WorldWideScience

Sample records for far-infrared chi wiggler

  1. Coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert H.; Freund, Henry P.; Pershing, Dean E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1993-11-01

    A magnetic wiggler design has been developed for applications in free-electron lasers which is scalable to small periods with high field amplitude, high beam current acceptance, and excellent transverse focusing and beam propagation properties. The Coaxial Hybrid Iron (CHI) wiggler design consists of a coaxial arrangement of alternating ferromagnetic and non- ferromagnetic rings with the central portion of the coax shifted by one half period. The entire arrangement is immersed in a solenoidal field which results in a cylindrically symmetric periodic field. A key advantage of this wiggler configuration is its capacity to handle very high beam currents with excellent focusing and transport properties. FEL configuration using the CHI wiggler design have the potential for high power, high frequency coherent generation in relatively compact systems. Analytic and simulated characteristics of the CHI wiggler are presented.

  2. A CHI wiggler ubitron amplifier experiment: Wiggler characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taccetti, J.M.; Jackson, R.H.; Freund, H.P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A 35 GHz CHI (Coaxial Hybrid Iron) wiggler ubitron amplifier experiment is under construction at the Naval Research Laboratory. The CHI wiggler configuration has the potential of generating high wiggler magnetic fields at short periods with excellent beam focusing and transport properties. This makes it a desirable configuration for the generation of high power coherent radiation in relatively compact systems. The CHI wiggler consists of alternating rings of magnetic and non-magnetic materials concentric with a central rod of similar alternating design but shifted along the axis by half a period. Once inserted in a solenoidal magnetic field, the CHI structure deforms the axial field to create a radial field oscillating with the same periodicity as the rings. An annular electron beam is propagated through the coaxial gap where the oscillating radial field imparts an azimuthal wiggle motion. The principal goals of the experiment are to investigate the performance tradeoffs involved in the CHI configuration for high frequency amplifiers operating at low voltages with small wiggler periods. The nominal design parameters are a center frequency of 35 GHz, wiggler period of 0.75 cm, and beam voltage of approximately 150 kV. Calculations have shown an intrinsic (untapered) efficiency of {approximately} 7% when operating at 6.3 kG axial field (wiggler field, B{sub w}{approximately}1270 G). The calculated gain was 36 dB, saturating at a distance of 46 cm. These parameters yield an instantaneous amplifier bandwidth of {approximately} 25%. There appears to be room for further improvement in efficiency, a matter which will be scrutinized more closely in the final design. A prototype CHI wiggler is presently being fabricated for use in conjunction with an existing 30 kG superconducting solenoid. The performance properties of the prototype will be characterized and compared with linear and non-linear calculations.

  3. Tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, K. M.; Jennings, D. A.; Petersen, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Tunable, CW, far-infrared radiation has been generated by nonlinear mixing of radiation from two CO2 lasers in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diode. The FIR difference-frequency power radiated from the MIM diode antenna to a calibrated indium antimonide bolometer. Two-tenths of a microwatt of FIR power was generated by 250 mW from each of the CO2 lasers. The combination of lines from a waveguide CO2 laser, with its larger tuning range, with lines from CO2, N2O, and CO2 isotopic lasers promises complete coverage of the entire far-infrared band from 100 to 5000 GHz (3-200 per cm) with stepwise-tunable CW radiation. To demonstrate the usefulness of the technique, the J = 4-5 line of CO was observed at 567 GHz.

  4. INSTRUMENTATION FOR FAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFITHS, P.R.; HOMES, C.

    2001-05-04

    Fourier transform spectrometers developed in three distinct spectral regions in the early 1960s. Pierre Connes and his coworkers in France developed remarkably sophisticated step-scan interferometers that permitted near-infrared spectra to be measured with a resolution of better than 0.0 1 cm{sup {minus}1}. These instruments may be considered the forerunners of the step-scan interferometers made by Bruker, Bio-Rad (Cambridge, MA, USA) and Nicolet although their principal application was in the field of astronomy. Low-resolution rapid-scanning interferometers were developed by Larry Mertz and his colleagues at Block Engineering (Cambridge, MA, USA) for remote sensing. Nonetheless, the FT-IR spectrometers that are so prevalent in chemical laboratories today are direct descendants of these instruments. The interferometers that were developed for far-infrared spectrometry in Gebbie's laboratory ,have had no commercial counterparts for at least 15 years. However, it could be argued that these instruments did as much to demonstrate the power of Fourier transform spectroscopy to the chemical community as any of the instruments developed for mid- and near-infrared spectrometry. Their performance was every bit as good as today's rapid-scanning interferometers. However, the market for these instruments is so small today that it has proved more lucrative to modify rapid-scanning interferometers that were originally designed for mid-infrared spectrometry than to compete with these instruments with slow continuous scan or step-scan interferometers.

  5. Mesoporous Silicon Far Infrared Filters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a novel method to make optical filters based on mesoporous silicon multilayers, for use at cold temperatures in the far infrared...

  6. FIRI-A far-infrared interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, Frank P.; Ivison, R. J.

    Half of the energy ever emitted by stars and accreting objects comes to us in the far-infrared (FIR) waveband and has yet to be properly explored. We propose a powerful Far-InfraRed Interferometer mission, FIRI, to carry out high-resolution imaging spectroscopy in the FIR. This key observational

  7. Demonstration of a Far Infrared Streak Camera.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drabbels, M.M.J.E.; Lankhuijzen, G.M.; Noordam, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    An atomic infrared (IR) streak camera is demonstrated that operates in the mid- and far-infrared (λ = 5-85 μm), well beyond the long wavelength cutoff of conventional streak cameras. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the streak camera are determined using the FELIX free-electron laser as

  8. Far-infrared spectrophotometer for astronomical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, H.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid-helium-cooled far infrared spectrophotometer was built and used to make low resolution observations of the continua of several kinds of astronomical objects using the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. This instrument fills a gap in both sensitivity to continuum sources and spectral resolution between the broadband photometers with lambda/Delta lambda approximately 1 and spectrometers with lambda/Delta lambda greater than 50. While designed primarily to study planetary nebulae, the instrument permits study of the shape of the continua of many weak sources which cannot easily be observed with high resolution systems.

  9. Ultrasensitive graphene far-infrared power detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKitterick, C B; Prober, D E; Vora, H; Du, X

    2015-04-29

    We describe the properties of ultrasensitive graphene photon detectors for use in the far-infrared/terahertz spectral region and present theoretical predictions for their power detection sensitivity. These predictions are based on two graphene contacting schemes with superconducting contacts: contacts with a thin insulating barrier, and direct superconducting contacts. To quantitatively assess these predictions, we perform thermal measurements of graphene at low temperatures and analyse them to extract information on electron-phonon cooling in graphene. These new results for the electron-phonon cooling channel allow reliable prediction of the noise equivalent power (NEP) that can be expected from an optimized graphene detector, using measurement of the Johnson noise emission as the thermometry method. We find that an NEP of 2 × 10(-19) W Hz(-1/2) should be achievable under certain biasing conditions with an ideal device.

  10. Far-infrared cameras for automotive safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonnoy, Jacques; Le Guilloux, Yann; Moreira, Raphael

    2005-02-01

    Far Infrared cameras used initially for the driving of military vehicles are slowly coming into the area of commercial (luxury) cars while providing with the FIR imagery a useful assistance for driving at night or in adverse conditions (fog, smoke, ...). However this imagery needs a minimum driver effort as the image understanding is not so natural as the visible or near IR one. A developing field of FIR cameras is ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) where FIR processed imagery fused with other sensors data (radar, ...) is providing a driver warning when dangerous situations are occurring. The communication will concentrate on FIR processed imagery for object or obstacles detection on the road or near the road. FIR imagery highlighting hot spots is a powerful detection tool as it provides a good contrast on some of the most common elements of the road scenery (engines, wheels, gas exhaust pipes, pedestrians, 2 wheelers, animals,...). Moreover FIR algorithms are much more robust than visible ones as there is less variability in image contrast with time (day/night, shadows, ...). We based our detection algorithm on one side on the peculiar aspect of vehicles, pedestrians in FIR images and on the other side on the analysis of motion along time, that allows anticipation of future motion. We will show results obtained with FIR processed imagery within the PAROTO project, supported by the French Ministry of Research, that ended in spring 04.

  11. Far-infrared Beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianbao; Billinghurst, Brant

    2017-06-01

    Far-infrared is a particularly useful technique for studies on lattice modes as they generally appear in the Far-infrared region. Far-infrared is also an important tool for gathering information on the electrical transport properties of metallic materials and the band gap of semiconductors. This poster will describe the horizontal microscope that has recently been built in the Far-infrared beamline at the Canadian Light Source Inc. (CLS). This microscope is specially designed for high-pressure Far-infrared absorbance and reflectance spectroscopic studies. The numerical aperture (0.5) and the long working distance (82.1 mm) in the microscope are good fits for Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC). The spectra are recorded using liquid helium cooled Si bolometer or Ge:Cu detector. The pressure in the DAC can be determined by using the fluorescence spectrometer available onsite. The Far-infrared beamline at CLS is a state-of-the-art synchrotron facility, offering significantly more brightness than conventional sources. Because of the high brightness of the synchrotron radiation, we can obtain the Far-infrared reflectance/absorbance spectra on the small samples with more throughput than with a conventional source. The Far-infrared beamline is open to users through peer review.

  12. Sub-Doppler tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguscio, M.; Zink, L. R.; Evenson, K. M.; Jennings, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The first experimental observations of sub-Doppler linewidths in a cell made using tunable far-infrared radiation are reported. A double-resonance scheme has been used, combining CO2-laser infrared radiation with tunable far-infrared radiation to observe a sub-Doppler line shape in an excited vibrational state of CH3OH.

  13. Multi-layer Far-Infrared Component Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR will demonstrate the feasibility of a process to create multi-layer thin-film optics for the far-infrared/sub-millimeter wave spectral region. The...

  14. Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of Weakly Bound Hydrated Cluster Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas

    -sized molecular clusters with water by means of far-infrared and terahertz neon matrix isolation spectroscopy. The embedding of non-covalent cluster molecules in solid cryogenic neon matrices at 2.8 K ensures a high sensitivity for direct spectroscopic observations of the large-amplitude intermolecular...

  15. The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) for AKARI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawada, Mitsunobu; Baba, Hajime; Barthel, Peter D.; Clements, David; Cohen, Martin; Doi, Yasuo; Figueredo, Elysandra; Fujiwara, Mikio; Goto, Tomotsugu; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hibi, Yasunori; Hirao, Takanori; Hiromoto, Norihisa; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kawai, Toshihide; Kawamura, Akiko; Kester, Do; Kii, Tsuneo; Kobayashi, Hisato; Kwon, Suk Minn; Lee, Hyung Mok; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Shuji; Mueller, Thomas G.; Murakami, Noriko; Nagata, Hirohisa; Nakagawa, Takao; Narita, Masanao; Noda, Manabu; Oh, Sang Hoon; Okada, Yoko; Okuda, Haruyuki; Oliver, Sebastian; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Pak, Soojong; Park, Yong-Sun; Pearson, Chris P.; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Saito, Toshinobu; Salama, Alberto; Sato, Shinji; Savage, Richard S.; Serjeant, Stephen; Shibai, Hiroshi; Shirahata, Mai; Sohn, Jungjoo; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Takahashi, Hidenori; Thomson, Matthew; Usui, Fumihiko; Verdugo, Eva; Watabe, Toyoki; White, Glenn J.; Wang, Lingyu; Yamamura, Issei; Yamauchi, Chisato; Yasuda, Akiko

    2007-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) is one of two focal-plane instruments on the AKARI satellite. FIS has four photometric bands at 65, 90, 140, and 160 mu m, and uses two kinds of array detectors. The FIS arrays and optics are designed to sweep the sky with high spatial resolution and redundancy. The

  16. Far-infrared spectral studies of magnesium and aluminum co ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 62; Issue 5. Far-infrared spectral studies of magnesium and aluminum co-substituted lithium ferrites. K B Modi J D Gajera M P Pandya H G Vora H H Joshi. Brief Reports Volume 62 Issue 5 May 2004 pp 1173-1180 ...

  17. The Far-Infrared Spectrum of ARP 220

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-27

    the OH lines were obtained also show far-infrared molecular absorption ( Kegel et al. 1999; Harvey et al. 1999), the rich molecular LWS spec- trum of...ApJ, 527, 795 Kegel , W. H., Hertenstein, T., & Quirrenbach, A. 1999, A&A, 351, 472 Kessler, M. F., et al. 1996, A&A, 315, L27 Launay, J.-M., & Roueff

  18. Arrays of Bolometers for Far-infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, D. T.; Allen, C. A.; Babu, S.; Benford, D. J.; Dotson, J. L.; Dowell, C. D.; Jhabvala, M.; Harper, D. A.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Silverberg, R. F.; Staguhn, J. G.; Voellmer, G.; Wollack, E. J.

    We describe 12 x 32 arrays of semiconducting cryogenic bolometers designed for use in far-infrared and submillimeter cameras. These 12 x 32 arrays are constructed from 1 x 32 monolithic pop-up detectors developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The pop-up technology allows the construction of large arrays with high filling factors that provide efficient use of space in the focal planes of far-infrared and submillimeter astronomical instruments. This directly leads to a significant decrease in integration time. The prototype array is currently operating in the second generation Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera (SHARC II), a facility instrument in use at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The elements of this array employ a bismuth absorber coating and quarter wave backshort to optimize the bolometer absorption for passbands centered at 350 and 450 microns. A second array is to be installed in the High-resolution Airborne Widebandwidth Camera (HAWC), a far-infrared imaging camera for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This array has been completed and is now awaiting integration into the HAWC test cryostat. HAWC is scheduled for commissioning in 2005. The HAWC array employs titanium-gold absorbers and is optimized for uniform absorption from 40 to 300 microns to accommodate all four of its far-infrared passbands. We describe the details of the HAWC array construction including the mechanical design and electrical characterization of the constituent linear arrays.

  19. Design and application of coaxial wigglers in free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert H.; Blank, Monica; Freund, Henry P.; Pershing, Dean E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1995-09-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is investigating innovative magnetic wigglers to reduce beam energy requirements for millimeter wave FELs and to enhance the gain and efficiency. Recent work has focused on coaxial designs. The advantages of this are twofold. First, annular configurations are advantageous for propagating high current beams. The annular geometry permits use of the central structure to enhance the wiggler field, hence, allowing shorter wiggler periods. One such wiggler is referred to as the Coaxial Hybrid Iron (CHI) wiggler, and employs a solenoid enclosing periodic arrays of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic material arranged as an outer ring and an inner rod. A second wiggler uses both outer and inner bifilar helical current windings. Both wiggler designs result in substantial enhancements in the wiggler field experienced by the electron beam as compared with the fields in the absence of the central structure. A prototype CHI wiggler is discussed along with a 35 GHz amplifier experiment which is under construction. Preliminary performance calculations for a two helix wiggler system are discussed. This will include both orbit theory and a fully 3D nonlinear simulation of the interaction.

  20. Optical difference frequency generation of far infrared radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, James Russell [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1977-07-01

    Three investigations of difference frequency generation (DFG) of far-infrared radiation by optical mixing are described: a theory of DFG by monochromatic, focused Gaussian pump laser beams, a theory of DFG by a picosecond pump laser pulse, and an experiment using ruby-pumped dye lasers. First, the theory of far-infrared generation by optical mixing of monochromatic, focused Gaussian beams in a uniaxial crystal is developed, taking into account the effects of diffraction, absorption, double refraction, and multiple reflections and total reflection at the boundary surfaces. (Reflection and transmission coefficients of a uniaxial crystal slab are derived by a new matrix technique.) Results of numerical calculations are presented. Focusing the pump beams appreciably enhances the far-infrared output despite the strong far-infrared diffraction. In a 1-cm long crystal, the optimum focal spot size is approximately equal to or smaller than the far-infrared wavelength for output frequencies less than 100 cm-1. Double refraction of the pump beams is relatively unimportant. Both far-infrared absorption and boundary reflections have major effects on the far-infrared output and its angular distribution. The former is often the factor which limits the output power. We show that a simple model treating the nonlinear polarization as a constant lie-radius Gaussian distribution of radiating dipoles adequately describes the effect of pump-beam focusing. We also compare the results of our calculations with those for second-harmonic generation. Second, a theoretical calculation of far-infrared power spectra generated by picosecond pulses in a nonlinear crystal is developed. The results are illustrated with two practical examples: LiNbO3 slabs oriented for rectification of the optical e-ray and for beating of the optical o-ray with the optical e-ray. The former is phase matched at 0 cm-1; the latter, at both the forward-(FCPM) and backward-collinear phase

  1. Passive magnetic shielding for the submillimeter and far infrared experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Koji; Warner, B.A.; Di Pirro, M.J.; Numazawa, Takenori

    2003-05-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center is developing the submillimeter and far infrared experiment (SAFIRE). SAFIRE will use SQUIDs as amplifiers for detectors, which must be shielded from the magnet cooling system, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The magnetic field at the detector package must remain at or below the 10{sup -7} tesla level while the detectors are operating. We discuss laboratory tests of the passive shielding and simulations.

  2. Two bolometer arrays for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Robert F.; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, Sachidananda R.; Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Dowell, Charles D.; Harper, Doyle A.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Loewenstein, Robert F.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-10-01

    We describe the development, construction, and testing of two 384 element arrays of ion-implanted semiconducting cryogenic bolometers designed for use in far-infrared and submillimeter cameras. These two dimensional arrays are assembled from a number of 32 element linear arrays of monolithic Pop-Up bolometer Detectors (PUD) developed at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. PUD technology allows the construction of large, high filling factor, arrays that make efficient use of available focal plane area in far-infrared and submillimeter astronomical instruments. Such arrays can be used to provide a significant increase in mapping speed over smaller arrays. A prototype array has been delivered and integrated into a ground-based camera, the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera (SHARC II), a facility instrument at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). A second array has recently been delivered for integration into the High-resolution Airborne Widebandwidth Camera (HAWC), a far-infrared imaging camera for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). HAWC is scheduled for commissioning in 2005.

  3. Tunability enhanced electromagnetic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, R.D.; Deis, G.A.

    1992-03-24

    The invention discloses a wiggler used in synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers, where each pole is surrounded by at least two electromagnetic coils. The electromagnetic coils are energized with different amounts of current to provide a wide tunable range of the on-axis magnetic flux density, while preventing magnetic saturation of the poles. 14 figs.

  4. Far-Infrared Absorption of PbSe Nanorods

    KAUST Repository

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool

    2011-07-13

    Measurements of the far-infrared absorption spectra of PbSe nanocrystals and nanorods are presented. As the aspect ratio of the nanorods increases, the Fröhlich sphere resonance splits into two peaks. We analyze this splitting with a classical electrostatic model, which is based on the dielectric function of bulk PbSe but without any free-carrier contribution. Good agreement between the measured and calculated spectra indicates that resonances in the local field factors underlie the measured spectra. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  5. Technology Needs for Far-Infrared, Submillimeter, and Millimeter Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, S. Harvey

    2004-01-01

    SAFIR will: Study the important and relatively unexplored region of the spectrum between 30 and 300 m; Enable the study of galaxy formation and the earliest stage of star formation by revealing regions too enshrouded by dust to be studied by NGST; Be more than 100 times as sensitive as SIRTF or the European [Herschel] mission.SAFIR is projected to cost around $600M total. The decadal review committee recommends that $100M be allocated in this decade to start the SAFIR project, and that additional technology developments be funded separately: Far-Infrared Array Development ($10M ) Refrigerators ($50M ) Large, Lightweight Optics ($80M ). Current developments are also described.

  6. Towards multiple quantum well optically pumped far infrared lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Optically pumped lasers based on GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) structures are a potential coherent source in the far infrared (FIR) wavelengths. The FIR (~ 30 to 300 µm) is a region within the electromagnetic spectrum that has seen relatively little development. No practical solid-state lasers have been possible in the FIR, which is also referred to as the terahertz (THz) wave, until the very recent demonstration of THz quantum cascade lasers. Other existing FIR lasers are either bu...

  7. Kinetic inductance detectors for far-infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlis, A., E-mail: abarlis@physics.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Aguirre, J. [University of Pennsylvania Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stevenson, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)

    2016-07-11

    The star formation mechanisms at work in the early universe remain one of the major unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. Many of the luminous galaxies present during the period of peak star formation (at redshift of about 2.5) were heavily enshrouded in dust, which makes observing their properties difficult at optical wavelengths. However, many spectral lines exist at far-infrared wavelengths that serve as tracers of star formation. Here, we describe a detector system suitable for a balloon-borne spectroscopic intensity mapping experiment at far-infrared wavelengths. The system uses lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs), which have the potential to achieve high sensitivity and low noise levels. KIDs consist of separate capacitive and inductive elements, and use the inductive element as the radiation absorber. We describe the design considerations, fabrication process, and readout scheme for a prototype LEKID array of 1600 pixels. - Highlights: • We describe a concept for a balloon-borne telescope for far-IR wavelengths. • Telescope would use high-sensitivity kinetic inductance detectors. • Design considerations and fabrication process for prototype detectors.

  8. Far-infrared Spectroscopic Characterization of Anti-vinyl Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Hayley; Soliday, Rebekah M.; Sumner, Isaiah; Raston, Paul L.

    2017-09-01

    We report a detailed analysis of the high-resolution far-infrared spectrum of anti-vinyl alcohol, which has been previously identified toward Sagittarius B2(N). The ν 15 OH torsional fundamental investigated here is more than 200 cm-1 removed from the next nearest vibration, making it practically unperturbed and ideal to help refine the ground state rotational constants that were previously determined from 25 microwave lines. We assigned 1335 lines within the ν 15 fundamental centered at 261.5512 cm-1, with J and K a ranges of 1-59 and 0-16, respectively. The microwave and far-infrared line positions were fit with Watson-type A- and S-reduced Hamiltonians, with the inclusion of quartic and select sextic distortion terms. This resulted in a significant refinement of the ground state constants, in addition to the determination of the {ν }15=1 state constants for the first time. The spectroscopic parameters are in good agreement with the results from anharmonic coupled-cluster calculations, and should be useful in searches for rotationally and/or vibrationally warm anti-vinyl alcohol in interstellar molecular clouds.

  9. Corrugated quantum well infrared photodetectors for far infrared detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwong-Kit; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Forrai, David; Sun, Jason; Endres, Darrel

    2011-06-01

    We have extended our investigation of corrugated quantum well infrared photodetector focal plane arrays (FPAs) into the far infrared regime. Specifically, we are developing the detectors for the thermal infrared sensor (TIRS) used in the Landsat Data Continuity Mission. To maintain a low dark current, we adopted a low doping density of 0.6×1018 cm-3 and a bound-to-bound state detector. The internal absorption quantum efficiency (QE) is calculated to be 25.4%. With a pixel fill factor of 80% and a substrate transmission of 70.9%, the external QE is 14.4%. To yield the theoretical conversion efficiency (CE), the photoconductive gain was measured and is 0.25 at 5 V, from which CE is predicted to be 3.6%. This value is in agreement with the 3.5% from the FPA measurement. Meanwhile, the dark current is measured to be 2.1×10-6 A/cm2 at 43 K. For regular infrared imaging above 8 μm, the FPA will have an noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 16 mK at 2 ms integration time in the presence of 260 read noise electrons. The highest operability of the tested FPAs is 99.967%. With the CE agreement, we project the FPA performance in the far infrared regime up to 30 μm cutoff.

  10. Far-infrared spectra of the tryptamine A conformer by IR-UV ion gain spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Spiering, F.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Jongma, R.T.; Jaeqx, S.; Rijs, A.M.; van der Zande, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    We present far infrared spectra of the conformer A of tryptamine in the 200 to 500 cm-1 wavenumber range along with resonant photoionization spectra of the far-infrared excited conformer A of tryptamine. We show that single-far-infrared photon excited tryptamine has highly structured resonance

  11. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  12. Vacuum variable-angle far-infrared ellipsometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friš, Pavel; Dubroka, Adam

    2017-11-01

    We present the design and performance of a vacuum far-infrared (∼50-680 cm-1) ellipsometer with a rotating analyser. The system is based on a Fourier transform spectrometer, an in-house built ellipsometer chamber and a closed-cycle bolometer. The ellipsometer chamber is equipped with a computer controlled θ-2θ goniometer for automated measurements at various angles of incidence. We compare our measurements on SrTiO3 crystal with the results acquired above 300 cm-1 with a commercially available ellipsometer system. After the calibration of the angle of incidence and after taking into account the finite reflectivity of mirrors in the detector part we obtain a very good agreement between the data from the two instruments. The system can be supplemented with a closed-cycle He cryostat for measurements between 5 and 400 K.

  13. The Far-Infrared Properties of the Most Isolated Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Sulentic, J.; Leon, S.; Espada, D.; Bergond, G.; García, E.; Sabater, J.; Santander-Vela, J. D.; Verley, S.

    2007-05-01

    A long-standing question in galaxy evolution involves the role of nature (self-regulation) vs. nurture (environment) on the observed properties (and evolution) of galaxies. A collaboration centreed at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (Granada, Spain) is trying to address this question by producing a observational database for a sample of 1050 isolated galaxies from the catalogue of Karachentseva (1973) with the overarching goal being the generation of a "zero-point" sample against which effects of environment on galaxies can be assessed. The AMIGA (Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated Galaxies) database (see www.iaa.es/AMIGA.html) will include optical, IR and radio line and continuum measures. The galaxies in the sample represent the most isolated galaxies in the local universe. In the present contribution, we will present the project, as well as the results of an analysis of the far-infrared (FIR) and molecular gas properties of this sample.

  14. Early results from the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Shafer, R. A.; Eplee, R. E.; Isaacman, R. B.; Fixsen, D. J.; Read, S. M.; Meyer, S. S.; Weiss, R.; Wright, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mapped 98 percent of the sky, 60 percent of it twice, before the liquid helium coolant was exhausted. The FIRAS covers the frequency region from 1 to 100/cm with a 7 deg angular resolution. The spectral resolution is 0.2/cm for frequencies less than 20/cm and 0.8/cm for higher frequencies. Preliminary results include: a limit on the deviations from a Planck curve of 1 percent of the peak brightness from 1 to 20/cm, a temperature of 2.735 +/- 0.06 K, a limit on the Comptonization parameter y of 0.001, on the chemical potential parameter mu of 0.01, a strong limit on the existence of a hot smooth intergalactic medium, and a confirmation that the dipole anisotropy spectrum is that of a Doppler shifted blackbody.

  15. Ice Cloud Property Retrievals Using Far Infrared Upwelling Radiance Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrelli, A. J.; Turner, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    Spectral measurements of the upwelling radiance in the mid-infrared (MIR, 8 - 12 μm wavelength) have proven sensitivity to microphysical and macrophysical parameters of ice clouds. This sensitivity is caused by the spectrally varying index of refraction, as well as the ice crystal shape and particle size parameter. Many methods have been demonstrated that utilize this sensitivity to retrieve bulk ice cloud microphysical properties such as effective ice particle size, and macrophysical properties such as optical depth and height. By extending the spectral observations into the far-infrared (FIR, 17 - 50 μm wavelength), additional information can be retrieved due to the different sensitivities exhibited by cloud ice at these longer wavelengths. Typically, in the far-infrared, ice exhibits stronger scattering across all particle sizes, due to a smaller complex index of refraction, and weaker forward scattering due to the smaller size parameter. In this research, a modeling framework is used to quantify the information content of the FIR spectrum for ice cloud property retrieval. The information content is quantitatively compared to the MIR, to show how ice cloud retrievals could be improved with FIR spectral measurements. For cases where the MIR spectrum contains a high amount of information (e.g., moderate optical depths with small particle size), the FIR spectrum adds only a marginal amount of information. In other cases where the MIR spectrum contains low information (e.g., high optical depth clouds), the FIR spectrum is shown to add significant information. The FIR spectrum can thus be shown to extend the region in state space where passive infrared measurements can effectively constrain ice cloud properties.

  16. Origins Space Telescope: The Far Infrared Imager and Polarimeter FIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staguhn, Johannes G.; Chuss, David; Howard, Joseph; Meixner, Margaret; Vieira, Joaquin; Amatucci, Edward; Bradley, Damon; Carter, Ruth; Cooray, Asantha; Flores, Anel; Leisawitz, David; Moseley, Samuel Harvey; Wollack, Edward; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2018-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST)* is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, one of the four science and technology definition studies of NASA Headquarters for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal survey. The current "concept 1", which envisions a cold (4K) 9m space telescope, includes 5 instruments, providing a wavelength coverage ranging from 6um and 667um. The achievable sensitivity of the observatory will provide three to four orders of magnitude of improvement in sensitivity over current observational capabilities, allowing to address a wide range of new and so far inaccessible scientific questions, ranging from bio-signatures on exo-planets to mapping primordial H_2 from the "dark ages" before the universe went through the phase of re-ionization.Here we present the Far Infrared Imager and Polarimeter (FIP) for OST. The cameral will cover four bands, 40um, 80um, 120um, and 240um. It will allow for differential polarimetry in those bands with the ability to observe two colors in polarimtery mode simultaneously, while all four bands can be observed simultaneously in total power mode. While the confusion limit will be reached in only 32ms at 240um, at 40um the source density on the sky is so low, that at the angular resolution of 1" of OST at this wavelength there will be no source confusion, even for the longest integration times. Science topics that can be addressed by FIP include but are not limited to galactic and extragalactic magnetic field studies, Deep Galaxy Surveys, and Outer Solar System objects..*Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. We welcome you to contact the Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) with your science needs and ideas by emailing us at ost_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu

  17. Far-Infrared Signatures of Hydrogen Bonding in Phenol Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Daniël J; Peters, Atze; Yatsyna, Vasyl; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Rijs, Anouk M

    2016-04-07

    One of the most direct ways to study the intrinsic properties of the hydrogen-bond interaction is by gas-phase far-infrared (far-IR) spectroscopy because the modes involving hydrogen-bond deformation are excited in this spectral region; however, the far-IR regime is often ignored in molecular structure identification due to the absence of strong far-IR light sources and difficulty in assigning the observed modes by quantum chemical calculations. Far-IR/UV ion-dip spectroscopy using the free electron laser FELIX was applied to directly probe the intramolecular hydrogen-bond interaction in a family of phenol derivatives. Three vibrational modes have been identified, which are expected to be diagnostic for the hydrogen-bond strength: hydrogen-bond stretching and hydrogen-bond-donating and -accepting OH torsion vibrations. Their position is evaluated with respect to the hydrogen bond strength, that is, the length of the hydrogen-bonded OH length. This shows that the hydrogen bond stretching frequency is diagnostic for the size of the ring that is closed by the hydrogen bond, while the strength of the hydrogen bond can be determined from the hydrogen-bond-donating OH torsion frequency. The combination of these two normal modes allows the direct probing of intramolecular hydrogen-bond characteristics using conformation-selective far-IR vibrational spectroscopy.

  18. Origins Space Telescope Concept 1: Mid to Far Infrared Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ruth; DiPirro, Michael; Origins Space Telescope Decadal Mission Study Team

    2018-01-01

    Origins Space Telescope (OST), is a NASA large mission concept designed to investigate the mid to far infrared sky. It would launch in the mid 2030’s, with mission development and implementation beginning in the mid-2020’s. This poster presents the overall architecture of OST Mission Concept 1. The Concept 1 telescope has a 9-meter diameter off-axis primary mirror, a three-mirror astigmat with a field steering mirror, covering the wavelength range of 6 to 600 µm. Five science instruments are on board the OST observatory for spectroscopy, imaging and coronagraphy. The instruments are the Medium Resolution Survey Spectrometer (MRSS), High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS), Far –IR Imaging and Polarimeter (FIP), Mid-IR Imaging Spectrometer and Coronagraph (MISC) and Heterodyne Instrument (HERO). The instruments are housed in the Instrument Accommodation Module (IAM). The Telescope and IAM are actively cooled to 4 Kelvin by relative high maturity 4 K cryocoolers To limit the Sun, Earth, Moon, and Spacecraft thermal radiation into the 4 K environment, multiple layers of sun shields similar to those used on JWST, are implemented. The sun-shields are also designed to minimize solar pressure and center of gravity discrepancies, thus resulting in the “sugar-scoop” like shape. To prevent locally generated stray light from entering the 4 Kelvin environment during mission operations, a 4 K baffle around the telescope and IAM is used. The OST Observatory will be inserted to a Sun-Earth L2 for mission operations.

  19. Capacitive-mesh output couplers for optically pumped far-infrared lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, D A; Skocpol, W J

    1978-07-01

    The use of capacitive-mesh output couplers for optically pumped far-infrared molecular lasers has been extended throughout the far-infrared spectrum, between 42 microm and 1.2 mm, and the optimum grid constants have been found for several lines. At shorter wavelengths, performance has been improved by the use of a novel hybrid capacitive-mesh hole output coupler.

  20. Far-infrared/millimetre emission in 3C sources - Dust in radio galaxies and quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreani, P; Fosbury, RAE; van Bemmel, [No Value; Freudling, W; Bemmel, I. M. van

    We present far-infrared and millimetric observations of a sample of 3C objects. Millimetre data were taken at 1.25 mm with the IRAM 30 m antenna feeding the MPIfR bolometer array. Mid-infrared (MIR) and far-infrared (FIR) photometry were carried out with the ISOCAM and ISOPHOT cameras on the ISO

  1. Testing models of low-excitation photodissociation regions with far-infrared observations of reflection nebulae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owl, RCY; Meixner, MM; Fong, D; Haas, MR; Rudolph, AL; Tielens, AGGM

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents Kuiper Airborne Observatory observations of the photodissociation regions ( PDRs) in nine reflection nebulae. These observations include the far-infrared atomic fine-structure lines of [O I] 63 and 145 mum, [C II] 158 mum, and [Si II] 35 mum and the adjacent far-infrared

  2. Beamed radio and far infrared emission in quasars and radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, H; Barthel, PD; Hes, R

    Simple orientation model predictions for the radio to far infrared spectral energy distributions of radio-loud AGN are confronted with observations at various radio frequencies. This model is subsequently used to investigate 60 mu m far-infrared data. The results are supportive of the unified scheme

  3. Studies on the hyperthermic effect of the body on utilization of far infrared radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Yong Wun; Cho, Chul Ku; Kim, Kyung Jung [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    This study investigated that strong heat reaction of far infrared radiation material could have the possibility for hyperthermia in patients. Objective was CaSki cell, human uterocervical cancer cell line and they observed descending effect remarkably to compare the effect of cell death by high temperature due to far infrared radiation, platelet numbers of experimental group to compare the control were increased 7 {approx} 17%, and lymphocyte numbers 20 {approx} 40 %. High acidity in tumor tissue due to the concentration of lactic acid, so the effects of far infrared had the result to the possibility to reduce the fatigue stuff. The secretion of endorphin as cerebroneuron substance than epinephrine, sympathetic nerve substance could be reduction of pain in cancer patients because of the effect of far infrared. Above data of experiment, we were found multiple the biological efficacy of far infrared about the possibility of medical utilization. (author). 10 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  4. Superconducting Microwave Resonator Arrays for Submillimeter/Far-Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozian, Omid

    Superconducting microwave resonators have the potential to revolutionize submillimeter and far-infrared astronomy, and with it our understanding of the universe. The field of low-temperature detector technology has reached a point where extremely sensitive devices like transition-edge sensors are now capable of detecting radiation limited by the background noise of the universe. However, the size of these detector arrays are limited to only a few thousand pixels. This is because of the cost and complexity of fabricating large-scale arrays of these detectors that can reach up to 10 lithographic levels on chip, and the complicated SQUID-based multiplexing circuitry and wiring for readout of each detector. In order to make substantial progress, next-generation ground-based telescopes such as CCAT or future space telescopes require focal planes with large-scale detector arrays of 104--10 6 pixels. Arrays using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID) are a potential solution. These arrays can be easily made with a single layer of superconducting metal film deposited on a silicon substrate and pattered using conventional optical lithography. Furthermore, MKIDs are inherently multiplexable in the frequency domain, allowing ˜ 10 3 detectors to be read out using a single coaxial transmission line and cryogenic amplifier, drastically reducing cost and complexity. An MKID uses the change in the microwave surface impedance of a superconducting thin-film microresonator to detect photons. Absorption of photons in the superconductor breaks Cooper pairs into quasiparticles, changing the complex surface impedance, which results in a perturbation of resonator frequency and quality factor. For excitation and readout, the resonator is weakly coupled to a transmission line. The complex amplitude of a microwave probe signal tuned on-resonance and transmitted on the feedline past the resonator is perturbed as photons are absorbed in the superconductor. The perturbation can be

  5. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  6. Properties and Applications of High Emissivity Composite Films Based on Far-Infrared Ceramic Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yabo; Huang, Shaoyun; Wang, Wenqi; Liu, Xinghai; Li, Houbin

    2017-11-29

    Polymer matrix composite materials that can emit radiation in the far-infrared region of the spectrum are receiving increasing attention due to their ability to significantly influence biological processes. This study reports on the far-infrared emissivity property of composite films based on far-infrared ceramic powder. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray powder diffractometry were used to evaluate the physical properties of the ceramic powder. The ceramic powder was found to be rich in aluminum oxide, titanium oxide, and silicon oxide, which demonstrate high far-infrared emissivity. In addition, the micromorphology, mechanical performance, dynamic mechanical properties, and far-infrared emissivity of the composite were analyzed to evaluate their suitability for strawberry storage. The mechanical properties of the far-infrared radiation ceramic (cFIR) composite films were not significantly influenced (p ≥ 0.05) by the addition of the ceramic powder. However, the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) properties of the cFIR composite films, including a reduction in damping and shock absorption performance, were significant influenced by the addition of the ceramic powder. Moreover, the cFIR composite films showed high far-infrared emissivity, which has the capability of prolonging the storage life of strawberries. This research demonstrates that cFIR composite films are promising for future applications.

  7. Studies on Heat Transfer in Agricultural Products by Far-infrared Ray

    OpenAIRE

    劉, 厚清; 毛利, 建太郎; 難波, 和彦

    1998-01-01

    Heat is transferred when the objected has temperature differences. In this research, the difference of two heating methods (far-infrared ray heating and hot wind heating) was analyzed. To compare their differences, the heat flux was measured by setting a heat flux meter beneath the surface of the object at different depths, then the heat conductivities and heat diffusion rates were analyzed. 1. Compared with hot wind, far-infrared ray heating has more heat flux before reaching a definite dept...

  8. The Far-Infrared Surveyor Mission Study: Paper I, the Genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, M.; Cooray, A.; Carter, R.; DiPirro, M.; Flores, A.; Leisawitz, D.; Armus, L.; Battersby, C.; Bergin, E.; Bradford, C. M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the beginning of the Far-Infrared Surveyor mission study for NASA's Astrophysics Decadal 2020. We describe the scope of the study, and the open process approach of the Science and Technology Definition Team. We are currently developing the science cases and provide some preliminary highlights here. We note key areas for technological innovation and improvements necessary to make a Far-Infrared Surveyor mission a reality.

  9. Numerical study of optical-cavity misalignment effects for a far-infrared FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Sobajima, M; Yokoyama, M; Oda, F; Kawai, M; Miura, H

    2002-01-01

    A far-infrared FEL will be newly installed in the IR FEL Research Center at the Science University of Tokyo (FEL-SUT) in 2002. In this study, optical cavity misalignment effects for the far-infrared FEL are researched by using the simulation code that has been developed at Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. Results show not only cavity losses but also the gain reduction by the tilt and the offset of the mirror and the offset of the electron beam. The required alignment accuracy is also obtained in this study.

  10. Far-infrared spectroscopy of lanthanide-based molecular magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Sabrina

    2015-05-13

    This thesis demonstrates the applicability of far-infrared spectroscopy for the study of the crystal-field splitting of lanthanides in single-molecular magnetic materials. The far-infrared studies of three different kinds of single-molecular-magnetic materials, a single-ion magnet, a single-chain magnet and an exchange-coupled cluster, yielded a deeper understanding of the crystal-field splitting of the lanthanides in these materials. In addition, our results offered the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into the relaxation processes of these materials.

  11. The Yerkes Observatory 60-channel far infrared camera for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D. AL, Jr.; Cole, David M.; Loewenstein, Robert F.; Mcmahon, T.; Pernic, R. J.; Wirth, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Yerkes Observatory Far Infrared Camera employs a two-dimensional, 60-detector array of (3)He-cooled silicon bolometers for broadband imaging in the spectral range of 40 to 240 microns. Four interchangeable filters have effective wavelengths of 60, 100, 160, and 200 microns. Three interchangeable lens sets give pixel sizes of 17, 27, and 45 in. Signals are processed through nitrogen-temperature JFET source-follower amplifiers, warm preamplifiers, and digital signal processors, and the system is controlled through a graphical user interface on a Macintosh computer. The camera has been used to image a wide variety of galactic and extragalactic far infrared sources.

  12. Theoretic model of myocardial revascularization by far infrared laser and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Le; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Ting; Zong, Ren-He; Deng, Shan-Xi

    2009-03-01

    A theoretic model of myocardial revascularization by a far infrared laser has been established and a quantificational relationship between the aperture of laser channel and parameters of laser has been concluded according to thermodynamics and the law of interaction of far infrared laser and myocardium. The experiment of a carbon dioxide laser revascularization in porcine myocardium has been done for different laser powers and irradiation time. The relative errors between experimental result and theoretic computation are from 13% to 22%. The reasons that cause the errors have been studied in detail.

  13. Energy levels and far-infrared spectra of oval-shaped nanorings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutiérrez, W.; García, L. F.; Mikhailov, I. D. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A. A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2014-05-15

    The evolution of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation of low-lying states and far infrared spectrum associated to variation of the path curvature for electron motion along nanorings with centerlines in a form of a set of Cassini ovals, whose shape is changed continuously from a single elongated loop to two separated loops is theoretically investigated.

  14. The Herschel-Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graauw, T. de; Helmich, F.P.; Phillips, T.G.; Stutzki, J.; Caux, E.; Whyborn, N.D.; Dieleman, P.; Roelfsema, P.R.; Aarts, H.; Assendorp, R.; Bachiller, R.; Baechtold, W.; Barcia, A.; Beintema, D.A.; Belitsky, V.; Benz, A.O.; Bieber, R.; Boogert, A.; Borys, C.; Bumble, B.; Caïs, P.; Caris, M.; Cerulli-Irelli, P.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Cherednichenko, S.; Ciechanowicz, M.; Coeur-Joly, O.; Comito, C.; Cros, A.; Jonge, A. de; Lange, G. de; Delforges, B.; Delorme, Y.; Boggende, T. den; Desbat, J.M.; Diez-González, C.; Di Giorgio, A.M.; Dubbeldam, L.; Edwards, K.; Eggens, M.; Erickson, N.; Evers, J.; Fich, M.; Finn, T.; Franke, B.; Gaier, T.; Gal, C.; Gao, J.R.; Gallego, J.D.; Gauffre, S.; Gill, J.J.; Glenz, S.; Golstein, H.; Goulooze, H.; Gunsing, T.; Güsten, R.; Hartogh, P.; Hatch, W.A.; Higgins, R.; Honingh, E.C.; Huisman, R.; Jackson, B.D.; Jacobs, H.; Jacobs, K.; Jarchow, C.; Javadi, H.; Jellema, W.; Justen, M.; Karpov, A.; Kasemann, C.; Kawamura, J.; Keizer, G.; Kester, D.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Klein, T.; Kollberg, E.; Kooi, J.; Kooiman, P.P.; Kopf, B.; Krause, M.; Krieg, J.M.; Kramer, C.; Kruizenga, B.; Kuhn, T.; Laauwen, W.; Lai, R.; Larsson, B.; Leduc, H.G.; Leinz, C.; Lin, R.H.; Liseau, R.; Liu, G.S.; Loose, A.; López-Fernandez, I.; Lord, S.; Luinge, W.; Marston, A.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Maestrini, A.; Maiwald, F.W.; McCoey, C.; Mehdi, I.; Megej, A.; Melchior, M.; Meinsma, L.; Merkel, H.; Michalska, M.; Monstein, C.; Moratschke, D.; Morris, P.; Muller, H.; Murphy, J.A.; Naber, A.; Natale, E.; Nowosielski, W.; Nuzzolo, F.; Olberg, M.; Olbrich, M.; Orfei, R.; Orleanski, P.; Ossenkopf, V.; Peacock, T.; Pearson, J.C.; Peron, I.; Phillip-May, S.; Piazzo, L.; Planesas, P.; Rataj, M.; Ravera, L.; Risacher, C.; Salez, M.; Samoska, L.A.; Saraceno, P.; Schieder, R.; Schlecht, E.; Schlöder, F.; Schmülling, F.; Schultz, M.; Schuster, K.; Siebertz, O.; Smit, H.; Szczerba, R.; Shipman, R.; Steinmetz, E.; Stern, J.A.; Stokroos, M.; Teipen, R.; Teyssier, D.; Tils, T.; Trappe, N.; Baaren, C. van; Leeuwen, B.J. van; Stadt, H. van de; Visser, H.; Wildeman, K.J.; Wafelbakker, C.K.; Ward, J.S.; Wesselius, P.; Wild, W.; Wulff, S.; Wunsch, H.J.; Tielens, X.; Zaal, P.; Zirath, H.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Zwart, F.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. This paper describes the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) that was launched onboard ESA's Herschel Space Observatory in May 2009. Methods. The instrument is a set of 7 heterodyne receivers that are electronically tuneable, covering 480-1250 GHz with SIS mixers and the

  15. Far-Infrared Study of the Charge Density Wave in Tetrathiofulvalene Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, D. B.; Cummings, K. D.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1981-01-01

    Detailed far-infrared measurements at temperatures from 25 to 300 K provide strong support for a charge-density-wave mechanism for the dc conductivity and microwave dielectric constant of tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ). At low temperatures the charge-density wave is pinned...

  16. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters II. Sersic 159-03

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jørgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    In a series of papers we investigate far-infrared emission from rich galaxy clusters. Maps have been obtained by ISO at 60 mu m, 100 mu m, 135 mu m, and 200 mu m using the PHT-C camera. Ground based imaging and spectroscopy were also acquired. Here we present the results for the cooling flow...

  17. Drying characteristics and quality of red ginseng using far-infrared rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xiaofeng; Lee, Junsoo; Han, Chungsu

    2015-01-01

    Background The current typical drying methods for red ginseng are sun drying and hot-air drying. The purpose of this study was to investigate drying characteristics of red ginseng by using far-infrared drying. Methods The far-infrared drying tests on red ginseng were conducted at two drying stages: (1) high temperature for 24 h drying and (2) low temperature drying until the final moisture content was 13 ± 0.5% (wet basis). The high temperature drying stage included three drying chamber temperature conditions of 60°C, 65°C, and 70°C. The low temperature drying stage was conducted at temperatures of 45°C and 50°C. Drying characteristics were analyzed based on factors such as drying rate, color changes, energy consumption, and saponin content. The results were compared with those of the hot-air and sun drying methods. Results The results revealed that increases in drying temperature caused a decrease in drying time and energy consumption for far-infrared drying. The saponin content decreased under all drying conditions after drying, the highest value (11.34 mg/g) was observed at drying conditions of 60∼50°C. The sun drying condition showed the lowest color difference value when compared with far-infrared and hot-air drying. Conclusion The far-infrared drying showed a faster drying rate, higher saponin content, lower color difference value, and a decrease in energy consumption than seen in hot-air drying. PMID:26869830

  18. Far infrared radiation promotes rabbit renal proximal tubule cell proliferation and functional characteristics, and protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, I-Ni; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Young, Tai-Horng

    2017-01-01

    Far infrared radiation, a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum, is beneficial for long-term tissue healing, anti-inflammatory effects, growth promotion, sleep modulation, acceleration of microcirculation, and pain relief. We investigated if far infrared radiation is beneficial for renal proximal tubule cell cultivation and renal tissue engineering. We observed the effects of far infrared radiation on renal proximal tubules cells, including its effects on cell proliferation, gene and protein expression, and viability. We also examined the protective effects of far infrared radiation against cisplatin, a nephrotoxic agent, using the human proximal tubule cell line HK-2. We found that daily exposure to far infrared radiation for 30 min significantly increased rabbit renal proximal tubule cell proliferation in vitro, as assessed by MTT assay. Far infrared radiation was not only beneficial to renal proximal tubule cell proliferation, it also increased the expression of ATPase Na+/K+ subunit alpha 1 and glucose transporter 1, as determined by western blotting. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we found that far infrared radiation enhanced CDK5R1, GNAS, NPPB, and TEK expression. In the proximal tubule cell line HK-2, far infrared radiation protected against cisplatin-mediated nephrotoxicity by reducing apoptosis. Renal proximal tubule cell cultivation with far infrared radiation exposure resulted in better cell proliferation, significantly higher ATPase Na+/K+ subunit alpha 1 and glucose transporter 1 expression, and significantly enhanced expression of CDK5R1, GNAS, NPPB, and TEK. These results suggest that far infrared radiation improves cell proliferation and differentiation. In HK-2 cells, far infrared radiation mediated protective effects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing apoptosis, as indicated by flow cytometry and caspase-3 assay.

  19. New far infrared images of bright, nearby, star-forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D. AL, Jr.; Cole, David M.; Dowell, C. Darren; Lees, Joanna F.; Lowenstein, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    Broadband imaging in the far infrared is a vital tool for understanding how young stars form, evolve, and interact with their environment. As the sensitivity and size of detector arrays has increased, a richer and more detailed picture has emerged of the nearest and brightest regions of active star formation. We present data on M 17, M 42, and S 106 taken recently on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory with the Yerkes Observatory 60-channel far infrared camera, which has pixel sizes of 17 in. at 60 microns, 27 in. at 100 microns, and 45 in. at 160 and 200 microns. In addition to providing a clearer view of the complex central cores of the regions, the images reveal new details of the structure and heating of ionization fronts and photodissociation zones where radiation form luminous stars interacts with adjacent molecular clouds.

  20. Optical characterization of polar HfO2 nanoparticles in the mid- and far-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, O.; McGinnity, T. L.; Roeder, R. K.; Hoffman, A. J.

    2017-07-01

    Monoclinic HfO2 nanoparticles with nominal diameters of 9, 30, and 45 nm are characterized using transmission and reflection spectroscopy from the mid- to far-infrared. Phonon modes are identified in the measured spectra and agree with previously reported values in HfO2 thin films and density functional perturbation theory calculations. An anomaly in both reflection and transmission is observed at 556 cm-1 that is not attributed to the optical phonon modes. Numerical models predict a localized surface phonon polariton mode near this frequency, and we attribute the anomaly to coupling to this surface mode. The results of this work suggest that HfO2 nanoparticles could enable engineered optical properties in new mid- and far-infrared materials and devices.

  1. Highly efficient oscillator for an optically pumped 192-μm far-infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuang; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang; Zhang, Ruiliang

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate an efficient CH3F oscillator based on an anti-reflection coated Ge dichroic beam splitter. When pumped by the 10R32 line of a CO2 laser (10.17 μm), 0.81-mJ far-infrared laser is obtained with the wavelength of 192 μm. The energy conversion efficiency of 0.16 % is the highest for an optically pumped 192-μm laser system to our knowledge. The beam quality factor of Mx2 and My2 is 1.53 and 1.57, respectively. Further, this oscillator can be extended to optically pumped far-infrared lasers with various wavelengths.

  2. Clustering of far-infrared galaxies in the AKARI All-Sky Survey North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Rybka, P.; Suzuki, T. L.; Pȩpiak, A.; Oyabu, S.

    2013-10-01

    We present the measurements of the angular two-point correlation function for AKARI 90-μm point sources, detected outside the Milky Way plane and other regions characterized by high Galactic extinction in the northern Galactic hemisphere, and categorized as extragalactic sources according to our far-infrared-color based criterion. Together with our previous work (Pollo et al., 2013) this is the first measurement of the large-scale angular clustering of galaxies selected in the far-infrared after IRAS. We present the first attempt to estimate the spatial clustering properties of AKARI All-Sky galaxies and we conclude that they are mostly a very nearby ( z ≤ 0.1) population of moderately clustered galaxies. We measure their correlation length r 0 ~ 4.5 h -1 Mpc, which is consistent with the assumption that the FIS AKARI All-Sky surveys observes mostly a nearby star-forming population of galaxies.

  3. Far-infrared contraband-detection-system development for personnel-search applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellenbaum, R. L.

    1982-09-01

    Experiments have been conducted toward the development of an active near-millimeter-wave, far infrared, personnel search system for the detection of contraband. These experiments employed a microwave hybrid tee interferometer/radiometer scanning system and quasi-optical techniques at 3.3-mm wavelength to illuminate and detect the reflection from target objects against a human body background. Clothing and other common concealing materials are transport at this wavelength. Retroreflector arrays, in conjunction with a Gunn diode radiation source, were investigated to provide all-angle illumination and detection of specular reflections from unaligned and irregular-shaped objects. Results indicate that, under highly controlled search conditions, metal objects greater than or equal to 25 cm/sup 2/ can be detected in an enclosure lined with retroreflectors. Further development is required to produce a practical personnel search system. The investigation and feasibility of alternate far infrared search techniques are presented. 23 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Far-infrared quantum cascade lasers operating in AlAs phonon Reststrahlen band

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtani, K; Süess, M J; Faist, J; Andrews, A M; Zederbauer, T; Detz, H; Schrenk, W; Strasser, G

    2016-01-01

    We report on the operation of a double metal waveguide far-infrared quantum cascade laser emitting at 28 $\\mu$m, corresponding to the AlAs-like phonon Reststrahlen band. To avoid absorption by AlAs-like optical phonons, the Al-free group-V alloy GaAs$_{0.51}$Sb$_{0.49}$ is used as a barrier layer in the bound-to-continuum based active region. Lasing occurs at a wavelength of 28.3 $\\mu$m, which is the longest wavelength among the quantum cascade lasers operating from mid-infrared to far-infrared. The threshold current density at 50 K is 5.5 kA/cm$^{2}$ and maximum operation temperature is 175 K. We also discuss the feasibility that operation wavelength cover the whole spectral range bridging between mid-infrared and terahertz by choosing suited group III-V materials.

  5. The Relationship Between Dynamics and Structure in the Far Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Liquid Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, K.

    2005-01-14

    Using an intense source of far-infrared radiation, the absorption spectrum of liquid water is measured at a temperature ranging from 269 to 323 K. In the infrared spectrum we observe modes that are related to the local structure of liquid water. Here we present a FIR measured spectrum that is sensitive to the low frequency (< 100cm{sup -1}) microscopic details that exist in liquid water.

  6. Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) for Far-infrared through Millimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David T.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) for Far-infrared through Millimeter Astronomy. The two science goals are to use polarized emission from the partially-aligned dust that provides a probe of the role of magnetic fields in star formation and to use the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation CMB to test theories of the very early universe and provide a probe of fundamental physics.

  7. Probing the Baryon Cycle of Galaxies with SPICA Mid- and Far-Infrared Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Tak, F. F. S.; Madden, S. C.; Roelfsema, P.; Armus, L.; Baes, M.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Bolatto, A.; Bontemps, S.; Bot, C.; Bradford, C. M.; Braine, J.; Ciesla, L.; Clements, D.; Cormier, D.; Fernández-Ontiveros, J. A.; Galliano, F.; Giard, M.; Gomez, H.; González-Alfonso, E.; Herpin, F.; Johnstone, D.; Jones, A.; Kaneda, H.; Kemper, F.; Lebouteiller, V.; De Looze, I.; Matsuura, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Onaka, T.; Pérez-González, P.; Shipman, R.; Spinoglio, L.

