processing perishable food commodities. - Abstract: Thermoluminescence (TL) studies on PbO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} glasses mixed with varying concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposed to γ-rays of dose in the range 0–5.0 kGy were carried out. The TL emission exhibited a dosimetric peak at about 185 °C. The TL output under the glow peak increased with increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and also with the γ-ray dose. The mechanisms responsible for TL emission and enhancement of TL output with increase in the concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were quantitatively discussed in terms of induced structural defects in the vicinity of Nd{sup 3+} ions due to interaction of γ-rays with the glass network in the scenario of varying concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The dose response of these glass samples exhibited linear behavior in the medium dose range viz., 1.0–3.0 kGy. Finally, it is concluded that the glass containing the highest concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits high TL output and such glasses are useful for dosimetry in the range 1.0–3.0 kGy and hence these glasses may be useful for dosimetry in such high range of doses required for commercial radiation processing of perishable food commodities to extend their shelf-lives.

  8. Barnidipine, a novel calcium antagonist for once-daily treatment of hypertension: a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study. Dutch Barnidipine Multicenter Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, W; Holwerda, N J

    1997-11-01

    The antihypertensive effects and tolerance of once-daily barnidipine, a novel dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, were evaluated. A total of 190 patients with a sitting diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of 95-114 mmHg were investigated in this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study. After a 4-week single-blind placebo run-in period, patients were randomized to placebo or barnidipine (10 mg, 20 mg, or 30 mg modified release capsules) once daily for 6 weeks. Nonresponders (sitting DBP > or =90 mmHg and a decrease of barnidipine lowered blood pressure, with a trend toward a dose-response relationship over the dose range 10-30 mg. A dose increment of 10 mg in nonresponders resulted in additional reductions in blood pressure. At the end of the active treatment period, the responder rates were 41% and 57% for 10 mg and 20 mg barnidipine, respectively. Heart rate in both sitting and standing positions was not affected by barnidipine. Treatment with barnidipine was well tolerated, and the incidence of adverse events was dose related and consistent with vasodilatation. In conclusion, barnidipine (10-30 mg) administered once daily is well tolerated and reduces blood pressure in patients with mild to moderate hypertension.

  9. Doses of Quercetin in the Range of Serum Concentrations Exert Delipidating Effects in 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes by Acting on Different Stages of Adipogenesis, but Not in Mature Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itziar Eseberri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scope. To determine whether doses of quercetin in the range of serum concentrations exert any effect on triacylglycerol accumulation in maturing preadipocytes and mature adipocytes. The influence on the expression of adipogenic markers as well as on gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in triacylglycerol metabolism were assessed. Methods and Results. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were treated during differentiation and mature adipocytes for 24 hours with low doses (0.1–10 µM of quercetin. Triacylglycerol content in both cell types and free fatty acid and glycerol in the incubation medium of mature adipocytes were measured spectrophotometrically. Gene and protein expression were assessed by RT-PCR and Western blot. LPL and FAS activities were quantified. During differentiation quercetin reduced triacylglycerol content at doses from 0.5 to 10 µM. 1 µM of quercetin reduced C/EBPβ gene expression, SREBP1 mature protein levels, and PPARγ gene expression. 10 µM of quercetin reduced LPL gene expression and PPARγ and SREBP1c expression. In mature adipocytes, only 10 µM of quercetin reduced triacylglycerol content. Lipogenic FAS expression and activity were reduced at this dose. Conclusion. Quercetin, in the range of serum concentrations, is able to inhibit adipogenesis, but higher doses, at least 10 µM, are needed to reduce fat accumulation in mature adipocytes.

  10. Passive dosing of triclosan in multi-generation tests with copepods - Stable exposure concentrations and effects at the low µg l-1 range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribbenstedt, Anton; Mustajärvi, Lukas; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    to test the applicability of passive dosing to maintain stable concentrations of the organochlorine bacteriocide triclosan in the water phase during a 6-week multi-generation population development test with the harpacticoid copepod Nitocra spinipes. Triclosan was loaded into silicone (1000 mg), which...... was used as passive dosing phase in the exposure vials. The distribution ratio for triclosan between silicone and water (Dsilicone-water ) was 10466 ± 1927. A population development test was conducted at three concentration levels of triclosan that were measured to be 3-5 µg L(-1) , 7-11 µg L(-1) and 16...... exerted on juvenile development. Progressively lower development index values in the populations exposed to increasing triclosan concentrations suggest developmental retardation. Our results further stress the need for chronic exposure during ecotoxicity testing in chemical risk assessment as even...

  11. Passive dosing of triclosan in multi-generation tests with copepods - Stable exposure concentrations and effects at the low µg l-1 range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribbenstedt, Anton; Mustajärvi, Lukas; Breitholtz, Magnus;

    2016-01-01

    to test the applicability of passive dosing to maintain stable concentrations of the organochlorine bacteriocide triclosan in the water phase during a 6-week multi-generation population development test with the harpacticoid copepod Nitocra spinipes. Triclosan was loaded into silicone (1000 mg), which...... was used as passive dosing phase in the exposure vials. The distribution ratio for triclosan between silicone and water (Dsilicone-water ) was 10466 ± 1927. A population development test was conducted at three concentration levels of triclosan that were measured to be 3-5 µg L(-1) , 7-11 µg L(-1) and 16...... exerted on juvenile development. Progressively lower development index values in the populations exposed to increasing triclosan concentrations suggest developmental retardation. Our results further stress the need for chronic exposure during ecotoxicity testing in chemical risk assessment as even...

  12. Passive dosing of triclosan in multi-generation tests with copepods - Stable exposure concentrations and effects at the low µg l-1 range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribbenstedt, Anton; Mustajärvi, Lukas; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Ecotoxicity testing is a crucial component of chemical risk assessment. Still, due to methodological difficulties related to controlling exposure concentrations over time, data on long-term effects of organic chemicals at low concentrations are limited. The aim of the present study was therefore...... to test the applicability of passive dosing to maintain stable concentrations of the organochlorine bacteriocide triclosan in the water phase during a 6-week multi-generation population development test with the harpacticoid copepod Nitocra spinipes. Triclosan was loaded into silicone (1000 mg), which...... was used as passive dosing phase in the exposure vials. The distribution ratio for triclosan between silicone and water (Dsilicone-water ) was 10466 ± 1927. A population development test was conducted at three concentration levels of triclosan that were measured to be 3-5 µg L(-1) , 7-11 µg L(-1) and 16...

  13. Placebo-controlled dose-ranging phase 2 study of subcutaneously administered LHRH antagonist cetrorelix in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, Frans; Gres, Arkadij A; Arustamov, Dmitrii L

    2008-07-01

    Pilot studies with daily dosing suggested the use of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist cetrorelix (CET) for the treatment of symptoms from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). To assess efficacy and safety of three dosing schemes of CET in patients with symptomatic BPH. After a run-in period with 4 weekly injections of placebo, 140 patients with an international prostate symptoms score (IPSS) > or =13 and a peak urinary flow rate (PFR) 5-13ml/s were randomly allocated to 4 treatment groups; patients with residual urine volume of >350ml were excluded. Patients received either CET at dosages of 5mg/wkx4, 10mg/2 wkx2 or 10mg/wkx4 or placebo. IPSS, PFR and mean uroflow, residual urinary volume, prostate volume, plasma testosterone, quality of life, and sexual function were evaluated over a total of 20 wk after randomization. Of 140 randomized patients, one patient did not complete treatment, 5 others dropped out off-treatment, before week 12 evaluation of the primary end point. In all CET groups a rapid improvement in mean IPSS was obtained, with a peak effect of -5.4 to -5.9 (placebo: -2.8). After all dosages of CET given, changes from baseline and differences to placebo were statistically significant up to week 20. Similarly, secondary parameters showed a significant, rapid, and persistent improvement for all CET dosages. All dosage regimens were well tolerated. The study evaluated a single treatment course only; further studies with repeated treatment courses will be required to establish a dose regimen for long-term disease management. At all dosage regimens tested, CET was safe and effective in patients with symptomatic BPH, with a trend towards a more rapid onset of effect for the CET 10mg/wkx4 regimen. Response persisted up to the end of follow-up, 16 wk after the last dose.

  14. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting apolipoprotein(a) in people with raised lipoprotein(a): two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Nicholas J; van Capelleveen, Julian C; Geary, Richard S; Xia, Shuting; Tami, Joseph A; Yu, Rosie Z; Marcovina, Santica M; Hughes, Steven G; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Crooke, Stanley T; Witztum, Joseph L; Stroes, Erik S; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-11-05

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is a highly prevalent (around 20% of people) genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis, but no approved specific therapy exists to substantially lower Lp(a) concentrations. We aimed to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of two unique antisense oligonucleotides designed to lower Lp(a) concentrations. We did two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. In a phase 2 trial (done in 13 study centres in Canada, the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, and the UK), we assessed the effect of IONIS-APO(a)Rx, an oligonucleotide targeting apolipoprotein(a). Participants with elevated Lp(a) concentrations (125-437 nmol/L in cohort A; ≥438 nmol/L in cohort B) were randomly assigned (in a 1:1 ratio in cohort A and in a 4:1 ratio in cohort B) with an interactive response system to escalating-dose subcutaneous IONIS-APO(a)Rx (100 mg, 200 mg, and then 300 mg, once a week for 4 weeks each) or injections of saline placebo, once a week, for 12 weeks. Primary endpoints were mean percentage change in fasting plasma Lp(a) concentration at day 85 or 99 in the per-protocol population (participants who received more than six doses of study drug) and safety and tolerability in the safety population. In a phase 1/2a first-in-man trial, we assessed the effect of IONIS-APO(a)-LRx, a ligand-conjugated antisense oligonucleotide designed to be highly and selectively taken up by hepatocytes, at the BioPharma Services phase 1 unit (Toronto, ON, Canada). Healthy volunteers (Lp[a] ≥75 nmol/L) were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of 10-120 mg IONIS-APO(a)LRx subcutaneously in an ascending-dose design or placebo (in a 3:1 ratio; single-ascending-dose phase), or multiple doses of 10 mg, 20 mg, or 40 mg IONIS-APO(a)LRx subcutaneously in an ascending-dose design or placebo (in an 8:2 ratio) at day 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, and 22 (multiple-ascending-dose phase). Primary endpoints were mean percentage change in

  15. SU-E-T-493: Analysis of the Impact of Range and Setup Uncertainties On the Dose to Brain Stem and Whole Brain in the Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, N; Zhu, X; Zhang, X; Poenisch, F; Li, H; Wu, R; Lii, M; Umfleet, W; Gillin, M; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D [MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of range and setup uncertainties on various dosimetric indices that are used to assess normal tissue toxicities of patients receiving passive scattering proton beam therapy (PSPBT). Methods: Robust analysis of sample treatment plans of six brain cancer patients treated with PSPBT at our facility for whom the maximum brain stem dose exceeded 5800 CcGE were performed. The DVH of each plan was calculated in an Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) version 11 applying ±3.5% range uncertainty and ±3 mm shift of the isocenter in x, y and z directions to account for setup uncertainties. Worst-case dose indices for brain stem and whole brain were compared to their values in the nominal plan to determine the average change in their values. For the brain stem, maximum dose to 1 cc of volume, dose to 10%, 50%, 90% of volume (D10, D50, D90) and volume receiving 6000, 5400, 5000, 4500, 4000 CcGE (V60, V54, V50, V45, V40) were evaluated. For the whole brain, maximum dose to 1 cc of volume, and volume receiving 5400, 5000, 4500, 4000, 3000 CcGE (V54, V50, V45, V40 and V30) were assessed. Results: The average change in the values of these indices in the worst scenario cases from the nominal plan were as follows. Brain stem; Maximum dose to 1 cc of volume: 1.1%, D10: 1.4%, D50: 8.0%, D90:73.3%, V60:116.9%, V54:27.7%, V50: 21.2%, V45:16.2%, V40:13.6%,Whole brain; Maximum dose to 1 cc of volume: 0.3%, V54:11.4%, V50: 13.0%, V45:13.6%, V40:14.1%, V30:13.5%. Conclusion: Large to modest changes in the dosiemtric indices for brain stem and whole brain compared to nominal plan due to range and set up uncertainties were observed. Such potential changes should be taken into account while using any dosimetric parameters for outcome evaluation of patients receiving proton therapy.

  16. Itolizumab in combination with methotrexate modulates active rheumatoid arthritis: safety and efficacy from a phase 2, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, dose-ranging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Arvind; Chandrashekara, S; Iyer, Rajgopalan; Rajasekhar, Liza; Shetty, Naresh; Veeravalli, Sarathchandra Mouli; Ghosh, Alakendu; Merchant, Mrugank; Oak, Jyotsna; Londhey, Vikram; Barve, Abhijit; Ramakrishnan, M S; Montero, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of itolizumab with methotrexate in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had inadequate response to methotrexate. In this open-label, phase 2 study, 70 patients fulfilling American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and negative for latent tuberculosis were randomized to four arms: 0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 mg/kg itolizumab weekly combined with oral methotrexate, and methotrexate alone (2:2:2:1). Patients were treated for 12 weeks, followed by 12 weeks of methotrexate alone during follow-up. Twelve weeks of itolizumab therapy was well tolerated. Forty-four patients reported adverse events (AEs); except for six severe AEs, all others were mild or moderate. Infusion-related reactions mainly occurred after the first infusion, and none were reported after the 11th infusion. No serum anti-itolizumab antibodies were detected. In the full analysis set, all itolizumab doses showed evidence of efficacy. At 12 weeks, 50 % of the patients achieved ACR20, and 58.3 % moderate or good 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS-28) response; at week 24, these responses were seen in 22 and 31 patients. Significant improvements were seen in Short Form-36 Health Survey and Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index scores. Overall, itolizumab in combination with methotrexate was well tolerated and efficacious in RA for 12 weeks, with efficacy persisting for the entire 24-week evaluation period. (Clinical Trial Registry of India, http://ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/login.php , CTRI/2008/091/000295).

  17. Gene expression analysis of volatile-rich male flowers of dioecious Pandanus fascicularis using expressed sequence tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod, M S; Sankararamasubramanian, H M; Priyanka, R; Ganesan, G; Parida, Ajay

    2010-07-15

    Pandanus fascicularis is dioecious with the female plant producing a non-scented fruit while the male produces a flower rich in volatiles. The essential oil extracted from the flowers is economically exploited as a natural flavouring agent as well as for its therapeutic properties. Molecular dissection of this distinct flower for identifying the genes responsible for its aroma by way of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) has not been initiated in spite of its economic viability. A male flower-specific cDNA library was constructed and 977 ESTs were generated. CAP3 analysis performed on the dataset revealed 83 contigs (549 ESTs) and 428 singlets, thereby yielding a total of 511 unigenes. Functional annotation using the BLAST2GO software resulted in 1952 Gene ontology (GO) functional classification terms for 621 sequences. Unknown proteins were further analysed with InterProScan to determine their functional motifs. RNA gel blot analysis of 26 functionally distinct transcripts potentially involved in flowering and volatile generation, using vegetative and reproductive tissues of both the sexes, revealed differential expression profiles. In addition to an overview of genes expressed, candidate genes with expression that are modulated predominantly in the male inflorescence were also identified. This is the first report on generation of ESTs to determine the subset of genes that can be used as potential candidates for future attempts aimed towards its genetic and genome analysis including metabolic engineering of floral volatiles in this economically important plant.

  18. Temporal stability of Symbiodinium phylotype in scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis from a tropicalfringing reef in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Guowei; HUANG Hui; DONG Zhijun; YU Ziniu

    2011-01-01

    Symbiodinium sp.occurs in a symbiotic association with various marine invertebrates,including the scleractinian corals.Understanding the flexibility and specificity in coral-algal symbiosis can have important implications for predicting the future of coral reefs in the era of global climate change.In the present study.we conducted Symbiodinium phylotype analysis,based on polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism ( PCR-RFLP).in the scleractinian coral,Galaxeafascicularis,from a tropical fringing reef in Hainan Island,over a l-yr period.Our results showed that Galaxea fascicularis could associate with Symbiodinium clade C and D either individually or simultaneously.However,during the sampling period,the Symbiodinium phylotype did not change significantly in the scleractinian coral Galaxeafascicularis,although the seawater temperature decreased sharply in the winter season.This study further suggests that the shift in Symbiodinium communities in response to seasonally fluctuating environments might not be a universal feature of coral-algal associations.

  19. Biologic data of Macaca mulatta, Macaca fascicularis, and Saimiri sciureusused for research at the fiocruz primate center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cristina Ribeiro Andrade

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological parameters of laboratory animals used for biomedical research is crucial for following several experimental procedures. With the intent to establish baseline biologic parameters for non-human primates held in closed colonies, hematological and morphometric data of captive monkeys were determined. Data of clinically healthy rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus were collected over a period of five years. Animals were separated according to sex and divided into five age groups. Hematological data were compared with those in the literature by Student's t test. Discrepancies with significance levels of 0.1, 1 or 5% were found in the hematological studies. Growth curves showed that the sexual dimorphism of rhesus monkeys appeared at an age of four years. In earlier ages, the differences between sexes could not be distinguished (p < 0.05. Sexual dimorphism in both squirrel monkeys and cynomolgus monkeys occurred at an age of about 32 months. Data presented in this paper could be useful for comparative studies using primates under similar conditions.

  20. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of a monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 in combination with a statin in patients with hypercholesterolaemia (LAPLACE-TIMI 57): a randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging, phase 2 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Robert P; Desai, Nihar R; Kohli, Payal; Rogers, William J; Somaratne, Ransi; Huang, Fannie; Liu, Thomas; Mohanavelu, Satishkumar; Hoffman, Elaine B; McDonald, Shannon T; Abrahamsen, Timothy E; Wasserman, Scott M; Scott, Robert; Sabatine, Marc S

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds LDL receptors, targeting them for degradation. We therefore assessed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of AMG 145, a human monoclonal IgG2 antibody against PCSK9, in stable patients with hypercholesterolemia on a statin. Methods In a phase 2, dose-ranging study done in 78 centres in the USA, Canada, Denmark, Hungary, and Czech Republic, patients (aged 18–80 years) with LDL-C greater than 2.2 mmol/L on a stable dose of statin (with or without ezetimibe), were randomly assigned equally, through an interactive voice response system, to subcutaneous injections of AMG 145 70 mg, 105 mg, or 140 mg, or matching placebo every 2 weeks; or subcutaneous injections of AMG 145 280 mg, 350 mg, or 420 mg, or matching placebo every 4 weeks. Everyone was masked to treatment assignment within the every 2 weeks and every 4 weeks schedules. The primary endpoint was the percentage change in LDL-C concentration from baseline after 12 weeks. Analysis was by modified intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01380730. Findings 631 patients with hypercholesterolaemia were randomly assigned to AMG 145 70 mg (n=79), 105 mg (n=79), or 140 mg (n=78), or matching placebo (n=78) every 2 weeks; or AMG 145 280 mg (n=79), 350 mg (n=79), and 420 mg (n=80), and matching placebo (n=79) every 4 weeks. At the end of the dosing interval at week 12, the mean LDL-C concentrations were reduced generally dose dependently by AMG 145 every 2 weeks (ranging from 41.8% to 66.1%; p<0.0001 for each dose vs placebo) and AMG 145 every 4 weeks (ranging from 41.8% to 50.3%; p<0.0001). No treatment-related serious adverse events occurred. The frequencies of treatment-related adverse events were similar in the AMG 145 and placebo groups (39 [8%] of 474 vs 11 [7%] of 155); none of these events were severe or life

  1. The trade balance of grooming and its coordination of reciprocation and tolerance in Indonesian long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumert, Michael D; Ho, Moon-Ho R

    2008-07-01

    We collected data on grooming, proximity, and aggression in long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Kalimantan, Indonesia. We used this data to study how grooming influenced a receiver's (B) behavior towards the bout's initiator (A). In our first analysis, post-grooming samples were collected after A groomed B. These were compared to matched-control samples of similar conditions but A had not previously groomed B. This comparison was performed on 26 individuals (16 female, 3 male, 7 immature) and tested whether A's initial act of grooming increased the pair's time in proximity and the amount of time B groomed A. We also tested if A's grooming decreased B's aggression towards A per time in proximity. Rates of B-->A aggression per time in proximity with A for 39 individuals (18 female, 5 male, 16 immature) were compared between post-grooming and focal sample data. Finally, we studied 248 grooming bouts to test if the first two grooming episodes were time matched. We assessed the influence of age, sex, rank and inferred kinship on time matching, and controlled for individual variation and tendency to groom using a general linear mixed model. Our results showed that A-->B grooming acted to increase B-->A grooming and the pair's proximity, while lowering B-->A aggression. Despite these effects, episodes in grooming bouts were generally not matched, except weakly among similar partners (i.e., female pairs and immature pairs). Grooming imbalance was greatest across age-sex class (i.e., male-female and adult-immature pairs). In similar pairs, grooming duration was skewed in favor of high-ranking individuals. We conclude grooming established tolerance and increased the likelihood that grooming reciprocation would occur, but grooming durations were not typically matched within bouts. Lack of time matching may be the result of grooming that is performed to coordinate interchanges of other social services.

  2. Experimental hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis): evidence of active extrahepatic site of HAV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Luciane A; Marchevsky, Renato S; de Paula, Vanessa S; Hooper, Cleber; Freire, Marcos da S; Gaspar, Ana Maria C; Pinto, Marcelo A

    2010-02-01

    This work studied the replication sites of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) after intravenous inoculation. The cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with the Brazilian hepatitis A virus strain (HAF-203). Monkeys were euthanized on days 15, 30, 45 and 60 postinoculation (pi). Liver samples, submandibular salivary gland, mesenteric lymph node and tonsils were removed for virological and pathological evaluation. Immunofluorescence analyses on liver and salivary gland sections using confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the presence of HAV antigen (HAV Ag). The presence of HAV genome was monitored by real-time PCR. The HAV RNA was detected at 7 days postinoculation (dpi), concomitantly in serum, saliva and faeces. The highest HAV viral load was observed in faeces at 15 dpi (10(5) copies/ml), followed by serum viral load of 10(4) copies/ml at 20 dpi and saliva viral load of 10(3 )copies/ml at 7 dpi. The animals showed first histological and biochemical signs of hepatitis at 15 dpi. The HAV antigen (Ag) was present from day 7 until day 60 pi in the liver and salivary glands. The HAV replicative intermediate was also detected in the liver (4.5 x 10(4) copies/mg), salivary glands (1.9 x 10(3) copies/mg), tonsils (4.2 x 10(1) copies/mg) and lymph nodes (3.4 x 10(1) copies/mg). Our data demonstrated that the salivary gland as an extrahepatic site of early HAV replication could create a potential risk of saliva transmitted infection. In addition, the cynomolgus monkey was confirmed as a suitable model to study the pathogenesis of HAV human infection.

  3. The acquisition of Streptococcus mutans by infant monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) and its relationship to the initiation of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighton, D; Hayday, H; Walker, J

    1982-08-01

    The acquisition and transmission of Streptococcus mutans by 16 consecutively born infant monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) was studied. The 16 infant monkeys were weaned in four groups and caged together to form a commune. Transmission from mother to infant occurred infrequently. Streptococcus mutans was isolated from nine of the mothers but only from the dental plaque of two infant monkeys at weaning at which time the predominant streptococci were S. sanguis and S. mitior. One further animal was colonized by S. mutants during the formation of the commune, but only after it was caged with an infant harbouring the same organism. For 46 d after the completion of the commune, the monkeys were fed a starch-based diet during which time S. mutans of serotypes c, e or h were isolated from the faeces of all 16 animals and from the dental plaque taken from the developmental groove of the first deciduous molar of 11 animals. Faecal transmission appeared to be an important factor in the spread of S. mutans between monkeys in the commune. The monkeys were then fed a caries-promoting high sucrose diet resulting in a rapid increase in the proportion of S. mutans in the plaque and in the faeces. Streptococcus mutans serotype e was more frequently isolated from both plaque and faeces and its predominance may in part be due to the production of a bacteriocin active in vitro against S. mutans serotype h and other species of oral streptococci isolated from monkey dental plaque. The proportion of S. mutans in the developmental groove 8 d after the introduction of the high sucrose diet was significantly related to both the caries status of the groove and the total caries score 6 months later. The results suggest that, in this model of human dental caries, S. mutans is the major bacterial factor in the initiation of tooth decay.

  4. Spontaneous cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumor in a juvenile cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaratirwa, Sydney; Rogerson, Petrina; Blanco, Ana L; Naylor, Stuart W; Bradley, Alys

    2012-08-01

    A neoplastic mass compressing the left cerebellar hemisphere and hindbrain was observed at trimming in a 3½-year-old male cynomolgus monkey from a control dose group. Microscopically, the neoplastic mass was nonencapsulated, invasive, and showed two morphological patterns. The predominant area consisted of densely packed undifferentiated, polygonal to spindle cells arranged in vague sheets supported by a scant fibrovascular stroma. The other area was less cellular and composed of round neoplastic cells separated by eosinophilic fibrillar material. Immunohistochemical staining for vimentin, synaptophysin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, neuron-specific enolase, neurofilament, and S-100 confirmed the presence of primitive undifferentiated neuroectodermal cells and some cells with neuronal or glial differentiation. On the basis of histopathology and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumor with neuronal and glial differentiation was made. Primitive neuroectodermal tumors are rare in animals including nonhuman primates; this is the first published report in this species.

  5. Toward reduction in animal sacrifice for drugs: molecular modeling of Macaca fascicularis P450 2C20 for virtual screening of Homo sapiens P450 2C8 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rua, Francesco; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Macaca fascicularis P450 2C20 shares 92% identity with human cytochrome P450 2C8, which is involved in the metabolism of more than 8% of all prescribed drugs. To date, only paclitaxel and amodiaquine, two substrate markers of the human P450 2C8, have been experimentally confirmed as M. fascicularis P450 2C20 drugs. To bridge the lack of information on the ligands recognized by M. fascicularis P450 2C20, in this study, a three-dimensional homology model of this enzyme was generated on the basis of the available crystal structure of the human homologue P450 2C8 using YASARA. The results indicated that 90.0%, 9.0%, 0.5%, and 0.5% of the residues of the P450 2C20 model were located in the most favorable, allowed, generously allowed, and disallowed regions, respectively. The root-mean-square deviation of the C-alpha superposition of the M. fascicularis P450 2C20 model with the Homo sapiens P450 2C8 was 0.074 Å, indicating a very high similarity of the two structures. Subsequently, the 2C20 model was used for in silico screening of 58 known P450 2C8 substrates and 62 inhibitors. These were also docked in the active site of the crystal structure of the human P450 2C8. The affinity of each compound for the active site of both cytochromes proved to be very similar, meaning that the few key residues that are mutated in the active site of the M. fascicularis P450 do not prevent the P450 2C20 from recognizing the same substrates as the human P450 2C8.

  6. The relationship between masseter force and masseter electromyogram during mastication in the monkey Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylander, W L; Johnson, K R

    1989-01-01

    In five adult monkeys, electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from bipolar surface electrodes positioned over the superficial masseter and from bipolar fine-wire electrodes within both the superficial and deep masseter. Relative masseter force was estimated by measuring surface bone strain from the lateral aspect of the zygomatic arch using rosette strain gauges. Multiple step-wise regression procedures demonstrated that peak values of the averaged masseter EMG could often explain a considerable amount of the variation of peak relative masseter force during mastication, i.e. r2 values ranged from 0.23 to 0.96 for the various single-electrode models and R2 values ranged from 0.78 to 0.96 for the various multiple-electrode models. The r2 values for relative masseter force and EMG data from the surface electrodes ranged from 0.69 to 0.96, and, on average, EMG data from surface electrodes provided somewhat more information about overall relative muscle force than data from fine-wire electrodes. The R2 values for a two-electrode model, consisting of data from surface electrodes over the superficial masseter and fine-wire electrodes in the posterior portion of the deep masseter, ranged from 0.78 to 0.95. The latency between the averaged surface EMG and relative muscle force was determined and the data indicated that the surface EMG usually preceded muscle force. This latency tended to decrease gradually throughout the entire power stroke of mastication. At peak values, the surface EMG preceded muscle force by about 22 ms. Towards the end of the power stroke, i.e. the 25% of peak values during unloading, muscle force may actually precede the average EMG.

  7. Functional MRI of brain in macaca fascicularis under alcohol scent stimulation%乙醇气味刺激食蟹猴的脑fMRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐惠; 朱建忠; 孙向东; 赵梦; 李传福

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the fMRl changes of brain in macaca fascicularis with alcohol scent stimulation. Methods Six healthy macaca fascicularis were selected and anesthetized. The block design was "rest-stimulation-rest". fMRI under alcohol scent stimulation and resting state were performed, respectively. The animals inhaled air mixed with 95% alcohol in the stimulation period, while inhaled pure air in rest period. BOLD-fMRI sequences and 128 phases scanning were performed, 16 slices axial images of the entire brain and total 2048 images were obtained. Data were analyzed using SPM2. The outcomes were superposed on the template of macaca fascicularis at last. Random effect mode group analysis was applied in estimating and calculating with f-test Results When alcohol scent stimulation was given, increased or decreased BOLD signals were observed in frontal lobe, temporal lobe, paracentral lobules, cingulate gyri, and lenticular nucleus, and anterior central gyrus, respectively. Conclusion Uncus gyri hippocampi and orbitofrontal are the most advanced center of olfaction. The central reaction induced by scent stimulation had an affinity with paracentral lobule, cingulate gyrus and lenticular nucleus.%目的 应用3.0T fMRI探讨食蟹猴经乙醇气味刺激引起的脑功能活动.方法 选取健康食蟹猴6只,麻醉后行乙醇气味刺激下的fMRI.采取“静息-刺激-静息”组块设计.刺激组块予乙醇气味刺激,静息组块无气味刺激.BOLDfMRI扫描128 phase,整个猴脑扫描16层.采用SPM2软件随机效应模式t检验进行组分析.将统计结果覆盖于食蟹猴模板图像上.结果 乙醇气味刺激下,在额叶、颞叶、中央旁小叶、扣带回、豆状核、中央前回分别可以检测到正激活和负激活.结论 海马回钩和眶额回为嗅觉最高级中枢.fMRI可以显示额叶、颞叶的激活.气味刺激引起的中枢反应与中央旁小叶、扣带回、豆状核有密切关系.

  8. Limited Susceptibility of Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to Leprosy after Experimental Administration of Mycobacterium leprae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gerald P.; Dela Cruz, Eduardo C.; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Tan, Esterlina V.; Fajardo, Tranquilino T.; Villahermosa, Laarni G.; Cellona, Roland V.; Balagon, Maria V.; White, Valerie A.; Saunderson, Paul R.; Walsh, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for human tuberculosis, but susceptibility to M. leprae is unknown. A cynomolgus model of leprosy could increase understanding of pathogenesis—importantly, neuritis and nerve-damaging reactions. We administered viable Mycobacterium leprae to 24 cynomolgus monkeys by three routes, with a median follow-up period of 6 years (range = 1–19 years) involving biopsies, nasal smears, antiphenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) antibody serology, and lepromin skin testing. Most developed evanescent papules at intradermal M. leprae inoculation sites that, on biopsy, showed a robust cellular immune response akin to a lepromin skin test reaction; many produced PGL-1 antibodies. At necropsy, four monkeys, without cutaneous or gross neurological signs of leprosy but with elevated PGL-1 antibodies, including three with nasal smears (+) for acid fast bacilli (AFB), showed histological features, including AFB, suggestive of leprosy at several sites. Overall, however, cynomolgus monkeys seem minimally susceptible to leprosy after experimental M. leprae administration. PMID:22855766

  9. Survey of prevalence of overweight body condition in laboratory-housed cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sharon A; Leslie, Ken E; Pearl, David L; Fournier, Jocelyn; Turner, Patricia V

    2010-07-01

    Excessive weight gain has been reported to occur in captive cynomolgus macaques with little to no change in diet. Overweight body condition can result in development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes and should be avoided. The purpose of this survey was to assess the prevalence of overweight cynomolgus macaques in North American research facilities, including breeding colonies and short-term and long-term facilities, and to describe current methods used to assess body condition. The survey consisted of 51 questions covering animal population demographics, body weight and body condition scoring, feeding, and behavior. Voluntary participants included veterinarians and animal care managers. Respondents from 13 facilities completed the survey, and information was collected on 17,500 cynomolgus macaques. The majority of surveyed facilities housed juvenile and young adult macaques. The reported prevalence of overweight (greater than 10% of ideal body weight) animals ranged between 0% and 20% and reportedly was more frequent in animals younger than 10 y. Most facilities had weight reduction strategies in place. Despite these programs, a significant proportion of animals were reported as being overweight. The results of this survey demonstrate that most North American facilities housing cynomolgus macaques recognize the importance of tracking body condition regularly. However, implementing effective weight reduction programs may be difficult in captive housing environments. Because of the potential for adverse health effects, facilities should have a means of regularly tracking body weight as well as an action plan for managing overweight animals.

  10. Reach–to-grasp movements in macaca fascicularis monkeys: the Isochrony Principle at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa eSartori

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans show a spontaneous tendency to increase the velocity of their movements depending on the linear extent of their trajectory in order to keep execution time approximately constant. Termed the isochrony principle, this compensatory mechanism refers to the observation that the velocity of voluntary movements increases proportionally with their linear extension. Although there is a wealth of psychophysical data regarding isochrony in humans, there is none regarding non-human primates. The present study attempts to fill that gap by investigating reach-to-grasp movement kinematics in free-ranging macaques. Video footage of monkeys grasping objects located at different distances was analyzed frame-by-frame using digitalization techniques. The amplitude of arm peak velocity was found to be correlated with the distance to be covered, and total movement duration remained invariant although target distances varied. Like in humans, the ‘isochrony principle’ seems to be operative as there is a gearing down/up of movement velocity that is proportional to the distance to be covered in order to allow for a relatively constant movement duration. Based on a centrally generated temporal template, this mode of motor programming could be functional in macaques given the high speed and great instability of posture and joint kinematics characterizing their actions. The data presented here take research in the field of comparative motor control a step forward as they are based on precise measurements of spontaneous grasping movements by animals living/acting in their natural environment.

  11. Generation of Macaca fascicularis iPS cell line ATCi-MF1 from adult skin fibroblasts using non-integrative Sendai viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Coppiello

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We generated ATCi-MF1 induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell line from Macaca fascicularis adult skin fibroblasts using non-integrative Sendai viruses carrying OCT3/4, KLF4, SOX2 and c-MYC. Once established, ATCi-MF1 cells present a normal karyotype, are Sendai virus-free and express pluripotency associated markers. Microsatellite markers analysis confirmed the origin of the iPS cells from the parental fibroblasts. Pluripotency was tested with the in vivo teratoma formation assay. ATCi-MF1 cell line may be a useful primate iPS cell model to test different experimental conditions where the use of human cells can imply ethical issues, as microinjection of pluripotent stem cells in pre-implantational embryos.

  12. 小鼠抗食蟹猴IgG单克隆抗体的制备%Preparation Monoclonal Antibodies Of Mice Against Macaca fascicularis IgG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张段玲; 张彦龙; 白素英

    2012-01-01

    目的 制备抗食蟹猴、恒河猴等非人灵长类实验动物免疫球蛋白二级抗体,开展对其传染病血清学快速诊断方法的建立.方法 采用饱和硫酸铵盐析、Agarose-Protein G亲和层析技术,从食蟹猴血清中提纯IgG.经SDS-PAGE电泳鉴定,采用常规法免疫C57BL/6小鼠,三次免疫后取脾细胞与Sp2/0-Agl4骨髓瘤细胞通过PEG4000融合制备杂交瘤细胞,利用间接ELISA、Western blot等方法进行筛选、鉴定.结果 得到5株阳性杂交瘤,分别命名为2B6、2B7、2D9、3B2、5E4,并且5株杂交瘤分泌的抗体均与恒河猴的IgG或血清发生交叉反应,而与其他物种如东北虎、犬等动物的IgG或血清无交叉反应.结论 5株杂交瘤产生的单克隆抗体(McAb)具有较好免疫活性,且能长期、稳定地分泌抗体.此项研究工作为后续研究食蟹猴、恒河猴传染病血清学诊断方法奠定基础.%Objective In order to prepare imraunoglobulin G (IgG) secondary antibody of non-human primates such as Macaca fascicularis and Macaca mulatta and establish a quick serological method to diagnose their diseases. Methods Macaco fascicularis IgG was isolated and purified from Macaco fascicularis serum by precipitated use saturated ammonium sulfate and affinity chromatography technology with Agarose-Protein G. After identified by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis murine monoclonal antibody ( McAb) were produced by conventional immune method and hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibody was produced when C57BL/6 mice was immunized three times and its spleen cells were fused with SP2/0-Agl4 myeloma cells. Indirect ELISA and Western blot methods were used for identification. Result 5 strains of myeloma cells acquired which were named 2B6, 2B7, 3B2, 5E4, 2D9. The antibodies they secret can all react well with both IgG and their serum of Macaco fascicularis and Macaca mulatto. There are no cross reaction with other species such as east-northern tigers and dogs. Conclusion The 5

  13. Reticulospinal neurons in the pontomedullary reticular formation of the monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, S T; Davidson, A G; Buford, J A

    2009-11-10

    Recent neurophysiological studies indicate a role for reticulospinal neurons of the pontomedullary reticular formation (PMRF) in motor preparation and goal-directed reaching in the monkey. Although the macaque monkey is an important model for such investigations, little is known regarding the organization of the PMRF in the monkey. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of reticulospinal neurons in the macaque. Bilateral injections of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) were made into the cervical spinal cord. A wide band of retrogradely labeled cells was found in the gigantocellular reticular nucleus (Gi) and labeled cells continued rostrally into the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC) and into the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO). Additional retrograde tracing studies following unilateral cervical spinal cord injections of cholera toxin subunit B revealed that there were more ipsilateral (60%) than contralateral (40%) projecting cells in Gi, while an approximately 50:50 ratio contralateral to ipsilateral split was found in PnC and more contralateral projections arose from PnO. Reticulospinal neurons in PMRF ranged widely in size from over 50 microm to under 25 microm across the major somatic axis. Labeled giant cells (soma diameters greater than 50 microm) comprised a small percentage of the neurons and were found in Gi, PnC and PnO. The present results define the origins of the reticulospinal system in the monkey and provide an important foundation for future investigations of the anatomy and physiology of this system in primates.