    2018-01-01

    The SPICA mid- and far-infrared telescope will address fundamental issues in our understanding of star formation and ISM physics in galaxies. A particular hallmark of SPICA is the outstanding sensitivity enabled by the cold telescope, optimised detectors, and wide instantaneous bandwidth throughout the mid- and far-infrared. The spectroscopic, imaging, and polarimetric observations that SPICA will be able to collect will help in clarifying the complex physical mechanisms which underlie the baryon cycle of galaxies. In particular, (i) the access to a large suite of atomic and ionic fine-structure lines for large samples of galaxies will shed light on the origin of the observed spread in star-formation rates within and between galaxies, (ii) observations of HD rotational lines (out to 10 Mpc) and fine structure lines such as [C ii] 158 μm (out to 100 Mpc) will clarify the main reservoirs of interstellar matter in galaxies, including phases where CO does not emit, (iii) far-infrared spectroscopy of dust and ice features will address uncertainties in the mass and composition of dust in galaxies, and the contributions of supernovae to the interstellar dust budget will be quantified by photometry and monitoring of supernova remnants in nearby galaxies, (iv) observations of far-infrared cooling lines such as [O i] 63 μm from star-forming molecular clouds in our Galaxy will evaluate the importance of shocks to dissipate turbulent energy. The paper concludes with requirements for the telescope and instruments, and recommendations for the observing strategy.

  8. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  9. Density functional theory for prediction of far-infrared vibrational frequencies: molecular crystals of astrophysical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, C.; Auchettl, R.; Appadoo, D. R. T.; Robertson, E. G.

    2017-11-01

    Solid-state density functional theory code has been implemented for the structure optimization of crystalline methanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid and for the calculation of infrared frequencies. The results are compared to thin film spectra obtained from low-temperature experiments performed at the Australian Synchrotron. Harmonic frequency calculations of the internal modes calculated at the B3LYP-D3/m-6-311G(d) level shows higher deviation from infrared experiment than more advanced theory applied to the gas phase. Importantly for the solid-state, the simulation of low-frequency molecular lattice modes closely resembles the observed far-infrared features after application of a 0.92 scaling factor. This allowed experimental peaks to be assigned to specific translation and libration modes, including acetaldehyde and acetic acid lattice features for the first time. These frequency calculations have been performed without the need for supercomputing resources that are required for large molecular clusters using comparable levels of theory. This new theoretical approach will find use for the rapid characterization of intermolecular interactions and bonding in crystals, and the assignment of far-infrared spectra for crystalline samples such as pharmaceuticals and molecular ices. One interesting application may be for the detection of species of prebiotic interest on the surfaces of Kuiper-Belt and Trans-Neptunian Objects. At such locations, the three small organic molecules studied here could reside in their crystalline phase. The far-infrared spectra for their low-temperature solid phases are collected under planetary conditions, allowing us to compile and assign their most intense spectral features to assist future far-infrared surveys of icy Solar system surfaces.

  10. First Light from the Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Johnson, David G.; Latvakoski, Harri; Jucks, Kenneth; Watson, Mike; Bingham, Gail; Kratz, David P.; Traub, Wesley A.; Wellard, Stanley J.; Hyde, Charles R.; hide

    2005-01-01

    We present first light spectra from the new Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument. FIRST is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer developed to measure accurately the far-infrared (15 to 100 micrometers; 650 to 100 wavenumbers) emission spectrum of the Earth and its atmosphere. The observations presented here were obtained during a high altitude balloon flight from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico on 7 June 2005. The flight data demonstrate the instrument's ability to observe the entire energetically significant infrared emission spectrum (50 to 2000 wavenumbers) at high spectral and spatial resolution on a single focal plane in an instrument with one broad spectral bandpass beamsplitter. Comparisons with radiative transfer calculations demonstrate that FIRST accurately observes the very fine spectral structure in the far-infrared. Comparisons of the atmospheric window radiances measured by FIRST and by instruments on the NASA Aqua satellite that overflew FIRST are in excellent agreement. FIRST opens a new window on the spectrum that can be used for studying atmospheric radiation and climate, cirrus clouds, and water vapor in the upper troposphere.

  11. Far infrared emitting plaster in knee osteoarthritis: a single blinded, randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Marino

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Therapeutic approach of osteoarthritis (OA still represents a challenge in clinical practice. The aim of the study is to assess the efficacy of far infrared (FIR emitting plaster in the treatment of knee OA. Design. This is a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group with equal randomization (1:1, clinical trial. Patients affected by knee OA were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups, either placebo plaster or far infrared emitting plaster. Primary endpoint was to assess pain improvement from baseline to 1 months posttreatment in the visual analogue score (VAS. Secondary end point was to evaluate pain score after 1 week of treatment and to compare ultrasonographic findings after 1 month of treatment. Results. Each group comprised 30 (in the FIR group and 30 (in the placebo group completers. VAS scores of the placebo and the FIR group were significantly lower at 1 week post-treatment (95% confidence interval CI = -1.14 to 0.31; PConclusions. Far infrared emitting plaster could be considered an effective non-pharmacological choice for the therapeutic management of knee OA.

  12. Efficacy and safety of far infrared radiation in lymphedema treatment: clinical evaluation and laboratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Ning Fei; Feng, Shao Qing; Tong, Yun; Zhang, Ju Fang; Constantinides, Joannis; Lazzeri, Davide; Grassetti, Luca; Nicoli, Fabio; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2017-04-01

    Swelling is the most common symptom of extremities lymphedema. Clinical evaluation and laboratory analysis were conducted after far infrared radiation (FIR) treatment on the main four components of lymphedema: fluid, fat, protein, and hyaluronan. Far infrared radiation is a kind of hyperthermia therapy with several and additional benefits as well as promoting microcirculation flow and improving collateral lymph circumfluence. Although FIR therapy has been applied for several years on thousands of lymphedema patients, there are still few studies that have reported the biological effects of FIR on lymphatic tissue. In this research, we investigate the effects of far infrared rays on the major components of lymphatic tissue. Then, we explore the effectiveness and safety of FIR as a promising treatment modality of lymphedema. A total of 32 patients affected by lymphedema in stage II and III were treated between January 2015 and January 2016 at our department. After therapy, a significant decrease of limb circumference measurements was noted and improving of quality of life was registered. Laboratory examination showed the treatment can also decrease the deposition of fluid, fat, hyaluronan, and protein, improving the swelling condition. We believe FIR treatment could be considered as both an alternative monotherapy and a useful adjunctive to the conservative or surgical lymphedema procedures. Furthermore, the real and significant biological effects of FIR represent possible future applications in wide range of the medical field.

  13. Reststrahlen Band Optics for the Advancement of Far-Infrared Optical Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streyer, William Henderson

    The dissertation aims to build a case for the benefits and means of investigating novel optical materials and devices operating in the underdeveloped far-infrared (20 - 60 microns) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This dissertation and the proposed future investigations described here have the potential to further the advancement of new and enhanced capabilities in fields such as astronomy, medicine, and the petrochemical industry. The first several completed projects demonstrate techniques for developing far-infrared emission sources using selective thermal emitters, which could operate more efficiently than their simple blackbody counterparts commonly used as sources in this wavelength region. The later projects probe the possible means of linking bulk optical phonon populations through interaction with surface modes to free space photons. This is a breakthrough that would enable the development of a new class of light sources operating in the far-infrared. Chapter 1 introduces the far-infrared wavelength range along with many of its current and potential applications. The limited capabilities of the available optical architecture in this range are outlined along with a discussion of the state-of-the-art technology available in this range. Some of the basic physical concepts routinely applied in this dissertation are reviewed; namely, the Drude formalism, semiconductor Reststrahlen bands, and surface polaritons. Lastly, some of the physical challenges that impede the further advancement of far-infrared technology, despite remarkable recent success in adjacent regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, are discussed. Chapter 2 describes the experimental and computational methods employed in this dissertation. Spectroscopic techniques used to investigate both the mid-infrared and far-infrared wavelength ranges are reviewed, including a brief description of the primary instrument of infrared spectroscopy, the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer

  14. Electromagnetic modelling of a space-borne far-infrared interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Anthony; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Murphy, J. Anthony; Bracken, Colm; Savini, Giorgio; Pascale, Enzo; Ade, Peter; Sudiwala, Rashmi; Hornsby, Amber

    2016-02-01

    In this paper I will describe work done as part of an EU-funded project `Far-infrared space interferometer critical assessment' (FISICA). The aim of the project is to investigate science objectives and technology development required for the next generation THz space interferometer. The THz/FIR is precisely the spectral region where most of the energy from stars, exo-planetary systems and galaxy clusters deep in space is emitted. The atmosphere is almost completely opaque in the wave-band of interest so any observation that requires high quality data must be performed with a space-born instrument. A space-borne far infrared interferometer will be able to answer a variety of crucial astrophysical questions such as how do planets and stars form, what is the energy engine of most galaxies and how common are the molecule building blocks of life. The FISICA team have proposed a novel instrument based on a double Fourier interferometer that is designed to resolve the light from an extended scene, spectrally and spatially. A laboratory prototype spectral-spatial interferometer has been constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of the double-Fourier technique at far infrared wavelengths (0.15 - 1 THz). This demonstrator is being used to investigate and validate important design features and data-processing methods for future instruments. Using electromagnetic modelling techniques several issues related to its operation at long baselines and wavelengths, such as diffraction, have been investigated. These are critical to the design of the concept instrument and the laboratory testbed.

  15. Invited Article: An integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühne, P., E-mail: kuehne@huskers.unl.edu; Schubert, M., E-mail: schubert@engr.unl.edu; Hofmann, T., E-mail: thofmann@engr.unl.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Nanohybrid Functional Materials, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Herzinger, C. M., E-mail: cherzinger@jawoollam.com; Woollam, J. A., E-mail: jwoollam@jawoollam.com [J. A. Woollam Co., Inc., 645 M Street, Suite 102, Lincoln, Nebraska 68508-2243 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    We report on the development of the first integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, covering an ultra wide spectral range from 3 cm{sup −1} to 7000 cm{sup −1} (0.1–210 THz or 0.4–870 meV). The instrument comprises four sub-systems, where the magneto-cryostat-transfer sub-system enables the usage of the magneto-cryostat sub-system with the mid-infrared ellipsometer sub-system, and the far-infrared/terahertz ellipsometer sub-system. Both ellipsometer sub-systems can be used as variable angle-of-incidence spectroscopic ellipsometers in reflection or transmission mode, and are equipped with multiple light sources and detectors. The ellipsometer sub-systems are operated in polarizer-sample-rotating-analyzer configuration granting access to the upper left 3 × 3 block of the normalized 4 × 4 Mueller matrix. The closed cycle magneto-cryostat sub-system provides sample temperatures between room temperature and 1.4 K and magnetic fields up to 8 T, enabling the detection of transverse and longitudinal magnetic field-induced birefringence. We discuss theoretical background and practical realization of the integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, as well as acquisition of optical Hall effect data and the corresponding model analysis procedures. Exemplarily, epitaxial graphene grown on 6H-SiC, a tellurium doped bulk GaAs sample and an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure are investigated. The selected experimental datasets display the full spectral, magnetic field and temperature range of the instrument and demonstrate data analysis strategies. Effects from free charge carriers in two dimensional confinement and in a volume material, as well as quantum mechanical effects (inter-Landau-level transitions) are observed and discussed exemplarily.

  16. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters I. Abell 2670

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jorgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    1999-01-01

    As part of an investigation of far-infrared emission from rich galaxy clusters the central part of Abell 2670 has been mapped with ISO at 60 mu m, 100 mu m, 135 mu m, and 200 mu m using the PHT-C camera. Point sources detected in the field have infrared fluxes comparable to normal spirals at the ...... at the cluster distance. Probable optical counterparts are cluster galaxies with various characteristics such as blue colour, Ha emission, or double nuclei. One source is extended which could possibly be emission from intracluster dust in debris from spiral galaxies....

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Far-Infrared Ray-Emitting Belts on Primary Dysmenorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Yi Liau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the therapeutic effect of the far-infrared ray-emitting belt (FIRB in the management of primary dysmenorrhea in female patients. Forty adolescent females with primary dysmenorrhea were enrolled in the study. Quantitative measurements were taken during the menstruation. Several parameters were measured and compared, including temperature, abdominal blood flow, heart rate variability, and pain assessment. Statistical analysis shows that treatment with FIRB had significant efficiency in increasing regional surface temperature and abdominal blood flow, widening standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals, and reducing VRS and NRS pain scores. The application of an FIRB appears to alleviate dysmenorrhea.

  18. Far-infrared dust opacity and visible extinction in the Polaris Flare

    OpenAIRE

    Cambresy, L.; Boulanger, F.; Lagache, G.; Stepnik, B.

    2001-01-01

    We present an extinction map of the Polaris molecular cirrus cloud derived from star counts and compare it with the Schlegel et al. (1998) extinction map derived from the far--infrared dust opacity. We find that, within the Polaris cloud, the Schlegel et al. Av values are a factor 2 to 3 higher than the star count values. We propose that this discrepancy results from a difference in $\\tau_{FIR}/ A_V$ between the diffuse atomic medium and the Polaris cloud. We use the difference in spectral en...

  19. Optical and magneto-optical far-infrared properties of bilayer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Abergel, D. S. L.; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the spectroscopic features of bilayer graphene determined by the formation of pairs of low-energy and split bands in this material. We show that the inter-Landau-level absorption spectrum in bilayer graphene at high magnetic field is much denser in the far-infrared range than that in monolayer material, and that the polarization dependence of its lowest energy peak can be used to test the form of the bilayer ground state in the quantum Hall-effect regime.

  20. Wavefront Sensing and Control Technology for Submillimeter and Far-Infrared Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The NGST wavefront sensing and control system will be developed to TRL6 over the next few years, including testing in a cryogenic vacuum environment with traceable hardware. Doing this in the far-infrared and submillimeter is probably easier, as some aspects of the problem scale with wavelength, and the telescope is likely to have a more stable environment; however, detectors may present small complications. Since this is a new system approach, it warrants a new look. For instance, a large space telescope based on the DART membrane mirror design requires a new actuation approach. Other mirror and actuation technologies may prove useful as well.

  1. Structure determination of isolated metal clusters via far-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielicke, André; Kirilyuk, Andrei; Ratsch, Christian; Behler, Jörg; Scheffler, Matthias; von Helden, Gert; Meijer, Gerard

    2004-07-09

    We present a new method for the size selective structure determination of small isolated metal clusters in the gas phase. The technique is applied to cationic vanadium clusters containing 6 to 23 atoms, whose far infrared absorption spectra are measured in the 140-450 cm(-1) spectral range. The spectra are unique for each cluster size and are true fingerprints of the cluster's structure. By comparing the experimental spectra to spectra obtained from density-functional theory, the geometric cluster structure can be identified.

  2. Extended far-infrared emission and star formation in Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, A. P.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation into the extended distribution of far-infrared (FIR) emission associated with nearby Seyfert galaxies is made using a set of MEM reconstructions of IRAS Chopped Photometric Channel (CPC) data (Marston 1993). The data is compared to a set of HII/starburst galaxy images similarly processed in order to compare distributions and FIR color properties. It is shown that the central 1 kpc or so of Seyfert galaxies show extended FIR emission. FIR colors suggest that the bulk of this emission is not directly associated with an active nucleus. They further suggest that the origins of the majority of the emission is from heated dust associated with star formation surrounding the nucleus rather than dust heated by the active nucleus. Nearby Seyfert galaxies are shown to have a higher concentration of far-infrared emission from their centers than the HII/starburst galaxies and a number appear to reside in disk galaxies with relatively low ongoing star formation in their disks. An example of this is NGC 7582 which has a smooth disk but an active nucleus/starbust center.

  3. THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE CARINA NEBULA FROM FAR-INFRARED TO RADIO WAVELENGTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salatino, M.; De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S. [Physics Department, Sapienza Universita di Roma, p.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Polenta, G., E-mail: maria.salatino@roma1.infn.it [ASI Science Data Center, ESRIN, via G. Galilei, I-00044, Frascati (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    Multi-wavelength observations are necessary for understanding the physical properties of astrophysical sources. In this paper, we use observations in the far-infrared to radio range to derive the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Carina nebula. To do this, we carefully subtract the irregularly varying diffuse emission from the Galactic plane, which can be of the order of 10% of the nebula flux at these wavelengths. We find that the far-infrared SED can be modeled as emission from a dust population with a single temperature T{sub d} = (34.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.8}) K and with a spectral index of emissivity {alpha} = -1.37{sup +0.09}{sub -0.08}. We also find a total infrared luminosity of the nebula of (7.4{sup +2.5}{sub -1.4}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} L{sub Sun} and, assuming a single temperature of the dust, a mass of the dust of (9500{sup +4600}{sub -3500}) M{sub Sun }.

  4. Effects of Somatothermal Far-Infrared Ray on Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Ke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the beneficial effects of using a far-infrared (FIR belt on the management of patients with primary dysmenorrhea. This is the first study to determine the efficacy of somatothermal FIR using a parallel-arm randomized sham-controlled and double-blinded design with objective physical evidence and psychometric self-reports. Fifty-one Taiwanese women with primary dysmenorrhea were enrolled in the study. Results indicate that there was an increased abdominal temperature of 0.6°C and a 3.27% increase in abdominal blood flow in the FIR group (wearing FIR belt compared to those in the control group (wearing sham belt. Verbal rating scale and numeric rating scale scores in the FIR group were both lower than those in the control group. Compared to the blank group (wearing no belt, the average dysmenorrhea pain duration of the FIR group was significantly reduced from 2.5 to 1.8 days, but there was no significant difference in the control group. These results demonstrate that the use of a belt made of far-infrared ceramic materials can reduce primary dysmenorrhea.

  5. Quasi-optical analysis of a far-infrared spatio-spectral space interferometer concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, C.; O'Sullivan, C.; Murphy, J. A.; Donohoe, A.; Savini, G.; Lightfoot, J.; Juanola-Parramon, R.; Fisica Consortium

    2016-07-01

    FISICA (Far-Infrared Space Interferometer Critical Assessment) was a three year study of a far-infrared spatio-spectral double-Fourier interferometer concept. One of the aims of the FISICA study was to set-out a baseline optical design for such a system, and to use a model of the system to simulate realistic telescope beams for use with an end-to-end instrument simulator. This paper describes a two-telescope (and hub) baseline optical design that fulfils the requirements of the FISICA science case, while minimising the optical mass of the system. A number of different modelling techniques were required for the analysis: fast approximate simulation tools such as ray tracing and Gaussian beam methods were employed for initial analysis, with GRASP physical optics used for higher accuracy in the final analysis. Results are shown for the predicted far-field patterns of the telescope primary mirrors under illumination by smooth walled rectangular feed horns. Far-field patterns for both on-axis and off-axis detectors are presented and discussed.

  6. Cryogenic far-infrared laser absorptivity measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope mirror coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jacqueline; Klaassen, Tjeerd; Hovenier, Niels; Jakob, Gerd; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sternberg, Oren

    2004-07-01

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 K to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit about the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. Together, the telescope's equilibrium temperature in space and the emissivity of the mirror surfaces will determine the far-infrared-submillimeter background and thus the sensitivity of two of the three astronomical instruments aboard the observatory if stray-light levels can be kept low relative to the mirror emission. Absorptivities of both clean and dust-contaminated samples were measured at 70, 118, 184, and 496 microm. Theoretical fits to the data predict absorptivities of 0.2-0.4% for the clean sample and 0.2-0.8% for the dusty sample, over the spectral range of the Herschel Space Observatory instruments.

  7. Far-infrared and sub-millimetre imaging of HD 76582's circumstellar disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jonathan P.; Booth, Mark; Holland, Wayne; Matthews, Brenda C.; Greaves, Jane S.; Zuckerman, Ben

    2016-07-01

    Debris discs, the tenuous rocky and icy remnants of planet formation, are believed to be evidence for planetary systems around other stars. The JCMT/SCUBA-2 debris disc legacy survey `SCUBA-2 Observations of Nearby Stars' (SONS) observed 100 nearby stars, amongst them HD 76582, for evidence of such material. Here, we present imaging observations by JCMT/SCUBA-2 and Herschel/PACS at sub-millimetre and far-infrared wavelengths, respectively. We simultaneously model the ensemble of photometric and imaging data, spanning optical to sub-millimetre wavelengths, in a self-consistent manner. At far-infrared wavelengths, we find extended emission from the circumstellar disc providing a strong constraint on the dust spatial location in the outer system, although the angular resolution is too poor to constrain the interior of the system. In the sub-millimetre, photometry at 450 and 850 μm reveals a steep fall-off that we interpret as a disc dominated by moderately sized dust grains (amin = 36 μm), perhaps indicative of a non-steady-state collisional cascade within the disc. A disc architecture of three distinct annuli, comprising an unresolved component at 20 au and outer components at 80 and 270 au, along with a very steep particle size distribution (γ = 5), is proposed to match the observations.

  8. Interpreting the cosmic far-infrared background anisotropies using a gas regulator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Doré, Olivier; Teyssier, Romain; Serra, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Cosmic far-infrared background (CFIRB) is a powerful probe of the history of star formation rate (SFR) and the connection between baryons and dark matter across cosmic time. In this work, we explore to which extent the CFIRB anisotropies can be reproduced by a simple physical framework for galaxy evolution, the gas regulator (bathtub) model. This model is based on continuity equations for gas, stars, and metals, taking into account cosmic gas accretion, star formation, and gas ejection. We model the large-scale galaxy bias and small-scale shot noise self-consistently, and we constrain our model using the CFIRB power spectra measured by Planck. Because of the simplicity of the physical model, the goodness of fit is limited. We compare our model predictions with the observed correlation between CFIRB and gravitational lensing, bolometric infrared luminosity functions, and submillimeter source counts. The strong clustering of CFIRB indicates a large galaxy bias, which corresponds to haloes of mass 10^{12.5}M_⊙ at z = 2, higher than the mass associated with the peak of the star formation efficiency. We also find that the far-infrared luminosities of haloes above 10^{12}M_⊙ are higher than the expectation from the SFR observed in ultraviolet and optical surveys.

  9. High speed FPGA-based Phasemeter for the far-infrared laser interferometers on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y.; Liu, H.; Zou, Z.; Li, W.; Lian, H.; Jie, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The far-infrared laser-based HCN interferometer and POlarimeter/INTerferometer\\break (POINT) system are important diagnostics for plasma density measurement on EAST tokamak. Both HCN and POINT provide high spatial and temporal resolution of electron density measurement and used for plasma density feedback control. The density is calculated by measuring the real-time phase difference between the reference beams and the probe beams. For long-pulse operations on EAST, the calculation of density has to meet the requirements of Real-Time and high precision. In this paper, a Phasemeter for far-infrared laser-based interferometers will be introduced. The FPGA-based Phasemeter leverages fast ADCs to obtain the three-frequency signals from VDI planar-diode Mixers, and realizes digital filters and an FFT algorithm in FPGA to provide real-time, high precision electron density output. Implementation of the Phasemeter will be helpful for the future plasma real-time feedback control in long-pulse discharge.

  10. Clustering of far-infrared galaxies in the AKARI All-Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Suzuki, T. L.; Oyabu, S.

    2013-03-01

    We present the first measurement of the angular two-point correlation function for AKARI 90-μm point sources, detected outside of the Milky Way plane and other regions characterized by high Galactic extinction, and categorized as extragalactic sources according to our far-infrared-color based criterion (Pollo et al., 2010). This is the first measurement of the large-scale angular clustering of galaxies selected in the far-infrared after IRAS measurements. Although a full description of the clustering properties of these galaxies will be obtained by more detailed studies, using either a spatial correlation function, or better information about properties and, at least, photometric redshifts of these galaxies, the angular correlation function remains the first diagnostic tool to establish the clustering properties of the catalog and the observed galaxy population. We find a non-zero clustering signal in both hemispheres extending up to ~40 degrees, without any significant fluctuations at larger scales. The observed correlation function is well fitted by a power-law function. The notable differences between the northern and southern hemispheres are found, which can probably be attributed to the photometry problems, and might point to the necessity of performing a better calibration in the data from the southern hemisphere.

  11. Far-infrared spectroscopy of a lensed starburst: a blind redshift from Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, R. D.; Ivison, R. J.; Hopwood, R.; Riechers, D. A.; Bussmann, R. S.; Cox, P.; Dye, S.; Krips, M.; Negrello, M.; Neri, R.; Serjeant, S.; Valtchanov, I.; Baes, M.; Bourne, N.; Clements, D. L.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S. A.; Ibar, E.; Maddox, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.; van der Werf, P.

    2013-11-01

    We report the redshift of HATLAS J132427.0+284452 (hereafter HATLAS J132427), a gravitationally lensed starburst galaxy, the first determined `blind' by the Herschel Space Observatory. This is achieved via the detection of [C II] consistent with z = 1.68 in a far-infrared spectrum taken with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS). We demonstrate that the [C II] redshift is secure via detections of CO J = 2 → 1 and 3 → 2 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique's Plateau de Bure Interferometer. The intrinsic properties appear typical of high-redshift starbursts despite the high lensing-amplified fluxes, proving the ability of the FTS to probe this population with the aid of lensing. The blind detection of [C II] demonstrates the potential of the SPICA Far-infrared Instrument imaging spectrometer, proposed for the much more sensitive Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics mission, to determine redshifts of multiple dusty galaxies simultaneously without the benefit of lensing.

  12. Far-infrared HD emission as a measure of protoplanetary disk mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapman, L.; Miotello, A.; Kama, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bruderer, S.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Protoplanetary disks around young stars are the sites of planet formation. While the dust mass can be estimated using standard methods, determining the gas mass - and thus the amount of material available to form giant planets - has proven to be very difficult. Hydrogen deuteride (HD) is a promising alternative to the commonly used gas mass tracer, carbon monoxide. However, the potential of HD has not yet been investigated with models incorporating both HD and CO isotopologue-specific chemistry, and its sensitivity to uncertainties in disk parameters has not yet been quantified. Aims: We examine the robustness of HD as tracer of the disk gas mass, specifically the effect of gas mass on HD far-infrared emission and its sensitivity to the vertical structure. Also, we seek to provide requirements for future far-infrared missions such as SPICA. Methods: Deuterium chemistry reactions relevant for HD were implemented in the thermochemical code DALI and more than 160 disk models were run for a range of disk masses and vertical structures. Results: The HD J = 1-0 line intensity depends directly on the gas mass through a sublinear power law relation with a slope of 0.8. Assuming no prior knowledge about the vertical structure of a disk and using only the HD 1-0 flux, gas masses can be estimated to within a factor of two for low mass disks (Mdisk ≤ 10-3M⊙). For more massive disks, this uncertainty increases to more than an order of magnitude. Adding the HD 2-1 line or independent information about the vertical structure can reduce this uncertainty to a factor of 3 for all disk masses. For TW Hya, using the radial and vertical structure from the literature, the observations constrain the gas mass to 6 × 10-3M⊙ ≤ Mdisk ≤ 9 × 10-3M⊙. Future observations require a 5σ sensitivity of 1.8 × 10-20 W m-2 (2.5 × 10-20 W m-2) and a spectral resolving power R ≥ 300 (1000) to detect HD 1-0 (HD 2-1) for all disk masses above 10-5M⊙ with a line

  13. Far-Infrared Excitations in an Antidot at Finite Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emperador, Agustí; Pi, Martí; Barranco, Manuel; Lipparini, Enrico; Serra, Llorenç

    2001-02-01

    We have investigated the far-infrared dipole modes of an antidot submitted to a perpendicularly applied magnetic field B. The ground state of the antidot is described in local spin-density functional theory, and the spectrum in time-dependent local spin-density functional theory. The results are compared with those corresponding to a quantum dot of similar electronic surface density. The method is able to reproduce two of the more salient experimental features, namely, that the main bulk and edge modes have the same circular polarization, and that the negative B dispersion edge branch oscillates, with minima at the B values corresponding to fully occupied Landau levels. It fails, however, to achieve the unique feature of short-period antidot lattices that the energy of the edge magnetoplasmon approaches the cyclotron frequency for small B values. The existence of anticyclotron-polarized bulk modes is discussed, and a detailed account of the dipole spin mode is presented.

  14. Symmetric Absorber-Coupled Far-Infrared Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    U-yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); Brown, Ari D. (Inventor); Stevenson, Thomas R. (Inventor); Patel, Amil A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a symmetric absorber-coupled far-infrared microwave kinetic inductance detector including: a membrane having an absorber disposed thereon in a symmetric cross bar pattern; and a microstrip including a plurality of conductor microstrip lines disposed along all edges of the membrane, and separated from a ground plane by the membrane. The conducting microstrip lines are made from niobium, and the pattern is made from a superconducting material with a transition temperature below niobium, including one of aluminum, titanium nitride, or molybdenum nitride. The pattern is disposed on both a top and a bottom of the membrane, and creates a parallel-plate coupled transmission line on the membrane that acts as a half-wavelength resonator at readout frequencies. The parallel-plate coupled transmission line and the conductor microstrip lines form a stepped impedance resonator. The pattern provides identical power absorption for both horizontal and vertical polarization signals.

  15. Optics Alignment of a Balloon-Borne Far-Infrared Interferometer BETTII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabal, Arnab; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Rizzo, Maxime J.; Mundy, Lee; Sampler, Henry; Juanola Parramon, Roser; Veach, Todd; Fixsen, Dale; Vila Hernandez De Lorenzo, Jor; Silverberg, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-m baseline far-infrared (FIR: 30 90 micrometer) interferometer providing spatially resolved spectroscopy. The initial scientific focus of BETTII is on clustered star formation, but this capability likely has a much broader scientific application.One critical step in developing an interferometer, such as BETTII, is the optical alignment of the system. We discuss how we determine alignment sensitivities of different optical elements on the interferogram outputs. Accordingly, an alignment plan is executed that makes use of a laser tracker and theodolites for precise optical metrology of both the large external optics and the small optics inside the cryostat. We test our alignment on the ground by pointing BETTII to bright near-infrared sources and obtaining their images in the tracking detectors.

  16. A hybrid type undulator for far-infrared FELs at FELI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zako, A.; Miyauchi, Y.; Koga, A. [Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc., Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Two FEL facilities of the FELI are now operating in the wavelength range of 1-20 {mu}m. A 3.2-m hybrid type undulator ({lambda}{sub u}=80mm, N=40) has been designed for far-infrared FELs and will be installed in December. It can cover the wavelength of 20-60 {mu}m by changing K-value from 1 to 2.7 for a 28.0-MeV electron beam. It is composed of ferrite magnetic poles and Sm-Co permanent magnets. Commonly wound coils induce alternating magnetic field in ferrite poles. Combination of the induced field and the permanent magnet field can controls the magnetic field between the undulator gap.

  17. ESPRIT: a study concept for a far-infrared interferometer in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, W.; de Graauw, Th.; Helmich, F.; Baryshev, A.; Cernicharo, J.; Gao, J. R.; Gunst, A.; Bos, A.; den Herder, J.-W.; Jackson, B.; Koshelets, V.; Langevelde, H.-J.; Maat, P.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Noordam, J.; Roelfsema, P.; Venema, L.; Wesselius, P.; Yagoubov, P.

    2008-07-01

    In the far-infrared (FIR) / THz regime the angular (and often spectral) resolution of observing facilities is still very restricted despite the fact that this frequency range has become of prime importance for modern astrophysics. ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) with its superb sensitivity and angular resolution will only cover frequencies up to about 1 THz, while the HIFI instrument for ESA'a Herschel Space Observatory will provide limited angular resolution (10 to 30 arcsec) up to 2 THz. Observations of regions with star and planet formation require extremely high angular resolution as well as frequency resolution in the full THz regime. In order to open these regions for high-resolution astrophysics we present a study concept for a heterodyne space interferometer, ESPRIT (Exploratory Submm Space Radio-Interferometric Telescope). This mission will cover the Terahertz regime inaccessible from the ground and outside the operating range of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

  18. Far-infrared synchrotron radiation spectroscopy of solids in normal and extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccinini, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via Fermi, 40 - 00044 Frascati (Italy); Universita di Roma, Dip. Scienze Geologiche, L.go S. Leonardo Murialdo, 1 - 00144 Rome (Italy); Cestelli Guidi, M.; Marcelli, A.; Burattini, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via Fermi, 40 - 00044 Frascati (Italy); Calvani, P.; Nucara, A.; Postorino, P.; Sacchetti, A.; Arcangeletti, E. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , P. le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Rome (Italy); Sheregii, E.; Polit, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Rzeszow, ul. Rejtana 16A, 35-310 Rzeszow (Poland); Kisiel, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2005-01-01

    New opportunities in solid-state physics are offered by SINBAD (Synchrotron INfrared Beamline At DAFNE), the infrared beamline operational at DA{phi}NE, the storage ring of the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the INFN. During 2003 several experiments, including those supported by the European TARI program, have been successfully performed at SINBAD. In this work we present the preliminary results of high resolution far infrared reflectivity data collected in different Zn{sub x}Cd{sub y}Hg{sub (1-x-y)}Te quaternary alloys as a function of temperature. The first far-IR investigation of Colossal Magnetoresistance manganites at high pressures, using a diamond anvil cell is also presented. Indeed, FT-IR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of insulating-to-metal transitions and charge ordering phenomena that may occur in transition metal oxides. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Drunk identification using far infrared imagery based on DCT features in DWT domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua; Jiang, Peng; Xiong, Ying; Li, Ke

    2016-10-01

    Drunk driving problem is a serious threat to traffic safety. Automatic drunk driver identification is vital to improve the traffic safety. This paper copes with automatic drunk driver detection using far infrared thermal images by the holistic features. To improve the robustness of drunk driver detection, instead of traditional local pixels, a holistic feature extraction method is proposed to attain compact and discriminative features for infrared face drunk identification. Discrete cosine transform (DCT) in discrete wavelet transform (DWT) domain is used to extract the useful features in infrared face images for its high speed. Then, the first six DCT coefficients are retained for drunk classification by means of "Z" scanning. Finally, SVM is applied to classify the drunk person. Experimental results illustrate that the accuracy rate of proposed infrared face drunk identification can reach 98.5% with high computation efficiency, which can be applied in real drunk driver detection system.

  20. Accurate frequency of the 119 micron methanol laser from tunable far-infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguscio, M.; Zink, L. R.; Evenson, K. M.; Jennings, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    High-accuracy absorption spectroscopy of CH3OH in the far infrared is discussed. In addition to 22 transitions in the ground state, the frequency of the (n, tau, J, K), (0, 1, 16, 8) to (0, 2, 15, 7) transition in the nu5 excited vibrational level, which is responsible for the laser emission at 119 microns, was measured. The measured frequency is 2,522,782.57(10) MHz at zero pressure, with a pressure shift of 6.1(32) kHz/Pa (0.805/420/ MHz/torr). An accurate remeasurement of the laser emission frequency has also been performed, and the results are in good agreement.

  1. Far infrared laser interferometry and polarimetry diagnostics for C-2W FRC experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bihe; Rouillard, Mark; Feng, Ping; Beall, Michael; Settles, Greg; Snitchler, Greg; Ziaei, Shawn; TAE Team

    2017-10-01

    C-2W field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiments are focused to resolve major physics issues facing the future of FRC devices. To achieve these goals, it is essential to measure the plasma equilibrium dynamics and monitor plasma fluctuations. One of the critical diagnostics under development is a 14-chord three-wave far infrared (FIR) laser interferometry and polarimetry system, which can provide simultaneous high temporal resolution measurements of density and Faraday rotation profiles with high accuracy. It is based on the previous successful experience of FIR polarimetry and interferometry measurements in C-2U FRC plasmas. The physics considerations and the electro-opto-mechanical design and development of the system will be described, with discussions on challenges and solutions specific to diagnosing the high beta FRC plasmas. Initial experimental data will also be presented.

  2. Far infrared-assisted encapsulation of filter paper strips in poly(methyl methacrylate) for proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiwen; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2016-02-01

    Filter paper strips were enclosed between two poly(methyl methacrylate) plates to fabricate paper-packed channel microchips under pressure in the presence of far infrared irradiation. After the enclosed paper strip was oxidized by periodate, trypsin was covalently immobilized in them to fabricate microfluidic proteolysis bioreactor. The feasibility and performance of the unique bioreactor were demonstrated by digesting BSA and lysozyme. The results were comparable to those of conventional in-solution proteolysis while the digestion time was significantly reduced to ∼18 s. The suitability of the microfluidic paper-based bioreactors to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Mid/far-infrared photo-detectors based on graphene asymmetric quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, E.; Chaabani, R.; Jaziri, S.

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a theoretical study on the electronic properties of a single-layer graphene asymmetric quantum well. Quantification of energy levels is limited by electron-hole conversion at the barrier interfaces and free-electron continuum. Electron-hole conversion at the barrier interfaces can be controlled by introducing an asymmetry between barriers and taking into account the effect of the interactions of the graphene sheet with the substrate. The interaction with the substrate induces an effective mass to carriers, allowing observation of Fabry-Pérot resonances under normal incidence and extinction of Klein tunneling. The asymmetry, between barriers creates a transmission gap between confined states and free-electron continuum, allowing the large graphene asymmetric quantum well to be exploited as a photo-detector operating at mid- and far-infrared frequency regimes.

  4. Simple method for any planar wiggler field simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Smolyakov

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a nonstandard method for calculating the magnetic field of planar wigglers and undulators consisting of pure permanent magnets. This method of calculation is based on certain properties of the Fourier transform. It allows the analytical expression of the Fourier transform for the planar magnetic fields through the wiggler's geometry and magnetization of its blocks. The upper theoretical limit for the amplitude of the magnetic field is derived and matched with the field amplitude of planar wigglers with standard designs. The property of universality for planar wigglers is also taken into consideration as it may greatly simplify the analysis of magnetic fields for wigglers with different designs.

  5. Airborne observations of far-infrared upwelling radiance in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Libois

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The first airborne measurements of the Far-InfraRed Radiometer (FIRR were performed in April 2015 during the panarctic NETCARE campaign. Vertical profiles of spectral upwelling radiance in the range 8–50 µm were measured in clear and cloudy conditions from the surface up to 6 km. The clear sky profiles highlight the strong dependence of radiative fluxes to the temperature inversion typical of the Arctic. Measurements acquired for total column water vapour from 1.5 to 10.5 mm also underline the sensitivity of the far-infrared greenhouse effect to specific humidity. The cloudy cases show that optically thin ice clouds increase the cooling rate of the atmosphere, making them important pieces of the Arctic energy balance. One such cloud exhibited a very complex spatial structure, characterized by large horizontal heterogeneities at the kilometre scale. This emphasizes the difficulty of obtaining representative cloud observations with airborne measurements but also points out how challenging it is to model polar clouds radiative effects. These radiance measurements were successfully compared to simulations, suggesting that state-of-the-art radiative transfer models are suited to study the cold and dry Arctic atmosphere. Although FIRR in situ performances compare well to its laboratory performances, complementary simulations show that upgrading the FIRR radiometric resolution would greatly increase its sensitivity to atmospheric and cloud properties. Improved instrument temperature stability in flight and expected technological progress should help meet this objective. The campaign overall highlights the potential for airborne far-infrared radiometry and constitutes a relevant reference for future similar studies dedicated to the Arctic and for the development of spaceborne instruments.

  6. Tunable far infrared laser spectroscopy of van der Waals bonds: Ar-NH sub 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA) California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-11-01

    Hyperfine resolved vibration-rotation-tunneling spectra of Ar--NH{sub 3} and (NH{sub 3}){sub 2}, generated in a planar supersonic jet, have been measured with the Berkeley tunable far infrared laser spectrometer. Among the seven rotationally assigned bands, one band belongs to Ar--NH{sub 3}, and the other six belong to (NH{sub 3}){sub 2}. To facilitate the intermolecular vibrational assignment for Ar--NH{sub 3}, a dynamics study aided by a permutation-inversion group theoretical treatment is performed on the rovibrational levels. The rovibrational quantum number correlation between the free internal rotor limit and the semi-rigid limit is established to provide a basic physical picture of the evolution of intermolecular vibrational component states. An anomalous vibronically allowed unique Q branch vibrational band structure is predicted to exist for a near prolate binary complex containing an inverting subunit. According to the model developed in this work, the observed band of Ar--NH{sub 3} centered at 26.470633(17) cm{sup {minus}1} can correlate only to either the fundamental dimeric stretching band for the A{sub 2} states with the NH{sub 3} inversional quantum number v{sub i} = 1, or the K{sub a} = 0 {l arrow} 0 subband of the lowest internal-rotation-inversion difference band. Although the estimated nuclear quadrupole coupling constant favors a tentative assignment in terms of the first possibility, a definitive assignment will require far infrared data and a dynamical model incorporating a potential surface.

  7. Modeling the light-travel-time effect on the far-infrared size of IRC +10216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    1995-01-01

    Models of the far-infrared emission from the large circumstellar dust envelope surrounding the carbon star IRC +10216 are used to assess the importance of the light-travel-time effect (LTTE) on the observed size of the source. The central star is a long-period variable with an average period of 644 +/- 17 days and a peak-to-peak amplitude of two magnituds, so a large light-travel-time effect is seen at 1 min radius. An attempt is made to use the LTTE to reconcile the discrepancy between the observations of Fazio et al. and Lester et al. regarding the far-infrared source size. This discrepancy is reviewed in light of recent, high-spatial-resolution observations at 11 microns by Danchi et al. We conclude that IRC +10216 has been resolved on the arcminute scale by Fazio et al. Convolution of the model intensity profile at 61 microns with the 60 sec x 90 sec Gaussian beam of Fazio et al. yields an observed source size full width at half maximum (FWHM) that ranges from approximately 67 sec to 75 sec depending on the phase of the star and the assumed distance to the source. Using a simple r(exp -2) dust distribution and the 106 deg phase of the Fazio et al. observations, the LTTE model reaches a peak size of 74.3 sec at a distance of 300 pc. This agrees favorably with the 78 sec x 6 sec size measured by Fazio et al. Finally, a method is outlined for using the LTTE as a distance indicator to IRC +10216 and other stars with extended mass outflows.

  8. Effect of ultraviolet and far infrared radiation on microbial decontamination and quality of cumin seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğdu, S Belgin; Ekiz, H İbrahim

    2011-01-01

    Cumin seeds might be exposed to a high level of natural bacterial contamination, and this could potentially create a public health risk besides leading to problems in exportation. Ultraviolet (UVC) and far infrared (FIR) radiation has low penetration power, and due to that, there might be no detrimental defects to the products during a possible decontamination process. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of UVC and FIR treatment on microbial decontamination and quality of cumin seeds. For this purpose, FIR treatment at different exposure times and temperatures were applied followed by constant UVC treatment with an intensity of 10.5 mW/cm² for 2 h. Total mesophilic aerobic bacteria of the cumin seeds were decreased to the target level of 10⁴ CFU/g after 1.57, 2.8, and 4.8 min FIR treatment at 300, 250, and 200 °C, respectively, following a 2 h UVC treatment. Under the given conditions, a complete elimination for total yeast and molds were obtained while there were no significant changes in volatile oil content and color of the cumin seeds. Consequently, combined UVC and FIR treatment was determined to be a promising method for decontamination of the cumin seeds. This research attempts to apply UVC and far infrared (FIR) radiation for pasteurization of cumin seeds. The data suggested that combined UVC and FIR radiation treatments can become a promising new method for pasteurization of cumin seeds without causing any detrimental defect to the quality parameters. The results of this industry partnered (Kadioglu Baharat, Mersin, Turkey--http://www.kadioglubaharat.com) study were already applied in industrial scale production lines. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Far-infrared observations of young clusters embedded in the R Coronae Austrinae and RHO Ophiuchi dark clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilking, B. A.; Harvey, P. M.; Joy, M.; Hyland, A. R.; Jones, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Multicolor far infrared maps in two nearby dark clouds, R Coronae Austrinae and rho Ophiuchi, were made in order to investigate the individual contribution of low mass stars to the energetics and dynamics of the surrounding gas and dust. Emission from cool dust associated with five low mass stars in Cr A and four in rho Oph was detected; their far infrared luminosities range from 2 far infrared luminosities L. up to 40 far infrared luminosities. When an estimate of the bolometric luminosity was possible, it was found that typically more than 50% of the star's energy was radiated longward of 20 micrometers. meaningful limits to the far infrared luminosities of an additional eleven association members in Cr A and two in rho Oph were also obtained. The dust optical depth surrounding the star R Cr A appears to be asymmetric and may control the dynamics of the surrounding molecular gas. The implications of the results for the cloud energetics and star formation efficiency in these two clouds are discussed.

  10. Beam heat load in superconducting wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, S.

    2013-04-22

    The beam heat load is a fundamental input parameter for the design of superconducting wigglers since it is needed to specify the cooling power. In this presentation I will review the possible beam heat load sources and the measurements of beam heat load performed and planned onto the cold vacuum chambers installed at different synchrotron light sources.

  11. Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Emission from Galactic and Extragalactic Photodissociation Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Michael J.; Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David J.; Luhman, Michael L.

    1999-12-01

    Photodissociation region (PDR) models are computed over a wide range of physical conditions, from those appropriate to giant molecular clouds illuminated by the interstellar radiation field to the conditions experienced by circumstellar disks very close to hot massive stars. These models use the most up-to-date values of atomic and molecular data, the most current chemical rate coefficients, and the newest grain photoelectric heating rates, which include treatments of small grains and large molecules. In addition, we examine the effects of metallicity and cloud extinction on the predicted line intensities. Results are presented for PDR models with densities over the range n=101-107 cm-3 and for incident far-ultraviolet radiation fields over the range G0=10-0.5-106.5 (where G0 is the far-ultravioliet [FUV] flux in units of the local interstellar value), for metallicities Z=1 and 0.1 times the local Galactic value, and for a range of PDR cloud sizes. We present line strength and/or line ratio plots for a variety of useful PDR diagnostics: [C II] 158 μm, [O I] 63 μm and 145 μm, [C I] 370 μm and 609 μm, CO J=1-0, J=2-1, J=3-2, J=6-5, and J=15-14, as well as the strength of the far-infrared continuum. These plots will be useful for the interpretation of Galactic and extragalactic far-infrared and submillimeter spectra observable with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite, the Far Infrared and Submillimeter Telescope, and other orbital and suborbital platforms. As examples, we apply our results to ISO and ground-based observations of M82, NGC 278, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Our comparison of the conditions in M82 and NGC 278 show that both the gas density and FUV flux are enhanced in the starburst nucleus of M82 compared with those in the normal spiral NGC 278. We model the high [C II]/CO ratio observed in the 30 Doradus region of the LMC and find that it can be

  12. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaru, Jordana [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    over ~ 1.5 μm. Layers grown at 550 C did not show significant Sb diffusion. Sn doped In2O3 (ITO) was studied for use in far infrared transparent low temperature contacts for BIB arrays. It was found that ~100 nm of ITO deposited on Ge remains electrically conducting at 4 K and is ~90% transparent in the far infrared. ITO should be suitable for passivating contacts to Ge BIB arrays.

  13. HAWC+/SOFIA observations of Rho Oph A: far-infrared polarization spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fabio; Dowell, Charles D.; Houde, Martin; Looney, Leslie; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; Novak, Giles; Ward-Thompson, Derek; HAWC+ Science Team

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we present preliminary results from the HAWC+ far-infrared polarimeter that operates on the SOFIA airborne observatory. The densest portions of the Rho Ophiuchi molecular complex, known as Rho Oph A, have been mapped using HAWC+ bands C (89 microns) and D (155 microns). Rho Oph A is a well known nearby star forming region. At the target's distance of approximately 130 pc, our observations provide excellent spatial resolution (~5 mpc in band C).The magnetic field map suggests a compressed and distorted field morphology around Oph S1, a massive B3 star that is the main heat source of Rho Oph A. We compute the ratio p(D)/p(C), where p(C) and p(D) are the polarization degree maps at bands C and D, respectively. This ratio estimates the slope of the polarization spectrum in the far-infrared. Although the slope is predicted to be positive by dust grain models, previous observations of other molecular clouds have revealed that negative slopes are common. In Rho Oph A, we find that there is a smooth gradient of p(D)/p(C) across the mapped field. The change in p(D)/p(C) is well correlated with the integrated NH3 (1,1) emission. A positive slope dominates the lower density and well illuminated portions of the cloud, whereas a transition to a negative slope is observed at the denser and less evenly illuminated cloud core.We interpret the positive to negative slope transition as being consistent with the radiative torques (RATs) grain alignment theory. For the sight lines of higher column density, polarized emission from the warmer outer cloud layers is added to emission from the colder inner well-shielded layers lying along the same line-of-sight. Given that the outer layers receive more radiation from Oph S1, their grain alignment efficiency is expected to be higher according to RATs. The combination of warmer, well aligned grains with cooler, poorly aligned grains is what causes the negative slope. This effect is not present in the sight lines of lower column

  14. Titan's Far-Infrared 220 cm-1 Cloud Seen for the First Time in the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald; Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, Robert; Nixon, Conor; Flasar, Michael; Teanby, Nick; de Kok, Remco; Coustenis, Athena; Vinatier, Sandrine

    2013-04-01

    In 2012 an emission feature at 220 cm-1 in Titan's far-infrared spectrum was seen for the first time in the south [1]. Attributed to a stratosphere ice cloud formed at the winter pole, the 220 cm-1 emission had previously been seen only at high northern latitudes where it had been decreasing since the arrival of Cassini in 2004 [2]. Our far-infrared observations were performed with the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini [3]. Although it had been expected that the 220 cm-1 emission would eventually appear in the south, the emission appeared rather suddenly, increasing by a factor of at least four between February (when it was not detected) and July 2012. At the time of our observations, one Titan month after equinox, the 220 cm-1feature was present in both the north and south and showed a trend of continued slow decrease in the north and steep increase in the south. As has been the case in the north, the emission in the south was confined to high latitudes associated with winter polar shadowing. Our spectroscopic detection of the southern 220 cm-1 ice cloud coincided with the rapid formation in 2012 of a haze hood and vortex at the south pole as seen in Cassini images [4]. The 220 cm-1 feature was first observed by the Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) on Voyager 1 [5, 6] and has been extensively studied in the north by CIRS [7-10]. Until now the 220 cm-1 emission, like the polar hood, has been associated solely with the north, owing to the fact that Voyager and Cassini have viewed Titan only during winter-spring. In 2012 we witnessed the start of a seasonal shift of this pattern to the south. The 220 cm-1 emission arises from altitudes of 80-150 km and peaks sharply near 140 km. The material responsible for the spectral feature is not known, but indirect evidence hints at a condensate arising from complex nitriles, which also tend to be present only at high winter latitudes. References: [1] Jennings, D. E., et al., ApJ, 761, L15, 2012. [2

  15. Micro-Spec: An Ultracompact, High-sensitivity Spectrometer for Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Huang, Wei-Chung; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    High-performance, integrated spectrometers operating in the far-infrared and submillimeter ranges promise to be powerful tools for the exploration of the epochs of reionization and initial galaxy formation. These devices, using high-efficiency superconducting transmission lines, can achieve the performance of a meter-scale grating spectrometer in an instrument implemented on a 4 inch silicon wafer. Such a device, when combined with a cryogenic telescope in space, provides an enabling capability for studies of the early universe. Here, the optical design process for Micro-Spec (micron-Spec) is presented, with particular attention given to its two-dimensional diffractive region, where the light of different wavelengths is focused on the different detectors. The method is based on the stigmatization and minimization of the light path function in this bounded region, which results in an optimized geometrical configuration. A point design with an efficiency of (is) approximately 90% has been developed for initial demonstration and can serve as the basis for future instruments. Design variations on this implementation are also discussed, which can lead to lower efficiencies due to diffractive losses in the multimode region.

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Far-Infrared Irradiation Generated by Ceramic Material on Murine Melanoma Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Kai Leung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of specific wavelengths, so-called “far-infrared radiation” produced from ceramic material (cFIR, on whole organisms are not yet well understood. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of cFIR on murine melanoma cells (B16-F10 at body temperature. cFIR irradiation treatment for 48 h resulted in an 11.8% decrease in the proliferation of melanoma cells relative to the control. Meanwhile, incubation of cells with cFIR for 48 h significantly resulted in 56.9% and 15.7% decreases in the intracellular heat shock protein (HSP70 and intracellular nitric oxide (iNO contents, respectively. Furthermore, cFIR treatment induced 6.4% and 12.3% increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species stained by 5-(and 6-carboxyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and dihydrorhodamine 123, respectively. Since malignant melanomas are known to have high HSP70 expression and iNO activity, the suppressive effects of cFIR on HSP70 and NO may warrant future interest in antitumor applications.

  17. Fundamental Limits on the Imaging and Polarisation Properties of Far-Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher N.; Withington, Stafford; Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Far-infrared bolometric detectors are used extensively in ground-based and space-borne astronomy, and thus it is important to understand their optical behaviour precisely. We have studied the intensity and polarisation response of free-space bolometers, and shown that when the size of the absorber is reduced below a wavelength, the response changes from being that of a classical optical detector to that of a few-mode antenna. We have calculated the modal content of the reception patterns, and found that for any volumetric detector having a side length of less than a wavelength, three magnetic and three electric dipoles characterize the behaviour. The size of the absorber merely determines the relative strengths of the contributions. The same formalism can be applied to thin-film absorbers, where the induced current is forced to flow in a plane. In this case, one magnetic and two electric dipoles characterize the behaviour. The ability to model easily the intensity, polarisation, and straylight characteristics of electrically-small detectors will be of great value when designing high-performance polarimetric imaging arrays.

  18. Water Vapor in Titan's Stratosphere from Cassini CIRS Far-Infrared Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Anderson, C. M.; Gorius, N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bezard, B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the measurement of water vapor in Titan's stratosphere using the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). CIRS senses water emissions in the far infrared spectral region near 50 micron, which we have modeled using two independent radiative transfer codes. From the analysis of nadir spectra we have derived a mixing ratio of 0.14 +/- 0.05 ppb at an altitude of 97 km, which corresponds to an integrated (from 0 to 600 km) surface normalized column abundance of 3.7 +/- 1.3 1014 molecules/cm2. In the latitude range 80S to 30N we see no evidence for latitudinal variations in these abundances within the error bars. Using limb observations, we obtained mixing ratios of 0.13 +/- 0.04 ppb at an altitude of 115 km and 0.45 +/- 0.15 ppb at an altitude of 230 km, confirming that the water abundance has a positive vertical gradient as predicted by photochemical models. We have also fitted our data using scaling factors of 0.1-0.6 to these photochemical model profiles, indicating that the models over-predict the water abundance in Titan's lower stratosphere.

  19. EVOLUTION OF THE FAR-INFRARED CLOUD AT TITAN’S SOUTH POLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Cottini, V.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Kunde, V. G.; Carlson, R. C.; Guandique, E.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Tingley, J. S.; Albright, S. A.; Segura, M. E. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kok, R. de [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.; Bampasidis, G. [Laboratoire d’Etudes Spatiales et d’Instrumentation en Astrophysique (LESIA), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Calcutt, S., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-10

    A condensate cloud on Titan identified by its 220 cm{sup −1} far-infrared signature continues to undergo seasonal changes at both the north and south poles. In the north, the cloud, which extends from 55 N to the pole, has been gradually decreasing in emission intensity since the beginning of the Cassini mission with a half-life of 3.8 years. The cloud in the south did not appear until 2012 but its intensity has increased rapidly, doubling every year. The shape of the cloud at the south pole is very different from that in the north. Mapping in 2013 December showed that the condensate emission was confined to a ring with a maximum at 80 S. The ring was centered 4° from Titan's pole. The pattern of emission from stratospheric trace gases like nitriles and complex hydrocarbons (mapped in 2014 January) was also offset by 4°, but had a central peak at the pole and a secondary maximum in a ring at about 70 S with a minimum at 80 S. The shape of the gas emission distribution can be explained by abundances that are high at the atmospheric pole and diminish toward the equator, combined with correspondingly increasing temperatures. We discuss possible causes for the condensate ring. The present rapid build up of the condensate cloud at the south pole is likely to transition to a gradual decline from 2015 to 2016.

  20. Evolution of the Far-Infrared Cloud at Titan's South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Cottini, V.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Kunde, V. G.; Carlson, R. C.; Guandique, E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    A condensate cloud on Titan identified by its 220 cm (sup -1) far-infrared signature continues to undergo seasonal changes at both the north and south poles. In the north the cloud, which extends from 55 North to the pole, has been gradually decreasing in emission intensity since the beginning of the Cassini mission with a half-life of 3.8 years. The cloud in the south did not appear until 2012 but its intensity has increased rapidly, doubling every year. The shape of the cloud at the South Pole is very different from that in the north. Mapping in December 2013 showed that the condensate emission was confined to a ring with a maximum at 80 South. The ring was centered 4 degrees from Titan's pole. The pattern of emission from stratospheric trace gases like nitriles and complex hydrocarbons (mapped in January 2014) was also offset by 4 degrees, but had a central peak at the pole and a secondary maximum in a ring at about 70 South with a minimum at 80 South. The shape of the gas emissions distribution can be explained by abundances that are high at the atmospheric pole and diminish toward the equator, combined with correspondingly increasing temperatures. We discuss possible causes for the condensate ring. The present rapid build up of the condensate cloud at the South Pole is likely to transition to a gradual decline during 2015-16.

  1. Far-infrared suppresses skin photoaging in ultraviolet B-exposed fibroblasts and hairless mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wen Chiu

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV induces skin photoaging, which is characterized by thickening, wrinkling, pigmentation, and dryness. Collagen, which is one of the main building blocks of human skin, is regulated by collagen synthesis and collagen breakdown. Autophagy was found to block the epidermal hyperproliferative response to UVB and may play a crucial role in preventing skin photoaging. In the present study, we investigated whether far-infrared (FIR therapy can inhibit skin photoaging via UVB irradiation in NIH 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and SKH-1 hairless mice. We found that FIR treatment significantly increased procollagen type I through the induction of the TGF-β/Smad axis. Furthermore, UVB significantly enhanced the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 and MMP-9. FIR inhibited UVB-induced MMP-1 and MMP-9. Treatment with FIR reversed UVB-decreased type I collagen. In addition, FIR induced autophagy by inhibiting the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. In UVB-induced skin photoaging in a hairless mouse model, FIR treatment resulted in decreased skin thickness in UVB irradiated mice and inhibited the degradation of collagen fibers. Moreover, FIR can increase procollagen type I via the inhibition of MMP-9 and induction of TGF-β in skin tissues. Therefore, our study provides evidence for the beneficial effects of FIR exposure in a model of skin photoaging.

  2. Far-infrared emission in luminous quasars accompanied by nuclear outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Natasha; Jarvis, M. J.; Banerji, M.; Hewett, P. C.; Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Maddox, S. J.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.

    2017-09-01

    Combining large-area optical quasar surveys with the new far-infrared (FIR) Herschel-ATLAS Data Release 1, we search for an observational signature associated with the minority of quasars possessing bright FIR luminosities. We find that FIR-bright quasars show broad C IV emission-line blueshifts in excess of that expected from the optical luminosity alone, indicating particularly powerful nuclear outflows. The quasars show no signs of having redder optical colours than the general ensemble of optically selected quasars, ruling out differences in line-of-sight dust within the host galaxies. We postulate that these objects may be caught in a special evolutionary phase, with unobscured, high black hole accretion rates and correspondingly strong nuclear outflows. The high FIR emission found in these objects is then either a result of star formation related to the outflow, or is due to dust within the host galaxy illuminated by the quasar. We are thus directly witnessing coincident small-scale nuclear processes and galaxy-wide activity, commonly invoked in galaxy simulations that rely on feedback from quasars to influence galaxy evolution.

  3. Pedestrian detection in far-infrared daytime images using a hierarchical codebook of SURF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besbes, Bassem; Rogozan, Alexandrina; Rus, Adela-Maria; Bensrhair, Abdelaziz; Broggi, Alberto

    2015-04-13

    One of the main challenges in intelligent vehicles concerns pedestrian detection for driving assistance. Recent experiments have showed that state-of-the-art descriptors provide better performances on the far-infrared (FIR) spectrum than on the visible one, even in daytime conditions, for pedestrian classification. In this paper, we propose a pedestrian detector with on-board FIR camera. Our main contribution is the exploitation of the specific characteristics of FIR images to design a fast, scale-invariant and robust pedestrian detector. Our system consists of three modules, each based on speeded-up robust feature (SURF) matching. The first module allows generating regions-of-interest (ROI), since in FIR images of the pedestrian shapes may vary in large scales, but heads appear usually as light regions. ROI are detected with a high recall rate with the hierarchical codebook of SURF features located in head regions. The second module consists of pedestrian full-body classification by using SVM. This module allows one to enhance the precision with low computational cost. In the third module, we combine the mean shift algorithm with inter-frame scale-invariant SURF feature tracking to enhance the robustness of our system. The experimental evaluation shows that our system outperforms, in the FIR domain, the state-of-the-art Haar-like Adaboost-cascade, histogram of oriented gradients (HOG)/linear SVM (linSVM) and MultiFtrpedestrian detectors, trained on the FIR images.

  4. Atrazine Molecular Imprinted Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Far-Infrared and Ultraviolet Induced Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Bai, Lian-Yang; Liu, Kun-Feng; Liu, Run-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) were comparatively synthesized using identical polymer formulation by far-infrared (FIR) radiation and ultraviolet (UV)-induced polymerization, respectively. Equilibrium binding experiments were carried out with the prepared MIPs; the results showed that MIPuv possessed specific binding to atrazine compared with their MIPFIR radiation counterparts. Scatchard plot’s of both MIPs indicated that the affinities of the binding sites in MIPs are heterogeneous and can be approximated by two dissociation-constants corresponding to the high-and low-affinity binding sites. Moreover, several common pesticides including atrazine, cyromazine, metamitron, simazine, ametryn, terbutryn were tested to determine their specificity, similar imprinting factor (IF) and different selectivity index (SI) for both MIPs. Physical characterization of the polymers revealed that the different polymerization methods led to slight differences in polymer structures and performance by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR), and mercury analyzer (MA). Finally, both MIPs were used as selective sorbents for solid phase extraction (SPE) of atrazine from lake water, followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Compared with commercial C18 SPE sorbent (86.4%–94.8%), higher recoveries of atrazine in spiked lake water were obtained in the range of 90.1%–97.1% and 94.4%–101.9%, for both MIPs, respectively. PMID:24398982

  5. Technology Development of Miniaturized Far-Infrared Sources for Biomolecular Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a purely solid-state based, thus miniaturized, far-infrared (FIR) (also known as terahertz (THz)) wave source using III-V semiconductor nanostructures for biomolecular detection and sensing. Many biomolecules, such as DNA and proteins, have distinct spectroscopic features in the FIR wavelength range as a result of vibration-rotation-tunneling motions and various inter- and intra-molecule collective motions. Spectroscopic characterization of such molecules requires narrow linewidth, sufficiently high power, tunable (in wavelength), and coherent FIR sources. Unfortunately, the FIR frequency is one of the least technologically developed ranges in the electromagnetic spectrum. Currently available FIR sources based on non-solid state technology are bulky, inefficient, and very often incoherent. In this project we investigated antimonide based compound semiconductor (ABCS) nanostructures as the active medium to generate FIR radiation. The final goal of this project was to demonstrate a semiconductor THz source integrated with a pumping diode laser module to achieve a compact system for biomolecular applications.

  6. H-ATLAS: THE COSMIC ABUNDANCE OF DUST FROM THE FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thacker, Cameron; Cooray, Asantha; Smidt, Joseph; De Bernardis, Francesco; Mitchell-Wynne, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Amblard, A. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Auld, R.; Eales, S.; Pascale, E. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Baes, M.; Michalowski, M. J. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, KrijgslAAn 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Clements, D. L.; Dariush, A.; Hopwood, R. [Physics Department, Imperial College London, South Kensington campus, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); De Zotti, G. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Hoyos, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Ibar, E. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, The Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Jarvis, M. [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-05-01

    We present a measurement of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic far-infrared background (CFIRB) anisotropies in one of the extragalactic fields of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m bands. Consistent with recent measurements of the CFIRB power spectrum in Herschel-SPIRE maps, we confirm the existence of a clear one-halo term of galaxy clustering on arcminute angular scales with large-scale two-halo term of clustering at 30 arcmin to angular scales of a few degrees. The power spectrum at the largest angular scales, especially at 250 {mu}m, is contaminated by the Galactic cirrus. The angular power spectrum is modeled using a conditional luminosity function approach to describe the spatial distribution of unresolved galaxies that make up the bulk of the CFIRB. Integrating over the dusty galaxy population responsible for the background anisotropies, we find that the cosmic abundance of dust, relative to the critical density, to be between {Omega}{sub dust} = 10{sup -6} and 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} in the redshift range z {approx} 0-3. This dust abundance is consistent with estimates of the dust content in the universe using quasar reddening and magnification measurements in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  7. The Far Infrared Spectroscopic Explorer (FIRSPEX): probing the lifecycle of the ISM in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulou, D.; Caldwell, M.; Ellison, B.; Pearson, C.; Caux, E.; Cooray, A.; Gallego, J. D.; Gerin, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Goldsmith, P.; Kramer, C.; Lis, D. C.; Molinari, S.; Ossenkopf-Okada, V.; Savini, G.; Tan, B. K.; Tielens, X.; Viti, S.; Wiedner, M.; Yassin, G.

    2016-07-01

    The Far Infrared Spectroscopic Explorer (FIRSPEX) is a novel European-led astronomy mission concept developed to enable large area ultra high spectroscopic resolution surveys in the THz regime. FIRSPEX opens up a relatively unexplored spectral and spatial parameter space that will produce an enormously significant scientific legacy by focusing on the properties of the multi-phase ISM, the assembly of molecular clouds in our Galaxy and the onset of star formation; topics which are fundamental to our understanding of galaxy evolution. The mission uses a heterodyne instrument and a ~1.2 m primary antenna to scan large areas of the sky in a number of discreet spectroscopic channels from L2. The FIRSPEX bands centered at [CI] 809 GHz, [NII]1460 GHz, [CII]1900 GHz and [OI]4700 GHz have been carefully selected to target key atomic and ionic fine structure transitions difficult or impossible to access from the ground but fundamental to the study of the multi-phase ISM in the Universe. The need for state-of-the-art sensitivity dictates the use of superconducting mixers configured either as tunnel junctions or hot electron bolometers. This technology requires cooling to low temperatures, approaching 4K, in order to operate. The receivers will operate in double sideband configuration providing a total of 7 pixels on the sky. FIRSPEX will operate from L2 in both survey and pointed mode enabling velocity resolved spectroscopy of large areas of sky as well as targeted observations.

  8. Highly correlated ab initio study of the far infrared spectra of methyl acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senent, M L; Domínguez-Gómez, R; Carvajal, M; Kleiner, I

    2013-01-28

    Highly correlated ab initio calculations (CCSD(T)) are used to compute gas phase spectroscopic parameters of three isotopologues of the methyl acetate (CH(3)COOCH(3), CD(3)COOCH(3), and CH(3)COOCD(3)), searching to help experimental assignments and astrophysical detections. The molecule shows two conformers cis and trans separated by a barrier of 4457 cm(-1). The potential energy surface presents 18 minima that intertransform through three internal rotation motions. To analyze the far infrared spectrum at low temperatures, a three-dimensional Hamiltonian is solved variationally. The two methyl torsion barriers are calculated to be 99.2 cm(-1) (C-CH(3)) and 413.1 cm(-1) (O-CH(3)), for the cis-conformer. The three fundamental torsional band centers of CH(3)COOCH(3) are predicted to lie at 63.7 cm(-1) (C-CH(3)), 136.1 cm(-1) (O-CH(3)), and 175.8 cm(-1) (C-O torsion) providing torsional state separations. For the 27 vibrational modes, anharmonic fundamentals and rovibrational parameters are provided. Computed parameters are compared with those fitted using experimental data.

  9. A study of dust color temperature and dust mass distributions of four far infrared loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, A. K.; Aryal, B.; Weinberger, R.

    2017-10-01

    We present dust color temperature, dust mass and inclination angle of four far infrared loops namely G007+18, G143+07, G214-01 and G323-02 which are found to be located within 1° from pulsars PSR J1720-1633, PSR J0406+6138, PSR J0652-0142 and PSR J1535-5848, respectively. These low latitude loops (lformed because high pressure events occurred in the past (e.g., supernova explosion). The dust color temperature of the core region is found to lie in the range 19.4±1.2-25.3±1.7K, whereas the range increased to 33±2-47±3K for the outer region. The dust color and dust mass distribution maps show that the low temperature region has greater density as expected. The core region of one loop is found to be edge-on (i>70°) whereas the larger structure is nearly face-on (i<70°).

  10. Far-infrared multi-resonant graphene-based metamaterial absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaz, Reza; Karami, Hamidreza

    2017-08-01

    Recent developments in metamaterial designs have opened up the possibility of absorption in the terahertz frequency range. In this paper, a multi-resonant absorber is presented in which the resonance frequencies are theoretically organized by doping graphene ribbons with a ring-shaped gold on each ribbon per unit cell. This action allows the free electrons to flow on a piece of graphene surface to produce several absorption peaks in the far-infrared spectrum. Besides, in order to adjust the absorber to respond at different and wide frequency spectra, the absorption peaks can be managed by manipulating the gate voltage and dielectric thickness. This periodic structure also consists of a dielectric substrate of silicon dioxide and a metal slab at its back to ensure the zero transmission. Moreover, the equivalent circuit and transmission line model are derived based on the reflected fields and vector-fitting method to facilitate analysis of the proposed design and evaluation of the full-wave simulation results. At the end, the sensitivity of the absorption against oblique incidence is studied for both TE and TM polarizations.

  11. Atrazine Molecular Imprinted Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Far-Infrared and Ultraviolet Induced Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs were comparatively synthesized using identical polymer formulation by far-infrared (FIR radiation and ultraviolet (UV-induced polymerization, respectively. Equilibrium binding experiments were carried out with the prepared MIPs; the results showed that MIPuv possessed specific binding to atrazine compared with their MIPFIR radiation counterparts. Scatchard plot’s of both MIPs indicated that the affinities of the binding sites in MIPs are heterogeneous and can be approximated by two dissociation-constants corresponding to the high- and low-affinity binding sites. Moreover, several common pesticides including atrazine, cyromazine, metamitron, simazine, ametryn, terbutryn were tested to determine their specificity, similar imprinting factor (IF and different selectivity index (SI for both MIPs. Physical characterization of the polymers revealed that the different polymerization methods led to slight differences in polymer structures and performance by scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR, and mercury analyzer (MA. Finally, both MIPs were used as selective sorbents for solid phase extraction (SPE of atrazine from lake water, followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis. Compared with commercial C18 SPE sorbent (86.4%–94.8%, higher recoveries of atrazine in spiked lake water were obtained in the range of 90.1%–97.1% and 94.4%–101.9%, for both MIPs, respectively.

  12. Radiation Effects on Stressed Ge:Ga Array Detector of Far-Infrared Surveyor on AKARI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toyoaki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Matsuura, Shuji; Shirahata, Mai; Nakagawa, Takao; Doi, Yasuo; Onaka, Takashi; Hibi, Yasunori; Shibai Mitsunobu Kawada, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    AKARI, the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, was launched on 2006 February 21 (UT) and put into a sun-synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 700 km. Cosmic radiations, particularly protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), were expected to affect the performance of the stressed Ge:Ga array far-infrared detector on board AKARI. One of the influences is the radioactivation of the detector housing; γ -rays from the radioactivated detector housing interact with Ge:Ga elements, producing spikes (so-called glitches) in the electric outputs of the detector. Prior to the launch, we performed a 100 MeV proton-beam irradiation test for an engineering model of the stressed Ge:Ga array, which simulated the SAA passage. In the test, we observed glitches in the detector output that were due to the radioactivation of the detector housing. By investigating the test data, we have computed the glitch rate of the flight array detector expected in the AKARI orbit, including its change with time from the launch to the end of the AKARI mission. After the launch of AKARI, we have compared the performance observed in the orbit to that predicted by the proton-beam test. The glitch rate really changed with time after the launch; we have found that the in-orbit behavior is consistent with the prediction.

  13. MODELING THE HD 32297 DEBRIS DISK WITH FAR-INFRARED HERSCHEL DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, J. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lebreton, J.; Augereau, J.-C. [UJF - Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Roberge, A. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Krivov, A. V., E-mail: jessd@astro.umd.edu [Astrophysikalishes Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Schillergaesschen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany)

    2013-07-20

    HD 32297 is a young A-star ({approx}30 Myr) 112 pc away with a bright edge-on debris disk that has been resolved in scattered light. We observed the HD 32297 debris disk in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, populating the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 63 to 500 {mu}m. We aimed to determine the composition of dust grains in the HD 32297 disk through SED modeling, using geometrical constraints from the resolved imaging to break the degeneracies inherent in SED modeling. We found the best fitting SED model has two components: an outer ring centered around 110 AU, seen in the scattered light images, and an inner disk near the habitable zone of the star. The outer disk appears to be composed of grains >2 {mu}m consisting of silicates, carbonaceous material, and water ice with an abundance ratio of 1:2:3 respectively and 90% porosity. These grains appear consistent with cometary grains, implying the underlying planetesimal population is dominated by comet-like bodies. We also discuss the 3.7{sigma} detection of [C II] emission at 158 {mu}m with the Herschel PACS instrument, making HD 32297 one of only a handful of debris disks with circumstellar gas detected.

  14. Thin-layer catalytic far-infrared radiation drying and flavour of tomato slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ekow Abano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A far-infrared radiation (FIR catalytic laboratory dryer was designed by us and used to dry tomato. The kinetics of drying of tomato slices with FIR energy was dependent on both the distance from the heat source and the sample thickness. Numerical evaluation of the simplified Fick’s law for Fourier number showed that the effective moisture diffusivity increased from 0.193×10–9 to 1.893×10–9 m2/s, from 0.059×10–9 to 2.885×10–9 m2/s, and, from 0.170×10–9 to 4.531×10–9 m2/s for the 7, 9, and 11 mm thick slices as moisture content decreased. Application of FIR enhanced the flavour of the dried tomatoes by 36.6% when compared with the raw ones. The results demonstrate that in addition to shorter drying times, the flavour of the products can be enhanced with FIR. Therefore, FIR drying should be considered as an efficient drying method for tomato with respect to minimization of processing time, enhancement in flavour, and improvements in the quality and functional property of dried tomatoes.

  15. 6 MeV storage ring dedicated to hard X-ray imaging and far-infrared ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ray imaging as well as far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. In spite of low electron energy, the 6 MeV MIRRORCLE generates hard X-rays ranging from 10 keV up to its electron energy and milliwatt order sub- millimetre range FIR rays.

  16. Inhomogeneous broadening of phosphorus donor lines in the far-infrared spectra of single-crystalline SiGe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, S. A.; Matmon, G.; Pavlov, S. G.; Litvinenko, K. L.; Redlich, B.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Hubers, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    The origins of line broadening in the far-infrared spectrum of phosphorus donors in SiGe are investigated. Using a combination of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and time-resolved pump-probe measurements, we show that the line shapes are dominated by inhomogenous broadening.

  17. Intense Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser-Pulses with a Length of 6 Optical Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; R F X A M Mols,; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    Second-order optical autocorrelation measurements are reported for a far-infrared free-electron laser. Second-harmonic generation in an 840-mu m-long CdTe crystal is used to provide the nonlinear autocorrelation signal. At wavelengths of 10.4 and 24.5 mu m, FWHM pulse durations of 220 and 500 fs,

  18. Effect of the Dosage of Tourmaline on Far Infrared Emission Properties of Tourmaline/Glass Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongchen; Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Zeng, Zhaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Tourmaline/glass composite materials were prepared by sintering at 600 °C using micron-size tourmaline mineral and glass powders as raw materials. The glass has lower melting point than the transition temperature of tourmaline. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the far infrared emissivity of composite was significantly higher than that of either tourmaline or glass powders. A highest far infrared emissivity of 0.925 was obtained when the dosage of tourmaline was 10 wt%. The effects of the amount of tourmaline on the far infrared emission properties of composite was also systematically studied by field emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The tourmaline phase was observed in the composite, showing a particle size of about 70 nm. This meant that the tourmaline particles showed nanocrystallization. They distributed homogenous in the glass matrix when the dosage of tourmaline was not more than 20 wt%. Two reasons were attributed to the improved far infrared emission properties of composite: the particle size of tourmaline-doped was nanocrystallized and the oxidation of Fe2+ (0.076 nm in radius) to Fe3+ (0.064 nm in radius) took place inside the tourmaline-doped. This resulted in the shrinkage of unit cell of the tourmaline in the composite.

  19. Planck intermediate results: XVII. Emission of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium from the far-infrared to microwave frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Delabrouille, J.

    2014-01-01

    The dust-Hi correlation is used to characterize the emission properties of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) from far infrared wavelengths to microwave frequencies. The field of this investigation encompasses the part of the southern sky best suited to study the cosmic infrared...

  20. Control and data acquisition systems for high field superconducting wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Batrakov, A; Karpov, G; Kozak, V; Kuzin, M; Kuper, E; Mamkin, V; Mezentsev, N A; Repkov, V V; Selivanov, A; Shkaruba, V A

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the control and DAQ system of superconducting wigglers with magnetic field range up to 10.3 T. The first version of the system controls a 7 T superconducting wiggler prepared for installation at Bessy-II (Germany). The second one controls a 10 T wiggler which is under testing now at the SPring-8 site (Japan). Both systems are based on VME apparatus. The set of specialized VME modules is elaborated to arrange wiggler power supply control, full time wiggler monitoring, and magnetic field high accuracy measurement and field stabilization. The software for the control of the wigglers is written in C language for VxWorks operation system for a Motorola-162 VME controller. The task initialization, stops and acquisition of the data can be done from the nearest personal computer (FTP host for VME), or from the remote system as well.

  1. Far infrared stimulated emission from the ns and nf Rydberg states of NO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Hiroki; Araki, Mitsunori; Umeki, Hiroya; Tsukiyama, Koichi [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2013-06-28

    We report directional far-infrared emission from the {upsilon}= 0 vibrational levels of the 9s{sigma}, 10s{sigma}, 11s{sigma}, 9f, and 10f Rydberg states of NO in the gas phase. The emission around 28 and 19 {mu}m from the 9f state was identified as the downward 9f{yields} 8g and subsequent 8g{yields} 7f cascade transitions, respectively. The emission around 38 and 40 {mu}m from the 10f state was identified as the 10f{yields} 9g and 10f{yields} 9d{sigma}{pi} transition, respectively. Following the excitation of the 9s{sigma}, 10s{sigma}, and 11s{sigma} states, the emission around 40, 60, and 83 {mu}m was assigned as the 9s{sigma}{yields} 8p{sigma}, 10s{sigma}{yields} 9p{sigma}, and 11s{sigma}{yields} 10p{sigma} transitions, respectively. In addition to these emission systems originated from the laser-prepared levels, we found the emission bands from the 8f, 9f, and 10f states which are located energetically above the 9s{sigma}, 10s{sigma}, and 11s{sigma} states, respectively. This observation suggests that the upward 8f Leftwards-Arrow 9s{sigma}, 9f Leftwards-Arrow 10s{sigma}, and 10f Leftwards-Arrow 11s{sigma} optical excitation occurs. Since the energy differences between nf and (n+ 1)s{sigma} states correspond to the wavelength longer than 100 {mu}m, the absorption of blackbody radiation is supposed to be essential for these upward transitions.

  2. Micro-Spec: an Integrated, Direct-Detection Spectrometer for Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The far-infrared and submillimeter portions of the electromagnetic spectrum provide a unique view of the astrophysical processes present in the early universe. Our ability to fully explore this rich spectral region has been limited, however, by the size and cost of the cryogenic spectrometers required to carry out such measurements. Micro-Spec (u-Spec) is a high-sensitivity, direct-detection spectrometer concept working in the 450-1000 micromillimeter wavelength range which will enable a wide range of flight missions that would otherwise be challenging due to the large size of current instruments with the required spectral resolution and sensitivity. The spectrometer design utilizes two internal antenna arrays, one for transmitting and one for receiving, superconducting microstrip transmission lines for power division and phase delay, and an array of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) to achieve these goals. The instrument will be integrated on a approximately 10 square cm silicon chip and can therefore become an important capability under the low background conditions accessible via space and high-altitude borne platforms. In this paper, an optical design methodology for Micro-Spec is presented, with particular attention given to its twodimensional diffractive region, where the light of different wavelengths is focused on the different detectors. The method is based on the maximization of the instrument resolving power and minimization of the RMS phase error on the instrument focal plane. This two-step optimization can generate geometrical configurations given specific requirements on spectrometer size, operating spectral range and performance. A point design with resolving power of 257, an RMS phase error less than 0.1 radians and four stigmatic points was developed for initial demonstration and will be the basis of future instruments with resolving power up to about 1200.

  3. Absorption of crystalline water ice in the far infrared at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, C.; Mutschke, H.; Krivov, A. V.; Löhne, T.; Mohr, P.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of ice in the far infrared are important for models of protoplanetary and debris disks. In this report, we derive a new set of data for the absorption (represented by the imaginary part of the refractive index κ) of crystalline water ice in this spectral range. The study includes a detailed inspection of the temperature dependence, which has not been conducted in such detail before. We measured the transmission of three ice layers with different thicknesses at temperatures ϑ = 10...250 K and present data at wavelengths λ = 80...625 μm. We found a change in the spectral dependence of κ at a wavelength of 175 ± 6 μm. At shorter wavelengths, κ exhibits a constant flat slope and no significant temperature dependence. Long-ward of that wavelength, the slope gets steeper and has a clear, approximately linear temperature dependence. This change in behaviour is probably caused by a characteristic absorption band of water ice. The measured data were fitted by a power-law model that analytically describes the absorption behaviour at an arbitrary temperature. This model can readily be applied to any object of interest, for instance a protoplanetary or debris disk. To illustrate how the model works, we simulated the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the resolved, large debris disk around the nearby solar-type star HD 207129. Replacing our ice model by another, commonly used data set for water ice results in a different SED slope at longer wavelengths. This leads to changes in the characteristic model parameters of the disk, such as the inferred particle size distribution, and affects the interpretation of the underlying collisional physics of the disk.

  4. Spatial distribution of far-infrared emission in spiral galaxies. I. Relation with radio continuum emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayya, Y. D.; Rengarajan, T. N.

    1997-09-01

    We use high resolution IRAS and 20 cm radio continuum (RC) images of a sample of 22 spiral galaxies to study the correlation between the far infra-red (FIR) and RC emissions within the galactic disks. A combination of exponential and gaussian profiles rather than a single exponential profile is found to be a better representation of the observed intensity profiles in the two bands. The gaussian component, which we show is not due to the effects of limited beam-resolution, contains more than 60% of the total flux in majority of the galaxies. The dominance of the gaussian component suggests that the nuclear star forming regions and the bulge stars are more important contributors to the emission in the two bands, rather than the outer exponential stellar disks. The RC profile is flatter compared to the FIR profile, resulting in a decrease of their ratio, Q-Sixty, away from the center. However, the Q-sixty increases in the extreme outer parts, where the dispersion in the FIR and RC correlation is also higher than in the central regions. The global Q-sixty and its dispersion match those in the inner parts of the galaxies. These results imply that the observed tight correlation in the global quantities reflects processes in the inner regions only where OB stars and the associated Type II supernovae control the FIR and RC emission. In the outer parts heating of very small dust grains by the old disk stars provides a secondary component in the FIR emission, without associated RC emission. The edge-on galaxy NGC3079 shows extended FIR and RC emissions along its minor axis, probably associated with the nuclear starburst activity. keywords - star formation - far infrared emission -- radio continuum emission

  5. Electrochemically induced far-infrared difference spectroscopy on metalloproteins using advanced synchrotron technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Nicolas; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bremond, Nicolas; Berthomieu, Dorothée; Roy, Pascale; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2013-03-05

    New information on a protein's structure, intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds, or metal-ligand bond properties can be unraveled in the far-infrared (far-IR)-terahertz-domain (600-3 cm(-1) or 18-0.1 THz). In this study, we compare the performances of thermal sources with synchrotron far-IR to record reaction-induced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) difference signals with proteins in solution. Using the model protein Cu-azurin placed in a short path length electrochemical cell adapted for transmission spectroscopy in vacuum-purged optics, we show that minute spectral shifts induced by metal isotope labeling or temperature changes are detected using the far-IR beamline AILES of the synchrotron SOLEIL. On one hand, these data allow us to identify modes involving Cu-ligand vibrations and pave the way for the analysis of metal sites or metal redox states of proteins not amenable to resonance Raman spectroscopy. On another hand, small band shifts or changes in band intensity upon temperature modifications show that far-IR difference spectroscopy allows one to extract from a complex background hydrogen-bonding signatures directly relevant to the protein function. For Cu-azurin, a temperature-sensitive IR mode involving Cu(II)-His vibrations points to the role of a hydrogen bond between a Cu histidine ligand and the water solvent in tuning the Cu(II)-histidine bond properties. Furthermore, these experimental data support the possible role of a His117-water interaction in electron-transfer activity of Cu-azurin proposed by theoretical studies.

  6. Status of far infrared tangential interferometry/polarimetry system on NSTX (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Deng, B.; Domier, C. W.; Johnson, M.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of the core BT(r,t) value is essential in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), since effects of paramagnetism and diamagnetism in the Spherical Torus are expected to be considerably greater than that in higher aspect ratio tokamaks. Therefore, plasma parameters dependent upon BT such as the q-profile and local q value cannot be evaluated without independent measurement of BT(r,t). The multichord tangential far infrared interferometer/polarimeter (FIReTIP) system currently under development for NSTX will provide temporally and radially resolved toroidal field profile [BT(r,t)] and two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile [ne(r,t)] data. The seven channel system is based on three FIR lasers including the Stark tuned FIR laser operating at 119 μm which is an optimum wavelength for NSTX plasma parameters. The optical system is configured as a Michelson system using retroreflectors. The final system design is completed and initial two channels will be installed this fiscal year to support NSTX operation. The channel spacing of FIReTIP system is optimized via data analysis with various expected electron density and magnetic field profile shapes. In simulation study, the solution of self-consistent magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium was used to project a diamagnetic effect on the toroidal magnetic field. A detailed inversion process based on assumed profiles of the electron density and self-consistent toroidal field is exercised to estimate the source of errors for both local density and local magnetic field. The outcome of the proposed system is crucial to the study of confinement, heating and stability of NSTX plasmas.

  7. Herschel Observations of Far-infrared Cooling Lines in Intermediate Redshift (Ultra)-luminous Infrared Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulou, D.; Hopwood, R.; Magdis, G. E.; Thatte, N.; Swinyard, B. M.; Farrah, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Bock, J. J.; Clements, D.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Pearson, C.; Riechers, D.; Scott, D.; Smith, A.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Wang, L.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first results from a spectroscopic survey of the [C II] 158 μm line from a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 1011.5 L ⊙), using the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver-Fourier Transform Spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory. This is the first survey of [C II] emission, an important tracer of star formation, at a redshift range where the star formation rate density of the universe increases rapidly. We detect strong [C II] 158 μm line emission from over 80% of the sample. We find that the [C II] line is luminous, in the range (0.8-4) × 10-3 of the far-infrared continuum luminosity of our sources, and appears to arise from photodissociation regions on the surface of molecular clouds. The L [C II]/L IR ratio in our intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs is on average ~10 times larger than that of local ULIRGs. Furthermore, we find that the L [C II]/L IR and L [C II]/L CO(1-0) ratios in our sample are similar to those of local normal galaxies and high-z star-forming galaxies. ULIRGs at z ~ 0.5 show many similarities to the properties of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Our findings strongly suggest that rapid evolution in the properties of the star-forming regions of (U)LIRGs is likely to have occurred in the last 5 billion years. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  8. The impact of clustering and angular resolution on far-infrared and millimeter continuum observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béthermin, Matthieu; Wu, Hao-Yi; Lagache, Guilaine; Davidzon, Iary; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Cousin, Morgane; Wang, Lingyu; Doré, Olivier; Daddi, Emanuele; Lapi, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Follow-up observations at high-angular resolution of bright submillimeter galaxies selected from deep extragalactic surveys have shown that the single-dish sources are comprised of a blend of several galaxies. Consequently, number counts derived from low- and high-angular-resolution observations are in tension. This demonstrates the importance of resolution effects at these wavelengths and the need for realistic simulations to explore them. We built a new 2 deg2 simulation of the extragalactic sky from the far-infrared to the submillimeter. It is based on an updated version of the 2SFM (two star-formation modes) galaxy evolution model. Using global galaxy properties generated by this model, we used an abundance-matching technique to populate a dark-matter lightcone and thus simulate the clustering. We produced maps from this simulation and extracted the sources, and we show that the limited angular resolution of single-dish instruments has a strong impact on (sub)millimeter continuum observations. Taking into account these resolution effects, we are reproducing a large set of observables, as number counts and their evolution with redshift and cosmic infrared background power spectra. Our simulation consistently describes the number counts from single-dish telescopes and interferometers. In particular, at 350 and 500 μm, we find that the number counts measured by Herschel between 5 and 50 mJy are biased towards high values by a factor 2, and that the redshift distributions are biased towards low redshifts. We also show that the clustering has an important impact on the Herschel pixel histogram used to derive number counts from P(D) analysis. We find that the brightest galaxy in the beam of a 500 μm Herschel source contributes on average to only 60% of the Herschel flux density, but that this number will rise to 95% for future millimeter surveys on 30 m-class telescopes (e.g., NIKA2 at IRAM). Finally, we show that the large number density of red Herschel sources

  9. HerMES: THE FAR-INFRARED EMISSION FROM DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calanog, J. A.; Wardlow, J.; Fu, Hai; Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Assef, R. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bock, J.; Riechers, D.; Schulz, B. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Casey, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Farrah, D.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Ibar, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Kartaltepe, J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Magdis, G.; Rigopoulou, D. [Department of Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Marchetti, L. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Pérez-Fournon, I. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Scott, Douglas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); and others

    2013-09-20

    Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) are an ultraviolet-faint, infrared-bright galaxy population that reside at z ∼ 2 and are believed to be in a phase of dusty star-forming and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We present far-infrared (far-IR) observations of a complete sample of DOGs in the 2 deg{sup 2} of the Cosmic Evolution Survey. The 3077 DOGs have (z) = 1.9 ± 0.3 and are selected from 24 μm and r {sup +} observations using a color cut of r {sup +} – [24] ≥ 7.5 (AB mag) and S{sub 24} ≥ 100 μJy. Based on the near-IR spectral energy distributions, 47% are bump DOGs (star formation dominated) and 10% are power-law DOGs (AGN-dominated). We use SPIRE far-IR photometry from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey to calculate the IR luminosity and characteristic dust temperature for the 1572 (51%) DOGs that are detected at 250 μm (≥3σ). For the remaining 1505 (49%) that are undetected, we perform a median stacking analysis to probe fainter luminosities. Herschel-detected and undetected DOGs have average luminosities of (2.8 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 12} L{sub ☉} and (0.77 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 12} L{sub ☉}, and dust temperatures of (33 ± 7) K and (37 ± 5) K, respectively. The IR luminosity function for DOGs with S{sub 24} ≥ 100 μJy is calculated, using far-IR observations and stacking. DOGs contribute 10%-30% to the total star formation rate (SFR) density of the universe at z = 1.5-2.5, dominated by 250 μm detected and bump DOGs. For comparison, DOGs contribute 30% to the SFR density for all z = 1.5-2.5 galaxies with S{sub 24} ≥ 100 μJy. DOGs have a large scatter about the star formation main sequence and their specific SFRs show that the observed phase of star formation could be responsible for their total observed stellar mass at z ∼ 2.

  10. Laboratory microwave, millimeter wave and far-infrared spectra of dimethyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabri, A.; Van, V.; Nguyen, H. V. L.; Mouhib, H.; Kwabia Tchana, F.; Manceron, L.; Stahl, W.; Kleiner, I.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Dimethyl sulfide, CH3SCH3 (DMS), is a nonrigid, sulfur-containing molecule whose astronomical detection is considered to be possible in the interstellar medium. Very accurate spectroscopic constants were obtained by a laboratory analysis of rotational microwave and millimeter wave spectra, as well as rotation-torsional far-infrared (FIR) spectra, which can be used to predict transition frequencies for a detection in interstellar sources. Aims: This work aims at the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the ground torsional state and ground torsional band ν15 of DMS in a large spectral range for astrophysical use. Methods: The microwave spectrum was measured in the frequency range 2-40 GHz using two Molecular Beam Fourier Transform MicroWave (MB-FTMW) spectrometers in Aachen, Germany. The millimeter spectrum was recorded in the 50-110 GHz range. The FIR spectrum was measured for the first time at high resolution using the FT spectrometer and the newly built cryogenic cell at the French synchrotron SOLEIL. Results: DMS has two equivalent methyl internal rotors with a barrier height of about 730 cm-1. We performed a fit, using the XIAM and BELGI-Cs-2Tops codes, that contained the new measurements and previous transitions reported in the literature for the ground torsional state νt = 0 (including the four torsional species AA, AE, EA and EE) and for the ground torsional band ν15 = 1 ← 0 (including only the AA species). In the microwave region, we analyzed 584 transitions with J ≤ 30 of the ground torsional state νt = 0 and 18 transitions with J ≤ 5 of the first excited torsional state νt = 1. In the FIR range, 578 transitions belonging to the torsional band ν15 = 1 ← 0 with J ≤ 27 were assigned. Totally, 1180 transitions were included in a global fit with 21 accurately determined parameters. These parameters can be used to produce a reliable line-list for an astrophysical detection of DMS. Full Tables B.1 and C.1, and Table E.1 are

  11. Indium Hybridization of Large Format TES Bolometer Arrays to Readout Multiplexers for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Allen, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The advance of new detector technologies combined with enhanced fabrication methods has resulted in an increase in development of large format arrays. The next generation of scientific instruments will utilize detectors containing hundreds to thousands of elements providing a more efficient means to conduct large area sky surveys. Some notable detectors include a 32x32 x-ray microcalorimeter for Constellation-X, an infrared bolometer called SAFIRE to fly on the airborne observatory SOFIA, and the sub-millimeter bolometer SCUBA-2 to be deployed at the JCMT which will use more than 10,000 elements for two colors, each color using four 32x40 arrays. Of these detectors, SCUBA-2 is farthest along in development and uses indium hybridization to multiplexers for readout of the large number of elements, a technology that will be required to enable the next generation of large format arrays. Our current efforts in working toward large format arrays have produced GISMO, the Goddard IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter observer. GISMO is a far infrared instrument to be field tested later this year at the IRAM 30 meter telescope in Spain. GISMO utilizes transition edge sensor (TES) technology in an 8x16 filled array format that allows for typical fan-out wiring and wire-bonding to four 1x32 NIST multiplexers. GISMO'S electrical wiring is routed along the tops of 30 micron walls which also serve as the mechanical framework for the array. This architecture works well for the 128 element array, but is approaching the limit for routing the necessary wires along the surface while maintaining a high fill factor. Larger format arrays will benefit greatly from making electrical connections through the wafer to the backside, where they can be hybridized to a read-out substrate tailored to handling the wiring scheme. The next generation array we are developing is a 32x40 element array on a pitch of 1135 microns that conforms to the NIST multiplexer, already developed for the SCUBA-2

  12. FAR-INFRARED DUST TEMPERATURES AND COLUMN DENSITIES OF THE MALT90 MOLECULAR CLUMP SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Smith, Howard A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA (United States); Sanhueza, Patricio [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Contreras, Yanett; Rathborne, Jill M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping 1710 NSW (Australia); Jackson, James M.; Hoq, Sadia [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-20

    We present dust column densities and dust temperatures for ∼3000 young, high-mass molecular clumps from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey, derived from adjusting single-temperature dust emission models to the far-infrared intensity maps measured between 160 and 870 μm from the Herschel/Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-Gal) and APEX/APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) surveys. We discuss the methodology employed in analyzing the data, calculating physical parameters, and estimating their uncertainties. The population average dust temperature of the clumps are 16.8 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that do not exhibit mid-infrared signatures of star formation (quiescent clumps), 18.6 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that display mid-infrared signatures of ongoing star formation but have not yet developed an H ii region (protostellar clumps), and 23.7 ± 0.2 and 28.1 ± 0.3 K for clumps associated with H ii and photo-dissociation regions, respectively. These four groups exhibit large overlaps in their temperature distributions, with dispersions ranging between 4 and 6 K. The median of the peak column densities of the protostellar clump population is 0.20 ± 0.02 g cm{sup −2}, which is about 50% higher compared to the median of the peak column densities associated with clumps in the other evolutionary stages. We compare the dust temperatures and column densities measured toward the center of the clumps with the mean values of each clump. We find that in the quiescent clumps, the dust temperature increases toward the outer regions and that these clumps are associated with the shallowest column density profiles. In contrast, molecular clumps in the protostellar or H ii region phase have dust temperature gradients more consistent with internal heating and are associated with steeper column density profiles compared with the quiescent clumps.

  13. Far-infrared observations of a massive cluster forming in the Monoceros R2 filament hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, T. S. M.; Griffin, M. J.; Schneider, N.; Motte, F.; Könyves, V.; André, P.; Di Francesco, J.; Didelon, P.; Pattle, K.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Anderson, L. D.; Benedettini, M.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bontemps, S.; Elia, D.; Fuente, A.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Kirk, J.; Marsh, K.; Men'shchikov, A.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Peretto, N.; Pezzuto, S.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Spinoglio, L.; Tigé, J.; Treviño-Morales, S. P.; White, G. J.

    2017-10-01

    We present far-infrared observations of Monoceros R2 (a giant molecular cloud at approximately 830 pc distance, containing several sites of active star formation), as observed at 70 μm, 160 μm, 250 μm, 350 μm, and 500 μm by the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instruments on the Herschel Space Observatory as part of the Herschel imaging survey of OB young stellar objects (HOBYS) Key programme. The Herschel data are complemented by SCUBA-2 data in the submillimetre range, and WISE and Spitzer data in the mid-infrared. In addition, C18O data from the IRAM 30-m Telescope are presented, and used for kinematic information. Sources were extracted from the maps with getsources, and from the fluxes measured, spectral energy distributions were constructed, allowing measurements of source mass and dust temperature. Of177 Herschel sources robustly detected in the region (a detection with high signal-to-noise and low axis ratio at multiple wavelengths), including protostars and starless cores, 29 are found in a filamentary hub at the centre of the region (a little over 1% of the observed area). These objects are on average smaller, more massive, and more luminous than those in the surrounding regions (which together suggest that they are at a later stage of evolution), a result that cannot be explained entirely by selection effects. These results suggest a picture in which the hub may have begun star formation at a point significantly earlier than the outer regions, possibly forming as a result of feedback from earlier star formation. Furthermore, the hub may be sustaining its star formation by accreting material from the surrounding filaments. Full Tables 4 and D.1-D.9 and the C180 datacube are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/607/A22

  14. A Herschel/PACS Far-infrared Line Emission Survey of Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Lu, N.; Stierwalt, S.; Stacey, G.; Malhotra, S.; van der Werf, P. P.; Howell, J. H.; Privon, G. C.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Murphy, E. J.; Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Linden, S. T.; Inami, H.; Larson, K. L.; Evans, A. S.; Appleton, P.; Iwasawa, K.; Lord, S.; Sanders, D. B.; Surace, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present an analysis of {[{{O}}{{I}}]}63, [O III]88, [N II]122, and {[{{C}}{{II}}]}158 far-infrared (FIR) fine-structure line observations obtained with Herschel/PACS, for ˜240 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey. We find pronounced declines (“deficits”) of line-to-FIR continuum emission for [N II]122, {[{{O}}{{I}}]}63, and {[{{C}}{{II}}]}158 as a function of FIR color and infrared luminosity surface density, {{{Σ }}}{IR}. The median electron density of the ionized gas in LIRGs, based on the [N II]122/[N II]205 ratio, is {n}{{e}} = 41 cm-3. We find that the dispersion in the {[{{C}}{{II}}]}158 deficit of LIRGs is attributed to a varying fractional contribution of photodissociation regions (PDRs) to the observed {[{{C}}{{II}}]}158 emission, f([{{C}} {{II}}{]}158{PDR}) = [{{C}} {{II}}{]}158{PDR}/{[{{C}}{{II}}]}158, which increases from ˜60% to ˜95% in the warmest LIRGs. The {[{{O}}{{I}}]}63/[{{C}} {{II}}{]}158{PDR} ratio is tightly correlated with the PDR gas kinetic temperature in sources where {[{{O}}{{I}}]}63 is not optically thick or self-absorbed. For each galaxy, we derive the average PDR hydrogen density, {n}{{H}}, and intensity of the interstellar radiation field, G, in units of {G}0 and find G/{n}{{H}} ratios of ˜0.1-50 {G}0 cm3, with ULIRGs populating the upper end of the distribution. There is a relation between G/{n}{{H}} and {{{Σ }}}{IR}, showing a critical break at {{{Σ }}}{IR}* ≃ 5 × 1010 L ⊙ kpc-2. Below {{{Σ }}}{IR}* , G/{n}{{H}} remains constant, ≃0.32 {G}0 cm3, and variations in {{{Σ }}}{IR} are driven by the number density of star-forming regions within a galaxy, with no change in their PDR properties. Above {{{Σ }}}{IR}* , G/{n}{{H}} increases rapidly with {{{Σ }}}{IR}, signaling a departure from the typical PDR conditions found in normal star-forming galaxies toward more intense/harder radiation fields and compact geometries typical of starbursting sources.

  15. Far-infrared absorption of La1-xCaxMnO3-y at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, A; Guidi, M Cestelli; Arcangeletti, E; Nucara, A; Calvani, P; Piccinini, M; Marcelli, A; Postorino, P

    2006-01-27

    The first far-infrared absorption spectra of manganite samples at pressures P up to 10 GPa were obtained on La1-xCaxMnO3-y by use of synchrotron radiation. For x=0.25 and 0.20 (y=0), P promotes partial metallization at room temperature through a strong reduction of the insulating gap. An x=0.20 sample with y=0.08 does not show any charge delocalization effect up to 10 GPa. An Urbach-like model of disordered Jahn-Teller wells is shown to well fit the far-infrared band edge and allows one to obtain a reliable pressure dependence of the energy gap.

  16. An optical resonator with insertable scraper output coupler for the JAERI far-infrared free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, R; Nishimori, N; Sawamura, M; Kikuzawa, N; Shizuma, T; Minehara, E J

    2001-01-01

    The performance of an optical resonator featuring an insertable scraper output coupler was evaluated for the JAERI far-infrared free-electron laser. An efficiency factor of the resonator was introduced for evaluation. The efficiency factor was derived from the amount of the output coupling and diffractive loss of the optical resonator, which were calculated by using an optical mode calculation code, using the iterative computation called Fox-Li procedure. As a result of the evaluation, it was found that the insertable scraper coupler was the most suitable for the far-infrared free-electron lasers.Dependencies of insertion direction and scraper radius were also investigated to find out the optimum geometry of the insertable scraper coupler. It was found that the optimum direction of the scraper was parallel to the wiggling plane of the electron beam and the efficiency of the optical resonator increased with the enlargement of the scraper radius.

  17. APS undulator and wiggler sources: Monte-Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.L.; Lai, B.; Viccaro, P.J.

    1992-02-01

    Standard insertion devices will be provided to each sector by the Advanced Photon Source. It is important to define the radiation characteristics of these general purpose devices. In this document,results of Monte-Carlo simulation are presented. These results, based on the SHADOW program, include the APS Undulator A (UA), Wiggler A (WA), and Wiggler B (WB).

  18. Far infrared laser polarimetry and far forward scattering diagnostics for the C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, B H; Kinley, J S; Knapp, K; Feng, P; Martinez, R; Weixel, C; Armstrong, S; Hayashi, R; Longman, A; Mendoza, R; Gota, H; Tuszewski, M

    2014-11-01

    A two-chord far infrared (FIR) laser polarimeter for high speed sub-degree Faraday rotation measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration experiment is described. It is based on high power proprietary FIR lasers with line width of about 330 Hz. The exceptionally low intrinsic instrument phase error is characterized with figures of merit. Significant toroidal magnetic field with rich dynamics is observed. Simultaneously obtained density fluctuation spectra by far forward scattering are presented.

  19. Suitability of using far-infrared imaging system for noncontact evaluation on working state of implantable medical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Jing

    2009-03-01

    The far-infrared thermal imaging is a promising noncontact way to assess the working state of an implantable medical device (IMD). The unique merit of this method lies in its direct detection of the unusual skin surface temperature distribution caused by the implanted IMD. This paper is dedicated to present a comprehensive investigation on the suitability of using far-infrared system to evaluate the thermal state at the skin surface above the implantation location of the IMD under various working, physiological, or environmental thermal conditions. It was found that an evident variation in temperature as disclosed on the skin surface is beneficial for the far-infrared thermal imaging detection. In addition, numerical simulations were also performed on three dimensional bioheat transfer problems in human bodies embedded with IMD by different implantation depth and physical characteristics. Both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation indicated that for a specific image system with fixed temperature resolution, when the IMD is embedded as close as possible to the superficial skin, the abnormal region of temperature on skin surface can be much more visible. Conceptual experiments either in vitro or in vivo are implemented to preliminarily demonstrate the theoretical predictions. To further improve the detection of an implanted IMD, intentional cooling by the alcohol was proposed and evaluated. Given the fact that several information of an implanted IMD can be revealed through the infrared thermograph, such noncontact imaging method could serve well as an assessment approach without causing any wound and radiation to human body.

  20. Far-infrared observations of young clusters embedded in the R Coronae Australis and Rho Ophiuchi dark clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilking, B. A.; Harvey, P. M.; Joy, M.; Hyland, A. R.; Jones, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Multicolor far-infrared maps in two nearby dark clouds, R Coronae Australis and Rho Ophiuchi, have been made in order to investigate the individual contribution of low-mass stars to the energetics and dynamics of the surrounding gas and dust. Emission from cool dust associated with five low-mass stars has been detected in CrA and four in Rho Oph; their far-infrared luminosities range from 2 solar luminosities to 40 solar luminosities. When an estimate of the bolometric luminosity was possible, it was found that typically more than 50 percent of the star's energy was radiated longward of 20 microns. Meaningful limits to the far-infrared luminosities of an additional 11 association members in CrA and two in Rho Oph were also obtained. The dust optical depth surrounding the star R CrA appears to be asymmetric and may control the dynamics of the surrounding molecular gas. The implications of these results for the cloud energetics and star formation efficiency in these two clouds are discussed.

  1. A far-infrared molecular and atomic line survey of the Orion KL region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerate, M. R.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Grundy, T. W.; Lim, T. L.; Polehampton, E. T.; Baluteau, J.-P.; Viti, S.; Yates, J.

    2006-08-01

    We have carried out a high spectral resolution (λ/Δλ ~ 6800-9700) line survey towards the Orion Kleinmann-Low (KL) cluster from 44 to 188 μm. The observations were taken with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) in Fabry-Pérot mode, on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). A total of 152 lines are clearly detected and a further 34 features are present as possible detections. The spectrum is dominated by the molecular species H2O, OH and CO, along with [OI] and [CII] lines from photodissociation region (PDR) or shocked gas and [O III] and [NIII] lines from the foreground M42 HII region. Several isotopic species, as well as NH3, are also detected. HDO and H3O+ are tentatively detected for the first time in the far-infrared (FIR) range towards Orion KL. A basic analysis of the line observations is carried out, by comparing with previous measurements and published models and deriving rotational temperatures and column densities in the case of the molecular species. Analysis of the [OI] and [CII] fine structure lines indicates that although a shock model can reproduce the observed [OI] surface brightness levels, it falls short of the observed [CII] level by more than a factor of 30. A PDR model can reproduce the [OI] 63.2 μm and [CII] surface brightness levels within 35 per cent, although overpredicting the LWS [OI] 145.5 μm-emission by a factor of 2.7. The 70 water lines and 22 OH lines detected by the survey appear with mainly P Cygni profiles at the shortest survey wavelengths and with mainly pure emission profiles at the longest survey wavelengths. The emission and absorption velocity peaks of the water and OH lines indicate that they are associated with gas expanding in the outflow from the KL cluster. The estimated column densities are (2-5) × 1014 cm-2 for H2O and (2.5-5.1) × 1016 cm-2 for OH. The 26 detected CO lines confirm the presence of three distinct components, with temperature and column density combinations ranging from 660 K, 6 × 1017

  2. HERschel key program heritage: A far-infrared source catalog for the Magellanic Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seale, Jonathan P.; Meixner, Margaret; Sewiło, Marta [The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter St., University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Engelbracht, Charles W.; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Gordon, Karl; Roman-Duval, Julia [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hony, Sacha; Okumura, Koryo; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Sauvage, Marc [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Boyer, Martha L. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Chen, C.-H. Rosie [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Indebetouw, Remy [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Matsuura, Mikako [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Oliveira, Joana M.; Loon, Jacco Th. van [School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Srinivasan, Sundar [UPMC-CNRS UMR7095, Institute d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); and others

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) have been used to identify dusty populations of sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). We conducted the study using the HERITAGE catalogs of point sources available from the Herschel Science Center from both the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS; 100 and 160 μm) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE; 250, 350, and 500 μm) cameras. These catalogs are matched to each other to create a Herschel band-merged catalog and then further matched to archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS catalogs from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) and SAGE-SMC surveys to create single mid- to far-infrared (far-IR) point source catalogs that span the wavelength range from 3.6 to 500 μm. There are 35,322 unique sources in the LMC and 7503 in the SMC. To be bright in the FIR, a source must be very dusty, and so the sources in the HERITAGE catalogs represent the dustiest populations of sources. The brightest HERITAGE sources are dominated by young stellar objects (YSOs), and the dimmest by background galaxies. We identify the sources most likely to be background galaxies by first considering their morphology (distant galaxies are point-like at the resolution of Herschel) and then comparing the flux distribution to that of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (ATLAS) survey of galaxies. We find a total of 9745 background galaxy candidates in the LMC HERITAGE images and 5111 in the SMC images, in agreement with the number predicted by extrapolating from the ATLAS flux distribution. The majority of the Magellanic Cloud-residing sources are either very young, embedded forming stars or dusty clumps of the interstellar medium. Using the presence of 24 μm emission as a tracer of star formation, we identify 3518 YSO candidates in the LMC and 663 in the SMC. There are far fewer far-IR bright YSOs in the SMC than the LMC

  3. TALC: a new deployable concept for a 20m far-infrared space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Gilles; Sauvage, Marc; Bonnet, Aymeric; Rodriguez, Louis; Ronayette, Samuel; Chanial, Pierre; Scola, Loris; Révéret, Vincent; Aussel, Hervé; Carty, Michael; Durand, Matthis; Durand, Lancelot; Tremblin, Pascal; Pantin, Eric; Berthe, Michel; Martignac, Jérôme; Motte, Frédérique; Talvard, Michel; Minier, Vincent; Bultel, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    TALC, Thin Aperture Light Collector is a 20 m space observatory project exploring some unconventional optical solutions (between the single dish and the interferometer) allowing the resolving power of a classical 27 m telescope. With TALC, the principle is to remove the central part of the prime mirror dish, cut the remaining ring into 24 sectors and store them on top of one-another. The aim of this far infrared telescope is to explore the 600 μm to 100 μm region. With this approach we have shown that we can store a ring-telescope of outer diameter 20m and ring thickness of 3m inside the fairing of Ariane 5 or Ariane 6. The general structure is the one of a bicycle wheel, whereas the inner sides of the segments are in compression to each other and play the rule of a rim. The segments are linked to each other using a pantograph scissor system that let the segments extend from a pile of dishes to a parabolic ring keeping high stiffness at all time during the deployment. The inner corners of the segments are linked to a central axis using spokes as in a bicycle wheel. The secondary mirror and the instrument box are built as a solid unit fixed at the extremity of the main axis. The tensegrity analysis of this structure shows a very high stiffness to mass ratio, resulting into 3 Hz Eigen frequency. The segments will consist of two composite skins and honeycomb CFRP structure build by replica process. Solid segments will be compared to deformable segments using the controlled shear of the rear surface. The adjustment of the length of the spikes and the relative position of the side of neighbor segments let control the phasing of the entire primary mirror. The telescope is cooled by natural radiation. It is protected from sun radiation by a large inflatable solar screen, loosely linked to the telescope. The orientation is performed by inertia-wheels. This telescope carries a wide field bolometer camera using cryocooler at 0.3K as one of the main instruments. This

  4. Use of the Far Infrared Tangential Interferometer/Polarimeter diagnostic for the study of rf driven plasma waves on NSTX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Lee, K C; Kaita, R; Phillips, C K; Domier, C W; Valeo, E; Luhmann, N C; Bonoli, P T; Park, H

    2010-10-01

    A rf detection system for waves in the 30 MHz range has been constructed for the Far Infrared Tangential Interferometer/Polarimeter on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). It is aimed at monitoring high frequency density fluctuations driven by 30 MHz high harmonic fast wave fields. The levels of density fluctuations at various radial chords and antenna phase angles can be estimated using the electric field calculated by TORIC code and linearized continuity equation for the electron density. In this paper, the experimental arrangement for the detection of rf signal and preliminary results of simulation will be discussed.