  14. Characterization of Dose in a TC of 64-Detectors used in pediatrics. Evaluation of the effects of the Over beaming and Over ranging; Caracterizacion de dosis en un TC de 64 detectores utilizado en pediatria. Evaluacion de los efectos del Overbeaming y Overranging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Castanon, P.; Roch Gonzalez, M.; Rodriguez Martin, G.; Espana Lopez, M. L.; Giner Sala, M.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the contribution of effects over beaming and over ranging dose received by the patient in a TC multislice with 64 detectors, installed at a children's hospital, for the different acquisition modes available, in order to assess the adequacy of the protocols pre-set for Pediatrics and more accurately assess the received dose. (Author)

  15. Fructosamine reference ranges in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Fritze, Misty J; Smith, Peter C; Zelterman, Daniel; Scholz, Jodi A Carlson

    2011-07-01

    Naturally occurring diabetes mellitus (DM) is common in several species of Old and New World nonhuman primates. Fructosamine values provide important information about recent glycemic control and can be useful in the diagnosis and management of DM. However, despite an abundance of reports in the literature describing spontaneous and induced DM in monkeys, few reference ranges are available for fructosamine. Reference ranges have been published for woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha), cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), and stumptail macaques (Macaca arctoides) but currently are not available for rhesus macaques. At our institution, DM is a common diagnosis in aging rhesus macaques. Here we report a reference range for fructosamine in rhesus macaques. The overall range was 157 to 230 μmol/L, with male rhesus and macaques 10 y or older having significantly higher values than do female rhesus and macaques younger than 10 y, respectively. This range provides clinical veterinarians with an additional tool for evaluating glycemic control in rhesus macaques. Copyright 2011 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

  16. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  17. AVE5026, a new hemisynthetic ultra-low-molecular-weight heparin for the prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients after total knee replacement surgery--TREK: a dose-ranging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, M R; Dahl, O E; Mismetti, P

    2009-01-01

    after total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the dose-response of AVE5026 for the prevention of VTE in patients undergoing TKR surgery. PATIENTS/METHODS: In this parallel-group, double-blind, double-dummy study, 690 patients were randomized, and 678 treated with once....... The primary safety outcome was the incidence of major bleeding. RESULTS: The primary efficacy outcome was assessed in 464 patients. There was a significant dose-response across the five AVE5026 groups for VTE prevention (P....8% in the enoxaparin group and for proximal DVT (P=0.0002). Also, a significant dose-response for AVE5026 was seen for major bleeding (P=0.0231) and any bleeding (P=0.0003). Six patients in the AVE5026 groups, four in the 60 mg group, experienced major bleeding; none did in the enoxaparin group. CONCLUSIONS...

  18. Whole-genome sequencing of six Mauritian Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) reveals a genome-wide pattern of polymorphisms under extreme population bottleneck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Naoki; Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Adeyemi Babarinde, Isaac; Saitou, Naruya; Blancher, Antoine

    2015-03-23

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were introduced to the island of Mauritius by humans around the 16th century. The unique demographic history of the Mauritian cynomolgus macaques provides the opportunity to not only examine the genetic background of well-established nonhuman primates for biomedical research but also understand the effect of an extreme population bottleneck on the pattern of polymorphisms in genomes. We sequenced the whole genomes of six Mauritian cynomolgus macaques and obtained an average of 20-fold coverage of the genome sequences for each individual. The overall level of nucleotide diversity was 23% smaller than that of the Malaysian cynomolgus macaques, and a reduction of low-frequency polymorphisms was observed. In addition, we also confirmed that the Mauritian cynomolgus macaques were genetically closer to a representative of the Malaysian population than to a representative of the Indochinese population. Excess of nonsynonymous polymorphisms in low frequency, which has been observed in many other species, was not very strong in the Mauritian samples, and the proportion of heterozygous nonsynonymous polymorphisms relative to synonymous polymorphisms is higher within individuals in Mauritian than Malaysian cynomolgus macaques. Those patterns indicate that the extreme population bottleneck made purifying selection overwhelmed by the power of genetic drift in the population. Finally, we estimated the number of founding individuals by using the genome-wide site frequency spectrum of the six samples. Assuming a simple demographic scenario with a single bottleneck followed by exponential growth, the estimated number of founders (∼20 individuals) is largely consistent with previous estimates.

  19. A novel wireless recording and stimulating multichannel epicortical grid for supplementing or enhancing the sensory-motor functions in monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippo, Antonio G; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Torres Martinez, Napoleon R; Caramenti, Gian C; Benabid, Alim L; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2015-01-01

    Artificial brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) represent a prospective step forward supporting or replacing faulty brain functions. So far, several obstacles, such as the energy supply, the portability and the biocompatibility, have been limiting their effective translation in advanced experimental or clinical applications. In this work, a novel 16 channel chronically implantable epicortical grid has been proposed. It provides wireless transmission of cortical recordings and stimulations, with induction current recharge. The grid has been chronically implanted in a non-human primate (Macaca fascicularis) and placed over the somato-motor cortex such that 13 electrodes recorded or stimulated the primary motor cortex and three the primary somatosensory cortex, in the deeply anaesthetized animal. Cortical sensory and motor recordings and stimulations have been performed within 3 months from the implant. In detail, by delivering motor cortex epicortical single spot stimulations (1-8 V, 1-10 Hz, 500 ms, biphasic waves), we analyzed the motor topographic precision, evidenced by tunable finger or arm movements of the anesthetized animal. The responses to light mechanical peripheral sensory stimuli (blocks of 100 stimuli, each single stimulus being detection. In conclusion, we propose a chronically implantable epicortical grid which can accommodate most of current technological restrictions, representing an acceptable candidate for BMI experimental and clinical uses.

  20. Range Tracing

    OpenAIRE

    Jenke, Philipp; Huhle, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we tackle the problem of merging an arbitrary number of range scans (depth images) into a single surface mesh. The mesh-based representation is superior to point-based approaches since it contains important connectivity information. Most previous mesh-based merge methods, however, lose surface details by using simplifying intermediate surface representations (e.g.\\ implicit functions). Such details are essential for further processing steps, especially for feature-preserving r...

  1. A Phase I Study of Light Dose for Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) Using 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2 devinyl Pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) for Treatment of Non-small Cell Carcinoma in situ or Non-small Cell Microinvasive Bronchogenic Carcinoma. A Dose Ranging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Demmy, Todd L.; Yendamuri, Sai; Loewen, Gregory; Nwogu, Chukwumere; Cooper, Michele; Henderson, Barbara W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report a phase I trial of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of carcinoma-insitu (CIS) and microinvasive cancer (MIC) of the central airways with the photosensitizer (PS) 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH). HPPH has the advantage of minimal general phototoxicity over the commonly used PS porfimer sodium (Photofrin®). Methods The objectives of this study were 1) to determine the maximally tolerated light dose at a fixed PS dose and 2) to gain initial insight into the effectiveness of this treatment approach. Seventeen patients with 21 CIS/MIC lesions were treated with HPPH with light dose escalation starting from 75 J/cm2 to 85, 95,125, and 150 J/cm2 respectively. Follow-up bronchoscopy for response assessment was done at one and six months, respectively. Results The rate of pathological complete response (CR) was 82.4% (14/17 evaluable lesions; 14 patients) at one-month and 72.7% (8/11 lesions; 8 patients) at 6 months. Only 4 patients developed mild skin erythema. One of the three patients in 150 J/cm2 light dose group experienced a serious adverse event. This patient had respiratory distress due to mucus plugging, which precipitated cardiac ischemia. Two additional patients treated subsequently at this light dose had no adverse events. The third sixth patient in this dose group was not recruited and the study was terminated because of delays in HPPH supply. However, given the observed serious adverse event, it is recommended that the light dose not exceed 125J/cm2. Conclusions PDT with HPPH can be safely used for the treatment of CIS/MIC of the airways, with potential effectiveness comparable to that reported for porfimer sodium in earlier studies. PMID:26718878

  2. A novel wireless recording and stimulating multichannel epicortical grid for supplementing or enhancing the sensory-motor functions in monkey (Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Giuliano Zippo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Artificial brain-machine interfaces (BMIs represent a prospective step forward supporting or replacing faulty brain functions. So far, several obstacles, such as the energy supply, the portability and the biocompatibility, have been limiting their effective translation in advanced experimental or clinical applications. In this work, a novel 16 channel chronically implantable epicortical grid has been proposed. It provides wireless transmission of cortical recordings and stimulations, with induction current recharge. The grid has been chronically implanted in a non-human primate (Macaca fascicularis and placed over the somato-motor cortex such that 13 electrodes recorded or stimulated the primary motor cortex and 3 the primary somatosensory cortex, in the deeply anaesthetized animal. Cortical sensory and motor recordings and stimulations have been performed within 3 months from the implant. In detail, by delivering motor cortex epicortical single spot stimulations (1 to 8V, 1 to 10 Hz, 500ms, biphasic waves, we analyzed the motor topographic precision, evidenced by tunable finger or arm movements of the anesthetized animal. The responses to light mechanical peripheral sensory stimuli (blocks of 100 stimuli, each single stimulus being < 1ms and interblock intervals of 1.5 to 4 s have been analyzed. We found 150 to 250ms delayed cortical responses from fast finger touches, often spread to nearby motor stations. We also evaluated the grid electrical stimulus interference with somatotopic natural tactile sensory processing showing no suppressing interference with sensory stimulus detection. In conclusion, we propose a chronically implantable epicortical grid which can accommodate most of current technological restrictions, representing an acceptable candidate for BMI experimental and clinical uses.

  3. A novel wireless recording and stimulating multichannel epicortical grid for supplementing or enhancing the sensory-motor functions in monkey (Macaca fascicularis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippo, Antonio G.; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Torres Martinez, Napoleon R.; Caramenti, Gian C.; Benabid, Alim L.; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) represent a prospective step forward supporting or replacing faulty brain functions. So far, several obstacles, such as the energy supply, the portability and the biocompatibility, have been limiting their effective translation in advanced experimental or clinical applications. In this work, a novel 16 channel chronically implantable epicortical grid has been proposed. It provides wireless transmission of cortical recordings and stimulations, with induction current recharge. The grid has been chronically implanted in a non-human primate (Macaca fascicularis) and placed over the somato-motor cortex such that 13 electrodes recorded or stimulated the primary motor cortex and three the primary somatosensory cortex, in the deeply anaesthetized animal. Cortical sensory and motor recordings and stimulations have been performed within 3 months from the implant. In detail, by delivering motor cortex epicortical single spot stimulations (1–8 V, 1–10 Hz, 500 ms, biphasic waves), we analyzed the motor topographic precision, evidenced by tunable finger or arm movements of the anesthetized animal. The responses to light mechanical peripheral sensory stimuli (blocks of 100 stimuli, each single stimulus being <1 ms and interblock intervals of 1.5–4 s) have been analyzed. We found 150–250 ms delayed cortical responses from fast finger touches, often spread to nearby motor stations. We also evaluated the grid electrical stimulus interference with somatotopic natural tactile sensory processing showing no suppressing interference with sensory stimulus detection. In conclusion, we propose a chronically implantable epicortical grid which can accommodate most of current technological restrictions, representing an acceptable candidate for BMI experimental and clinical uses. PMID:26029061

  4. The Vgamma2/Vdelta2 T-cell repertoire in Macaca fascicularis: functional responses to phosphoantigen stimulation by the Vgamma2/Jgamma1.2 subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Cristiana; Propp, Nadia; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Colizzi, Vittorio; Pauza, C David

    2005-06-01

    Circulating Vgamma2/Vdelta2 T cells in human and non-human primates respond to small molecular weight non-peptidic phosphoantigens in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted manner. These responses are encoded by the Vgamma2/Jgamma1.2 chain of the T-cell receptor and are positively selected during early development to create a biased repertoire in adults. We characterized the Vgamma2 chain in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to develop a non-human primate model for studying the effects of infection and therapy on the circulating Vgamma2/Vdelta2 T-cell subset. The cynomolgus macaque Vgamma2 chain was highly homologous to the Vgamma2 chain from human beings and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), though we noted conserved substitutions in critical residues within the CDR3 for both macaque species. Despite these substitutions, Vgamma2/Vdelta2+ T cells from cynomolgus monkeys exhibited polyclonal responses to two different phosphoantigens. Proliferative responses were observed with both isopentenylpyrophosphate and alendronate, but stronger interferon-gamma secretory responses were observed with isopentenylpyrophosphate. In vitro stimulation and expansion led to selective outgrowth of the Vgamma2/Jgamma1.2 subset, with a marked shift in the Vgamma2 spectratype. As a result of the less biased starting repertoire for Vgamma2, the cynomolgus macaque constitutes a sensitive model for examining the effects of in vitro or in vivo treatments on the Vgamma2/Vdelta2 T-cell population. Our studies establish the value of cynomolgus macaques as a model for Vgamma2/Vdelta2 T-cell responses to non-peptidic antigens, and further evidence the remarkable evolutionary conservation of this unusual, phosphoantigen-responsive T-cell subset that is found only in primate species.

  5. The Vγ2/Vδ2 T-cell repertoire in Macaca fascicularis: functional responses to phosphoantigen stimulation by the Vγ2/Jγ1.2 subset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Cristiana; Propp, Nadia; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Colizzi, Vittorio; Pauza, C David

    2005-01-01

    Circulating Vγ2/Vδ2 T cells in human and non-human primates respond to small molecular weight non-peptidic phosphoantigens in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted manner. These responses are encoded by the Vγ2/Jγ1.2 chain of the T-cell receptor and are positively selected during early development to create a biased repertoire in adults. We characterized the Vγ2 chain in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to develop a non-human primate model for studying the effects of infection and therapy on the circulating Vγ2/Vδ2 T-cell subset. The cynomolgus macaque Vγ2 chain was highly homologous to the Vγ2 chain from human beings and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), though we noted conserved substitutions in critical residues within the CDR3 for both macaque species. Despite these substitutions, Vγ2/Vδ2+ T cells from cynomolgus monkeys exhibited polyclonal responses to two different phosphoantigens. Proliferative responses were observed with both isopentenylpyrophosphate and alendronate, but stronger interferon-γ secretory responses were observed with isopentenylpyrophosphate. In vitro stimulation and expansion led to selective outgrowth of the Vγ2/Jγ1.2 subset, with a marked shift in the Vγ2 spectratype. As a result of the less biased starting repertoire for Vγ2, the cynomolgus macaque constitutes a sensitive model for examining the effects of in vitro or in vivo treatments on the Vγ2/Vδ2 T-cell population. Our studies establish the value of cynomolgus macaques as a model for Vγ2/Vδ2 T-cell responses to non-peptidic antigens, and further evidence the remarkable evolutionary conservation of this unusual, phosphoantigen-responsive T-cell subset that is found only in primate species. PMID:15885125

  6. Dose rate mapping of VMAT treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, Mark; Antoniu Popescu, I.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Human tissues exhibit a varying response to radiation dose depending on the dose rate and fractionation scheme used. Dose rate effects have been reported for different radiations, and tissue types. The literature indicates that there is not a significant difference in response for low-LET radiation when using dose rates between 1 Gy min-1 and 12 Gy min-1 but lower dose rates have an observable sparing effect on tissues and a differential effect between tissues. In intensity-modulated radiotherapy such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) the dose can be delivered with a wide range of dose rates. In this work we developed a method based on time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations to quantify the dose rate frequency distribution for clinical VMAT treatments for three cancer sites, head and neck, lung, and pelvis within both planning target volumes (PTV) and normal tissues. The results show a wide range of dose rates are used to deliver dose in VMAT and up to 75% of the PTV can have its dose delivered with dose rates  organs at risk. Two VMAT plans that fulfil the same dose objectives and constraints may be delivered with different dose rate distributions, particularly when comparing single arcs to multiple arc plans. It is concluded that for dynamic plans, the dose rate range used varies to a larger degree than previously assumed. The effect of the dose rate range in VMAT on clinical outcome is unknown.

  7. Effects of MDMA Injections on the Behavior of Socially-Housed Long-Tailed Macaques (Macaca fascicularis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ballesta

    Full Text Available 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methyl amphetamine (MDMA is one of the few known molecules to increase human and rodent prosocial behaviors. However, this effect has never been assessed on the social behavior of non-human primates. In our study, we subcutaneously injected three different doses of MDMA (1.0, 1.5 or 2.0mg/kg to a group of three, socially housed, young male long-tailed macaques. More than 200 hours of behavioral data were recorded, during 68 behavioral sessions, by an automatic color-based video device that tracked the 3D positions of each animal and of a toy. This data was then categorized into 5 exclusive behaviors (resting, locomotion, foraging, social contact and object play. In addition, received and given social grooming was manually scored. Results show several significant dose-dependent behavioral effects. At 1.5mg/kg only, MDMA induces a significant increase in social grooming behavior, thus confirming the prosocial effect of MDMA in macaques. Additionally, at 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg MDMA injection substantially decreases foraging behavior, which is consistent with the known anorexigenic effect of this compound. Furthermore, at 2.0 mg/kg MDMA injection induces an increase in locomotor behavior, which is also in accordance with its known stimulant property. Interestingly, MDMA injected at 1.0mg/kg increases the rate of object play, which might be interpreted as a decrease of the inhibition to manipulate a unique object in presence of others, or, as an increase of the intrinsic motivation to manipulate this object. Together, our results support the effectiveness of MDMA to study the complex neurobiology of primates' social behaviors.

  8. 钙化积分扫描缩短冠脉CTA扫描范围及降低辐射量的作用%Effect of calcium scoring scan in reducing scan range and radiation dose in retrospectively ECG-gated CT coronary angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付维东; 龚建平; 宦坚; 张伟; 张博; 乔方

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To find out a way of reducing scan range in retrospectively ECG-gated CT coronary angiography in order to reduce the radiation dose. Methods: Forty consecutive patients were analyzed retrospectively. The scan range of CT coronary angiography derived respectively from the scout view and from the axial images of calcium scoring were compared. The former was assumed to be determined from 1cm under the trachea carina to 2cm under the inferior margin of the heart. The latter was performed by identifying the left anterior descending coronary artery and posterior descending coronary artery and adding lcm cranially and caudally. Effective radiation doses were calculated for CT coronary angiography using both scout view-derived and calcium scoring-derived scan range. Results: The calcium scoring-derived range was (10. 40+.0. 60)cm; while the scout view-derived range was (12. 5 ± 0. 94)cm which was significantly larger than that of using the calcium scoring-derived scan (t = 17. 31,P<0. 01). The average difference between them was (2. 09±0. 76)cm, corresponding to a radiation dose reduction of (1. 67 ±0. 72)mSv. After offsetting the dose given for the calcium scoring scan,the savings in radiation exposure when using a calcium scoring-derived instead of a scout view-derived scan range for CT coronary angiography -including the radiation dose of the calcium scoring scan and the test bolus scan- was (1. 25 + 0. 72)mSv (t=10. 92.P<0. 01) ,which accounted for a dose reduction of 9. 20%. Conclusion:Using the images from calcium scoring instead of the scout view to determine the scan range of contrast-unenhanced CT coronary angiography can effectively decrease the scan range and reduce the radiation dose significantly.%目的:探讨使用钙化积分扫描缩短增强扫描范围以降低后门控冠状动脉CTA检查辐射量的临床应用价值.方法:40例患者行冠脉钙化积分及冠脉CTA检查,其增强扫描的实际扫描范围根据钙化积分扫描图

  9. A randomized, dose-ranging assessment of the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of a combined diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus-Hemophilus influenzae type b (DTPw-HBV-IPV/Hib) vaccine vs. co-administration of DTPw-HBV/Hib and IPV vaccines in 12 to 24 months old Filipino toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiambao, Beatriz; Van Der Meeren, Olivier; Kolhe, Devayani; Gatchalian, Salvacion

    2012-03-01

    As progress toward global poliovirus eradication continues, more and more countries are moving away from use of oral poliovirus vaccines (OPV) to inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPV) in national vaccination schedules. Reduction of antigen dose in IPV could increase manufacturing capacity and facilitate the change from OPV to IPV. Combination vaccines reduce the number of injections required to complete vaccination, thus playing an important role in maintaining high vaccine coverage with good public acceptability. Three formulations of a combined, candidate hexavalent diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus-Hemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (DTPw-HBV-IPV/Hib, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) differing only in IPV antigen content (full-dose, half-dose and one-third dose as compared with available stand-alone IPV vaccines), were evaluated when administered to healthy toddlers. Controls received separately administered licensed DTPw-HBV/Hib and IPV vaccines. Immunogenicity was assessed before and one month after vaccination. Safety and reactogenicity data were assessed for 30 d after vaccination. A total of 312 Filipino children were vaccinated in their second year of life. Each DTPw-HBV-IPV/Hib formulation was non-inferior to control in terms of pre-defined criteria for IPV immunogenicity. Post-vaccination GMTs against each poliovirus type were increased between 4.2- and 37.9-fold over pre-vaccination titers. Non-inferiority to other vaccine antigens was also demonstrated. The safety profile of the 3 DTPw-HBV-IPV/Hib formulations resembled licensed DTPw-HBV/Hib Kft and IPV in terms of the frequency and intensity of adverse reactions after vaccination. Further investigation of DTPw-HBV-IPV/Hib containing reduced quantity of IPV antigen for primary vaccination in infants is warranted. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT number: NCT01106092.

  10. A randomized, dose-ranging assessment of the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of a combined diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus-Hemophilus influenzae type b (DTPw-HBV-IPV/Hib) vaccine vs. co-administration of DTPw-HBV/Hib and IPV vaccines in 12 to 24 months old Filipino toddlers

    OpenAIRE

    Quiambao, Beatriz; Van Der Meeren, Olivier; Kolhe, Devayani; Gatchalian, Salvacion

    2012-01-01

    As progress toward global poliovirus eradication continues, more and more countries are moving away from use of oral poliovirus vaccines (OPV) to inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPV) in national vaccination schedules. Reduction of antigen dose in IPV could increase manufacturing capacity and facilitate the change from OPV to IPV. Combination vaccines reduce the number of injections required to complete vaccination, thus playing an important role in maintaining high vaccine coverage with good...

  11. Radiation dose in neurological computed tomographic scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitmore, R.C.; Bushong, S.C.; Archer, B.A.; Glaze, S.A.

    1979-07-01

    Patient dose and dose distribution during neurologicl computed tomography examinations were determined with five different computed tomography scanners. Maximum intracranial doses ranged from 1.17 to 2.67 rads. Doses to the lens of the eye ranged from 0.23 to 2.81 rads. These levels are considered and compared with patient doses reported for other computed tomography studies and for conventional tomographic examinations. In general, patient dose during computer tomographic examinations is less than one quarter of that during conventional tomography of the head.

  12. Molecular composition of drusen and possible involvement of anti-retinal autoimmunity in two different forms of macular degeneration in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Michihiro T; Okamoto, Haru; Ono, Fumiko; Mizota, Atsushi; Terao, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Iwata, Takeshi

    2005-10-01

    We have previously reported a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) pedigree with early onset macular degeneration that develops drusen at 2 yr after birth. In this study, the molecular composition of drusen in monkeys affected with late onset and early onset macular degeneration was both characterized. Involvement of anti-retinalautoimmunity in the deposition of drusen and the pathogenesis of the disease was also evaluated. Funduscopic and histological examinations were performed on 278 adult monkeys (mean age=16.94 yr) for late onset macular degeneration. The molecular composition of drusen was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and/or direct proteome analysis using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). Anti-retinal autoantibodies in sera were screened in 20 affected and 10 age-matched control monkeys by Western blot techniques. Immunogenic molecules were identified by 2D electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Relative antibody titer against each antigen was determined by ELISA in sera from 42 affected (late onset) and 41 normal monkeys. Yellowish-white spots in the macular region were observed in 90 (32%) of the late onset monkeys that were examined. Histological examination demonstrated that drusen or degenerative retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells were associated with the pigmentary abnormalities. Drusen in both late and early onset monkeys showed immunoreactivities for apolipoprotein E, amyloid P component, complement component C5, the terminal C5b-9 complement complex, vitronectin, and membrane cofactor protein. LC-MS/MS analyses identified 60 proteins as constituents of drusen, including a number of common components in drusen of human age-related macular degeneration (AMD), such as annexins, crystallins, immunoglobulins, and complement components. Half of the affected monkeys had single or multiple autoantibodies against 38, 40, 50, and 60 kDa retinal proteins. The reacting antigens of 38 and 40 kDa were identified as annexin II and mu

  13. 大交角近景影像的仿射不变特征匹配方法研究%Method of affine invariant feature matching for large-angle and dose-range images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁艳; 盛业华; 杨林

    2013-01-01

    针对近景数字摄影测量中大交角影像的匹配问题,本文提出了一种仿射不变特征提取与匹配方法.该方法集成Hessain-Affine和MSER特征检测算法提取一定数量的仿射不变特征区域,并将提取的椭圆形特征区域归一化处理为圆形区域,再用SIFT特征描述算子对特征区域进行描述,然后进行基于距离的粗匹配,最后在核线约束下进行精匹配.实验表明,本文的方法在对大交角近景图像进行匹配时,可以得到相对多数量的匹配对和较高的正确匹配率,具有很好的稳定性和鲁棒性.%To solve such problem for matching the large-angle and close-range images of digital photogrammetry, the affine invariant feature extraction and matching method was proposed in the paper. The method integrated Hessain-Affine and MSER algorithms to extract certain number of affine invariant regions, normalized irregular feature areas into circle areas, and described them with SIFT descriptor, then roughly matched based on the distance, finally, in order to improve the accuracy of matching, fine matching on the epi-polar constraint was carried out. The experiments showed that this method could get the relatively large amount of matched point pairs and higher matching auuracy rate with good stability and robustness in matching the large-angle and close-range images.

  14. Variation in hair δ13C and δ15N values in long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) from Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Michael A.; Castellini, J. Margaret; Stricker, Craig A.; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Lee, Benjamin P.Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the primatology literature on stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) has focused on African and New World species, with comparatively little research published on Asian primates. Here we present hair δ13C and δ15N isotope values for a sample of 33 long-tailed macaques from Singapore. We evaluate the suggestion by a previous researcher that forest degradation and biodiversity loss in Singapore have led to a decline in macaque trophic level. The results of our analysis indicated significant spatial variability in δ13C but not δ15N. The range of variation in δ13C was consistent with a diet based on C3 resources, with one group exhibiting low values consistent with a closed canopy environment. Relative to other macaque species from Europe and Asia, the macaques from Singapore exhibited a low mean δ13C value but mid-range mean δ15N value. Previous research suggesting a decline in macaque trophic level is not supported by the results of our study.

  15. Dose rate mapping of VMAT treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, Mark; Popescu, I Antoniu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Human tissues exhibit a varying response to radiation dose depending on the dose rate and fractionation scheme used. Dose rate effects have been reported for different radiations, and tissue types. The literature indicates that there is not a significant difference in response for low-LET radiation when using dose rates between 1 Gy min(-1) and 12 Gy min(-1) but lower dose rates have an observable sparing effect on tissues and a differential effect between tissues. In intensity-modulated radiotherapy such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) the dose can be delivered with a wide range of dose rates. In this work we developed a method based on time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations to quantify the dose rate frequency distribution for clinical VMAT treatments for three cancer sites, head and neck, lung, and pelvis within both planning target volumes (PTV) and normal tissues. The results show a wide range of dose rates are used to deliver dose in VMAT and up to 75% of the PTV can have its dose delivered with dose rates  <1 Gy min(-1). Pelvic plans on average have a lower mean dose rate within the PTV than lung or head and neck plans but a comparable mean dose rate within the organs at risk. Two VMAT plans that fulfil the same dose objectives and constraints may be delivered with different dose rate distributions, particularly when comparing single arcs to multiple arc plans. It is concluded that for dynamic plans, the dose rate range used varies to a larger degree than previously assumed. The effect of the dose rate range in VMAT on clinical outcome is unknown.

  16. Organ Doses and Effective Doses in Pediatric Radiography: Patient-Dose Survey in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiljunen, T.; Tietaevaeinen, A.; Parviainen, T.; Viitala, A.; Kortesniemi, M. (Radiation Practices Regulation, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Use of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology permits the radiation exposure of diverse diagnostic procedures to be quantified. Fundamental knowledge of patient doses enhances the implementation of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. Purpose: To provide comparative information on pediatric examination protocols and patient doses in skull, sinus, chest, abdominal, and pelvic radiography examinations. Material and Methods: 24 Finnish hospitals were asked to register pediatric examination data, including patient information and examination parameters and specifications. The total number of examinations in the study was 1916 (1426 chest, 228 sinus, 96 abdominal, 94 skull, and 72 pelvic examinations). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and dose-area products (DAP) were calculated retrospectively or DAP meters were used. Organ doses and effective doses were determined using a Monte Carlo program (PCXMC). Results: There was considerable variation in examination protocols between different hospitals, indicating large variations in patient doses. Mean effective doses of different age groups ranged from 5 muSv to 14 muSv in skull and sinus examinations, from 25 muSv to 483 muSv in abdominal examinations, and from 6 muSv to 48 muSv in chest examinations. Conclusion: In chest and sinus examinations, the amount of data was extensive, allowing national pediatric diagnostic reference levels to be defined. Parameter selection in pediatric examination protocols should be harmonized in order to reduce patient doses and improve optimization

  17. The Establishment of Environmental Endocrine Disruptors Induced Precocious Puberty Macaca Fascicularis Model and the Intervention of Yin Nourishing Fire Purging Chinese Materia Medica%由环境内分泌干扰物引致食蟹猴性早熟疾病模型建立及滋阴泻火中药治疗干预的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱琳; 蔡德培

    2012-01-01

    目的 建立灵长类--食蟹猴的由环境内分泌干扰物(environmental endocrine disruptors,EEDs)引致的性早熟疾病模型,验证滋阴泻火中药对EEDs拟雌激素活性的拮抗作用.方法 (1)不同月龄组青春前期雌性食蟹猴喂饲高、低剂量EEDs,通过观察EEDs拟雌激素作用,以确定最佳月龄、染毒剂量及染毒时间.(2)15只青春前期雌性食蟹猴随机分为染毒组、治疗组及对照组,每组5只.染毒组喂饲壬基酚(nonylphenol,4-NP)及双酚A(bisphenol,BPA),治疗组将染毒物质及滋阴泻火中药合剂同时喂饲,对照组喂饲溶剂玉米油.疗程4周.疗程完成时,检测血清雌激素水平、阴道脱落细胞成熟指数,取出子宫,测定其子宫湿重、子宫内膜及环形平滑肌厚度、子宫内膜上皮细胞及腺上皮细胞高度.结果 (1)20月龄为最佳染毒月龄,低剂量EEDs为最佳染毒剂量,4周为最佳染毒时间.(2)与对照组比较,染毒组血清雌激素水平明显升高,阴道脱落细胞成熟指数显著增加,子宫湿重、子宫内膜厚度及环形平滑肌厚度、子宫内膜上皮细胞及腺上皮细胞高度显著增加(P<0.05).与染毒组比较,治疗组上述指标均显著降低(P<0.05).结论 本研究成功地建立了灵长类--食蟹猴由EEDs引致性早熟的疾病模型,证实了EEDs具有显著的拟雌激素活性,并验证了滋阴泻火中药合剂对其拟雌激素活性具有显著的拮抗作用.%Objective To establish the environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) induced precocious puberty macaca fascicularis model, thus verifying the antagonism of yin nourishing fire purging Chinese materia medica (YNFPCMM) against the estrogenic effects. Methods (1) The female prepubescent monkeys at different months old were fed with high dose and low dose EEDs. By observing EEDs' estrogenic effects, the optimal age, the optimal exposure dose, and the optimal exposure time were determined. (2) Fifteen female prepubescent monkeys were

  18. Comparative research of Symbiodinium diversity associated with two color morphs of reef-building coral Galaxea fascicularis%丛生盔形珊瑚的2种颜色群体共生藻组成比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周国伟; 黄晖; 喻子牛; 尤丰; 李秀保

    2011-01-01

    造礁石珊瑚与共生藻 Symbiodinium spp.的互利共生对维护多样性极为丰富的珊瑚礁生态系统至关重要.在受到诸如水温异常等环境胁迫时,宿主珊瑚会排出体内共生藻而导致珊瑚白化直至死亡.造礁石珊瑚群体丰富的颜色对于珊瑚适应环境有着重要的作用,即使是同种造礁石珊瑚的不同群体,它们在颜色上也会有差异.丛生盔形珊瑚 Galaxea.fascicularis 作为印度-太平洋区系常见种广泛分布于海南三亚珊瑚礁海域,不同群体的颜色相异.对绿色和褐色2种颜色的丛生盔形珊瑚群体共生藻的28S rDNA进行限制性片段长度多态性(polymerase chainreaction-restrictionfragmentlength polymorphism,PCR-RFLP)分析,结果显示,该珊瑚可以与C和D系群共生藻分别或同时共生.此外,丛生盔形珊瑚2种颜色群体的共生藻组成并无显著差异,表明珊瑚群体的颜色差异与共生藻的组成并无直接联系.影响珊瑚表型颜色的因素复杂,包括珊瑚的绿色荧光蛋白(green fluorescent protein,GFP)、珊瑚和共生藻的各种色素等,具体机理需要进一步研究.%The symbiotic association between corals and Symbiodinium is a major contributing factor in the success of coral reef ecosystem with high biodiversity.Under stressful environmental conditions, such as abnormally high water temperatures, this symbiosis can break down and the zooxanthellae are lost in a process known as "bleaching", which can cause the death of corals if stresses are severe or persistent.Reef-building corals have diverse colors even in different colonies within the same species, and the color plays a key role in acclimation of coral to environment.Galaxea fascicularis is a common reef-building coral in the Indo-Pacific area, including the coral reef areas in Sanya, Hainan Island, and displays a variety colors even with different colonies.The authors used PCR-RFLP to investigate whether or not variation in color is associated

  19. 食蟹猴动物实验在PET/CT扫描检查中的注意事项%Guidelines for PET/CT scanography in animal experiment of Macaca fascicularis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪文; 秦朝军

    2012-01-01

    Objective To search for the best scanning parameters of PET/CT scanning examination in animal experiment of Macaca fascicularis, and to obtain the best images. Methods One male and one female monkeys respectively received the CT multiparameter scanning and PET multi - time period dynamic tomoscan. Results When the scanning conditions were 420 mAs and 120 kV,the best resolution ratio and the lightest constructed defect could be obtained. In the images of PET multi - time period dynamic tomoscan, the best image effects could be obtained from the images within 40-60 min. Conclusion Before the animal experiment of Macaca fascicularis on the PET/CT machine, the monkeys should receive the pre - scanning. And the best scanning parameters should be selected in order to obtain satisfactory results in the experiment.%目的 寻找食蟹猴动物实验在PET/CT扫描检查中最佳的扫描参数,获得最佳图像.方法 两只食蟹猴为一雄一雌,对两只食蟹猴分别采用CT多参数扫描和PET的多时段动态断层扫描.结果 扫描条件采用420 mAs、120 kV时,可以获得最佳的图像分辨率和最轻的伪影.PET扫描多时段动态断层扫描的图像中,40~60 min的图像可以获得最佳图像效果.结论 食蟹猴在PET/CT机上行动物实验前,应进行预扫描,选择最佳的扫描参数,才能获得满意的实验结果.

  20. Simplified Warfarin Dose-response Pharmacodynamic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seongho; Gaweda, Adam E.; Wu, Dongfeng; Li, Lang; Shesh N Rai; Brier, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Warfarin is a frequently used oral anticoagulant for long-term prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events. Due to its narrow therapeutic range and large inter-individual dose-response variability, it is highly desirable to personalize warfarin dosing. However, the complexity of the conventional kinetic-pharmacodynamic (K-PD) models hampers the development of the personalized dose management. To avert this challenge, we propose simplified PD models for warfarin dose-response relationshi...