  5. Structure determination of small vanadium clusters by density-functional theory in comparison with experimental far-infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsch, C; Fielicke, A; Kirilyuk, A; Behler, J; von Helden, G; Meijer, G; Scheffler, M

    2005-03-22

    The far-infrared vibrational spectra for charged vanadium clusters with sizes of 3-15 atoms have been measured using infrared multiple photon dissociation of Vn+Ar-->Vn(+)+Ar. Using density-functional theory calculations, we calculated the ground state energy and vibrational spectra for a large number of stable and metastable geometries of such clusters. Comparison of the calculated vibrational spectra with those obtained in the experiment allows us to deduce the cluster size specific atomic structures. In several cases, a unique atomic structure can be identified, while in other cases our calculations suggest the presence of multiple isomers.

  6. Fast computation of the Narcissus reflection coefficient for the Herschel far-infrared/submillimeter-wave Cassegrain telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke, Robert L.; Fischer, Jacqueline; Polegre, Arturo M.; Beintema, Douwe A.

    2005-10-01

    Placement of a scatter cone at the center of the secondary of a Cassegrain telescope greatly reduces Narcissus reflection. To calculate the remaining Narcissus reflection, a time-consuming physical optics code such as GRASP8 is often used to model the effects of reflection and diffraction. Fortunately, the Cassegrain geometry is sufficiently simple that a combination of theoretical analysis and Fourier propagation can yield rapid, accurate results at submillimeter wavelengths. We compare these results with those from GRASP8 for the heterodyne instrument for the far-infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory and confirm the effectiveness of the chosen scatter cone design.

  7. Effect of far-infrared radiation assisted microwave-vacuum drying on drying characteristics and quality of red chilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengrayap, Rattapon; Tansakul, Ampawan; Mittal, Gauri S

    2015-05-01

    Fresh red chilli (Capsicum frutescens L.) was dried using microwave-vacuum drying (MVD) and the far-infrared radiation assisted microwave-vacuum drying (FIR-MVD) method. The MVD was operated using the microwave power of 100, 200 and 300 W under absolute pressure of 21.33, 28.00 and 34.66 kPa. In terms of FIR-MVD, far-infrared power was applied at 100, 200 and 300 W. The effect of drying conditions, i.e., microwave power, absolute pressure and FIR power, on drying characteristics and qualities of dried product were investigated. It was observed that an increase in microwave power and FIR power with a decrease in absolute pressure could accelerate the drying rate. It was also found that FIR-MVD method required shorter drying time than MVD. Moreover, qualities, i.e., color changes, texture, rehydration ability and shrinkage, of FIR-MVD chilli were found to be better than those of MVD. Consequently, the optimum drying condition of FIR-MVD within this study was microwave power of 300 W under absolute pressure of 21.33 kPa with FIR power of 300 W.

  8. Design and instrumentation of an airborne far infrared radiometer for in-situ measurements of ice clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Christian; Ngo Phong, Linh; Lamontagne, Frédéric; Wang, Min; Fisette, Bruno; Martin, Louis; Châteauneuf, François

    2016-09-01

    We report on the design and instrumentation of an aircraft-certified far infrared radiometer (FIRR) and the resulting instrument characteristics. FIRR was designed to perform unattended airborne measurements of ice clouds in the arctic in support of a microsatellite payload study. It provides radiometrically calibrated data in nine spectral channels in the range of 8-50 μm with the use of a rotating wheel of bandpass filters and reference blackbodies. Measurements in this spectral range are enabled with the use of a far infrared detector based on microbolometers of 104-μm pitch. The microbolometers have a new design because of the large structure and are coated with gold black to maintain uniform responsivity over the working spectral range. The vacuum sealed detector package is placed at the focal plane of a reflective telescope based on a Schwarschild configuration with two on-axis spherical mirrors. The telescope field-of-view is of 6° and illuminates an area of 2.1-mm diameter at the focal plane. In operation, FIRR was used as a nonimaging radiometer and exhibited a noise equivalent radiance in the range of 10-20 mW/m2-sr. The dynamic range and the detector vacuum integrity of FIRR were found to be suited for the conditions of the airborne experiments.

  9. Nonlinear analysis of wiggler-imperfections in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, H.P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Yu, L.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We present an analysis of the effect of wiggler imperfections in FELs using a variety of techniques. Our basic intention is to compare wiggler averaged nonlinear simulations to determine the effect of various approximations on the estimates of gain degradation due to wiggler imperfections. The fundamental assumption in the wiggler-averaged formulations is that the electrons are described by a random walk model, and an analytic representation of the orbits is made. This is fundamentally different from the approach taken for the non-wiggler-averaged formulation in which the wiggler imperfections are specified at the outset, and the orbits are integrated using a field model that is consistent with the Maxwell equations. It has been conjectured on the basis of prior studies using the non-wiggler-averaged formalism that electrons follow a {open_quotes}meander line{close_quotes} through the wiggler governed by the specific imperfections; hence, the electrons behave more as a ball-in-groove than as a random walk. This conjecture is tested by comparison of the wiggler-averaged and non-wiggler-averaged simulations. In addition, two different wiggler models are employed in the non-wiggler-averaged simulation: one based upon a parabolic pole face wiggler which is not curl and divergence free in the presence of wiggler imperfections, and a second model in which the divergence and z-component of the curl vanish identically. This will gauge the effect of inconsistencies in the wiggler model on the estimation of the effect of the imperfections. Preliminary results indicate that the inconsistency introduced by the non-vanishing curl and divergence result in an overestimation of the effect of wiggler imperfections on the orbit. The wiggler-averaged simulation is based upon the TDA code, and the non-wiggler-averaged simulation is a variant of the ARACHNE and WIGGLIN codes called MEDUSA developed to treat short-wavelength Gauss-Hermite modes.

  10. The property of universality for wigglers and invariance of electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyakov, M N

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the electromagnetic radiation generated in any planar pure permanent magnet wiggler. The following mental modification of the wiggler magnetic system is theoretically investigated: the easy axis of all magnetic blocks, which compose the wiggler, are rotated by the special low, while the wiggler geometry remains intact. This evidently causes the wiggler magnetic field to change in shape and amplitude. However it can be proved that the total power of wiggler radiation along with the wavelengths of radiated harmonics is invariant under this transformation. The change of magnetic field involves a variation in intensities of the radiation harmonics.

  11. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B. H., E-mail: bdeng@trialphaenergy.com; Beall, M.; Schroeder, J.; Settles, G.; Feng, P.; Kinley, J. S.; Gota, H.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  12. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, B H; Beall, M; Schroeder, J; Settles, G; Feng, P; Kinley, J S; Gota, H; Thompson, M C

    2016-11-01

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 1016 m-2 at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  13. Effects of intermittent CO2convection under far-infrared radiation on vacuum drying of pre-osmodehydrated watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rajat; Mondal, Pijus

    2017-08-01

    Watermelon, a tropical seasonal fruit with high nutrient content, requires preservation through drying due to its perishable nature. Nevertheless, drying of watermelon through conventional processes has a negative impact either on the drying time or on the final product quality. In this work, osmotic dehydration of watermelon followed by far-infrared radiation-assisted vacuum drying (FIRRAVD) was optimized to develop dehydrated watermelon with minimum moisture content. Significantly, during FIRRAVD, an attempt was made to further intensify the drying rate by forced convection through intermittent CO 2 injection. Drying kinetics of each operation and physicochemical qualities of dried products were evaluated. FIRRAVD was a viable method of watermelon drying with appreciably high moisture diffusivity (D eff,m ) of 4.97 × 10 -10 to 1.49 × 10 -9 m 2 s -1 compared to conventional tray drying. Moreover, intermittent CO 2 convection during FIRRAVD (ICFIRRAVD) resulted in appreciable intensification of drying rate, with enhanced D eff,m (9.93 × 10 -10 to 1.99 × 10 -9 m 2 s -1 ). Significantly, ICFIRRAVD required less energy and approximately 16% less time compared to FIRRAVD. The quality of the final dehydrated watermelon was superior compared to conventional drying protocols. The novel CO 2 convective drying of watermelon in the presence of far-infrared radiation demonstrated an energy-efficient and time-saving operation rendering a dehydrated watermelon with acceptable quality parameters. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics in a SPEAR wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Safranek

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BL11, the most recently installed wiggler in the SPEAR storage ring at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, produces a large nonlinear perturbation of the electron beam dynamics, which was not directly evident in the integrated magnetic field measurements. Measurements of tune shifts with betatron oscillation amplitude and closed orbit shifts were used to characterize the nonlinear fields. Because of the narrow pole width in BL11, the nonlinear fields seen along the wiggling electron trajectory are dramatically different from the magnetic measurements made along a straight line with a stretched wire. This difference explains the tune shift measurements and the observed degradation in dynamic aperture. Because of the relatively large dispersion (1.2 m at BL11, the nonlinearities particularly reduced the off-energy dynamic aperture. Because of the nature of these nonlinear fields, it is impossible, even theoretically, to cancel them completely with short multipole correctors. Magic finger corrector magnets were built, however, that partially correct the nonlinear perturbation, greatly improving the storage ring performance.

  15. T'ai Chi

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults T'ai Chi KidsHealth > For Teens > T'ai Chi ... strengthening your legs, abs, and arms. What Is T'ai Chi? When you think about martial arts, ...

  16. A wiggler magnet for FEL low voltage operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Shamma`a, A.; Stuart, R.A.; Lucas, J.

    1995-12-31

    In low voltage FELs (ie, 200kV), operation is necessarily in the microwave frequency range for wiggler periods of the order of cms., so that a waveguide system is mandatory. Also, because of the relatively low velocity of the electron beam, the wiggle amplitude of the electron beam can be much larger than is normal for highly relativistic FELs. Both these factors mean that the electron trajectory must be carefully controlled to avoid beam collision with the waveguide walls. A wiggler system with half poles at entrance and exit is not an acceptable solution because of the offset is gives rise to the electron trajectory. Consequently, we have designed and constructed a wiggler magnet with exponential entrance and exit tapers for a minimal deflection and displacement of the electron beam. Simulations and experimental measurements showed that an on axis trajectory is easily obtainable.

  17. Commissioning of the LNLS 2 T Hybrid Wiggler

    CERN Document Server

    Farias, Ruy H A; Aparecida-Gouveia, Ana F; Cabral-Jahnel, Lucia; Citadini, James F; Ferreira, Marcelo J; Franco, J G; Liu, Lin; Neuenschwander, Regis; Resende, Ximenes R; Tavares, Pedro; Tosin, Giancarlo

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of the commissioning of a 28-pole 2 T Hybrid Wiggler at the 1.37 GeV electron storage ring of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source. The wiggler will be used mainly for protein crystallography and was optimized for the production of 12 keV photons. The very high field and relatively large gap (22 mm) of this insertion device led to a magnetic design that includes large main and side magnets and heavily saturated poles. We present the results of the commissioning with beam, with special attention to the correction of the large linear tune-shift perturbations produced by the wiggler as well as on the reduction of beam lifetime at full energy. Since the injection at the LNLS storage ring is performed at 500 MeV we also focus on the effects of non-linearities and their impact on injection efficiency.

  18. Linear Optics Compensation of the Superconducting Wiggler in HLS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lin; Li, Wei-min; Xu, Hong-liang; Zhang, He

    2005-01-01

    Hefei Light Source is a dedicated VUV light source. A superconducting wiggler magnet with 6 Tesla magnetic field was installed on the storage ring to generate hard X-ray radiation. With the compensation of tune shift due to insertion device, beam was successfully stored, but the beam lifetime was decreased much. In order to cure the lifetime, a simple hard-edge model of the wiggler was constructed in lattice simulation code and the compensation scheme was extensively studied again. Calculation showed that it is difficulty to localize the strong focusing effects from wiggler magnet. Then, a new scheme was brought forward and experimental result showed that it can restore the beam lifetime largely. As the application of LOCO method in HLS, a new compensation scheme was calculated by response matrix fitting, and the experimental result also presented in this paper.

  19. Varying the Path Length of Charged Particles Using Wiggler Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Autin, Bruno; Martini, M; Royer, P

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, different versions of optical modules based on alternation of positive and neg-ative curvature magnets, called wigglers in analogy with the devices used in electron ma-chines, are presented. A careful analysis of their properties is carried out. For each module, a set of free parameters is given and the sign of the momentum compaction is discussed for various regions of the parameter space. Different types of wigglers are compared and one of them is applied to stretching an H- bunch in the transfer line from the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) and the accumulator ring for the CERN Neutrino Factory scenario.

  20. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts ≳2, potentially linked to high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). Aims: This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS. Furthermore, the data enable examining the putative relationship between IFRS and HzRGs and testing whether IFRS are more distant or fainter siblings of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 μm and 500 μm. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. Results: All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared channels (stacking limits: σ = 0.74 mJy at 100 μm, σ = 3.45 mJy at 500 μm). Based on our SED modelling, we ruled out the following objects to explain the photometric characteristics of IFRS: (a) known radio-loud quasars and compact steep-spectrum sources at any redshift; (b) starburst galaxies with and without an AGN and Seyfert galaxies at any redshift, even if the templates were modified; and (c) known HzRGs at z ≲ 10.5. We find that the IFRS analysed in this work can only be explained by objects that fulfil the selection criteria of HzRGs. More precisely, IFRS could be (a) known HzRGs at very high redshifts (z ≳ 10.5); (b) low-luminosity siblings of HzRGs with additional dust obscuration at lower redshifts; (c) scaled or unscaled versions of Cygnus A at any

  1. A Comparative Analysis of the Far Infrared Spectra of Saturn's Rings and Icy Satellites with Cassini CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, Linda; Edgington, Scott G.

    2016-10-01

    We will report on a campaign to observe Saturn's main rings and major icy satellites with the Composite Infrared Spectrometer onboard Cassini. CIRS' three infrared detectors cover a combined spectral range of 10 to 1400 cm-1 (1 mm down to 7 microns). We focus on data from Focal Plane 1, which covers the 10 to 600 cm-1 range (1 mm to 16 microns). The apodized spectral resolution of the instrument can be varied from 15 cm-1 to 0.5 cm-1 (Flasar et al. 2004).The spectral behavior of Saturn's main rings and icy satellites in the far infrared has been the subject of previous studies with CIRS FP1 data (Spilker at al. 2005, Carvano et al. 2007, Morishima et al. 2012). These studies have shown that the infrared spectra of these icy rings and bodies are remarkably flat between about 40 to 200 microns. Longward of this, CIRS observations, as well as older spacecraft data, show a gradual decrease in ring emissivity. This roll-off in emissivity may be due to varying optical constants of water ice, which dominates the rings' composition, as one moves towards microwave wavelengths. Carvano et al. (2007), who analyzed spectra of the icy satellites Phoebe, Iapetus, Enceladus, Tethys and Hyperion, investigated the absence of emissivity features in spectra of those satellites. This absence is intriguing, as water ice, which dominates their surface composition, contains absorption features in the FP1 spectral range. They conclude that high porosity in these satellites' regoliths may explain this lack of spectral variability.To better characterize the far infrared spectra of the rings and satellites, we have implemented a series of dedicated observations. The goal is to obtain thousands of infrared spectra at 3 cm-1 resolution of each individual ring region and as many satellites as possible. We will have more spectra than Spilker et al. had for their work at a higher spectral resolution than in the analyses of Carvano et al. and Morishima et al. A preliminary analysis of these

  2. Far infrared ray (FIR) therapy: An effective and oncological safe treatment modality for breast cancer related lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Xia, Liang; Liu, Ning Fei; Nicoli, Fabio; Constantinides, Joannis; D'Ambrosia, Christopher; Lazzeri, Davide; Tremp, Mathias; Zhang, Ju Fang; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2017-07-01

    The incidence of breast cancer related lymphedema is approximately 5%. Far infrared ray (FIR) treatment can potentially reduce fluid volume and extremity circumference as well as the frequency of dermato-lymphangitis (DLA). However, there is no published data on the oncological safety of FIR and the potential for activation of any residual breast cancer cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the safety of far infrared ray (FIR) treatment of postmastectomy lymphedema, clinically and in vitro. Patients who underwent mastectomy more than 5years ago complicated by upper extremity lymphedema for more than 1year were included. The enrolled patients were divided into an FIR treatment group and a control group (conservative treatment using bandage compression). Outcome measures included tumor markers (CA153, CA125), ultrasonography of relevant structures and monitoring for adverse reactions 1year after treatment. For the in vitro part of the study, the effects of FIR on human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MCF7, MDA-MB231) compared to the effects of FIR on human dermal fibroblasts as a control were considered. The viability, proliferation, cell cycle and apoptotic statistics of the adenocarcinoma and human dermal fibroblast cell lines were analyzed and compared. Results demonstrated that after treatment with FIR, tumor marker (CA153, CA125) concentrations in both the FIR and control groups were not elevated. There was no statistically significant difference between FIR and control group marker expression (p>0.05). Furthermore, no patients were diagnosed with lymphadenectasis or newly enlarged lymph nodes in these two groups. Importantly, there were no adverse events in either group. The in vitro experiment indicated that FIR radiation does not affect viability, proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of fibroblasts, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. FIR should be considered as feasible and safe for the treatment of breast cancer related lymphedema patients 5years

  3. OH far-infrared emission from low- and intermediate-mass protostars surveyed with Herschel-PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampfler, S. F.; Bruderer, S.; Karska, A.; Herczeg, G. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Benz, A. O.; Doty, S. D.; McCoey, C.; Baudry, A.; Giannini, T.; Larsson, B.

    2013-04-01

    Context. The OH radical is a key species in the water chemistry network of star-forming regions, because its presence is tightly related to the formation and destruction of water. Previous studies of the OH far-infrared emission from low- and intermediate-mass protostars suggest that the OH emission mainly originates from shocked gas and not from the quiescent protostellar envelopes. Aims: We aim to study the excitation of OH in embedded low- and intermediate-mass protostars, determine the influence of source parameters on the strength of the emission, investigate the spatial extent of the OH emission, and further constrain its origin. Methods: This paper presents OH observations from 23 low- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects obtained with the PACS integral field spectrometer on-board Herschel in the context of the "Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) key program. Radiative transfer codes are used to model the OH excitation. Results: Most low-mass sources have compact OH emission (≲5000 AU scale), whereas the OH lines in most intermediate-mass sources are extended over the whole 47.″0 × 47.″0 PACS detector field-of-view (≳20 000 AU). The strength of the OH emission is correlated with various source properties such as the bolometric luminosity and the envelope mass, but also with the [OI] and H2O emission. Rotational diagrams for sources with many OH lines show that the level populations of OH can be approximated by a Boltzmann distribution with an excitation temperature at around 70 K. Radiative transfer models of spherically symmetric envelopes cannot reproduce the OH emission fluxes nor their broad line widths, strongly suggesting an outflow origin. Slab excitation models indicate that the observed excitation temperature can either be reached if the OH molecules are exposed to a strong far-infrared continuum radiation field or if the gas temperature and density are sufficiently high. Using realistic source parameters and

  4. Far infrared interference filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, S P; Möller, K D

    1969-08-01

    Capacitive meshes for far ir, low pass filters are prepared from Cu layers on 2.5 micro plastic film. The properties of these meshes of different mesh constants g with their different combinations in two-mesh, fourmesh, and eight-mesh filters are studied in the spectral region 160 cm(-1) to 10 cm(-1) by the use of a grating spectrometer. The applications of these meshes as low pass filters in the far ir spectral region in a grating spectrometer are described.

  5. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Kiyochi, M.; Nakao, N.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Nakai, S.; Mima, K.

    1999-06-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field.

  6. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    CERN Document Server

    Ohigashi, N; Kiyochi, M; Nakao, N; Fujita, M; Imasaki, K; Nakai, S; Mima, K

    1999-01-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field.

  7. Micro-Spec: An Ultra-Compact, High-Sensitivity Spectrometer for Far-Infrared and Sub-Millimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Huang, Wei-Chung; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    High-performance, integrated spectrometers operating in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter promise to be powerful tools for the exploration of the epochs of reionization and initial galaxy formation. These devices, using high-efficiency superconducting transmission lines, can achieve the performance of a meter-scale grating spectrometer in an instrument implemented on a four-inch silicon wafer. Such a device, when combined with a cryogenic telescope in space, provides an enabling capability for studies of the early universe. Here, the optical design process for Micro-Spec (mu-Spec) is presented, with particular attention given to its two-dimensional diffractive region, where the light of different wavelengths is focused on the different detectors. The method is based on the stigmatization and minimization of the light path function in this bounded region, which results in an optimized geometrical configuration. A point design with an efficiency of approx. 90% has been developed for initial demonstration, and can serve as the basis for future instruments. Design variations on this implementation are also discussed, which can lead to lower efficiencies due to diffractive losses in the multimode region.

  8. Effect of graphene on far-infrared transmission and absorption of FeF2 photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Zhou, Sheng; Fu, Shufang

    2017-10-01

    The influence of graphene (Gr) on the far-infrared transmission and absorption of FeF2 photonic crystals (PCs) is investigated by the forth-order transfer matrix since Gr is anisotropic when the external field is perpendicular to the surface of PCs. The numerical results show that the transmission and absorption spectra largely depend on the structural symmetry of Gr/FeF2 PCs and the position of Gr layer. The optimal structure and number of dielectric bi-layers (N) are discussed. In addition, the introduction of Gr leads to the disappearance of the defect modes in the band gap. Meanwhile, the line width of absorption around of the resonant frequencies of FeF2 has been extremely broadened, which is compared with the one of FeF2 PCs. Once N is beyond a critical value, the absorber will become the reflector. The effect of Fermi energy and external field on the absorption is also investigated.

  9. The Far Infrared Spectrum of Thiophosgene: Analysis of the νb{2} Fundamental Band at 500 wn

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Billinghurst, B. E.

    2009-06-01

    Thiophosgene (Cl_2CS) is a model system for studies of vibrational dynamics. Many hundreds of vibrational levels in the ground electronic state have been experimentally observed, allowing a detailed anharmonic force field to be developed including all six vibrational modes. But there have been no previous high resolution studies of this molecule in the infrared, presumably because its mass and multiple isotopic species result in very congested spectra. Here we report a detailed study of the strong νb{2} fundamental band (symmetric C - Cl stretch) based on a spectrum obtained using synchrotron radiation with the Bruker IFS125 FT spectrometer at the Canadian Light Source far infrared beamline. Thiophosgene is an interesting example of an accidentally near-symmetric oblate rotor. Indeed, its inertial axes switch with isotopic substitution: for ^{35}Cl_2CS, the C_{2v} symmetry axis coincides with the a inertial axis, but for ^{37}Cl_2CS, this changes to the b axis. Fortunately for us, the ground state microwave spectrum has been well studied. Even so, it has required the full spectral resolution of the present results, with observed line widths of about 0.0008 wn, to achieve a true line-by-line analysis. [1] For example: P.D. Chowdary, B. Strickler, S. Lee, and M. Gruebele, Chem. Phys. Letters 434, 182 (2007). [2] J.H. Carpenter, D.F. Rimmer, J.G. Smith, and D.H. Whiffen, J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 2 71, 1752 (1971).

  10. Detection of pedestrians in far-infrared automotive night vision using region-growing and clothing distortion compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ronan; Jones, Edward; Glavin, Martin

    2010-11-01

    We present a night-time pedestrian detection system based on automotive infrared video processing. Far-infrared or thermal night vision is a technology well suited for automatic detection of pedestrians at night as they generally appear warmer than the background. However, the appearance of a pedestrian in IR video can vary dramatically depending on the physical properties of the clothing they wear, the time spent adjusting to the outside environment, and the ambient temperature. We highlight the difficulties of detection in low temperatures (below 8 °C) when pedestrians typically wear highly insulating clothing, which can lead to distortion of the IR signature of the pedestrian. A pre-processing step is presented, which compensates for this clothing-based distortion using vertically-biased morphological closing. Potential pedestrians (Regions of Interest) are then segmented using feature-based region-growing with high intensity seeds. Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) features are extracted from candidates and utilised for Support Vector Machine classification. Positively classified targets are tracked between frames using a Kalman filter, adding robustness and increasing performance. The proposed system adapts not just to variations between images or video frames, but to variations in appearance between different pedestrians in the same image or frame. Results indicate improved performance compared to previous HOG-SVM automotive IR pedestrian detection systems, which utilised stereo IR cameras.

  11. Antibacterial effect of citrus press-cakes dried by high speed and far-infrared radiation drying methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarakoon, Kalpa; Senevirathne, Mahinda; Lee, Won-Woo; Kim, Young-Tae; Kim, Jae-Il; Oh, Myung-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the antibacterial effect was evaluated to determine the benefits of high speed drying (HSD) and far-infrared radiation drying (FIR) compared to the freeze drying (FD) method. Citrus press-cakes (CPCs) are released as a by-product in the citrus processing industry. Previous studies have shown that the HSD and FIR drying methods are much more economical for drying time and mass drying than those of FD, even though FD is the most qualified drying method. The disk diffusion assay was conducted, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined with methanol extracts of the dried CPCs against 11 fish and five food-related pathogenic bacteria. The disk diffusion results indicated that the CPCs dried by HSD, FIR, and FD prevented growth of all tested bacteria almost identically. The MIC and MBC results showed a range from 0.5-8.0 mg/mL and 1.0-16.0 mg/mL respectively. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the extracts changed the morphology of the bacteria cell wall, leading to destruction. These results suggest that CPCs dried by HSD and FIR showed strong antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria and are more useful drying methods than that of the classic FD method in CPCs utilization. PMID:22808341

  12. Characterizing the Youngest Herschel-detected Protostars. II. Molecular Outflows from the Millimeter and the Far-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Manoj, P.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Karska, Agata; Nagy, Zsofia; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Fischer, William J.; Watson, Dan M.; Stanke, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) CO (J=1\\to 0) observations and Herschel PACS spectroscopy, characterizing the outflow properties toward extremely young and deeply embedded protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. The sample comprises a subset of the Orion protostars known as the PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRS; Stutz et al.). We observed 14 PBRS with CARMA and 8 of these 14 with Herschel, acquiring full spectral scans from 55 to 200 μm. Outflows are detected in CO (J=1\\to 0) from 8 of 14 PBRS, with two additional tentative detections; outflows are also detected from the outbursting protostar HOPS 223 (V2775 Ori) and the Class I protostar HOPS 68. The outflows have a range of morphologies; some are spatially compact, 13) CO lines and/or H2O lines from 5 of 8 PBRS and only for those with detected CO outflows. The far-infrared CO rotation temperatures of the detected PBRS are marginally colder (˜230 K) than those observed for most protostars (˜300 K), and only one of these five PBRS has detected [O I] 63 μm emission. The high envelope densities could be obscuring some [O I] emission and cause a ˜20 K reduction to the CO rotation temperatures. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  13. The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII): Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy in the Far-Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical studies at infrared wavelengths have dramatically improved our understanding of the universe, and observations with Spitzer, the upcoming Herschel mission, and SOFIA will continue to provide exciting new discoveries. The relatively low angular resolution of these missions, however, is insufficient to resolve the physical scale on which mid-to far-infrared emission arises, resulting in source and structure ambiguities that limit our ability to answer key science questions. Interferometry enables high angular resolution at these wavelengths - a powerful tool for scientific discovery. We will build the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII), an eight-meter baseline Michelson stellar interferometer to fly on a high-altitude balloon. BETTII's spectral-spatial capability, provided by an instrument using double-Fourier techniques, will address key questions about the nature of disks in young star clusters and active galactic nuclei and the envelopes of evolved stars. BETTII will also lay the technological groundwork for future space interferometers and for suborbital programs optimized for studying extrasolar planets.

  14. A far-infrared broadband (8.5-37 mu m) autocorrelator with sub-picosecond time resolution based on cadmium telluride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Knippels, G.M.H.; Oepts, D.; van der Meer, A. F. G.

    2001-01-01

    A background-free autocorrelator has been developed for measuring the duration of far-infrared laser pulses in the spectral range from 8.5 to 37 mum by using an 840-mum-long wedged cadmium telluride crystal as the second-harmonic generator. Typical intensity second-harmonic autocorrelation traces

  15. Assembling a 'wiggler' magnet with a view to LEP

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Electron and positron beams, to be accelerated in the PS for onward transmission to the SPS and LEP, are not normally stable in a combined-function machine. This effect can be corrected by using 'wiggler' magnets. See Annul Report 1983 p. 87, Fig. 6.

  16. Planar electron beams in a wiggler magnet array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-02-01

    Feb 1, 2013 ... Planar electron beams in a wiggler magnet array. ARTI HADAP1,∗ and K C MITTAL2. 1General Engineering Department, Terna Engineering College, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706,. India. 2Accelerator and Pulsed Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay,. Mumbai 400 085, India. ∗.

  17. Herschel far-infrared observations of the Carina Nebula complex. III. Detailed cloud structure and feedback effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccatagliata, V.; Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Gaczkowski, B.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The star formation process in large clusters/associations can be strongly influenced by the feedback from high-mass stars. Whether the resulting net effect of the feedback is predominantly negative (cloud dispersal) or positive (triggering of star formation due to cloud compression) is still an open question. Aims: The Carina Nebula complex (CNC) represents one of the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We use our Herschel far-infrared observations to study the properties of the clouds over the entire area of the CNC (with a diameter of ≈3.2°, which corresponds to ≈125 pc at a distance of 2.3 kpc). The good angular resolution (10''-36'') of the Herschel maps corresponds to physical scales of 0.1-0.4 pc, and allows us to analyze the small-scale (i.e., clump-size) structures of the clouds. Methods: The full extent of the CNC was mapped with PACS and SPIRE in the 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm bands. We determined temperatures and column densities at each point in these maps by modeling the observed far-infrared spectral energy distributions. We also derived a map showing the strength of the UV radiation field. We investigated the relation between the cloud properties and the spatial distribution of the high-mass stars and computed total cloud masses for different density thresholds. Results: Our Herschel maps resolve for the first time the small-scale structure of the dense clouds over the entire spatial extent of the CNC. Several particularly interesting regions, including the prominent pillars south of η Car, are analyzed in detail. We compare the cloud masses derived from the Herschel data with previous mass estimates based on sub-mm and molecular line data. Our maps also reveal a peculiar wave-like pattern in the northern part of the Carina Nebula. Finally, we characterize two prominent cloud complexes at the periphery of our Herschel maps, which are probably molecular clouds in the Galactic background. Conclusions: We find that the

  18. Human Detection Based on the Generation of a Background Image by Using a Far-Infrared Light Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Som Jeon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for computer vision-based human detection has increased in fields, such as security, intelligent surveillance and monitoring systems. However, performance enhancement of human detection based on visible light cameras is limited, because of factors, such as nonuniform illumination, shadows and low external light in the evening and night. Consequently, human detection based on thermal (far-infrared light cameras has been considered as an alternative. However, its performance is influenced by the factors, such as low image resolution, low contrast and the large noises of thermal images. It is also affected by the high temperature of backgrounds during the day. To solve these problems, we propose a new method for detecting human areas in thermal camera images. Compared to previous works, the proposed research is novel in the following four aspects. One background image is generated by median and average filtering. Additional filtering procedures based on maximum gray level, size filtering and region erasing are applied to remove the human areas from the background image. Secondly, candidate human regions in the input image are located by combining the pixel and edge difference images between the input and background images. The thresholds for the difference images are adaptively determined based on the brightness of the generated background image. Noise components are removed by component labeling, a morphological operation and size filtering. Third, detected areas that may have more than two human regions are merged or separated based on the information in the horizontal and vertical histograms of the detected area. This procedure is adaptively operated based on the brightness of the generated background image. Fourth, a further procedure for the separation and removal of the candidate human regions is performed based on the size and ratio of the height to width information of the candidate regions considering the camera viewing direction

  19. Far-infrared ray for treating chronic lower extremity lymphedema with dermatolymphangioadenitis: a postoperative complication of gynecological tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Xu, Heng; Liu, Ning Fei; Sadigh, Parviz; Evans, Verity; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2017-06-01

    Lower extremity lymphedema is regarded as a relatively common postoperative complication and is often accompanied with dermatolymphangioadenitis (DLA). This study combines clinical assessment and laboratory investigation to explore therapeutic effects of far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy for chronic lower extremity lymphedema accompanied with DLA, occurring after gynecological tumor resection. Patients who met inclusion and exclusion criteria would be enrolled. They received regular sessions using the FIR therapy machine over the 4-week treatment course. Clinical and laboratory outcome measures were carried out before and after treatment. Clinical outcome measures included DLA seizure frequency (episodes/year), patients' subjective feedback for lymphedema-related symptoms and quality of life (QOL). Laboratory outcome measures included bacterial cultures and concentrations of inflammatory cytokines: IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IL-18, TNF-α, TNF-β, caspase-1 and INF-γ, detected in serum and local lymphedema tissue fluid samples using protein microarray and ELISA. Between 2012 and 2016, a total of 120 female patients were screened for study enrollment. Sixty-four recruited patients underwent clinical evaluation both before FIR radiation therapy and 1 year after a single course of FIR radiation therapy. Eleven patients (17.2%), randomly chosen from the study group, underwent additional laboratory analysis of blood and local lymphedema tissue fluid samples. The frequency of DLA decreased following treatment (p treatment. The efficiency rate calculated using DLA frequencies was greater than 50% for 63 (98%) patients following treatment. Patients reported a subjective decrease in lymphedema-related symptoms (p treatment (p treatment were both negative. FIR radiation therapy provides an effective treatment modality for patients with chronic lymphedema accompanied with DLA that develops secondarily to treatment of gynecological malignancies, whose

  20. Human detection based on the generation of a background image by using a far-infrared light camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun Som; Choi, Jong-Suk; Lee, Ji Hoon; Shin, Kwang Yong; Kim, Yeong Gon; Le, Toan Thanh; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2015-03-19

    The need for computer vision-based human detection has increased in fields, such as security, intelligent surveillance and monitoring systems. However, performance enhancement of human detection based on visible light cameras is limited, because of factors, such as nonuniform illumination, shadows and low external light in the evening and night. Consequently, human detection based on thermal (far-infrared light) cameras has been considered as an alternative. However, its performance is influenced by the factors, such as low image resolution, low contrast and the large noises of thermal images. It is also affected by the high temperature of backgrounds during the day. To solve these problems, we propose a new method for detecting human areas in thermal camera images. Compared to previous works, the proposed research is novel in the following four aspects. One background image is generated by median and average filtering. Additional filtering procedures based on maximum gray level, size filtering and region erasing are applied to remove the human areas from the background image. Secondly, candidate human regions in the input image are located by combining the pixel and edge difference images between the input and background images. The thresholds for the difference images are adaptively determined based on the brightness of the generated background image. Noise components are removed by component labeling, a morphological operation and size filtering. Third, detected areas that may have more than two human regions are merged or separated based on the information in the horizontal and vertical histograms of the detected area. This procedure is adaptively operated based on the brightness of the generated background image. Fourth, a further procedure for the separation and removal of the candidate human regions is performed based on the size and ratio of the height to width information of the candidate regions considering the camera viewing direction and perspective

  1. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  2. Stress Management: Tai Chi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Tai chi helps reduce stress and anxiety. And it also helps increase flexibility and balance. By Mayo ... you're looking for a way to reduce stress, consider tai chi (TIE-CHEE). Originally developed for ...

  3. Micro-Spec: an Integrated, Direct-Detection Spectrometer for Far-Infrared and Sub-Millimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Moseley, S. H.; Hsieh, W.; Huang, W.; Stevenson, T.; Wollack, E.

    2014-01-01

    Many space-based observatories, such as Spitzer and Herschel, have opened the far-infrared (IR) window to the universe, revealing rich line and continuum spectra from objects ranging from interplanetary dust particles to galactic mergers and young galaxies in the early universe. Micro-Spec (µ-Spec) is proposed as a novel technology concept to enable new discoveries in the far-IR spectral range. µ-Spec will be a high-sensitivity, direct-detection spectrometer operating in the 450-1000 µm regime. It will have two antenna arrays, one for transmitting and one for receiving, and superconducting microstrip transmission lines for power division and phase delay. Using superconducting materials reduces losses at a minimum, thereby providing background-limited sensitivity (noise equivalent power, NEP, less than 3x10^-21 W/√Hz) at a resolution 1200, potentially making µ-Spec four orders of magnitude more sensitive than its most capable predecessors. Materials being investigated for the development of the instrument transmission line and detectors include niobium and niobium-titanium nitride for the former, and molybdenum nitride for the latter. In addition, the instrument will be integrated on a four-inch-diameter silicon chip. Such a dramatic size reduction is made possible by the fact that silicon has a refraction index three times that of vacuum, thereby allowing the transmission lines to be shorter than in vacuum by a factor of three. For all these reasons, µ-Spec can become an important capability under the low background conditions provided by space telescopes such as the space infrared telescope for cosmology and astrophysics SPICA, possible Explorers and cryogenically-cooled balloons. The discussion will illustrate a point design developed for initial demonstration with a 30% efficiency due to losses to other diffraction orders. Design variations on this implementation will be shown that lead to near-unity efficiency and will be the basis of future instruments

  4. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P. M.; Rich, J. A.; Xu, C. K. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lisenfeld, U. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Bitsakis, T. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guillard, P. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris-Sud XI, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Charmandaris, V. [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Cluver, M.; Jarrett, T. [Astrophysics Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Dept of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, 7701, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Freeland, E. [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Rasmussen, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Verdes-Montenegro, L. [Departamento Astronomía Extragaláctica, Instituto Astrofísica Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Yun, M., E-mail: kalatalo@ipac.caltech.edu [University of Massachusetts, Astronomy Department, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L {sub FIR} and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H{sub 2} emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  5. Far infrared conductivity of charge density wave materials and the oxygen isotope effect in high-T sub c superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creager, W.N.

    1991-09-01

    The far infrared reflectance and conductivity of (Ta{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}Se{sub 4}){sub 2}I and TaS{sub 3} have been measured to determine the origin of a huge infrared resonance that dominates the charge density wave (CDW) dynamics along with the pinned acoustic phason mode in the related materials (TaSe{sub 4}){sub 2}I and K{sub 0. 3}MoO{sub 3}. The measurements cover frequencies from 3 to 700cm{sup {minus}1} and the temperature range from 15K to 300K. In the niobium-doped alloys (Ta{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}Se{sub 4}){sub 2}I, the size and frequency of the giant infrared mode remain nearly constant as the impurity concentration x is increased. For TaS{sub 3}, the pinned acoustic phason near 0.5cm{sup {minus}1} dominates {var epsilon}({omega}) and an additional small mode lies near 9cm{sup {minus}1}. The latter mode is much smaller than the infrared mode in other CDW materials. These results rule out several models of a generic infrared mode'' in CDW excitations. They are compared in detail to the predictions of a recent theory attributing the infrared mode to a bound collective mode localized at impurity sites within the crystal. The transmittance of K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} has been measured at 1.2K with a strong dc electric field applied across the crystal. Under these conditions, the charge density wave depins abruptly and carries large currents with near-zero differential resistance. For some samples, the low-frequency transmittance is enhanced slightly when the CDW depins. The magnitude of the oxygen isotope effect in the high-{Tc} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} has been determined by substitution of {sup 18}O for {sup 16}O. A series of cross-exchanges was performed on high-quality polycrystalline specimens to eliminate uncertainties due to sample heat treatments and sample inhomogeneities.

  6. On the Role of Inertial Effects and Dipole-Dipole Coupling in the Theory of the Debye and Far-Infrared Absorption of Polar Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, W. T.; Corcoran, P. M.; Evans, M. W.

    1987-03-01

    The theory of dielectric relaxation of an assembly of molecules containing rotating polar groups, originally developed by Budo, is extended to include inertial effects. It is shown that the inclusion of these effects gives rise to a resonance absorption in the far infrared band of frequencies. To obtain analytical formulae for the polarizability and the absorption coefficient the system is first treated in the harmonic approximation. Nonlinear effects are then taken account of by using the averaging method of Krylov and Bogoliubov. Inclusion of these effects indicates that the frequency of maximum far-infrared power absorption should decrease as the temperature increases in qualitative agreement with experimental findings. Also the nonlinear effects cause the angularvelocity correlation functions to become less oscillatory as temperature is increased. The present treatment gives rise to equations that in the harmonic approximation are formally similar to those of the itinerant oscillator model.

  7. Advanced optimization of permanent magnet wigglers using a genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajima, Ryoichi [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    In permanent magnet wigglers, magnetic imperfection of each magnet piece causes field error. This field error can be reduced or compensated by sorting magnet pieces in proper order. We showed a genetic algorithm has good property for this sorting scheme. In this paper, this optimization scheme is applied to the case of permanent magnets which have errors in the direction of field. The result shows the genetic algorithm is superior to other algorithms.

  8. Field Distribution of a Planar Electrostatic Wiggler and Modulation Effect on the Motion of Relativistic Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Chang

    2010-03-01

    A planar electrostatic wiggler is formed by two parallel metallic plates, where the upper-plate is corrugated with sinusoidal ripples and connected to a negative voltage and the lower-plate is smooth and grounded. The field distribution is mathematically derived in detail. It is demonstrated that this planar electrostatic wiggler can efficiently modulate the motion of relativistic electrons just as a magneto-static wiggler does in a free-electron laser. Results obtained here will provide basis to analyze the amplification mechanism of a fast wave by a relativistic electron beam in a planar electrostatic wiggler.

  9. Development of 14 cm Period Wiggler at PLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. E.; Park, K. H.; Lee, H. G.; Suh, H. S.; Han, H. S.; Jung, Y. G.; Chung, C. W.

    2004-05-01

    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) is developing a 14 cm period wiggler (MPW14) for high flux material science(HFMS) beamline. The MPW14 is a hybrid type device achieving higher peak flux density. PLS MPW14 features period of 14cm, minimum gap of 14mm, 24 full field poles, maximum flux density of 2.02 Tesla, and the total magnetic structure length of 2056mm. The peak flux density is higher compared to the other wigglers of similar pole gap and period. The high peak flux density has been achieved by using advanced new magnetic materials and optimized magnetic geometry. The magnetic performance of the MPW14 is measured using a conventional hall probe scanning system and flipping coil system. The newly developed angularly resolved flipping coil measurement system is very precise and fast. Due to its angular resolving feature, all higher order multipole contents of the MPW14 could be measured. In this article, all the developments efforts for the PLS MPW14 wiggler and the efforts for the angularly resolving flipping coil measurement system are described.

  10. Herschel/PACS observations of young sources in Taurus: the far-infrared counterpart of optical jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, L.; Kamp, I.; Flower, D.; Howard, C.; Sandell, G.; Mora, A.; Aresu, G.; Brittain, S.; Dent, W. R. F.; Pinte, C.; White, G. J.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Observations of the atomic and molecular line emission associated with jets and outflows emitted by young stellar objects provide sensitive diagnostics of the excitation conditions, and can be used to trace the various evolutionary stages they pass through as they evolve to become main sequence stars. Aims: To understand the relevance of atomic and molecular cooling in shocks, and how accretion and ejection efficiency evolves with the evolutionary state of the sources, we will study the far-infrared counterparts of bright optical jets associated with Class I and II sources in Taurus (T Tau, DG Tau A, DG Tau B, FS Tau A+B, and RW Aur). Methods: We have analysed Herschel/PACS observations of a number of atomic ([O i]63 μm, 145 μm, [C ii]158 μm) and molecular (high-J CO, H2O, OH) lines, collected within the open time key project GASPS (PI: W. R. F. Dent). To constrain the origin of the detected lines we have compared the obtained FIR emission maps with the emission from optical-jets and millimetre-outflows, and the measured line fluxes and ratios with predictions from shock and disk models. Results: All of the targets are associated with extended emission in the atomic lines; in particular, the strong [O i] 63 μm emission is correlated with the direction of the optical jet/mm-outflow. The line ratios suggest that the atomic lines can be excited in fast dissociative J-shocks occurring along the jet. The molecular emission, on the contrary, originates from a compact region, that is spatially and spectrally unresolved, and lines from highly excited levels are detected (e.g., the o-H2O 818-707 line, and the CO J = 36-35 line). Disk models are unable to explain the brightness of the observed lines (CO and H2O line fluxes up to 10-15-6 × 10-16 W m-2). Slow C- or J-shocks with high pre-shock densities reproduce the observed H2O and high-J CO lines; however, the disk and/or UV-heated outflow cavities may contribute to the observed emission. Conclusions

  11. Second crystal cooling on cryogenically cooled undulator and wiggler double crystal monochromators.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, G. S.

    1998-08-03

    Simple methods for the cooling of the second crystals of cryogenically cooled undulator and wiggler double crystal monochromators are described. Copper braids between the first and second crystals are used to cool the second crystals of the double crystal monochromators. The method has proved successful for an undulator monochromator and we describe a design for a wiggler monochromator.

  12. Measuring the Evolution of Stellar Populations And Gas Metallicity in Galaxies with Far-Infrared Space Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Gordon

    We propose a study of the evolution of stellar populations and gas metallicities in about 80 nearby star forming galaxies based on mining the NASA data archives for observations of the [NIII] 57 µm, [OIII] 52 µm and/or 88 µm, [NII] 122 and [CII] 158 µm far-infrared (FIR) fine- structure lines and other archives for thermal radio continuum. These lines are powerful probes of both stellar populations and gas properties and our primary science derives from these tracers. For sources that show both signs of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation, we will take advantage of the readily available NASA Spitzer IRS data base that includes mid-IR [NeII] 12.8 µm, [NeIII] 15.6 µm and [NeV] 14.3 µm, [OIV] 25.9 µm and PAH observations. These complementary data reveal the relative fractions of the FIR line emission that might arise from star formation and the narrow line regions (NLR) associated with an AGN, thereby providing a robust set of observations to compare with star formation models. Subsets of the FIR lines have been detected from hundreds of nearby galaxies. From both theoretical studies and the results of these pioneering observations we know that these lines can be powerful probes of stellar populations and star formation in galaxies. Here we plan to use various combinations of the lines to constrain (1) the age of the stellar populations (through lines that trace the hardness of the stellar radiation fields, hence stellar spectral type), (2) the degree of processing of the interstellar medium (through lines that trace growth of secondary to primary element abundances for example, the N/O ratio), (3) the efficiency of star formation (through growth in absolute abundances of N and O, the N/H and O/H ratios), and (4) the current day mass function of upper main sequence stars. Surprisingly, there has been no systematic study of the large sample of these line detections made with PACS on Herschel in order to truly assess and calibrate their diagnostic

  13. Electron cloud dynamics in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Celata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The interference of stray electrons (also called “electron clouds” with accelerator beams is important in modern intense-beam accelerators, especially those with beams of positive charge. In magnetic wigglers, used, for instance, for transverse emittance damping, the intense synchrotron radiation produced by the beam can generate an electron cloud of relatively high density. In this paper the complicated dynamics of electron clouds in wigglers is examined using the example of a wiggler in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator experiment at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with the WARP-POSINST computer code show different density and dynamics for the electron cloud at locations near the maxima of the vertical wiggler field when compared to locations near the minima. Dynamics in these regions, the electron cloud distribution vs longitudinal position, and the beam coherent tune shift caused by the wiggler electron cloud will be discussed.

  14. Determination of the pigments present in a wallpaper of the middle nineteenth century: the combination of mid-diffuse reflectance and far infrared spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizabalaga, Iker; Gómez-Laserna, Olivia; Aramendia, Julene; Arana, Gorka; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-24

    In this work the determination of the pigments present in a decorative wallpaper of the middle nineteenth century from the Santa Isabel factory (Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country, Spain) has been performed by a combination of mid-Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFT) and Far Infrared Spectroscopy (FIR) in transmission mode. The DRIFT is a powerful infrared technique that is not widely used in the analyses of artworks in spite of being especially adequate for powdered samples. In this mode, sample pretreatment is not required and the obtained spectra are easier to solve than those obtained in transmittance mode. Those pigments which are not active in the mid-infrared region may be determined easily by FIR. In the last decade, in the field of painted materials very few studies performed by far infrared spectroscopy and mid infrared spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance mode can be found. In most of them the researchers have used one of these techniques, but in no case the combination of both. As we demonstrate in this work, combining these two techniques a complete characterization of the wallpaper can be carried out. Small samples were collected from the wallpaper for the analysis of the rose, brown, yellow and blue colours. In this way, minium (Pb3O4), calcite (CaCO3), barium sulphate (BaSO4), prussian blue (Fe7C18N18), iron oxide yellow (α-FeOOH), vermillion (HgS) and carbon black pigment from organic origen were detected. Finally, the validation was carried out by XRF and Raman spectroscopy getting the same results as with the combination of diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy and far infrared spectroscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of hydrogen bonding on torsional dynamics: A combined far-infrared jet and matrix isolation study of methanol dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollipost, F.; Andersen, Jonas; Wallin Mahler Andersen, Denise

    2014-01-01

    The effect of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding on torsional degrees of freedom is investigated by far-infrared absorption spectroscopy for different methanol dimer isotopologues isolated in supersonic jet expansions or embedded in inert neon matrices at low temperatures. For the vacuum......-isolated and Ne-embedded methanol dimer, the hydrogen bond OH librational mode of the donor subunit is finally observed at ∼560 cm(-1), blue-shifted by more than 300 cm(-1) relative to the OH torsional fundamental of the free methanol monomer. The OH torsional mode of the acceptor embedded in neon is observed...

  16. Far-Infrared Emission Characteristics and Wear Comfort Property of ZrC-Imbedded Heat Storage Knitted Fabrics for Emotional Garments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyun Ah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the far-infrared emission characteristics and wear comfort properties of ZrC-imbedded heat storage knitted fabrics. For this purpose, ZrC-imbedded, heat storage PET (polyethylene terephthalate was spun from high-viscosity PET with imbedded ZrC powder on the core part and low-viscosity PET on the sheath part using a conjugated spinning method. ZrC-imbedded PET knitted fabric was also prepared and its physical properties were measured and compared with those of regular PET knitted fabric. In addition, ingredient analysis and the far-infrared emission characteristics of the ZrC-imbedded knitted fabrics were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The thermal properties, moisture absorption, and drying properties of the ZrC-imbedded PET knitted fabric were measured and compared with those of the regular PET knitted fabric. The mechanical properties using the FAST (fabric assurance by simple testing system and the dye affinity of the ZrC-imbedded knitted fabric were also measured and compared with those of regular PET knitted fabric.

  17. Comfort and Functional Properties of Far-Infrared/Anion-Releasing Warp-Knitted Elastic Composite Fabrics Using Bamboo Charcoal, Copper, and Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Elastic warp-knitted composite fabrics with far-infrared emissivity and an anion-releasing property were prepared using bamboo charcoal (BC, copper (Cu, and phase-change material (PCM. The functional composite fabric, which was composed of self-made complex yarns with various twisting degrees and material composition, were created using a rotor twister and ring-spinning technique. The fabric structure was diversified by the feeding modes of weft yarn into a crochet-knitting machine. The twist number of complex yarns was optimized by tensile tenacity, twist contraction, and hairiness, and analysis showed that twisting at 12 twists per inch produced the highest tensile tenacity and appropriate twist contraction and hairiness. Comfort evaluation showed that the elastic composite fabrics with BC weft yarns exhibited higher water–vapor transmission rate and air permeability, reaching 876 g/m2∙ day and 73.2 cm3/s/cm2, respectively. Three structures of composite fabric with various weft yarns had >0.85 ε far-infrared emissivity and 350–420 counts/cm3 anion amount. The prepared elastic warp-knitted fabrics can provide a comfortable, dry, and breathable environment to the wearer and can thus be applied as health-care textiles in the future.