  1. Methotrexate Dosing Regimen for Plaque-type Psoriasis: A Systematic Review of the Use of Test-dose, Start-dose, Dosing Scheme, Dose Adjustments, Maximum Dose and Folic Acid Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menting, Stef P; Dekker, Paul M; Limpens, Jacqueline; Hooft, Lotty; Spuls, Phyllis I

    2016-01-01

    There is a range of methotrexate dosing regimens for psoriasis. This review summarizes the evidence for test-dose, start-dose, dosing scheme, dose adjustments, maximum dose and use of folic acid. A literature search for randomized controlled trials and guidelines was performed. Twenty-three randomized controlled trials (29 treatment groups) and 10 guidelines were included. Two treatment groups used a test-dose, 5 guidelines recommend it. The methotrexate start-dose in randomized controlled trials varied from 5 to 25 mg/week, most commonly being either 7.5 mg or 15 mg. Guidelines vary from 5 to 15 mg/week. Methotrexate was administered as a single dose or in a Weinstein schedule in 15 and 11 treatment-groups, respectively; both recommended equally in guidelines. A fixed dose (n = 18), predefined dose (n = 3), or dose adjusted on clinical improvement (n = 8) was used, the last also being recommended in guidelines. Ten treatment groups used folic acid; in 2 it was allowed, in 14 not mentioned, and in 3 no folic acid was used. Most guidelines recommend the use of folic acid. Authors' suggestions for methotrexate dosing are given.

  2. Dose-Finding when the Target Dose Is on a Plateau of a Dose-Response Curve: Comparison of Fully Sequential Designs

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Xiao, Changfu

    2013-01-01

    Consider the problem of estimating a dose with a certain response rate. Many multistage dose-finding designs for this problem were originally developed for oncology studies where the mean dose-response is strictly increasing in dose. In non-oncology Phase II dose-finding studies the dose-response curve often plateaus in the range of interest and there are several doses with the mean response equal to the target. In this case it is usually of interest to find the lowest of these doses since hi...

  3. Telmisartan and Insulin Resistance in HIV (TAILoR): protocol for a dose-ranging phase II randomised open-labelled trial of telmisartan as a strategy for the reduction of insulin resistance in HIV-positive individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpakom, Sudeep P; Taylor, Claire; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi; Spowart, Catherine; Vora, Jiten; García-Fiñana, Marta; Kemp, Graham J; Whitehead, John; Jaki, Thomas; Khoo, Saye; Williamson, Paula; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2015-10-15

    Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, has beneficial effects on insulin resistance and cardiovascular health in non-HIV populations. This trial will evaluate whether telmisartan can reduce insulin resistance in HIV-positive individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy. This is a phase II, multicentre, randomised, open-labelled, dose-ranging trial of telmisartan in 336 HIV-positive individuals over a period of 48 weeks. The trial will use an adaptive design to inform the optimal dose of telmisartan. Patients will be randomised initially 1:1:1:1 to receive one of the three doses of telmisartan (20, 40 and 80 mg) or no intervention (control). An interim analysis will be performed when half of the planned maximum of 336 patients have been followed up for at least 24 weeks. The second stage of the study will depend on the results of interim analysis. The primary outcome measure is a reduction in insulin resistance (as measured by Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR)) in telmisartan treated arm(s) after 24 weeks of treatment in comparison with the non-intervention arm. The secondary outcome measures include changes in lipid profile; body fat redistribution (as measured by MRI); plasma and urinary levels of various biomarkers of cardiometabolic and renal health at 12, 24 and 48 weeks. Serious adverse events will be compared between different telmisartan treated dose arm(s) and the control arm. The study, this protocol and related documents have been approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee North West-Liverpool Central (Ref: 12/NW/0214). On successful completion, study data will be shared with academic collaborators. The findings from TAILoR will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, at scientific conferences, the media and through patient and public involvement. 04196/0024/001-0001; 2012-000935-18; 51069819. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  4. Dose banding as an alternative to body surface area-based dosing of chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Chatelut (Etienne); M.L. White-Koning (M.); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); F. Puisset (F.); S.D. Baker (Sharyn); A. Sparreboom (Alex)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Dose banding is a recently suggested dosing method that uses predefined ranges (bands) of body surface area (BSA) to calculate each patients dose by using a single BSA-value per band. Thus, drugs with sufficient long-term stability can be prepared in advance. The main advanta

  5. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  6. Clinical experience with daily doses of misonidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogelnik, H.D.; Reinartz, G.; Szepesi, T.; Seitz, W.; Wurst, F.; Mamoli, B.; Wessely, P.; Stark, H.

    1980-11-01

    In this pilot study daily low doses of misonidazole (in the range of 1 to 2 g) up to cumulative doses between 7 and 19 g/m/sup 2/ were used. Serum levels were analysed at different times after administration and according to several dose regimens. We related the cumulative doses to the incidence and severity of the observed peripheral neuropathies. The aim was to find an effective daily low-dose schedule of misonidazole with a clinically acceptable incidence of side effects. Some impressive clinical responses were observed.

  7. 靶向食蟹猴NTCP基因的CRISPR/Cas9系统gRNA筛选%gRNA Screening of CRISPR/Cas9 System Targeting Macaca fascicularis NTCP Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐桂利; 高新; 刘铮铸; 巩元芳; 宋海峰

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to screen gRNA of efficient knockout activity targeting Macaca fascicularis NTCP gene by the CRISPR/Cas9 enzyme digestion method and PCR amplification methods in vitro .Comparing NTCP gene sequences between Macaca fascicularis and human,the sequences of NTCP gene coding amino acid 84 to 87 and 157 to 1 65 were chosen as gene knockout targets.3 to 4 candidate gRNA sequences were designed in two target sequence regions through gRNA software.By screening cleavage activity targeting NTCP gene in vitro ,gRNA1.2 and gRNA2.1 were selected and inserted into pLV hUbC-Cas9-T2A-GFP plasmid,respectively.The genome DNA was extracted from primary hepatocytes after gRNA1.2 and gRNA2.1 being trans-ferred,respectively.Then NTCP sequences were amplified by PCR and sequenced by being cloned into T vector.The results indicated that compared to gRNA1.2,gRNA2.1 had much higher activ-ity to make a frame-shift mutation in NTCP gene.This study laid a theoretical foundation for fur-ther editing NTCP gene and its biological function in Macaca fascicularis .%本研究旨在通过 CRISPR/Cas9体外酶切法及细胞水平上的 PCR 扩增测序筛选出靶向食蟹猴 NTCP 基因具有高敲除活性的 gRNA。首先通过比对食蟹猴与人类 NTCP 氨基酸序列,选择差异位点,即第84—87位和第157—165位氨基酸作为基因靶点序列区;利用 gRNA 软件设计针对上述基因靶点序列的 gRNA,每个靶点设计3~4条候选 gRNA 序列;然后利用 gRNA 体外检测试剂盒,筛选出靶向 NTCP 基因的体外敲除活性较高的两条gRNA 序列:gRNA1.2和 gRNA2.1。将 gRNA1.2和 gRNA2.1分别插入 pLV hUbC-Cas9-T2A-GFP 载体中,转染食蟹猴原代肝细胞。提取转染后细胞基因组 DNA,通过 PCR 扩增 NTCP 基因并将其克隆到 T 载体中进行测序分析。结果表明,gRNA1.2和 gRNA2.1均可使 NTCP 基因产生移码突变,但 gRNA2.1比 gRNA1.2具有更高的敲除活性。本研究为下一步编辑食蟹猴 NTCP

  8. Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor (DDREF); Der Dosis- und Dosisleistungs-Effektivitaetsfaktor (DDREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2016-08-01

    For practical radiation protection purposes it is supposed that stochastic radiation effects a determined by a proportional dose relation (LNT). Radiobiological and radiation epidemiological studies indicated that in the low dose range a dependence on dose rates might exist. This would trigger an overestimation of radiation risks based on the LNT model. OCRP had recommended a concept to combine all effects in a single factor DDREF (dose and dose-Rate effectiveness factor). There is still too low information on cellular mechanisms of low dose irradiation including possible repair and other processes. The Strahlenschutzkommission cannot identify a sufficient scientific justification for DDREF and recommends an adaption to the actual state of science.

  9. Estimating thyroid dose in pediatric CT exams from surface dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Senan, Rani; Mueller, Deborah L.; Hatab, Mustapha R.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of estimating pediatric thyroid doses from CT using surface neck doses. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neck surface dose of 25 children ranging in ages between one and three years old. The neck circumference for each child was measured. The relationship between obtained surface doses and thyroid dose was studied using acrylic phantoms of various sizes and with holes of different depths. The ratios of hole-to-surface doses were used to convert patients' surface dose to thyroid dose. ImPACT software was utilized to calculate thyroid dose after applying the appropriate age correction factors. A paired t-test was performed to compare thyroid doses from our approach and ImPACT. The ratio of thyroid to surface dose was found to be 1.1. Thyroid doses ranged from 20 to 80 mGy. Comparison showed no statistical significance (p = 0.18). In addition, the average of surface dose variation along the z-axis in helical scans was studied and found to range between 5% (in 10 cm diameter phantom/24 mm collimation/pitch 1.0) and 8% (in 16 cm diameter phantom/12 mm collimation/pitch 0.7). We conclude that surface dose is an acceptable predictor for pediatric thyroid dose from CT. The uncertainty due to surface dose variability may be reduced if narrower collimation is used with a pitch factor close to 1.0. Also, the results did not show any effect of thyroid depth on the measured dose.

  10. Benchmark Dose Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finite doses are employed in experimental toxicology studies. Under the traditional methodology, the point of departure (POD) value for low dose extrapolation is identified as one of these doses. Dose spacing necessarily precludes a more accurate description of the POD value. ...

  11. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  12. Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from indoor and outdoor gamma dose rate of university of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, ... In addition, the excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) calculated for indoor exposure ranges ...

  13. Can digoxin dose requirements be predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, S M; Mawer, G E; Rodgers, M; Woodcock, B G; Lucas, S B

    1976-04-01

    A search for patient variables relevant to digoxin dose requirements was made in fourty-three patients with a wide range of renal and hepatic function. The daily dose of digoxin to achieve a mean serum concentration of 1.5 ng/ml, the standardized dose, was calculated for each patient. The standardized dose correlated significantly with the following variables, in descending order of correlation coefficient; creatinine clearance, serum creatinine concentration, body weight and serum albumin concentration. An equation containing the two independent variables, creatinine clearance and serum albumin concentration, had a significantly stronger correlation with standardized dose than creatinine clearance alone. Attempts were made in each patient to predict the standardized dose using both empirical prescribing methods and the published nomograms. Although a maximum of 70% of the variance of the standardized dose was explained, this corresponded approximately to one patient in three having a predicted dose outside the 95% confidnece limits for the standardized dose. There remain important sources of individual variation in digoxin dose requirements yet to be identified. Future application of empirical prescribing methods, such as multiple linear regression and Bayes' theorem, to prescription for large, defined patient groups may improve dose prediction for individual patients.

  14. Dose Effects of Ion Beam Exposure on Deinococcus Radiodurans: Survival and Dose Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To explore the survival and dose response of organism for different radiation sources is of great importance in the research of radiobiology. In this study, the survival-dose response of Deinococcus radiodurans (E.coli, as the control) for ultra-violet (UV), γ-rays radiation and ion beam exposure was investigated. The shoulder type of survival curves were found for both UV and γ-ray ionizing radiation, but the saddle type of survival curves were shown for H+ 、 N+( 20keV and 30keV) and Ar+ beam exposure. This dose effect of the survival initially decreased withthe increase in dose and then increased in the high dose range and finally decreased again in thehigher dose range. Our experimental results suggest that D. radiodurans, which is considerablyradio-resistant to UV and x-ray and γ-ray ionizing radiation, do not resist ion beam exposure.

  15. [Absorbed doses in dental radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, S D; Roccuzzo, M; Albrito, F; Ragona, R; Anglesio, S

    1996-01-01

    The growing use of dento-maxillo-facial radiographic examinations has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies on dosimetry. A thorough review of the literature is presented in this article. Most studies were carried out on tissue equivalent skull phantoms, while only a few were in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vivo absorbed doses during Orthopantomography (OPT). Full Mouth Periapical Examination (FMPE) and Intraoral Tube Panoramic Radiography (ITPR). Measurements were made on 30 patients, reproducing clinical conditions, in 46 anatomical sites, with 24 intra- and 22 extra-oral thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDS). The highest doses were measured, in orthopantomography, at the right mandibular angle (1899 mu Gy) in FMPE on the right naso-labial fold (5640 mu Gy and in ITPR on the palatal surface of the left second upper molar (1936 mu Gy). Intraoral doses ranged from 21 mu Gy, in orthopantomography, to 4494 mu Gy in FMPE. Standard errors ranged from 142% in ITPR to 5% in orthopantomography. The highest rate of standard errors was found in FMPE and ITPR. The data collected in this trial are in agreement with others in major literature reports. Disagreements are probably due to different exam acquisition and data collections. Such differences, presented comparison in several sites, justify lower doses in FMPE and ITPR. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo dosimetry of the maxillary region are discussed, the former being a close resemblance to clinical conditions of examination and the latter the impossibility of collecting values in depth of tissues. Finally, both ITPR and FMPE required lower doses than expected, and can be therefore reconsidered relative to their radiation risk.

  16. Failure-probability driven dose painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Håkansson, Katrin; Due, Anne K.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Kristensen, Claus A.; Rasmussen, Jacob; Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100 (Denmark); Berthelsen, Anne K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark and Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100 (Denmark); Bentzen, Søren M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark and Departments of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a data-driven dose-painting strategy based on the spatial distribution of recurrences in previously treated patients. The result is a quantitative way to define a dose prescription function, optimizing the predicted local control at constant treatment intensity. A dose planning study using the optimized dose prescription in 20 patients is performed.Methods: Patients treated at our center have five tumor subvolumes from the center of the tumor (PET positive volume) and out delineated. The spatial distribution of 48 failures in patients with complete clinical response after (chemo)radiation is used to derive a model for tumor control probability (TCP). The total TCP is fixed to the clinically observed 70% actuarial TCP at five years. Additionally, the authors match the distribution of failures between the five subvolumes to the observed distribution. The steepness of the dose–response is extracted from the literature and the authors assume 30% and 20% risk of subclinical involvement in the elective volumes. The result is a five-compartment dose response model matching the observed distribution of failures. The model is used to optimize the distribution of dose in individual patients, while keeping the treatment intensity constant and the maximum prescribed dose below 85 Gy.Results: The vast majority of failures occur centrally despite the small volumes of the central regions. Thus, optimizing the dose prescription yields higher doses to the central target volumes and lower doses to the elective volumes. The dose planning study shows that the modified prescription is clinically feasible. The optimized TCP is 89% (range: 82%–91%) as compared to the observed TCP of 70%.Conclusions: The observed distribution of locoregional failures was used to derive an objective, data-driven dose prescription function. The optimized dose is predicted to result in a substantial increase in local control without increasing the predicted risk of toxicity.

  17. Dose evaluation from multiple detector outputs using convex optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    A dose evaluation using multiple radiation detectors can be improved by the convex optimisation method. It enables flexible dose evaluation corresponding to the actual radiation energy spectrum. An application to the neutron ambient dose equivalent evaluation is investigated using a mixed-gas proportional counter. The convex derives the certain neutron ambient dose with certain width corresponding to the true neutron energy spectrum. The range of the evaluated dose is comparable to the error of conventional neutron dose measurement equipments. An application to the neutron individual dose equivalent measurement is also investigated. Convexes of particular dosemeter combinations evaluate the individual dose equivalent better than the dose evaluation of a single dosemeter. The combinations of dosemeters with high orthogonality of their response characteristics tend to provide a good suitability for dose evaluation.

  18. The transit dose component of high dose rate brachytherapy: Direct measurements and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastin, K.T.; Podgorsak, M.B.; Thomadsen, B.R. (Univ. of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-07-15

    The purpose was to measure the transit dose produced by a moving high dose rate brachytherapy source and assess its clinical significance. The doses produced from source movement during Ir-192 HDR afterloading were measured using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeter rods. Transit doses at distances of 0.5-4.0 cm from an endobronchial applicator were measured using a Lucite phantom accommodating 1 x 1 x 6 mm thermoluminescent rods. Surface transit dose measurements were made using esophageal and endobronchial catheters, a gynecologic tandem, and an interstitial needle. No difference was detected in thermoluminescent dosimeter rod responses to 4 MV and Ir-192 spectra (427 nC/Gy) in a range of dose between 2 and 300 cGy. The transit dose at 0.5 cm from an endobronchial catheter was 0.31 cGy/(Curie-fraction) and followed an inverse square fall-off with increasing distance. Surface transit doses ranged from 0.38 cGy/(Curie-fraction) for an esophageal catheter to 1.03 cGy/(Curie-fraction) for an endobronchial catheter. Source velocity is dependent on the interdwell distance and varies between 220-452 mm/sec. A numeric algorithm was developed to calculate total transit dose, and was based on a dynamic point approximation for the moving high dose rate source. This algorithm reliably predicted the empirical transit doses and demonstrated that total transit dose is dependent on source velocity, number of fractions, and source activity. Surface transit doses are dependent on applicator diameter and wall material and thickness. Total transit doses within or outside the desired treatment volume are typically <100 cGy, but may exceed 200 cGy when using a large number of fractions with a high activity source. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Biological dose estimation for accidental supra-high dose gamma-ray exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y., E-mail: yingchen29@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Yan, X.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Department of Radiation Safety, Beijing Institute of Nuclear and Chemical Safety, 14 Guan-cun, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100077 (China); Du, J.; Wang, Z.D.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zeng, F.G.; Zhou, P.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2011-09-15

    To correctly estimate the biological dose of victims accidentally exposed to a very high dose of {sup 60}Co gamma-ray, a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics/multicentrics and rings in the supra-high dose range was established. Peripheral blood from two healthy men was irradiated in vitro with doses of {sup 60}Co gamma-rays ranging from 6 to 22 Gy at a dose rate of 2.0 Gy/min. Lymphocytes were concentrated, cultured and harvested at 52 h, 68 h and 72 h. The numbers of dic + r were counted. The dose-effect curves were established and validated using comparisons with doses from the Tokai-mura accident and were then applied to two victims of supra-high dose exposure accident. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in chromosome aberration frequency among the different culture times from 52 h to 72 h. The 6-22 Gy dose-effect curve was fitted to a linear quadratic model Y = -2.269 + 0.776D - 7.868 x l0{sup -3}D{sup 2}. Using this mathematic model, the dose estimates were similar to data from Tokai-mura which were estimated by PCC ring. Whole body average doses of 9.7 Gy and 18.1 Gy for two victims in the Jining accident were satisfactorily given. We established and successfully applied a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics plus ring (dic + r) after 6-22 Gy {gamma}-irradiation from a supra-high dose {sup 60}Co gamma-ray accident.

  20. Dose finding when the target dose is on a plateau of a dose-response curve: comparison of fully sequential designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Xiao, Changfu

    2013-01-01

    Consider the problem of estimating a dose with a certain response rate. Many multistage dose-finding designs for this problem were originally developed for oncology studies where the mean dose-response is strictly increasing in dose. In non-oncology phase II dose-finding studies, the dose-response curve often plateaus in the range of interest, and there are several doses with the mean response equal to the target. In this case, it is usually of interest to find the lowest of these doses because higher doses might have higher adverse event rates. It is often desirable to compare the response rate at the estimated target dose with a placebo and/or active control. We investigate which of the several known dose-finding methods developed for oncology phase I trials is the most suitable when the dose-response curve plateaus. Some of the designs tend to spread the allocation among the doses on the plateau. Others, such as the continual reassessment method and the t-statistic design, concentrate allocation at one of the doses with the t-statistic design selecting the lowest dose on the plateau more frequently.

  1. Minnesota Pheasant Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset delineates the spatial range of wild pheasant populations in Minnesota as of 2002 by dividing the MN state boundary into 2 units: pheasant range and...

  2. Towards optimal range medians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Gfeller, Beat; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2011-01-01

    that in the cell-probe model, any data structure which supports updates in O(logO(1)n) time must have Ω(log n/loglog n) query time. Our approach naturally generalizes to higher-dimensional range median problems, where element positions and query ranges are multidimensional - it reduces a range median query...... to a logarithmic number of range counting queries....

  3. Tau ranging revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a ranging receiver with a sufficient and reasonable number of correlators is competitive with the current sequential component ranging system by some 1.5 to 2.5 dB. The optimum transmitter code, the optimum receiver, and a near-maximum-lilelihood range-estimation algorithm are presented.

  4. Patient radiation dose in conventional and xerographic cephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copley, R.L.; Glaze, S.A.; Bushong, S.C.; West, D.C.

    1979-11-01

    A comparison of the radiation doses for xeroradiographic and conventional film screen cephalography was made. Alderson tissue-equivalent phantoms were used for patient simulation. An optimum technique in terms of patient dose and image quality indicated that the dose for the Xerox process ranged from five to eleven times greater than that for the conventional process for entrance and exit exposures, respectively. This dose, however, falls within an acceptable range for other dental and medical radiation doses. It is recommended that conventional cephalography be used for routine purposes and that xeroradiography be reserved for situations requiring the increased image quality that the process affords.

  5. Factors for converting dose measured in polystyrene phantoms to dose reported in water phantoms for incident proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyers, M. F.; Vatnitsky, A. S.; Vatnitsky, S. M. [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Guthrie Clinic/Robert Packard Hospital, Sayre, Pennsylvania 18840 (United States); EBG MedAustron, Wiener Neustadt, Austria A2700 (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Previous dosimetry protocols allowed calibrations of proton beamline dose monitors to be performed in plastic phantoms. Nevertheless, dose determinations were referenced to absorbed dose-to-muscle or absorbed dose-to-water. The IAEA Code of Practice TRS 398 recommended that dose calibrations be performed with ionization chambers only in water phantoms because plastic-to-water dose conversion factors were not available with sufficient accuracy at the time of its writing. These factors are necessary, however, to evaluate the difference in doses delivered to patients if switching from calibration in plastic to a protocol that only allows calibration in water. Methods: This work measured polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors for this purpose. Uncertainties in the results due to temperature, geometry, and chamber effects were minimized by using special experimental set-up procedures. The measurements were validated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results: At the peak of non-range-modulated beams, measured polystyrene-to-water factors ranged from 1.015 to 1.024 for beams with ranges from 36 to 315 mm. For beams with the same ranges and medium sized modulations, the factors ranged from 1.005 to 1.019. The measured results were used to generate tables of polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors. Conclusions: The dose conversion factors can be used at clinical proton facilities to support beamline and patient specific dose per monitor unit calibrations performed in polystyrene phantoms.

  6. Sesame allergy threshold dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dano, D; Remington, B C; Astier, C; Baumert, J L; Kruizinga, A G; Bihain, B E; Taylor, S L; Kanny, G

    2015-09-01

    Sesame is a relevant food allergen in France. Compared to other allergens there is a lack of food challenge data and more data could help sesame allergy risk management. The aim of this study is to collect more sesame challenge data and investigate the most efficient food challenge method for future studies. Records of patients at University Hospital in Nancy (France) with objective symptoms to sesame challenges were collected and combined with previously published data. An estimation of the sesame allergy population threshold was calculated based on individual NOAELs and LOAELs. Clinical dosing schemes at Nancy were investigated to see if the optimal protocol for sesame is currently used. Fourteen patients (10 M/4 F, 22 ± 14.85 years old) with objective symptoms were added to previously published data making a total of 35 sesame allergic patients. The most sensitive patient reacted to the first dose at challenge of 1.02 mg sesame protein. The ED05 ranges between 1.2 and 4.0 mg of sesame protein (Log-Normal, Log-Logistic, and Weibull models) and the ED10 between 4.2 and 6.2 mg. The optimal food challenge dosing scheme for sesame follows semi-log dose increases from 0.3 to 3000 mg protein. This article provides a valuable update to the existing clinical literature regarding sesame NOAELs and LOAELs. Establishment of a population threshold for sesame could help in increasing the credibility of precautionary labelling and decrease the costs associated with unexpected allergic reactions. Also, the use of an optimal dosing scheme would decrease time spent on diagnostic and thereafter on the economic burden of sesame allergy diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dose assessment in pediatric computerized tomography; Avaliacao de doses em tomografia computadorizada pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarinho, Luisa Maria Auredine Lima

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this work was the evaluation of radiation doses in paediatric computed tomography scans, considering the high doses usually involved and the absence of any previous evaluation in Brazil. Dose values were determined for skull and abdomen examinations, for different age ranges, by using the radiographic techniques routinely used in the clinical centers investigated. Measurements were done using pencil shape ionization chambers inserted in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms. These were compact phantoms of different diameters were specially designed and constructed for this work, which simulate different age ranges. Comparison of results with published values showed that doses were lower than the diagnostic reference levels established to adults exams by the European Commission. Nevertheless, doses in paediatric phantoms were higher than those obtained in adult phantoms. The paediatric dose values obtained in Hospitals A and B were lower than the reference level (DRL) adopted by SHIMPTON for different age ranges. In the range 0 - 0.5 year (neonatal), the values of DLP in Hospital B were 94 por cent superior to the DRL For the 10 years old children the values of CTDI{sub w} obtained were inferior in 89 por cent for skull and 83 por cent for abdomen examinations, compared to the values published by SHRIMPTON and WALL. Our measured CTDI{sub w} values were inferior to the values presented for SHRIMPTON and HUDA, for all the age ranges and types of examinations. It was observed that the normalized dose descriptors values in children in the neonatal range were always superior to the values of doses for the adult patient. In abdomen examinations, the difference was approximately 90% for the effective dose (E) and of 57%.for CTDI{sub w} . (author)

  8. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  9. Central Makran Range, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    A spectacular view of the Makran Range of Pakistan (27.0N, 65.5E) looking north with the Arabian Sea and the city of Karachi in the foreground. In the center, the Indian sub-continent moving slowly north into the Asian continent has caused the folded sedimentary Makran Range to bend from east-west to north-south as well as the uplift forming The Great Himalaya Range and the high Tibetan Plateau to the north.

  10. Baculovirus Host-Range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suzanne M. Thiem; Xiao-Wen Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Baculoviruses are used as microbial insecticides, protein expression vectors, epitope display platforms, and most recently as vectors for gene therapy. Understanding the mechanisms that control baculovirus host-range and tissue tropisms are important for assessing their safety and for improving their properties for these biotechnology applications. In the past two decades some progress has been made and several baculovirus genes that influence host-range have been identified. Despite this progress, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that restrict baculovirus host-range is still limited. Here we review what is currently known about baculovirus genes that influence virus host-range.

  11. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  12. Laser Range Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.C. Bahuguna

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design aspects of laser range finders and proximity sensors being developed at IRDE for different applications. The principle used in most of the laser range finders is pulse echo or time-of-flight measurement. Optical triangulation is used in proximity sensors while techniques like phase detection and interferometry are employed in instruments for surveying and motion controllers where high accuracy is desired. Most of the laser range finders are designed for ranging non-cooperative targets.

  13. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  14. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  15. Surface dose in intracavitary orthovoltage radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, M.B.; Schreiner, L.J.; Podgorsak, E.B. (Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ (Canada) Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, PQ (Canada))

    1990-07-01

    Radiotherapy with orthovoltage techniques is often the prime treatment for localized superficial malignancies. Surface doses and depth doses measured with cylindrical and end-window Farmer chambers are presented for various orthovoltage x-ray beams in the range from 80 to 300 kVp, both for open beams and beams collimated with commercial intracavitary leaded-glass cones. For radiation fields collimated by a diaphragm positioned at a distance from the patient surface (open beams) there is a small skin-sparing effect. On the other hand, the surface doses with commercial leaded-glass intracavitary cones can exhibit a fivefold increase compared to the open-beam dose maxima. Beyond a depth of {similar to}0.2 mm in a tissue-equivalent phantom, the doses measured for open beams and beams collimated with intracavitary cones are essentially identical. The increase in the surface dose observed with intracavitary cones is attributed to photoelectrons and recoil electrons produced in the cones. The high surface doses are measured by thin-wall parallel-plate ionization chambers but cannot be measured with cylindrical Farmer chambers since these chambers have wall thicknesses too large for the transmission of electrons produced in the cone. Since cylindrical Farmer chambers are typically used for calibration of radiation output, the high surface doses produced by the intracavitary cones may be overlooked; they can, however, be reduced to open-beam values by simple modifications to the cones.

  16. Dose and dose rate effects of irradiation on blood count and cytokine assay in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joong Sun [Research center, Dongnam institute of radiological and Medical Sciences (DIRAMS), Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The possible role of exposure to radiation as a risk factor for human health has been of increasing public concern in the series of explosions at earthquake damaged nuclear reactors on the Japan. Current events throughout the world underscore the growing threat of different forms of accidental exposure to radiation including nuclear accidents, atomic weapons use and testing, and the side effects of cancer therapy. A large range of dose rates of ionizing radiations could be encountered in accidental radiation situations. Nevertheless, most of the studies related to radiation effects have only examined a high dose rate. In this study, we investigated the blood count and the cytokine levels in the serum of mice exposed to a high or low dose rate of radiation. In this study, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the low dose rate of radiation remains unclear, but differential hematopoietic effects of radiation exposed at a high dose rate versus low dose rate were observed using the number of peripheral blood count and serum cytokines. These data suggest that chronic low dose rate exposure caused a stimulation of heamatopoietic system occurrence, unlike those observed after higher dose rate exposure. Our data suggest that the dose rate, rather than the total dose, may be more critical in causing damage to the cellular hematopoietic compartments of the body.

  17. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  18. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...

  19. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    Range selection is the problem of preprocessing an input array A of n unique integers, such that given a query (i; j; k), one can report the k'th smallest integer in the subarray A[i];A[i+1]; : : : ;A[j]. In this paper we consider static data structures in the word-RAM for range selection and sev...

  20. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  1. Temporal Expression of Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Biomarkers in a Macaca fascicularis Infection Model of Tuberculosis; Comparison with Human Datasets and Analysis with Parametric/Non-parametric Tools for Improved Diagnostic Biomarker Identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Javed

    Full Text Available A temporal study of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis primary, pulmonary challenge model Macaca fascicularis has been conducted. PBL samples were taken prior to challenge and at one, two, four and six weeks post-challenge and labelled, purified RNAs hybridised to Operon Human Genome AROS V4.0 slides. Data analyses revealed a large number of differentially regulated gene entities, which exhibited temporal profiles of expression across the time course study. Further data refinements identified groups of key markers showing group-specific expression patterns, with a substantial reprogramming event evident at the four to six week interval. Selected statistically-significant gene entities from this study and other immune and apoptotic markers were validated using qPCR, which confirmed many of the results obtained using microarray hybridisation. These showed evidence of a step-change in gene expression from an 'early' FOS-associated response, to a 'late' predominantly type I interferon-driven response, with coincident reduction of expression of other markers. Loss of T-cell-associate marker expression was observed in responsive animals, with concordant elevation of markers which may be associated with a myeloid suppressor cell phenotype e.g. CD163. The animals in the study were of different lineages and these Chinese and Mauritian cynomolgous macaque lines showed clear evidence of differing susceptibilities to Tuberculosis challenge. We determined a number of key differences in response profiles between the groups, particularly in expression of T-cell and apoptotic makers, amongst others. These have provided interesting insights into innate susceptibility related to different host `phenotypes. Using a combination of parametric and non-parametric artificial neural network analyses we have identified key genes and regulatory pathways which may be important in early and adaptive responses to TB. Using

  2. Controllable dose; Dosis controlable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jtar@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  3. Once daily dose gentamicin in neonates - is our dosing correct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serane, Tiroumourougane V; Zengeya, Stanley; Penford, Gemma; Cooke, Jane; Khanna, Gitika; McGregor-Colman, Elle

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the safety and efficacy (measured by therapeutic level) of once daily gentamicin in neonates >or=32 weeks of gestation and or=32 weeks of gestation and 2 mg/L. Only 39 (60%) had peak and trough levels within the therapeutic range. All babies who had audiometric evaluation (62 out of 65) had normal hearing. Out of the 65 babies, 60 had paired serum creatinine levels estimated and none had evidence of renal dysfunction. Among term neonates, only 2 out of 50 had the trough serum concentration of >2 mg/L. In 38 (76%) of the 50 neonates, the trough serum gentamicin concentration was <2.0 mg/L and the peak level was <10 mg/L. Forty-eight babies had audiometric evaluation which was normal. A dose of 4 mg/kg/day produces serum gentamicin levels outside the therapeutic range in two-fifths of neonates between 32 and 36 +/- 6 weeks. A single dose of 4 mg/kg/day of gentamicin is appropriate for term babies and probably excessive for 32-36 weeks' neonates.

  4. Morphologic, stereologic, and morphometric evaluation of the nervous system in young cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) following maternal administration of tanezumab, a monoclonal antibody to nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Mark; Evans, Mark; Bowman, Christopher J; Cummings, Thomas; Oneda, Satoru; Shelton, David; Zorbas, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Tanezumab, an antibody to nerve growth factor, was administered to pregnant cynomolgus monkeys at 0, 0.5, 4, and 30 mg/kg weekly, beginning gestation day (GD) 20 through parturition (∼GD165). Maternal tanezumab administration appeared to increase stillbirths and infant mortality, but no consistent pattern of gross and/or microscopic change was detected to explain the mortality. Offspring exposed in utero were evaluated at 12 months of age using light microscopy (all tissues), stereology (basal forebrain cholinergic and dorsal root ganglia neurons), and morphometry (sural nerve). Light microscopy revealed decreased number of neurons in sympathetic ganglia (superior mesenteric, cervicothoracic, and ganglia in the thoracic sympathetic trunk). Stereologic assessment indicated an overall decrease in dorsal root ganglion (thoracic) volume and number of neurons in animals exposed to tanezumab 4 mg/kg (n = 9) and 30 mg/kg (n = 1). At all tanezumab doses, the sural nerve was small due to decreases in myelinated and unmyelinated axons. Existing axons/myelin sheaths appeared normal when viewed with light and transmission electron microscopy. There was no indication of tanezumab-related, active neuron/nerve fiber degeneration/necrosis in any tissue, indicating decreased sensory/sympathetic neurons and axonal changes were due to hypoplasia or atrophy. These changes in the sensory and sympathetic portions of the peripheral nervous system suggest some degree of developmental neurotoxicity, although what effect, if any, the changes had on normal function and survival was not apparent. Overall, these changes were consistent with published data from rodent studies.

  5. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGING RADIATION DOSE TO PATIENTS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY USING REFERENCE DOSE LEVELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almén, Anja; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities.

  6. SU-E-T-374: Evaluation and Verification of Dose Calculation Accuracy with Different Dose Grid Sizes for Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, C; Schultheiss, T [City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we aim to evaluate the effect of dose grid size on the accuracy of calculated dose for small lesions in intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and to verify dose calculation accuracy with radiochromic film dosimetry. Methods: 15 intracranial lesions from previous SRS patients were retrospectively selected for this study. The planning target volume (PTV) ranged from 0.17 to 2.3 cm{sup 3}. A commercial treatment planning system was used to generate SRS plans using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique using two arc fields. Two convolution-superposition-based dose calculation algorithms (Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm and Acuros XB algorithm) were used to calculate volume dose distribution with dose grid size ranging from 1 mm to 3 mm with 0.5 mm step size. First, while the plan monitor units (MU) were kept constant, PTV dose variations were analyzed. Second, with 95% of the PTV covered by the prescription dose, variations of the plan MUs as a function of dose grid size were analyzed. Radiochomic films were used to compare the delivered dose and profile with the calculated dose distribution with different dose grid sizes. Results: The dose to the PTV, in terms of the mean dose, maximum, and minimum dose, showed steady decrease with increasing dose grid size using both algorithms. With 95% of the PTV covered by the prescription dose, the total MU increased with increasing dose grid size in most of the plans. Radiochromic film measurements showed better agreement with dose distributions calculated with 1-mm dose grid size. Conclusion: Dose grid size has significant impact on calculated dose distribution in intracranial SRS treatment planning with small target volumes. Using the default dose grid size could lead to under-estimation of delivered dose. A small dose grid size should be used to ensure calculation accuracy and agreement with QA measurements.

  7. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  8. Light Detection And Ranging

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  9. Range_Extent_15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The GIS layer "Range_extent_15" is a simple polyline representing the geographic distribution of the southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) in mainland...

  10. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    is a small number, but only gave heuristic arguments for this. In this paper, we provide the first methods for rigorously estimating the Range of Skill of a given game. We provide some general, asymptotic bounds that imply that the Range of Skill of a perfectly balanced game tree is almost exponential in its...... size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  11. Correlation radio range finder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorochan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In work widely known methods of range measuring are short characterized. The basic attention is given features of signal processing in a correlation method of range measuring. The signal with angular modulation with one-voice-frequency fluctuation is used as a probing signal. The absence of Doppler effect on the formation of the correlation integral, the frequency instability of the transmitter, the phase change on reflection from the target is presented. It is noticed that the result of signal processing in the range measuring instrument is reduced to formation on an exit one-voice-frequency harmonious fluctuation equal to modulating frequency that provides high characteristics of a radio range finder.

  12. Antenna Pattern Range (APR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TheAntenna Pattern Range (APR)features a non-metallic arch with a trolley to move the transmit antenna from the horizon to zenith. At the center of the ground plane,...

  13. Light Detection And Ranging

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  14. Substring Range Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. {itemize} We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems to a new problem, which we call \\emph{substring range reporting}. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of...