  18. Effect of heater with plasma-sprayed mullite coatings on heating by far-infrared radiation. Mullite himaku wo keiseishita kanetsutai no ensekigaisen hosha tokusei oyobi kanetsu koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, M.; Nishino, A.; Suzuki, T. (Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan))

    1993-09-30

    Effects of a quartz tube heater coated with plasma-sprayed mullite on the far-infrared radiation heating was investigated by means of spectral energy distribution in wavelength ranging from 1.4 to 14[mu]m, and color difference and weight loss observations before and after toasting of bread. Mullite material was sprayed on the opaque quartz tube substrate using an 80kW plasma-spray apparatus, to make a coating with thickness of 50[mu]m. The mullite coating on the quartz tube heater showed high far-infrared radiation. It was found that the mullite coating exhibited good wavelength change characteristics, and the spectral energy increased by about 7%. It was also illustrated that for the heating by the heater with mullite coating, the heating efficiency was improved during toasting of bread. As a result, the heater coated with mullite showed a decrease in heating time and also provided energy saving of around 12% during toasting of bread. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Far-Infrared and Nebular Star-Formation Rate of Dusty Star Forming Galaxies from Herschel, CANDELS and 3D-HST at z~1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Farhanul; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Cooray, Asantha R.; Herschel Group: University of California Irvine. Dept. of Physics & Astronomy. Led by professor Asantha Cooray, Reed College Undergraduate Research Committee

    2017-06-01

    We present a combined Herschel/PACS and SPIRE and HST/WFC3 observations of the five CANDELS fields, EGS, GOODS-N, GOODS-S, COSMOS and UDS, to study star-formation activity in dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at z~1. We use 3D-HST photometry and Grism spectroscopic redshifts to construct the Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) of galaxies in the near UV, optical and near infrared, along with IRAC measurements at 3.6-8 μm in the mid-infrared, and Herschel data at 250-500 μm in the far-infrared. The 3D-HST grism line measurements are used to estimate the star-formation rate from nebular emission. In particular, we compare the H-alpha measured SFRs (corrected for attenuation) to that of direct observations of the far-infrared from Herschel. We further look at the infrared excess in this sample of dusty star-forming galaxies (denoted by LIR/LUV) as a function of the UV slope. We find that the population of high-z DSFGs sit above the trend expected for normal star-forming galaxies. Additionally, we study the dependence of SFR on total dust attenuation and confirm a strong correlation between SFR(Ha) and the balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ).

  20. Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH). III. Far-infrared cooling lines in low-mass young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karska, A.; Herczeg, G. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wampfler, S. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Visser, R.; Nisini, B.; San José-García, I.; Bruderer, S.; Śniady, P.; Doty, S.; Fedele, D.; Yıldız, U. A.; Benz, A. O.; Bergin, E.; Caselli, P.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Liseau, R.; Tafalla, M.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2013-04-01

    Context. Understanding the physical phenomena involved in the earlierst stages of protostellar evolution requires knowledge of the heating and cooling processes that occur in the surroundings of a young stellar object. Spatially resolved information from its constituent gas and dust provides the necessary constraints to distinguish between different theories of accretion energy dissipation into the envelope. Aims. Our aims are to quantify the far-infrared line emission from low-mass protostars and the contribution of different atomic and molecular species to the gas cooling budget, to determine the spatial extent of the emission, and to investigate the underlying excitation conditions. Analysis of the line cooling will help us characterize the evolution of the relevant physical processes as the protostar ages. Methods. Far-infrared Herschel-PACS spectra of 18 low-mass protostars of various luminosities and evolutionary stages are studied in the context of the WISH key program. For most targets, the spectra include many wavelength intervals selected to cover specific CO, H2O, OH, and atomic lines. For four targets the spectra span the entire 55-200 μm region. The PACS field-of-view covers ~47" with the resolution of 9.4". Results. Most of the protostars in our sample show strong atomic and molecular far-infrared emission. Water is detected in 17 out of 18 objects (except TMC1A), including 5 Class I sources. The high-excitation H2O 818-707 63.3 μm line (Eu/kB = 1071 K) is detected in 7 sources. CO transitions from J = 14-13 up to J = 49 - 48 are found and show two distinct temperature components on Boltzmann diagrams with rotational temperatures of ~350 K and ~700 K. H2O has typical excitation temperatures of ~150 K. Emission from both Class 0 and I sources is usually spatially extended along the outflow direction but with a pattern that depends on the species and the transition. In the extended sources, emission is stronger off source and extended on &≥10,000 AU

  1. PENGARUH PENGERINGAN DENGAN FAR INFRARED DRYER, OVEN VAKUM DAN FREEZE DRYER TERHADAP WARNA, KADAR TOTAL KAROTEN, BETA KAROTEN DAN VITAMIN C PADA DAUM BAYAM (Amaranthus Tricolor L.) [Effect of Drying with Far Infrared Dryer, Oven Vacuum, and Freeze Dryer on the Color, Total Carotene, Beta-Carotene, and Vitamin C of Spinach Leaves (Amaranthus Tricolor L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Ridwan Thahir2); Asep Sopian; Tien R Muchtadi1)

    2005-01-01

    Spinach is a well known vegetable as a source of nutrition especially for is carotene. Soinach leaves need to be dried for application in product development of food like biscuit, extruded products and analysis. One the drying method that became popular is drying using infrared wave. The aim of this research was to compare the effect of blanching and drying (far infrared dryer, oven vacuum, and freeze dryer) on the color, total carotene, beta-carotene, and vitamin C of spinach leaves. Blanchi...

  2. Results from a triple chord stellar occultation and far-infrared photometry of the trans-Neptunian object (229762) 2007 UK126

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, K.; Wolf, J.; Bardecker, J.; Olsen, A.; Müller, T.; Kiss, C.; Ortiz, J. L.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Herald, D.; Krabbe, A.

    2017-04-01

    Context. A stellar occultation by a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) provides an opportunity to probe the size and shape of these distant solar system bodies. In the past seven years, several occultations by TNOs have been observed, but mostly from a single location. Only very few TNOs have been sampled simultaneously from multiple locations. Sufficient data that enable a robust estimation of shadow size through an ellipse fit could only be obtained for two objects. Aims: We present the first observation of an occultation by the TNO 2007 UK126 on 15 November 2014, measured by three observers, one nearly on and two almost symmetrical to the shadow's centerline. This is the first multi-chord dataset obtained for a so-called detached object, a TNO subgroup with perihelion distances so large that the giant planets have likely not perturbed their orbits. We also revisit Herschel/PACS far-infrared data, applying a new reduction method to improve the accuracy of the measured fluxes. Combining both datasets allows us to comprehensively characterize 2007 UK126. Methods: We use error-in-variable regression to solve the non-linear problem of propagating timing errors into uncertainties of the ellipse parameters. Based on the shadow's size and a previously reported rotation period, we expect a shape of a Maclaurin spheroid and derive a geometrically plausible size range. To refine our size estimate of 2007 UK126, we model its thermal emission using a thermophysical model code. We conduct a parametric study to predict far-infrared fluxes and compare them to the Herschel/PACS measurements. Results: The favorable geometry of our occultation chords, combined with minimal dead-time imaging, and precise GPS time measurements, allow for an accurate estimation of the shadow size (best-fitting ellipse with axes 645.80 ± 5.68 km × 597.81 ± 12.74 km) and the visual geometric albedo (pV = 15.0 ± 1.6%). By combining our analyses of the occultation and the far-infrared data, we can

  3. Chirped-pulse Fourier transform millimeter-wave spectroscopy of ten vibrationally excited states of i-propyl cyanide: exploring the far-infrared region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Benjamin E; Gruet, Sébastien; Steber, Amanda L; Giuliano, Barbara M; Schnell, Melanie

    2017-01-18

    We report here further spectroscopic investigation of the astrochemically relevant molecule i-propyl cyanide. We observed and analysed the rotational spectra of the ground state of the molecule and ten vibrationally excited states with energies between 180-500 cm(-1). For this, we used a segmented W-band spectrometer (75-110 GHz) and performed the experiments under room temperature conditions. This approach thus provides access to high-resolution, pure rotational data of vibrational modes that occur in the far-infrared fingerprint region, and that can be difficult to access with other techniques. The obtained, extensive data set will support further astronomical searches and identifications, such as in warmer regions of the interstellar space where contributions from vibrationally excited states become increasingly relevant.

  4. A Study of the Far Infrared Spectrum of N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine Using THz-TDS, FTIR, and Semiempirical Quantum Chemistry Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Chamorro-Posada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The far infrared spectrum of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine has been studied by combining THz–TDS and FTIR characterization techniques with theoretical studies based on semiempirical quantum chemistry methods. A strong spectral peak at 60 cm−1 has been identified, which constitutes the main signature of the material in the terahertz band. Calculated molecular vibrations are in good qualitative and semiquantitative agreement with both the THz-TDS and FTIR experiments. In comparison to previous DFT-based studies, the semiempirical approach chosen herein, suitable for parallel multi-core and GPU acceleration, allows for a full study using periodic boundary conditions and no further approximations within a constrained computing time.

  5. The effect of stimulated interband emission on the impurity-assisted far-infrared photoluminescence in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhov, I. S.; Panevin, V. Yu.; Sofronov, A. N.; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya.; Vasil'ev, A. P.; Maleev, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    Emission of far- and near-infrared radiations in the n-GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well nanostructures under interband photoexcitation of electron-hole pairs is studied at low lattice temperatures. Optical transitions of nonequilibrium electrons involving donor impurity states in quantum wells are revealed in far- and near-infrared emission spectra. Intensive optical pumping allows to observe near-infrared stimulated emission related to the radiative recombination of electrons from the ground donor state and holes from the valence subband in quantum wells. The possibility of the intensity increase of impurity-assisted far-infrared radiation due to effective depopulation of donor states with interband stimulated emission in quantum wells is demonstrated.

  6. Low-frequency quadrupole impedance of undulators and wigglers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Blednykh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical expression of the low-frequency quadrupole impedance for undulators and wigglers is derived and benchmarked against beam-based impedance measurements done at the 3 GeV NSLS-II storage ring. The adopted theoretical model, valid for an arbitrary number of electromagnetic layers with parallel geometry, allows to calculate the quadrupole impedance for arbitrary values of the magnetic permeability μ_{r}. In the comparison of the analytical results with the measurements for variable magnet gaps, two limit cases of the permeability have been studied: the case of perfect magnets (μ_{r}→∞, and the case in which the magnets are fully saturated (μ_{r}=1.

  7. Magnetic x-ray measurements using the elliptical multipole wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montano, P. A.; Li, Y.; Beno, M. A.; Jennings, G.; Kimball, C. W.

    1999-10-26

    The EMW at the BESSRC beam lines at the APS provides high photon flux at high energies with the capability of producing circular polarization on axis. The authors observe a high degree of circularly polarized x-rays at such energies. The polarization and frequency tunability of the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW) is an ideal source for many magnetic measurements from X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) to Compton scattering experiments. They performed Compton scattering measurements to determine the polarization and photon flux at the sample as a function of the deflection parameters K{sub y} and K{sub x}. They used for their measurements a Si (220) Laue monochromator providing simultaneous photon energies at 50 keV, 100 keV and 150 keV. Magnetic Compton Profiles were determined by either switching the magnet polarity or the photon helicity. The results obtained using Fe(110) single crystals were very similar.

  8. Absorber for wakefield interference management at the entrance of the wiggler of a free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchlik, Matthew; Biallas, George Herman

    2017-03-07

    A method for managing the broad band microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation in a free electron laser (FEL) having a wiggler producing power in the electromagnetic spectrum. The method includes placement of broadband microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation absorbers on the upstream end of the wiggler. The absorbers dampen the bounced back, broad band microwave and THz radiation returning from the surfaces outside the nose of the cookie-cutter and thus preventing broadening of the electron beam pulse's narrow longitudinal energy distribution. Broadening diminishes the ultimate laser power from the wiggler. The broadband microwave and THz radiation absorbers are placed on either side of the slot in the cookie-cutter that shapes the wake field wave of the electron pulse to the slot shape of the wiggler chamber aperture. The broad band microwave and THz radiation absorber is preferably a non-porous pyrolytic grade of graphite with small grain size.

  9. An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated by damping wigglers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaobiao [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-01-06

    We discuss the approach of generating round beams for ultimate storage rings using vertical damping wigglers (with horizontal magnetic field). The vertical damping wigglers provide damping and excite vertical emittance. This eliminates the need to generate large linear coupling that is impractical with traditional off-axis injection. We use a PEP-X compatible lattice to demonstrate the approach. This lattice uses separate quadrupole and sextupole magnets with realistic gradient strengths. Intrabeam scattering effects are calculated. As a result, the horizontal and vertical emittances are 22.3 pm and 10.3 pm, respectively, for a 200 mA, 4.5 GeV beam, with a vertical damping wiggler of a total length of 90 m, a peak field of 1.5 T and a wiggler period of 100 mm.

  10. Emittance control of the PS e ± beams using a robinson wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baconnier, Y.; Cappi, R.; Riunaud, J. P.; Umstätter, H. H.; Level, M. P.; Sommer, M.; Zyngier, H.

    1985-02-01

    In 1958 Robinson of the Cambridge electron accelerator (Massachusetts) proposed that a gradient wiggler magnet be used to stabilise naturally unstable electron and positron beams in combined function machines. In 1986 such a method is to be applied in the PS so that, besides its many other tasks, it may serve as an accelerator in the LEP injector chain. This paper describes a prototype of a gradient wiggler magnet designed and constructed at CERN. It reports the results of measurements obtained with proton beams in the PS to check the influence of the wiggler on beam optics and of measurements made with positron beams in DCI (LAL, Orsay, France) to check the damping variations produced by this wiggler. As predictions were confirmed by these measurements, three magnets of this type will be installed in the PS when it is part of the LEP injector chain.

  11. Absorber for wakefield interference management at the entrance of the wiggler of a free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchlik, Matthew; Biallas, George Herman

    2017-03-07

    A method for managing the broad band microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation in a free electron laser (FEL) having a wiggler producing power in the electromagnetic spectrum. The method includes placement of broadband microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation absorbers on the upstream end of the wiggler. The absorbers dampen the bounced back, broad band microwave and THz radiation returning from the surfaces outside the nose of the cookie-cutter and thus preventing broadening of the electron beam pulse's narrow longitudinal energy distribution. Broadening diminishes the ultimate laser power from the wiggler. The broadband microwave and THz radiation absorbers are placed on either side of the slot in the cookie-cutter that shapes the wake field wave of the electron pulse to the slot shape of the wiggler chamber aperture. The broad band microwave and THz radiation absorber is preferably a non-porous pyrolytic grade of graphite with small grain size.

  12. The origin of the far-infrared continuum of z ~ 6 quasars. A radiative transfer model for SDSS J1148+5251

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R.; Bianchi, S.; Valiante, R.; Risaliti, G.; Salvadori, S.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Understanding the history of formation of z > 6 quasars is a major challenge to theoretical models. Physical insights on the connection between the central black hole and its host galaxy can be gained by means of the quasar infrared properties. Aims: Here we investigate the origin of the far-infrared continuum of SDSS J1148+5251, using it as a prototype for the more general class of high-luminosity high-redshift quasars. Methods: We run the radiative transfer code TRADING to follow the transfer of radiation from the central source and from stellar sources through the dusty environment of the host galaxy. We adopt simple models for the central source, including all the radiation that can travel beyond the dusty torus. The radiation from stellar sources is modelled using the code PÉGASE. The model is based on the output of the semi-analytical merger tree code, GAMETE/QSOdust, which lets us predict the evolution of the host galaxy and of its nuclear black hole, following the star formation history and chemical evolution - including dust - in all the progenitor galaxies of SDSS J1148+5251. Results: We find that the radiation emitted by the central source, which dominates the observed spectral energy distribution from UV/optical to near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, can also provide an important source of heating for the dust distributed in the host galaxy, powering at least 30% and up to 70% of the observed far-infrared emission at rest-frame wavelengths [20-1000] μm. The remaining fraction is contributed by stellar sources and can only be achieved if the host galaxy is able to sustain a star formation rate of ≈900 M⊙/yr at z = 6.4. This points to a co-evolution scenario where, during their hierarchical assembly, the first super-massive black holes and their host galaxies grow at the same pace until the black hole reaches a mass of ~2 × 108 M⊙; it then starts growing faster than its host, reaching the bright quasar phase when the black hole and

  13. Far infrared fusion plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Peebles, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last several years, reflectometry has grown in importance as a diagnostic for both steady-state density Profiles as well as for the investigation of density fluctuations and turbulence. As a diagnostic for density profile measurement, it is generally believed to be well understood in the tokamak environment. However, its use as a fluctuation diagnostic is hampered by a lack of quantitative experimental understanding of its wavenumber sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several researchers, have theoretically investigated these questions. However, prior to the UCLA laboratory investigation, no group has experimentally investigated these questions. Because of the reflectometer's importance to the world effort in understanding plasma turbulence and transport, UCLA has, over the last year, made its primary Task IIIA effort the resolution of these questions. UCLA has taken the lead in a quantitative experimental understanding of reflectometer data as applied to the measurement of density fluctuations. In addition to this, work has proceeded on the design, construction, and installation of a reflectometer system on UCLA's CCT tokamak. This effort will allow a comparison between the improved confinement regimes (H-mode) observed on both the DIII-D and CCT machines with the goal of achieving a physics understanding of the phenomena. Preliminary investigation of a new diagnostic technique to measure density profiles as a function of time has been initiated at UCLA. The technique promises to be a valuable addition to the range of available plasma diagnostics. Work on advanced holographic reflectometry technique as applied to fluctuation diagnostics has awaited a better understanding of the reflectometer signal itself as discussed above. Efforts to ensure the transfer of the diagnostic developments have continued with particular attention devoted to the preliminary design of a multichannel FIR interferometer for MST.

  14. Far infrared maser communications technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claspy, P. C.; Pao, Y. H.

    1975-01-01

    An optically pumped FIR laser was constructed and tested. Optimum operating conditions were determined with CH3OH as the lasing medium. The laser was found to operate equally well with flowing gas or in a sealed off configuration. The FIR cavity stability and pump laser stability were found to have significant problems. The absorption coefficient per unit pressure of 1-1 difluoroethylene at the P(22) and P(24) lines of the 10.4 micron CO2 band was measured. The FIR line pumped by P(22) occurs at approximately 890 microns, which may be in an atmospheric transmission window. It was found that significant Stark tuning of absorption lines of methanol and 1-1 difluoroethylene can be accomplished, even at the usual 100 to 300 mTorr operating pressures of FIR lasers. This means that the use of Stark tuning may enable more effective use of pump laser output.

  15. Far-Infrared Based Pedestrian Detection for Driver-Assistance Systems Based on Candidate Filters, Gradient-Based Feature and Multi-Frame Approval Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Far-infrared pedestrian detection approaches for advanced driver-assistance systems based on high-dimensional features fail to simultaneously achieve robust and real-time detection. We propose a robust and real-time pedestrian detection system characterized by novel candidate filters, novel pedestrian features and multi-frame approval matching in a coarse-to-fine fashion. Firstly, we design two filters based on the pedestrians’ head and the road to select the candidates after applying a pedestrian segmentation algorithm to reduce false alarms. Secondly, we propose a novel feature encapsulating both the relationship of oriented gradient distribution and the code of oriented gradient to deal with the enormous variance in pedestrians’ size and appearance. Thirdly, we introduce a multi-frame approval matching approach utilizing the spatiotemporal continuity of pedestrians to increase the detection rate. Large-scale experiments indicate that the system works in real time and the accuracy has improved about 9% compared with approaches based on high-dimensional features only.

  16. Infrared Space Observatory Observations of Far-Infrared Rotational Emission Lines of Water Vapor Toward the Supergiant Star VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Harwit, Martin; Melnick, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the detection of numerous far-infrared emission lines of water vapor toward the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris. A 29.5-45 micron grating scan of VY CMa, obtained using the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of the Infrared Space Observatory at a spectral resolving power lambda/delat.lambda of approximately 2000, reveals at least 41 spectral features due to water vapor that together radiate a total luminosity of approximately 25 solar luminosity . In addition to pure rotational transitions within the ground vibrational state, these features include rotational transitions within the (010) excited vibrational state. The spectrum also shows the (sup 2)product(sub 1/2) (J = 5/2) left arrow (sup 2)product(sub 3/2) (J = 3/2) OH feature near 34.6 micron in absorption. Additional SWS observations of VY CMa were carried out in the instrument's Fabry-Perot mode for three water transitions: the 7(sub 25)-6(sub 16) line at 29.8367 micron, the 4(sub 41)-3(sub 12) line at 31.7721 micron, and the 4(sub 32)-3(sub 03) line at 40.6909 micron. The higher spectral resolving power lambda/delta.lambda of approximately 30,000 thereby obtained permits the line profiles to be resolved spectrally for the first time and reveals the "P Cygni" profiles that are characteristic of emission from an outflowing envelope.

  17. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure, ultraviolet light-C, and far-infrared treatments on the digestibility, antioxidant and antihypertensive activity of α-casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanlan; Zheng, Yuanrong; Liu, Zhenmin; Xiao, Yang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2017-04-15

    Alpha-casein is the most important bioactive protein in processing technologies. This study investigated the digestibility, antioxidant and antihypertensive activities of α-casein when treated by high hydrostatic pressure (HPP), ultraviolet light-C (UV-C), and far-infrared radiation (FIR). The in vitro digestibility was modified after treatments, especially after 5min/200MPa HHP treatment. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis showed that one 5min/200MPa HHP treatment resulted in the highest yield of peptides. Based on the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and antioxidant and antihypertensive activity assays, HHP increased the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory activity at different levels. The 15min UV-C treatment resulted in the highest antioxidant DPPH radical-scavenging activity, while the 15min UV-C and FIR treatments had higher angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities than those of 5min treatments. This study revealed that HHP, UV-C and FIR treatments increased the antioxidant and antihypertensive activities of α-casein. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Effect of Ge-doping on the short-wave, mid- and far-infrared intersubband transitions in GaN/AlGaN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Caroline B.; Ajay, Akhil; Lähnemann, Jonas; Bougerol, Catherine; Monroy, Eva

    2017-12-01

    This paper assesses the effects of Ge-doping on the structural and optical (band-to-band and intersubband (ISB)) properties of GaN/AlGaN multi-quantum wells (QWs) designed to display ISB absorption in the short-wave, mid- and far-infrared ranges (SWIR, MIR, and FIR, respectively). The standard c-plane crystallographic orientation is considered for wells absorbing in the SWIR and MIR spectral regions, whereas the FIR structures are grown along the nonpolar m-axis. In all cases, we compare the characteristics of Ge-doped and Si-doped samples with the same design and various doping levels. The use of Ge appears to improve the mosaicity of the highly lattice-mismatched GaN/AlN heterostructures. However, when reducing the lattice mismatch, the mosaicity is rather determined by the substrate and does not show any dependence on the dopant nature or concentration. From the optical point of view, by increasing the dopant density, we observe a blueshift of the photoluminescence in polar samples due to the screening of the internal electric field by free carriers. In the ISB absorption, on the other hand, there is a systematic improvement of the linewidth when using Ge as a dopant for high doping levels, whatever the spectral region under consideration (i.e. different QW size, barrier composition and crystallographic orientation).

  19. Far-infrared ray patches relieve pain and improve skin sensitivity in myofascial pain syndrome: A double-blind randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yen-Ting; Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Lin, Shu-Huan; Lin, Chih-Ching; Li, Szu-Yuan; Liu, Chih-Kuang; Teng, Hao-Wei; Liu, Wen-Sheng

    2017-12-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common disorder characterized by muscle pain if myofascial trigger points (MTrP) are stimulated. This study evaluated the effectiveness of far-infrared ray (FIR) patches in reducing the severity of pain in patients with MPS. A double-blind, randomized controlled study involving 125 patients with MPS and 201 MTrPs located in the trapezius muscle. A FIR patch was applied to 98 MTrPs for 24h in the intervention group (61 patients) and a placebo patch was applied to 91 MTrPs in the control group (57 patients) at the end. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analogue scale (V) while pressure pain threshold (P) and maximal pain tolerance (T) were measured using an algometer before and after treatment. The mean age of the patients was 37.16 years old and 67% were female. There was a positive correlation between P and T (ppain (with decreased V), but P and T dropped only in the intervention group with FIR patches. This probably resulted from FIR penetrated only to the skin layer and improved skin sensitivity with more blood circulation, but the muscle remained unaffected. Further studies should investigate the effect of longer exposure or higher energy applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Parallel-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess the Effects of a Far-Infrared-Emitting Collar on Neck Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to assess the beneficial effects of a far-infrared-emitting collar (FIRC on the management of neck disorders. A neck disorder is generalized as neck muscle pain and its relative mental disorders because the etiologies of the neck’s multidimensional syndrome are either muscle impairment or psychiatric distress. This is the first study to determine the efficacy of a FIRC by evaluating objective physical evidence and psychometric self-reports using a parallel-arm randomized sham-controlled and single-blinded design. In this trial, 60 participants with neck disorders were observed at baseline and post-intervention. Compared to the placebo group after a 30-min intervention, the FIRC demonstrated a statistically significant biological effect in elevating skin temperature and promoting blood circulation with p-values 0.003 and 0.020, respectively. In addition, FIRC application significantly reduced neck muscle tension, relieved pain, ameliorated fatigue, improved depression, and decreased anxiety. The FIRC could therefore be a potential treatment for neck disorders.

  1. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  2. An 8 cm period electromagnetic wiggler magnet with coils made from sheet copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Biallas; Stephen Benson; Tommy Hiatt; George Neil; Michael Snyder

    2005-05-01

    An electromagnetic wiggler, now lasing at the Jefferson Lab FEL, has 29 eight cm periods with K variable from 0.5 to 1.1 and gap of 2.6 cm. The wiggler was made inexpensively in 11 weeks by an industrial machine shop. The conduction cooled coil design uses copper sheet material cut to forms using water jet cutting. The conductor is cut to serpentine shapes and the cooling plates are cut to ladder shape. The sheets are assembled in stacks insulated with polymer film, also cut with water jet. The coil design extends the serpentine conductor design of the Duke OK4 to more and smaller conductors. The wiggler features graded fields in the two poles at each end and trim coils on these poles to eliminate field errors caused by saturation. An added critical feature is mirror plates at the ends with integral trim coils to eliminate three dimensional end field effects and align the entrance and exit orbit with the axis of the wiggler. Details of construction, measurement methods and excellent wiggler performance are presented.

  3. Feasibility Study on Introducing a Superconducting Wiggler to Saga Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Koda, Shigeru; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Okajima, Toshihiro; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Takabayashi, Yuichi; Tomimasu, Takio; Torikoshi, Masami; Yoshida, Katuhide

    2005-01-01

    Saga light source (SAGA-LS) is the synchrotron radiation facility, which consists of 250 MeV electron linac and 1.4 GeV storage ring. We have a plan to introduce an existing superconducting wiggler, which has been developed for other project by National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The superconducting wiggler consists of a main pole of 7T and two side poles of 4T. Each pole is composed of a racetrack-shaped coil and an iron core. We have examined the effects of the wiggler on the beam optics when it is introduced into SAGA-LS. The distribution of multipole components in the planes perpendicular to the electron orbit, which is deformed by the wiggler fields, have been calculated using magnetic field calculation code RADIA. Then the lattice function and the dynamic aperture of the ring have been calculated by the lattice calculation code SAD. The results show that the tune shift due to the quadrupole component of the wiggler field is as large as to make horizontal beam orbit unstable. The dynamic apertur...

  4. Higher harmonic emission by a relativistic electron beam in a longitudinal magnetic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ronald C.; McMullin, Wayne A.

    1982-10-01

    The classical limit of the Einstein-coefficient method is used in the low-gain regime to calculate the stimulated emission from a tenuous relativistic electron beam propagating in the combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields (B0+δB k0z)e^z produced near the axis of a multiple-mirror (undulator) field configuration. Emission is found to occur at all harmonics of the wiggler wave number k0 with Doppler upshifted output frequency given by ω=(lk0Vb+ωcb)(1+Vbc)γ2b(1+γ2bV2⊥c2), where l>=1. The emission is compared to the low-gain cyclotron maser with δB=0 and to the low-gain free-electron laser (operating at higher harmonics) utilizing a transverse linearly polarized wiggler field.

  5. Superconducting high-field wigglers and wave length shifter in budker INP

    CERN Document Server

    Batrakov, A M; Borovikov, V M

    2001-01-01

    Several high-field superconducting wigglers (SCW) and wavelength shifters (WLS) are fabricated in the Budker INP for generation of synchrotron radiation.Three-pole WLS with the magnetic field of 7.5 T are installed on LSU-CAMD and BESSY-II storage rings for shifting the radiation spectrum.WLS with the field of 10.3 T will be used for generation of slow positrons on SPring-8.Creation of a 13-pole 7 T wiggler for the BESSY-II and 45-pole 3.5 T wiggler for ELETRA now is finished.The main characteristics,design features and synchrotron radiation properties of SCW and WLS created in the Budker INP are presented in this article.

  6. Association of Far-Infrared Radiation Therapy and Ankle-Brachial Index of Patients on Hemodialysis with Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Kuo, I-Ching; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recognized to be a good marker for atherosclerosis, and is useful in the diagnosis of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) which is prevalent among patients on hemodialysis (HD). Methods: This randomized trial aimed to evaluate the effect of far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy on ABI in HD patients with PAOD. PAOD was defined as patients with ABI < 0.95. One hundred and eight HD patients were enrolled, including 50 in the control group and 58 in the FIR group. A WS TY101 FIR emitter was applied for 40 minutes during each HD session, three times per week for six months. The ABI was measured before and after the FIR therapy. Results: Regardless of FIR therapy, the bilateral ABI decreased (in the FIR group, left: 0.88±0.22 to 0.85±0.24, p = 0.188; right: 0.92±0.20 to 0.90±0.23, p = 0.372; in control group, left: 0.91±0.23 to 0.88±0.21, p = 0144; right: 0.93±0.17 to 0.89±0.21, p = 0.082). Multivariate logistic analysis of the FIR group revealed that high uric acid (odds ratio [OR]: 2.335; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.117-4.882; p=0.024) and aspirin use (OR: 16.463; 95% CI: 1.787-151.638; p=0.013) were independently associated with increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that ABI is not increased after FIR therapy in HD patients with PAOD. However, in the FIR group, patients with higher uric acid level or those who used aspirin have increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy.

  7. Pedestrian Detection Based on Adaptive Selection of Visible Light or Far-Infrared Light Camera Image by Fuzzy Inference System and Convolutional Neural Network-Based Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Kyu; Hong, Hyung Gil; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2017-07-08

    A number of studies have been conducted to enhance the pedestrian detection accuracy of intelligent surveillance systems. However, detecting pedestrians under outdoor conditions is a challenging problem due to the varying lighting, shadows, and occlusions. In recent times, a growing number of studies have been performed on visible light camera-based pedestrian detection systems using a convolutional neural network (CNN) in order to make the pedestrian detection process more resilient to such conditions. However, visible light cameras still cannot detect pedestrians during nighttime, and are easily affected by shadows and lighting. There are many studies on CNN-based pedestrian detection through the use of far-infrared (FIR) light cameras (i.e., thermal cameras) to address such difficulties. However, when the solar radiation increases and the background temperature reaches the same level as the body temperature, it remains difficult for the FIR light camera to detect pedestrians due to the insignificant difference between the pedestrian and non-pedestrian features within the images. Researchers have been trying to solve this issue by inputting both the visible light and the FIR camera images into the CNN as the input. This, however, takes a longer time to process, and makes the system structure more complex as the CNN needs to process both camera images. This research adaptively selects a more appropriate candidate between two pedestrian images from visible light and FIR cameras based on a fuzzy inference system (FIS), and the selected candidate is verified with a CNN. Three types of databases were tested, taking into account various environmental factors using visible light and FIR cameras. The results showed that the proposed method performs better than the previously reported methods.

  8. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy vs. far-infrared vs. passive modalities on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage in highly-trained runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Hausswirth

    Full Text Available Enhanced recovery following physical activity and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD has become a priority for athletes. Consequently, a number of post-exercise recovery strategies are used, often without scientific evidence of their benefits. Within this framework, the purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of whole body cryotherapy (WBC, far infrared (FIR or passive (PAS modalities in hastening muscular recovery within the 48 hours after a simulated trail running race. In 3 non-adjoining weeks, 9 well-trained runners performed 3 repetitions of a simulated trail run on a motorized treadmill, designed to induce muscle damage. Immediately (post, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise, all participants tested three different recovery modalities (WBC, FIR, PAS in a random order over the three separate weeks. Markers of muscle damage (maximal isometric muscle strength, plasma creatine kinase [CK] activity and perceived sensations [i.e. pain, tiredness, well-being] were recorded before, immediately after (post, post 1 h, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise. In all testing sessions, the simulated 48 min trail run induced a similar, significant amount of muscle damage. Maximal muscle strength and perceived sensations were recovered after the first WBC session (post 1 h, while recovery took 24 h with FIR, and was not attained through the PAS recovery modality. No differences in plasma CK activity were recorded between conditions. Three WBC sessions performed within the 48 hours after a damaging running exercise accelerate recovery from EIMD to a greater extent than FIR or PAS modalities.

  9. Near-ideal lasing with a uniform wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, R.W.; Sollid, J.E.; Feldman, D.W.; Stein, W.E.; Johnson, W.J.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Goldstein, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos FEL team has reduced or eliminated many of the experimental problems that resulted in non-ideal lasing. The major problems were accelerator instabilities that cause noise and fluctuations in current, energy, and timing; wakefield effects in the wiggler and beamline that introduce fluctuations in the beam's energy; and mirror nonlinearities caused by free carriers produced in the mirror by the high light levels, which caused extra light losses and interfered with the diagnostics. Lasing is not thought to be ideal in that it lacks major disturbing effects and is limited only by emittance, energy spread, and peak current. In this paper we describe the features of lasing that we have observed over a range of optical power of 1000, from the onset of lasing, to the threshold of the sideband instability, to the organization of regular optical spikes, to the region of chaotic spikes. Cavity-length detuning is presented as an ideal technique, in most circumstances, to completely suppress sidebands. With detuning one can easily switch operating modes from that giving the highest efficiency (chaotic spiking) to that giving the narrowest spectral line (no sidebands). Alternative techniques for sideband suppression normally use some kind of wavelength selective device (e.g., a grating) inserted in the cavity. With detuning, there is no need for such a device, and, therefore, no conflict between the wavelength control exerted by this extra optical component and that exerted by the energy of the electron beam. Lasing, therefore, starts easily, a shift in wavelength, i.e., chirp, is easily accomplished, and the consequences of inadequate control of the electron beam energy are not severe. 35 refs., 16 figs.

  10. Design and System Integration of the Superconducting Wiggler Magnets for the Compact Linear Collider Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Bernhard, A; Bragin, A; Karppinen, M; Maccaferri, R; Mezentsev, N; Papaphilippou, Y; Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R; Rumolo, G; Russenschuck, S; Vobly, P; Zolotarev, K

    2012-01-01

    To achieve high luminosity at the collision point of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the normalized horizontal and vertical emittances of the electron and positron beams must be reduced to 500 nm and 4 nm before the beams enter the 1.5TeV linear accelerators. An effective way to accomplish ultra-low emittances with only small effects on the electron polarization is using damping rings operating at 2.86 GeV equipped with superconducting wiggler magnets. This paper describes a technical design concept for the CLIC damping wigglers.

  11. Simultaneous retrieval of water vapour, temperature and cirrus clouds properties from measurements of far infrared spectral radiance over the Antarctic Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Natale, Gianluca; Palchetti, Luca; Bianchini, Giovanni; Del Guasta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    The possibility separating the contributions of the atmospheric state and ice clouds by using spectral infrared measurements is a fundamental step to quantifying the cloud effect in climate models. A simultaneous retrieval of cloud and atmospheric parameters from infrared wideband spectra will allow the disentanglement of the spectral interference between these variables. In this paper, we describe the development of a code for the simultaneous retrieval of atmospheric state and ice cloud parameters, and its application to the analysis of the spectral measurements acquired by the Radiation Explorer in the Far Infrared - Prototype for Applications and Development (REFIR-PAD) spectroradiometer, which has been in operation at Concordia Station on the Antarctic Plateau since 2012. The code performs the retrieval with a computational time that is comparable with the instrument acquisition time. Water vapour and temperature profiles and the cloud optical and microphysical properties, such as the generalised effective diameter and the ice water path, are retrieved by exploiting the 230-980 cm-1 spectral band. To simulate atmospheric radiative transfer, the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) has been integrated with a specifically developed subroutine based on the δ-Eddington two-stream approximation, whereas the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds have been derived from a database for hexagonal column habits. In order to detect ice clouds, a backscattering and depolarisation lidar, co-located with REFIR-PAD has been used, allowing us to infer the position and the cloud thickness to be used in the retrieval. A climatology of the vertical profiles of water vapour and temperature has been performed by using the daily radiosounding available at the station at 12:00 UTC. The climatology has been used to build an a priori profile correlation to constrain the fitting procedure. An optimal estimation method with the Levenberg-Marquardt approach has been

  12. High-power free-electron laser amplifier using a scalloped electron beam and a two-stage wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Nguyen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available High-power free-electron laser (FEL amplifiers present many practical design and construction problems. One such problem is possible damage to any optical beam control elements beyond the wiggler. The ability to increase the optical beam’s divergence angle after the wiggler, thereby reducing the intensity on the first optical element, is important to minimize such damage. One proposal to accomplish this optical beam spreading is to pinch the electron beam thereby focusing the radiation as well. In this paper, we analyze an approach that relies on the natural betatron motion to pinch the electron beam near the end of the wiggler. We also consider a step-tapered, two-stage wiggler to enhance the efficiency. The combination of a pinched electron beam and step-taper wiggler leads to additional optical guiding of the optical beam. This novel configuration is studied in simulation using the MEDUSA code. For a representative set of beam and wiggler parameters, we discuss (i the effect of the scalloped beam on the interaction in the FEL and on the focusing and propagation of the radiation, and (ii the efficiency enhancement in the two-stage wiggler.

  13. Predesign Study of a 4-5 tesla Superconducting Wiggler Magnet for the ESRF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, Herman H.J.; ter Avest, D.; ter Avest, D.; Ravex, A.; Lagnier, M.; Elleaume, P.

    1994-01-01

    The ESRF is currently setting up a beam line for very hard photons well above 250 keV. This requires the installation of a high field three polewavelength shifter. The nominal and target fields of the wiggler magnet are 4 and 5 tesla respectively while the nominal field integral over the central

  14. In vacuum permanent magnet wiggler optimized for the production of hard x rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcouille, O.; Bechu, N.; Berteaud, P.; Brunelle, P.; Chapuis, L.; Herbeaux, C.; Lestrade, A.; Marlats, J.-L.; Mary, A.; Massal, M.; Nadji, A.; Tavakoli, K.; Valleau, M.; Veteran, J.; Couprie, M.-E.; Filhol, J.-M.

    2013-05-01

    A new concept of wiggler has been designed and realized at SOLEIL to produce high energy photons in low/intermediate electron storage rings. Instead of using the superconducting technology which requires new equipment and instrumentation, heavy maintenance, and additional running costs, we have proposed to build a compact in-vacuum small gap short period wiggler that operates rather at moderate field than at high field. The wiggler composed of 38 periods of 50 mm produces 2.1 T at a gap of 5.5 mm. The moderate value of the magnetic field enables one to limit the effects on the beam dynamics and to avoid excessive power and magnetic forces. In this purpose, the narrow magnetic system has been equipped with a counterforce device made of nonmagnetic springs. The roll-off resulting from the small size of poles has been compensated in situ by permanent magnet magic fingers. This paper reports the phases of design, construction, magnetic measurements, and on-beam tests of the in-vacuum wiggler WSV50.

  15. In vacuum permanent magnet wiggler optimized for the production of hard x rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Marcouille

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of wiggler has been designed and realized at SOLEIL to produce high energy photons in low/intermediate electron storage rings. Instead of using the superconducting technology which requires new equipment and instrumentation, heavy maintenance, and additional running costs, we have proposed to build a compact in-vacuum small gap short period wiggler that operates rather at moderate field than at high field. The wiggler composed of 38 periods of 50 mm produces 2.1 T at a gap of 5.5 mm. The moderate value of the magnetic field enables one to limit the effects on the beam dynamics and to avoid excessive power and magnetic forces. In this purpose, the narrow magnetic system has been equipped with a counterforce device made of nonmagnetic springs. The roll-off resulting from the small size of poles has been compensated in situ by permanent magnet magic fingers. This paper reports the phases of design, construction, magnetic measurements, and on-beam tests of the in-vacuum wiggler WSV50.

  16. A CLIC Damping Wiggler Prototype at ANKA: Commissioning and Preparations for a Beam Dynamics Experimental Program

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhard, Axel; Casalbuoni, Sara; Ferracin, Paolo; Garcia Fajardo, Laura; Gerstl, Stefan; Gethmann, Julian; Grau, Andreas; Huttel, Erhard; Khrushchev, Sergey; Mezentsev, Nikolai; Müller, Anke-Susanne; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Saez de Jauregui, David; Schmickler, Hermann; Schoerling, Daniel; Shkaruba, Vitaliy; Smale, Nigel; Tsukanov, Valery; Zisopoulos, Panagiotis; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    In a collaboration between CERN, BINP and KIT a prototype of a superconducting damping wiggler for the CLIC damping rings has been installed at the ANKA synchrotron light source. On the one hand, the foreseen experimental program aims at validating the technical design of the wiggler, particularly the conduction cooling concept applied in its cryostat design, in a long-term study. On the other hand, the wiggler's influence on the beam dynamics particularly in the presence of collective effects is planned to be investigated. ANKA's low-alpha short-bunch operation mode will serve as a model system for these studies on collective effects. To simulate these effects and to make verifiable predictions an accurate model of the ANKA storage ring in low-alpha mode, including the insertion devices is under parallel development. This contribution reports on the first operational experience with the CLIC damping wiggler prototype in the ANKA storage ring and steps towards the planned advanced experimental program with th...

  17. 25+2 poles, 4.3 T wiggler at BMIT – 7 years operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W., E-mail: bmit@lightsource.ca; Chapman, L. Dean; Miller, Denise; Belev, George; Lin, Linda; Adam, Madison; Wurtz, Ward; Dallin, Les [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2016-07-27

    The research program at the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) Facility at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) required a unique radiation source that would provide a wide beam fan with high critical energy and high dose rates. A superconductive wiggler was the only practical solution that could be installed inside the CLS ring. Design requirements were defined in 2005 [1-2]. The wiggler, optimized for a 3 GeV ring, was to match operating parameters of an equivalent hard X-ray source on a 6 GeV ring. Manufacturing started in 2006 and the wiggler was installed in November of 2007 [3-5]. Several modifications to external hardware and to the power supplies’ controls were implemented to address the air leaks into the He space and to provide the ability to change the field of the wiggler during normal operation without affecting other research groups. The original burst disk and pressure relief valves were replaced with commercial units. Most of the buna O-rings were replaced with metal O-rings, helping to provide air-tightness of external connections. Over the years, the nominal, no-load temperatures went up by 0.3 K at the LHe space and up by 4 K at the 50 K shield space due to deterioration of thermal links and insulation, resulting from thermal cycling and vibrations generated by cryo-coolers. In October of 2014 the wiggler went through major maintenance to improve the thermal links operation, to improve the LHe transfer line connection, to install additional heaters to mitigate potential ice growth, and to provide a separate exhaust path for the rupture disk port.

  18. Simulations of the effects of a superconducting damping wiggler on a short bunched electron beam at ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gethmann, Julian; Bernhard, Axel; Blomley, Edmund; Hillenbrand, Steffen; Mueller, Anke-Susanne; Smale, Nigel [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Zolotarev, Konstantin [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    (As a part of the CLIC collaboration) A CLIC damping wiggler prototype has been installed at the ANKA synchrotron light source in order to validate the technical design of the 3 T superconducting conduction cooled wiggler and its cryostat and to cary out studies on beam dynamical aspects including collective effects. The latter one will be the main focus in this talk. Collective effects that will occur in damping rings are an issue in ANKA's short bunch operation as well. To simulate these effects the accelerator's model including its insertion device has to be very accurate. Such a model of the ANKA storage ring in short bunch operation mode has been developed in elegant. Simulations with the damping wiggler switched on and off have been performed in order to investigate effects of the wiggler on different machine parameters. These new results will be discussed with regard to the question if on the one hand the wiggler could be used for diagnostic purposes and if on the other hand the wiggler's impact on the beam dynamics is changed by the collective effects.

  19. PENGARUH PENGERINGAN DENGAN FAR INFRARED DRYER, OVEN VAKUM DAN FREEZE DRYER TERHADAP WARNA, KADAR TOTAL KAROTEN, BETA KAROTEN DAN VITAMIN C PADA DAUM BAYAM (Amaranthus Tricolor L. [Effect of Drying with Far Infrared Dryer, Oven Vacuum, and Freeze Dryer on the Color, Total Carotene, Beta-Carotene, and Vitamin C of Spinach Leaves (Amaranthus Tricolor L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwan Thahir2

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinach is a well known vegetable as a source of nutrition especially for is carotene. Soinach leaves need to be dried for application in product development of food like biscuit, extruded products and analysis. One the drying method that became popular is drying using infrared wave. The aim of this research was to compare the effect of blanching and drying (far infrared dryer, oven vacuum, and freeze dryer on the color, total carotene, beta-carotene, and vitamin C of spinach leaves. Blanching and drying of increased brightness, a value, and b value. The a value is shows spinach brightness in mix red-green color while b value shows mix blue-yellow. Total carotene of fresh spinach decreased by 10.47% after blanching. Drying with vacuum decreased the total carotene by 39.31% (with blanching and 31.66 (with blanching. Drying with freeze dryer decreased the beta carotene by 4.99% (with blanching and 18.60% (with blanching. Drying with FIR dryer decreased spinach total carotene by 34.90% (with blanching and 24.86% (with blanching. The beta-carotene of fresh spinach with balancing treatment decreased of by 16.53%.drying oven vacuum decreased the beta carotene by 42.80% (wiyh blanching and 18.91% (with blanching. Drying with freeze dyer decreased the beta carotene by 29.03% (with blanching the beta carotene. The decreased of beta-carotene is bigger than total carotene. Vitamin C of fresh spinach decreased by 20.35% after blanching. Drying with oven vacuum decreased of 55.77% (without blanching and 65.42% (with blanching f the vitamin C. drying with freeze dryer decreased the vitamin C by 13.21% (without blanching and 30.67% (with blanching. Meanwhile, the vitamin C of spinach after drying with FIR dyer decreased of 60.53% (without blanching and 70.29% (with blanching.

  20. Magnetic field measurements of the CEBAF (NIST) wiggler using the pulsed wire method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Stephen M.

    1992-09-01

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) has proven to be a versatile photon source for many applications in science, industry, and defense. It is capable of providing wide tunability and high efficiency, but has yet to yield high average power required as a weapon system. The proposed infrared and ultraviolet FELs at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have been projected to provide high average power. The first section of this thesis will study the necessity of a FEL for shipboard defense, and state the advantages over other defense systems. The remainder will focus on use of the pulsed wire method for measuring the magnetic field errors of the CEBAF/National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) wiggler. Data analysis indicates the wiggler will have a net electron beam deflection of x = 5.2 mm, which is much greater than the electron beam radius of re = 0.4 mm and the optical mode waist of wo = 1 mm.

  1. Magnetic design of a 3 T time-varying elliptical wiggler

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C H; Hwang, C S; Huang Ming Hsiung; Fan, T C; Chen, H H; Lin, F Y

    2000-01-01

    This work describes the design of an elliptical wiggler capable of producing highly circular polarized light in the energy range of 1-10 keV. The time-varying elliptical wiggler consists of vertical and horizontal periodic magnet structures with a period length of 25 cm. The vertical magnetic field is generated by a hybrid permanent magnet structure with peak field strength of 3 T at a minimum gap of 12 mm. An iron core electromagnetic circuit that is shifted longitudinally by one-quarter period length relative to the vertical structure produces the AC horizontal magnetic field; it has peak field strength of 600 G. The right and left elliptically polarized light can be switched at a rate of 1 Hz. The magnetic field maximization and the spectral performance optimization are also presented.

  2. Measurements of electron cloud growth and mitigation in dipole, quadrupole, and wiggler magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvey, J.R., E-mail: jrc97@cornell.edu; Hartung, W.; Li, Y.; Livezey, J.A.; Makita, J.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.

    2015-01-11

    Retarding field analyzers (RFAs), which provide a localized measurement of the electron cloud, have been installed throughout the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR), in different magnetic field environments. This paper describes the RFA designs developed for dipole, quadrupole, and wiggler field regions, and provides an overview of measurements made in each environment. The effectiveness of electron cloud mitigations, including coatings, grooves, and clearing electrodes, are assessed with the RFA measurements.

  3. The CHI 2013 interactive schedule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satyanarayan, Arvind; Strazzulla, Daniel; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2013-01-01

    CHI 2013 offers over 500 separate events including paper presentations, panels, courses, case studies and special interest groups. Given the size of the conference, it is no longer practical to host live summaries of these events. Instead, a 30-second Video Preview summary of each event is availa...... with these displays using their mobile devices by either constructing custom video playlists or adding on-screen content to their personal schedule....

  4. Design of high heat load white-beam slits for wiggler/undulator beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, D.; Tcheskidov, V.; Nian, T.; Haeffner, D.R.; Alp, E.E.; Ryding, D.; Collins, J.; Li, Y.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-12-01

    A set of horizontal and vertical white-beam slits has been designed for the Advanced Photon Source wiggler/undulator beamlines at Argonne National Laboratory. While this slit set can handle the high heat flux from on e APS undulator source, it has large enough aperture to be compatible with a wiggler source also. A grazing-incidence, knife-edge configuration has been used in the design to eliminate downstream X-ray scattering. Enhanced heat transfer technology has been used in the water-cooling system. A unique stepping parallelogram driving structure provides precise vertical slit motion with large optical aperture. The full design detail is presented in this paper.

  5. Biomedical wellness by tai chi and sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Daniel C.; Chin, Amita G.

    2011-06-01

    Tai-chi chuan is popular worldwide especially in China. People practice tai-chi chuan daily with faith believing that they will be rewarded with health and varieties of other rewords. The Tai Chi Chuan Theory by Master Chang and the Tai Chi Chuan Theory by Master Wang are translated to be the baseline of the tai-chi chuan. The theory described in these two papers clearly shows that the tai-chi power source is the combination of the two antigravity forces distinction by each foot. The ying, yang and hollowed, solid discussed in the papers are the properties and body relationship of the two antigravity forces. The antigravity forces presented inside of body are as air to the balloon termed chi. However chi could be generated by any muscle pressing; only the antigravity forces from feet are called nature chi that has the maximum strength of the person. When a person is soft, as an infant the nature chi will fulfill entire body with no time and effort. The sequence forms were designed for deploying the nature chi in speed and power. The combination of chi and tai-chi form make tai chi chuan supreme than other kinds of martial art. In the training process chi massages whole body many time for a sequence form practice that stimulate all organs and could lead to cure body diseases, lose weight, postpone aging process, and remove the aging symptoms. For the people practicing in the park daily with proper guidance they will fulfill their wishes. Tai chi exercise could also apply to other sports as in dancing and golfing they are discussed at the end of the paper.

  6. The MX2 macromolecular crystallography beamline: a wiggler X-ray source at the LNLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Beatriz G; Sanfelici, Lucas; Neuenschwander, Regis T; Rodrigues, Flávio; Grizolli, Walan C; Raulik, Marco A; Piton, James R; Meyer, Bernd C; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Polikarpov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP, Brazil] is the first commissioned synchrotron light source in the southern hemisphere. The first wiggler macromolecular crystallography beamline (MX2) at the LNLS has been recently constructed and brought into operation. Here the technical design, experimental set-up, parameters of the beamline and the first experimental results obtained at MX2 are described. The beamline operates on a 2.0 T hybrid 30-pole wiggler, and its optical layout includes collimating mirror, Si(111) double-crystal monochromator and toroidal bendable mirror. The measured flux density at the sample position at 8.7 eV reaches 4.8 x 10(11) photons s(-1) mm(-2) (100 mA)(-1). The beamline is equipped with a MarResearch Desktop Beamline Goniostat (MarDTB) and 3 x 3 MarMosaic225 CCD detector, and is controlled by a customized version of the Blu-Ice software. A description of the first X-ray diffraction data sets collected at the MX2 LNLS beamline and used for macromolecular crystal structure solution is also provided.

  7. Conceptual design of a 14 cm period multipole wiggler at PLS

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D E; Suh, H S; Jung, Y G; Park, K H; Bak, J S

    2001-01-01

    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) is developing a Multipole Wiggler (MPW14) to utilize high-energy (approx 30 keV) synchrotron radiation at Pohang Light Source (PLS). The MPW14 is a hybrid type device to achieve maximum peak flux density and wide beam fan that can serve two beamlines. PLS MPW14-features period of 14 cm, minimum gap of 14 mm, 20 full field periods, maximum flux density of 2.06 T, 3036 mm total magnetic structure length. The peak flux density is very high compared to the other wigglers of similar pole gap and the period. The high peak flux density was possible using advanced new magnetic material and optimized magnetic geometry. The MPW14 will be used in hard X-ray region of 10-30 keV at 2.5 GeV electron energy. The total photon power is 6.19 kW and the peak power density is 5.27 kW/mrad sup 2 at 2.5 GeV, 150 mA. To withstand the big magnetic loads with minimum deflections, C-type support structure is designed with detailed FEM structural analysis. In this article, all the conceptual design e...

  8. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Du-Hyong [Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Mi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Duk-Hee [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Inho, E-mail: inhojo@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  9. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossington, C.S.

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration.

  10. Prospects for searching axion-like particle dark matter with dipole, toroidal and wiggler magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Oliver K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Betz, Michael; Caspers, Fritz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Lindner, Axel; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Semertzidis, Yannis [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sikivie, Pierre [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zioutas, Konstantin [Patras Univ. (Greece)

    2011-10-15

    In this work we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such ALP dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets that are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axion-like dark matter particles. (orig.)

  11. Inequalities for noncentral chi-square distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, W.C.M.

    1990-01-01

    An upper and lower bound are presented for the difference between the distribution functions of noncentral chi-square variables with the same degrees of freedom and different noncentralities. The inequalities are applied in a comparison of two approximations to the power of Pearson's chi-square

  12. CHI: A General Agent Communication Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, S.Y.; Phillips, L.R.; Spires, S.V.

    1998-12-17

    We have completed and exercised a communication framework called CHI (CLOS to HTML Interface) by which agents can communicate with humans. CHI follows HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol) and produces HTML (HyperText Markup Language) for use by WWW (World-Wide Web) browsers. CHI enables the rapid and dynamic construction of interface mechanisms. The essence of CHI is automatic registration of dynamically generated interface elements to named objects in the agent's internal environment. The agent can access information in these objects at will. State is preserved, so an agent can pursue branching interaction sequences, activate failure recovery behaviors, and otherwise act opportunistically to maintain a conversation. The CHI mechanism remains transparent in multi-agent, multi-user environments because of automatically generated unique identifiers built into the CHI mechanism. In this paper we discuss design, language, implementation, and extension issues, and, by way of illustration, examine the use of the general CHI/HCHI mechanism in a specific international electronic commerce system. We conclude that the CHI mechanism is an effective, efficient, and extensible means of the agent/human communication.

  13. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca(2+) mobilization and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser(1179)) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. This study suggests that FIR radiation increases NO production via increasing CaMKII-mediated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation but TRPV channels may not be involved in this pathway. Our results may provide the molecular mechanism by which FIR radiation improves endothelial function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Far infrared near normal specular reflectivity of Nix(SiO2)1-x (x = 1.0, 0.84, 0.75, 0.61, 0.54, 0.28) granular films

    KAUST Repository

    Massa, Néstor E.