  15. Substring Range Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. {itemize} We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems to a new problem, which we call \\emph{substring range reporting}. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of...

  16. A comprehensive study on the relationship between image quality and imaging dose in low-dose cone beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Hao; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-01-01

    While compressed sensing (CS) based reconstructions have been developed for low-dose CBCT, a clear understanding on the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose at low dose levels is needed. In this paper, we qualitatively investigate this subject in a comprehensive manner with extensive experimental and simulation studies. The basic idea is to plot image quality and imaging dose together as functions of number of projections and mAs per projection over the whole clinically relevant range. A clear understanding on the tradeoff between image quality and dose can be achieved and optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols can be developed for various imaging tasks in IGRT. Main findings of this work include: 1) Under the CS framework, image quality has little degradation over a large dose range, and the degradation becomes evident when the dose < 100 total mAs. A dose < 40 total mAs leads to a dramatic image degradation. Optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols likely fall in the dose range of 40-100 ...

  17. Dose response biology: the case of resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J; Mattson, Mark P; Calabrese, Vittorio

    2010-12-01

    Resveratrol often displays hormesis-like biphasic dose responses. This occurs in a broad range of biological models and for numerous endpoints of biomedical interest and public health concern. Recognition of the widespread occurrence of the hormetic nature of many of the responses of resveratrol is important on multiple levels. It can help optimize study design protocols by investigators, create a dose-response framework for better addressing dose-related biological complexities and assist in the development of public health and medical guidance with respect to considerations for what is an optimal dose not just for an agent such as resveratrol, but also for the plethora of agents that also act via hormetic mechanisms.

  18. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other

  19. Range Information Propagation Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向荣; 朱志刚; 等

    1998-01-01

    A novel method of model-based object recognition is presented in this paper.Its novelty stems from the fact that the gray level image captured by a camera is merged with sparse range information in an active manner.By using a projective transform, which is determined by the sparse range data,festures(e.g.edge points)related to a single planar surface patch of figure in the scene can be assignew with their corresponding range values respectively.As a result,the shape of the very planar patch or figure can be recovered and various kinds of description in the Euclidean space can be calculated.Based on these descriptions values,the hypothesis about the identification of the object and its pose in space can be obtained with a high probability of success,and a high efficiency of hypothesis-verification process can be expected.Another advantage of this method is that the edge detection process can be navigated to the proper location hinted by the sparse range image.In consequence edge features can be extracted even in the regions with low contrast.In this paper the principle of range information propagation transform(RIPT)is explained,and some implementation issues,such as the algorithms using calibrated or uncalibrated gray level image for object recognition,are discussed.The preliminary experimental results are presented to indicate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  20. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    and several natural special cases thereof. The rst special case is known as range median, which arises when k is xed to b(j 􀀀 i + 1)=2c. The second case, denoted prex selection, arises when i is xed to 0. Finally, we also consider the bounded rank prex selection problem and the xed rank range......Range selection is the problem of preprocessing an input array A of n unique integers, such that given a query (i; j; k), one can report the k'th smallest integer in the subarray A[i];A[i+1]; : : : ;A[j]. In this paper we consider static data structures in the word-RAM for range selection...... selection problem. In the former, data structures must support prex selection queries under the assumption that k for some value n given at construction time, while in the latter, data structures must support range selection queries where k is xed beforehand for all queries. We prove cell probe lower bounds...

  1. Reconfigurable laser ranging instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiter, John

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a fast, flexible, non-contact, eye-safe laser ranging instrument useful in a variety of industrial metrology situations, such as in-process machining control and part inspection. The system has variable computer-controlled standoff and depth of field, and can obtain 3-D images of surfaces within a range of from 1.5 ft to almost 10 ft from the final optical element. The minimum depth of field is about 3.5 in. at 1.5 ft and about 26 in. at the far range. The largest depth of field for which useful data are available is about 41 in. Resolution, with appropriate averaging, is about one part in 4000 of the depth of field, which implies a best case resolution for this prototype of 0.00075 in. System flexibility is achieved by computer controlled relative positioning of optical components.

  2. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... space. Combined with our reductions this leads to significantly improved time-space trade-offs for the above problems. In particular, for each problem we obtain the first solutions with optimal time query and O(nlog O(1) n) space, where n is the length of the indexed string. We show that our techniques...

  3. Induction of chromosome aberrations is non-linear within the low dose region and depends on dose rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, A.A.; Geras' kin, S.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Nesterov, Y.B.; Dikareva, N.S

    2002-07-01

    The low dose region was evaluated for meristem cells of spring barley. A study of the cytogenetic damage in the low dose range was carried out to determine the genuine shape of the dose curve. The relationship between the frequency of aberrant cells and the absorbed dose is shown to be non-linear with a site at low doses within which the cytogenetic damage exceeds the control level significantly and does not depend on dose value. Within the tested exposure region, the aberrant cell frequency is found to decrease with increasing dose rate, but the shape of the dose curve remained invariable. The piecewise linear model fits the experimental data much better than the linear one. (author)

  4. Himalayan Mountain Range, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Snow is present the year round in most of the high Himalaya Mountain Range (33.0N, 76.5E). In this view taken at the onset of winter, the continuous snow line can be seen for hundreds of miles along the south face of the range in the Indian states of Punjab and Kashmir. The snow line is at about 12,000 ft. altitude but the deep Cenab River gorge is easily delineated as a break along the south edge of the snow covered mountains. '

  5. Range-Clustering Queries

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen, Mikkel; de Berg, Mark; Buchin, Kevin; Mehr, Mehran; Mehrabi, Ali D.

    2017-01-01

    In a geometric $k$-clustering problem the goal is to partition a set of points in $\\mathbb{R}^d$ into $k$ subsets such that a certain cost function of the clustering is minimized. We present data structures for orthogonal range-clustering queries on a point set $S$: given a query box $Q$ and an integer $k>2$, compute an optimal $k$-clustering for $S\\setminus Q$. We obtain the following results. We present a general method to compute a $(1+\\epsilon)$-approximation to a range-clustering query, ...

  6. Evaluation of the cell death mechanisms activated by the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 in a dose range of 1 to 5 Gy; Evaluacion de los mecanismos de muerte celular activados por el radiofarmaco {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 en un intervalo de dosis de 1 a 5 Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin V, E.P.; Rojas C, E. L.; Martinez V, B. E.; Ramos B, J. C.; Jimenez M, N. P.; Ferro F, G., E-mail: erica.azorin@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    The radio immunotherapy with anti-CD20 antibodies significantly increases the remission rate of patients with B-cell lymphomas over expressing the CD20. The radiolabeled antibodies directed to surface antigens allow delivering scaled doses of radiation to specific targets thus limiting the dose to healthy tissue. The anti-CD20 causes cell death by two major pathways; activating the immune system to destroy malignant cells and inducing the activation of cell death pathways. The {sup 177}Lu is a beta particle emitter (max. 0.497 MeV) with a maximum reach on soft tissue of 0.7 mm and a half-life of 6.7 days. Several clinical studies have established a maximum tolerated dose (45 m Ci/m{sup 2}) for {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab, which shows a favorable clinical response without hematological toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of action by synergistic effect of anti-CD20 and radionuclide have not been studied. In this work was evaluated; by flow cytometry, the activation kinetics of the cell death mechanisms induced by the treatment with {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 in non-Hodgkin (Raji) lymphoma cells. The absorbed radiation dose delivered to the cell nucleus was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the contribution of the beta emissions of the radiopharmaceutical present in the cell membrane and surrounding environment, as well as crossfire. This work shows that the application of radiation doses of 1 to 5 Gy of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20, are sufficient to induce cell death by apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle. The combination of these factors (continuous delivery of radiation, activation of repair mechanisms and increased radio sensitivity) causes the acute activation of the apoptotic program resulting in significant cell death after 96 h of treatment. The temporal analysis of cell death suggests the early activation of apoptosis that is counteracted by the activation of repair processes caused by sustained irradiation

  7. Optimizing Radiation Doses for Computed Tomography Across Institutions: Dose Auditing and Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demb, Joshua; Chu, Philip; Nelson, Thomas; Hall, David; Seibert, Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John; Krishnam, Mayil; Cagnon, Christopher; Bostani, Maryam; Gould, Robert; Miglioretti, Diana; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Radiation doses for computed tomography (CT) vary substantially across institutions. To assess the impact of institutional-level audit and collaborative efforts to share best practices on CT radiation doses across 5 University of California (UC) medical centers. In this before/after interventional study, we prospectively collected radiation dose metrics on all diagnostic CT examinations performed between October 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, at 5 medical centers. Using data from January to March (baseline), we created audit reports detailing the distribution of radiation dose metrics for chest, abdomen, and head CT scans. In April, we shared reports with the medical centers and invited radiology professionals from the centers to a 1.5-day in-person meeting to review reports and share best practices. We calculated changes in mean effective dose 12 weeks before and after the audits and meeting, excluding a 12-week implementation period when medical centers could make changes. We compared proportions of examinations exceeding previously published benchmarks at baseline and following the audit and meeting, and calculated changes in proportion of examinations exceeding benchmarks. Of 158 274 diagnostic CT scans performed in the study period, 29 594 CT scans were performed in the 3 months before and 32 839 CT scans were performed 12 to 24 weeks after the audit and meeting. Reductions in mean effective dose were considerable for chest and abdomen. Mean effective dose for chest CT decreased from 13.2 to 10.7 mSv (18.9% reduction; 95% CI, 18.0%-19.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 3.8% to 23.5%. The mean effective dose for abdominal CT decreased from 20.0 to 15.0 mSv (25.0% reduction; 95% CI, 24.3%-25.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 10.8% to 34.7%. The number of CT scans that had an effective dose measurement that exceeded benchmarks was reduced considerably by 48% and 54% for chest and abdomen, respectively. After

  8. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  9. Dose Reduction Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  10. Agriculture, forest, and range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the panel for developing a satellite remote-sensing global information system in the next decade are reported. User requirements were identified in five categories: (1) cultivated crops, (2) land resources, (3)water resources, (4)forest management, and (5) range management. The benefits from the applications of satellite data are discussed.

  11. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  12. LONG RANGE HEALTH PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ST. Motameni

    1974-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past, health planning in Iran has been carried out in the context of short-range economic plans. Although this mechanism has helped a great deal in the achievement of certain health plans however, the said scheme has been short in meeting the health objectives on a comprehensive basis. Most often, the heath programs have lost their values to the priority and cost effectiveness of economic plans. A brief review of heath planning in the past shows that the second development plan has been devoted to the establishment of new hospitals on a scattered pattern. The development of a coordinated hospital and health center system has been accepted and partly implemented during the third plan period. In the fourth plan the whole direction has changed towards the de­velopment of private hospitals on profit making basis, and now the fifth plan calls for the regionalized hospital system. Thus, one can say that the past twenty years have been spent to the experimentation of different schemes with­out a real long-range goal. In the past decade the World Health Organization has ventured in the development of health planning principles, but most of the efforts have been devoted to the short-range planning. The long-range health planning is not only a new look to the prin­ciples of planning, but a thorough examination of the time factor in health planning.

  13. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We study the following one-dimensional range reporting problem: On an arrayA of n elements, support queries that given two indices i ≤ j and an integerk report the k smallest elements in the subarray A[i..j] in sorted order. We present a data structure in the RAM model supporting such queries in ...

  14. Doses metrics and patient age in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Walter; Tipnis, Sameer V

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how effective dose and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) change with patient age (size) for routine head and abdominal/pelvic CT examinations. Heads and abdomens of patients were modelled as a mass-equivalent cylinder of water corresponding to the patient 'effective diameter'. Head CT scans were performed at CTDIvol(S) of 40 mGy, and abdominal CT scans were performed at CTDIvol(L) of 10 mGy. Values of SSDE were obtained using conversion factors in AAPM Task Group Report 204. Age-specific scan lengths for head and abdominal CT scans obtained from the authors' clinical practice were used to estimate the dose-length product for each CT examination. Effective doses were calculated from previously published age- and sex-specific E/DLP conversion factors, based on ICRP 103 organ-weighting factors. For head CT examinations, the scan length increased from 15 cm in a newborn to 20 cm in adults, and for an abdominal/pelvic CT, the scan length increased from 20 cm in a newborn to 45 cm in adults. For head CT scans, SSDE ranged from 37.2 mGy in adults to 48.8 mGy in a newborn, an increase of 31 %. The corresponding head CT effective doses range from 1.4 mSv in adults to 5.2 mSv in a newborn, an increase of 270 %. For abdomen CT scans, SSDE ranged from 13.7 mGy in adults to 23.0 mGy in a newborn, an increase of 68 %. The corresponding abdominal CT effective doses ranged from 6.3 mSv in adults to 15.4 mSv in a newborn, an increase of 140 %. SSDE increases much less than effective dose in paediatric patients compared with adults because it does not account for scan length or scattered radiation. Size- and age-specific effective doses better quantify the total radiation received by patients in CT by explicitly accounting for all organ doses, as well as their relative radio sensitivity.

  15. Dose Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Waggoner, L O

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the sm...

  16. T dose Vaccine Policy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Programme of Immunization (NPI), measles remains a disturbing cause ... or as a supplement is expected to offer a second opportunity to children who ... available in 1963, the world welcomed it with joy .... one dose of vaccine were not always protected from .... begins a long story Starting now is still early enough.

  17. ORANGE: RANGE OF BENEFITS

    OpenAIRE

    Parle Milind; Chaturvedi Dev

    2012-01-01

    No wonder that oranges are one of the most popular fruits in the world. Orange (citrus sinensis) is well known for its nutritional and medicinal properties throughout the world. From times immemorial, whole Orange plant including ripe and unripe fruits, juice, orange peels, leaves and flowers are used as a traditional medicine. Citrus sinensis belongs to the family Rutaceae. The fruit is a fleshy, indehiscent, berry that ranges widely in size from 4 cm to 12 cm. The major medicinal proper...

  18. Radiation dose to the eye lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; D. Nielsen, Kamilla

    2015-01-01

    .69 – 4.46). With the high dose protocol and position ‘kipped’, the radiation dose to the eye lens decreased by 41.5%, on average by 1.52 mSv (95% CI: 0.39-2.64; p=0.008) compared to ‘standard’, i.e., from 3.66 mSv (range 1.62 – 4.68) to 2.14 mSv (range 1.12 – 4.46). With the low dose protocol......Radiation Dose to the Eye Lens: Does Positioning Really Matter? C. Baun1, K. Falch1, K.D. Nielsen2, S. Shanmuganathan1, O. Gerke1, P.F. Høilund-Carlsen1 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark. 2University College Lillebaelt, Odense, Denmark. Aim: The scan...... might avoid including the eye in the CT scan without losing sufficient visualization of the scull base. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of decreasing the radiation dose to the eye lens, simply by changing the head position, when doing the PET/CT scan from the base of the scull...

  19. Occupational dose constraints in interventional cardiology procedures: the DIMOND approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapaki, Virginia [Medical Physics Department, Konstantopoulio Agia Olga Hospital, Athens (Greece); Kottou, Sophia [Medical Physics Department, Athens University, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Vano, Eliseo [Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department, San Carlos University Hospital and Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Komppa, Tuomo [Stuk, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Padovani, Renato [Servizio di Fisica Medica, Ospedale S Maria della Misericordia, Udine (Italy); Dowling, Annita [Medical Physics and Bioengineering Department, St James' s Hospital and Haughton Institute, Dublin (Ireland); Molfetas, Michael [Medical Physics Department, ' Evangelismos' Hospital, Athens (Greece); Neofotistou, Vassiliki [Medical Physics Department, Regional Athens General Hospital ' G Gennimatas' , Athens (Greece)

    2004-03-21

    Radiation fields involved in angiographic suites are most uneven with intensity and gradient varying widely with projection geometry. The European Commission DIMOND III project addressed among others, the issues regarding optimization of staff doses with an attempt to propose preliminary occupational dose constraints. Two thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were used to assess operators' extremity doses (left shoulder and left foot) during 20 coronary angiographies (CAs) and 20 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties (PTCAs) in five European centres. X-ray equipment, radiation protection measures used and the dose delivered to the patient in terms of dose-area product (DAP) were recorded so as to subsequently associate them with operator's dose. The range of staff doses noted for the same TLD position, centre and procedure type emphasizes the importance of protective measures and technical characteristics of x-ray equipment. Correlation of patient's DAP with staff shoulder dose is moderate whereas correlation of patient's DAP with staff foot dose is poor in both CA and PTCA. Therefore, it is difficult to predict operator's dose from patient's DAP mainly due to the different use of protective measures. A preliminary occupational dose constraint value was defined by calculating cardiologists' annual effective dose and found to be 0.6 mSv.

  20. 利用微卫星标记分析4个食蟹猴群体的遗传多样性%Analysis of genetic diversity of four Macaca fascicularis populations with microsatellite markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    皮道元; 谢莉萍; 卢晟盛; 卢克焕

    2011-01-01

    利用7个恒河猴源微卫星标记和4个人源微卫星标记共11个标记,分析了来源于束埔寨(Pop1)、老挝(Pop2)、越南1(Pop3)和越南2(Pop4)共4个群体食蟹猴的遗传多样性.研究结果显示,所选择的11个微卫星位点表现出很高的多态性,群体内的多态性较低,存在较严重的近亲交配.Hardy-Weinberg平衡检测说明4个群体在这11个位点上均处于不平衡状态,可能存在较严重的人工选择繁育.亚群体内的固定指数平均为0.526 2,说明群体内存在近亲交配;亚种群间的固定指数均值为0.016 6,说明各群体间的遗传分化很小;各位点上的基因流均值为14.814 2,说明其交流很活跃,可有效地防止因遗传漂移而产生的遗传分化.从基于Nei氏标准遗传距离的UPGMS聚类图看出,先是Pop3和Pop4聚为一类,再和Pop1聚在一起,最后和Pop2聚在一起,其结果和其地理分布所表现的遗传差异一致.%The genetic diversity of Macaca fascicularis from four populations was analyzed by using eleven microsatellite markers including seven rhesus-derived markers and four human-derived makers. The four populations came from Cambodia (Pop 1) ,Laos (Pop 2) ,Vietnam 1 (Pop 3) and Vietnam 2 (Pop 4) ,respectively. It is illuminated that the high polymorphism was showed in 11 microsatellite locus. There was low polymorphism and seriously inbreeding within the groups. The unbalance on 11 locus from four groups was proved according to Hardy-Weinberg test. There may be more serious artificial selection inbreeding. When Fis is 0. 526 2,it showed that inbreeding was existed within groups. The Fst is 0.016 6,meaning that the genetic differentiation between groups is very small. The gene flow on every locus is 14.814 2, showing that the exchange of them is active. It may be effective by preventing genetic from differentiation because of genetic drift. According to dendrogram of UPGMS based on Nei's Unbiased Measures of genetic distance,Pop3

  1. Required accuracy and dose thresholds in individual monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.; Griffith, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    this uncertainty factor, a value of 21% can be evaluated for the allowable maximum overall standard deviation for dose measurements at dose levels near the annual dose limits increasing to 45% for dose levels at the lower end of the dose range required to be monitored. A method is described for evaluating...... the overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system by combining random and systematic uncertainties in quadrature, and procedures are also given for determining each individual uncertainty connected to the dose measurement. In particular, attention is paid to the evaluation of the combined uncertainty due...... to energy and angular dependencies of the dosemeter. In type testing of personal dosimetry systems, the estimated overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system is the main parameter to be tested. An important characteristic of a personal dosimetry system is its capability of measuring low doses...

  2. Verification of cell irradiation dose deposition using a radiochromic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomic, N [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gosselin, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wan, Jonathan F [Radiation Oncology Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Saragovi, Uri [Department of Pharmacology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Podgorsak, E B [Medical Physics Department, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Evans, M [Medical Physics Department, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Devic, S [Medical Physics Department, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2007-06-07

    We describe a technique for the MTT assay that irradiates all cells at once by a combination of couch movement and a step-and-shoot irradiation technique on a linear accelerator with 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams. In two experimental setups, we obtained maximum to minimum dose ranges of 10 for the constant MU/bin (monitor units per bin) setup and 20 for the variable MU/bin technique. The irradiation technique described is dose rate independent and it can be used on any teletherapy irradiation machine. We also employed radiochromic film dosimetry to verify dose delivered in each of the wells within the dish. It is shown that for the lowest doses, relative dose variation within wells reaches a value of 6%. We also demonstrated that the radiochromic film positioned below the 96-well plate does not underestimate dose deposited within each compartment by more than 2% due to the vertical dose gradient.

  3. Verification of cell irradiation dose deposition using a radiochromic film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomic, N.; Gosselin, M.; Wan, Jonathan F.; Saragovi, Uri; Podgorsak, E. B.; Evans, M.; Devic, S.

    2007-06-01

    We describe a technique for the MTT assay that irradiates all cells at once by a combination of couch movement and a step-and-shoot irradiation technique on a linear accelerator with 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams. In two experimental setups, we obtained maximum to minimum dose ranges of 10 for the constant MU/bin (monitor units per bin) setup and 20 for the variable MU/bin technique. The irradiation technique described is dose rate independent and it can be used on any teletherapy irradiation machine. We also employed radiochromic film dosimetry to verify dose delivered in each of the wells within the dish. It is shown that for the lowest doses, relative dose variation within wells reaches a value of 6%. We also demonstrated that the radiochromic film positioned below the 96-well plate does not underestimate dose deposited within each compartment by more than 2% due to the vertical dose gradient.

  4. Optimizing lithium dosing in hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason, N H; Munkner, R; Kampmann, J P

    2006-01-01

    We studied a 62-year-old female hemodialysis patient during initiation and maintenance of lithium carbonate therapy. Three different methods were applied to estimate the regimen: a scenario based on volume of distribution (V(d)), a scenario based on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and a scenario...... estimates. Furthermore, the maintenance dose estimated from the central compartment (V1) led to plasma concentrations within the therapeutic range. Thus, a regimen where 12.2 mmol lithium was given after each hemodialysis session resulted in stable between-dialysis plasma lithium concentrations...... in this patient with no residual kidney function. We did not observe adverse effects related to this regimen, which was monitored from 18 days to 8 months of therapy, and the patient experienced relief from her severe depressive disorder. In conclusion, dialysis patients may be treated with lithium administrated...

  5. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O(3Pj) from 1.3 × 1016 to 2.3 × 1017 cm-2 s-1. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O(3Pj) ranging from 6 × 1016 to 2 × 1017 cm-3, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 1017 to 1 × 1018 cm-3; cells were inactivated by O(3Pj) doses exceeding 1 × 1018 cm-3, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O(3Pj).

  6. Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants have been described. Written descriptions of repetitive high dose jobs, their collective dose equivalent ranges and list of dose reduction techniques will aid in reducing collective dose equivalents from these dose-reduction targets. Knowing which components contribute to high maintenance or repair dose will aid in reducing routine maintenance collective dose equivalents. The radwaste dose reduction improvements will aid in reducing radwaste operations collective dose equivalent and reduce the number of radwaste workers who exceed their administrative dose limits. The identification and rating of managers' and workers' ALARA incentives will provide the basis for recommendations to improve dose reduction incentives. Lastly, the identification and rating of the key components of an ALARA program will aid in

  7. Uncertainties on lung doses from inhaled plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncher, Matthew; Birchall, Alan; Bull, Richard K

    2011-10-01

    In a recent epidemiological study, Bayesian uncertainties on lung doses have been calculated to determine lung cancer risk from occupational exposures to plutonium. These calculations used a revised version of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) published by the ICRP. In addition to the Bayesian analyses, which give probability distributions of doses, point estimates of doses (single estimates without uncertainty) were also provided for that study using the existing HRTM as it is described in ICRP Publication 66; these are to be used in a preliminary analysis of risk. To infer the differences between the point estimates and Bayesian uncertainty analyses, this paper applies the methodology to former workers of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), who constituted a subset of the study cohort. The resulting probability distributions of lung doses are compared with the point estimates obtained for each worker. It is shown that mean posterior lung doses are around two- to fourfold higher than point estimates and that uncertainties on doses vary over a wide range, greater than two orders of magnitude for some lung tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that uncertainties on the parameter values, rather than the model structure, are largely responsible for these effects. Of these it appears to be the parameters describing absorption from the lungs to blood that have the greatest impact on estimates of lung doses from urine bioassay. Therefore, accurate determination of the chemical form of inhaled plutonium and the absorption parameter values for these materials is important for obtaining reliable estimates of lung doses and hence risk from occupational exposures to plutonium.

  8. Dose estimates from the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, R.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1987-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) responded to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union by utilizing long-range atmospheric dispersion modeling to estimate the amount of radioactivity released (source term) and the radiation dose distribution due to exposure to the radioactive cloud over Europe and the Northern Hemisphere. In later assessments, after the release of data on the accident by the Soviet Union, the ARAC team used their mesoscale to regional scale model to focus in on the radiation dose distribution within the Soviet Union and the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant. 22 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Proton Therapy Dose Characterization and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    shows a deviation in the polar WET plot at 15 degrees between the planning CT (green) and the corrected CBCT (blue) at the time of treatment...Pennsylvania is Figure 8. Detection of proton range differences between CBCT and planning CT images. The polar plot measures the water equivalent...dose wtrllin orout\\ide I’TVs was >114% of cl:te presclibed dose ( Fig. 1 D-G~ OVerall, procon p lans Tltft2 ilnd •d;.pdve pr-oton pla.n5 bdd

  10. Monocular visual ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witus, Gary; Hunt, Shawn

    2008-04-01

    The vision system of a mobile robot for checkpoint and perimeter security inspection performs multiple functions: providing surveillance video, providing high resolution still images, and providing video for semi-autonomous visual navigation. Mid-priced commercial digital cameras support the primary inspection functions. Semi-autonomous visual navigation is a tertiary function whose purpose is to reduce the burden of teleoperation and free the security personnel for their primary functions. Approaches to robot visual navigation require some form of depth perception for speed control to prevent the robot from colliding with objects. In this paper present the initial results of an exploration of the capabilities and limitations of using a single monocular commercial digital camera for depth perception. Our approach combines complementary methods in alternating stationary and moving behaviors. When the platform is stationary, it computes a range image from differential blur in the image stack collected at multiple focus settings. When the robot is moving, it extracts an estimate of range from the camera auto-focus function, and combines this with an estimate derived from angular expansion of a constellation of visual tracking points.

  11. Radiochromic Plastic Films for Accurate Measurement of Radiation Absorbed Dose and Dose Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Fidan, S.

    1977-01-01

    in polymeric solutions can be cast into flexible free-standing thin films of uniform thickness and reproducible response to ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. The increase in optical density versus energy deposited by radiation is linear over a wide range of doses and is for practical purposes independent...... of many polymeric systems in industrial radiation processing. The result is that errors due to energy dependence of response of the radiation sensor are effectively reduced, since the spectral sensitivity of the dose meter matches that of the polymer of interest, over a wide range of photon and electron...

  12. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  13. Entrance surface dose according to dose calculation: Head and wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ho Jin [Dept. Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Song, Jong Nam; Choi, Nam Gil [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study were compared with the direct measurement and indirect dose methods through various dose calculation in head and wrist. And, the modified equation was proposed considering equipment type, setting conditions, tube voltage, inherent filter, added filter and its accompanied back scatter factor. As a result, it decreased the error of the direct measurement than the existing dose calculation. Accordingly, diagnostic radiography patient dose comparison would become easier and radiographic exposure control and evaluation will become more efficient. The study findings are expected to be useful in patients' effective dose rate evaluation and dose reduction.

  14. First dose in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Du er blevet ansat som læge i et lægemiddelfirma med ansvar for planlægning og sikkerhed i fase 1 forsøg. Firmaet har udviklet tre dopamin D2-receptor antagonister til behandling af skizofreni. Lægemidlerne har undergået et omfattende farmakologisk, toksikologisk og farmaceutisk afprøvningsprogra...... fase 1 forsøg alias »First dose in man«....

  15. A mathematical approach to optimal selection of dose values in the additive dose method of ERP dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, R.B.; Haskell, E.H.; Kenner, G.H. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Additive dose methods commonly used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry are time consuming and labor intensive. We have developed a mathematical approach for determining optimal spacing of applied doses and the number of spectra which should be taken at each dose level. Expected uncertainitites in the data points are assumed to be normally distributed with a fixed standard deviation and linearity of dose response is also assumed. The optimum spacing and number of points necessary for the minimal error can be estimated, as can the likely error in the resulting estimate. When low doses are being estimated for tooth enamel samples the optimal spacing is shown to be a concentration of points near the zero dose value with fewer spectra taken at a single high dose value within the range of known linearity. Optimization of the analytical process results in increased accuracy and sample throughput.

  16. Absorbed dose and dose rate using the Varian OBI 1.3 and 1.4 CBCT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Asa; Nilsson, Elisabeth; Herrnsdorf, Lars

    2010-01-28

    According to published data, the absorbed dose used for a CBCT image acquisition with Varian OBI v1.3 can be as high as 100 mGy. In 2008 Varian released a new OBI version (v1.4), which promised to reduce the imaging dose. In this study, absorbed doses used for CBCT image acquisitions with the default irradiation techniques of Varian OBI v1.3 and v1.4 are measured. TLDs are used to derive dose distributions at three planes inside an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition, point doses and dose profiles inside a 'stack' of three CTDI body phantoms are measured using a new solid state detector, the CT Dose Profiler. With the CT Dose Profiler, the individual pulses from the X-ray tube are also studied. To verify the absorbed dose measured with the CT Dose Profiler, it is compared to TLD. The image quality is evaluated using a Catphan phantom. For OBI v1.3, doses measured in transverse planes of the Alderson phantom range between 64 mGy and 144 mGy. The average dose is around 100 mGy. For OBI v1.4, doses measured in transverse planes of the Alderson phantom range between 1 mGy and 51 mGy. Mean doses range between 3-35 mGy depending on CBCT mode. CT Dose Profiler data agree with TLD measurements in a CTDI phantom within the uncertainty of the TLD measurements (estimated SD +/- 10%). Instantaneous dose rate at the periphery of the phantom can be higher than 20 mGy/s, which is 10 times the dose rate at the center. The spatial resolution in v1.4 is not as high as in v1.3. In conclusion, measurements show that the imaging doses for default modes in Varian OBI v1.4 CBCT system are significantly lower than in v1.3. The CT Dose Profiler is proven fast and accurate for CBCT applications.

  17. Absorbed dose evaluations in retrospective dosimetry: Methodological developments using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Correcher, V.

    2000-01-01

    Dose evaluation procedures based on luminescence techniques were applied to 50 quartz samples extracted from bricks that had been obtained from populated or partly populated settlements in Russia and Ukraine downwind of the Chernobyl NPP. Determinations of accrued dose in the range similar to 30...

  18. ORANGE: RANGE OF BENEFITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parle Milind

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available No wonder that oranges are one of the most popular fruits in the world. Orange (citrus sinensis is well known for its nutritional and medicinal properties throughout the world. From times immemorial, whole Orange plant including ripe and unripe fruits, juice, orange peels, leaves and flowers are used as a traditional medicine. Citrus sinensis belongs to the family Rutaceae. The fruit is a fleshy, indehiscent, berry that ranges widely in size from 4 cm to 12 cm. The major medicinal properties of orange include anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti- diabetic, cardio- protective, anti-cancer, anti-arthritic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-Tubercular, anti-asthmatic and anti-hypertensive. Phytochemically, whole plant contains limonene, citral, neohesperidin, naringin, rutin, rhamnose, eriocitrin, and vitamin-C. In the present review article, a humble attempt is made to compile all the strange facts available about this tasty fruit.

  19. Estimation of the Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Current models to estimate radiation risk use the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort that received high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Transferring risks from these high dose rates to the low doses and dose rates received by astronauts in space is a source of uncertainty in our risk calculations. The solid cancer models recommended by BEIR VII [1], UNSCEAR [2], and Preston et al [3] is fitted adequately by a linear dose response model, which implies that low doses and dose rates would be estimated the same as high doses and dose rates. However animal and cell experiments imply there should be curvature in the dose response curve for tumor induction. Furthermore animal experiments that directly compare acute to chronic exposures show lower increases in tumor induction than acute exposures. A dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) has been estimated and applied to transfer risks from the high doses and dose rates of the LSS cohort to low doses and dose rates such as from missions in space. The BEIR VII committee [1] combined DDREF estimates using the LSS cohort and animal experiments using Bayesian methods for their recommendation for a DDREF value of 1.5 with uncertainty. We reexamined the animal data considered by BEIR VII and included more animal data and human chromosome aberration data to improve the estimate for DDREF. Several experiments chosen by BEIR VII were deemed inappropriate for application to human risk models of solid cancer risk. Animal tumor experiments performed by Ullrich et al [4], Alpen et al [5], and Grahn et al [6] were analyzed to estimate the DDREF. Human chromosome aberration experiments performed on a sample of astronauts within NASA were also available to estimate the DDREF. The LSS cohort results reported by BEIR VII were combined with the new radiobiology results using Bayesian methods.

  20. Dose reduction in evacuation proctography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hare, C.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.; Gupta, R.; Walker, A.E.; Renfrew, I. [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St. Mark' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2001-03-01

    The goal of this study was to reduce the patient radiation dose from evacuation proctography. Ninety-eight consecutive adult patients referred for proctography to investigate difficult rectal evacuation were studied using a digital imaging system with either a standard digital program for barium examinations, a reduced dose digital program (both with and without additional copper filtration), or Video fluoroscopy. Dose-area products were recorded for each examination and the groups were compared. All four protocols produced technically acceptable examinations. The low-dose program with copper filtration (median dose 382 cGy cm{sup 2}) and Video fluoroscopy (median dose 705 cGy cm{sup 2}) were associated with significantly less dose than other groups (p < 0.0001). Patient dose during evacuation proctography can be reduced significantly without compromising the diagnostic quality of the examination. A digital program with added copper filtration conveyed the lowest dose. (orig.)

  1. Brachytherapy source characterization for improved dose calculations using primary and scatter dose separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kellie R; Tedgren, Asa K Carlsson; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2005-09-01

    In brachytherapy, tissue heterogeneities, source shielding, and finite patient/phantom extensions affect both the primary and scatter dose distributions. The primary dose is, due to the short range of secondary electrons, dependent only on the distribution of material located on the ray line between the source and dose deposition site. The scatter dose depends on both the direct irradiation pattern and the distribution of material in a large volume surrounding the point of interest, i.e., a much larger volume must be included in calculations to integrate many small dose contributions. It is therefore of interest to consider different methods for the primary and the scatter dose calculation to improve calculation accuracy with limited computer resources. The algorithms in present clinical use ignore these effects causing systematic dose errors in brachytherapy treatment planning. In this work we review a primary and scatter dose separation formalism (PSS) for brachytherapy source characterization to support separate calculation of the primary and scatter dose contributions. We show how the resulting source characterization data can be used to drive more accurate dose calculations using collapsed cone superposition for scatter dose calculations. Two types of source characterization data paths are used: a direct Monte Carlo simulation in water phantoms with subsequent parameterization of the results, and an alternative data path built on processing of AAPM TG43 formatted data to provide similar parameter sets. The latter path is motivated of the large amounts of data already existing in the TG43 format. We demonstrate the PSS methods using both data paths for a clinical 192Ir source. Results are shown for two geometries: a finite but homogeneous water phantom, and a half-slab consisting of water and air. The dose distributions are compared to results from full Monte Carlo simulations and we show significant improvement in scatter dose calculations when the collapsed

  2. Estimation of breast dose reduction potential for organ-based tube current modulated CT with wide dose reduction arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wanyi; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Agasthya, Greeshma; Segars, W. Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to estimate the organ dose reduction potential for organ-dose-based tube current modulated (ODM) thoracic CT with wide dose reduction arc. Twenty-one computational anthropomorphic phantoms (XCAT, age range: 27- 75 years, weight range: 52.0-105.8 kg) were used to create a virtual patient population with clinical anatomic variations. For each phantom, two breast tissue compositions were simulated: 50/50 and 20/80 (glandular-to-adipose ratio). A validated Monte Carlo program was used to estimate the organ dose for standard tube current modulation (TCM) (SmartmA, GE Healthcare) and ODM (GE Healthcare) for a commercial CT scanner (Revolution, GE Healthcare) with explicitly modeled tube current modulation profile, scanner geometry, bowtie filtration, and source spectrum. Organ dose was determined using a typical clinical thoracic CT protocol. Both organ dose and CTDIvol-to-organ dose conversion coefficients (h factors) were compared between TCM and ODM. ODM significantly reduced all radiosensitive organ doses (psaw an increase or no significant change. The organ-dose-based tube current modulation significantly reduced organ doses especially for radiosensitive superficial anterior organs such as the breasts.

  3. Impact of surface curvature on dose delivery in intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Moonseong; Wang, Zhou; Malhotra, Harish K; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    In intraoperative high-dose-rate (IOHDR) brachytherapy, a 2-dimensional (2D) geometry is typically used for treatment planning. The assumption of planar geometry may cause serious errors in dose delivery for target surfaces that are, in reality, curved. A study to evaluate the magnitude of these errors in clinical practice was undertaken. Cylindrical phantoms with 6 radii (range: 1.35-12.5 cm) were used to simulate curved treatment geometries. Treatment plans were developed for various planar geometries and were delivered to the cylindrical phantoms using catheters inserted into Freiburg applicators of varying dimension. Dose distributions were measured using radiographic film. In comparison to the treatment plan (for a planar geometry), the doses delivered to prescription points were higher on the concave side of the geometry, up to 15% for the phantom with the smallest radius. On the convex side of the applicator, delivered doses were up to 10% lower for small treated areas (5 catheters). Our measurements have shown inaccuracy in dose delivery when the original planar treatment plan is delivered with a curved applicator. Dose delivery errors arising from the use of planar treatment plans with curved applicators may be significant.

  4. Characterization of infectious dose and lethal dose of two strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Douglas; Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to infect a host is a key trait of a virus, and differences in infectivity could put one virus at an evolutionary advantage over another. In this study we have quantified the infectivity of two strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) that are known to differ in fitness and virulence. By exposing juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hosts to a wide range of virus doses, we were able to calculate the infectious dose in terms of ID50 values for the two genotypes. Lethal dose experiments were also conducted to confirm the virulence difference between the two virus genotypes, using a range of virus doses and holding fish either in isolation or in batch so as to calculate LD50values. We found that infectivity is positively correlated with virulence, with the more virulent genotype having higher infectivity. Additionally, infectivity increases more steeply over a short range of doses compared to virulence, which has a shallower increase. We also examined the data using models of virion interaction and found no evidence to suggest that virions have either an antagonistic or a synergistic effect on each other, supporting the independent action hypothesis in the process of IHNV infection of rainbow trout.

  5. Dose-Response—A Challenge for Allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Regina G.; Hurle, Karl; Duke, Stephen O.

    2005-01-01

    The response of an organism to a chemical depends, among other things, on the dose. Nonlinear dose-response relationships occur across a broad range of research fields, and are a well established tool to describe the basic mechanisms of phytotoxicity. The responses of plants to allelochemicals as biosynthesized phytotoxins, relate as well to nonlinearity and, thus, allelopathic effects can be adequately quantified by nonlinear mathematical modeling. The current paper applies the concept of nonlinearity to assorted aspects of allelopathy within several bioassays and reveals their analysis by nonlinear regression models. Procedures for a valid comparison of effective doses between different allelopathic interactions are presented for both, inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The dose-response applications measure and compare the responses produced by pure allelochemicals [scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxaxin-3(4H)-one); BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one); MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one)], involved in allelopathy of grain crops, to demonstrate how some general principles of dose responses also relate to allelopathy. Hereupon, dose-response applications with living donor plants demonstrate the validity of these principles for density-dependent phytotoxicity of allelochemicals produced and released by living plants (Avena sativa L., Secale cereale L., Triticum L. spp.), and reveal the use of such experiments for initial considerations about basic principles of allelopathy. Results confirm that nonlinearity applies to allelopathy, and the study of allelopathic effects in dose-response experiments allows for new and challenging insights into allelopathic interactions. PMID:19330161

  6. Dose-response-a challenge for allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl; Duke, Stephen O

    2005-04-01

    The response of an organism to a chemical depends, among other things, on the dose. Nonlinear dose-response relationships occur across a broad range of research fields, and are a well established tool to describe the basic mechanisms of phytotoxicity. The responses of plants to allelochemicals as biosynthesized phytotoxins, relate as well to nonlinearity and, thus, allelopathic effects can be adequately quantified by nonlinear mathematical modeling. The current paper applies the concept of nonlinearity to assorted aspects of allelopathy within several bioassays and reveals their analysis by nonlinear regression models. Procedures for a valid comparison of effective doses between different allelopathic interactions are presented for both, inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The dose-response applications measure and compare the responses produced by pure allelochemicals [scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxaxin-3(4H)-one); BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one); MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one)], involved in allelopathy of grain crops, to demonstrate how some general principles of dose responses also relate to allelopathy. Hereupon, dose-response applications with living donor plants demonstrate the validity of these principles for density-dependent phytotoxicity of allelochemicals produced and released by living plants (Avena sativa L., Secale cereale L., Triticum L. spp.), and reveal the use of such experiments for initial considerations about basic principles of allelopathy. Results confirm that nonlinearity applies to allelopathy, and the study of allelopathic effects in dose-response experiments allows for new and challenging insights into allelopathic interactions.

  7. Dose distributions around selectron applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, C.; Evans, M.D.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1987-11-01

    Measured and calculated dose distributions around selectron applicators, loaded with /sup 60/Co high dose rate pellets, are presented. The effect of the stopping screw, spacers, pellets themselves and the applicator wall on the dose distribution is discussed. The measured dose distribution is in almost perfect agreement with the calculated distribution in planes perpendicular to the applicator axis and containing a source. On the applicator axis directly below the applicator the measured dose amounts to about 75% of the calculated value, when only the stopping screw attenuates the beam from a pellet. When the beam is attenuated by spacers in addition to the stopping screw, the discrepancy between the calculated and measured dose may exceed 50%. Clinically relevant source geometries are also discussed. It is shown that for most regions around the applicator the method of a simple addition of dose contributions from individual point sources is an acceptable approximation for the calculation of dose distributions around the selectron applicators.

  8. Evaluating dose response from flexible dose clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baron David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The true dose effect in flexible-dose clinical trials may be obscured and even reversed because dose and outcome are related. Methods To evaluate dose effect in response on primary efficacy scales from 2 randomized, double-blind, flexible-dose trials of patients with bipolar mania who received olanzapine (N = 234, 5–20 mg/day, or patients with schizophrenia who received olanzapine (N = 172, 10–20 mg/day, we used marginal structural models, inverse probability of treatment weighting (MSM, IPTW methodology. Dose profiles for mean changes from baseline were evaluated using weighted MSM with a repeated measures model. To adjust for selection bias due to non-random dose assignment and dropouts, patient-specific time-dependent weights were determined as products of (i stable weights based on inverse probability of receiving the sequence of dose assignments that was actually received by a patient up to given time multiplied by (ii stable weights based on inverse probability of patient remaining on treatment by that time. Results were compared with those by unweighted analyses. Results While the observed difference in efficacy scores for dose groups for the unweighted analysis strongly favored lower doses, the weighted analyses showed no strong dose effects and, in some cases, reversed the apparent "negative dose effect." Conclusion While naïve comparison of groups by last or modal dose in a flexible-dose trial may result in severely biased efficacy analyses, the MSM with IPTW estimators approach may be a valuable method of removing these biases and evaluating potential dose effect, which may prove useful for planning confirmatory trials.

  9. Analysis on the entrance surface dose and contrast medium dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young Hyun [Dept. of Cardiovascular Center, Yeocheon Jeonnam Hospital, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Choi, Nam Gil; Song, Jong Nam [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study aimed to identify dose reduction measures by retrospectively analyzing the entrance surface dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination and to contribute the patients with renal impairmend and a high probability of side effects to determine the inspection's direction by measuring the contrast usages actually to active actions for the dose by actually measuring the contrast medium dose. The CTDIvol value and air kerma value, which are the entrance surface doses of the two examinations, and the contrast medium dose depending on the number of slides were compared and analyzed. This study was conducted in 21 subjects (11 males; 10 females) who underwent Cardiac Computed Tomographic Angiography (CCTA) and Coronary Angiography (CAG) in this hospital during the period from May 2014 to May 2016. The subject's age was 48-85 years old (mean 65±10 years old), and the weight was 37.6~83.3 kg (mean 63±6 kg). Dose reduction could be expected in the cardiovascular examination using CCTA rather than in the examination using CAG. In terms of contrast medium dose, CAG used a smaller dose than CCTA. In particular, as the number of slides increases at CAG, the contrast medium dose increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the contrast medium dose, the number of slides suitable for the scan range must be selected.

  10. dose in cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Siavashpour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the optimum organ filling point for organs at risk (OARs dose in cervical cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. Material and methods : In a retrospective study, 32 locally advanced cervical cancer patients (97 insertions who were treated with 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy during 2010-2013 were included. Rotterdam HDR tandem-ovoid applicators were used and computed tomography (CT scanning was performed after each insertion. The OARs delineation and GEC-ESTRO-based clinical target volumes (CTVs contouring was followed by 3D forward planning. Then, dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of organs were recorded and patients were classified based on their OARs volumes, as well as their inserted tandem length. Results : The absorbed dose to point A ranged between 6.5-7.5 Gy. D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³ of the bladder significantly increased with the bladder volume enlargement (p value < 0.05. By increasing the bladder volume up to about 140 cm3, the rectum dose was also increased. For the cases with bladder volumes higher than 140 cm3, the rectum dose decreased. For bladder volumes lower than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose decreased; however, for bladder volumes higher than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose increased. The D 2cm ³ of the bladder and rectum were higher for longer tandems than for shorter ones, respectively. The divergence of the obtained results for different tandem lengths became wider by the extension of the bladder volume. The rectum and sigmoid volume had a direct impact on increasing their D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³, as well as decreasing their D 10 , D 30 , and D 50 . Conclusions : There is a relationship between the volumes of OARs and their received doses. Selecting a bladder with a volume of about 70 cm3 or less proved to be better with regards to the dose to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid.

  11. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  12. Equivalent normalized total dose estimates in cyberknife radiotherapy dose delivery in prostate cancer hypofractionation regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudahar, H; Kurup, P G G; Murali, V; Mahadev, P; Velmurugan, J

    2012-04-01

    As the α/β value of prostate is very small and lower than the surrounding critical organs, hypofractionated radiotherapy became a vital mode of treatment of prostate cancer. Cyberknife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) treatment for localized prostate cancer is performed in hypofractionated dose regimen alone. Effective dose escalation in the hypofractionated regimen can be estimated if the corresponding conventional 2 Gy per fraction equivalent normalized total dose (NTD) distribution is known. The present study aims to analyze the hypofractionated dose distribution of localized prostate cancer in terms of equivalent NTD. Randomly selected 12 localized prostate cases treated in cyberknife with a dose regimen of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions were considered. The 2 Gy per fraction equivalent NTDs were calculated using the formula derived from the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Dose distributions were analyzed with the corresponding NTDs. The conformity index for the prescribed target dose of 36.25 Gy equivalent to the NTD dose of 90.63 Gy (α/β = 1.5) or 74.31 Gy (α/β = 3) was ranging between 1.15 and 1.73 with a mean value of 1.32 ± 0.15. The D5% of the target was 111.41 ± 8.66 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 90.15 ± 6.57 Gy for α/β = 3. Similarly, the D95% was 91.98 ± 3.77 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 75.35 ± 2.88 Gy for α/β = 3. The mean values of bladder and rectal volume receiving the prescribed dose of 36.25 Gy were 0.83 cm3 and 0.086 cm3, respectively. NTD dose analysis shows an escalated dose distribution within the target for low α/β (1.5 Gy) with reasonable sparing of organs at risk. However, the higher α/β of prostate (3 Gy) is not encouraging the fact of dose escalation in cyberknife hypofractionated dose regimen of localized prostate cancer.

  13. A Range-Shift Technique for TOF Range Image Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Tomonari; Ito, Kana; Nakayama, Masakatsu; Kawahito, Shoji

    In Time-of-Flight (TOF) range image sensors using periodical pulsed light, there is a trade-off between the maximum range and range resolution. This paper proposes a range-shift technique for improving range resolution of the TOF range image sensor without sacrificing the measurement range. The range-shift operation uses a TOF range imaging pixel with periodical charge draining structure and several time-shifted short pulses. The use of the short pulse can improve the range resolution. The range image using the range-shift technique is synthesized with several sub-frames, each acquires one of the shifted range images. The use of the small duty-ratio pulse leads to reducing the effect of ambient light and improving the range resolution. The range-shift technique is tested with an implemented TOF range image sensor and it is found that the range resolution is improved to 2cm using a 10ns light pulse and 7 overlapped shifted ranges for the measurement range of 0.5m to 4.0m.

  14. Quantification of Proton Dose Calculation Accuracy in the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, Clemens, E-mail: Grassberger.Clemens@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Center for Proton Radiotherapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Daartz, Juliane; Dowdell, Stephen; Ruggieri, Thomas; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the accuracy of a clinical proton treatment planning system (TPS) as well as Monte Carlo (MC)–based dose calculation through measurements and to assess the clinical impact in a cohort of patients with tumors located in the lung. Methods and Materials: A lung phantom and ion chamber array were used to measure the dose to a plane through a tumor embedded in the lung, and to determine the distal fall-off of the proton beam. Results were compared with TPS and MC calculations. Dose distributions in 19 patients (54 fields total) were simulated using MC and compared to the TPS algorithm. Results: MC increased dose calculation accuracy in lung tissue compared with the TPS and reproduced dose measurements in the target to within ±2%. The average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target was 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients showed a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. For large tumors, MC also predicted consistently higher V5 and V10 to the normal lung, because of a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target could show large deviations, although this effect was highly patient specific. Range measurements showed that MC can reduce range uncertainty by a factor of ∼2: the average (maximum) difference to the measured range was 3.9 mm (7.5 mm) for MC and 7 mm (17 mm) for the TPS in lung tissue. Conclusion: Integration of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. In addition, the ability to confidently reduce range margins would benefit all patients by potentially lowering toxicity.

  15. Effective dose and dose to crystalline lens during angiographic procedures; Dose effective et dose au cristallin lors de procedures angiographiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pages, J. [QUARAD and Radiology Dept., Vvije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    The highest radiation doses levels received by radiologists are observed during interventional procedures. Doses to forehead and neck received by a radiologist executing angiographic examinations at the department of radiology at the academic hospital (AZ-VUB) have been measured for a group of 34 examinations. The doses to crystalline lens and the effective doses for a period of one year have been estimated. For the crystalline lens the maximum dose approaches the ICRP limit, that indicates the necessity for the radiologist to use leaded glasses. (N.C.)

  16. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  17. Peripheral doses of cranial pediatric IMRT performed with attenuator blocks; Doses perifericas de IMRT cranial pediatrica realizada com blocos atenuadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger; Schitz, Ivette; Schelin, Hugo Reuters, E-mail: soboll@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: iveteschitz@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Silva, Ricardo Goulart da, E-mail: ricardo.goulart@ymail.co [Hospital Angelina Caron, Campina Grande do Sul, PR (Brazil); Viamonte, Alfredo, E-mail: aviamonte@inca.gov.b [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper presents values of peripheral doses measured at six vital points of simulator objects which represent the ages of 2, 5 and 10 years old, submitted to a cranial IMRT procedure that applied compensator blocks interposed to 6 MV beams. The found values indicate that there is independence of dose with position of measurements and age of the patient, as the peripheral dose at the points nearest and the 2 year old simulator object where larger. The doses in thyroid reached the range of 1.4 to 2.9% of the dose prescribed in the isocenter, indicating that the peripheral doses for IMRT that employ compensator blocks can be greater than for the IMRT produced with sliding window technique

  18. Dose assessment of an accidental exposure at the IPNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Torres, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    Seven different methods were used to estimate the dose rate to a female worker who was accidentally exposed in the neutron PHOENIX beamline at the IPNS. Theoretical and measured entrance dose ranged from 550 mrem/min to 2850 mrem/min. Theoretical estimates were based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a spectrum provided by IPNS (Crawford Spectrum). Dose measurements were made with TLDs on phantoms and with ionization chambers in a water phantom. Estimates of the whole body total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) rate ranged from 5.2 mrem/min to 840 mrem/min. Assumed and measured quality factors ranged from 2.6 to 11.8. Cytogenetic analyses of blood samples detected no positive exposure. The recommended TEDE rate was 158 mrem/min. The TEDE was 750 mrem.

  19. Dose assessment of an accidental exposure at IPNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, M.M.C.

    1996-05-01

    Seven different methods were used to estimate the dose rate to a female worker who was accidentally exposed in the neutron PHOENIX beamline at the IPNS. Theoretical and measured entrance dose rates ranged from 550 mrem/min to 2,850 mrem/min. Theoretical estimates were based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a spectrum provided by IPNS (Crawford Spectrum). Dose measurements were made with TLDs on phantoms and with ionization chambers in a water phantom. Estimates of the whole body total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) rate ranged from 5.2 mrem/min to 840 mrem/min. Assumed and measured quality factors ranged from 2.6 to 11.8. Cytogenic analyses of blood samples detected no positive exposure. The recommended TEDE rate was 158 mrem/min. The TEDE was 750 mrem.

  20. Evaluation of Serum Lipid, Thyroid, and Hepatic Clinical Chemistries in Association With Serum Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) in Cynomolgus Monkeys After Oral Dosing With Potassium PFOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bruce C.; Andres, Kara L.; Ehresman, David J.; Falvo, Ria; Provencher, Anne; Olsen, Geary W.; Butenhoff, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract An oral dose study with perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was undertaken to identify potential associations between serum PFOS and changes in serum clinical chemistry parameters in purpose-bred young adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). In this study, control group (n = 6/sex) was sham-dosed with vehicle (0.5% Tween 20 and 5% ethanol in water), low-dose group (n = 6/sex) received 1 single K+PFOS dose (9 mg/kg), and high-dose group (n = 4–6/sex) received 3 separate K+ PFOS doses (11–17.2 mg/kg). Monkeys were given routine checkups and observed carefully for health problems on a daily basis. Scheduled blood samples were drawn from all monkeys prior to, during, and after K+PFOS administration for up to 1 year and they were analyzed for PFOS concentrations and clinical chemistry markers for coagulation, lipids, hepatic, renal, electrolytes, and thyroid-related hormones. No mortality occurred during the study. All the monkeys were healthy, gained weight, and were released back to the colony at the end of the study. The highest serum PFOS achieved was approximately 165 μg/ml. When compared with time-matched controls, administration of K+PFOS to monkeys did not result in any toxicologically meaningful or clinically relevant changes in serum clinical measurements for coagulation, lipids, hepatic, renal, electrolytes, and thyroid-related hormones. A slight reduction in serum cholesterol (primarily the high-density lipoprotein fraction), although not toxicologically significant, was observed. The corresponding lower-bound fifth percentile benchmark concentrations (BMCL1sd) were 74 and 76 μg/ml for male and female monkeys, respectively. Compared to the 2013–2014 geometric mean serum PFOS level of 4.99 ng/ml (0.00499 μg/ml) in US general population reported by CDC NHANES, this represents 4 orders of magnitude for margin of exposure. PMID:28115654

  1. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  2. Effects of dose and dose protraction on embryotoxicity of 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, D.A.; Buck, S.J. [Alfred I. duPont Institute, Wilmington, DE (United States)]|[Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Solomon, H.M. [SmithKline and Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (United States); Gorson, R.O. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mills, R.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Brent, R.L. [Alfred I. duPont Institute, Wilmington, DE (United States)]|[Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The embryotoxic effects of neutron radiation on rodent embryos are documented, but there is disagreement about the dose-response relationship and the impact of protracting the dose. Pregnant rats were exposed to total absorbed doses of 0.15 to 1.50 Gy 14.1 MeV neutrons on day 9.5 after conception, coincident with the most sensitive stage of embryonic development for the induction of major congenital malformations. In general terms, the incidence of embryotoxic effects increased with increasing total absorbed dose. However, the dose-response relationship differed depending on the parameter of embryotoxicity chosen, namely, intrauterine death, malformations or very low body weight. In a second study, embryos were exposed to a single embryotoxic absorbed dose (0.75 Gy) administered at a range of dose rates, from 0.10 to 0.50 Gy/h. The results offer no evidence that protraction of this selected dose significantly increased or decreased the incidence or pattern of embryotoxicity of the neutron exposure used in this study. The results do not support the hypothesis of a linear dose-response relationship for the effects of prenatal neutron irradiation that contribute to embryotoxicity for total absorbed doses of 0.15 to 1.50 Gy. 23 refs., 8 tabs.

  3. Phenytoin dose adjustment in epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawer, G E; Mullen, P W; Rodgers, M; Robins, A J; Lucas, S B

    1974-04-01

    1 A preliminary survey showed that many outpatients with partially controlled epilepsy had serum concentrations of phenytoin below the recommended therapeutic range (10-20 μg/ml). A phenytoin tolerance test was devised with the intention of predicting a more adequate daily dose for such a patient. 2 Fifteen patients were each given an oral test dose of 600 mg phenytoin sodium and the serum concentration of phenytoin was measured at intervals over 48 h; the concentration rose during the first 4 h and decayed between 12-48 h as an almost linear function of time. 3 The serum concentration/time curves were fitted by an interative computer program based on the Michaelis-Menten equation. The mean saturated rate of elimination of phenytoin was 435 mg/day and the serum concentration (K(m)) corresponding with 50% saturation was 3.8 μg/ml. The mean calculated dose of phenytoin sodium required for a steady state serum concentration of 10-20 μg/ml was 345-400 mg/day. 4 The Michaelis-Menten principle was used to predict steady state serum phenytoin concentrations in individual patients receiving daily doses of phenytoin sodium adjusted by steps of 100 mg. The serum concentrations tended to be either too low or too high. The steep relationship between phenytoin concentration and dose indicates that when the concentration reaches 5-10 μg/ml it is then appropriate to adjust dose by small steps of about 25 mg.

  4. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  5. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard

    X-ray computer tomography has many benefits to medical and research applications. Recently, over the last decade CT has had a large increase in usage in hospitals and medical diagnosis. In pediatric care, from 2000 to 2006, abdominal CT scans increased by 49 % and chest CT by 425 % in the emergency room (Broder 2007). Enormous amounts of effort have been performed across multiple academic and government groups to determine an accurate measure of organ dose to patients who undergo a CT scan due to the inherent risks with ionizing radiation. Considering these intrinsic risks, CT dose estimating software becomes a necessary tool that health care providers and radiologist must use to determine many metrics to base the risks versus rewards of having an x-ray CT scan. This thesis models the resultant organ dose as body mass increases for patients with all other related scan parameters fixed. In addition to this,this thesis compares a modern dose estimating software, VirtualDose CT to two other programs, CT-Expo and ImPACT CT. The comparison shows how the software's theoretical basis and the phantom they use to represent the human body affect the range of results in organ dose. CT-Expo and ImPACT CT dose estimating software uses a different model for anatomical representation of the organs in the human body and the results show how that approach dramatically changes the outcome. The results categorizes four datasets as compared to the three software types where the appropriate phantom was available. Modeling was done to simulate chest abdominal pelvis scans and whole body scans. Organ dose difference versus body mass index shows as body mass index (BMI) ranges from 23.5 kg/m 2 to 45 kg/m2 the amount of organ dose also trends a percent change from -4.58 to -176.19 %. Comparing organ dose difference with increasing x-ray tube potential from 120 kVp to 140 kVp the percent change in organ dose increases from 55 % to 65 % across all phantoms. In comparing VirtualDose to CT

  6. PABLM. Accumulated Environment Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E.Jr.; Soldat, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-04-01

    PABLM calculates internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release, after deposition, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider exposure to radionuclides deposited on the ground or crops from contaminated air or irrigation water, radionuclides in contaminated drinking water, aquatic foods raised in contaminated water, and radionuclides in bodies of water and sediments where people might fish, boat, or swim. For vegetation, the radiation dose model considers both direct deposition and uptake through roots. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The program is designed to calculate accumulated radiation doses from the chronic ingestion of food products that contain radionuclides and doses from the external exposure to radionuclides in the environment. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years.

  7. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-07-08

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases.

  8. Range assessment in particle therapy based on prompt gamma-ray timing measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golnik, Christian; Hueso-Gonzalez, Fernando; Muller, Andreas; Dendooven, Peter; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Fiedler, Fine; Kormoll, Thomas; Roemer, Katja; Petzoldt, Johannes; Wagner, Andreas; Pausch, Guntram

    2014-01-01

    Proton and ion beams open up new vistas for the curative treatment of tumors, but adequate technologies for monitoring the compliance of dose delivery with treatment plans in real time are still missing. Range assessment, meaning the monitoring of therapy-particle ranges in tissue during dose

  9. Maximum embryo absorbed dose from intravenous urography: interhospital variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilakis, J.; Perisinakis, K. [University of Crete (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics; Koukourakis, M. [University of Crete (Greece). Dept. of Radiology; Gourtsoyiannis, N. [University Hospital of Iraklion, Crete (Greece). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum embryo dose during intravenous urography (IVU) examinations, when inadvertent irradiation of a pregnant woman occurs, and to investigate the variation of doses received from different institutions. Doses at average embryo depth from IVU examinations have been measured in four institutions using a Rando phantom and thermoluminescent crystals. In order to estimate the maximum range of embryo doses, radiologists were asked to carry out the examinations with the same technique as in female patients with acute ureteral obstruction. The range of doses estimated at embryo depth for the institutions participating in this study was 5.77 to 35.2 mGy. The considerable interhospital variation found in dose can be explained by different equipment and techniques used. A simple method of estimating embryo dose from pelvic radiographs reported previously was found to be also applicable to IVU examinations. Absorbed dose at 6 cm, the average embryo depth, was found significantly less than 50 mGy. (Author).

  10. Evaluation of various approaches for assessing dose indicators and patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampado, Osvaldo, E-mail: orampado@cittadellasalute.to.it; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Rossetti, Veronica; Ropolo, Roberto [Struttura Complessa Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Città della Salute e della Scienza, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Turin, Torino 10126 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate various approaches for assessing patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT (CBCT), by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms, a Monte Carlo based dose calculation software, and different dose indicators as presently defined. Methods: Dose evaluations were performed on a CBCT Elekta XVI (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for different protocols and anatomical regions. The first part of the study focuses on using PCXMC software (PCXMC 2.0, STUK, Helsinki, Finland) for calculating organ doses, adapting the input parameters to simulate the exposure geometry, and beam dose distribution in an appropriate way. The calculated doses were compared to readouts of TLDs placed in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. After this validation, the software was used for analyzing organ dose variability associated with patients’ differences in size and gender. At the same time, various dose indicators were evaluated: kerma area product (KAP), cumulative air-kerma at the isocenter (K{sub air}), cone-beam dose index, and central cumulative dose. The latter was evaluated in a single phantom and in a stack of three adjacent computed tomography dose index phantoms. Based on the different dose indicators, a set of coefficients was calculated to estimate organ doses for a range of patient morphologies, using their equivalent diameters. Results: Maximum organ doses were about 1 mGy for head and neck and 25 mGy for chest and pelvis protocols. The differences between PCXMC and TLDs doses were generally below 10% for organs within the field of view and approximately 15% for organs at the boundaries of the radiation beam. When considering patient size and gender variability, differences in organ doses up to 40% were observed especially in the pelvic region; for the organs in the thorax, the maximum differences ranged between 20% and 30%. Phantom dose indexes provided better correlation with organ

  11. Dose from slow negative muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siiskonen, T

    2008-01-01

    Conversion coefficients from fluence to ambient dose equivalent, from fluence to maximum dose equivalent and quality factors for slow negative muons are examined in detail. Negative muons, when stopped, produce energetic photons, electrons and a variety of high-LET particles. Contribution from each particle type to the dose equivalent is calculated. The results show that for the high-LET particles the details of energy spectra and decay yields are important for accurate dose estimates. For slow negative muons the ambient dose equivalent does not always yield a conservative estimate for the protection quantities. Especially, the skin equivalent dose is strongly underestimated if the radiation-weighting factor of unity for slow muons is used. Comparisons to earlier studies are presented.

  12. Radiation doses to neonates requiring intensive care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, A. (Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield (UK)); Dellagrammaticas, H.D. (Sheffield Univ. (UK))

    1983-06-01

    Radiological investigations have become accepted as an important part of the range of facilities required to support severely ill newborn babies. Since the infants are so small, many of the examinations are virtually ''whole-body'' irradiations and it was thought that the total doses received might be appreciable. A group of such babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Sheffield over a six-month period have been studied. X-ray exposure factors used for each examination have been noted and total skin, gonad and bone marrow doses calculated, supplemented by measurements on phantoms. It is concluded that in most cases doses received are of the same order as those received over the same period from natural background radiation and probably less than those received from prenatal obstetric radiography, so that the additional risks from the diagnostic exposure are small. The highest doses are received in CT scans and barium examinations and it is recommended that the need for these should be carefully considered.

  13. The nasal distribution of metered dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, S P; Morén, P F; Clarke, S W

    1987-02-01

    The intranasal distribution of aerosol from a metered dose inhaler has been assessed using a radiotracer technique. Inhalers were prepared by adding 99Tcm-labelled Teflon particles (simulating the drug particles) to chlorofluorocarbon propellants, and scans of the head (and chest) taken with a gamma camera. Ten healthy subjects (age range 19-29 years) each performed two radioaerosol studies with the inhaler held in two different ways: either in a single position (vial pointing upwards) or in two positions (vial pointing upwards and then tilted by 30 degrees in the sagittal plane). The vast majority of the dose (82.5 +/- 2.8 (mean +/- SEM) per cent and 80.7 +/- 3.1 per cent respectively for one-position and two-position studies) was deposited on a single localized area in the anterior one-third of the nose, the initial distribution pattern being identical for each study. No significant radioaerosol was detected in the lungs. Only 18.0 +/- 4.7 per cent and 15.4 +/- 4.1 per cent of the dose had been removed by mucociliary action after 30 minutes, and it is probable that the remainder had not penetrated initially beyond the vestibule. Since the deposition pattern was highly localized and more than half the dose probably failed to reach the turbinates it is possible that the overall effect of nasal MDIs is suboptimal for the treatment of generalized nasal disorders.

  14. Is low dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy as effective for inflammation and remodeling in asthma? : A randomized, parallel group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baraket, Melissa; Oliver, Brian G G; Burgess, Janette K; Lim, Sam; King, Gregory G; Black, Judith L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While most of the clinical benefits of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy may occur at low doses, results of dose-ranging studies are inconsistent. Although symptom/lung function response to low and high dose ICS medication is comparable, it is uncertain whether low dose ICSs are as ef

  15. Dose response problems in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, K S

    1979-03-01

    The estimation of risks from exposure to carcinogens is an important problem from the viewpoint of protection of human health. It also poses some very difficult dose-response problems. Two dose-response models may fit experimental data about equally well and yet predict responses that differ by many orders of magnitude at low doses. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis are not sufficiently understood so that the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses can be satisfactorily predicted. Mathematical theories of carcinogenesis and statistical procedures can be of use with dose-reponse problems such as this and, in addition, can lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. In this paper, mathematical dose-response models of carcinogenesis are considered as well as various proposed dose-response procedures for estimating carcinogenic risks at low doses. Areas are suggested in which further work may be useful. These areas include experimental design problems, statistical procedures for use with time-to-occurrence data, and mathematical models that incorporate such biological features as pharmacokinetics of carcinogens, synergistic effects, DNA repair, susceptible subpopulations, and immune reactions.

  16. Dosimetric accuracy of tomotherapy dose calculation in thorax lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangili Paola

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyse limits and capabilities in dose calculation of collapsed-cone-convolution (CCC algorithm implemented in helical tomotherapy (HT treatment planning system for thorax lesions. Methods The agreement between measured and calculated dose was verified both in homogeneous (Cheese Phantom and in a custom-made inhomogeneous phantom. The inhomogeneous phantom was employed to mimic a patient's thorax region with lung density encountered in extreme cases and acrylic inserts of various dimensions and positions inside the lung cavity. For both phantoms, different lung treatment plans (single or multiple metastases and targets in the mediastinum using HT technique were simulated and verified. Point and planar dose measurements, both with radiographic extended-dose-range (EDR2 and radiochromic external-beam-therapy (EBT2 films, were performed. Absolute point dose measurements, dose profile comparisons and quantitative analysis of gamma function distributions were analyzed. Results An excellent agreement between measured and calculated dose distributions was found in homogeneous media, both for point and planar dose measurements. Absolute dose deviations Conclusions Very acceptable accuracy was found for complex lung treatment plans calculated with CCC algorithm implemented in the tomotherapy TPS even in the heterogeneous phantom with very low lung-density.

  17. Dose energy dependence in proton imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denyak, V.V., E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Federal University of Technology - Parana, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Paschuk, S.A.; Schelin, H.R.; Rocha, R.L.; Setti, J.A.P.; Klock, M.C.L.; Evseev, I.G. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Yevseyeva, O.I. [Polytechnic Institute of the Rio de Janeiro State University, Nova Friburgo 28610-970 (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In the earliest works dedicated to proton radiography and proton computed tomography it was shown that the advantage of image creation using proton beams appears when the energy is chosen as small as possible, but enough to pass the object. This phenomenon is based on the great sensitivity of the energy flux of the proton beam in relation to the length and density of the object at the end of the proton range. However, this fact was proved experimentally only with thin detectors, such as photographic films, which detect only part of the exit energy of protons. Another method which is based on the measurement of total exit energy of protons contains two effects that act in opposite ways: the necessary irradiation dose increases when the energy of the proton is reduced. In this work, the dependence of the irradiation dose on proton initial energy was studied using analytical formulas and computer simulations. The investigation shows that the irradiation dose depends slightly on the proton energy beyond the region at the end of the proton range and increases sharply in it.

  18. Limitations of analytical dose calculations for small field proton radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Changran; Daartz, Juliane; Lam-Tin-Cheung, Kimberley; Bussiere, Marc; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to evaluate the dosimetric uncertainties of an analytical dose calculation engine and the impact on treatment plans using small fields in intracranial proton stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS) for a gantry based double scattering system. 50 patients were evaluated including 10 patients for each of 5 diagnostic indications of: arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma (AN), meningioma (MGM), metastasis (METS), and pituitary adenoma (PIT). Treatment plans followed standard prescription and optimization procedures for PSRS. We performed comparisons between delivered dose distributions, determined by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and those calculated with the analytical dose calculation algorithm (ADC) used in our current treatment planning system in terms of dose volume histogram parameters and beam range distributions. Results show that the difference in the dose to 95% of the target (D95) is within 6% when applying measured field size output corrections for AN, MGM, and PIT. However, for AVM and METS, the differences can be as great as 10% and 12%, respectively. Normalizing the MC dose to the ADC dose based on the dose of voxels in a central area of the target reduces the difference of the D95 to within 6% for all sites. The generally applied margin to cover uncertainties in range (3.5% of the prescribed range  +  1 mm) is not sufficient to cover the range uncertainty for ADC in all cases, especially for patients with high tissue heterogeneity. The root mean square of the R90 difference, the difference in the position of distal falloff to 90% of the prescribed dose, is affected by several factors, especially the patient geometry heterogeneity, modulation and field diameter. In conclusion, implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic can reduce the uncertainty of the target dose for proton stereotactic radiosurgery. If MC is not available for treatment planning, using MC dose distributions to

  19. Evaluation of skin dose in tomographic radiographs of temporomandibular joint; Avaliacao da dose pele em radiografias tomograficas da articulacao tempromandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, S.B.; Chaves, F.C.; Rocha, F.E.F.C. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica e Odontologia Preventiva; Khoury, H.J. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear]. E-mail: khoury@elogica.com.br

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the skin entrance dose, in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunctions submitted to computerized tomography. For this purpose, in a private medical establishment, in the city of Recife-Pe/Br, 40 patients were evaluated, in according to radiation doses received in eyes, thyroid and TMJ regions. The value found for eye region range from 0.004 to 0.125 mGy, for thyroid range from 0.002 to 0.113 mGy and for TMJ range from 0.112 to 0.541 mGy.

  20. Analysis of dose distribution of Leipzig conical applicator; Analise da distribuicao de dose do aplicador conico tipo Leipzig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Ricardo H.; Flosi, Adriana A. [A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The dose distribution of Leipzig conical metallic applicators compared to the dose distribution calculated through a planning system with calculation algorithm based on TG43 was analyzed, since this algorithm does not take into account the heterogeneities present. The dose distribution of the subject applicator associated with a GammaMed Plus iX®, used in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Iridium 192 source was observed. The batch calibration of EBT2 films with a 6MV beam of a Clinac 600C® linear accelerator was performed for the dose range of 0.1Gy to 8.0Gy. The experiment was performed with each applicator of the available set, with different diameters, being used as a function of the size of the lesion to be treated, positioned on a solid water phantom with 10cm depth, offering scattering conditions.It was prescribed 4.0Gy at 3mm depth. The surface dose was observed at 3, 5 and 7mm depth, using solid water plates between the applicator and the film. Using an Epson scanner, images were obtained, which can be analyzed by Image J software, allowing the calibration of the batch of films and analysis of the dose distribution of the applicator. Afterwards, the simulation of the cited experiment was carried out in a commercial planning system. Dose superficiality was observed, being larger in experiment (27.8%), and absolute dose deviation in depth with that observed in the planning system, being smaller in experiment (7.5%)

  1. An example of problems in dose reconstruction from doses formed by electromagnetic irradiation by different energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Vladimir; Kuchuro, Joseph; Tolstik, Sergey; Leonova, Tatyana

    2010-02-01

    Dose reconstruction for citizens of Belarus affected by the Chernobyl accident showed an unexpectedly wide range of doses. Using the EPR tooth enamel dosimetry method, it has been demonstrated that when the tooth enamel dose was formed due to x-rays with effective energy of 34 keV and the additional irradiation of enamel samples was performed by gamma radiation with mean energy of 1,250 keV, it led to a considerable increase in the reconstructed absorbed dose as compared with the applied. In the case when the dose was formed due to gamma radiation and the additional irradiation was performed by x-rays, it led to a considerable decrease in the reconstructed dose as compared with the applied. When the dose formation and the additional irradiation were carried out from external sources of electromagnetic radiation of equal energy, the reconstructed dose value was close to that of the applied. The obtained data show that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses by the EPR tooth enamel spectra, it is necessary to take into account the contribution from diagnostic x-ray examination of the teeth, jaw, and skull of some individuals who were exposed to a combined effect of the external gamma radiation and x-rays.