    2010-04-01

    One of the current issues at the basis of the understanding of novel materials is the degree of the role played by spatial inhomogeneities due to subtle phase separations. To clarify this picture here we compare the plain glass network response of transition metal granular films with different metal fractions against what is known for conducting oxides. Films for Nix(SiO2)1-x (x = 1.0, 0.84, 0.75, 0.61, 0.54, 0.28) were studied by temperature dependent far infrared measurements. While for pure Ni the spectrum shows a flat high reflectivity, those for x ∼ 0.84 and ∼0.75 have a Drude component, vibrational modes mostly carrier screened, and a long tail that extents toward near infrared. This is associated with hopping electron conductivity and strong electron-phonon interactions. The relative reduction of the number of carriers in Ni0.75(SiO2)0.25 allows less screened phonon bands on the top of a continuum and a wide and overdamped oscillator at mid-infrared frequencies. Ni0.54(SiO2)0.46 and Ni0.28(SiO2)0.72 have well defined vibrational bands and a sharp threshold at ∼1450 cm-1. It is most remarkable that a distinctive resonant peak at ∼1250 cm-1 found for p-polarized angle dependent specular reflectivity. It originates in an electron cloud traced to electrons that are not able to overcome the metal-dielectric interface that, beating against the positive background, generates the electric dipole. Overall, we conclude that the spectra are analogous to those regularly found in conducting oxides where with a suitable percolating network polarons are formed. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chi-Nu Level 2 Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert Cameron [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Hye Young [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mosby, Shea Morgan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Solomon, Clell Jeffrey Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fotiadis, Nikolaos [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matthew James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ullmann, John Leonard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bredeweg, Todd Allen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jandel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Stephen Arthur [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Neudecker, Denise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; White, Morgan Curtis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ching-Yen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bucher, Brian Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Buckner, Matthew Quinn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Roger Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-09-18

    This series of slides presents information on Chi-Nu measurements and analysis of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) for neutron energy below 1 MeV for 235U. A key focus of the Chi-Nu measurement is to address the energy dependence of the low-energy emissions. The 235U PFNS evaluation is in progress. Chi-Nu delivered preliminary experimental data and input for part of the old experimental data base. The 239Pu PFNS evaluation is finalized and submitted for testing. Data from 252Cf spontaneous fission will also be obtained.

  16. CHI Research on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, W.-S.; Raman, R.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Mueller, D.; Ebrahimi, F.; Ono, M.; Jardin, S. C.; Taylor, G.

    2017-10-01

    At present about 20% of the total plasma current required for sustained operation has been generated by transient CHI. The present understanding suggests that it may be possible to generate all of the needed current in a ST / tokamak using transient CHI. In such a scenario, one could transition directly from a CHI produced plasma to a non-inductively sustained plasma, without the difficult intermediate step that involves non-inductive current ramp-up. STs based on this new configuration would take advantage of evolving developments in high-temperature superconductor technology to develop a simpler design ST that relies primarily on CHI for plasma current generation. Motivated by the very good results from NSTX and HIT-II, we are examining the potential application of transient CHI for reactor configurations through these studies. (1) Study of the maximum levels of start-up currents that could be generated on NSTX-U, (2) application of a single biased electrode configuration on QUEST to protect the insulator from neutron damage in a CHI reactor installation, and (3) QUEST-like, but a double biased electrode configuration for PEGASUS and NSTX-U. Results from these on-going studies will be described. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Contracts: DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FG02-99ER54519 AM08, and DE-SC0006757.

  17. Relativistic self-focusing of an intense laser pulse with hot magnetized plasma in the presence of a helical magnetostatic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Varaki, M.; Jafari, S.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we study the nonlinear interaction of a circularly polarized laser pulse propagating through a hot magnetized plasma in the presence of a helical magnetostatic wiggler. A non-linear equation that describes the spot-size of the laser beam for both left- and right-hand polarizations has been derived. Non-linear dispersion relation describing the evolution of the laser frequency propagating through the hot magnetized plasma has been obtained. The effect of the wiggler magnetic field strength on the evolution of the laser spot-size has been discussed. The results indicate that for the right-hand polarization with increasing wiggler magnetic field strength, the laser spot-size decreases and the laser pulse becomes more focused. On the contrary, for the left-hand polarization, the self-focusing decreases with increasing wiggler magnetic field strength. Besides, it was found that in the right-hand polarization, the laser spot-size increases with the increasing plasma temperature, and the laser beam becomes more defocused. Furthermore, for the left-hand polarization, the laser self-focusing increases with the decreasing plasma temperature. Further numerical results revealed that by increasing the wiggler field strength, the normalized laser power increases significantly.

  18. Building Bridges: Psi Chi and International Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes A McCormick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available “How can Psi Chi best partner with international psychologists to expand the honor society world-wide?” This has been an important question since 2009, when the 1,100 chapters of Psi Chi in the United States voted to become “The International Honor Society in Psychology”. This report updates and expands on a unique symposium offered at the 120th meeting of the American Psychological Association in Orlando, Florida, in August of 2012 - the first symposium on the Presidential theme of “Building Bridges” between Psi Chi and international psychology [8]. Here, seven leaders in international psychology in North and South America join to address different aspects of this timely question--with many suggestions on how to “build bridges” to expand Psi Chi globally. It was in part due to this historic symposium that in 2013 Guatemala became the first nation in Latin America, and Russia the first nation in mainland Europe to launch a chapter of Psi Chi.

  19. The modular sequence space of $\\chi^{2}$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce the modular sequence space of $\\chi^{2}$ and examine some topological properties of these space also establish some duals results among them. Lindenstrauss and Tzafriri [7] used the idea of Orlicz function to define the sequence space $\\ell_{M}$ which is called an Orlicz sequence space. Another generalization of Orlicz sequence spaces is due to Woo [9]. We define the sequence spaces $\\chi^{2}_{f\\lambda}$ and $\\chi^{2\\lambda}_{g},$ where $f=\\left(f_{mn}\\right$ and $g=\\left(g_{mn}\\right$ are sequences of modulus functions such that $f_{mn}$ and $g_{mn}$ be mutually complementary for each $m,n.$

  20. Gain Shift Corrections at Chi-Nu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Tristan Brooks [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Applied Physics; Devlin, Matthew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Ambient conditions have the potential to cause changes in liquid scintillator detector gain that vary with time and temperature. These gain shifts can lead to poor resolution in both energy as well as pulse shape discrimination. In order to correct for these shifts in the Chi-Nu high energy array, a laser system has been developed for calibration of the pulse height signals.

  1. Transition IOP-MMI – Chi Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Leer; R. Collier

    2010-01-01

    IOP-MMI is an innovation program funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs that supports research and development projects in user-system interaction. This year marks the culmination of the 10-year IOP-MMI program. Chi Nederland, the Dutch Association for HCI, is the biggest professional

  2. A precursory ULF signature for the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Akinaga

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available ULF emission data at Lunping (epicentral distance, 120 km have been analysed for the Chi-Chi earthquake (with magnitude 7.6 and depth of 11 km in Taiwan which occurred on 21 September 1999. Simple intensity analyses have not yielded any significant results but we have found, based on the analysis of polarization (the ratio of vertical magnetic field component Z to the horizontal component G, that the polarization (Z/G showed a significant enhancement for two months before the earthquake. This kind of temporal evolution of polarization seems to be very similar to previous results, so that it is highly likely that this phenomenon may be associated with the Chi-Chi earthquake. Also, the comparison of the results of polarization analyses, by changing the signal threshold, has given us an approximate intensity of the seismogenic emission of the order of the monthly mean value.

  3. Inclusive and exclusive measurements of $B$ decays to $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, V; Panzenböck, E; Trabelsi, K; Frey, A; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bansal, V; Barberio, E; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Frost, O; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Greenwald, D; Haba, J; Hamer, P; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kawasaki, T; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, N; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lee, I S; Li, C; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Loos, A; Lukin, P; Masuda, M; Matvienko, D; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Purohit, M V; Rauch, J; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Seino, Y; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Singh, J B; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Stypula, J; Sumihama, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wehle, S; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Ye, H; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report inclusive and exclusive measurements for $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ production in $B$ decays. We measure $\\mathcal{B}(B \\to \\chi_{c1} X)$= $(3.03 \\pm 0.05(\\mbox{stat}) \\pm 0.24(\\mbox{syst})) \\times 10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(B \\to \\chi_{c2} X)$= $(0.70 \\pm 0.06(\\mbox{stat}) \\pm 0.10(\\mbox{syst})) \\times 10^{-3}$. For the first time, $\\chi_{c2}$ production in exclusive $B$ decays in the modes $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c2}\\pi^- K^+$ and $B^+ \\to \\chi_{c2} \\pi^+ \\pi^- K^+$ has been observed, along with first evidence for the $B^+ \\to \\chi_{c2} \\pi^+ K_S^0$ decay mode. For $\\chi_{c1}$ production, we report the first observation in the $B^+ \\to \\chi_{c1} \\pi^+ \\pi^- K^+$, $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c1} \\pi^+ \\pi^- K_S^0$ and $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c1} \\pi^0 \\pi^- K^+$ decay modes. Using these decay modes, we observe a difference in the production mechanism of $\\chi_{c2}$ in comparison to $\\chi_{c1}$ in $B$ decays. In addition, we report searches for $X(3872)$ and $\\chi_{c1}(2P)$ in the $B^+ \\to (\\chi_{c1} \\pi^+ \\pi^-) K^+$ decay mode....

  4. CHY-graphs on a torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona, Carlos [Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Tsing-Hua University,Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013 (China); Gomez, Humberto [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade de São Paulo,Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Santiago de Cali,Calle 5 62-00 Barrio Pampalinda, Cali, Valle (Colombia)

    2016-10-21

    Recently, we proposed a new approach using a punctured Elliptic curve in the CHY framework in order to compute one-loop scattering amplitudes. In this note, we further develop this approach by introducing a set of connectors, which become the main ingredient to build integrands on M{sub 1,n}, the moduli space of n-punctured Elliptic curves. As a particular application, we study the Φ{sup 3} bi-adjoint scalar theory. We propose a set of rules to construct integrands on M{sub 1,n} from Φ{sup 3} integrands on M{sub 0,n}, the moduli space of n-punctured spheres. We illustrate these rules by computing a variety of Φ{sup 3} one-loop Feynman diagrams. Conversely, we also provide another set of rules to compute the corresponding CHY-integrand on M{sub 1,n} by starting instead from a given Φ{sup 3} one-loop Feynman diagram. In addition, our results can easily be extended to higher loops.

  5. Dicty_cDB: CHI343 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available re E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value CHI343 (CHI343Q) /C...2002.11.22 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N AC116956 |AC11

  6. Observation of psi -> e(+)e(-)chi(cJ) and chi(cJ) -> e(+)e(-)J/psi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Tiemens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Using 4.479 x 10(8) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector, we search for the decays psi(3686) -> e(+)e(-)chi(cJ) and chi(cJ) -> e(+)e(-)J/psi, where J = 0, 1, 2. The decays psi(3686) -> e(+)e(-)chi(cJ) and chi(cJ) -> e(+)e(-)J/psi are observed for the first time. The measured branching

  7. Wiggler Effects on the Growth Rate of a Raman Free-electron Laser with Axial Magnetic Field or Ion-Channel Guiding

    CERN Document Server

    Maraghechi, Behrouz

    2004-01-01

    A relativistic theory for Raman backscattering in the beam frame of electrons is presented and is used to find the growth rate of a free-electron laser (FEL), in the Raman regime. A one dimensional helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field are considered. The effects of static self-electric and self-magnetic fields, induced by the steady-state charge density and currents of the non-neutral electron beam, are taken into account to find the steady-state trajectories. The wiggler effects on the linear dispersion relations of the space-charge wave and radiation are included in the analysis. A numerical computation is conducted to compare the growth rate of the excited waves with nonrelativistic treatment. It was found that self-field effects increase the growth rate in the group II orbits and decrease it in the group I orbits. However, the wiggler effects on growth rate are stronger and increase the growth rate on both group I and group II orbits. The discontinuity, due to the cyclotron resonance with the radia...

  8. Sleep quality of middle-aged Tai Chi practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda Yin King; Tam, Ka Wai; Lee, Mei Lam; Lau, Nga Yi; Lau, Joanne Cho Yan; Lam, Yin Mai; Lam, Christine Hoi Wai; Kwan, Wing Kit; Chan, Daisy; Chan, Betsy; Chan, Paul Zoen Kit

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the association between Tai Chi and sleep quality in middle-aged Tai Chi practitioners. This cross-sectional descriptive study recruited a convenience sample of 250 middle-aged Tai Chi practitioners. Sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Descriptive statistics such as frequency and percentage were used to describe the demographic characteristics of the subjects. Pearson's product-moment correlation was used to determine the relationship between sleep quality and duration of practicing Tai Chi. anova was used to compare difference in sleep quality among subjects practicing different styles of Tai Chi. Linear regression was conducted to determine the contribution of duration of practicing Tai Chi and the style of Tai Chi being practiced to explaining sleep quality. Subjects had practiced Tai Chi for 4.7 years. They reported a global PSQI score of 5.3. Among the subjects, 156 were classified as good sleepers (PSQI score, sleep quality and duration of Tai Chi practice (P = 0.175). No significant differences in sleep quality were found among subjects who practiced different styles of Tai Chi (P = 0.876). Linear regression analysis indicated that the duration of practicing Tai Chi and the style of Tai Chi being practiced did not make a significant contribution to sleep quality. The present study represented an initial attempt to investigate the sleep quality among middle-aged Tai Chi practitioners. It serves to generate hypotheses for future testing. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  9. Tai Chi Chuan in Medicine and Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Lan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tai Chi Chuan (Tai Chi is a Chinese traditional mind-body exercise and recently, it becomes popular worldwide. During the practice of Tai Chi, deep diaphragmatic breathing is integrated into body motions to achieve a harmonious balance between body and mind and to facilitate the flow of internal energy (Qi. Participants can choose to perform a complete set of Tai Chi or selected movements according to their needs. Previous research substantiates that Tai Chi has significant benefits to health promotion, and regularly practicing Tai Chi improves aerobic capacity, muscular strength, balance, health-related quality of life, and psychological well-being. Recent studies also prove that Tai Chi is safe and effective for patients with neurological diseases (e.g., stroke, Parkinson's disease, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, cognitive dysfunction, rheumatological disease (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and fibromyalgia, orthopedic diseases (e.g., osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, low-back pain, and musculoskeletal disorder, cardiovascular diseases (e.g., acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, and heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and breast cancers. Tai Chi is an aerobic exercise with mild-to-moderate intensity and is appropriate for implementation in the community. This paper reviews the existing literature on Tai Chi and introduces its health-promotion effect and the potential clinical applications.

  10. Streamflow Changes in the Vicinity of Seismogenic Fault After the 1999 Chi-Chi Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Chia, Yeeping; Chuang, Po-Yu; Wang, Chi-Yuen; Ge, Shemin; Teng, Mao-Hua

    2017-09-01

    Changes in streamflow have been observed at 23 stream gauges in central Taiwan after the 1999 M W 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake. Post-earthquake increases, ranging from 58 to 833% in discharge, were recorded at 22 gauges on four rivers and their tributaries. The streamflow increase typically peaked in 2-3 days and followed by a slow decay for a month or more. An increased groundwater discharge to the river after the earthquake can be attributed to rock fracturing by seismic shaking as well as pore pressure rise due to compressive strain. A large decrease in discharge was recorded immediately after the earthquake at the gauge near the earthquake epicenter. Further analysis of long-term data indicates that the post-earthquake discharge at the gauge reduced to a level smaller than that at an upstream gauge for 8 months. Such a streamflow decrease might have been caused by a discharge to the streambed due to a co-seismic decrease in pore pressure induced by crustal extension during the rupture of the thrust fault.

  11. Tai Chi for People with Visual Impairments: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszko, Tanya A.; Ramsey, Vincent K.; Blasch, Bruce B.

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the physical and psychological outcomes of a tai chi exercise program for eight adults with visual impairments. It found that after eight weeks of orientation and mobility training and tai chi practice, the participants' single leg-stance time and total knee flexion work and power improved, as did their frequency of,…

  12. The semantics of depictive secondary predication in chiShona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It will be argued that in the chiShona language the subject and object orientation of the depictives is influenced by the overt agreement marking system. While in other languages, like English, it is argued that object-oriented depictives of activity verbs are ungrammatical, chiShona provides evidence as one of the languages ...

  13. Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is sponsored jointly by Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology, and the APA. The award is presented annually to the psychology graduate student who submits the best research paper that was published or presented at a national, regional, or state psychological association conference during the past calendar year. The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award was established in 1979. The award was established to recognize young researchers at the beginning of their professional lives and to commemorate both the 50th anniversary of Psi Chi and the 100th anniversary of psychology as a science (dating from the founding of Wundt's laboratory). It was named for Dr. Edwin B. Newman, the first national president of Psi Chi (1929) and one of its founders. He was a prolific researcher and a long-time chair of the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. Newman was a member of APA's Board of Directors, served as recording secretary of the board from 1962 to 1967, and was parliamentarian for the APA Council of Representatives for many years. He served both Psi Chi and APA in a distinguished manner for half a century. The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. Members of the 2017 Edwin B. Newman Award Committee were Shawn Carlton, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Christina Frederick-Recascino, PhD; John Norcross, PhD, APA representative; Karenna Malavanti, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Steven Kohn, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Warren Fass, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Chris Lovelace, PhD, Psi Chi representative; and Cathy Epkins, PhD, APA representative. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Determination of chi_c and chi_b polarizations from dilepton angular distributions in radiative decays

    CERN Document Server

    Faccioli, Pietro; Seixas, Joao; Wöhri, Hermine K

    2011-01-01

    The angular distributions of the decay products in the successive decays chi_c (chi_b) to J/psi (Upsilon) gamma and J/psi (Upsilon) to l+l- are calculated as a function of the angular momentum composition of the decaying chi meson and of the multipole structure of the photon radiation, using a formalism independent of production mechanisms and polarization frames. The polarizations of the chi states produced in high energy collisions can be derived from the dilepton decay distributions of the daughter J/psi or Upsilon mesons, with a reduced dependence on the details of the photon reconstruction or simulation. Moreover, this method eliminates the dependence of the polarization measurement on the actual details of the multipole structure of the radiative transition. Problematic points in previous calculations of the chi_c decay angular distributions are identified and clarified.

  15. The mental-attention Tai Chi effect with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Theresa H M; Pascual-Leone, Juan; Johnson, Janice; Tamim, Hala

    2016-05-31

    Tai Chi practice has some fitness, wellness, and general cognitive effects in older adults. However, benefits of Tai Chi on specific mental-attentional executive processes have not been investigated previously. We studied older Canadian adults of Chinese and non-Chinese origin and from low socioeconomic areas. Sixty-four adults (51-87 years old) took part in a 16-week Tai Chi program. There were two groups: Chinese-background (n = 35) and Non-Chinese-background (n = 29). They received four mental-attention executive tasks before and after the 16-week period. These tasks measured visuospatial reasoning, mental-attentional activation (working memory), attentional inhibition, and balance between these attention factors (field-dependence-independence). Chinese participants showed significant gain on Figural Intersections Task (mental-attentional capacity), Antisaccade (attentional inhibition), and Matrix Reasoning (fluid intelligence measure). Both groups evidenced gain on the Water Level Task (attentional balance). These gains suggest that Tai Chi can improve mental-attentional vigilance and executive control, when practitioners are sufficiently motivated to pursue this practice, and apply themselves (as our Chinese participants seem to have done). We found that Tai Chi enhanced mental attentional executives in the Chinese sample. The largely negative results with Non-Chinese participants might be explained by less strong motivation and by the relatively short Tai Chi practice period, which contrasts with the prior familiarity with Tai Chi of the Chinese participants.

  16. Tai Chi Chuan Exercise for Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ching; Chen, Ssu-Yuan; Wong, May-Kuen; Lai, Jin Shin

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone of rehabilitation for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although high-intensity exercise has significant cardiovascular benefits, light-to-moderate intensity aerobic exercise also offers health benefits. With lower-intensity workouts, patients may be able to exercise for longer periods of time and increase the acceptance of exercise, particularly in unfit and elderly patients. Tai Chi Chuan (Tai Chi) is a traditional Chinese mind-body exercise. The exercise intensity of Tai Chi is light to moderate, depending on its training style, posture, and duration. Previous research has shown that Tai Chi enhances aerobic capacity, muscular strength, balance, and psychological well-being. Additionally, Tai Chi training has significant benefits for common cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, poor exercise capacity, endothelial dysfunction, and depression. Tai Chi is safe and effective in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery, congestive heart failure (HF), and stroke. In conclusion, Tai Chi has significant benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease, and it may be prescribed as an alternative exercise program for selected patients with CVD. PMID:24348732

  17. Tai Chi Chuan Exercise for Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Lan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training is the cornerstone of rehabilitation for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD. Although high-intensity exercise has significant cardiovascular benefits, light-to-moderate intensity aerobic exercise also offers health benefits. With lower-intensity workouts, patients may be able to exercise for longer periods of time and increase the acceptance of exercise, particularly in unfit and elderly patients. Tai Chi Chuan (Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese mind-body exercise. The exercise intensity of Tai Chi is light to moderate, depending on its training style, posture, and duration. Previous research has shown that Tai Chi enhances aerobic capacity, muscular strength, balance, and psychological well-being. Additionally, Tai Chi training has significant benefits for common cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, poor exercise capacity, endothelial dysfunction, and depression. Tai Chi is safe and effective in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG surgery, congestive heart failure (HF, and stroke. In conclusion, Tai Chi has significant benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease, and it may be prescribed as an alternative exercise program for selected patients with CVD.

  18. Far infrared and Raman response in tetragonal PZT ceramic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buixaderas, E.; Kadlec, C.; Vanek, P.; Drnovsek, S.; Ursic, H.; Malic, B.

    2015-07-01

    PbZr{sub 0}.38Ti{sub 0}.62O{sub 3} and PbZr{sub 0}.36Ti{sub 0}.64{sub O}3 thick films deposited by screen printing on (0 0 0 1) single crystal sapphire substrates and prepared at two different sintering temperatures, were studied by Fourier-transform infrared reflectivity, time-domain TH{sub z} transmission spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The dielectric response is discussed using the Lichtenecker model to account for the porosity of the films and to obtain the dense bulk dielectric functions. Results are compared with bulk tetragonal PZT 42/58 ceramics. The dynamic response in the films is dominated by an overdamped lead-based vibration in the TH{sub z} range, as known in PZT, but its evaluated dielectric contribution is affected by the porosity and roughness of the surface. (Author)

  19. Far-infrared edge modes in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipparini, E.; Barberán, N.; Barranco, M.; Pi, M.; Serra, Ll.

    1997-11-01

    We have investigated edge modes of different multipolarity sustained by quantum dots submitted to external magnetic fields. We present a microscopic description based on a variational solution of the equation of motion for any axially symmetric confining potential and multipole mode. Numerical results for dots with different numbers of electrons, whose ground state is described within a local current density-functional theory, are discussed. Two sum rules, which are exact within this theory, are derived. In the limit of a large neutral dot at B=0, we show that the classical hydrodynamic dispersion law for edge waves ω(q) ~q ln (q0/q) holds when quantum and finite-size effects are taken into account.

  20. Telluride glass step index fiber for the far infrared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurugeon, S.; Boussard-Plédel, C.; Troles, J.; Faber, A.J.; Lucas, P.; Zhang, X.H.; Lucas, J.; Bureau, B.

    2010-01-01

    Nulling interferometry is an important technique under development for the DARWIN planet finding mission which enables the detection of the weak infrared emission lines of an orbiting planet. This technique requires the use of single mode optical fibers transmitting light as far as possible in the

  1. SAFARI : A Far Infrared Imaging FTS-Spectrometer for SPICA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goicoechea, J. R.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Jellema, W.; Swinyard, B. M.

    The far-IR spectral window plays host to a critical range of both spectroscopic and photometric diagnostics with which to study our Galaxy and beyond, at wavelengths completely blocked by the Earth’s atmosphere. The proposed Japanese-led IR space telescope SPICA, with its cryogenically cooled ~3.2m

  2. Far Infrared Imaging Spectrometer for Large Aperture Infrared Telescope System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    233, 109. Ulrich, R., Renk , K. F. and Genzel, L. 1963, IEEE Trans. MTT 11, 363. Wollrnan, E. R., Stuart, E. E., Smith, H. A., and Waltman, W. B. 1983, Proc. Spie. Mtg. Instrumentation in Astronomy (London). 43

  3. Far-infrared spectra for copper-zinc mixed ferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaki, H.M., E-mail: dakdik2001@yahoo.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdul Aziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University (Egypt); Dawoud, H.A. [University of Gaza, P.O. Box 108, Gaza Strip, Palestine Physics Department (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)

    2010-11-01

    Infrared spectra of Zn{sup 2+} ions substituted Cu ferrites with the general formula Cu{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (where x=0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1) have been analyzed in the frequency range 200-1000 cm{sup -1}. These mixed ferrites were prepared by the standard double sintering ceramic method. Two prominent bands were observed, high-frequency band {nu}{sub 1} around 550 cm{sup -1} and low-frequency band {nu}{sub 2} around 395 cm{sup -1} and assigned to tetrahedral and octahedral sites for spinel lattice, respectively. On introducing zinc ions IR spectra indicate new shoulders or splitting on tetrahedral absorption bands around 600 and 700 cm{sup -1}. A small absorption band {nu}{sub 3} was observed around 310 cm{sup -1}. This indicates the migration of some Zn{sup 2+} ions to octahedral site. Another small weak absorption band was also observed around 265 cm{sup -1}; its intensity increased with Zn content. Force constant was calculated for both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. Threshold frequency {nu}{sub th} for the electronic transition was determined and found to increase with an increase in Zn ions. The half bandwidth for each site was calculated and the ratio seemed to increase with an increase in zinc content. The cation distribution for these ferrites was estimated in the light of IR spectra.

  4. Stratospheric HBr mixing ratio obtained from far infrared emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Carli, B.; Barbis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Emission features of HBr isotopes have been identified in high-resolution FIR emission spectra obtained with a balloon-borne Fourier-transform spectrometer in the spring of 1979 at 32 deg N latitude. When six single-scan spectra at a zenith angle of 93.2 deg were averaged, two features of HBr isotopes at 50.054 and 50.069/cm were obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5. The volume mixing ratio retrieved from the average spectrum is 2.0 x 10 to the -11th, which is assumed to be constant above 28 km, with an uncertainty of 35 percent. This stratospheric amount of HBr is about the same as the current level of tropospheric organic bromine compounds, 25 pptv. Thus HBr could be the major stratospheric bromine species.

  5. Spectrometer Technology Development for Far-Infrared Line Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to build and demonstrate a new direct-detection diffraction grating concept and couple it to an array of bolometers. The spectrometer was to be built around a parallel-plate waveguide diffraction grating, WaFIRS: Waveguide Far-InfraRed Spectrometer. The grating is two dimensional in nature, which provides a compact configuration to suit NASA s needs for cryogenic spectrometers for future opportunities, such as infrared/submillimeter spectrometers for a suborbital balloon platform, for SOFIA, for SPICA (a Japanese satellite), and for SAFIR. Our goal was to build a spectrometer (Z-Spec) for 1.0 - 1.5 mm and demonstrate spectral resolution, throughput, and background-limited performance. This grant would partially cover the expenses and we were subsequently awarded a second grant, NAGS-12788, to complete the project. We have one-year received a no-cost extension on NAG.5-12788, to be completed in 3/31/06.

  6. Multi-Layer Far-Infrared Component Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed for fabricating high-reflectivity, multi-layer optical films for the terahertz wavelength region. A silicon mirror with 99.997-percent reflectivity at 70 micrometer wavelength requires an air gap of 17.50 micrometers and a silicon thickness of 5.12 micrometers. This approach obtains pre-thinned wafers of about 20 mm thickness in order to measure their thickness precisely. A gold annulus of appropriate thickness is deposited to reach the required total thickness. This, in turn, has the central aperture etched down to the desired final silicon thickness. Also, the novel Bragg stack optics in this innovation are key to providing Fabry-Perot spectroscopy and improved spectral component technologies of unprecedented resolution, free spectral range, and aperture.

  7. Terahertz Technology for ESPRIT - A Far-Infrared Space Interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, W.; de Graauw, Th.; Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J.; Gao, J. R.; Helmich, F.; Jackson, B. D.; Koshelets, V. P.; Roelfsema, P.; Whyborn, N. D.; Yagoubov, P.

    2005-01-01

    In the Terahertz regime the angular (and sometimes spectral) resolution of observing facilities is still very restricted despite the fact that this frequency range has become of prime importance for modern astrophysics. ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) with its superb sensitivity and angular

  8. Far-infrared spectral studies of magnesium and aluminum co ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    crystalline solids [3], ordering phenomenon in spinels [4,5], presence/absence of Fe2+ ions [6,7] and also to determine force constants for A- and B-sites [1,8]. The detailed analysis of IR spectra with precise crystallographic knowledge helps to ...

  9. Far-infrared line images of dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poglitsch, A.; Geis, N.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.; Genzel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Irregular dwarf galaxies are about ten times more widespread in the universe than regular spiral galaxies. They are characterized by a relatively low metallicity, i.e., lower abundance of the heavier elements (metals) with respect to hydrogen than in the solar neighborhood. These heavier elements in the form of molecules, atoms, or ions, which have radiative transitions in the infrared play a decisive role in the energy balance of the ISM and thereby for the formation of stars. Dwarf galaxies are thus model cases for the physical conditions in the early phase of the universe. Large Magellanic Cloud: 30 Doradus. The two nearest dwarf galaxies are the Magellanic clouds at a distance approximately 50 kpc. The LMC contains 30 Dor, a region with young, extremely massive stars which strongly interact with the surrounding ISM on account of their stellar winds and intense UV radiation. 30 Dor is the brightest object in the LMC at almost all wavelengths.

  10. Far Infrared Photonic Crystals Operating in the Reststrahl Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soref, Richard A; Qiang, Zexuan; Zhou, Weidong

    2007-01-01

    ...: GaP and Si, or GaAs and Ge, or AlAs and GaAs. The crystals operate in a wavelength range where the real refractive index of one material undergoes a major dispersion associated with the LO and TO phonon absorption peaks...

  11. Evolution of fault scarp knickpoints following 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake in West-Central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, L. S.; Stock, J. D.; Roering, J. J.; Kirchner, J. W.; Dietrich, W. E.; Chi, W.; Hsu, L.; Hsieh, M.; Tsao, S.; Chen, M.

    2005-12-01

    The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake in West-Central Taiwan caused vertical offset of 2-8 meters along the Chelungpu fault, creating numerous knickpoints on rivers draining the Western Foothills Range. This event offers an excellent opportunity to study the erosional mechanisms which control the style and rate of knickpoint migration and the role of sediment in mediating landscape response to tectonic forcing along fault boundaries. Here we report results from three field surveying campaigns four, 17 and 41 months after the coseismic surface rupture. We focus on seven channels spanning a range of offset magnitude, drainage area and degree of alluviation. Erosional response was rapid due to the weak underlying mudstone and several typhoons. Plunge pool scour and block toppling, the principal fluvial erosional processes which tend to preserve and translate the scarp morphology upstream, are enhanced by large vertical offset, low sediment load and wide joint spacing. In contrast, bedrock wear by bedload abrasion, hydraulic plucking and hydration fracturing result in scarp destruction by notching and upstream diffusion of the tectonic signal, and are favored by high sediment load, low vertical offset and weaker rock. The most rapid upstream propagation of the earthquake-induced pulse of accelerated bedrock erosion occurred on channels where a thin pre-rupture alluvial mantle was rapidly stripped for several hundred meters upstream exposing the bedrock to extensive wear. Alluvial stripping upstream of the knickpoints may be due to flow acceleration approaching the free fall over the scarp, and to a reduction in the effective friction angle as the wave of sediment removal sweeps upstream. In some cases, incision upstream of the scarps created narrow inner channels leaving behind remnants of the pre-rupture bedrock bed as nascent strath surfaces. Where alluvial cover thickness was equal or greater than scarp offset, knickpoints diffused symmetrically by progradation of a

  12. Why Yoga, Tai Chi and Meditation Are Good for You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_166673.html Why Yoga, Tai Chi and Meditation Are Good for You Mind-body interventions reverse ... mental health benefits of pursuits like yoga and meditation begin in your genes, a new review suggests. ...

  13. CHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The CHI Papers and Notes program is continuing to grow along with many of our sister conferences. We are pleased that CHI is still the leading venue for research in human-computer interaction. CHI 2013 continued the use of subcommittees to manage the review process. Authors selected the subcommit......The CHI Papers and Notes program is continuing to grow along with many of our sister conferences. We are pleased that CHI is still the leading venue for research in human-computer interaction. CHI 2013 continued the use of subcommittees to manage the review process. Authors selected...... a tremendous amount of work from all areas of the human-computer interaction community. As co-chairs of the process, we are amazed at the ability of the community to organize itself to accomplish this task. We would like to thank the 2680 individual reviewers for their careful consideration of these papers. We...... that you enjoy these papers and notes, which represent the best research in human-computer interaction....

  14. From Tornadoes to Earthquakes: Forecast Verification for Binary Events Applied to the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan,Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Forecast verification procedures for statistical events with binary outcomes typically rely on the use of contingency tables and Relative Operating Characteristic (ROC diagrams. Originally developed for the statistical evaluation of tornado forecasts on a county-by-county basis, these methods can be adapted to the evaluation of competing earthquake forecasts. Here we apply these methods retrospectively to two forecasts for the M 7.3 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake. We show that a previously proposed forecast method that is based on evaluating changes in seismic intensity on a regional basis is superior to a forecast based only on the magnitude of seismic intensity in the same region. Our results confirm earlier suggestions that the earthquake preparation process for events such as the Chi-Chi earthquake involves anomalous activation or quiescence, and that signatures of these processes can be detected in seismicity data using appropriate methods.

  15. Simplified Tai Chi Program Training versus Traditional Tai Chi on the Functional Movement Screening in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiru Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The present study aimed to evaluate and compare the effect of two different types of Tai Chi programs on the Functional Movement Screening (FMS in older adults. Methods. Ninety older adults (65.5 ± 4.6 years old who met the eligibility criteria were randomized into three different groups based on a ratio of 1 : 1 : 1: a traditional Tai Chi exercise (TTC, a simplified Tai Chi exercise (TCRT, or a control group (routine activity. The FMS consisted of the deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg rise, trunk stability push-up, and rotatory stability, which was used to measure physical function before the present study and after six months of Tai Chi interventions. Results. Seventy-nine participants completed the present study (control = 27, TTC = 23, and TCRT = 29. Significant improvement on the FMS tests between the baseline and after the six-month intervention was observed in both Tai Chi programs, whereas no significant improvement was observed in the control group. In addition, participants in the TCRT group demonstrated greater improvement than those in the TTC group. Conclusions. The TCRT is more effective in improving the physical function in older adults when compared to the traditional Tai Chi modality, particularly for improving balance.

  16. Strong ground motion in the Taipei basin from the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Joe B.; Wen, K.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The Taipei basin, located in northwest Taiwan about 160 km from the epicenter of the Chi-Chi earthquake, is a shallow, triangular-shaped basin filled with low-velocity fluvial deposits. There is a strong velocity contrast across the basement interface of about 600 m/sec at a depth of about 600-700 m in the deeper section of the basin, suggesting that ground motion should be amplified at sites in the basin. In this article, the ground-motion recordings are analyzed to determine the effect of the basin both in terms of amplifications expected from a 1D model of the sediments in the basin and in terms of the 3D structure of the basin. Residuals determined for peak acceleration from attenuation curves are more positive (amplified) in the basin (average of 5.3 cm/ sec2 compared to - 24.2 cm/sec2 for those stations outside the basin and between 75 and 110 km from the surface projection of the faulted area, a 40% increase in peak ground acceleration). Residuals for peak velocity are also significantly more positive at stations in the basin (31.8 cm/sec compared to 20.0 cm/sec out). The correlation of peak motion with depth to basement, while minor in peak acceleration, is stronger in the peak velocities. Record sections of ground motion from stations in and around the Taipei basin show that the largest long-period arrival, which is coherent across the region, is strongest on the vertical component and has a period of about 10-12 sec. This phase appears to be a Rayleigh wave, probably associated with rupture at the north end of the Chelungpu fault. Records of strong motion from stations in and near the basin have an additional, higher frequency signal: nearest the deepest point in the basin, the signal is characterized by frequencies of about 0.3 - 0.4 Hz. These frequencies are close to simple predictions using horizontal layers and the velocity structure of the basin. Polarizations of the S wave are mostly coherent across the array, although there are significant

  17. Changes in Regional Stress Associated with the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, Earthquake Based on Focal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Huang, B.; Tsai, Y.; Shin, T.

    2004-12-01

    The 1999 Mw7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake was the most recent prominent earthquake in Taiwan. The mainshock was followed by substantial number of strong aftershocks. Pre- and post-mainshock focal mechanisms of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake are analyzed to characterize spatial and temporal variation around the Chelungpu fault, which ruptured during the mainshock. The Frohlich¡¦s triangle diagram used to define the classification of earthquake focal mechanisms. We categorized the types of earthquake focal mechanisms as either normal , strike-slip, or thrust according to the corresponding maximum plunges is the pressure axis (P), null axis(B), or tension axis (T). The strain and stress orientations was estimated based on moment tensor summation and focal mechanism stress inversion respectively. The stress is caused by tectonic sources, but the strain results from the application of stress to particular structure of the crust. We show the difference between stress and strain directions and on what we can learn from this observation about tectonic processes in the volume studied. A comparison of the directions of strain and stress tensors showed close agreement for subvolumes with predominantly thrust and strike-slip faulting. This article describe and characterize the spatial and temporal distribution of earthquake focal mechanisms in the region of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake before(107 event) and after(401 event) the mainshock within the period from 1 January 1991 to 31 December 2001. Whereas the earthquake focal mechanism data suggest some spatial and temporal complexity in Central Taiwan, the overall pattern can be characterized by cluster analysis of grouped earthquake according to the seismicity trend and type of focal mechanisms. The aftershock focal mechanisms are dominant by strike-slip type even though the mainshock is thrust fault type. In contrast, for temporal distribution of different kind of aftershock focal mechanisms, which occurrence sequence is strike

  18. Consumer Acceptance of Functional Foods in Ho Chi Minh City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duy Tung BUI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify and evaluate the underlying factors affecting consumer acceptance of functional foods. The contribution of this study is to better understand customer willingness to buy such products in Ho Chi Minh City by shedding light on how socio-demographic, cognitive and attitudinal determinants affect consumer's choices of foods. We conducted a survey using 217 respondents from Ho Chi Minh City. Next, we develop a binary-probit model to quantify the impact of each factor on consumer acceptance. The results show that having a sick relative, beliefs in health benefits positively affect acceptance level. Other than that, old people in Ho Chi Minh City tend to reject the use of functional foods. However, when they are provided with enough knowledge, they are the most intensive buyers of these products. Implications and further researches are also discussed.

  19. Tai Chi training reduced coupling between respiration and postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Matthew L; Manor, Brad; Hsieh, Wan-hsin; Hu, Kun; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    In order to maintain stable upright stance, the postural control system must account for the continuous perturbations to the body's center-of-mass including those caused by spontaneous respiration. Both aging and disease increase "posturo-respiratory synchronization;" which reflects the degree to which respiration affects postural sway fluctuations over time. Tai Chi training emphasizes the coordination of respiration and bodily movements and may therefore optimize the functional interaction between these two systems. The purpose of the project was to examine the effect of Tai Chi training on the interaction between respiration and postural control in older adults. We hypothesized that Tai Chi training would improve the ability of the postural control system to compensate for respiratory perturbations and thus, reduce posturo-respiratory synchronization. Participants were recruited from supportive housing facilities and randomized to a 12-week Tai Chi intervention (n=28; 86 ± 5 yrs) or educational-control program (n=34, 85 ± 6 yrs). Standing postural sway and respiration were simultaneously recorded with a force plate and respiratory belt under eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Posturo-respiratory synchronization was determined by quantifying the variation of the phase relationship between the dominant oscillatory mode of respiration and corresponding oscillations within postural sway. Groups were similar in age, gender distribution, height, body mass, and intervention compliance. Neither intervention altered average sway speed, sway magnitude or respiratory rate. As compared to the education-control group, however, Tai Chi training reduced posturo-respiratory synchronization when standing with eyes open or closed (ppostural control or respiration, yet reduced the coupling between respiration and postural control. The beneficial effects of Tai Chi training may therefore stem in part from optimization of this multi-system interaction. Copyright © 2015

  20. Observation of B0 -> chi_c0 K*0 and Evidence of B+ -> chi_c0 K*+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, : B.

    2008-08-13

    The authors present the observation of the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}K*{sup 0} as well as evidence of B{sup +} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}K*{sup +}, with an 8.9 and a 3.6 standard deviation significance, respectively, using a data sample of 454 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B meson factory located at the Standard Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The measured branching fractions are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}K*{sup 0}) = (1.7 {+-} 0.3 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}K*{sup +}) = (1.4 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -4}, where the first quoted errors are statistical and the second are systematic. They obtain a branching fraction upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}K*{sup +}) < 2.1 x 10{sup -4} at the 90% confidence level.

  1. Chi-squared goodness of fit tests with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Balakrishnan, N; Nikulin, MS

    2013-01-01

    Chi-Squared Goodness of Fit Tests with Applications provides a thorough and complete context for the theoretical basis and implementation of Pearson's monumental contribution and its wide applicability for chi-squared goodness of fit tests. The book is ideal for researchers and scientists conducting statistical analysis in processing of experimental data as well as to students and practitioners with a good mathematical background who use statistical methods. The historical context, especially Chapter 7, provides great insight into importance of this subject with an authoritative author team

  2. CHI 2013 Human Work Interaction Design (HWID) SIG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Campos, Pedro F.; Katre, Dinesh S.

    2013-01-01

    In this SIG we aim to introduce the IFIP 13.6 Human Work Interaction Design (HWID) approach to the CHI audience. The HWID working group aims at establishing relationships between extensive empirical work-domain studies and HCI design. We invite participants from industry and academia...... with an interest on empirical work analysis, HCI, interaction design and usability and user experience in work situations and in the workplace. This SIG is a vital step towards creating a CHI2014 workshop on this topic....

  3. Stability of an emittance-dominated sheet-electron beam in planar wiggler and periodic permanent magnet structures with natural focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, B. E.; Earley, L. M.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Russell, S. J.; Potter, J. M.; Ferguson, P.; Humphries, S.

    2005-06-01

    A sheet-beam traveling-wave amplifier has been proposed as a high-power generator of rf from 95 to 300 GHz, using a microfabricated rf slow-wave structure [Carlsten et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 33, 85 (2005), ITPSBD, 0093-3813, 10.1109/TPS.2004.841172], for emerging radar and communications applications. The planar geometry of microfabrication technologies matches well with the nearly planar geometry of a sheet beam, and the greater allowable beam current leads to high-peak power, high-average power, and wide bandwidths. Simulations of nominal designs using a vane-loaded waveguide as the slow-wave structure have indicated gains in excess of 1 dB/mm, with extraction efficiencies greater than 20% at 95 GHz with a 120-kV, 20-A electron beam. We have identified stable sheet-beam formation and transport as the key enabling technology for this type of device. In this paper, we describe sheet-beam transport, for both wiggler and periodic permanent magnet (PPM) magnetic field configurations, with natural (or single-plane) focusing. For emittance-dominated transport, the transverse equation of motion reduces to a Mathieu equation, and to a modified Mathieu equation for a space-charge dominated beam. The space-charge dominated beam has less beam envelope ripple than an emittance-dominated beam, but they have similar stability thresholds (defined by where the beam ripple continues to grow without bound along the transport line), consistent with the threshold predicted by the Mathieu equation. Design limits are derived for an emittance-dominated beam based on the Mathieu stability threshold. The increased beam envelope ripple for emittance-dominated transport may impact these design limits, for some transport requirements. The stability of transport in a wiggler field is additionally compromised by the beam’s increased transverse motion. Stable sheet-beam transport with natural focusing is shown to be achievable for a 120-kV, 20-A, elliptical beam with a cross section of

  4. Anomalous effect in Schumann resonance phenomena observed in Japan, possibly associated with the Chi-chi earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Schumann resonance phenomenon has been monitored at Nakatsugawa (near Nagoya in Japan since the beginning of 1999, and due to the occurance of a severe earthquake (so-called Chi-chi earthquake on 21 September 1999 in Taiwan we have examined our Schumann resonance data at Nakatsugawa during the entire year of 1999. We have found a very anomalous effect in the Schumann resonance, possibly associated with two large land earthquakes (one is the Chi-chi earthquake and another one on 2 November 1999 (Chia-yi earthquake with a magnitude again greater than 6.0. Conspicuous effects are observed for the larger Chi-chi earthquake, so that we summarize the characteristics for this event. The anomaly is characterized mainly by the unusual increase in amplitude of the fourth Schumann resonance mode and a significant frequency shift of its peak frequency (~1.0Hz from the conventional value on the By magnetic field component which is sensitive to the waves propagating in the NS meridian plane. Anomalous Schumann resonance signals appeared from about one week to a few days before the main shock. Secondly, the goniometric estimation of the arrival angle of the anomalous signal is found to coincide with the Taiwan azimuth (the unresolved dual direction indicates toward South America. Also, the pulsed signals, such as the Q-bursts, were simultaneously observed with the "carrier" frequency around the peak frequency of the fourth Schumann resonance mode. The anomaly for the second event for the Chia-yi earthquake on 2 November had much in common. But, most likely due to a small magnitude, the anomaly appears one day before and lasts until one day after the main shock, with the enhancement at the fourth Schumann resonance mode being smaller in amplitude than the case of the Chi-chi earthquake. Yet, the other characteristics, including the goniometric direction finding result, frequency shift, etc., are nearly the same. Although the emphasis of the present study is

  5. Anomalous effect in Schumann resonance phenomena observed in Japan, possibly associated with the Chi-chi earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Schumann resonance phenomenon has been monitored at Nakatsugawa (near Nagoya in Japan since the beginning of 1999, and due to the occurance of a severe earthquake (so-called Chi-chi earthquake on 21 September 1999 in Taiwan we have examined our Schumann resonance data at Nakatsugawa during the entire year of 1999. We have found a very anomalous effect in the Schumann resonance, possibly associated with two large land earthquakes (one is the Chi-chi earthquake and another one on 2 November 1999 (Chia-yi earthquake with a magnitude again greater than 6.0. Conspicuous effects are observed for the larger Chi-chi earthquake, so that we summarize the characteristics for this event. The anomaly is characterized mainly by the unusual increase in amplitude of the fourth Schumann resonance mode and a significant frequency shift of its peak frequency (~1.0Hz from the conventional value on the By magnetic field component which is sensitive to the waves propagating in the NS meridian plane. Anomalous Schumann resonance signals appeared from about one week to a few days before the main shock. Secondly, the goniometric estimation of the arrival angle of the anomalous signal is found to coincide with the Taiwan azimuth (the unresolved dual direction indicates toward South America. Also, the pulsed signals, such as the Q-bursts, were simultaneously observed with the "carrier" frequency around the peak frequency of the fourth Schumann resonance mode. The anomaly for the second event for the Chia-yi earthquake on 2 November had much in common. But, most likely due to a small magnitude, the anomaly appears one day before and lasts until one day after the main shock, with the enhancement at the fourth Schumann resonance mode being smaller in amplitude than the case of the Chi-chi earthquake. Yet, the other characteristics, including the goniometric direction finding result, frequency shift, etc., are nearly the same. Although the emphasis of

  6. ChiShona periphrastic causatives as syntactic complex predicates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ChiShona periphrastic causatives as syntactic complex predicates: An HPSG analysis. ... We utilise analytical insights from the notion of Argument Composition (AC) and Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar (HPSG) theory. Since AC is considered as a lexical process, its account of complex predicates satisfies strict ...

  7. CHI SYMBOLISM IN ACHEBE'S THINGS FALL APART: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    all to ground by derivation as in the methodology of the human sciences, but to unfold the foundation by clarification. In other words, the phenomenological task discoverable in Being and ... The spectrum of Igbo application of the chi reveals that it is used to denote destiny. This is shown thus in chim—my fate, my destiny, my ...

  8. Potentiation of the synergistic activities of chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC from Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2 by chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Román, Martha Ingrid; Dunn, Michael F; Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Holguín-Meléndez, Francisco; Huerta-Palacios, Graciela; Guillén-Navarro, Karina

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the chitinolytic mechanism of the potential biological control strain Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2, genes encoding chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC, chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP) were cloned, the protein products overexpressed in Escherichia coli as 6His-Sumo fusion proteins and purified by affinity chromatography. Following affinity tag removal, the chitinolytic activity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated individually and in combination using colloidal chitin as substrate. ChiB and ChiC were highly active while ChiA was inactive. Reactions containing both ChiB and ChiC showed significantly increased N-acetylglucosamine trimer and dimer formation, but decreased monomer formation, compared to reactions with either enzyme alone. This suggests that while both ChiB and ChiC have a general affinity for the same substrate, they attack different sites and together degrade chitin more efficiently than either enzyme separately. Chb and CBP in combination with ChiB and ChiC (individually or together) increased their chitinase activity. We report for the first time the potentiating effect of Chb on the activity of the chitinases and the synergistic activity of a mixture of all five proteins (the three chitinases, Chb and CBP). These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of action of the chitinases produced by strain CFFSUR-B2 and provide a molecular basis for its high potential as a biocontrol agent against fungal pathogens.

  9. Measurement of the relative rate of prompt $\\chi_{c0}$, $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ production at $\\sqrt{s}=7$TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Prompt production of charmonium $\\chi_{c0}$, $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ mesons is studied using proton-proton collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$TeV. The $\\chi_{c}$ mesons are identified through their decay to $J/\\psi\\gamma$, with $J/\\psi\\rightarrow\\mu^+mu^-$ using photons that converted in the detector. A data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.0\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb detector, is used to measure the relative prompt production rate of $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ in the rapidity range $2.0chi_{c0}$ meson production at a hadron collider is also presented.

  10. Measurement of $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ production with $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV $pp$ collisions at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; {\\AA}kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ask, Stefan; {\\AA}sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jurg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Buscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urb\\'an, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, Joao; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coelli, Simone; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muino, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, Mar\\'ia Jos\\'e; Costanzo, Davide; C\\^ot\\'e, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Cr\\'ep\\'e-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Crist\\'obal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliot, Frederic; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, Andr\\'e; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jorg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Duhrssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duren, Michael; Dwuznik, Michal; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filip\\v{c}i\\v{c}, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Matthew; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; Garc\\'ia, Carmen; Garc\\'ia Navarro, Jos\\'e Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniel Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-H\\'el\\`ene; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, B{\\o}rge Kile; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gon\\c calo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonz\\'alez de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gori\\v{s}ek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gossling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafstrom, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Grybel, Kai; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haefner, Petra; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, J{\\o}rgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hern\\'andez Jim\\'enez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Hig\\'on-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hulsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Goran; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; J\\'ez\\'equel, St\\'ephane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Ker\\v{s}evan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koenig, Sebastian; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Koneke, Karsten; Konig, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Kruger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ram\\'on; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lan\\c con, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Lev\\^eque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Dorthe; Ludwig, Inga; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Ma\\v{c}ek, Bo\\v{s}tjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madar, Romain; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Am\\'elia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandi\\'{c}, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, Jos\\'e; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattig, Peter; Mattig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijovi\\'{c}, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Miku\\v{z}, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjornmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Ll\\'acer, Mar\\'ia; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, Ant\\'onio; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; P\\'asztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Perez Garcia-Estan, Maria Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, Joao Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pomm\\`es, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quilty, Donnchadha; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisin, Hernan; Reisinger, Ingo; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; R{\\o}hne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruhr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, Jos\\'e; Salvachua Ferrando, Bel\\'en; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; S\\'anchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, Joao; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schafer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, Jos\\'e; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, Jos\\'e; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjolin, Jorgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Span\\`o, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Strohmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; 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Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timoth\\'ee; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tom\\'{a}\\v{s}; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tok\\'ar, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torr\\'o Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocm\\'e, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; \\v{Z}eni\\v{s}, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    The prompt and non-prompt production cross-sections for the $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ charmonium states are measured in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using 4.5 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The $\\chi_{c}$ states are reconstructed through the radiative decay $\\chi_{c}\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\,\\gamma$ (with $J/\\psi\\rightarrow\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$) where photons are reconstructed from $\\gamma\\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}$ conversions. The production rate of the $\\chi_{c2}$ state relative to the $\\chi_{c1}$ state is measured for prompt and non-prompt $\\chi_{c}$ as a function of $J/\\psi$ transverse momentum. The prompt $\\chi_{c}$ cross-sections are combined with existing measurements of prompt $J/\\psi$ production to derive the fraction of prompt $J/\\psi$ produced in feed-down from $\\chi_{c}$ decays. The fractions of $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ produced in $b$-hadron decays are also measured. In addition to measurements of inclusive $\\chi_{c}$ production, the branching fraction ${\\cal B}(B^...

  11. Probability variance CHI feature selection method for unbalanced data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Chen, Bingfeng

    2017-08-01

    The problem of feature selection on unbalanced text data is a difficult problem to be solved. In view of the above problems, this paper analyzes the distribution of the feature items in the class and the class and the difference of the document under the unbalanced data set. The research is based on the word frequency probability and the document probability measurement feature and the document in the unbalanced data this paper proposes a CHI feature selection method based on probabilistic variance, which improves the traditional chi-square statistical model by introducing the intra-class word frequency probability factor, inter-class document probability concentration factor and intra-class uniformity factor. The experiment proves the effectiveness and feasibility of the method.

  12. Two-color holography concept (T-CHI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, C. S.; Caulfield, H. J.; Workman, G. L.; Trolinger, J. D.; Wood, C. P.; Clark, R. L.; Kathman, A. D.; Ruggiero, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The Material Processing in the Space Program of NASA-MSFC was active in developing numerous optical techniques for the characterization of fluids in the vicinity of various materials during crystallization and/or solidification. Two-color holographic interferometry demonstrates that temperature and concentration separation in transparent (T-CHI) model systems is possible. The experiments were performed for particular (succinonitrile) systems. Several solutions are possible in Microgravity Sciences and Applications (MSA) experiments on future Shuttle missions. The theory of the T-CHI concept is evaluated. Although particular cases are used for explanations, the concepts developed will be universal. A breadboard system design is also presented for ultimate fabrication and testing of theoretical findings. New developments in holography involving optical fibers and diode lasers are also incorporated.

  13. Modulational instability in the nonlocal chi(2)-model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyller, John Andreas; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Bang, Ole

    2007-01-01

    in the parameter space for which a fundamental gain band exists, and regions for which higher order gain bands and modulational stability exist. We also show that the MI analysis for the nonlocal model is applicable in the finite walk-off case. Finally, we show that the plane waves of the nonlocal chi((2))-model......We investigate in detail the linear regime of the modulational instability (MI) properties of the plane waves of the nonlocal model for chi((2))- media formulated in Nikolov et al. [N.I. Nikolov, D. Neshev, O. Bang, W.Z. Krolikowski, Quadratic solitons as nonlocal solitons, Phys. Rev. E 68 (2003......) 036614; I.V. Shadrivov, A.A. Zharov, Dynamics of optical spatial solitons near the interface between two quadratically nonlinear media, J. Opt. Soc. Amer. B 19 (2002) 596-602]. It is shown that the MI is of the oscillatory type and of finite bandwidth. Moreover, it is possible to identify regions...

  14. From Dynamic Condition Response Structures to Büchi Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have presented distributed dynamic condition response structures (DCR structures) as a declarative process model conservatively generalizing labelled event structures to allow for finite specifications of repeated, possibly infinite behavior. The key ideas are to split the causality r...... and show how to characterise the execution of DCR structures and the acceptance condition for infinite runs by giving a map to Bu ̈chi-automata. This is the first step towards automatic verification of processes specified as DCR structures....

  15. An Advanced Dictionary? Similarities and Differences between Duramazwi ReChiShona and Duramazwi Guru ReChiShona *

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Chabata

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: In this article a comparative analysis of Duramazwi ReChiShona (DRC and Duramazwi Guru ReChiShona (DGC is made. Both DRC and DGC are monolingual Shona dictionaries compiled by a team of researchers under the African Languages Lexical (ALLEX Project, now the African Languages Research Institute (ALRI. During the compilation process, DRC was known as the General Shona Dictionary and DGC as the Advanced Shona Dictionary. A simple analysis of these titles shows that the dictionaries are similar in some ways and also different in others. The writer tries to show the ways in which DGC is regarded as a more advanced dictionary when compared to DRC. Although the argument of the article is mainly built on those differences which make DGC the more advanced, attention is also paid to the similarities between the dictionaries.

    Keywords: ALLEX PROJECT, ALRI, DURAMAZWI RECHISHONA, DURAMAZWI GURU RECHISHONA, DICTIONARY, SHONA, HEADWORD, SENSE, MONOLINGUAL DICTIONARY, CORPUS, IDIOM, PROVERB, PITHY SAYING

    Opsomming: 'n Gevorderde woordeboek? Ooreenkomste en verskille tussen Duramazwi ReChiShona en Duramazwi Guru ReChiShona. In hierdie artikel word 'n vergelykende ontleding van Duramazwi ReChiShona (DRC en Duramazwi Guru ReChiShona (DGC gemaak. Sowel die DRC en DGC is eentalige Sjonawoordeboeke, saamgestel deur ?n span navorsers by die African Languages Lexical (ALLEX Project, tans die African Languages Research Institute (ALRI. Gedurende die samestellingsproses was DRC bekend as die Algemene Sjonawoordeboek en DGC as die Gevorderde Sjonawoordeboek. 'n Eenvoudige ontleding van hierdie titels toon dat die woordeboeke op sommige maniere eenders en op ander ook verskillend is. Die skrywer probeer die maniere aantoon waarop DGC beskou word as 'n meer gevorderde woordeboek wanneer dit met DRC vergelyk word. Alhoewel die argument van die artikel hoofsaaklik gebou is op daardie verskille wat DGC die gevorderdste maak, word ook aandag gegee aan

  16. Measurement of the $\\chi_b(3P)$ mass and of the relative rate of $\\chi_{b1}(1P)$ and $\\chi_{b2}(1P)$ production

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Lespinasse, Mickael; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-10-14

    The production of $\\chi_b$ mesons in proton-proton collisions is studied using a data sample collected by the LHCb detector, at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8$ TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$. The $\\chi_b$ mesons are identified through their decays to $\\Upsilon(1S)\\gamma$ and $\\Upsilon(2S)\\gamma$ using photons that converted to $e^+e^-$ pairs in the detector. The $\\chi_b(3P)$ meson mass, and the relative prompt production rate of $\\chi_{b1}(1P)$ and $\\chi_{b2}(1P)$ mesons as a function of the $\\Upsilon(1S)$ transverse momentum in the $\\chi_b$ rapidity range 2.0< $y$<4.5, are measured. Assuming a mass splitting between the $\\chi_{b1}(3P)$ and the $\\chi_{b2}(3P)$ states of 10.5 MeV/$c^2$, the mass of the $\\chi_{b1}(3P)$ meson is \\begin{equation*} m(\\chi_{b1}(3P))= 10515.7^{+2.2}_{-3.9}(stat) ^{+1.5}_{-2.1}(syst) MeV/c^2. \\end{equation*}

  17. Precise measurement of the $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ resonance parameters with the decays $\\chi_{c1,c2}\\to J\\psi\\mu^+\\mu^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Atzeni, Michele; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Chapman, Matthew George; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chitic, Stefan-Gabriel; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Colombo, Tommaso; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Douglas, Lauren; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fazzini, Davide; Federici, Luca; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gabriel, Emmy; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabowski, Jascha Peter; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruber, Lukas; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hancock, Thomas Henry; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Hasse, Christoph; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Hecker, Malte; Heinicke, Kevin; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Hu, Wenhua; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Ibis, Philipp; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kazeev, Nikita; Kecke, Matthieu; Keizer, Floris; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Kress, Felix Johannes; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Pei-Rong; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Lisovskyi, Vitalii; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luchinsky, Alexey; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Macko, Vladimir; Mackowiak, Patrick; Maddrell-Mander, Samuel; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Maisuzenko, Dmitrii; Majewski, Maciej Witold; Malde, Sneha; Malecki, Bartosz; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Marangotto, Daniele; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Mead, James Vincent; Meadows, Brian; Meaux, Cedric; Meier, Frank; Meinert, Nis; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Millard, Edward James; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Minzoni, Luca; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Mombächer, Titus; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Ossowska, Anna; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pisani, Flavio; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Pullen, Hannah Louise; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Quintana, Boris; Rachwal, Bartlomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Reboud, Meril; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Robert, Arnaud; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Ruiz Vidal, Joan; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarpis, Gediminas; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepulveda, Eduardo Enrique; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stepanova, Margarita; Stevens, Holger; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Jiayin; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szumlak, Tomasz; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Usachov, Andrii; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagner, Alexander; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Weisser, Constantin; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Menglin; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zonneveld, Jennifer Brigitta; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The decays $\\chi_{c1} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $\\chi_{c2} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ are observed and used to study the resonance parameters of the $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ mesons. The masses of these states are measured to be \\begin{align*} m(\\chi_{c1}) = 3510.71 \\pm 0.04(stat) \\pm 0.09(syst)~ \\text{MeV}\\,, \\\\ m(\\chi_{c2}) = 3556.10 \\pm 0.06(stat) \\pm 0.11(syst)~ \\text{MeV}\\,, \\end{align*} where the knowledge of the momentum scale for charged particles dominates the systematic uncertainty. The momentum-scale uncertainties largely cancel in the mass difference \\begin{equation*} m(\\chi_{c2}) - m(\\chi_{c1}) = 45.39 \\pm 0.07(stat) \\pm 0.03(syst)~ \\text{MeV}. \\end{equation*} The natural width of the $\\chi_{c2}$ meson is measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\Gamma(\\chi_{c2}) = 2.10 \\pm 0.20(stat) \\pm 0.02(syst)~ \\text{MeV}. \\end{equation*} These results are in good agreement with and have comparable precision to the current world averages.

  18. On the {sigma}({chi}{sub c1})/{sigma}({chi}{sub c2}) ratio in the k{sub t}-factorization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, S.P. [P.N. Lebedev Institute of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    We address the puzzle of {sigma}({chi}{sub c1})/{sigma}({chi}{sub c2}) ratio at the collider and fixed-target experiments. We consider several factors that can affect the predicted ratio of the production rates. In particular, we discuss the effect of {chi}{sub cJ} polarization, the effect of including next-to-leading order contributions, and the effect of probably different {chi}{sub c1} and {chi}{sub c2} wave functions. (orig.)

  19. Tai Chi pedicle screw placement for severe scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kao-Wha; Wang, Yu-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Zhi; Cheng, Ching-Wei; Chen, Hung-Yi; Leng, Xiangyang; Chen, Yin-Yu

    2012-05-01

    Retrospective. To evaluate the clinical safety and accuracy of the Tai Chi ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) technique for placing pedicle screws, without intraoperative radiographic imaging, in severe scoliotic spines. The current techniques for pedicle screw placement have a number of drawbacks in cases of severe scoliosis, including difficulty or impossibility to use, delayed operative time, requiring the presence of trained personnel for the duration of the surgery, high cost issues, increased radiation exposure, and technical challenges. No previous report has described the application of the Tai Chi pedicle screw placement technique for severe scoliosis. Between 2006 and 2008, the cases of 39 consecutive patients with severe scoliosis (Cobb angle >100 degrees) who underwent posterior correction and stabilization (from T1 to L5) using 992 transpedicular screws were examined. The mean patient age was 25.7 (range, 11 to 63) years at the time of surgery. Pedicle screws were inserted by the Tai Chi technique using anatomic landmarks and preoperative radiographs as a guide. Tai Chi drilling fully utilizes the natural anatomic and physical characteristics of pedicles and unconstrained circular force. By nature, a drill bit driven by unconstrained circular force would migrate within the pedicle along a path of least resistance, advancing along the central cancellous bone tunnel spontaneously. Accurate drilling was achieved by following the nature and sticking to the hand sensation when the drill bit broke through the cancellous bone. The total time for inserting all pedicle screws in each case was recorded. Postoperative computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate the position of the inserted pedicle screws. The screw position was classified as "in" or "out." The distance of perforation was measured. The average Cobb angle was 127 degrees (range, 100 to 153 degrees). The number of screws inserted at each level were as follows: T1 (n=10), T2 (n

  20. Cloning of the Aegiceras corniculatum class I chitinase gene (AcCHI I) and the response of AcCHI I mRNA expression to cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, You-Shao; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Yeok, Foong Swee

    2015-10-01

    Chitinases in terrestrial plants have been reported these are involved in heavy metal tolerance/detoxification. This is the first attempt to reveal chitinase gene (AcCHI I) and its function on metal detoxification in mangroves Aegiceras corniculatum. RT-PCR and RACE techniques were used to clone AcCHI I, while real-time quantitative PCR was employed to assess AcCHI I mRNA expressions in response to Cadmium (Cd). The deduced AcCHI I protein consists of 316 amino acids, including a signal peptide region, a chitin-binding domain (CBD) and a catalytic domain. Protein homology modeling was performed to identify potential features in AcCHI I. The CBD structure of AcCHI I might be critical for metal tolerance/homeostasis of the plant. Clear tissue-specific differences in AcCHI I expression were detected, with higher transcript levels detected in leaves. Results demonstrated that a short duration of Cd exposure (e.g., 3 days) promoted AcCHI I expression in roots. Upregulated expression was also detected in leaves under 10 mg/kg Cd concentration stress. The present study demonstrates that AcCHI I may play an important role in Cd tolerance/homeostasis in the plant. Further studies of the AcCHI I protein, gene overexpression, the promoter and upstream regulation will be necessary for clarifying the functions of AcCHI I.

  1. Hadroproduction of the $\\chi1$ and $\\chi2$ States of Charmonium in 800 GeV/c Proton-Silicon Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Alexopoulos, T; Arenton, M; Ballagh, H C; Bingham, H; Blankman, A; Block, M; Boden, A; Bonomi, G; Cao, Z L; Chen, T Y; Clark, K; Cline, D; Conetti, S; Cooper, M; Corti, G; Cox, B; Creti, P; Dukes, E C; Durandet, C; Elia, V; Erwin, A R; Fortney, L; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Hagan, K; Haire, M; Hanlet, P; He, M; Introzzi, G; Jenkins, M; Judd, D; Kononenko, W; Kowald, W; Lau, K; Ledovskoy, A A; Liguori, G; Lys, J; Mazur, P O; McManus, A P; Misawa, S; Mo, G H; Murphy, C T; Nelson, K; Pogosyan, V; Ramachandran, S; Rhoades, J; Selove, W; Smith, R P; Spiegel, L; Sun, J G; Tokar, S; Torre, P; Trischuk, J; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Wang, C R; Wei, C; Yang, W; Yao, N; Zhang, N J; Zou, B T

    2000-01-01

    The cross sections for the hadroproduction of the Chi1 and Chi2 states of charmonium in proton-silicon collisions at sqrt{s}=38.8 GeV have been measured in Fermilab fixed target Experiment 771. The Chi states were observed via their radiative decay to J/psi+gamma, where the photon converted to e+e- in the material of the spectrometer. The measured values for the Chi1 and Chi2 cross sections for x_F>0 are 263+-69(stat)+-32(syst) and 498+-143(stat)+-67(syst) nb per nucleon respectively. The resulting sigma(Chi1}/sigma(Chi2) ratio of 0.53+-0.20(stat)+-0.07(syst), although somewhat larger than most theoretical expectations, can be accomodated by the latest theoretical estimates.

  2. Coseismic Deformation of Chi-Chi Earthquake as Detected by Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry and GPS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Sheng Hsieh Tian-Yuan Shih

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A rupture in the Chelungpu fault caused an Mw 7.6 earthquake on 21 September 1999 near Chi-Chi in central Taiwan. This earthquake was the most destructive experienced in Taiwan for the past century along this fault. In this study, we examined the earthquake-induced surface deformation pattern using differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (D-InSAR combined with global positioning system (GPS data regarding the footwall of the Chelungpu fault. Six synthetic aperture radar (SAR scenes, approximately 100 × 100 km each, recorded by the European Remote Sensing Satellite 2 (ERS-2, spanning the rupture area, were selected for study. The data were used to generate a high-resolution, wide-area map of displacements in flat or semi-flat areas. Interferograms show radar line contours indicating line-of-sight (LOS changes corresponding to surface displacements caused by earthquake ruptures. These results were compared to synthetic interferograms generated from GPS data. Displacements shown by GPS data were interpolated onto wide-area maps and transformed to coincide with the radar LOS direction. The resulting coseismic displacement contour map showed a lobed pattern consistent with the precise GPSbased displacement field. Highly accurate vertical displacement was determined using D-InSAR data using the coordinate transform method, while GPS data was effective in showing the horizontal component. Thus, this study confirmed the effectiveness of the D-InSAR method for determining the coseismic deformation caused by the Chi-Chi earthquake at the footwall of the Chelungpu fault.

  3. Chitinase Genes LbCHI31 and LbCHI32 from Limonium bicolor Were Successfully Expressed in Escherichia coli and Exhibit Recombinant Chitinase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihua; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Rongshu; Diao, Guiping; Fan, Haijuan; Wang, Zhiying

    2013-01-01

    The two chitinase genes, LbCHI31 and LbCHI32 from Limonium bicolor, were, respectively, expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 strain. The intracellular recombinant chitinases, inrCHI31 and inrCHI32, and the extracellular exrCHI31 and exrCHI32 could be produced into E. coli. The exrCHI31 and exrCHI32 can be secreted into extracellular medium. The optimal reaction condition for inrCHI31 was 5 mmol/L of Mn2+ at 40°C and pH 5.0 with an activity of 0.772 U using Alternaria alternata cell wall as substrate. The optimal condition of inrCHI32 was 5 mmol/L of Ba2+ at 45°C and pH 5.0 with an activity of 0.792 U using Valsa sordida cell wall as substrate. The optimal reaction condition of exrCHI31 was 5 mmol/L of Zn2+ at 40°C and pH 5.0, and the activity was 0.921 U using the A. alternata cell wall as substrate. Simultaneously, the optimal condition of exrCHI32 was 5 mmol/L of K+ at 45°C and pH 5.0, with V. sordida cell wall as the substrate, and the activity was 0.897 U. Furthermore, the activities of extracellular recombinant enzymes on fungal cell walls and compounds were generally higher than those of the intracellular recombinant enzymes. Recombinant exrCHI31 and exrCHI32 have better hydrolytic ability on cell walls of different fungi than synthetic chitins and obviously showed activity against A. alternata. PMID:24385885

  4. Identification of sigma and chi phases in duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorca-Isern, Núria, E-mail: nullorca@ub.edu [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti-Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); López-Luque, Héctor, E-mail: hlopezlu7@alumnes.ub.edu [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti-Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); López-Jiménez, Isabel, E-mail: ilopezji9@alumnes.ub.edu [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti-Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Biezma, Maria Victoria, E-mail: maria.biezma@unican.es [Department of Earth, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Cantabria - UC, Gamazo, 1, 39004 Santander (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this work is to find out the most suitable method for detecting and analyzing accurately the formation conditions of secondary phases, particularly Sigma-phase (σ-phase) and Chi-phase (χ-phase) in duplex stainless steels (UNS S32205 and UNS S32750). The microstructure was characterized after a solution annealing at 1080 °C followed by an isothermal heating at 830 °C for different time ranges, ranging from 1 min to 9 h, in order to enlighten the controversial point concerning the mechanism of χ-phase nucleation in relation with the σ-phase. Etched samples were observed using optical microscopy (MO), and scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with a backscattered electron detector (BSE) was used on unetched samples. Compositional microanalysis (EDS) was carried out for identifying the different phases present in the steels. Sigma phase was easily observed using different etching procedures, whereas χ-phase was only clearly detected with FESEM–BSE on unetched samples. The compositional analyses showed that the molybdenum content in χ-phase almost doubles the content of this element in σ-phase, and as a result the kinetics of nucleation and growth were also found to be remarkably faster when the alloy content in the steel is higher. In addition, chromium nitrides and carbides were also observed to precipitate as a result of the heat treatments and, in the case of the chromium nitrides, they act as a favorable site for the nucleation of σ-phase and χ-phase. - Highlights: • Microscopy was used on heat treated duplex steels for microstructure identification. • FESEM–BSE observation on unetched samples provided the best contrast between phases. • Analyses of carbides, nitrides, chi and sigma phases were possible by EDS and WDS. • Chromium nitrides act as favorable site for the nucleation of chi and sigma phases. • Secondary phases nucleation kinetics are faster in superduplex than in duplex steels.

  5. Escape angles in bulk chi((2)) soliton interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steffen Kjær; Bang, Ole; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2002-01-01

    We develop a theory for nonplanar interaction between two identical type I spatial solitons propagating at opposite, but arbitrary transverse angles in quadratic nonlinear (or so-called chi((2))) bulk, media. We predict quantitatively the outwards escape angle, below which the solitons turn around...... and collide, and above which they continue to move-away from each other. For in-plane interaction, the theory allows prediction of the Outcome of a collision through the inwards escape angle, i.e., whether the solitons fuse or cross. We find an analytical expression determining the inwards escape angle using...

  6. Experimental Investigation of the Two-Photon Widths of the $\\chi_{c0}$ and the $\\chi_{c2}$ Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenstein, B I; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Poling, R A; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Savinov, V; Chen, S; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Gao, Y S; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Benslama, K; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Majumder, G; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Kopp, S E; Kostin, M A; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; McGee, S; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Jaffe, D E; Mahapatra, R; Masek, G; Paar, H P; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Hill, T S; Morrison, R J; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Vogel, H; Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Drell, P S; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Gaidarev, P B; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Palmer, M; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Romano, A; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Valant-Spaight, B L; Viehhauser, G; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R

    2001-01-01

    Using 12.7 $fb^{-1}$ of data collected with the CLEO detector at CESR, we observed two-photon production of the $c \\bar c$ states $\\chi_{c0}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ in their decay to $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$. We measured $\\Gamma_{\\gamma\\gamma}(\\chi_{c}) \\times {\\mathcal B}(\\chi_{c} \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ to be 75 +- 13 (stat) +- 8 (syst) eV for the $\\chi_{c0}$ and 6.4 +- 1.8 (stat) +- 0.8 (syst) eV for the $\\chi_{c2}$ implying $\\Gamma_{\\gamma\\gamma}(\\chi_{c0})$ = 3.76 +- 0.65 (stat) +- 0.41 (syst) +- 1.69 (br) keV and $\\Gamma_{\\gamma\\gamma}(\\chi_{c2})$ = 0.53 +- 0.15 (stat) +- 0.06 (syst) +- 0.22 (br) keV. Also, cancelation of dominant experimental and theoretical uncertainties permits a precise comparison of $\\Gamma_{\\gamma\\gamma}(\\chi_{c0})/\\Gamma_{\\gamma\\gamma}(\\chi_{c2})$, evaluated to be 7.4 +- 2.4 (stat) +- 0.5 (syst) +- 0.9 (br), with QCD-based predictions.

  7. Area Balancing Method as a Useful Tool to Estimate the Depth of the Chi-Chi Earthquake Rupture at the Fengyuan Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hsi Lee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, Mw = 7.6, was associated with a near 100-km-long surface rupture along which the horizontal slip and vertical displacement reached to 9 m and 4 m, respectively, according to coseismic GPS slip vectors. After the Chi-Chi earthquake, drilling projects were conducted to clarify the characteristics of the earthquake rupture in depth. At the Fengyuan site, inclined-well drilling was performed at an angle of 50 degrees westward to a drilling depth of 455.3 m in the northern segment of the Chi-Chi earthquake rupture. Two possible earthquake rupture zones were observed at drilling depths of 225 m and 330 m according to the core structures and seismic profiling. We apply an area balancing method to determine the depth of the earthquake rupture in the cores; and we suggest that the 330-m drilling depth is the most likely candidate for the earthquake rupture.

  8. Effect of tai chi exercise on proprioception of ankle and knee joints in old people

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, D; Hong, Y; Li, J; Chan, K

    2004-01-01

    To assess if tai chi, a traditional Chinese form of exercise, could improve proprioception in old people and if the effects of tai chi on proprioception are more evident than other exercise forms in the elderly...

  9. Tai Chi and Your Health: A Modern Take on an Ancient Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online tai chi videos at nccih.nih.gov/video/taichidvd-full . Related Stories ... activity and limits. Ask whether tai chi might be a good option for you. Look for classes based on your age and health. Some classes ...

  10. The best approximation of $P-$ metric space of $\\chi^{2}-$ defined by Musielak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAGARAJAN SUBRAMANIAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce the idea of constructing sequence space $\\chi^{2}$ of best approximation in $p-$ metric defined by Musielak and also construct some general topological properties of approximation of $\\chi^{2}$

  11. Effect of Finite Frequency Bandwidth Limitation on Evaluations of Seismic Radiation Energy of the 1999 Chi-Chi Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeen-Hwa Wang Ming-Wey Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the £s−2 and £s−3 source models, we explore the effect on estimates of seismic radiation energy, Es , caused by finite frequency bandwidth limitation of source spectra. Let fc be the corner frequency of a source spectrum and fu and fc are, respectively, the upper and lower bounds of a frequency band in use. Results show that the effect depends on fu/fc and fl/fc , and Es is under-estimated when fl > 0 and fu 20, the effect is insensitive only to fu/fc for the two models. Let Es¡¦ be the seismic radiation energy estimated without removal of finite frequency bandwidth limitation. Results show: (1 Es¡¦/Es first slightly increases and then decreases with increasing fc ; or (2 Es¡¦/Es monotonously decrease with increasing fc. For the 1999 Ms 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake, Taiwan, Es was under-estimated by Hwang et al. (2001, and the degree of under-estimates varies from station to station.

  12. Comparative effectiveness of Tai Chi versus physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis. Objective: To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy f...

  13. mRNA Expression of EgCHI1, EgCHI2, and EgCHI3 in Oil Palm Leaves (Elaeis guineesis Jacq. after Treatment with Ganoderma boninense Pat. and Trichoderma harzianum Rifai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Naher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Basal stem rot (BSR disease caused by the fungus Ganoderma boninense is the most serious disease affecting the oil palm; this is because the disease escapes the early disease detection. The biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum can protect the disease only at the early stage of the disease. In the present study, the expression levels of three oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. chitinases encoding EgCHI1, EgCHI2, and EgCHI3 at 2, 5, and 8 weeks inoculation were measured in oil palm leaves from plants treated with G. boninense or T. harzianum alone or both. Methods. The five-month-old oil palm seedlings were treated with Gano-wood blocks inoculum and trichomulch. Expression of EgCHI1, EgCHI2, and EgCHI3 in treated leaves tissue was determined by real-time PCR. Results. Oil palm chitinases were not strongly expressed in oil palm leaves of plants treated with G. boninense alone compared to other treatments. Throughout the 8-week experiment, expression of EgCHI1 increased more than 3-fold in leaves of plants treated with T. harzianum and G. boninense when compared to those of control and other treated plants. Conclusion. The data illustrated that chitinase cDNA expression varied depending on tissue and the type of treatment.

  14. mRNA expression of EgCHI1, EgCHI2, and EgCHI3 in oil palm leaves (Elaeis guineesis Jacq.) after treatment with Ganoderma boninense pat. and Trichoderma harzianum Rifai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naher, Laila; Tan, Soon Guan; Ho, Chai Ling; Yusuf, Umi Kalsom; Ahmad, Siti Hazar; Abdullah, Faridah

    2012-01-01

    Basal stem rot (BSR) disease caused by the fungus Ganoderma boninense is the most serious disease affecting the oil palm; this is because the disease escapes the early disease detection. The biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum can protect the disease only at the early stage of the disease. In the present study, the expression levels of three oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) chitinases encoding EgCHI1, EgCHI2, and EgCHI3 at 2, 5, and 8 weeks inoculation were measured in oil palm leaves from plants treated with G. boninense or T. harzianum alone or both. The five-month-old oil palm seedlings were treated with Gano-wood blocks inoculum and trichomulch. Expression of EgCHI1, EgCHI2, and EgCHI3 in treated leaves tissue was determined by real-time PCR. Oil palm chitinases were not strongly expressed in oil palm leaves of plants treated with G. boninense alone compared to other treatments. Throughout the 8-week experiment, expression of EgCHI1 increased more than 3-fold in leaves of plants treated with T. harzianum and G. boninense when compared to those of control and other treated plants. The data illustrated that chitinase cDNA expression varied depending on tissue and the type of treatment.

  15. mRNA Expression of EgCHI1, EgCHI2, and EgCHI3 in Oil Palm Leaves (Elaeis guineesis Jacq.) after Treatment with Ganoderma boninense Pat. and Trichoderma harzianum Rifai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naher, Laila; Tan, Soon Guan; Ho, Chai Ling; Yusuf, Umi Kalsom; Ahmad, Siti Hazar; Abdullah, Faridah

    2012-01-01

    Background. Basal stem rot (BSR) disease caused by the fungus Ganoderma boninense is the most serious disease affecting the oil palm; this is because the disease escapes the early disease detection. The biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum can protect the disease only at the early stage of the disease. In the present study, the expression levels of three oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) chitinases encoding EgCHI1, EgCHI2, and EgCHI3 at 2, 5, and 8 weeks inoculation were measured in oil palm leaves from plants treated with G. boninense or T. harzianum alone or both. Methods. The five-month-old oil palm seedlings were treated with Gano-wood blocks inoculum and trichomulch. Expression of EgCHI1, EgCHI2, and EgCHI3 in treated leaves tissue was determined by real-time PCR. Results. Oil palm chitinases were not strongly expressed in oil palm leaves of plants treated with G. boninense alone compared to other treatments. Throughout the 8-week experiment, expression of EgCHI1 increased more than 3-fold in leaves of plants treated with T. harzianum and G. boninense when compared to those of control and other treated plants. Conclusion. The data illustrated that chitinase cDNA expression varied depending on tissue and the type of treatment. PMID:22919345

  16. Measurement of the cross-section ratio $\\sigma(\\chi_{c2})/\\sigma(\\chi_{c1})$ for prompt $\\chi_c$ production at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Bailey, D.S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Buchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Conti, G.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G.A.; Currie, R.; D'Almagne, B.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Deissenroth, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Bonal, F.Domingo; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Esteve, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Farber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V.V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S.C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P.F.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R.S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y.M.; Knecht, M.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Raighne, A.Mac; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R.M.D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Marki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Mclean, C.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M.N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Muller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J.M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S.K.; Patrick, G.N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D.L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; du Pree, T.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M.M.; dos Reis, A.C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G.J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shao, B.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R.Silva; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A.C.; Smith, N.A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F.J.P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V.K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M.T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M.Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Watson, N.K.; Webber, A.D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S.A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2013-07-16

    The prompt production of the charmonium $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ mesons has been studied in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The $\\chi_c$ mesons are identified through their decays $\\chi_c\\,\\rightarrow\\,J/\\psi\\,\\gamma$ with $J/\\psi\\,\\rightarrow\\,\\mu^+\\,\\mu^-$ using 36~$\\mathrm{pb^{-1}}$ of data collected by the LHCb detector in 2010. The ratio of the prompt production cross-sections for the two $\\chi_c$ spin states, $\\sigma(\\chi_{c2})\\,/\\,\\sigma(\\chi_{c1})$, has been determined as a function of the $J/\\psi$ transverse momentum, $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{J/\\psi}$, in the range from 2 to 15~GeV/$c$. The results are in agreement with the next-to-leading order non-relativistic QCD model at high $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{J/\\psi}$ and lie consistently above the pure leading-order colour singlet prediction.

  17. How-To-Do-It: Snails, Pill Bugs, Mealworms, and Chi-Square? Using Invertebrate Behavior to Illustrate Hypothesis Testing with Chi-Square.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, Carol

    1988-01-01

    Described is a study designed to introduce students to the behavior of common invertebrate animals, and to use of the chi-square statistical technique. Discusses activities with snails, pill bugs, and mealworms. Provides an abbreviated chi-square table and instructions for performing the experiments and statistical tests. (CW)

  18. GammaCHI: a package for the inversion and computation of the gamma and chi-square cumulative distribution functions (central and noncentral)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gil (Amparo); J. Segura (Javier); N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA Fortran 90 module GammaCHI for computing and inverting the gamma and chi-square cumulative distribution functions (central and noncentral) is presented. The main novelty of this package is the reliable and accurate inversion routines for the noncentral cumulative distribution

  19. Teaching Tai Chi to elders with osteoarthritis pain and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jason Y; Tsai, Pao-Feng; Woods, Sheery; Beck, Cornelia; Roberson, Paula K; Rosengren, Karl

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the authors' experience and strategies in teaching Tai Chi, a gentle exercise derived from an ancient Chinese martial art, to mildly cognitively impaired elders to relieve osteoarthritic knee pain. The 12-form Sun-style Tai Chi, a set of Tai Chi forms endorsed by the American Arthritis Foundation, was used in the program. Teaching Tai Chi to elders with mild cognitive impairment requires particular strategies tailored to their physical and cognitive frailty. When effectively taught, Tai Chi can be a unique and cost-effective intervention for elders with knee pain caused by osteoarthritis.

  20. Two-dimensional Co-Seismic Surface Displacements Field of the Chi-Chi Earthquake Inferred from SAR Image Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jun Zhu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mw=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan occurred in 1999 over the Chelungpu fault and caused a great surface rupture and severe damage. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR has been applied previously to study the co-seismic ground displacements. There have however been significant limitations in the studies. First, only one-dimensional displacements along the Line-of-Sight (LOS direction have been measured. The large horizontal displacements along the Chelungpu fault are largely missing from the measurements as the fault is nearly perpendicular to the LOS direction. Second, due to severe signal decorrelation on the hangling wall of the fault, the displacements in that area are un-measurable by differential InSAR method. We estimate the co-seismic displacements in both the azimuth and range directions with the method of SAR amplitude image matching. GPS observations at the 10 GPS stations are used to correct for the orbital ramp in the amplitude matching and to create the two-dimensional (2D co-seismic surface displacements field using the descending ERS-2 SAR image pair. The results show that the co-seismic displacements range from about -2.0 m to 0.7 m in the azimuth direction (with the positive direction pointing to the flight direction, with the footwall side of the fault moving mainly southwards and the hanging wall side northwards. The displacements in the LOS direction range from about -0.5 m to 1.0 m, with the largest displacement occuring in the northeastern part of the hanging wall (the positive direction points to the satellite from ground. Comparing the results from amplitude matching with those from DInSAR, we can see that while only a very small fraction of the LOS displacement has been recovered by the DInSAR mehtod, the azimuth displacements cannot be well detected with the DInSAR measurements as they are almost perpendicular to the LOS. Therefore, the amplitude matching method is obviously more

  1. Observation of chi_cJ radiative decays to light vector mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, J V

    2008-01-01

    Using a total of 2.74 x 10^7 decays of the psi(2S) collected with the CLEO-c detector, we present a study of chi_cJ -> gamma V, where V = rho^0, omega, phi. The transitions chi_c1 -> gamma rho^0 and chi_c1 -> gamma omega are observed with B(chi_c1 -> gamma rho^0) = (2.43 +- 0.19 +- 0.22) x 10^-4 and B(chi_c1 -> gamma omega) = (8.3 +- 1.5 +- 1.2) x 10^-5. In the chi_c1 -> gamma rho^0 transition, the final state meson is dominantly longitudinally polarized. Upper limits on the branching fractions of other chi_cJ states to light vector mesons are presented.

  2. Filter Tuning Using the Chi-Squared Statistic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly-Salkowski, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) performs orbit determination (OD) for the Aqua and Aura satellites. Both satellites are located in low Earth orbit (LEO), and are part of what is considered the A-Train satellite constellation. Both spacecraft are currently in the science phase of their respective missions. The FDF has recently been tasked with delivering definitive covariance for each satellite.The main source of orbit determination used for these missions is the Orbit Determination Toolkit developed by Analytical Graphics Inc. (AGI). This software uses an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to estimate the states of both spacecraft. The filter incorporates force modelling, ground station and space network measurements to determine spacecraft states. It also generates a covariance at each measurement. This covariance can be useful for evaluating the overall performance of the tracking data measurements and the filter itself. An accurate covariance is also useful for covariance propagation which is utilized in collision avoidance operations. It is also valuable when attempting to determine if the current orbital solution will meet mission requirements in the future.This paper examines the use of the Chi-square statistic as a means of evaluating filter performance. The Chi-square statistic is calculated to determine the realism of a covariance based on the prediction accuracy and the covariance values at a given point in time. Once calculated, it is the distribution of this statistic that provides insight on the accuracy of the covariance.For the EKF to correctly calculate the covariance, error models associated with tracking data measurements must be accurately tuned. Over estimating or under estimating these error values can have detrimental effects on the overall filter performance. The filter incorporates ground station measurements, which can be tuned based on the accuracy of the individual ground stations. It also includes

  3. X-radiation damage of hydrated lecithin membranes detected by real-time X-ray diffraction using wiggler-enhanced synchrotron radiation as the ionizing radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Martin

    1984-05-01

    Radiation damage of hydrated lecithin membranes brought about by exposure to wiggler-derived synchrotron radiation at 8.3 keV (1.5 Å) is reported. Considerable damage was observed with exposures under 1 h at an incident flux density of 3 × 10 10 photon s -1 mm -2, corresponding to a cumulative radiation dose of ≦10 MRad. Damage was so dramatic as to be initially observed while making real-time X-ray diffraction measurements on the sample. The damaging effects of 8.3 keV X-rays on dispersions of dipalmitoyllecithin and lecithin derived from hen egg yolk are as follows: (1) marked changes were noted in the X-ray diffraction behaviour, indicating disruption of membrane stacking. (2) Chemical breakdown of lecithin was observed. (3) The X-ray beam visibly damaged the sample and changed the appearance of the lipid dispersion, when viewed under the light microscope. Considering the importance of X-ray diffraction as a structural probe and the anticipated use of synchrotron radiation in studies involving membranes, the problem of radiation damage must be duly recognized. Furthermore, since dipalmitoyllecithin, the major lipid used in the present study, is a relatively stable compound, it is not unreasonable to expect that X-ray damage may be a problem with other less stable biological and non-biological materials. These results serve to emphasize that whenever a high intensity X-ray source is used, radiation damage can be a problem and that the sensitivity of the sample must always be evaluated under the conditions of measurement.

  4. Electromagnetic Currents and Magnetic Moments in $\\chi$EFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saori Pastore, Luca Girlanda, Rocco Schiavilla, Michele Viviani, Robert Wiringa

    2009-09-01

    A two-nucleon potential and consistent electromagnetic currents are derived in chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT) at, respectively, $Q^{\\, 2}$ (or N$^2$LO) and $e\\, Q$ (or N$^3$LO), where $Q$ generically denotes the low-momentum scale and $e$ is the electric charge. Dimensional regularization is used to renormalize the pion-loop corrections. A simple expression is derived for the magnetic dipole ($M1$) operator associated with pion loops, consisting of two terms, one of which is determined, uniquely, by the isospin-dependent part of the two-pion-exchange potential. This decomposition is also carried out for the $M1$ operator arising from contact currents, in which the unique term is determined by the contact potential. Finally, the low-energy constants (LEC's) entering the N$^2$LO potential are fixed by fits to the $np$ S- and P-wave phase shifts up to 100 MeV lab energies. Three additional LEC's are needed to completely specify the $M1$ operator at N$^3$L

  5. CD11c(hi) Dendritic Cells Regulate Ly-6C(hi) Monocyte Differentiation to Preserve Immune-privileged CNS in Lethal Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Han, Young Woo; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-12-02

    Although the roles of dendritic cells (DCs) in adaptive defense have been defined well, the contribution of DCs to T cell-independent innate defense and subsequent neuroimmunopathology in immune-privileged CNS upon infection with neurotropic viruses has not been completely defined. Notably, DC roles in regulating innate CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocyte functions during neuroinflammation have not yet been addressed. Using selective ablation of CD11c(hi)PDCA-1(int/lo) DCs without alteration in CD11c(int)PDCA-1(hi) plasmacytoid DC number, we found that CD11c(hi) DCs are essential to control neuroinflammation caused by infection with neurotropic Japanese encephalitis virus, through early and increased infiltration of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and higher expression of CC chemokines. More interestingly, selective CD11c(hi) DC ablation provided altered differentiation and function of infiltrated CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in the CNS through Flt3-L and GM-CSF, which was closely associated with severely enhanced neuroinflammation. Furthermore, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes generated in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated environment had a deleterious rather than protective role during neuroinflammation, and were more quickly recruited into inflamed CNS, depending on CCR2, thereby exacerbating neuroinflammation via enhanced supply of virus from the periphery. Therefore, our data demonstrate that CD11c(hi) DCs provide a critical and unexpected role to preserve the immune-privileged CNS in lethal neuroinflammation via regulating the differentiation, function, and trafficking of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes.

  6. Determination of BR(chi_{cJ} --> p \\bar{p}) in psi(2S) decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J; Chen, J C; Chen Jun; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Fu, L P; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Harris, F A; He, J; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, L; Huang, X P; Ji, X B; Jia, Q Y; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R B; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, X S; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu Fang; Liu, F; Liu, H M; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Song, L W; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, Meng; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Z; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Z Y; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xu, Y; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yan, W B; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, S D; Yang, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Yue, Q; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J M; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L S; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang Xiao Min; Zhang, X Y; Zhang Yi Yun; Zhang, Y J; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zou, B S

    2004-01-01

    The processes psi(2S) --> gamma chi_{cJ}, chi_{cJ} --> p pbar (J=0,1,2) are studied using a sample of 14X10^6 psi(2S) decays collected with the Beijing Spectrometer at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider. Very clear chi_{c0}, chi_{c1} and chi_{c2} signals are observed, and the branching fractions BR(chi_{cJ} --> p pbar) (J=0,1,2) are determined to be (27.1^{+4.3}_{-3.9}\\pm 4.7)X10^{-5}, (5.7^{+1.7}_{-1.5}\\pm0.9)X10^{-5}, and (6.5^{+2.4}_{-2.1}\\pm1.0)X10^{-5}, respectively, where the first errors are statistical and the second are systematic.

  7. Observation of the Decays Alpha(0)(b) -> chi(c1)pK(-) and Alpha(0)(b) ->chi(c2)pK(-)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufour, L.; Mulder, M; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.; van Veghel, M.

    2017-01-01

    The first observation of the decays Lambda(b)(0) -> chi(c1)pK(-) and Lambda(0)(b) -> chi(c2)pK(-) is reported using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV The following ratios

  8. Tai Chi: a new star for the administration of chronic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tai Chi Quan (Tai Chi, a traditional Chinese martial art, has become increasingly popular in western countries. Tai Chi integrates deep diaphragmatic breathing with body movements to achieve a harmonious balance between the body and mind, which facilitates the flow of internal energy (Qi. An increasing number of studies have reported that Tai Chi significantly benefits aerobic capacity, muscular strength, balance, and psychological well-being. In addition, Tai Chi offers unique advantages for physical fitness and the treatment of chronic diseases. This paper reviews the existing literatures on Tai Chi, introduces its health-promotion effects and the potential clinical applications, and summarizes recent studies that prove Tai Chi is safe and effective for patients with neurological diseases, rheumatological diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and cancers. After reviewing the literatures in this field, we conclude that the long-term results of practicing Tai Chi may benefit the cardiovascular system, motor system, respiratory system, and nervous system. However, the potential role and mechanism of Tai Chi has not yet been determined. Further studies with long follow-up periods are necessary to meet the standards of clinical applications.

  9. Study of {chi}{sub c} production using HERA-B data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrov, Aleksandar

    2010-07-15

    In this thesis the production of the charmonium states {chi}{sub c1} and {chi}{sub c2} in protonnucleus collisions at a proton-nucleon center-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=41.6 GeV was studied. The data used for the analysis have been taken by the fixed-target experiment HERA-B that uses the HERA proton beam to scatter protons off the nuclei of different wire targets. About 122.10{sup 3} recorded muonic J/{psi} decays, J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, resulted in almost 10000 reconstructed {chi}{sub c}{yields}J/{psi}{gamma}. The ratio R{sub {chi}{sub c}}= sum {sub i=1,2}{sigma}({chi}{sub ci})Br({chi}{sub ci}{yields}J/{psi}{gamma})/{sigma}(J/{psi}), which is the ratio of J/{psi} from {chi}{sub c} decays to all produced J/{psi}, was measured in the kinematical range -0.35chi}{sub c}}=0.190{sub -0.029}{sup +0.030}. Despite the small separation of the masses of the two {chi}{sub c} states, comparable to the detector resolution, the ratio R{sub 12}=R{sub {chi}{sub c}{sub 1}}/R{sub {chi}{sub c}{sub 2}} was measured yielding R{sub 12}=1.30{sub -0.37}{sup +0.59} which corresponds to a production cross section ratio ({sigma}({chi}{sub c1}))/({sigma}({chi}{sub c2}))=0.74{sub -0.22}{sup +0.34}. By using the known J/{psi} production cross section, the {chi}{sub c1} and {chi}{sub c2} production cross sections are calculated to be {sigma}({chi}{sub c1})=(153{+-}27) nb/nucleon and {sigma}({chi}{sub c2})=(207{+-}39) nb/nucleon, respectively. All results were obtained under the assumption that both the J/{psi} and {chi}{sub c} states are produced without polarization. In addition a study of possible deviations of R{sub {chi}{sub c}} and R{sub 12} due to the polarization of J/{psi} and {chi}{sub c} was performed. By varying the polarization parameter, {lambda}{sub obs}, of all produced J/{psi} by 2{sigma} around the value measured by HERA-B, and assuming fully

  10. Observation of $B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi$ decay and study of $B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1,2}K^{*0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Holtrop, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The first observation of the decay $B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi$ and a study of $B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1,2}K^{*0}$ decays are presented. The analysis is performed using a dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: \\begin{equation*} \\begin{array}{lll} \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi)}{\\cal{B}(B^0_s\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi)} &=& (18.9 \\pm1.8\\,(stat)\\pm1.3\\,(syst)\\pm0.8\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}K^{*0})}{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K^{*0})} &=& (19.8 \\pm1.1\\,(stat)\\pm1.2\\,(syst)\\pm0.9\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c2}K^{*0})}{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c 1}K^{*0})} &=& (17.1 \\pm5.0\\,(stat)\\pm1.7\\,(syst)\\pm1.1\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\end{array} \\end{equation*} where the third uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge o...

  11. Surface waves in the western Taiwan coastal plain from an aftershock of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.-Q.; Tang, G.-Q.; Boore, D.M.; Van Ness, Burbach; Jackson, C.R.; Zhou, X.-Y.; Lin, Q.-L.

    2006-01-01

    Significant surface waves were recorded in the western coastal plain (WCP) of Taiwan during the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake and its series of aftershocks. We study in detail the surface waves produced by one aftershock (20 September 1999, 18hr 03m 41.16sec, M 6.2) in this paper. We take the Chelungpu-Chukou fault to be the eastern edge of the WCP because it marks a distinct lateral contrast in seismic wave velocities in the upper few kilometers of the surface. For many records from stations within the WCP, body waves and surface waves separate well in both the time domain and the period domain. Long-period (e.g., >2 sec) ground motions in the plain are dominated by surface waves. Significant prograde Rayleigh wave particle motions were observed in the WCP. The observed peak ground velocities are about 3-5 times larger than standard predictions in the central and western part of the plain. Observed response spectra at 3 sec, 4 sec, and 5 sec at the center of the plain can be 15 times larger than standard predictions and 10 times larger than the predictions of Joyner (2000) based on surface wave data from the Los Angeles basin. The strong surface waves were probably generated at the boundary of the WCP and then propagated toward the west, largely along radial directions relative to the epicenter. The geometry of the boundary may have had a slight effect on propagation directions of surface waves. Group velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves are estimated using the multiple filter analysis (MFA) technique and are refined with phase matched filtering (PMF). Group velocities of fundamental mode surface waves range from about 0.7 km/sec to 1.5 km/sec for the phases at periods from 3 sec to 10 sec. One important observation from this study is that the strongest surface waves were recorded in the center of the plain. The specific location of the strongest motions depends largely on the period of surface waves rather than on specific site conditions or

  12. Structure, Catalysis, and Inhibition of OfChi-h, the Lepidoptera-exclusive Insect Chitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Yong; Jiang, Xi; Duan, Yanwei; Yang, Qing

    2017-02-10

    Chitinase-h (Chi-h) is of special interest among insect chitinases due to its exclusive distribution in lepidopteran insects and high sequence identity with bacterial and baculovirus homologs. Here OfChi-h, a Chi-h from Ostrinia furnacalis, was investigated. Crystal structures of both OfChi-h and its complex with chitoheptaose ((GlcN)7) reveal that OfChi-h possesses a long and asymmetric substrate binding cleft, which is a typical characteristics of a processive exo-chitinase. The structural comparison between OfChi-h and its bacterial homolog SmChiA uncovered two phenylalanine-to-tryptophan site variants in OfChi-h at subsites +2 and possibly -7. The F232W/F396W double mutant endowed SmChiA with higher hydrolytic activities toward insoluble substrates, such as insect cuticle, α-chitin, and chitin nanowhisker. An enzymatic assay demonstrated that OfChi-h outperformed OfChtI, an insect endo-chitinase, toward the insoluble substrates, but showed lower activity toward the soluble substrate ethylene glycol chitin. Furthermore, OfChi-h was found to be inhibited by N,N',N″-trimethylglucosamine-N,N',N″,N″'-tetraacetylchitotetraose (TMG-(GlcNAc)4), a substrate analog which can be degraded into TMG-(GlcNAc)1-2 Injection of TMG-(GlcNAc)4 into 5th-instar O. furnacalis larvae led to severe defects in pupation. This work provides insights into a molting-indispensable insect chitinase that is phylogenetically closer to bacterial chitinases than insect chitinases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Regulation of the chitin degradation and utilization system by the ChiX small RNA in Serratia marcescens 2170.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Shimizu, Mari; Sasaki, Naomi; Ogawa, Chisana; Minami, Haruka; Sugimoto, Hayuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Serratia marcescens 2170 produces three different types of chitinases and chitin-binding protein CBP21. We found that transposon insertion into the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of chiPQ-ctb led to defective chitinase and CBP21 production. ChiX small RNA possessed the complementary sequence of the 5' UTRs of the chiPQ-ctb and chiR and repressed the expression of chiP and chiR. ChiX was detected in a medium containing glucose, glycerol, GlcNAc, and (GlcNAc)2, but the expression of both chiP and chiR was only observed in a medium containing (GlcNAc)2. ∆chiX mutant produced chitinases, CBP21, and chitobiase without induction. chiP transcripts were more abundant than those of chiR or chiX in a medium containing (GlcNAc)2. These results suggest that the constitutively expressed ChiX binds to the highly abundant chiP 5' UTR, thereby leading to the induction of chiR mRNA translation and the subsequent expression of chitinases and CBP21.

  14. Efficacy of Tai Chi, brisk walking, meditation, and reading in reducing mental and emotional stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, P

    1992-05-01

    Tai Chi, a moving meditation, is examined for its efficacy in post-stressor recovery. Forty-eight male and 48 female Tai Chi practitioners were randomly assigned to four treatment groups: Tai Chi, brisk walking, mediation and neutral reading. Mental arithmetic and other difficult tests were chosen as mental challenges, and a stressful film was used to produce emotional disturbance. Tai Chi and the other treatments were applied after these stressors. After all treatments, the salivary cortisol level dropped significantly, and the mood states were also improved. In general the stress-reduction effect of Tai Chi characterized moderate physical exercise. Heart rate, blood pressure, and urinary catecholamine changes for Tai Chi were found to be similar to those for walking at a speed of 6 km/hr. Although Tai Chi appeared to be superior to neutral reading in the reduction of state anxiety and the enhancement of vigour, this effect could be partially accounted for by the subjects' high expectations about gains from Tai Chi. Approaches controlling for expectancy level are recommended for further assessment.

  15. Molecular mechanism of BjCHI1-mediated plant defense against Botrytis cinerea infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Zhao, Kaijun

    2017-01-02

    Plant chitinases are a group of proteins associated with defense against pathogen attack. BjCHI1 is the first characterized chitinase containing two chitin binding domains (CBDs). Investigations have shown that BjCHI1 inhibits growth of fungal phytopathogens and agglutinates Gram-negative bacteria. Our recent studies revealed that expression of BjCHI1 mRNA is largely induced upon infection of Botrytis cinerea via a R2R3-MYB transcription factor BjMYB1 interacting with a W box-like element (Wbl-4) in the BjCHI1 promoter. The enhanced expression pattern of BjMYB1 was similar to that of BjCHI1 and associated with resistant phenotype against B. cinerea. These findings suggest that BjCHI1 is involved in host defense against fungal attack through interaction with BjMYB1. Here, we review the recent studies on BjCHI1 and propose a model of BjCHI1-mediated plant defense against fungal attack.

  16. Multi-Core Emptiness Checking of Timed Büchi Automata using Inclusion Abstraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laarman, Alfons; Olesen, Mads Chr.; Dalsgaard, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to the multi-core model checking of timed automata (TA) with respect to liveness properties, by investigating checking of TA Büchi emptiness under the very coarse inclusion abstraction or zone subsumption, an open problem in this field. We show that in general Büchi emptiness...

  17. Tai chi improves cognitive and physical function in the elderly: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao; Kanagawa, Katsuko; Sasaki, Junko; Ooki, Syuichi; Xu, Huali; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of Tai Chi on cognitive and physical function in the elderly. [Subjects and Methods] A randomized trial design was used. A total 150 subjects were enrolled and were divided into Tai Chi and control groups. Subjects in the Tai Chi group participated Tai Chi for 6 months, and subjects in the control group participated in other non-athletic activities. [Results] There were no differences between the groups in the one leg standing time with eyes open, left grip strength, or the Frontal Assessment Battery at bedside after 3 and 6 months of intervention. The Mini-Mental State Examination scores after 3 and 6 months were higher in the Tai Chi group than in the control group. The right grip strength after 3 months increased more in the Tai Chi group than in the control group. Both the 5-m high walking speed and 10-m normal walking speed were significantly lower after 3 and 6 months of Tai Chi practice. [Conclusion] These results suggest that regular Tai Chi practice may improve cognitive and physical function in the elderly. PMID:26157242

  18. Amplitude analysis of the chi(c1) -> eta pi(+)pi(-) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Tiemens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Using 448.0 x 10(6) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector, an amplitude analysis is performed for psi(3686) -> gamma chi(c1), chi(c1) ->eta pi(+)pi(-) decays. The most dominant two- body structure observed is a(0)(980)(+/-) pi(-/+); a(0)(980)(+/-) -> eta pi(+/-.) line shape is modeled

  19. An Assessment of Tai Chi Exercise on Cognitive Ability in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Manh NGUYEN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Tai Chi exercise on cognitive performance of community - dwelling elderly in Vinh city, Vietnam. It is a controlled trial. One hundred subjected were recruited. Subjects were divided randomly into two groups. Tai Chi group was assigned 6 - months Tai Chi training. Control group was instructed to maintain their routine daily activities. Participants in Tai Chi group reported significant improvement cognitive ability, part A with F(1, 68 = 75.36, p < .001, and in part B with F(1, 68= 172.83, p < .001 in comparison with Control group. Tai Chi is beneficial to improve cognitive performance of the elderly.

  20. Privacy-preserving Chi-squared testing for genome SNP databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, Yuichi; Ohsuga, Akihiko

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the importance of privacy protection in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been increasing. GWAS focuses on identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with certain diseases such as cancer and diabetes, and Chi-squared testing can be used for this. However, recent studies reported that publishing the p-value or the corresponding chi-squared value of analyzed SNPs can cause privacy leakage. Several studies have been proposed for the anonymization of the chi-squared value with differential privacy, which is a de facto privacy metric in the cryptographic community. However, they can be applied to only small contingency tables; otherwise, they lose a lot of useful information. We propose novel anonymization methods: Rand-Chi and RandChiDist, and these methods are experimentally evaluated using real data sets.

  1. Measurement of the relative prompt production rate of $\\chi_{c2}$ and $\\chi_{c1}$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; 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Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Usai, Emanuele; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Nesvold, Erik; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Stoye, Markus; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Pellett, Dave; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Traczyk, Piotr; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Krajczar, Krisztian; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Nash, David; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Jindal, Pratima; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Safdi, Ben; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Brownson, Eric; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2012-12-14

    A measurement is presented of the relative prompt production rate of $\\chi_{c2}$ and $\\chi_{c1}$ with 4.6 inverse femtobarns of data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. The two states are measured via their radiative decays $\\chi_{c} \\to J/\\psi + \\gamma$, with the photon converting into a dielectron pair for J/$\\psi$ rapidity abs(y(J/$\\psi$)) 0.5 GeV. The measurement is given for six intervals of pt(J/$\\psi$) between 7 and 25 GeV. The results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  2. A randomized controlled trial of tai chi for long-term low back pain (TAI CHI: Study rationale, design, and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Amanda M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain persisting for longer than 3 months is a common and costly condition for which many current treatments have low-moderate success rates at best. Exercise is among the more successful treatments for this condition, however, the type and dosage of exercise that elicits the best results is not clearly defined. Tai chi is a gentle form of low intensity exercise that uses controlled movements in combination with relaxation techniques and is currently used as a safe form of exercise for people suffering from other chronic pain conditions such as arthritis. To date, there has been no scientific evaluation of tai chi as an intervention for people with back pain. Thus the aim of this study will be to examine the effects of a tai chi exercise program on pain and disability in people with long-term low back pain. Methods and design The study will recruit 160 healthy individuals from the community setting to be randomised to either a tai chi intervention group or a wait-list control group. Individuals in the tai chi group will attend 2 tai chi sessions (40 minutes/week for 8 weeks followed by 1 tai chi session/week for 2 weeks. The wait-list control will continue their usual health care practices and have the opportunity to participate in the tai chi program once they have completed the follow-up assessments. The primary outcome will be bothersomeness of back symptoms measured with a 0–10 numerical rating scale. Secondary outcomes include, self-reports of pain-related disability, health-related quality of life and global perceived effect of treatment. Statistical analysis of primary and secondary outcomes will be based on the intention to treat principle. Linear mixed models will be used to test for the effect of treatment on outcome at 10 weeks follow up. This trial has received ethics approval from The University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee. HREC Approval No.10452 Discussion This study will be the first

  3. Search for Prompt Production of $\\chi_{c}$ and X(3872) in e^+e^- Annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bequilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Röthel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-01-01

    We have searched for prompt production of $\\chi_{c1}$, $\\chi_{c2}$ and X(3872) in continuum e^+e^- annihilations using a 386 fb^{-1} data sample collected around $\\sqrt{s} = 10.6$ GeV with the BABAR detector using the $\\gamma J/\\psi$ decay mode. After accounting for the feed-down from $\\psi(2S)\\to\\gamma\\chi_{c1,2}$, no significant signal for prompt $\\chi_{c1,2}$ production is observed. We present improved upper limits on the cross-section, with the rest of the event consisting of more than two charged tracks, to be 77 fb for $\\chi_{c1}$ and 79 fb for $\\chi_{c2}$ with $e^+e^-$ center-of-mass frame $\\chi_c$ momentum greater than 2.0 GeV at 90% confidence level. These limits are consistent with NRQCD predictions. We also set an upper limit on the prompt production of X(3872) through the decay $X(3872)\\to \\gamma J/\\psi$.