  2. Comparison of low dose with standard dose abdominal/pelvic multidetector CT in patients with stage 1 testicular cancer under surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Malley, Martin E. [Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chung, Peter; Warde, Padraig [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Haider, Masoom; Jhaveri, Kartik; Khalili, Korosh [Princess Margaret Hospital, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jang, Hyun-Jung [Toronto General Hospital, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Panzarella, Tony [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-15

    To compare the image quality and acceptability of a low dose with those of standard dose abdominal/pelvic multidetector CT in patients with stage 1 testicular cancer managed by surveillance. One hundred patients (median age 31 years; range 19-83 years), 79 with seminoma and 21 with non-seminoma, underwent abdominal/pelvic imaging with low and standard dose protocols on 64-slice multidetector CT. Three reviewers independently evaluated images for noise and diagnostic quality on a 5-point scale and for diagnostic acceptability. On average, each reader scored noise and diagnostic quality of standard dose images significantly better than corresponding low dose images (p < 0.0001). One reader found all CT examinations acceptable; two readers each found 1/100 (1%) low dose examinations unacceptable. Median and mean dose-length product for low and standard dose protocols were 416.0 and 452.2 (range 122.9-913.4) and 931.9 and 999.8 (range 283.8-1,987.7) mGy cm, respectively. The low dose protocol provided diagnostically acceptable images for at least 99% of patients and achieved mean dose reduction of 55% compared with the standard dose protocol. (orig.)

  3. Assessment of patient and occupational dose in established and new applications of MDCT fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joemai, Raoul M S; Zweers, Dirk; Obermann, Wim R; Geleijns, Jacob

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to assess patient dose and occupational dose in established and new applications of MDCT fluoroscopy. Electronic personal dosimeters were used to measure occupational dose equivalent. Effective patient dose was derived from the recorded dose-length product. Acquisition parameters that were observed during CT fluoroscopy (CTF) provided the basis for the estimation of an entrance skin dose profile. Two hundred ten CT-guided interventional procedures were included in the study. The median effective patient dose was 10 mSv (range, 0.1-235 mSv; 107 procedures). The median peak entrance skin dose was 0.4 Sv (0.1-2.1 Sv; 27 procedures). From 547 measurements of occupational dose equivalent, a median occupational effective dose of 3 muSv per procedure was derived for the interventional radiologists and 0.4 muSv per procedure for the assisting radiologists and radiology technologists. The estimated maximum occupational effective dose reached 0.4 mSv. The study revealed high effective patient doses, up to 235 mSv, mainly for relatively new applications such as CTF-guided radiofrequency ablations using MDCT, vertebroplasty, and percutaneous ethanol injections of tumors. Entrance doses were occasionally in the range of the warning level for deterministic skin effects but were always below the threshold for serious deterministic effects. The complexity of the procedure, expected benefits of the treatment, and general health state of the patient contribute to the justification of observed high effective patient doses.

  4. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship for Heart Disease With Low-Dose Radiation Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eugene [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Corbett, James R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Marsh, Robin B.; Feng, Mary; Jagsi, Reshma; Kessler, Marc L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ficaro, Edward C. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pierce, Lori J., E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify cardiac radiation therapy (RT) exposure using sensitive measures of cardiac dysfunction; and to correlate dysfunction with heart doses, in the setting of adjuvant RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: On a randomized trial, 32 women with node-positive left-sided breast cancer underwent pre-RT stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion scans. Patients received RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes to doses of 50 to 52.2 Gy. Repeat SPECT-CT scans were performed 1 year after RT. Perfusion defects (PD), summed stress defects scores (SSS), and ejection fractions (EF) were evaluated. Doses to the heart and coronary arteries were quantified. Results: The mean difference in pre- and post-RT PD was −0.38% ± 3.20% (P=.68), with no clinically significant defects. To assess for subclinical effects, PD were also examined using a 1.5-SD below the normal mean threshold, with a mean difference of 2.53% ± 12.57% (P=.38). The mean differences in SSS and EF before and after RT were 0.78% ± 2.50% (P=.08) and 1.75% ± 7.29% (P=.39), respectively. The average heart Dmean and D95 were 2.82 Gy (range, 1.11-6.06 Gy) and 0.90 Gy (range, 0.13-2.17 Gy), respectively. The average Dmean and D95 to the left anterior descending artery were 7.22 Gy (range, 2.58-18.05 Gy) and 3.22 Gy (range, 1.23-6.86 Gy), respectively. No correlations were found between cardiac doses and changes in PD, SSS, and EF. Conclusions: Using sensitive measures of cardiac function, no clinically significant defects were found after RT, with the average heart Dmean <5 Gy. Although a dose response may exist for measures of cardiac dysfunction at higher doses, no correlation was found in the present study for low doses delivered to cardiac structures and perfusion, SSS, or EF.

  5. Dose calculations for intakes of ore dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, R.S

    1998-08-01

    This report describes a methodology for calculating the committed effective dose for mixtures of radionuclides, such as those which occur in natural radioactive ores and dusts. The formulae are derived from first principles, with the use of reasonable assumptions concerning the nature and behaviour of the radionuclide mixtures. The calculations are complicated because these `ores` contain a range of particle sizes, have different degrees of solubility in blood and other body fluids, and also have different biokinetic clearance characteristics from the organs and tissues in the body. The naturally occurring radionuclides also tend to occur in series, i.e. one is produced by the radioactive decay of another `parent` radionuclide. The formulae derived here can be used, in conjunction with a model such as LUDEP, for calculating total dose resulting from inhalation and/or ingestion of a mixture of radionuclides, and also for deriving annual limits on intake and derived air concentrations for these mixtures. 15 refs., 14 tabs., 3 figs.

  6. Thyroid dose distribution in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bristow, R.G.; Wood, R.E.; Clark, G.M. (Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto (Canada))

    1989-10-01

    The anatomic position and proven radiosensitivity of the thyroid gland make it an organ of concern in dental radiography. A calibrated thermoluminescent dosimetry system was used to investigate the absorbed dose (microGy) to the thyroid gland resultant from a minimum irradiated volume, intraoral full-mouth radiography technique with the use of rectangular collimation with a lead-backed image receptor, and conventional panoramic radiography performed with front and rear lead aprons. Use of the minimum irradiated volume technique resulted in a significantly decreased absorbed dose over the entire thyroid region ranging from 100% to 350% (p less than 0.05). Because this intraoral technique results in radiographs with greater image quality and also exposes the thyroid gland to less radiation than the panoramic, this technique may be an alternative to the panoramic procedure.

  7. Off-axis dose distribution for rectangle proton beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gou Cheng-Jun; Luo Zheng-Ming; Huang Chu-Ye; Feng Xiao-Ning; Wu Zhang-Wen

    2008-01-01

    This paper modifies an analytical algorithm originally developed for electron dose calculations to evaluate the off-axis dose distribution of rectangle proton beam. This spatial distribution could be described by Fermi-Eyges theory since a proton undergoes small-angle scattering when it passes through medium. Predictions of the algorithm for relative off-axis dose distribution by a 6 cm 6 cm initial monoenergetic proton beam are compared with the results from the published Monte Carlo simulations. The excellent levcl of agreement between the results of these two methods of dose calculation (< 2%) demonstrates that the off-axis dose distribution from rectangle proton beam may be computed with high accuracy using this algorithm. The results also prompts the necessity to consider the off-axis distribution when the proton is applied to clinical radiotherapy since the penumbra is significant at the distal of its range (about 0.6 cm at the Bragg-peak depth).

  8. An efficient dose-compensation method for proximity effect correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ying; Han Weihua; Yang Xiang; Zhang Yang; Yang Fuhua [Research Center of Semiconductor Integrated Technology, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang Renping, E-mail: wangying@semi.ac.c [State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-08-15

    A novel simple dose-compensation method is developed for proximity effect correction in electron-beam lithography. The sizes of exposed patterns depend on dose factors while other exposure parameters (including accelerate voltage, resist thickness, exposing step size, substrate material, and so on) remain constant. This method is based on two reasonable assumptions in the evaluation of the compensated dose factor: one is that the relation between dose factors and circle-diameters is linear in the range under consideration; the other is that the compensated dose factor is only affected by the nearest neighbors for simplicity. Four-layer-hexagon photonic crystal structures were fabricated as test patterns to demonstrate this method. Compared to the uncorrected structures, the homogeneity of the corrected hole-size in photonic crystal structures was clearly improved. (semiconductor technology)

  9. Microscopic dose to lung from inhaled alpha emitters in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diel, Joseph; Belosokhov, Maxim; Romanov, Sergey [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozersk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Guilmette, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS G761, RP-2, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Because of the short range of alpha particles in tissue, the degree of uniformity of irradiation of the lung varies greatly depending on the form of the inhaled material. Animal studies have shown that the degree of dose uniformity influences the risk of lung cancer. This study investigates the radiation dose distribution of plutonium in human lung. Numerical maps of tissue configuration and target cell locations are obtained from histological sections of human lung tissue stained to enhance the identification of putative cell types for parenchymal lung cancers, i.e. alveolar type II cells and Clara cells. Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain dose distribution around individual particles, and these distributions are used to compute dose distribution in volumes of lung tissue. Lung dose is characterised both by the degree of non-uniformity of irradiation and the relative degree of irradiation of all tissue versus the special cells of interest. (authors)

  10. Topographic Effects on Ambient Dose Equivalent Rates from Radiocesium Fallout

    CERN Document Server

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    Land topography can affect air radiation dose rates by locating radiation sources closer to, or further, from detector locations when compared to perfectly flat terrain. Hills and slopes can also shield against the propagation of gamma rays. To understand the possible magnitude of topographic effects on air dose rates, this study presents calculations for ambient dose equivalent rates at a range of heights above the ground for varying land topographies. The geometries considered were angled ground at the intersection of two planar surfaces, which is a model for slopes neighboring flat land, and a simple conical geometry, representing settings from hilltops to valley bottoms. In each case the radiation source was radioactive cesium fallout, and the slope angle was varied systematically to determine the effect of topography on the air dose rate. Under the assumption of homogeneous fallout across the land surface, and for these geometries and detector locations, the dose rates at high altitudes are more strongly...

  11. Usability of tartaric acid in dose measurements: an ESR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Güney; Polat, Mustafa; Korkmaz, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    Unirradiated tartaric acid samples do not exhibit any ESR signal. However, the ESR spectra of irradiated samples contain many resonance signals. The dose-responce curves of the resonance signals, denoted as I 1, I 2, I 3 and I 4 in the present study, were found to increase linearly with the applied radiation dose in the range of 0.04-25 kGy. Adjusting the microvawe power and modulation amplitudes of 1.0 mW and 1.0 mT, respectively, was found to increase the sensitivity of tartaric acid. From the dose-response curves and room temperature decay data, it was concluded that the I 3 resonance signal of tartaric acid can be used for dose measurements at intermediate (0.04-0.4 kGy) and high dose (0.5-25 kGy) levels.

  12. Design of an integrating type neutron dose monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni

    2011-07-01

    It is intended that deuterium-deuterium reaction experiments will be performed for the next phase of the large helical device (LHD) at National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Japan. To protect workers against radiation, the characteristics of the radiation field at the LHD workplace should be evaluated. The neutron fluence at the workplace was calculated by means of the radiation transportation code. Since the neutron energy distribution at the workplace has a wide energy range, from thermal to fast neutrons, a neutron dose monitor had to be especially designed. The author designed an integrating type neutron dose monitor for this purpose. Since this monitor has good responses for dose evaluation in every energy range, it should be able to evaluate the dose at the LHD workplace accurately.

  13. The importance of carcinogen dose in chemoprevention studies: quantitative interrelationships between, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene dose, chlorophyllin dose, target organ DNA adduct biomarkers and final tumor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, M Margaret; Reddy, Ashok P; Hendricks, Jerry D; Pereira, Cliff; Kensler, Thomas W; Bailey, George S

    2007-03-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL) is a potent antimutagen in vitro, an effective anti-carcinogen in several animal models, and significantly reduced urinary biomarkers of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) exposure in a human population. Here we report an expanded analysis of CHL chemoprevention using the potent environmental hydrocarbon dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP). A dose-dose matrix design employed over 12 000 rainbow trout to evaluate the interrelationships among dietary carcinogen dose, anti-carcinogen dose, carcinogen-DNA adduct levels at exposure and eventual tumor outcome in two target organs. Included was an evaluation of the pharmaceutical CHL preparation (Derifil), used previously in a study of individuals chronically exposed to AFB(1). CHL was pre-, co- and post-fed at doses of 0-6000 p.p.m. and co-fed with DBP at doses of 0-371.5 p.p.m. for 4 weeks. This protocol generated a total of 21 dose-dose treatment groups, each evaluated with three or more replicates of 100 animals. The DBP-only treatment produced dose-responsive increases in liver and stomach DBP-DNA adducts, whereas increasing CHL co-treatment doses produced successive inhibition in liver (49-83%) and stomach (47-75%) adduct levels at each DBP dose examined. The remaining 8711 trout were necropsied, 10 months later. DBP treatment alone produced a logit incidence versus log [DBP] dose-response curve in stomach that was linear; CHL co-treatment provided dose-dependent tumor inhibition which ranged from 30 to 68% and was predictable from the adduct response. The Derifil CHL preparation was also found to effectively reduce DNA adduction and final tumor incidence in stomach (as well as liver), with a potency compatible with its total chlorin content. Liver tumor incidence in the DBP-only groups appeared to plateau near 60%. At DBP doses of doses generally reduced tumor incidence and multiplicity consistent with early DNA adducts as biomarkers. At 225 p.p.m. DBP, however, very high CHL doses were

  14. From total empiricism to a rational design of metronomic chemotherapy phase I dosing trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Thomas; Hetherington, John W; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2006-02-01

    'Metronomic chemotherapy' represents a novel anti-angiogenic strategy whereby low-dose chemotherapy is utilized in a continuous fashion in order to target tumor endothelium. There are many potential advantages of this strategy and clinical trials are already underway. However, although the scheduling of metronomic chemotherapy is relatively unequivocal, metronomic dosing principles are at present poorly defined. Arbitrarily, 10-33% of the maximum tolerated dose comprises 'the dose range'. We argue that this is too empirical and propose a set of phase I metronomic chemotherapy dosing strategies based on a principled approach which may help to reduce the problem of empiricism in dosing for metronomic chemotherapy trials.

  15. High-dose Helical Tomotherapy With Concurrent Full-dose Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Michael L.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre (Singapore); Koom, Woong Sub; Yoon, Hong In; Chung, Yoonsun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Si Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil, E-mail: jsseong@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To improve poor therapeutic outcome of current practice of chemoradiotherapy (CRT), high-dose helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy has been performed on patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), and the results were analyzed. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients with LAPC treated with radiotherapy using HT (median, 58.4 Gy; range, 50.8-59.9 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy between 2006 and 2009. Radiotherapy was directed to the primary tumor with a 0.5-cm margin without prophylactic nodal coverage. Twenty-nine patients (79%) received full-dose (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) gemcitabine-based chemotherapy during HT. After completion of CRT, maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 37 patients (95%). Results: The median follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 3.4-43.9) for the entire cohort, and 22.5 months (range, 12.0-43.9) for the surviving patients. The 1- and 2-year local progression-free survival rates were 82.1% and 77.3%, respectively. Eight patients (21%) were converted to resectable status, including 1 with a pathological complete response. The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 21.2 and 14.0 months, respectively. Acute toxicities were acceptable with no gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity higher than Grade 3. Severe late GI toxicity ({>=}Grade 3) occurred in 10 patients (26%); 1 treatment-related death from GI bleeding was observed. Conclusion: High-dose helical tomotherapy with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy resulted in improved local control and long-term survival in patients with LAPC. Future studies are needed to widen the therapeutic window by minimizing late GI toxicity.

  16. Evolution of radon dose evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical change of radon dose evaluation is reviewed based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR reports. Since 1955, radon has been recognized as one of the important sources of exposure of the general public. However, it was not really understood that radon is the largest dose contributor until 1977 when a new concept of effective dose equivalent was introduced by International Commission on Radiological Protection. In 1982, the dose concept was also adapted by UNSCEAR and evaluated per caput dose from natural radiation. Many researches have been carried out since then. However, lots of questions have remained open in radon problems, such as the radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha rays and the large discrepancy of risk estimation among dosimetric and epidemiological approaches.

  17. Application of combined TLD and CR-39 PNTD method for measurement of total dose and dose equivalent on ISS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benton, E.R. [Eril Research, Inc., Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Deme, S.; Apathy, I. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary)

    2006-07-01

    To date, no single passive detector has been found that measures dose equivalent from ionizing radiation exposure in low-Earth orbit. We have developed the I.S.S. Passive Dosimetry System (P.D.S.), utilizing a combination of TLD in the form of the self-contained Pille TLD system and stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (P.N.T.D.) oriented in three mutually orthogonal directions, to measure total dose and dose equivalent aboard the International Space Station (I.S.S.). The Pille TLD system, consisting on an on board reader and a large number of Ca{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:Dy TLD cells, is used to measure absorbed dose. The Pille TLD cells are read out and annealed by the I.S.S. crew on orbit, such that dose information for any time period or condition, e.g. for E.V.A. or following a solar particle event, is immediately available. Near-tissue equivalent CR-39 P.N.T.D. provides Let spectrum, dose, and dose equivalent from charged particles of LET{sub {infinity}}H{sub 2}O {>=} 10 keV/{mu}m, including the secondaries produced in interactions with high-energy neutrons. Dose information from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is used to correct the absorbed dose component {>=} 10 keV/{mu}m measured in TLD to obtain total dose. Dose equivalent from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is combined with the dose component <10 keV/{mu}m measured in TLD to obtain total dose equivalent. Dose rates ranging from 165 to 250 {mu}Gy/day and dose equivalent rates ranging from 340 to 450 {mu}Sv/day were measured aboard I.S.S. during the Expedition 2 mission in 2001. Results from the P.D.S. are consistent with those from other passive detectors tested as part of the ground-based I.C.C.H.I.B.A.N. intercomparison of space radiation dosimeters. (authors)

  18. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  19. Plastic film materials for dosimetry of very large absorbed doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Abdel-Rahim, F.

    1985-01-01

    Most plastic films have limited response ranges for dosimetry because of radiation-induced brittleness, degradation, or saturation of the signal used for analysis (e.g. spectrophotometry) at high doses. There are, however, a few types of thin plastic films showing linearity of response even up...... to doses as high as 2 × 106 Gy (200 Mrad) without severe loss of mechanical properties. Among many candidate film types tested, those showing such resistance to radiation damage and continued response at such high doses are polyethylene terephthalate, high-density polyethylene, dyed polyvinylchloride...

  20. Range monitoring proton therapy by means of secondary radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Espallardo, I.; Gillam, J. E.; Garcia Ortega, P.; Cabello, J.; Oliver, J.; Llosa, G.; Trovato, M.; Solaz, C.; Lacasta, C.; Rafecas, M.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this work is to study the ability of the open ring PET geometries with TOF and of the proposed Compton Camera for assessing range shifts below 5 mm. All this work is part of the ENVISION project which is directed towards on-line dose monitoring in hadron therapy. (Author)

  1. Doses of Nearby Nature Simultaneously Associated with Multiple Health Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. C. Cox

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to nature provides a wide range of health benefits. A significant proportion of these are delivered close to home, because this offers an immediate and easily accessible opportunity for people to experience nature. However, there is limited information to guide recommendations on its management and appropriate use. We apply a nature dose-response framework to quantify the simultaneous association between exposure to nearby nature and multiple health benefits. We surveyed ca. 1000 respondents in Southern England, UK, to determine relationships between (a nature dose type, that is the frequency and duration (time spent in private green space and intensity (quantity of neighbourhood vegetation cover of nature exposure and (b health outcomes, including mental, physical and social health, physical behaviour and nature orientation. We then modelled dose-response relationships between dose type and self-reported depression. We demonstrate positive relationships between nature dose and mental and social health, increased physical activity and nature orientation. Dose-response analysis showed that lower levels of depression were associated with minimum thresholds of weekly nature dose. Nearby nature is associated with quantifiable health benefits, with potential for lowering the human and financial costs of ill health. Dose-response analysis has the potential to guide minimum and optimum recommendations on the management and use of nearby nature for preventative healthcare.

  2. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Seo, Yo Seob; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 {mu}Sv and 37.8 {mu}Sv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 {mu}Sv, 27.6 {mu}Sv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 {mu}Sv, 15.9 {mu}Sv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom.

  3. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Jae-Duk

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 µSv and 37.8 µSv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 µSv, 27.6 µSv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 µSv, 15.9 µSv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom.

  4. Surface dose with grids in electron beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, K.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.; Lin, J.-P.; Chu, T.-C. E-mail: tcchu@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2002-03-01

    This investigation attempts to solve the problem of the lack of skin-sparing effect in electron radiation therapy and to increase the tolerance of skin to radiation using the grid technique. Electron grid therapy involves the mounting of a Cerrobend grid in the electron cone. Film dosimetry was employed to measure the relative surface dose and the percentage depth dose profile of electron grid portals. Various grid hole diameters (d=0.45, 1.0, 1.5 cm) and grid hole spacings (s=0.4, 0.2 cm) were considered for electron beams from 6 to 14 MeV. Experimental results indicate that the electron grid technique can reduce the relative surface dose in electron radiation therapy. Degradations of the relative surface dose depend on the percentage of open area in the grid portal. A proper grid design allows the surface dose to be reduced and the range of nonhomogeneous doses to be limited to a depth at which the target volume can receive a homogeneous dose. The grid technique can lower the surface dose in electron radiation therapy.

  5. Student's music exposure: Full-day personal dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washnik, Nilesh Jeevandas; Phillips, Susan L; Teglas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that collegiate level music students are exposed to potentially hazardous sound levels. Compared to professional musicians, collegiate level music students typically do not perform as frequently, but they are exposed to intense sounds during practice and rehearsal sessions. The purpose of the study was to determine the full-day exposure dose including individual practice and ensemble rehearsals for collegiate student musicians. Sixty-seven college students of classical music were recruited representing 17 primary instruments. Of these students, 57 completed 2 days of noise dose measurements using Cirrus doseBadge programed according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion. Sound exposure was measured for 2 days from morning to evening, ranging from 7 to 9 h. Twenty-eight out of 57 (49%) student musicians exceeded a 100% daily noise dose on at least 1 day of the two measurement days. Eleven student musicians (19%) exceeded 100% daily noise dose on both days. Fourteen students exceeded 100% dose during large ensemble rehearsals and eight students exceeded 100% dose during individual practice sessions. Approximately, half of the student musicians exceeded 100% noise dose on a typical college schedule. This finding indicates that a large proportion of collegiate student musicians are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss due to hazardous sound levels. Considering the current finding, there is a need to conduct hearing conservation programs in all music schools, and to educate student musicians about the use and importance of hearing protection devices for their hearing.

  6. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O- Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, H. [Neelain University, College of Science and Technology, Medical Physics Department, Khartoum (Sudan); Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  7. Doses of Nearby Nature Simultaneously Associated with Multiple Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel T C; Shanahan, Danielle F; Hudson, Hannah L; Fuller, Richard A; Anderson, Karen; Hancock, Steven; Gaston, Kevin J

    2017-02-09

    Exposure to nature provides a wide range of health benefits. A significant proportion of these are delivered close to home, because this offers an immediate and easily accessible opportunity for people to experience nature. However, there is limited information to guide recommendations on its management and appropriate use. We apply a nature dose-response framework to quantify the simultaneous association between exposure to nearby nature and multiple health benefits. We surveyed ca. 1000 respondents in Southern England, UK, to determine relationships between (a) nature dose type, that is the frequency and duration (time spent in private green space) and intensity (quantity of neighbourhood vegetation cover) of nature exposure and (b) health outcomes, including mental, physical and social health, physical behaviour and nature orientation. We then modelled dose-response relationships between dose type and self-reported depression. We demonstrate positive relationships between nature dose and mental and social health, increased physical activity and nature orientation. Dose-response analysis showed that lower levels of depression were associated with minimum thresholds of weekly nature dose. Nearby nature is associated with quantifiable health benefits, with potential for lowering the human and financial costs of ill health. Dose-response analysis has the potential to guide minimum and optimum recommendations on the management and use of nearby nature for preventative healthcare.

  8. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing of (high-dose) chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema-de Jonge, M.E. (Milly Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    Due to variation in drug distribution, metabolism and elimination processes between patients, systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic agents may be highly variable from patient to patient after administration of similar doses. This pharmacokinetic variability may explain in part the large variability

  9. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, TN (United States). Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  10. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, TN (United States). Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  11. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  12. Superficial dose evaluation of four dose calculation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhen; Qiu, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhiping; Lei, Mingjun; Liu, Gui; Zhang, Zijian; Hu, Yongmei

    2017-08-01

    Accurate superficial dose calculation is of major importance because of the skin toxicity in radiotherapy, especially within the initial 2 mm depth being considered more clinically relevant. The aim of this study is to evaluate superficial dose calculation accuracy of four commonly used algorithms in commercially available treatment planning systems (TPS) by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and film measurements. The superficial dose in a simple geometrical phantom with size of 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm was calculated by PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution), AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm), AXB (Acuros XB) in Eclipse system and CCC (Collapsed Cone Convolution) in Raystation system under the conditions of source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm and field size (FS) of 10×10 cm2. EGSnrc (BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) program was performed to simulate the central axis dose distribution of Varian Trilogy accelerator, combined with measurements of superficial dose distribution by an extrapolation method of multilayer radiochromic films, to estimate the dose calculation accuracy of four algorithms in the superficial region which was recommended in detail by the ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement) and the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). In superficial region, good agreement was achieved between MC simulation and film extrapolation method, with the mean differences less than 1%, 2% and 5% for 0°, 30° and 60°, respectively. The relative skin dose errors were 0.84%, 1.88% and 3.90%; the mean dose discrepancies (0°, 30° and 60°) between each of four algorithms and MC simulation were (2.41±1.55%, 3.11±2.40%, and 1.53±1.05%), (3.09±3.00%, 3.10±3.01%, and 3.77±3.59%), (3.16±1.50%, 8.70±2.84%, and 18.20±4.10%) and (14.45±4.66%, 10.74±4.54%, and 3.34±3.26%) for AXB, CCC, AAA and PBC respectively. Monte Carlo simulation verified the feasibility of the superficial dose measurements by multilayer Gafchromic films. And the rank

  13. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  14. Derivation of Human Lethal Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-19

    Hardman, JG; Limbird, LE; Goodman Gilman , A, (editors). (2001) Goodman and Gilman’s The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. New York, NY: McGraw... Goodman and Gilman’s N/A No LDLo, MLD, or lethal dose for humans; no LD50 for rat or mouse NIOSH N/A No LDLo, MLD, or lethal dose for humans; no LD50...Basis of Therapeutics– Goodman and Gilman’s N/A No LDLo, MLD, or lethal dose for humans; no LD50 for rat or mouse NIOSH N/A No LDLo, MLD, or lethal

  15. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-04-26

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  16. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    OpenAIRE

    Med Amine Touil; Noureddine Ellouze

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range) images from HDR (High Dynamic Range) images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute loc...

  17. Stereoscopic High Dynamic Range Video

    OpenAIRE

    Rüfenacht, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Stereoscopic video content is usually being created by using two or more cameras which are recording the same scene. Traditionally, those cameras have the exact same intrinsic camera parameters. In this project, the exposure times of the cameras differ, allowing to record different parts of the dynamic range of the scene. Image processing techniques are then used to enhance the dynamic range of the captured data. A pipeline for the recording, processing, and displaying of high dynamic range (...

  18. Vaginal dose assessment in image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Can we really rely on dose-point evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limkin, Elaine Johanna; Dumas, Isabelle; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Chargari, Cyrus; Maroun, Pierre; Annède, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Seisen, Thomas; Doyeux, Kaya; Tailleur, Anne; Martinetti, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Haie-Meder, Christine; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Although dose-volume parameters in image-guided brachytherapy have become a standard, the use of posterior-inferior border of the pubic symphysis (PIBS) points has been recently proposed in the reporting of vaginal doses. The aim was to evaluate their pertinence. Nineteen patients who received image-guided brachytherapy after concurrent radiochemotherapy were included. Per treatment, CT scans were performed at Days 2 and 3, with reporting of the initial dwell positions and times. Doses delivered to the PIBS points were evaluated on each plan, considering that they were representative of one-third of the treatment. The movements of the applicator according to the PIBS point were analysed. Mean prescribed doses at PIBS -2, PIBS, PIBS +2 were, respectively, 2.23 ± 1.4, 6.39 ± 6.6, and 31.85 ± 36.06 Gy. Significant differences were observed between the 5 patients with vaginal involvement and the remaining 14 at the level of PIBS +2 and PIBS: +47.60 Gy and +7.46 Gy, respectively (p = 0.023 and 0.03). The variations between delivered and prescribed doses at PIBS points were not significant. However, at International commission on radiation units and measurements rectovaginal point, the delivered dose was decreased by 1.43 ± 2.49 Gy from the planned dose (p = 0.019). The delivered doses at the four points were strongly correlated with the prescribed doses with R(2) ranging from 0.93 to 0.95. The movements of the applicator in regard of the PIBS point assessed with the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates were insignificant. The doses evaluated at PIBS points are not impacted by intrafractional movements. PIBS and PIBS +2 dose points allow distinguishing the plans of patients with vaginal infiltration. Further studies are needed to correlate these parameters with vaginal morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Two Week Oral Dose Range-Finding Toxicity Study of WR242511 in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-08

    Chemistry System Doumas, B.T. and Biggs, H.G. Standard Methods of Clinical Chemistry, 7, 175, 1972. Calcium Modified alizarin procedure Ciba...Aspartate aminotransferase (AST/SGOT) Calcium Chloride Cholesterol Creatinine Globulin (calculated) Glucose Inorganic phosphorus Potassium...died on Day 13. Prior to death, this animal lost significant body weight. Histologically , the animal demonstrated significant coagulative liver

  20. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics confirm no accumulation and dose proportionality of the novel promotile drug tegaserod (HTF 919).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel-Dingemanse, S; Hirschberg, Y; Osborne, S; Pommier, F; McLeod, J

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate the steady-state pharmacokinetics (PK) and dose proportionality of the selective 5-HT4 receptor partial agonist tegaserod (HTF 919) in healthy subjects. Eighteen subjects were given 2, 6, or 12-mg doses of tegaserod twice daily (b.i.d.) for 5 days, with PK and safety assessments made during the 12 h or 24 h following first administration, and 12 h after the final dose. Tegaserod was rapidly absorbed [time to reach measured maximum plasma concentration after multiple administrations (tmax,ss) 1 h]. Steady-state PK were consistent with single-dose PK characteristics supporting that there was no accumulation of tegaserod in plasma based on systemic exposure. Mean measured maximum plasma concentration after multiple administrations (Cmax,ss) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve over one dosing interval (tau, 0-12 h after drug administration, AUC tau) were between 0.7 +/- 0.3 ng/ml and 5.6 +/- 2.9 ng/ml and 2.4 +/- 1.3 h.ng/ml and 20.4 +/- 14.0 h.ng/ml, respectively, indicating dose-proportional PK of tegaserod in the range 2-12 mg b.i.d. Tegaserod was safe and well tolerated. No serious adverse events were reported. Tegaserod exhibits no accumulation and dose-proportional PK after multiple doses.

  1. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). To assess potential local RBE variations, LET distributions were calculated with Monte Carlo, and compared for different plans. The results were assessed in terms of their sensitivity to uncertainties in model parameters and delivery. Results: IFD courses included equal number of fractions boosting either hemisphere, thus, the combined physical dose was close to uniform throughout the prostate. However, for the entire course, the prostate EUD in IFD was higher than in conventional FTP by up to 14%, corresponding to the estimated increase in TCP to 96% from 88%. The extent of gain depended on the mixing factor, i.e., relative weights used to combine FTP and STP spot weights. Increased weighting of STP typically yielded a higher target EUD, but also led to increased sensitivity of dose to variations in the proton's range. Rectal and bladder EUD were same or lower (per normalization), and the NTCP for both remained below 1%. The LET distributions in IFD also depended strongly on the mixing weights: plans using higher weight of STP spots yielded higher LET, indicating a potentially higher local RBE. Conclusions: In proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning, improved therapeutic outcome can potentially be expected with delivery of IFD distributions, while administering the prescribed quasi-uniform dose to the target over the entire course. The biological effectiveness of IFD may be further enhanced by optimizing the LET distributions. IFD distributions are characterized by a dose gradient located in proximity of the prostate's midplane, thus, the fidelity of delivery would depend crucially on the precision with which the proton range could be controlled.

  2. Osprey Range - CWHR [ds601

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  3. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges

  4. Dose-to-medium vs. dose-to-water: Dosimetric evaluation of dose reporting modes in Acuros XB for prostate, lung and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Acuros XB (AXB dose calculation algorithm is available for external beam photon dose calculations in Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS. The AXB can report the absorbed dose in two modes: dose-to-water (Dw and dose-to-medium (Dm. The main purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the AXB_Dm with that of AXB_Dw on real patient treatment plans. Methods: Four groups of patients (prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT lung cancer, left breast cancer, and right breast cancer were selected for this study, and each group consisted of 5 cases. The treatment plans of all cases were generated in the Eclipse TPS. For each case, treatment plans were computed using AXB_Dw and AXB_Dm for identical beam arrangements. Dosimetric evaluation was done by comparing various dosimetric parameters in the AXB_Dw plans with that of AXB_Dm plans for the corresponding patient case. Results: For the prostate cancer, the mean planning target volume (PTV dose in the AXB_Dw plans was higher by up to 1.0%, but the mean PTV dose was within ±0.3% for the SBRT lung cancer. The analysis of organs at risk (OAR results in the prostate cancer showed that AXB_Dw plans consistently produced higher values for the bladder and femoral heads but not for the rectum. In the case of SBRT lung cancer, a clear trend was seen for the heart mean dose and spinal cord maximum dose, with AXB_Dw plans producing higher values than the AXB_Dm plans. However, the difference in the lung doses between the AXB_Dm and AXB_Dw plans did not always produce a clear trend, with difference ranged from -1.4% to 2.9%. For both the left and right breast cancer, the AXB_Dm plans produced higher maximum dose to the PTV for all cases. The evaluation of the maximum dose to the skin showed higher values in the AXB_Dm plans for all 5 left breast cancer cases, whereas only 2 cases had higher maximum dose to the skin in the AXB_Dm plans for the right breast cancer

  5. Utilisation of PACS to monitor patient CT doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSuwaidi, J S; Bayoumi, M; Al Shibli, N; Sulaiman, H; Urrahman, T; AlYarah, M

    2011-09-01

    In the past 5 y, the number of computed tomography (CT) studies has doubled at Dubai Health Authority hospitals. This situation, along with patient's overdoses reported internationally, has prompted action to establish a system to manage patient doses incurred due to medical imaging practices. In this work, the authors aim to homogenise dose reporting to monitor radiation dose levels and facilitate the establishment of local and national dose reference levels. The two hospitals enrolled in this study are equipped with three CT systems (two 4 slices and one 64 slices). Through the Picture Archive and Communication Systems (PACS) tracking system, it is mandatory to fill CT patient doses in radiology information system (RIS). Dose length product (mGy cm) was recorded for 2502 adult and 178 paediatric patients. All patients' dosimetry data were collected from the RIS by Cogonos statistical software. The PACS data were reviewed to exclude incomplete data. Average and range of effective doses for adult and paediatric patients were calculated using an appropriate weighting factor. Individual accumulated effective doses for adult and paediatric patients were calculated for 4s-scanner-1 only. Adult average effective doses for the head (1482 exams) were 1.23 ± 0.58, 2.84 ± 0.83 and 2.98 ± 1.103 mSv, the chest (545 exams) were 5.39 ± 1.63, 21.85 ± 5.63 and 18.19 ± 3.22 mSv and for the abdomen and pelvis (1183 exams) were 10.85 ± 4.26, 25.66 ± 8.83 and 26.46 ± 13.75 mSv for 4s-scanner-1, 4s-scanner-2 and 64 s, respectively. The paediatric average effective dose for the head (127 exams) was 1.77 ± 0.82 mSv, for the chest (22 exams) was 3.3 ± 1.29 mSv and for the abdomen and pelvis (27 exams) was 6.16 ± 2.64 mSv. Results of individual accumulated effective doses for adult and paediatric patients were presented. PACS dose reporting facilitated dosimetry clinical auditing. Effective doses obtained in this work demonstrated that the results of one scanner were within

  6. Verification of calculated skin doses in postmastectomy helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shima; Parker, Brent C; Levine, Renee; Sanders, Mary Ella; Fontenot, Jonas; Gibbons, John; Hogstrom, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    To verify the accuracy of calculated skin doses in helical tomotherapy for postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). In vivo thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the skin dose at multiple points in each of 14 patients throughout the course of treatment on a TomoTherapy Hi·Art II system, for a total of 420 TLD measurements. Five patients were evaluated near the location of the mastectomy scar, whereas 9 patients were evaluated throughout the treatment volume. The measured dose at each location was compared with calculations from the treatment planning system. The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for the scar measurements was -1.8% ± 0.2% (standard deviation [SD], 4.3%; range, -11.1% to 10.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for measurements throughout the treatment volume was -3.0% ± 0.4% (SD, 4.7%; range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for all measurements was -2.1% ± 0.2% (standard deviation, 4.5%: range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference between measured and calculated TLD doses was statistically significant at two standard deviations of the mean, but was not clinically significant (i.e., was <5%). However, 23% of the measured TLD doses differed from the calculated TLD doses by more than 5%. The mean of the measured TLD doses agreed with TomoTherapy calculated TLD doses within our clinical criterion of 5%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Three dimensional biological dose distribution of antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegami, Sara; Boll, Rebecca; Sellner, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Welsch, Carsten P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cockcroft Institute, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Holzscheiter, Michael H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The goal of external beam cancer therapy is to destroy the tumour while sparing the healthy tissue around it. In hadron therapy, the dose profile of heavy charged particles satisfies this request, because most of the energy is deposited at the end of the particle path, in the Bragg peak. Antiprotons are even more promising, thanks to the extra energy released by annihilation when captured in a normal atom at the end of range. The aim of the AD-4/ACE experiment at CERN is to determine the increase in biological dose near the Bragg peak due to densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons. Initial experiments showed the damage to cells inflicted at the end of the beam for identical damage at the skin level to be four times higher for antiprotons than for protons. The radiation field in a spread-out Bragg peak produced with antiprotons is highly mixed and for proper dose planning knowledge of linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological efficiency (RBE) at any point in the target is needed. We are studying a number of detection methods for their response to mixed radiation fields with the goal to obtain a direct measurement of the 3D LET distribution and report on first results.

  8. Dose assessment of aircrew using passive detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, M.; Berge, T.; Schoener, W.; Summerer, L.; Vana, N

    2002-07-01

    Radiation exposure of aircrew is a serious concern which has been given special emphasis in the European Council directive 96/29/Euratom. The cosmic ray induced neutron component can contribute more than 50% to the biologically relevant dose at aviation altitudes. Various computational approaches to route dose assessment, e.g. CARI, are in use nowadays and are compared with experimental data. Measurements of aircrew exposure usually involve extensive instrumentation in order to cover the whole particle spectrum and energy range present inside aircraft. Due to their small size and easy handling, thermoluminescence dosemeters represent an appropriate alternative. Previous measurements onboard aircraft applying the high-temperature ratio method with LiF:Mg,Ti dosemeters for the determination of an 'averaged' linear energy transfer of mixed radiation fields demonstrate the ability of this method to evaluate the dose equivalent, according to the Q(LET{sub (}) relationship proposed by the ICRP. Measurements with CaF{sub 2}:Tm dosemeters are currently in progress and are discussed here. (author)

  9. Low dose metoprolol in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K P; Krishnaswami, S; Prasad, N K; Rath, P C; Jose, J

    1989-01-01

    A study of the effects of low dose Metoprolol was undertaken in 37 patients with acute myocardial infarction. These patients were randomly divided into three groups depending on the dose of the drug per kg body weight. Group I, consisting of 18 patients, received 0.36 to 0.65 mg per kg per day, Group II (10 patients) received 0.66 to 0.99 mg/kg/day, and Group III (9 patients) 1 to 1.81 mg/kg/day. To assess the degree of beta blockade achieved, the parameters that were evaluated were the fall in blood pressure and heart rate. There was a fall in systolic blood pressure which ranged from 7 to 17%, and fall in heart rate of 6.6 to 12.8% in the 3 groups over the 48-hour study period. These observations were compared with the results obtained from the Goteberg Metoprolol trial and Metoprolol in acute myocardial infarction (MIAMI) trials wherein 200 mg of Metoprolol per day were used. Our preliminary observations suggest that Indian patients may not need such a high dose, and Metoprolol at 50-100 mg per day would probably be sufficient to get the desired effect.

  10. High dose insulin in toxic cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holger, Joel S; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Marini, John J

    2009-04-01

    To report the successful use of high dose insulin (HDI) in previously unreported insulin dosing ranges in a patient with severe myocardial toxicity due to an amitriptyline and citalopram overdose. A 65-year-old female presented in respiratory arrest, which was followed by bradycardic pulseless electrical activity after ingesting multiple medications. After a prolonged resuscitation, the patient was maintained only on infusions of norepinephrine (40 mcg/min), vasopressin (4 units/h), insulin (80 units/h), and sodium bicarbonate. Due to a deteriorating clinical condition and limited prognosis, the insulin infusion was titrated incrementally upwards to 600 units/h (6 units/kg/h) over a 5 h time period while simultaneously completely weaning off both vasopressors. She developed brisk pulses and warm extremities, and her cardiac output nearly tripled. After 2 days of stabilization the insulin was slowly tapered, and the patient recovered. HDI as a single cardiovascular agent significantly improved clinical and cardiovascular parameters after the failure of vasopressor therapy in severe cardiovascular toxicity. Higher doses of insulin than previously recommended may be needed in toxic poisonings when severe myocardial depression is present.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  12. Optimal Dosing for Targeted Therapies in Oncology: Drug Development Cases Leading by Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Jeffrey R; Mayawala, Kapil; Gadamsetty, Satvik; Kang, Soonmo Peter; de Alwis, Dinesh P

    2016-03-15

    One of the key objectives of oncology first-in-human trials has often been to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). However, targeted therapies might not exhibit dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) at doses significantly higher than sufficiently active doses, and there is frequently a limited ability to objectively quantify adverse events. Thus, while MTD-based determination of recommended phase II dose may have yielded appropriate dosing for some cytotoxics, targeted therapeutics (including monoclonal antibodies and/or immunotherapies) sometimes need alternative or complementary strategies to help identify dose ranges for a randomized dose-ranging study. One complementary strategy is to define a biologically efficacious dose (BED) using an "effect marker." An effect marker could be a target engagement, pharmacodynamic, or disease progression marker (change in tumor size for solid tumors or bone marrow blast count for some hematologic tumors). Although the concept of BED has been discussed extensively, we review specific examples in which the approach influenced oncology clinical development. Data extracted from the literature and the examples support improving dose selection strategies to benefit patients, providers, and the biopharmaceutical industry. Although the examples illustrate key contributions of effect markers in dose selection, no one-size-fits-all approach to dosing can be justified. Higher-than-optimal dosing can increase toxicity in later trials (and in clinical use), which can have a negative impact on efficacy (via lower adherence or direct sequelae of toxicities). Proper dose selection in oncology should follow a multifactorial decision process leading to a randomized, dose-ranging study instead of a single phase II dose. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentefour, El H.; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams ‘proton imaging field’ are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  14. Microfluidic Thrombosis under Multiple Shear Rates and Antiplatelet Therapy Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, David N.; Forest, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    The mainstay of treatment for thrombosis, the formation of occlusive platelet aggregates that often lead to heart attack and stroke, is antiplatelet therapy. Antiplatelet therapy dosing and resistance are poorly understood, leading to potential incorrect and ineffective dosing. Shear rate is also suspected to play a major role in thrombosis, but instrumentation to measure its influence has been limited by flow conditions, agonist use, and non-systematic and/or non-quantitative studies. In this work we measured occlusion times and thrombus detachment for a range of initial shear rates (500, 1500, 4000, and 10000 s−1) and therapy concentrations (0–2.4 µM for eptifibatide, 0–2 mM for acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA), 3.5–40 Units/L for heparin) using a microfluidic device. We also measured complete blood counts (CBC) and platelet activity using whole blood impedance aggregometry. Effects of shear rate and dose were analyzed using general linear models, logistic regressions, and Cox proportional hazards models. Shear rates have significant effects on thrombosis/dose-response curves for all tested therapies. ASA has little effect on high shear occlusion times, even at very high doses (up to 20 times the recommended dose). Under ASA therapy, thrombi formed at high shear rates were 4 times more prone to detachment compared to those formed under control conditions. Eptifibatide reduced occlusion when controlling for shear rate and its efficacy increased with dose concentration. In contrast, the hazard of occlusion from ASA was several orders of magnitude higher than that of eptifibatide. Our results show similar dose efficacy to our low shear measurements using whole blood aggregometry. This quantitative and statistically validated study of the effects of a wide range of shear rate and antiplatelet therapy doses on occlusive thrombosis contributes to more accurate understanding of thrombosis and to models for optimizing patient treatment. PMID:24404131

  15. Microfluidic thrombosis under multiple shear rates and antiplatelet therapy doses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Li

    Full Text Available The mainstay of treatment for thrombosis, the formation of occlusive platelet aggregates that often lead to heart attack and stroke, is antiplatelet therapy. Antiplatelet therapy dosing and resistance are poorly understood, leading to potential incorrect and ineffective dosing. Shear rate is also suspected to play a major role in thrombosis, but instrumentation to measure its influence has been limited by flow conditions, agonist use, and non-systematic and/or non-quantitative studies. In this work we measured occlusion times and thrombus detachment for a range of initial shear rates (500, 1500, 4000, and 10000 s(-1 and therapy concentrations (0-2.4 µM for eptifibatide, 0-2 mM for acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA, 3.5-40 Units/L for heparin using a microfluidic device. We also measured complete blood counts (CBC and platelet activity using whole blood impedance aggregometry. Effects of shear rate and dose were analyzed using general linear models, logistic regressions, and Cox proportional hazards models. Shear rates have significant effects on thrombosis/dose-response curves for all tested therapies. ASA has little effect on high shear occlusion times, even at very high doses (up to 20 times the recommended dose. Under ASA therapy, thrombi formed at high shear rates were 4 times more prone to detachment compared to those formed under control conditions. Eptifibatide reduced occlusion when controlling for shear rate and its efficacy increased with dose concentration. In contrast, the hazard of occlusion from ASA was several orders of magnitude higher than that of eptifibatide. Our results show similar dose efficacy to our low shear measurements using whole blood aggregometry. This quantitative and statistically validated study of the effects of a wide range of shear rate and antiplatelet therapy doses on occlusive thrombosis contributes to more accurate understanding of thrombosis and to models for optimizing patient treatment.

  16. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentefour, El H; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-21

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams 'proton imaging field' are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  17. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. (comps.)

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  18. Description of dose response curve

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Samarai, Firas

    2011-01-01

    The book included several methods to estimate LD50, in addition to explain how to use several programs to estimate LD50. Moreover the book illustrate the description of the dose response curves. Firas Al-Samarai

  19. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  20. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  1. PN ranging/telemetry transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deerkoski, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    System can transmit range-indicating pseudonoise (PN) codes and simultaneously transmit auxiliary information as binary data at a rate at least on order of pseudonoise chipping rate. PN code is modulated by data stream with relatively low bit rate. Data stream with high bit rate can be transmitted in same frequency band as PN ranging code.

  2. Dose variation during solar minimum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G.; Brautigam, D.H. (Phillips Lab., Geophysics Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (US)); Holeman, E. (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    In this paper, the authors use direct measurement of dose to show the variation in inner and outer radiation belt populations at low altitude from 1984 to 1987. This period includes the recent solar minimum that occurred in September 1986. The dose is measured behind four thicknesses of aluminum shielding and for two thresholds of energy deposition, designated HILET and LOLET. The authors calculate an average dose per day for each month of satellite operation. The authors find that the average proton (HILET) dose per day (obtained primarily in the inner belt) increased systematically from 1984 to 1987, and has a high anticorrelation with sunspot number when offset by 13 months. The average LOLET dose per day behind the thinnest shielding is produced almost entirely by outer zone electrons and varies greatly over the period of interest. If any trend can be discerned over the 4 year period it is a decreasing one. For shielding of 1.55 gm/cm{sup 2} (227 mil) Al or more, the LOLET dose is complicated by contributions from {gt} 100 MeV protons and bremsstrahlung.

  3. Improved Range Searching Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2012-01-01

    Table of Contents -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- In this paper we present a number of improved lower bounds for range searching in the pointer machine and the group model. In the pointer machine, we prove lower bounds for the approximate simplex...... range reporting problem. In approximate simplex range reporting, points that lie within a distance of ε ⋅ Diam(s) from the border of a query simplex s, are free to be included or excluded from the output, where ε ≥ 0 is an input parameter to the range searching problem. We prove our lower bounds...... by constructing a hard input set and query set, and then invoking Chazelle and Rosenberg's [CGTA'96] general theorem on the complexity of navigation in the pointer machine. For the group model, we show that input sets and query sets that are hard for range reporting in the pointer machine (i.e. by Chazelle...

  4. High dynamic range subjective testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Brahim; Nilsson, Mike

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes of a set of subjective tests that the authors have carried out to assess the end user perception of video encoded with High Dynamic Range technology when viewed in a typical home environment. Viewers scored individual single clips of content, presented in High Definition (HD) and Ultra High Definition (UHD), in Standard Dynamic Range (SDR), and in High Dynamic Range (HDR) using both the Perceptual Quantizer (PQ) and Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) transfer characteristics, and presented in SDR as the backwards compatible rendering of the HLG representation. The quality of SDR HD was improved by approximately equal amounts by either increasing the dynamic range or increasing the resolution to UHD. A further smaller increase in quality was observed in the Mean Opinion Scores of the viewers by increasing both the dynamic range and the resolution, but this was not quite statistically significant.

  5. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  6. High dynamic range images for enhancing low dynamic range content

    OpenAIRE

    Banterle, Francesco; Dellepiane, Matteo; Scopigno, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    This poster presents a practical system for enhancing the quality of Low Dynamic Range (LDR) videos using High Dynamic Range (HDR) background images. Our technique relies on the assumption that the HDR information is static in the video footage. This assumption can be valid in many scenarios where moving subjects are the main focus of the footage and do not have to interact with moving light sources or highly reflective objects. Another valid scenario is teleconferencing via webcams, where th...

  7. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  8. Home range analysis using a mechanistic home range model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorcroft, P.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology); Lewis, M.A. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Mathematics) Crabtree, R.L. (Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources)

    1999-07-01

    The traditional models used to characterize animal home ranges have no mechanistic basis underlying their descriptions of space use, and as a result, the analysis of animal home ranges has primarily been a descriptive endeavor. In this paper, the authors characterize coyote (Canis latrans) home range patterns using partial differential equations for expected space use that are formally derived from underlying descriptions of individual movement behavior. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that mechanistic models have been used to characterize animal home ranges. The results provide empirical support for a model formulation of movement response to scent marks, and suggest that having relocation data for individuals in adjacent groups is necessary to capture the spatial arrangement of home range boundaries. The authors then show how the model fits can be used to obtain predictions for individual movement and scent marking behavior and to predict changes in home range patterns. More generally, the findings illustrate how mechanistic models permit the development of a predictive theory for the relationship between movement behavior and animal spatial distribution.

  9. Dose profile study in head CT scans using radiochromic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladino G, A. M.; Prata M, A., E-mail: amlgphys@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Diagnostic images of computed tomography generate higher doses than other methods of diagnostic radiology using X-ray beam attenuation. Clinical applications of CT have been increased by technological advances, what leads to a wide variety of scanner in the Brazilian technological pool. It has been difficult to implement dose reduction strategies because of the lack of proper guidance on computed tomography examinations. However, CT scanners allow adjusting acquisition parameter according to the patients physical profile and diagnostic application for which the scan is intended. The knowledge of the dose distribution is important because changes in image acquisition parameters may provide dose reduction. In this study, it was used a cylindrical head phantom in PMMA with 5 openings, what allows dose measurement in 5 regions. In a GE CT scanner, Discovery model of 64 channels, the central slice of the head phantom was irradiated and the absorbed doses were measured using a pencil ionization chamber. Radiochromic film strips were placed in the peripheral and in the central region of the head phantom and was performed a scan of 10 cm in the phantom central region. The scan was performed using the head scanning protocol of the radiobiology service, with a voltage of 120 kV. After scanning, the radiochromic film strips were digitalized and their digital images were used to have the dose longitudinal profiles. The dose values recorded have variation in a range of 18.66 to 23.57 mGy. In the results it was compared the dose index values obtained by the pencil chamber measurement to the dose longitudinal profiles recorded by the film strips. (Author)

  10. Comparison of the neutron ambient dose equivalent and ambient absorbed dose calculations with different GEANT4 physics lists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rosane Moreira; Souza-Santos, Denison

    2017-10-01

    A comparison between neutron physics lists given by GEANT4, is made in the calculation of the ambient dose equivalent, and ambient absorbed dose, per fluence conversion coefficients (H* (10) / ϕ and D* (10) / ϕ) for neutrons in the range of 10-9 MeV to 15 MeV. Physics processes are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles. Results obtained for QBBC, QGSP_BERT, QGSP_BIC and Neutron High Precision physics lists are compared with values published in ICRP 74 and previously published articles. Neutron high precision physics lists showed the best results in the studied energy range.

  11. Differential Response and Priming Dose Effect on the Proteome of Human Fibroblast and Stem Cells Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Monika; Haghdoost, Siamak; Gomolka, Maria; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius; Dietz, Anne; Kulka, Ulrike; Unger, Kristian; Babini, Gabriele; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Hornhardt, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that a mechanistic understanding of the cellular responses to low dose and dose rate may be valuable in reducing some of the uncertainties involved in current risk estimates for cancer- and non-cancer-related radiation effects that are inherited in the linear no-threshold hypothesis. In this study, the effects of low-dose radiation on the proteome in both human fibroblasts and stem cells were investigated. Particular emphasis was placed on examining: 1. the dose-response relationships for the differential expression of proteins in the low-dose range (40-140 mGy) of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation; and 2. the effect on differential expression of proteins of a priming dose given prior to a challenge dose (adaptive response effects). These studies were performed on cultured human fibroblasts (VH10) and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). The results from the VH10 cell experiments demonstrated that low-doses of low-LET radiation induced unique patterns of differentially expressed proteins for each dose investigated. In addition, a low priming radiation dose significantly changed the protein expression induced by the subsequent challenge exposure. In the ADSC the number of differentially expressed proteins was markedly less compared to VH10 cells, indicating that ADSC differ in their intrinsic response to low doses of radiation. The proteomic results are further discussed in terms of possible pathways influenced by low-dose irradiation.

  12. Energetic dose: Beyond fire and flint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G.; Rattner, B.; Cohen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Nutritional and bioenergetic interactions influence exposure to environmental chemicals and may affect the risk realized when wildlife are exposed in the field. Here, food-chain analysis focuses on prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) and the evaluation of chemical risks associated with paraquat following 10-d dietary exposures. Reproductive effects were measured in 60-d trials that followed exposures to paraquat-tainted feed: control (untainted feed); 21 mg paraquat/kg feed; 63 mg paraquat/kg feed; and feed-restricted control (untainted feed restricted to 60% baseline consumption). Reproductive success was evaluated in control and treated breeding pairs, and a preliminary bioenergetics analysis was completed in parallel to derive exposure dose. Although reproductive performance differed among groups, feed-restriction appeared to be the dominant treatment effect observed in these 10-d feeding exposure/limited reproductive trials. Exposure dose ranged from 3.70-3.76 to 9.41-11.51 mg parquat/kg BW/day at 21 and 63 mg paraquat/kg feed stock exposures, respectively. Energetic doses as ug paraquat/kcal yielded preliminary estimates of energetic costs associated with paraquat exposure, and were similar within treatments for both sexes, ranging from 4.2-5.5 and 13.1-15.0 ug paraquat/kcal for voles exposed to 21 mg/kg feed stock and 63 mg/kg feed stock, respectively. Given the increasing likelihood that environmental chemicals will be found in wildlife habitat at 'acceptable levels', the critical role that wildlife nutrition plays in evaluating ecological risks should be fully integrated into the assessment process. Tools applied to the analysis of risk must gain higher resolution than the relatively crude methods we currently bring to the process.

  13. Testicular Doses in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen Zhe; Yu, James B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Peschel, Richard E.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate testicular doses contributed by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions from kVCBCT on 3 prostate cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were compared between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments and kVCBCT scans. The impact of CBCT scanning mode, kilovoltage peak energy (kVp), and CBCT field span on dose deposition to testes and other organs was investigated. Results: In comparison with one 10-MV IMRT treatment, a 125-kV half-fan CBCT scan delivered 3.4, 3.8, 4.1, and 5.7 cGy to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, respectively, accounting for 1.7%, 3.2%, 3.2%, and 8.4% of megavoltage photon dose contributions. However, the testes received 2.9 cGy from the same CBCT scan, a threefold increase as compared with 0.7 cGy received during IMRT. With the same kVp, full-fan mode deposited much less dose to organs than half-fan mode, ranging from 9% less for prostate to 69% less for testes, except for rectum, where full-fan mode delivered 34% more dose. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, kVCBCT-contributed doses increased exponentially for all organs, irrespective of scanning mode. Reducing CBCT field span from 30 to 10 cm in the superior-inferior direction cut testicular doses from 5.7 to 0.2 cGy in half-fan mode and from 1.5 to 0.1 cGy in full-fan mode. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, kVCBCT-contributed doses to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads are clinically insignificant, whereas dose to the testes is threefold more. Full-fan CBCT usually deposits much less dose to organs (except for rectum) than half-fan mode in prostate patients. Kilovoltage CBCT-contributed doses increase exponentially with photon beam energy. Reducing CBCT field significantly cuts doses to testes and other organs.

  14. Laser ranging ground station development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The employment of ground to conduct radar range measurements of the lunar distance is discussed. The advantages of additional ground stations for this purpose are analyzed. The goals which are desirable for any new type of ranging station are: (1) full time availability of the station for laser ranging, (2) optimization for signal strength, (3) automation to the greatest extent possible, (4) the capability for blind pointing, (5) reasonable initial and modest operational costs, and (6) transportability to enhance the value of the station for geophysical purposes.

  15. Dynamic Range Majority Data Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Elmasry, Amr; HE, MENG; Munro, J. Ian; Nicholson, Patrick K.

    2011-01-01

    Given a set $P$ of coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range $\\alpha$-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on $P$. More specifically, for a query range $Q$, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an $\\alpha$-fraction of the points contained in $Q$. We present a new data structure for answering range $\\alpha$-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where $\\alpha \\in (0,1)$. Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in $O((\\lg...

  16. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Med Amine Touil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range images from HDR (High Dynamic Range images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute local digital signatures, encryption for confidentiality, and scrambling technique.

  17. Clinical implementation and evaluation of the Acuros dose calculation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chenyu; Combine, Anthony G; Bednarz, Greg; Lalonde, Ronald J; Hu, Bin; Dickens, Kathy; Wynn, Raymond; Pavord, Daniel C; Saiful Huq, M

    2017-08-20

    The main aim of this study is to validate the Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm for a Varian Clinac iX linac in our clinics, and subsequently compare it with the wildely used AAA algorithm. The source models for both Acuros XB and AAA were configured by importing the same measured beam data into Eclipse treatment planning system. Both algorithms were validated by comparing calculated dose with measured dose on a homogeneous water phantom for field sizes ranging from 6 cm × 6 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Central axis and off-axis points with different depths were chosen for the comparison. In addition, the accuracy of Acuros was evaluated for wedge fields with wedge angles from 15 to 60°. Similarly, variable field sizes for an inhomogeneous phantom were chosen to validate the Acuros algorithm. In addition, doses calculated by Acuros and AAA at the center of lung equivalent tissue from three different VMAT plans were compared to the ion chamber measured doses in QUASAR phantom, and the calculated dose distributions by the two algorithms and their differences on patients were compared. Computation time on VMAT plans was also evaluated for Acuros and AAA. Differences between dose-to-water (calculated by AAA and Acuros XB) and dose-to-medium (calculated by Acuros XB) on patient plans were compared and evaluated. For open 6 MV photon beams on the homogeneous water phantom, both Acuros XB and AAA calculations were within 1% of measurements. For 23 MV photon beams, the calculated doses were within 1.5% of measured doses for Acuros XB and 2% for AAA. Testing on the inhomogeneous phantom demonstrated that AAA overestimated doses by up to 8.96% at a point close to lung/solid water interface, while Acuros XB reduced that to 1.64%. The test on QUASAR phantom showed that Acuros achieved better agreement in lung equivalent tissue while AAA underestimated dose for all VMAT plans by up to 2.7%. Acuros XB computation time was about three times faster than AAA for VMAT plans, and

  18. Radiation dose monitoring in the clinical routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika [UK Essen (Germany). Radiology

    2017-04-15

    Here we describe the first clinical experiences regarding the use of an automated radiation dose management software to monitor the radiation dose of patients during routine examinations. Many software solutions for monitoring radiation dose have emerged in the last decade. The continuous progress in radiological techniques, new scan features, scanner generations and protocols are the primary challenge for radiation dose monitoring software systems. To simulate valid dose calculations, radiation dose monitoring systems have to follow current trends and stay constantly up-to-date. The dose management software is connected to all devices at our institute and conducts automatic data acquisition and radiation dose calculation. The system incorporates 18 virtual phantoms based on the Cristy phantom family, estimating doses in newborns to adults. Dose calculation relies on a Monte Carlo simulation engine. Our first practical experiences demonstrate that the software is capable of dose estimation in the clinical routine. Its implementation and use have some limitations that can be overcome. The software is promising and allows assessment of radiation doses, like organ and effective doses according to ICRP 60 and ICRP 103, patient radiation dose history and cumulative radiation doses. Furthermore, we are able to determine local diagnostic reference doses. The radiation dose monitoring software systems can facilitate networking between hospitals and radiological departments, thus refining radiation doses and implementing reference doses at substantially lower levels.

  19. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  20. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y; Sato, O; Tanaka, S I; Tsuda, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, N

    2003-01-01

    In the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 Recommendations, radiation weighting factors were introduced in the place of quality factors, the tissue weighting factors were revised, and effective doses and equivalent doses of each tissues and organs were defined as the protection quantities. Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of theses data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality fact...

  1. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: gas@cdtn.br, e-mail: pls@cdtn.br, e-mail: fcp@cdtn.br, e-mail: lcmb@cdtn.br, e-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  2. Dedicated breast CT: effect of adaptive filtration on dose distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the work was experimental investigations of the breast dose distributions with adaptive filtration. Adaptive filtration reduces detector dynamic range and improves image quality. The adaptive filter with predetermined shape is placed at the x-ray beam such that the x-ray intensity at the detector surface is flat. However, adaptive filter alters the mean dose to the breast, as well as volume distribution of the dose. Methods: The dose was measured using a 14 cm diameter cylindrical acrylic breast phantom. An acrylic adaptive filter was fabricated to match the 14 cm diameter of the phantom. The dose was measured using ion chamber inserted into holes distributed along the radius of the phantom from the center to the edge. The radial distribution of dose was measured and fitted by an analytical function and the volume distribution and mean value of dose was calculated. The measurements were performed at 40, 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages and 6.6 mGy air kerma. Results: The adaptive filt...

  3. Application of ALARP to extremity doses for hospital workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C J; Whitby, M [Health Physics Service, Divisional Offices (West), Western Infirmary, Glasgow G11 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-01

    The implementation of ALARP for hospital workers is considered in relation to extremity doses. Criteria are proposed which could provide guidance in determining strategies for both implementing radiation protection measures and dose monitoring for the extremities. Two groups of hospital workers have been studied, namely interventional radiologists/cardiologists, and radionuclide staff preparing and administering radiopharmaceuticals. The radiology procedures can give high doses to both the hands and legs. Those to the legs can be reduced by the use of lead rubber shields. Study of the distribution of dose across radiologists' hands has identified the ring position on the little finger as the appropriate position for dose monitoring. The variations in dose across the hands of radionuclide workers are greater, with the tip likely to receive the highest dose. The protection strategy will need to be determined for each department, because of the wide range in techniques used in handling radiopharmaceuticals. It is hoped that the criteria could aid balanced decision-making about the appropriate protection strategy and ensure that protection measures are in place where they are required, but avoid their introduction where they are unnecessary.

  4. Patient Doses in Paediatric Fluoroscopic Examinations in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A.; Komppa, T.; Heikkila, M.; Parviainen, T

    2000-07-01

    Dose-area products (DAP) in paediatric fluoroscopic examinations were measured at paediatric clinics in three university hospitals. The purpose was to provide supplementary data for development of reference doses, and for determination of relations between patient size and dose, in examinations involving both radiography and fluoroscopy for paediatric patients of various ages. The number of paediatric patients was 217. The most common fluoroscopic examinations were: micturating cystourethrography (MCU), 103 patients; barium enema (anography), 39 patients; barium meal and follow, 20 patients; and oesophagus, nine patients. Data on the patients and examination techniques, and the dose-area products are reported for various examinations and age groups. In the MCU examinations the mean DAP values were 560 mGy.cm{sup 2} for the age group of 0 years: 910 mGy.cm{sup 2} for the age group of 1-4 years; 880 mGy.cm{sup 2} for the age group of 5-9 years; and 4600 mGy.cm{sup 2} for the age group of 10-15 years. The radiation doses to which paediatric patients are exposed in fluoroscopic examinations vary over a large scale, even within narrow age bands, and comparisons between the doses are difficult because of wide ranges in patient size. This indicates the need for developing a method for taking account of the effects of patients size before deriving reference doses. (author)

  5. Australian per caput dose from diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, A; Wallace, A; Marks, P; Edmonds, K; Tingey, D; Johnston, P

    2013-10-01

    The largest man-made contributor to the ionising radiation dose to the Australian population is from diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine. The last estimation of this dose was made in 2004 (1.3 mSv), this paper describes a recent re-evaluation of this dose to reflect the changes in imaging trends and technology. The estimation was calculated by summing the dose from five modalities, computed tomography (CT), general radiography/fluoroscopy, interventional procedures, mammography and nuclear medicine. Estimates were made using Australian frequency data and dose data from a range of Australian and international sources of average effective dose values. The ionising radiation dose to the Australian population in 2010 from diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine is estimated to be 1.7 mSv (1.11 mSv CT, 0.30 mSv general radiography/fluoroscopy, 0.17 mSv interventional procedures, 0.03 mSv mammography and 0.10 mSv nuclear medicine). This exceeds the estimate of 1.5 mSv per person from natural background and cosmic radiation.

  6. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi, E-mail: hashizume@plasma.engg.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-08-31

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) from 1.3 × 10{sup 16} to 2.3 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) ranging from 6 × 10{sup 16} to 2 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} to 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}; cells were inactivated by O({sup 3}P{sub j}) doses exceeding 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O({sup 3}P{sub j})

  7. Fast reconstruction of low dose proton CT by sinogram interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David C.; Sangild Sørensen, Thomas; Rit, Simon

    2016-08-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated as a promising image modality in particle therapy planning. It can reduce errors in particle range calculations and consequently improve dose calculations. Obtaining a high imaging resolution has traditionally required computationally expensive iterative reconstruction techniques to account for the multiple scattering of the protons. Recently, techniques for direct reconstruction have been developed, but these require a higher imaging dose than the iterative methods. No previous work has compared the image quality of the direct and the iterative methods. In this article, we extend the methodology for direct reconstruction to be applicable for low imaging doses and compare the obtained results with three state-of-the-art iterative algorithms. We find that the direct method yields comparable resolution and image quality to the iterative methods, even at 1 mSv dose levels, while yielding a twentyfold speedup in reconstruction time over previously published iterative algorithms.

  8. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images and measur......Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k...

  9. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions....... Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track-structure based alanine......-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasi mono energetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties...

  10. Plastic film materials for dosimetry of very large absorbed doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Abdel-Rahim, F.

    1985-01-01

    of the polyhalostyrenes have essentially rate-independent and moderately temperature-dependent responses to such large doses of ionizing radiation. While radiation-induced optical absorption in the ultraviolet for polystyrene is unstable following irradiation, thus leading to an intrinsic low-intensity rate dependence......Most plastic films have limited response ranges for dosimetry because of radiation-induced brittleness, degradation, or saturation of the signal used for analysis (e.g. spectrophotometry) at high doses. There are, however, a few types of thin plastic films showing linearity of response even up...... to doses as high as 2 × 106 Gy (200 Mrad) without severe loss of mechanical properties. Among many candidate film types tested, those showing such resistance to radiation damage and continued response at such high doses are polyethylene terephthalate, high-density polyethylene, dyed polyvinylchloride...

  11. Radiological dose assessment for vault storage concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, R.F.

    1997-02-25

    This radiological dose assessment presents neutron and photon dose rates in support of project W-460. Dose rates are provided for a single 3013 container, the ``infloor`` storage vault concept, and the ``cubicle`` storage vault concept.

  12. Kenai National Moose Range Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This book presents a summary of the history, wildlife, recreational opportunities, economic uses, and future plans for Kenai National Moose Range.

  13. The Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the geological history, early settlement, game resources, early conservation interests, and establishment of Kenai National Moose Range.

  14. Genus Ranges of Chord Diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jonathan; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    2015-04-01

    A chord diagram consists of a circle, called the backbone, with line segments, called chords, whose endpoints are attached to distinct points on the circle. The genus of a chord diagram is the genus of the orientable surface obtained by thickening the backbone to an annulus and attaching bands to the inner boundary circle at the ends of each chord. Variations of this construction are considered here, where bands are possibly attached to the outer boundary circle of the annulus. The genus range of a chord diagram is the genus values over all such variations of surfaces thus obtained from a given chord diagram. Genus ranges of chord diagrams for a fixed number of chords are studied. Integer intervals that can be, and those that cannot be, realized as genus ranges are investigated. Computer calculations are presented, and play a key role in discovering and proving the properties of genus ranges.

  15. Effect of γ-dose rate and total dose interrelation on the polymeric hydrogel: A novel injectable male contraceptive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pradeep K.; Jha, Rakhi; Gupta, B. L.; Guha, Sujoy K.

    2010-05-01

    Functional necessity to use a particular range of dose rate and total dose of γ-initiated polymerization to manufacture a novel polymeric hydrogel RISUG ® (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) made of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), for its broad biomedical application explores new dimension of research. The present work involves 16 irradiated samples. They were tested by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, etc. to see the interrelation effect of gamma dose rates (8.25, 17.29, 20.01 and 25.00 Gy/min) and four sets of doses (1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 kGy) on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution and porosity analysis of the biopolymeric drug RISUG ®. The results of randomized experiment indicated that a range of 18-24 Gy/min γ-dose rate and 2.0-2.4 kGy γ-total doses is suitable for the desirable in vivo performance of the contraceptive copolymer.

  16. Effect of gamma-dose rate and total dose interrelation on the polymeric hydrogel: A novel injectable male contraceptive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Pradeep K. [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Department of Management Science, U.P. Technical University, Lucknow 226021 (India); Jha, Rakhi [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Ch. C.S. University, Meerut 200005 (India); Gupta, B.L. [CH3/56 Kendriya Vihar, Kharghar, Sector-11, Navi Mumbai-410 210 (India); Guha, Sujoy K., E-mail: guha_sk@yahoo.co [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2010-05-15

    Functional necessity to use a particular range of dose rate and total dose of gamma-initiated polymerization to manufacture a novel polymeric hydrogel RISUG (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) made of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), for its broad biomedical application explores new dimension of research. The present work involves 16 irradiated samples. They were tested by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, etc. to see the interrelation effect of gamma dose rates (8.25, 17.29, 20.01 and 25.00 Gy/min) and four sets of doses (1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 kGy) on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution and porosity analysis of the biopolymeric drug RISUG. The results of randomized experiment indicated that a range of 18-24 Gy/min gamma-dose rate and 2.0-2.4 kGy gamma-total doses is suitable for the desirable in vivo performance of the contraceptive copolymer.

  17. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose-response calibration curve, background frequency in the population and dose estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastkhah, E; Zakeri, F; Ghoranneviss, M; Rajabpour, M R; Farshidpour, M R; Mianji, F; Bayat, M

    2016-03-01

    An in vitro study of the dose responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted with the aim of creating calibrated dose-response curves for biodosimetry measuring up to 4 Gy (0.25-4 Gy) of gamma radiation. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay was employed to obtain the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell in blood samples from 16 healthy donors (eight males and eight females) in two age ranges of 20-34 and 35-50 years. The data were used to construct the calibration curves for men and women in two age groups, separately. An increase in micronuclei yield with the dose in a linear-quadratic way was observed in all groups. To verify the applicability of the constructed calibration curve, MN yields were measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes of two real overexposed subjects and three irradiated samples with unknown dose, and the results were compared with dose values obtained from measuring dicentric chromosomes. The comparison of the results obtained by the two techniques indicated a good agreement between dose estimates. The average baseline frequency of MN for the 130 healthy non-exposed donors (77 men and 55 women, 20-60 years old divided into four age groups) ranged from 6 to 21 micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells. Baseline MN frequencies were higher for women and for the older age group. The results presented in this study point out that the CBMN assay is a reliable, easier and valuable alternative method for biological dosimetry.