  4. Tai chi training reduces self-report of inattention in healthy young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander K. Converse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to identify effective non-pharmacological alternatives to stimulant medications that reduce symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. In this study of healthy young adults, we measured the effects of training in tai chi, which involves mindful attention to the body during movement. Using a non-randomized, controlled, parallel design, students in a 15-week introductory tai chi course (n=28 and control participants (n=44 were tested for ADHD indicators and cognitive function at three points over the course of the 15 weeks. The tai chi students' self-report of attention, but not hyperactivity-impulsivity, improved compared to controls. At baseline, inattention correlated positively with reaction time variability in an affective go/no-go task across all participants, and improvements in attention correlated with reductions in reaction time variability across the tai chi students. Affective bias changed in the tai chi students, as reaction times to positive- and negative-valenced words equalized over time. These results converge to suggest that tai chi training may help improve attention in healthy young adults. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to evaluate tai chi as therapy for individuals with ADHD.

  5. Is tai chi beneficial for improving aerobic capacity? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M S; Lee, E-N; Ernst, E

    2009-08-01

    Tai chi has been claimed to generate beneficial effects with respect to a wide range of diseases. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate evidence from randomised clinical trials (RCTs) testing the effectiveness of tai chi for increasing aerobic capacity. Systematic searches were conducted on 14 electronic databases without restrictions on population characteristics or the language of publication. The outcome measures considered for inclusion were changes in maximal oxygen consumption as a test for aerobic capacity. Five RCTs met all inclusion criteria. Three RCTs compared the effects of tai chi with no treatment. The meta-analysis failed to show an effect of tai chi on aerobic capacity compared with sedentary controls (n = 151, weight mean difference, ml/kg/min, 0.50, 95% CI -1.14 to 2.15, p = 0.55). Two RCTs compared tai chi with conventional physical exercise including brisk, low intensity and moderate intensity walking, and aerobic exercise. The results show that tai chi was not statistically significantly superior to physical exercise. In conclusion, the existing evidence does not suggest that regular tai chi is an effective way of increasing aerobic capacity.

  6. Role of Vibrio cholerae exochitinase ChiA2 in horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Moumita; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2016-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae exochitinase ChiA2 plays a key role in acquisition of nutrients by chitin hydrolysis in the natural environment as well as in pathogenesis in the intestinal milieu. In this study we demonstrate the importance of ChiA2 in horizontal gene transfer in the natural environment. We found that the expression of ChiA2 and TfoX, the central regulator of V. cholerae horizontal gene transfer, varied with changes in environmental conditions. The activity of ChiA2 was also dependent on these conditions. In 3 different environmental conditions tested here, we observed that the supporting environmental condition for maximum expression and activity of ChiA2 was 20 °C, pH 5.5, and 100 mmol/L salinity in the presence of chitin. The same condition also induced TfoX expression and was favorable for horizontal gene transfer in V. cholerae. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that ChiA2 released a significant amount of (GlcNAc)2 from chitin hydrolysis under the favorable condition. We hypothesized that under the favorable environmental condition, ChiA2 was upregulated and maximally active to produce a significant amount of (GlcNAc)2 from chitin. The same environmental condition also induced tfoX expression, followed by its translational activation by the (GlcNAc)2 produced, leading to efficient horizontal gene transfer.

  7. Tai chi training reduces self-report of inattention in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Alexander K; Ahlers, Elizabeth O; Travers, Brittany G; Davidson, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    It is important to identify effective non-pharmacological alternatives to stimulant medications that reduce symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study of healthy young adults, we measured the effects of training in tai chi, which involves mindful attention to the body during movement. Using a non-randomized, controlled, parallel design, students in a 15-week introductory tai chi course (n = 28) and control participants (n = 44) were tested for ADHD indicators and cognitive function at three points over the course of the 15-weeks. The tai chi students' self-report of attention, but not hyperactivity-impulsivity, improved compared to controls. At baseline, inattention correlated positively with reaction time variability in an affective go/no-go task across all participants, and improvements in attention correlated with reductions in reaction time variability across the tai chi students. Affective bias changed in the tai chi students, as reaction times to positive- and negative-valenced words equalized over time. These results converge to suggest that tai chi training may help improve attention in healthy young adults. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to evaluate tai chi as therapy for individuals with ADHD.

  8. High order Fuchsian equations for the square lattice Ising model: {chi}-tilde{sup (5)}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostan, A [INRIA Paris-Rocquencourt, Domaine de Voluceau, B.P. 105 78153 Le Chesnay, Cedex (France); Boukraa, S [LPTHIRM and Departement d' Aeronautique, Universite de Blida (Algeria); Guttmann, A J; Jensen, I [ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematics and Statistics of Complex Systems, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hassani, S; Zenine, N [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, BP 399, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Maillard, J-M [LPTMC, UMR 7600 CNRS, Universite de Paris, Tour 24, 4eme etage, case 121, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: alin.bostan@inria.fr, E-mail: boukraa@mail.univ-blida.dz, E-mail: tonyg@ms.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: I.Jensen@ms.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: maillard@lptmc.jussieu.fr, E-mail: maillard@lptl.jussieu.fr, E-mail: njzenine@yahoo.com

    2009-07-10

    We consider the Fuchsian linear differential equation obtained (modulo a prime) for {chi}-tilde{sup (5)}, the five-particle contribution to the susceptibility of the square lattice Ising model. We show that one can understand the factorization of the corresponding linear differential operator from calculations using just a single prime. A particular linear combination of {chi}-tilde{sup (1)} and {chi}-tilde{sup (3)} can be removed from {chi}-tilde{sup (5)} and the resulting series is annihilated by a high order globally nilpotent linear ODE. The corresponding (minimal order) linear differential operator, of order 29, splits into factors of small orders. A fifth-order linear differential operator occurs as the left-most factor of the 'depleted' differential operator and it is shown to be equivalent to the symmetric fourth power of L{sub E}, the linear differential operator corresponding to the elliptic integral E. This result generalizes what we have found for the lower order terms {chi}-tilde{sup (3)} and {chi}-tilde{sup (4)}. We conjecture that a linear differential operator equivalent to a symmetric (n - 1) th power of L{sub E} occurs as a left-most factor in the minimal order linear differential operators for all {chi}-tilde{sup (n)}'s.

  9. Exploring Tai Chi in rheumatoid arthritis: a quantitative and qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Till; Fongen, Camilla; Steen, Eldri; Christie, Anne; Ødegård, Sigrid

    2010-03-05

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory and systemic disease which affects the musculoskeletal system. Exercise programmes are reported to improve physical functioning in patients with RA. Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese martial art which combines slow and gentle movements with mental focus. The purpose of this study was to study in which way Tai Chi group exercise impacted on disease activity, physical function, health status and experience in RA patients, applying quantitative and qualitative methods. Fifteen patients with RA (13 females, age 33-70 years) were recruited from a rheumatology department into a single group study. The patients were instructed in Tai Chi exercise twice weekly for 12 weeks. Assessments at baseline, 12 weeks, and 12 weeks follow-up were performed with a wide range of measures, including disease activity, self-reported health status, physical performance tests (Walking in Figure of Eight, Timed-Stands Test, and Shoulder Movement Impairment Scale). Qualitative data were obtained from a focus group interview conducted after completed intervention with taping and verbatim transcription. Review of the transcripts identified themes important to patients practicing Tai Chi. Within the group, Tai Chi practice lead to improved lower-limb muscle function at the end of intervention and at 12 weeks follow-up. Qualitative analyses showed that patients experienced improved physical condition, confidence in moving, balance and less pain during exercise and in daily life. Other experience included stress reduction, increased body awareness, confidence in moving and indicated that Tai Chi was a feasible exercise modality in RA. Improved muscle function in lower limbs was also reflected when patient experiences with Tai Chi were studied in depth in this explorative study. The combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods shows that Tai Chi has beneficial effects on health not related to disease activity and standardised

  10. Characterization of new cell line stably expressing CHI3L1 oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekhonin V. P.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To characterize the immortalized 293 cell line after stable transfection with human oncogene (CHI3L1. Methods. 293 cells, stably transfected with pcDNA3.1_CHI3L1, and 293 cells, stably transfected with pcDNA3.1 as a negative control, were used throughout all experiments. The clones of CHI3L1-expressing 293 cells and 293 cells, transfected with pcDNA3.1, were analyzed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Cell proliferation was measured using MTT assay; analyses of ERK1/2 and AKT activation and their cellular localization were performed with anti-phospho-ERK and anti-phospho-AKT antibodies. Specific activation of MAP and PI3 kinases was measured by densitometric analysis of Western-blot signals. Results. The obtained results show quite modest ability of CHI3L1 to stimulate cell growth and reflect rather an improved cellular plating efficiency of the 293 cells stably transfected with pcDNA3.1_CHI3L1 as compared to the 293 cells transfected with an «empty» vector. ERK1/2 and AKT are activated in the 293_CHI3L1 cells. In these cells phosphorylated ERK1/2 were localized in both cell cytoplasm and nuclei while AKT only in cytoplasm. The 293_CHI3L1 cells differed from the 293 cells, transfected with an «empty» vector, in their size and ability to adhere to the culture plates. Conclusions. The overexpression of CHI3L1 is likely to have an important role in tumorigenesis via a mechanism which involves activation of PI3K and ERK1/2 pathways. The tumors which can be induced by orthotopic implantation of the transformed human cells with overexpressed human oncogene CHI3L1 into the rat brain can be used as a target for anticancer drug development.

  11. Exploring Tai Chi in rheumatoid arthritis: a quantitative and qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Anne

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, inflammatory and systemic disease which affects the musculoskeletal system. Exercise programmes are reported to improve physical functioning in patients with RA. Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese martial art which combines slow and gentle movements with mental focus. The purpose of this study was to study in which way Tai Chi group exercise impacted on disease activity, physical function, health status and experience in RA patients, applying quantitative and qualitative methods. Methods Fifteen patients with RA (13 females, age 33-70 years were recruited from a rheumatology department into a single group study. The patients were instructed in Tai Chi exercise twice weekly for 12 weeks. Assessments at baseline, 12 weeks, and 12 weeks follow-up were performed with a wide range of measures, including disease activity, self-reported health status, physical performance tests (Walking in Figure of Eight, Timed-Stands Test, and Shoulder Movement Impairment Scale. Qualitative data were obtained from a focus group interview conducted after completed intervention with taping and verbatim transcription. Review of the transcripts identified themes important to patients practicing Tai Chi. Results Within the group, Tai Chi practice lead to improved lower-limb muscle function at the end of intervention and at 12 weeks follow-up. Qualitative analyses showed that patients experienced improved physical condition, confidence in moving, balance and less pain during exercise and in daily life. Other experience included stress reduction, increased body awareness, confidence in moving and indicated that Tai Chi was a feasible exercise modality in RA. Conclusions Improved muscle function in lower limbs was also reflected when patient experiences with Tai Chi were studied in depth in this explorative study. The combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods shows that Tai Chi has beneficial effects

  12. Chi 3 dispersion in planar tantalum pentoxide waveguides in the telecommunications window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruiqi Y; Charlton, Martin D B; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2009-04-01

    We report on the dispersion of the third-order nonlinear susceptibility (chi(3) or "Chi 3") in planar Ta2O5 waveguides in the telecommunications spectral window. We utilize the observation of third-harmonic generation under ultrashort pulsed excitation as a reference-free characterization method of chi(3) and obtain a large nonlinear coefficient, 2x10(-13) esu, at 1550 nm. Our observation of efficient third-harmonic generation in Ta2O5 waveguides in the telecoms window reveals the potential of this material system in high-speed integrated nonlinear optical switches.

  13. Tai chi/yoga reduces prenatal depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Delgado, Jeannette; Medina, Lissette

    2013-02-01

    Ninety-two prenatally depressed pregnant women were randomly assigned to a tai chi/yoga or a waitlist control group at an average of 22 weeks gestation. The tai chi/yoga group participated in a 20-min group session per week for 12 weeks. At the end of the treatment period the tai chi/yoga group had lower summary depression (CES-D) scores, as well as lower negative affect and somatic/vegetative symptoms subscale scores on the CES-D, lower anxiety (STAI) scores and lower sleep disturbances scores. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chi-Squared Test of Fit and Sample Size-A Comparison between a Random Sample Approach and a Chi-Square Value Adjustment Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Chi-square statistics are commonly used for tests of fit of measurement models. Chi-square is also sensitive to sample size, which is why several approaches to handle large samples in test of fit analysis have been developed. One strategy to handle the sample size problem may be to adjust the sample size in the analysis of fit. An alternative is to adopt a random sample approach. The purpose of this study was to analyze and to compare these two strategies using simulated data. Given an original sample size of 21,000, for reductions of sample sizes down to the order of 5,000 the adjusted sample size function works as good as the random sample approach. In contrast, when applying adjustments to sample sizes of lower order the adjustment function is less effective at approximating the chi-square value for an actual random sample of the relevant size. Hence, the fit is exaggerated and misfit under-estimated using the adjusted sample size function. Although there are big differences in chi-square values between the two approaches at lower sample sizes, the inferences based on the p-values may be the same.

  15. Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being

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    Full Text Available ... coordinate your care. Tai chi, which originated in China as a martial art, is sometimes referred to ... your health care provider. The mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by ...

  16. The beneficial effect of Tai Chi on self-concept in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xueming; Jin, Kaimin

    2015-03-01

    Previous research has documented the beneficial effect of Tai Chi, but most of the studies focused on elders and patients with specific health conditions. The aim of the study was to test whether Tai Chi can help to improve self-concept in adolescents with a longitudinal study. The sample comprised 160 students from a Chinese middle school; half of students formed the experimental group and the rest formed the control group. A 1-year Tai Chi intervention was delivered in 60-minute sessions, five times a week. Both groups were instructed to complete the measure of self-concept at the beginning and end of the intervention. Statistical analysis shows the significant reduction of good behaviour, intellectual and school status, popularity and anxiety in the experimental group compared with the control group. The results suggest that the Tai Chi intervention could improve self-concept in adolescents. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  17. Calculations of Acute and Chronic "Chi I Q" Dispersion Estimates for a Sulface Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.M. Fransioli

    1999-12-17

    The objective of this calculation is to determine downwind normalized concentration, ''Chi/Q'' ({chi}/Q), estimates at the surface for acute (short-term) and chronic (long-term) exposures of an airborne material released from a surfaced-based point release. This calculation was requested by the Safety Analysis Department to support repository design in the Site Recommendation and possible future License Application activities. Attachment IV, item 1 displays this request. The {chi}/Q dispersion estimates will be calculated at twenty pre-determined distances from a surface release point. The acute exposure dispersion estimates will be calculated for five percentile, percentage of occurrences {chi}/Q values are not exceeded, values.

  18. An update on $\\chi_{c}$ decays perturbative QCD versus data

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, Michelangelo L; Mangano, M L; Petrelli, A

    1995-01-01

    We present a global fit of current available experimental results on \\chi_c decays within next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD. The quality and reduced errors of recent data improve the agreement between theory and experiment.

  19. Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being

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    Full Text Available ... All Health Information Research Research Results Results by Date Sponsored by NCCIH Division of Extramural Research Conducted ... and Well-Being Video Introduction and Background Warm-up Qi Gong Tai Chi Cool Down This page ...

  20. Influence of personal patterns of behavior on the effects of Tai Chi: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Masahiro; Den, Rei; Hasegawa-Ohira, Masako; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the influence of individual patterns of personality and behavior on the change in mood status after a brief period of Tai Chi exercise. The mood status in 22 healthy females was evaluated before and after a period of Tai Chi exercise using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) score. Patterns of personal behavior were also assessed by written questionnaire. In the type A behavior pattern group, the score for total mood disturbance decreased significantly after a brief period (20 min) of Tai Chi exercise. No change was observed in the type B behavior pattern group. These findings suggest that a brief period of Tai Chi exercise is mentally beneficial, particularly to individuals with type A characteristics.

  1. The size of chi = arg (-Vts Vtb* Vcs* Vcb) and physics beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Branco, Gustavo Castello; Nebot, M

    2004-01-01

    We analyse the allowed range of values of chi, both in the Standard Model and in models with New Physics, pointing out that a relatively large value of chi, e.g. of order lambda, is only possible in models where the unitarity of the 3x3 Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix is violated through the introduction of extra Q=2/3 quarks. We study the interesting case where the extra quark is an isosinglet, determining the allowed range for chi and the effect of a large chi on various low-energy observables, such as CP asymmetries in B meson decays. We also discuss the correlated effects which would be observable at high energy colliders, like decays t -> cZ, modifications of the cross section and forward-backward asymmetry in e+ e- -> ttbar and the direct production of a new quark.

  2. Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being

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    Full Text Available ... Council Job Opportunities All About NCCIH Health Topics A-Z # A B C D E F G H I ... tool that features tai chi and qi gong as an activity to enhance wellness. These exercise therapies ...

  3. Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being

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    Full Text Available ... Online Continuing Education Series Distinguished Lecture Series Integrated Medicine Research Lecture Series All Training Information News & Events ... features tai chi A practice in traditional Chinese medicine that uses a series of slow, gentle movements ...

  4. Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being

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    Full Text Available ... chi, which originated in China as a martial art, is sometimes referred to as “moving meditation”—practitioners move their bodies slowly, gently, and with awareness. Learn more about ...

  5. Production of $\\chi_{c2}$ Mesons in Photon-Photon Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    We present an observation at LEP of the production of chi_c2 mesons in the collisions of two quasi-real photons using the OPAL detector. The chi_c2 mesons are reconstructed in the decay channel Chi_c2 to J/psi gamma to l+l- gamma (with l= e,mu) using all data taken at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of 91 and 183 GeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 167 and 55 pb-1 respectively. The two-photon width of the Chi_2 is determined to be 1.76 +- 0.47 +- 0.37 +- 0.15 keV where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic and the third comes from branching ratio uncertainties.

  6. Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being

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    Full Text Available ... NCCIH At a Glance Mission and Vision Organizational Structure Director's Message Strategic Plans & Reports Budget & Legislation Advisory ... more about tai chi NCCIH has provided this material for your information. It is not intended to ...

  7. Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being

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    Full Text Available ... Legislation Advisory Council Job Opportunities All About NCCIH Health Topics A-Z # A B C D E ... Y Z Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being Share: © Mariann Seriff The following ...

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    Full Text Available ... Council Job Opportunities All About NCCIH Health Topics A-Z # A B C D E F G H I ... be an educational tool that features tai chi A practice in traditional Chinese medicine that uses a ...

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    Full Text Available ... Alternative or Integrative Health? Safety Information Know the Science For Health Care Professionals Clinical Practice Guidelines Literature ... more about tai chi NCCIH has provided this material for your information. It is not intended to ...

  10. Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being

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    Full Text Available ... gentle movements coordinated with breathing and meditation. The goal is to enhance physical functioning, improve balance and ... more about tai chi NCCIH has provided this material for your information. It is not intended to ...

  11. Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health and Well-Being

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    Full Text Available ... that features tai chi A practice in traditional Chinese medicine that uses a series of slow, gentle ... stress. and qi gong A component of traditional Chinese medicine that combines movement, meditation, and controlled breathing. ...

  12. Tai Chi Chuan: State of the Art in International Research: Vol 52 (Medicine & Sport Science)

    OpenAIRE

    Youlian Hong

    2008-01-01

    DESCRIPTION This collection on the latest and practical research data about the characteristics and beneficial effects of Tai Chi Chuan on various physiological and pathological matters is published as the 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE To address the effects of Tai Chi Chuan in the fields of biomechanics and physiology, sensory motor control and fall prevention, psychology and social aspects, as well as various clinical applications. FEATURES The book is organised...

  13. Using volcano plots and regularized-chi statistics in genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentian; Freudenberg, Jan; Suh, Young Ju; Yang, Yaning

    2014-02-01

    Labor intensive experiments are typically required to identify the causal disease variants from a list of disease associated variants in the genome. For designing such experiments, candidate variants are ranked by their strength of genetic association with the disease. However, the two commonly used measures of genetic association, the odds-ratio (OR) and p-value may rank variants in different order. To integrate these two measures into a single analysis, here we transfer the volcano plot methodology from gene expression analysis to genetic association studies. In its original setting, volcano plots are scatter plots of fold-change and t-test statistic (or -log of the p-value), with the latter being more sensitive to sample size. In genetic association studies, the OR and Pearson's chi-square statistic (or equivalently its square root, chi; or the standardized log(OR)) can be analogously used in a volcano plot, allowing for their visual inspection. Moreover, the geometric interpretation of these plots leads to an intuitive method for filtering results by a combination of both OR and chi-square statistic, which we term "regularized-chi". This method selects associated markers by a smooth curve in the volcano plot instead of the right-angled lines which corresponds to independent cutoffs for OR and chi-square statistic. The regularized-chi incorporates relatively more signals from variants with lower minor-allele-frequencies than chi-square test statistic. As rare variants tend to have stronger functional effects, regularized-chi is better suited to the task of prioritization of candidate genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality of Reporting of Randomized Clinical Trials in Tai Chi Interventions—A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yi Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the reporting quality of published randomized clinical trials (RCTs in the Tai Chi literature following the publication of the CONSORT guidelines in 2001. Data Sources. The OVID MEDLINE and PUBMED databases. Review Methods. To survey the general characteristics of Tai Chi RCTs in the literature, we included any report if (i it was an original report of the trial; (ii its design was RCT; (iii one of the treatments being tested was Tai Chi; and (iv it was in English. In addition, we assessed the reporting quality of RCTs that were published between 2002 and 2007, using a modified CONSORT checklist of 40 items. The adequate description of Tai Chi interventions in these trials was examined against a 10-item checklist adapted from previous reviews. Results. The search yielded 31 Tai Chi RCTs published from 2002 to 2007 and only 11 for 1992–2001. Among trials published during 2002–2007, the most adequately reported criteria were related to background, participant eligibility and interpretation of the study results. Nonetheless, the most poorly reported items were associated with randomization allocation concealment, implementation of randomization and the definitions of period of recruitment and follow-up. In addition, only 23% of RCTs provided adequate details of Tai Chi intervention used in the trials. Conclusion. The findings in this review indicated that the reporting quality of Tai Chi intervention trials is sub-optimal. Substantial improvement is required to meet the CONSORT guidelines and allow assessment of the quality of evidence. We believe that not only investigators, but also journal editors, reviewers and funding agencies need to follow the CONSORT guidelines to improve the standards of research and strengthen the evidence base for Tai Chi and for complementary and alternative medicine.

  15. Estimation of false discovery proportion in multiple testing: From normal to chi-squared test statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Lilun; Zhang, Chunming

    2017-01-01

    Multiple testing based on chi-squared test statistics is common in many scientific fields such as genomics research and brain imaging studies. However, the challenges of designing a formal testing procedure when there exists a general dependence structure across the chi-squared test statistics have not been well addressed. To address this gap, we first adopt a latent factor structure ([14]) to construct a testing framework for approximating the false discovery proportion ($\\mathrm{FDP}$) for ...

  16. An evidence map of the effect of Tai Chi on health outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Solloway, Michele R.; Taylor, Stephanie L.; Shekelle, Paul G.; Miake-Lye, Isomi M.; Beroes, Jessica M.; Shanman, Roberta M.; Hempel, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background This evidence map describes the volume and focus of Tai Chi research reporting health outcomes. Originally developed as a martial art, Tai Chi is typically taught as a series of slow, low-impact movements that integrate the breath, mind, and physical activity to achieve greater awareness and a sense of well-being. Methods The evidence map is based on a systematic review of systematic reviews. We searched 11 electronic databases from inception to February 2014, screened reviews of r...

  17. Comparative Effectiveness of Tai Chi Versus Physical Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; Schmid, Christopher H; Iversen, Maura D; Harvey, William F; Fielding, Roger A; Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn; Wong, John B; Reid, Kieran F; Rones, Ramel; McAlindon, Timothy

    2016-07-19

    Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis. To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Randomized, 52-week, single-blind comparative effectiveness trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01258985). An urban tertiary care academic hospital. 204 participants with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (mean age, 60 years; 70% women; 53% white). Tai Chi (2 times per week for 12 weeks) or standard physical therapy (2 times per week for 6 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of monitored home exercise). The primary outcome was Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included physical function, depression, medication use, and quality of life. At 12 weeks, the WOMAC score was substantially reduced in both groups (Tai Chi, 167 points [95% CI, 145 to 190 points]; physical therapy, 143 points [CI, 119 to 167 points]). The between-group difference was not significant (24 points [CI, -10 to 58 points]). Both groups also showed similar clinically significant improvement in most secondary outcomes, and the benefits were maintained up to 52 weeks. Of note, the Tai Chi group had significantly greater improvements in depression and the physical component of quality of life. The benefit of Tai Chi was consistent across instructors. No serious adverse events occurred. Patients were aware of their treatment group assignment, and the generalizability of the findings to other settings remains undetermined. Tai Chi produced beneficial effects similar to those of a standard course of physical therapy in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health of the National Institutes of Health.

  18. Square lattice Ising model {chi}-tilde{sup (5)} ODE in exact arithmetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, B [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Jensen, I; Guttmann, A J [ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematics and Statistics of Complex Systems, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Boukraa, S [LPTHIRM and Departement d' Aeronautique, Universite de Blida, Blida (Algeria); Hassani, S; Zenine, N [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, BP 399, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Maillard, J-M, E-mail: bgn@physics.uoguelph.c, E-mail: I.Jensen@ms.unimelb.edu.a, E-mail: boukraa@mail.univ-blida.d, E-mail: tonyg@ms.unimelb.edu.a, E-mail: maillard@lptmc.jussieu.f, E-mail: njzenine@yahoo.co [LPTMC, UMR 7600 CNRS, Universite de Paris, Tour 24, 4eme etage, case 121, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2010-05-14

    We obtain in exact arithmetic the order 24 linear differential operator L{sub 24} and the right-hand side E{sup (5)} of the inhomogeneous equation L{sub 24}({Phi}{sup (5)}) = E{sup (5)}, where {Phi}{sup (5)}={chi}-tilde{sup (5)}-{chi}-tilde{sup (3)}/2+{chi}-tilde{sup (1)}/120 is a linear combination of n-particle contributions to the susceptibility of the square lattice Ising model. In Bostan et al (2009 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 275209), the operator L{sub 24} (modulo a prime) was shown to factorize into L{sub 12}{sup (left){center_dot}}L{sub 12}{sup (right)}; here we prove that no further factorization of the order 12 operator L{sub 12}{sup (left)} is possible. We use the exact ODE to obtain the behaviour of {chi}-tilde{sup (5)} at the ferromagnetic critical point and to obtain a limited number of analytic continuations of {chi}-tilde{sup (5)} beyond the principal disc defined by its high temperature series. Contrary to a speculation in Boukraa et al (2008 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 41 455202), we find that {chi}-tilde{sup (5)} is singular at w = 1/2 on an infinite number of branches.

  19. High-order Fuchsian equations for the square lattice Ising model: {chi}{sup (6)}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukraa, S [LPTHIRM and Departement d' Aeronautique, Universite de Blida (Algeria); Hassani, S; Zenine, N [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, BP 399, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Jensen, I [ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematics and Statistics of Complex Systems, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Maillard, J-M [LPTMC, Universite de Paris 6, Tour 24, 4eme etage, case 121, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: boukraa@mail.univ-blida.dz, E-mail: I.Jensen@ms.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: maillard@lptmc.jussieu.fr, E-mail: njzenine@yahoo.com

    2010-03-19

    This paper deals with {chi}-tilde{sup (6)}, the six-particle contribution to the magnetic susceptibility of the square lattice Ising model. We have generated, modulo a prime, series coefficients for {chi}-tilde{sup (6)}. The length of the series is sufficient to produce the corresponding Fuchsian linear differential equation (modulo a prime). We obtain the Fuchsian linear differential equation that annihilates the 'depleted' series {phi}{sup (6)}={chi}-tilde{sup (6)} - 2/3 {chi}-tilde{sup (4)} + 2/45 {chi}-tilde{sup (2)}. The factorization of the corresponding differential operator is performed using a method of factorization modulo a prime, introduced in a previous paper. The 'depleted' differential operator is shown to have a structure similar to the corresponding operator for {chi}-tilde{sup (5)}. It splits into factors of smaller orders, with the left-most factor of order 6 being equivalent to the symmetric fifth power of the linear differential operator corresponding to the elliptic integral E. The right-most factor has a direct sum structure, and using series calculated modulo several primes, all the factors in the direct sum have been reconstructed in exact arithmetics.

  20. Effects of Tai Chi intervention on dual-task ability in older adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Courtney D; Miszko, Tanya; Wolf, Steven L

    2009-03-01

    To determine if a 12-week program of Tai Chi that has been shown to reduce falls incidence in older adults would improve the ability to allocate attention to balance under dual-task conditions. Pre-/posttest experimental research design. Movement studies research laboratory. Community dwelling older adults (N=15; range, 62-85y) participated in either Tai Chi training or health education classes (controls) for 12 weeks. Participants in the Tai Chi group attended a twice-weekly, 1.5-hour class taught by an experienced instructor. The control group attended a biweekly, 1-hour class for lectures on health-related topics. Two cognitive tasks (responding to auditory or visual stimulus as quickly as possible) were performed concurrently while maintaining static balance during the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and while avoiding obstacles while walking. The percent change in performance relative to the single-task condition was calculated and defined as the dual-task cost. The dual-task cost was calculated for both the postural and cognitive measures. There was no improvement in the performance of postural stability or cognitive task under dual-task conditions for the SOT for Tai Chi versus controls. There was no improvement in avoiding obstacles under dual-task conditions for Tai Chi versus controls. Contrary to our hypothesis, the findings of this study did not support a benefit of Tai Chi on the ability to allocate attention to balance under dual-task conditions.

  1. Changes of heart rate variability and prefrontal oxygenation during Tai Chi practice versus arm ergometer cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xi; Hui-Chan, Christina Wan-Ying; Tsang, William Wai-Nam

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] Exercise has been shown to improve cardiovascular fitness and cognitive function. Whether the inclusion of mind over exercise would increase parasympathetic control of the heart and brain activities more than general exercise at a similar intensity is not known. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Tai Chi (mind-body exercise) versus arm ergometer cycling (body-focused exercise) on the heart rate variability and prefrontal oxygenation level. [Subjects and Methods] A Tai Chi master was invited to perform Tai Chi and arm ergometer cycling with similar exercise intensity on two separate days. Heart rate variability and prefrontal oxyhemoglobin levels were measured continuously by a RR recorder and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. [Results] During Tai Chi exercise, spectral analysis of heart rate variability demonstrated a higher high-frequency power as well as a lower low-frequency/high-frequency ratio than during ergometer cycling, suggesting increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic control of the heart. Also, prefrontal oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin levels were higher than those during arm ergometer exercise. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that increased parasympathetic control of the heart and prefrontal activities may be associated with Tai Chi practice. Having a "mind" component in Tai Chi could be more beneficial for older adults' cardiac health and cognitive function than body-focused ergometer cycling.

  2. Managing cardiovascular risks with Tai Chi in people with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Sook; Song, Rhayun; Oh, Kyong Ok; So, Hee Young; Kim, Dal Sook; Kim, Jong Im; Kim, Tae Sook; Kim, Hyun Li; Ahn, Suk Hee

    2010-02-01

    The paper is a report of the study to determine the effects of the cardiovascular risk management programme with Tai Chi on cardiovascular risks, health behaviours and quality of life in individuals with coronary artery disease. Many eligible patients with coronary artery disease do not participate in programmes for cardiovascular risk management, mainly because of lack of motivation, high cost or limited accessibility. Tai Chi has been introduced by health professionals to promote cardiovascular functioning and quality of life. A quasi-experimental design with a non-equivalent control group was used. Eighty-five people with a mean age of 66 years completed pretest and 6-month follow-up measures in the following three groups: Tai Chi with education (n = 33), Tai Chi only (n = 19) and control (n = 33). Analysis of covariance was used to compare outcome variables with pretest variables as covariates to adjust for baseline differences. The data were collected in 2005-2006. In the Tai-Chi-with-education group there were statistically significant reductions in modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (F = 3.49, P = 0.035) and improvements in health behaviours (F = 6.12, P = 0.003), mental scores (F = 3.96, P = 0.023), and in the role-emotional (F = 7.30, P = 0.001) and vitality (F = 3.81, P = 0.026) dimensions of quality of life. Tai Chi was safely implemented as an alternative form of exercise in a cardiovascular risk management programme. Whether the beneficial effects of Tai Chi in cardiovascular risk management are comparable with those induced by other types of aerobic exercise requires further investigation.

  3. Search for hadronic transition chi(cJ) -> eta(c)pi(+)pi(-) and observation of chi(cJ) -> K(K)over-bar pi pi pi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, M.L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J.P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A.Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J.S.; Huang, X.T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L.L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.S.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y.T.; Liao, G.R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, Cheng; Liu, C.X.; Liu, C.Y.; Liu, F.H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C.L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales, C. Morales; Motzko, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J.W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schaefer, B. D.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J.F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y.J.; Sun, Y.Z.; Sun, Z.J.; Sun, Z.T.; Tang, C.J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B.Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z.Y.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L.H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S.X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q.J.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S.J.; Zhao, T.C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X.R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X.W.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.M.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Werner, M.J.; Zheng, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Hadronic transitions of chi(cJ) -> eta(c)pi(+)pi(-) (J = 0, 1, 2) are searched for using a sample of 1.06 x 10(8) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring. The eta(c) is reconstructed with (KSK +/-)-K-0 pi(-/+) and K+K-pi(0) final states. No signals are observed

  4. Parameter Estimation in Astronomy with Poisson-Distributed Data. 1; The (CHI)2(gamma) Statistic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    1999-01-01

    Applying the standard weighted mean formula, [Sigma (sub i)n(sub i)ssigma(sub i, sup -2)], to determine the weighted mean of data, n(sub i), drawn from a Poisson distribution, will, on average, underestimate the true mean by approx. 1 for all true mean values larger than approx.3 when the common assumption is made that the error of the i th observation is sigma(sub i) = max square root of n(sub i), 1).This small, but statistically significant offset, explains the long-known observation that chi-square minimization techniques which use the modified Neyman'chi(sub 2) statistic, chi(sup 2, sub N) equivalent Sigma(sub i)((n(sub i) - y(sub i)(exp 2)) / max(n(sub i), 1), to compare Poisson - distributed data with model values, y(sub i), will typically predict a total number of counts that underestimates the true total by about 1 count per bin. Based on my finding that weighted mean of data drawn from a Poisson distribution can be determined using the formula [Sigma(sub i)[n(sub i) + min(n(sub i), 1)](n(sub i) + 1)(exp -1)] / [Sigma(sub i)(n(sub i) + 1)(exp -1))], I propose that a new chi(sub 2) statistic, chi(sup 2, sub gamma) equivalent, should always be used to analyze Poisson- distributed data in preference to the modified Neyman's chi(exp 2) statistic. I demonstrated the power and usefulness of,chi(sub gamma, sup 2) minimization by using two statistical fitting techniques and five chi(exp 2) statistics to analyze simulated X-ray power - low 15 - channel spectra with large and small counts per bin. I show that chi(sub gamma, sup 2) minimization with the Levenberg - Marquardt or Powell's method can produce excellent results (mean slope errors approx. less than 3%) with spectra having as few as 25 total counts.

  5. The Listeria monocytogenes ChiA chitinase enhances virulence through suppression of host innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swarnava; Gantner, Benjamin N; Ye, Richard D; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Freitag, Nancy E

    2013-03-19

    Environmental pathogens survive and replicate within the outside environment while maintaining the capacity to infect mammalian hosts. For some microorganisms, mammalian infection may be a relatively rare event. Understanding how environmental pathogens retain their ability to cause disease may provide insight into environmental reservoirs of disease and emerging infections. Listeria monocytogenes survives as a saprophyte in soil but is capable of causing serious invasive disease in susceptible individuals. The bacterium secretes virulence factors that promote cell invasion, bacterial replication, and cell-to-cell spread. Recently, an L. monocytogenes chitinase (ChiA) was shown to enhance bacterial infection in mice. Given that mammals do not synthesize chitin, the function of ChiA within infected animals was not clear. Here we have demonstrated that ChiA enhances L. monocytogenes survival in vivo through the suppression of host innate immunity. L. monocytogenes ΔchiA mutants were fully capable of establishing bacterial replication within target organs during the first 48 h of infection. By 72 to 96 h postinfection, however, numbers of ΔchiA bacteria diminished, indicative of an effective immune response to contain infection. The ΔchiA-associated virulence defect could be complemented in trans by wild-type L. monocytogenes, suggesting that secreted ChiA altered a target that resulted in a more permissive host environment for bacterial replication. ChiA secretion resulted in a dramatic decrease in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and ΔchiA mutant virulence was restored in NOS2(-/-) mice lacking iNOS. This work is the first to demonstrate modulation of a specific host innate immune response by a bacterial chitinase. Bacterial chitinases have traditionally been viewed as enzymes that either hydrolyze chitin as a food source or serve as a defense mechanism against organisms containing structural chitin (such as fungi). Recent evidence indicates

  6. Transformation of a metaphor: semantic shift in a Cantonese term 'Chi Sin' denoting insanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J Y W; Chen, E Y H

    2015-03-01

    The historical evolution of the existing terms used to describe insanity may be able to shed light on the formation of stigma towards psychosis patients. In Hong Kong, a widely used Cantonese term for insanity 'Chi Sin' provides a unique example because of its neutral original sense, as it literally means misconnection in a network circuit. We attempt to trace the origin and subsequent evolution of the term 'Chi Sin' from its early use to the present day to understand how local Hong Kong people have attached increasingly negative connotations to this scientific term since the mid-20th century. We sampled as many newspapers and magazines published in Hong Kong from 1939 to June 2014 as possible, and sampled 7 popular local movies from the 1950s and 1960s. We also searched all the newspapers published in Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and Mainland China from January 1998 to June 2014, and searched several other local historical resources. In one early use of 'Chi Sin' in 1939, the term was only used in a technical sense to describe 'short circuiting'. We found that the development of the telephone system, the Strowger system, in Hong Kong is closely related to the evolution of the semantics of the term 'Chi Sin'. The original meaning of short circuitry of the term 'Chi Sin' is no longer used, and it has become a dead metaphor through repeated use with negative emotional connotations. This illustrates some of the factors facilitating the emergence of a metaphor with subsequent semantic drift.

  7. Tai Chi Exercise for the Quality of Life in a Perimenopausal Women Organization: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Shan, Weichao; Li, Qing; Yang, Na; Shan, Weiying

    2017-08-01

    Improvement of the quality of life in perimenopausal women has recently become an important global health issue. Extensive research reports provide evidence of Tai Chi for the quality of life, but no systematic review has individually investigated Tai Chi as a main intervention on the quality of life in perimenopausal women. To assess clinical evidence of Tai Chi for the quality of life in perimenopausal women. Studies related to the effect of Tai Chi on the quality of life in perimenopausal women in the databases of China and abroad were searched. RevMan version 5.2 software was used, and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) and bone mineral density (BMD) were selected as evaluation indices. Five trials were included. The results of this study showed that Tai Chi had a significant effect on bodily pain, general health, vitality, mental health of SF-36, and the spine dimension of BMD, as supported by the following data: bodily pain (Standard Mean Difference [SMD] = -3.63; 95% confidence interval [CI] [-6.62, -0.64]; p = .02); general health (SMD = -5.08; 95% CI [-7.60, -2.56]; p quality randomized controlled trials are urgently needed to confirm these results. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  8. Hepatitis B Stigma and Knowledge among Vietnamese in Ho Chi Minh City and Chicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Dam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stigma regarding viral hepatitis and liver disease has psychological and social consequences including causing negative self-image, disrupting relationships, and providing a barrier to prevention, testing, and treatment. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare HBV knowledge and stigma in Vietnamese in Ho Chi Minh City and Chicago and to begin to evaluate the cultural context of HBV stigma. Methods. A written survey including knowledge questions and a validated HBV stigma questionnaire was distributed to Vietnamese in Ho Chi Minh City and Chicago. 842 surveys from Ho Chi Minh City and 170 from Chicago were analyzed. Results. Vietnamese living in Chicago had better understanding of HBV transmission and that HBV can cause chronic infection and liver cancer. Vietnamese in Chicago had higher stigma scores on a broad range of items including guilt and shame about HBV and were more likely to feel that persons with HBV can bring harm to others and should be isolated. Conclusions. Vietnamese in Ho Chi Minh City and Chicago have knowledge deficits about HBV, particularly regarding modes of transmission. Persons in Ho Chi Minh City expressed lower levels of HBV stigma than Vietnamese living in Chicago, likely reflecting changing cultural attitudes in Vietnam. Culturally appropriate educational initiatives are needed to address the problem of HBV stigma.

  9. Evolution Of The Women Images In Chi Li’s Novel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Mariana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Chi Li, one of the outstanding women writers in the 1980’s, portrays various images of women in her works. Female image that Chi Li describe is from obedient to tradition type until self determination and independence, and gain a clairvoyance of that female’s culture existence state and the value conception separately. Chi Li thinks deeply of the meaning of Chinese female’s life, in search of the culture value of contemporary female throughout the different female images, which figured in the novel, and it revealed the sprits in exploring of culture and the unique aesthetics taste of the author.

  10. TAI CHI CHUAN: STATE OF THE ART IN INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH: VOL 52 (MEDICINE & SPORT SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youlian Hong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This collection on the latest and practical research data about the characteristics and beneficial effects of Tai Chi Chuan on various physiological and pathological matters is published as the 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE To address the effects of Tai Chi Chuan in the fields of biomechanics and physiology, sensory motor control and fall prevention, psychology and social aspects, as well as various clinical applications. FEATURES The book is organised into four sections, each containing four to seven chapters: the first section focuses on biomechanical and physiological aspects of Tai Chi in seven chapters, the second section addresses the benefits of the sport in terms of sensory motor control and fall prevention in five chapters, the third section highlights the psychological and social aspects in four chapters, and in the last section the application of Tai Chi in clinical intervention such as in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's diseases, coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes is demonstrated in six chapters. AUDIENCE This is a thorough reference book for students, researchers, teachers and healthcare professionals in exercise science and medicine. In fact, anyone already practicing Tai Chi Chuan or considering it up would benefit from this book. ASSESSMENT This 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal on Tai Chi Chuan is a valuable and essential source of information brought together by recognized researchers around the Globe. The book is for everybody who is interested in understanding the effects and application of this fascinating form of exercise which has been developed as a form of martial arts and used for health exercise for centuries in China.

  11. Tai Chi for treating knee osteoarthritis: Designing a long-term follow up randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rones Ramel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA is a major cause of pain and functional impairment among elders. Currently, there are neither feasible preventive intervention strategies nor effective medical remedies for the management of KOA. Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese mind-body exercise that is reported to enhance muscle function, balance and flexibility, and to reduce pain, depression and anxiety, may safely and effectively be used to treat KOA. However, current evidence is inconclusive. Our study examines the effects of a 12-week Tai Chi program compared with an attention control (wellness education and stretching on pain, functional capacity, psychosocial variables, joint proprioception and health status in elderly people with KOA. The study will be completed by July 2009. Methods/Design Forty eligible patients, age > 55 yr, BMI ≤ 40 kg/m2 with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (American College of Rheumatology criteria are identified and randomly allocated to either Tai Chi (10 modified forms from classical Yang style Tai Chi or attention control (wellness education and stretching. The 60-minute intervention sessions take place twice weekly for 12 weeks. The study is conducted at an urban tertiary medical center in Boston, Massachusetts. The primary outcome measure is the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC pain subscale at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes include weekly WOMAC pain, function and stiffness scores, patient and physician global assessments, lower-extremity function, knee proprioception, depression, self-efficacy, social support, health-related quality of life, adherence and occurrence of adverse events after 12, 24 and 48 weeks. Discussion In this article, we present the challenges of designing a randomized controlled trial with long-term follow up. The challenges encountered in this design are: strategies for recruitment, avoidance of selection bias, the actual practice of Tai Chi, and the maximization of adherence

  12. Tai Chi for osteopenic women: design and rationale of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Mary

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-menopausal osteopenic women are at increased risk for skeletal fractures. Current osteopenia treatment guidelines include exercise, however, optimal exercise regimens for attenuating bone mineral density (BMD loss, or for addressing other fracture-related risk factors (e.g. poor balance, decreased muscle strength are not well-defined. Tai Chi is an increasingly popular weight bearing mind-body exercise that has been reported to positively impact BMD dynamics and improve postural control, however, current evidence is inconclusive. This study will determine the effectiveness of Tai Chi in reducing rates of bone turnover in post-menopausal osteopenic women, compared with standard care, and will preliminarily explore biomechanical processes that might inform how Tai Chi impacts BMD and associated fracture risks. Methods/Design A total of 86 post-menopausal women, aged 45-70y, T-score of the hip and/or spine -1.0 and -2.5, have been recruited from primary care clinics of a large healthcare system based in Boston. They have been randomized to a group-based 9-month Tai Chi program plus standard care or to standard care only. A unique aspect of this trial is its pragmatic design, which allows participants randomized to Tai Chi to choose from a pre-screened list of community-based Tai Chi programs. Interviewers masked to participants' treatment group assess outcomes at baseline and 3 and 9 months after randomization. Primary outcomes are serum markers of bone resorption (C-terminal cross linking telopeptide of type I collagen, bone formation (osteocalcin, and BMD of the lumbar spine and proximal femur (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Secondary outcomes include health-related quality-of-life, exercise behavior, and psychological well-being. In addition, kinetic and kinematic characterization of gait, standing, and rising from a chair are assessed in subset of participants (n = 16 to explore the feasibility of modeling skeletal

  13. Variation in CHI3LI in relation to type 2 diabetes and related quantitative traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathcke, Camilla Noelle; Holmkvist, Johan; Jørgensen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CHI3LI encoding the inflammatory glycoprotein YKL-40 is located on chromosome 1q32.1. YKL-40 is involved in inflammatory processes and patients with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) have elevated circulating YKL-40 levels which correlate with their level of insulin resistance. Interestingly......, it has been reported that rs10399931 (-329 G/A) of CHI3LI contributes to the inter-individual plasma YKL-40 levels in patients with sarcoidosis, and that rs4950928 (-131 C/G) is a susceptibility polymorphism for asthma and a decline in lung function. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms...

  14. APA/Psi Chi Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award: Samantha F. Anderson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and the American Psychological Association. The award was established to recognize young researchers at the beginning of their professional lives and to commemorate both the 50th anniversary of Psi Chi and the 100th anniversary of psychology as a science (dating from the founding of Wundt's laboratory). The 2017 recipient is Samantha F. Anderson, who was chosen for "an exceptional research paper that responds to psychology's 'replication crisis' by outlining a broader view of success in replication." Her award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Connor H. G. Patros: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. The award was established to recognize young researchers at the beginning of their professional lives and to commemorate both the 50th anniversary of Psi Chi and the 100th anniversary of psychology as a science (dating from the founding of Wundt's laboratory). The 2015 recipient is Connor H. G Patros. Patros was chosen for "an excellent research paper that examines the complex relationship between working memory, choice-impulsivity, and the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) phenotype." Patros's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Variation in CHI3LI in relation to type 2 diabetes and related quantitative traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Noelle Rathcke

    Full Text Available CHI3LI encoding the inflammatory glycoprotein YKL-40 is located on chromosome 1q32.1. YKL-40 is involved in inflammatory processes and patients with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D have elevated circulating YKL-40 levels which correlate with their level of insulin resistance. Interestingly, it has been reported that rs10399931 (-329 G/A of CHI3LI contributes to the inter-individual plasma YKL-40 levels in patients with sarcoidosis, and that rs4950928 (-131 C/G is a susceptibility polymorphism for asthma and a decline in lung function. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs or haplotypes thereof the CHI3LI locus might influence risk of T2D. The aim of the present study was to investigate the putative association between SNPs and haplotype blocks of CHI3LI and T2D and T2D related quantitative traits.Eleven SNPs of CHI3LI were genotyped in 6514 individuals from the Inter99 cohort and 2924 individuals from the outpatient clinic at Steno Diabetes Center. In cas-control studies a total of 2345 T2D patients and 5302 individuals with a normal glucose tolerance test were examined. We found no association between rs10399931 (OR, 0.98 (CI, 0.88-1.10, p = 0.76, rs4950928 (0.98 (0.87-1.10, p = 0.68 or any of the other SNPs with T2D. Similarly, we found no significant association between any of the 11 tgSNPs and T2D related quantitative traits, all p>0.14. None of the identified haplotype blocks of CHI3LI showed any association with T2D, all p>0.16.None of the examined SNPs or haplotype blocks of CHI3LI showed any association with T2D or T2D related quantitative traits. Estimates of insulin resistance and dysregulated glucose homeostasis in T2D do not seem to be accounted for by the examined variations of CHI3LI.

  17. Does Tai Chi relieve fatigue? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xiang

    Full Text Available Fatigue is not only a familiar symptom in our daily lives, but also a common ailment that affects all of our bodily systems. Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs have proven Tai Chi to be beneficial for patients suffering from fatigue, however conclusive evidence is still lacking. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed on all RCTs reporting the effects of Tai Chi for fatigue.In the end of April 2016, seven electronic databases were searched for RCTs involving Tai Chi for fatigue. The search terms mainly included Tai Chi, Tai-ji, Taiji, fatigue, tiredness, weary, weak, and the search was conducted without language restrictions. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. RevMan 5.3 software was used for meta-analysis. Publication bias was estimated with a funnel plot and Egger's test. We also assessed the quality of evidence with the GRADE system.Ten trials (n = 689 were included, and there was a high risk of bias in the blinding. Two trials were determined to have had low methodological quality. Tai Chi was found to have improved fatigue more than conventional therapy (standardized mean difference (SMD: -0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI: -0.70, -0.20 overall, and have positive effects in cancer-related fatigue (SMD:-0.38, 95% CI: -0.65, -0.11. Tai Chi was also more effective on vitality (SMD: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.20, 1.07, sleep (SMD: -0.32, 95% CI: -0.61, -0.04 and depression (SMD: -0.58, 95% CI: -1.04, -0.11. However, no significant difference was found in multiple sclerosis-related fatigue (SMD: -0.77, 95% CI: -1.76, 0.22 and age-related fatigue (SMD: -0.77, 95% CI: -1.78, 0.24. No adverse events were reported among the included studies. The quality of evidence was moderate in the GRADE system.The results suggest that Tai Chi could be an effective alternative and /or complementary approach to existing therapies for people with fatigue. However, the quality of the evidence was only moderate and may

  18. A small RNA controls expression of the chitinase ChiA in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper S; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Lillebæk, Eva Maria Sternkopf

    2011-01-01

    establishing LhrA as a multiple target regulator. Lmo0302 encodes a hypothetical protein with no known function, whereas chiA encodes one of two chitinases present in L. monocytogenes. We show here that LhrA acts as a post-transcriptional regulator of lmo0302 and chiA by interfering with ribosome recruitment....... monocytogenes. In marked contrast to this, we found that Hfq has a stimulating effect on the chitinolytic activity, suggesting that Hfq plays multiple roles in the complex regulatory pathways controlling the chitinases of L. monocytogenes....

  19. FAR-INFRARED LINE SPECTRA OF SEYFERT GALAXIES FROM THE HERSCHEL-PACS SPECTROMETER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Busquet, Gemma [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Dasyra, Kalliopi M. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA (CNRS:UMR8112), 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014, Paris (France); Calzoletti, Luca [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Malkan, Matthew A. [Astronomy Division, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Tommasin, Silvia, E-mail: luigi.spinoglio@iaps.inaf.it [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Neurobiology, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2015-01-20

    We observed the far-IR fine-structure lines of 26 Seyfert galaxies with the Herschel-PACS spectrometer. These observations are complemented with Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and Herschel SPIRE spectroscopy. We used the ionic lines to determine electron densities in the ionized gas and the [C I] lines, observed with SPIRE, to measure the neutral gas densities, while the [O I] lines measure the gas temperature, at densities below ∼10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}. Using the [O I]145 μm/63 μm and [S III]33/18 μm line ratios, we find an anti-correlation of the temperature with the gas density. Various fine-structure line ratios show density stratifications in these active galaxies. On average, electron densities increase with the ionization potential of the ions. The infrared lines arise partly in the narrow line region, photoionized by the active galactic nucleus (AGN), partly in H II regions photoionized by hot stars, and partly in photo-dissociated regions. We attempt to separate the contributions to the line emission produced in these different regions by comparing our observed emission line ratios to theoretical values. In particular, we tried to separate the contribution of AGNs and star formation by using a combination of Spitzer and Herschel lines, and we found that besides the well-known mid-IR line ratios, the line ratio of [O III]88 μm/[O IV]26 μm can reliably discriminate the two emission regions, while the far-IR line ratio of [C II]157 μm/[O I]63 μm is only able to mildly separate the two regimes. By comparing the observed [C II]157 μm/[N II]205 μm ratio with photoionization models, we also found that most of the [C II] emission in the galaxies we examined is due to photodissociation regions.

  20. Design and study of far infrared free electron laser at Tokyo University of Science

    CERN Document Server

    Koike, H; Yokoyama, M; Oda, F; Kawai, M; Kuroda, H; Nakai, K; Toyoda, K

    2002-01-01

    The FIR-FEL project group, collaboration of Tokyo University of Science and Kawasaki Heavy Industry, Ltd. (KHI), has completed the design of an S-band linac based FIR-FEL device at a spectral range between 300 and 1000 micrometers in 2000. And the FEL device has already been installed in the IR FEL Center at Tokyo University of Science in April 2002. Our optical resonator is composed of a waveguide with a gap of 4.5 mm and two cylindrical mirrors positioned among the waveguide surfaces in order to improve a slippage problem and diffraction losses. The waveguide makes a slippage length reduce and makes a lasing at the spectral range easier. In this paper, the design and the fabrication of the FIR-FEL device, RF components, linac, optical resonator, and beam transport line are described. (author)