  18. Life span of C57 mice as influenced by radiation dose, dose rate, and age at exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, J.F.; Thomas, R.G.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1982-10-01

    This study was designed to measure the life shortening of C57BL/6J male mice as a result of exposure to five external doses from /sup 60/Co gamma radiation delivered at six different dose rates. Total doses ranged from 20 to 1620 rad at exposure rates ranging from 0.7 to 36,000 R/day. The ages of the mice at exposure were newborn, 2, 6, or 15 months. Two replications were completed. Although death was the primary endpoint, we did perform gross necropsies. The life span findings are variable, but we found no consistent shortening compared to control life spans. Therefore, we cannot logically extrapolate life shortening to lower doses, from the data we have obtained. In general, the younger the animals were at the beginning of exposure, the longer their life spans were compared to those of controls. This relationship weakened at the higher doses and dose rates, as mice in these categories tended not to have significantly different life spans from controls. Using life span as a criterion, we find this study suggests that some threshold dosage may exist beyond which effects of external irradiation may be manifested. Up to this threshold, there is no shortening effect on life span compared to that of control mice. Our results are in general agreement with the results of other researchers investigating human and other animal life span effects on irradiation.

  19. Cytogenetic dose-response in vitro for biological dosimetry after exposure to high doses of gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Maznyk, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    The dose response for dicentrics plus centric rings and total unstable chromosome-type aberrations was studied in the first mitoses of cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to doses of ∼2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16 and 20 Gy of acute (60)Со gamma-rays. A dose-dependent increase of aberration yield was accompanied by a tendency to the underdispersion of dicentrics and centric rings among cells distributions compared with Poisson statistics at doses ≥6 Gy. The formal fitting of the data to a linear-quadratic model resulted in an equation with the linear and quadratic coefficients ranged 0.098-0.129×cell(-1)×Gy(-1) and 0.039-0.034×cell(-1)×Gy(-2), respectively, depending on the fitting method. The actual radiation-induced aberration yield was markedly lower than expected from a calibration curve, generated earlier within a lower dose range. Interlaboratory variations in reported dicentric yields induced by medium-to-high radiation doses in vitro are discussed.

  20. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Ebert@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Foo, Kerwyn [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gulliford, Sarah L. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Angel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Denham, James W. [School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  1. Influence of dose calculation algorithms on the predicted dose distribution and NTCP values for NSCLC patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Wieslander, Elinore; Fogliata, Antonella;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate differences in calculated doses and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values between different dose algorithms.......To investigate differences in calculated doses and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values between different dose algorithms....

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M. (comp.)

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movement of radioactive materials from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assembles, evaluates, and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. In addition to population and demographic data, the food and water resources and consumption patterns for populations are estimated because they provide a primary pathway for the intake of radionuclides. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task use the information produced by the other tasks to estimate the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford radiation. Project progress is documented in this monthly report, which is available to the public. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Multicentre evaluation of a novel vaginal dose reporting method in 153 cervical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerveld, Henrike; de Leeuw, Astrid; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Oosterveld, Bernard; Oinam, Arun; Hudej, Robert; Swamidas, Jamema; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a vaginal dose reporting method for combined EBRT and BT in cervical cancer patients was proposed. The current study was to evaluate vaginal doses with this method in a multicentre setting, wherein different applicators, dose rates and protocols were used. In a subset of patients from the EMBRACE study, vaginal doses were evaluated. Doses at the applicator surface left/right and anterior/posterior and at 5mm depth were measured. In addition, the dose at the Posterior-Inferior Border of Symphysis (PIBS) vaginal dose point and PIBS±2cm, corresponding to the mid and lower vagina, was measured. 153 patients from seven institutions were included. Large dose variations expressed in EQD2 with α/β=3Gy were seen between patients, in particular at the top left and right vaginal wall (median 195 (range 61-947)Gy/178 (61-980)Gy, respectively). At 5mm depth, doses were 98 (55-212)Gy/91 (54-227)Gy left/right, and 71 (51-145)Gy/67 (49-189)Gy anterior/posterior, respectively. The dose at PIBS and PIBS±2cm was 41 (3-81)Gy, 54 (32-109)Gy and 5 (1-51)Gy, respectively. At PIBS+2cm (mid vagina) dose variation was coming from BT. The variation at PIBS-2cm (lower vagina) was mainly dependent on EBRT field border location. This novel method for reporting vaginal doses coming from EBRT and BT through well-defined dose points gives a robust representation of the dose along the vaginal axis. In addition, it allows comparison of vaginal dose between patients from different centres. The doses at the PIBS points represent the doses at the mid and lower parts of the vagina. Large variations in dose throughout the vagina were observed between patients and centres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effects of TCDD on Pregnant Cynomolgus Macaque (MacacaFascicularis) and its Pregnancy Outcome%TCDD对猕猴妊娠期及其妊娠结局的毒性影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玉梅; Lasley,B

    2000-01-01

    在雌猴妊娠第12天采用灌胃法一次性给予TCDD,剂量为1.0、2.0、4.0μg/kg.bw,每个剂量组4个动物。对照组(7个动物)给予相同体积的溶媒(丙酮-色拉油)。结果发现母猴在染毒10天后相继出现食欲下降、体重降低、脱毛、皮炎和贫血等中毒症状,染毒组12只猴子有10只在怀孕的第22到32天发生早期胚胎丢失。结果表明,低剂量TCDD可导致妊娠期猕猴出现中毒症状,并影响妊娠结局。%Females macaques were administrated single doses of 1, 2,4pg/kg TCDD(n = 4 per dose group)on gestational day (GD)12.The controls(n = 7)received the same dosing volume of acetone-coin oil. The results showed that poor appetite, weight loss, alope-cia, dermatitis, anemia and other toxic reactions were recordedsince rtrteatment day 10, and early fetal loss occurred between GDs22 and 32 in 10 of the 12 animals treated, with TCDD. The resultsdemonstrated that toxicity was induced by low level TCDD inpregnant macaques and pregnancy outcomes were affected too.

  5. Paediatric dose measurement in a full-body digital radiography unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maree, Gert J.; Hering, Egbert R. [Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Division of Medical Physics, Cape Town (South Africa); Irving, Benjamin J. [University of Cape Town, MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, Department of Human Biology, Cape Town, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2007-10-15

    Ionizing radiation has a detrimental effect on the human body, particularly in children. Thus it is important to minimize the dose. Linear slit-scanning X-ray units offer the possibility of dose reductions. In order to further develop linear slit-scanning radiography, the dose needs to be accurately calculated for various examinations. To measure the entrance dose (free-in-air) and calculate the effective doses for various radiological examinations in children on Lodox Statscan and Shimadzu radiography units. Entrance doses (free-in-air) were measured using a dose meter and ionization chamber on the Statscan and Shimadzu units at two South African hospitals. The entrance doses were measured for a number of common examinations and were used to compute the effective dose using a Monte Carlo program. The standard deviation of the entrance doses was in the range 0-0.6%. The effective dose from the Statscan unit was well below that from the Shimadzu unit as well as that found in other radiological studies from around the world in children. The one exception was chest examination where the dose was similar to that in other studies worldwide due to the use of Chest AP projection compared to Chest PA used in the comparitive studies. Linear slit-scanning systems help reduce the dose in radiological examinations in children. (orig.)

  6. Optical range and range rate estimation for teleoperator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, N. L., Jr.; Kirkpatrick, M., III; Malone, T. B.; Huggins, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    Range and range rate are crucial parameters which must be available to the operator during remote controlled orbital docking operations. A method was developed for the estimation of both these parameters using an aided television system. An experiment was performed to determine the human operator's capability to measure displayed image size using a fixed reticle or movable cursor as the television aid. The movable cursor was found to yield mean image size estimation errors on the order of 2.3 per cent of the correct value. This error rate was significantly lower than that for the fixed reticle. Performance using the movable cursor was found to be less sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio variation than was that for the fixed reticle. The mean image size estimation errors for the movable cursor correspond to an error of approximately 2.25 per cent in range suggesting that the system has some merit. Determining the accuracy of range rate estimation using a rate controlled cursor will require further experimentation.

  7. Performance standard for dose Calibrator

    CERN Document Server

    Darmawati, S

    2002-01-01

    Dose calibrator is an instrument used in hospitals to determine the activity of radionuclide for nuclear medicine purposes. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has published IEC 1303:1994 standard that can be used as guidance to test the performance of the instrument. This paper briefly describes content of the document,as well as explains the assessment that had been carried out to test the instrument accuracy in Indonesia through intercomparison measurement.Its is suggested that hospitals acquire a medical physicist to perform the test for its dose calibrator. The need for performance standard in the form of Indonesia Standard is also touched.

  8. Pediatric patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures; Doses em paciente pediatrico em procedimentos de cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, R.B.; Murata, C.H.; Moreira, A.C., E-mail: rbitelli2012@gmail.com, E-mail: camila.murata@gmail.com, E-mail: antonio.xray@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Pulista de Medicina; Khoury, H.J.; Borras, C., E-mail: hjkhoury@gmail.com, E-mail: cariborras@starpower.net [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, M.S.R da, E-mail: msrochas2003@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The radiation doses from interventional procedures is relevant when treating children because of their greater radiosensitivity compared with adults. The purposes of this paper were to estimate the dose received by 18 pediatric patients who underwent cardiac interventional procedures and to correlate the maximum entrance surface air kerma (Ke,max), estimated with radiochromic films, with the cumulative air kerma values displayed at the end of procedures. This study was performed in children up to 6 years. The study was performed in two hospitals, one located in Recife and the other one in São Paulo. The x-ray imaging systems used were Phillips Allura 12 model with image intensifier system and a Phillips Allura FD10 flat panel system. To estimate the Ke,max on the patient’s skin radiochromic films(Gafchromic XR-RV2) were used. These values were estimated from the maximum optical density measured on film using a calibration curve. The results showed cumulative air kerma values ranging from 78.3- 500.0mGy, with a mean value of 242,3 mGy. The resulting Ke,max values ranged from 20.0-461.8 mGy, with a mean value of 208,8 mGy. The Ke,max values were correlated with the displayed cumulative air kerma values. The correlation factor R² was 0.78, meaning that the value displayed in the equipment’s console can be useful for monitoring the skin absorbed dose throughout the procedure. The routine fluoroscopy time records is not able by itself alert the physician about the risk of dose exceeding the threshold of adverse reactions, which can vary from an early erythema to serious harmful skin damage. (author)

  9. Gafchromic EBT-XD film: Dosimetry characterization in high-dose, volumetric-modulated arc therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Hosono, Fumika; Sumida, Naoki; Okazue, Toshiya; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2016-11-08

    Radiochromic films are important tools for assessing complex dose distributions. Gafchromic EBT-XD films have been designed for optimal performance in the 40-4,000 cGy dose range. We investigated the dosimetric characteristics of these films, including their dose-response, postexposure density growth, and dependence on scanner orientation, beam energy, and dose rate with applications to high-dose volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) verification. A 10 MV beam from a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator was used to irradiate the films with doses in the 0-4,000 cGy range. Postexposure coloration was analyzed at postirradiation times ranging from several minutes to 48 h. The films were also irradiated with 6 MV (dose rate (DR): 600 MU/min), 6 MV flattening filter-free (FFF) (DR: 1,400 MU/ min), and 10 MV FFF (DR: 2,400 MU/min) beams to determine the energy and dose-rate dependence. For clinical examinations, we compared the dose distribu-tion measured with EBT-XD films and calculated by the planning system for four VMAT cases. The red channel of the EBT-XD film exhibited a wider dynamic range than the green and blue channels. Scanner orientation yielded a variation of ~ 3% in the net optical density (OD). The difference between the film front and back scan orientations was negligible, with variation of ~ 1.3% in the net OD. The net OD increased sharply within the first 6 hrs after irradiation and gradually afterwards. No significant difference was observed for the beam energy and dose rate, with a variation of ~ 1.5% in the net OD. The gamma passing rates (at 3%, 3 mm) between the film- measured and treatment planning system (TPS)-calculated dose distributions under a high dose VMAT plan in the absolute dose mode were more than 98.9%. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Dynamic range majority data structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmasry, Amr Ahmed Abd Elmoneim; He, Meng; Munro, J. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Given a set P of n coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range α-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on P. More specifically, for a query range Q, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an α-fraction of the points contained in Q. We present a new...... data structure for answering range α-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where α ε (0,1). Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in O((lg n)/α) time, and updates in O((lg n)/α) amortized time. If the coordinates of the points are integers, then the query time can be improved to O...

  11. GEA CRDA Range Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-28

    E1, July-August 1998 18 3.3. Example 3: SatMex, Solidaridad 2, May-June 1998 27 3.4. Example 4: PanAmSat, Galaxy IV, May-June 1998 33 3.5...17 Millstone measurements residuals for Telstar 401 on Days 181-263. 26 3-18 Millstone measurement residuals for Solidaridad 1 on Days 141-153...with 29 SatMex range data. 3-19 Hermosillo B-- Solidaridad 1 range residuals through Days 135-144 with bias 30 removed. 3-20 Iztapalapa D

  12. Minimal doses of hydroxyurea for sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S.P. Lima

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of hydroxyurea (HU can improve the clinical course of sickle cell disease. However, several features of HU treatment remain unclear, including the predictability of drug response and determination of adequate doses, considering positive responses and minimal side effects. In order to identify adequate doses of HU for treatment of sickle cell disease, 10 patients, 8 with sickle cell anemia and 2 with Sß thalassemia (8SS, 2Sß, were studied for a period of 6 to 19 months in an open label dose escalation trial (10 to 20 mg kg-1 day-1. Hemoglobin (Hb, fetal hemoglobin (Hb F and mean corpuscular volume (MCV values and reticulocyte, neutrophil and platelet counts were performed every two weeks during the increase of the HU dose and every 4 weeks when the maximum HU dose was established. Reduction in the number of vasoocclusive episodes was also considered in order to evaluate the efficiency of the treatment. The final Hb and Hb F concentrations, and MCV values were significantly higher than the initial values, while the final reticulocyte and neutrophil counts were significantly lower. There was an improvement in the concentration of Hb (range: 0.7-2.0 g/dl at 15 mg HU kg-1 day-1, but this concentration did not increase significantly when the HU dose was raised to 20 mg kg-1 day-1. The concentration of Hb F increased significantly (range: 1.0-18.1% when 15 mg HU was used, and continued to increase when the dose was raised to 20 mg kg-1 day-1. The final MCV values increased 11-28 fl (femtoliters. However, reticulocyte (range: 51-205 x 109/l and neutrophil counts (range: 9.5-1.3 x 109/l obtained at this dose were significantly lower than those obtained with 15 mg kg-1 day-1. All patients reported a decrease in frequency or severity of vasoocclusive episodes. These results suggest that a hydroxyurea dose of 15 mg kg-1 day-1 seems to be adequate for treatment of sickle cell disease in view of the minimal side effects observed and the improvement

  13. Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

  14. Patient-specific dose calculations for pediatric CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, Susan D.; Carver, Diana E.; Stabin, Michael G. [Vanderbilt University, Physics and Astronomy Department, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Fraser, Nicholas D.; Pickens, David R.; Price, Ronald R.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Organ dose is essential for accurate estimates of patient dose from CT. To determine organ doses from a broad range of pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic chest-abdomen-pelvis CT and investigate how these relate to patient size. We used a previously validated Monte Carlo simulation model of a Philips Brilliance 64 multi-detector CT scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) to calculate organ doses for 40 pediatric patients (M:F = 21:19; range 0.6-17 years). Organ volumes and positions were determined from the images using standard segmentation techniques. Non-linear regression was performed to determine the relationship between volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol})-normalized organ doses and abdominopelvic diameter. We then compared results with values obtained from independent studies. We found that CTDI{sub vol}-normalized organ dose correlated strongly with exponentially decreasing abdominopelvic diameter (R{sup 2} > 0.8 for most organs). A similar relationship was determined for effective dose when normalized by dose-length product (R{sup 2} = 0.95). Our results agreed with previous studies within 12% using similar scan parameters (e.g., bowtie filter size, beam collimation); however results varied up to 25% when compared to studies using different bowtie filters. Our study determined that organ doses can be estimated from measurements of patient size, namely body diameter, and CTDI{sub vol} prior to CT examination. This information provides an improved method for patient dose estimation. (orig.)

  15. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, Delis [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct a peak dose assessment in support of the Authorized Limits Request for Solid Waste Disposal at Landfill C-746-U at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE-PPPO 2011a). The peak doses were calculated based on the DOE-PPPO Proposed Single Radionuclides Soil Guidelines and the DOE-PPPO Proposed Authorized Limits (AL) Volumetric Concentrations available in DOE-PPPO 2011a. This work is provided as an appendix to the Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky (ORISE 2012). The receptors evaluated in ORISE 2012 were selected by the DOE-PPPO for the additional peak dose evaluations. These receptors included a Landfill Worker, Trespasser, Resident Farmer (onsite), Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and an Offsite Resident Farmer. The RESRAD (Version 6.5) and RESRAD-OFFSITE (Version 2.5) computer codes were used for the peak dose assessments. Deterministic peak dose assessments were performed for all the receptors and a probabilistic dose assessment was performed only for the Offsite Resident Farmer at the request of the DOE-PPPO. In a deterministic analysis, a single input value results in a single output value. In other words, a deterministic analysis uses single parameter values for every variable in the code. By contrast, a probabilistic approach assigns parameter ranges to certain variables, and the code randomly selects the values for each variable from the parameter range each time it calculates the dose (NRC 2006). The receptor scenarios, computer codes and parameter input files were previously used in ORISE 2012. A few modifications were made to the parameter input files as appropriate for this effort. Some of these changes

  16. Effect of statistical fluctuation in Monte Carlo based photon beam dose calculation on gamma index evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Yan Jiang; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-03-21

    The γ-index test has been commonly adopted to quantify the degree of agreement between a reference dose distribution and an evaluation dose distribution. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been widely used for the radiotherapy dose calculation for both clinical and research purposes. The goal of this work is to investigate both theoretically and experimentally the impact of the MC statistical fluctuation on the γ-index test when the fluctuation exists in the reference, the evaluation, or both dose distributions. To the first order approximation, we theoretically demonstrated in a simplified model that the statistical fluctuation tends to overestimate γ-index values when existing in the reference dose distribution and underestimate γ-index values when existing in the evaluation dose distribution given the original γ-index is relatively large for the statistical fluctuation. Our numerical experiments using realistic clinical photon radiation therapy cases have shown that (1) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and a non-MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is overestimated and the gamma passing rate decreases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the reference dose; (2) when performing a γ-index test between a non-MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is underestimated when they are within the clinically relevant range and the gamma passing rate increases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the evaluation dose; (3) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the gamma passing rate is overestimated due to the statistical noise in the evaluation dose and underestimated due to the statistical noise in the reference dose. We conclude that the γ-index test should be used with caution when comparing dose distributions computed with MC simulation.

  17. Specification of absorbed dose to water using model-based dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Carlsson, Gudrun Alm

    2013-04-21

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), recently introduced in treatment planning systems (TPS) for brachytherapy, calculate tissue absorbed doses. In the TPS framework, doses have hereto been reported as dose to water and water may still be preferred as a dose specification medium. Dose to tissue medium Dmed then needs to be converted into dose to water in tissue Dw,med. Methods to calculate absorbed dose to differently sized water compartments/cavities inside tissue, infinitesimal (used for definition of absorbed dose), small, large or intermediate, are reviewed. Burlin theory is applied to estimate photon energies at which cavity sizes in the range 1 nm-10 mm can be considered small or large. Photon and electron energy spectra are calculated at 1 cm distance from the central axis in cylindrical phantoms of bone, muscle and adipose tissue for 20, 50, 300 keV photons and photons from (125)I, (169)Yb and (192)Ir sources; ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers and mass energy absorption coefficients are calculated as applicable to convert Dmed into Dw,med for small and large cavities. Results show that 1-10 nm sized cavities are small at all investigated photon energies; 100 µm cavities are large only at photon energies <20 keV. A choice of an appropriate conversion coefficient Dw, med/Dmed is discussed in terms of the cavity size in relation to the size of important cellular targets. Free radicals from DNA bound water of nanometre dimensions contribute to DNA damage and cell killing and may be the most important water compartment in cells implying use of ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers for converting Dmed into Dw,med.

  18. The Dynamic Range of LZ

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The electronics of the LZ experiment, the 7-tonne dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), is designed to permit studies of physics where the energies deposited range from 1 keV of nuclear-recoil energy up to 3,000 keV of electron-recoil energy. The system is designed to provide a 70% efficiency for events that produce three photoelectrons in the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). This corresponds approximately to the lowest energy threshold achievable in such a detector, and drives the noise specifications for the front end. The upper limit of the LZ dynamic range is defined by the electroluminescence (S2) signals. The low-energy channels of the LZ amplifiers provide the dynamic range required for the tritium and krypton calibrations. The high-energy channels provide the dynamic range required to measure the activated Xe lines. S2 signals induced by alpha particles from radon decay will saturate one or more channels of the top PMT array but techniques are being dev...

  19. Truthful approximations to range voting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filos-Ratsika, Aris; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    We consider the fundamental mechanism design problem of approximate social welfare maximization under general cardinal preferences on a finite number of alternatives and without money. The well-known range voting scheme can be thought of as a non-truthful mechanism for exact social welfare...

  20. Heteronuclear Long-Range Correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole W.

    The lecture will cover heteronuclear long-range correlation techniques like HMBC, H2BC, and HAT HMBC with the emphasis on determining the number of covalent bonds between two spins being correlated. H2BC and HMBC spectra are quite complementary as a peak can be strong in one of the two spectra...

  1. Mobile Lunar Laser Ranging Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intellect, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Harlan Smith, chairman of the University of Texas's Astronomy Department, discusses a mobile lunar laser ranging station which could help determine the exact rates of movement between continents and help geophysicists understand earthquakes. He also discusses its application for studying fundamental concepts of cosmology and physics. (Editor/RK)

  2. Range Compressed Holographic Aperture Ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    digital holography, laser, active imaging, remote sensing, laser imaging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: SAR 8...slow speed tunable lasers, while relaxing the need to precisely track the transceiver or target motion. In the following section we describe a scenario...contrast targets. As shown in Figure 28, augmenting holographic ladar with range compression relaxes the dependence of image reconstruction on

  3. Risperidone Dosing in Children and Adolescents with Autistic Disorder: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Justine M.; Kushner, Stuart; Ning, Xiaoping; Karcher, Keith; Ness, Seth; Aman, Michael; Singh, Jaskaran; Hough, David

    2013-01-01

    Efficacy and safety of 2 risperidone doses were evaluated in children and adolescents with autism. Patients (N = 96; 5-17 years), received risperidone (low-dose: 0.125 mg/day [20 to 45 kg] or high-dose: 1.25 mg/day [20 to 45 kg]) or placebo. Mean baseline (range 27-29) to endpoint change…

  4. Radiation dose to patient and personnel during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, W.H.; Jones, D.; Gibbons, R.P.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation dose to the patient and personnel was determined during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy treatment of 60 patients. Surface radiation dose to the patient's back from the fluoroscopy unit on the side with the kidney stone averaged 10 rem (100 mSv.) per case, although the range was wide (1 to 30 rem). The surface dose from the opposing biplane x-ray unit was less, averaging 5.5 rem (55 mSv.) per case but again with a wide range (0.1 to 21 rem). Exit dose at the lower abdomen averaged 13 mrem. (0.13 mSv.) per case and estimated female gonad dose averaged 100 mrem. (1.2 mSv.). Radiation dose to personnel working in the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy suite averaged less than 2 mrem. (0.02 mSv.) per case, making it a procedure that is safe in regard to radiation exposure.

  5. Responses to low doses of ionizing radiation in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Pollycove, Myron; Sondhaus, Charles A

    2004-07-01

    Biological tissues operate through cells that act together within signaling networks. These assure coordinated cell function in the face of constant exposure to an array of potentially toxic agents, externally from the environment and endogenously from metabolism. Living tissues are indeed complex adaptive systems.To examine tissue effects specific for low-dose radiation, (1) absorbed dose in tissue is replaced by the sum of the energies deposited by each track event, or hit, in a cell-equivalent tissue micromass (1 ng) in all micromasses exposed, that is, by the mean energy delivered by all microdose hits in the exposed micromasses, with cell dose expressing the total energy per micromass from multiple microdoses; and (2) tissue effects are related to cell damage and protective cellular responses per average microdose hit from a given radiation quality for all such hits in the exposed micromasses.The probability of immediate DNA damage per low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) average micro-dose hit is extremely small, increasing over a certain dose range in proportion to the number of hits. Delayed temporary adaptive protection (AP) involves (a) induced detoxification of reactive oxygen species, (b) enhanced rate of DNA repair, (c) induced removal of damaged cells by apoptosis followed by normal cell replacement and by cell differentiation, and (d) stimulated immune response, all with corresponding changes in gene expression. These AP categories may last from less than a day to weeks and be tested by cell responses against renewed irradiation. They operate physiologically against nonradiogenic, largely endogenous DNA damage, which occurs abundantly and continually. Background radiation damage caused by rare microdose hits per micromass is many orders of magnitude less frequent. Except for apoptosis, AP increasingly fails above about 200 mGy of low-LET radiation, corresponding to about 200 microdose hits per exposed micromass. This ratio appears to exceed approximately

  6. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy AMC EXPERIANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Gyong; Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyong; Yi, Byong Yong [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Remote afterloading high dose rate brachytherapy(HDRB) is a new technology and needs new biological principle for time and dose schedule. Here, authors attempt to evaluate the technique and clinical outcome in 116 patients, 590 procedures performed at Asan Medical Center for 3 years. From Sep. 1985 to Aug 1992, 471 procedures of intracavitary radiation in 55 patients of cervical cancer and 26 of nasopharyngeal cancer, 79 intraluminal radiation in 12 of esophageal cancer, 11 of endobronchial cancer and 1 Klatskin tumor and 40 interstitial brachytherapy in 4 of breast cancer, 1 sarcoma and 1 urethral cancer were performed. Median follow-up was 7 months with range 1-31 months. All procedures except interstitial were performed under the local anesthesia and they were all well tolerated and completed the planned therapy except 6 patients. 53/58 patients with cervical cancer and 22/26 patients with nasopharynx cancer achieved CR. Among 15 patients with palliative therapy, 80% achieves palliation. We will describe the details of the technique and results in the text. To evaluate biologic effects of HDRB and optimal time/dose/fractionation schedule, we need longer follow-up. But authors feel that HDRB with proper fractionation schedule may yield superior results compared to the low dose rate brachytherapy considering the advantages of HDRB in safety factor for operator, better control of radiation dose and volume and patients comfort over the low dose brachytherapy.

  7. Radiation doses to aquatic organisms from natural radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E; Jones, S R; Saxén, R; Thørring, H; Vives i Batlle, J

    2004-12-01

    A framework for protection of the environment is likely to require a methodology for assessing dose rates arising from naturally occurring radionuclides. This paper addresses this issue for European aquatic environments through a process of (a) data collation, mainly with respect to levels of radioactivity in water sediments and aquatic flora and fauna, (b) the use of suitable distribution coefficients, concentration factors and global data where data gaps are present and (c) the utilisation of a reference organism approach whereby a finite number of suitable geometries are selected to allow dose per unit concentration factors to be derived and subsequent absorbed dose calculations (weighted or unweighted) to be made. The majority of the calculated absorbed dose, for both marine and freshwater organisms, arises from internally incorporated alpha emitters, with 210Po and 226Ra being the major contributors. Calculated doses are somewhat higher for freshwater compared to marine organisms, and the range of doses is also much greater. This reflects both the much greater variability of radionuclide concentrations in freshwater as compared to seawater, and also variability or uncertainty in concentration factor values. This work has revealed a number of substantial gaps in published empirical data especially for European aquatic environments.

  8. The Impact of a One-Dose versus Two-Dose Oral Cholera Vaccine Regimen in Outbreak Settings: A Modeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Andrew S; Luquero, Francisco J; Ciglenecki, Iza; Grais, Rebecca F; Sack, David A; Lessler, Justin

    2015-08-01

    In 2013, a stockpile of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) was created for use in outbreak response, but vaccine availability remains severely limited. Innovative strategies are needed to maximize the health impact and minimize the logistical barriers to using available vaccine. Here we ask under what conditions the use of one dose rather than the internationally licensed two-dose protocol may do both. Using mathematical models we determined the minimum relative single-dose efficacy (MRSE) at which single-dose reactive campaigns are expected to be as or more effective than two-dose campaigns with the same amount of vaccine. Average one- and two-dose OCV effectiveness was estimated from published literature and compared to the MRSE. Results were applied to recent outbreaks in Haiti, Zimbabwe, and Guinea using stochastic simulations to illustrate the potential impact of one- and two-dose campaigns. At the start of an epidemic, a single dose must be 35%-56% as efficacious as two doses to avert the same number of cases with a fixed amount of vaccine (i.e., MRSE between 35% and 56%). This threshold decreases as vaccination is delayed. Short-term OCV effectiveness is estimated to be 77% (95% CI 57%-88%) for two doses and 44% (95% CI -27% to 76%) for one dose. This results in a one-dose relative efficacy estimate of 57% (interquartile range 13%-88%), which is above conservative MRSE estimates. Using our best estimates of one- and two-dose efficacy, we projected that a single-dose reactive campaign could have prevented 70,584 (95% prediction interval [PI] 55,943-86,205) cases in Zimbabwe, 78,317 (95% PI 57,435-100,150) in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and 2,826 (95% PI 2,490-3,170) cases in Conakry, Guinea: 1.1 to 1.2 times as many as a two-dose campaign. While extensive sensitivity analyses were performed, our projections of cases averted in past epidemics are based on severely limited single-dose efficacy data and may not fully capture uncertainty due to imperfect surveillance data and

  9. The Impact of a One-Dose versus Two-Dose Oral Cholera Vaccine Regimen in Outbreak Settings: A Modeling Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Azman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a stockpile of oral cholera vaccine (OCV was created for use in outbreak response, but vaccine availability remains severely limited. Innovative strategies are needed to maximize the health impact and minimize the logistical barriers to using available vaccine. Here we ask under what conditions the use of one dose rather than the internationally licensed two-dose protocol may do both.Using mathematical models we determined the minimum relative single-dose efficacy (MRSE at which single-dose reactive campaigns are expected to be as or more effective than two-dose campaigns with the same amount of vaccine. Average one- and two-dose OCV effectiveness was estimated from published literature and compared to the MRSE. Results were applied to recent outbreaks in Haiti, Zimbabwe, and Guinea using stochastic simulations to illustrate the potential impact of one- and two-dose campaigns. At the start of an epidemic, a single dose must be 35%-56% as efficacious as two doses to avert the same number of cases with a fixed amount of vaccine (i.e., MRSE between 35% and 56%. This threshold decreases as vaccination is delayed. Short-term OCV effectiveness is estimated to be 77% (95% CI 57%-88% for two doses and 44% (95% CI -27% to 76% for one dose. This results in a one-dose relative efficacy estimate of 57% (interquartile range 13%-88%, which is above conservative MRSE estimates. Using our best estimates of one- and two-dose efficacy, we projected that a single-dose reactive campaign could have prevented 70,584 (95% prediction interval [PI] 55,943-86,205 cases in Zimbabwe, 78,317 (95% PI 57,435-100,150 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and 2,826 (95% PI 2,490-3,170 cases in Conakry, Guinea: 1.1 to 1.2 times as many as a two-dose campaign. While extensive sensitivity analyses were performed, our projections of cases averted in past epidemics are based on severely limited single-dose efficacy data and may not fully capture uncertainty due to imperfect

  10. Dose rate effects on the thermoluminescence kinetics properties of MWCVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, S.; Chernov, V.; Melendrez, R.; Soto-Puebla, D.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; Barboza-Flores, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, AP 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora 83190 (Mexico); Cruz-Zaragoza, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-543 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Favalli, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, TP800,Via E. Fermi, 21020 Ispra (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    Dose rate effects are important in thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeter applications because a certain absorbed dose given at different dose rates may result in a different TL yield. The present work reports about the dose rate effects on TL glow curves and kinetics properties of microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) diamond films grown on (100) silicon. The diamond films were exposed to {gamma} radiation at 20.67, 43.4 and 81.11 Gy min{sup -1} dose rates in the range of 0.05-10 kGy. The films showed a linear dose behavior up to 2 kGy and reached saturation for higher doses. The TL intensity varied as a function of dose rate and the samples had a maximum TL response for relatively lower dose rates. A single first order kinetics TL peak was typical for low doses while at higher doses two first order kinetics peaks were necessary to fit the glow curves. The results indicate that dose rate effects may be significant in dosimetric applications of MWCVD diamond. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Short-range communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  12. Long-Range Facilities - Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-31

    time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the...sternwheeler “Mark Twain” for Disneyland and fabrication of eight 52 foot submarines for the Disneyland “Navy.” This was followed by fabrication of the masts...reconstruction. This long-range plan provides a baseline against which the funds required for reconstruction can be balanced against a definite structure

  13. Dynamic Range Majority Data Structures

    CERN Document Server

    He, Meng; Nicholson, Patrick K

    2011-01-01

    Given a set $P$ of coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range $\\alpha$-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on $P$. More specifically, for a query range $Q$, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an $\\alpha$-fraction of the points contained in $Q$. We present a new data structure for answering range $\\alpha$-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where $\\alpha \\in (0,1)$. Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in $O((\\lg n) / \\alpha)$ time, and updates in $O((\\lg n) / \\alpha)$ amortized time. If the coordinates of the points are integers, then the query time can be improved to $O(\\lg n / (\\alpha \\lg \\lg n) + (\\lg(1/\\alpha))/\\alpha))$. For constant values of $\\alpha$, this improved query time matches an existing lower bound, for any data structure with polylogarithmic update time. We also generalize our data structure to handle sets of points in d-dimensions, for $d \\ge 2$, as well as dynamic arrays, in which each entry is a colour.

  14. Phase I Study of Continuous Weekly Dosing of Dimethylamino Benzoylphenylurea (BPU) in Patients with Solid Tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Messersmith, Wells A.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Baker, Sharyn D.; Zhao, Ming; Collins, Connie; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Donehower, Ross C.; Carducci, Michael A.; Wolff, Antonio C.

    2006-01-01

    A phase I study of Dimethylamino Benzoylphenylurea (BPU), a tubulin inhibitor, was performed using a weekly continuous schedule. Patients with refractory solid tumours received oral BPU once weekly without interruption at doses ranging from 5 to 320mg using an accelerated titration design. Nineteen subjects received 54 cycles of BPU. Early pharmacokinetic findings of decreased clearance with increasing dose and plasma accumulation led to the expansion of the 320mg dose level. Two subjects the...

  15. Polyvinyl butyral films containing leuco-malachite green as low-dose dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Hoang Hoa; Solomon, H. M.; Taguchi, M.; Kojima, T.

    2008-04-01

    Thin films containing leuco-malachite green (LMG) dye in polyvinyl butyral (PVB) have been developed for dose measurements of a few hundreds Gy level. The film shows significant color change in the visible range, and the sensitivity of the film to absorbed dose was enhanced by addition of chloride-containing compounds, such as chloral hydrate or 2,2,2-trichloroethanol. The film is suitable as dosimeters for dose measurements, e.g. in food irradiation and environmental protection.

  16. Polyvinyl butyral films containing leuco-malachite green as low-dose dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Hoa Mai [Institute for Nuclear Science Technique, Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (VAEC), 59 Ly Thuong Kiet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Solomon, H.M. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman Quezon City (Philippines); Taguchi, M. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki-shi. Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kojima, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki-shi. Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)], E-mail: kojima.takuji@jaea.go.jp

    2008-04-15

    Thin films containing leuco-malachite green (LMG) dye in polyvinyl butyral (PVB) have been developed for dose measurements of a few hundreds Gy level. The film shows significant color change in the visible range, and the sensitivity of the film to absorbed dose was enhanced by addition of chloride-containing compounds, such as chloral hydrate or 2,2,2-trichloroethanol. The film is suitable as dosimeters for dose measurements, e.g. in food irradiation and environmental protection.

  17. Clinical and economic consequences of pharmacogenetic-guided dosing of warfarin

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPatients using warfarin for oral anticoagulant therapy need to be frequently monitored because of warfarins narrow therapeutic range and the large variation in dose requirements among patients. Patients receiving the wrong dose have an increased risk of bleeding or thromboembolic events. The required dose is influenced by environmental factors, such as gender, age, diet and concomitant medication, as well as genetic factors. Pharmacogenetic testing prior to warfarin initiation mig...

  18. Cellular and molecular aspects of the anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Large, Martin

    2015-01-01

    For decades an anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of low-dose X-irradiation (LD-RT) has clinically been well established in the treatment of a plethora of benign diseases and chronic degenerative disorders with empirically identified single doses < 1 Gy to be most effective. Although considerable progress has been achieved in the understanding of immune modulatory effects of ionising radiation, especially in the low-dose range, the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently not fully r...

  19. Estimation of eye absorbed doses in head & neck radiotherapy practices using thermoluminescent detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh Bagheri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Determination of eye absorbed dose during head & neck radiotherapy is essential to estimate the risk of cataract. Dose measurements were made in 20 head & neck cancer patients undergoing 60Co radiotherapy using LiF(MCP thermoluminescent dosimeters. Head & neck cancer radiotherapy was delivered by fields using SAD & SSD techniques. For each patient, 3 TLD chips were placed on each eye. Head & neck dose was about 700-6000 cGy in 8-28 equal fractions. The range of eye dose is estimated to be (3.49-639.1 mGy with a mean of maximum dose (98.114 mGy, which is about 3 % of head & neck dose. Maximum eye dose was observed for distsnces of about 3 cm from edge of the field to eye.