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Sample records for family mediates antigenic

  1. The Plasmodium falciparum STEVOR multigene family mediates antigenic variation of the infected erythrocyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhtar Niang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of the Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cell (iRBC surface have been linked to parasite-associated pathology. Such modifications enable the parasite to establish long-lasting chronic infection by evading antibody mediate immune recognition and splenic clearance. With the exception of the well-demonstrated roles of var-encoded PfEMP1 in virulence and immune evasion, the biological significance of other variant surface antigens (rif and stevor is largely unknown. While PfEMP1 and RIFIN have been located on the iRBC surface, recent studies have located STEVOR at the iRBC membrane where it may be exposed on the erythrocyte surface. To investigate the role of STEVOR in more detail, we have developed antibodies against two putative STEVOR proteins and used a combination of indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA, live IFA, flow cytometry, as well as agglutination assays, which enable us to demonstrate that STEVOR is clonally variant at the surface of schizont stage parasites. Crucially, expression of different STEVOR on the surface of the iRBC changes the antigenic property of the parasite. Taken together, our data for the first time demonstrate that STEVOR plays a role in creating antigenic diversity of schizont stage parasites, thereby adding additional complexity to the immunogenic properties of the iRBC. Furthermore, it clearly demonstrates that to obtain a complete understanding of how parasite-induced pathology is linked to variation on the surface of the iRBC, focusing the interactions of multiple multigene families needs to be considered.

  2. Mediated intimacy in families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard, Malthe Kirkhoff

    2006-01-01

    Mediating intimacy between children and their parents is still limited investigated and at the same time, we find that, emerging technologies are about to change and affect the way we interact with each other. In this paper, we report from an empirical study where we investigated the social...... with other types of intimate relations such as strong-tie intimacy (couples cohabiting). However, we also identified several issues of intimacy unique to the special relation between children and their parents. These unique acts of intimacy propose challenges when designing technologies for mediated intimacy...

  3. Family education and television mediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz CÁNOVAS LEONHARDT

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article try to deal with the complex influence of television viewing in the process of socialization of children and adolescents, focusing our attention on the importance of the family as the mediator-educator agency of particular relevance. Once analyzed the basic theoretical assumptions, we deepened in reality under study by providing data about how the studied population lives television and what extent parental mediation influences and affects the process. The article concludes with some reflections and pedagogical suggestions which trying to help to the optimization of the educational reality.

  4. Blood Group Antigen Recognition via the Group A Streptococcal M Protein Mediates Host Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, David M. P.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; Everest-Dass, Arun; Day, Christopher J.; Dabbs, Rebecca A.; Ve, Thomas; Kobe, Bostjan; Nizet, Victor; Packer, Nicolle H.; Walker, Mark J.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) is responsible for over 500,000 deaths worldwide each year. The highly virulent M1T1 GAS clone is one of the most frequently isolated serotypes from streptococcal pharyngitis and invasive disease. The oral epithelial tract is a niche highly abundant in glycosylated structures, particularly those of the ABO(H) blood group antigen family. Using a high-throughput approach, we determined that a strain representative of the globally disseminated M1T1 GAS clone 5448 interacts with numerous, structurally diverse glycans. Preeminent among GAS virulence factors is the surface-expressed M protein. M1 protein showed high affinity for several terminal galactose blood group antigen structures. Deletion mutagenesis shows that M1 protein mediates glycan binding via its B repeat domains. Association of M1T1 GAS with oral epithelial cells varied significantly as a result of phenotypic differences in blood group antigen expression, with significantly higher adherence to those cells expressing H antigen structures compared to cells expressing A, B, or AB antigen structures. These data suggest a novel mechanism for GAS attachment to host cells and propose a link between host blood group antigen expression and M1T1 GAS colonization. PMID:28119471

  5. In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) and change mediated antigen technology (CMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D

    2006-09-01

    In this chapter, an overview of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) and change mediated antigen technology (CMAT) will be presented, including a discussion of the advantages and limitations of these methods. Over fifteen different microbial pathogens have been or are known to be currently studied with these methods. Salient data obtained from the application of IVIAT and/or CMAT to a selection of human and plant pathogens will be summarized. This includes recent reports on Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A) in neurological disorders and invasive diseases, Xylella fastidiosa in Pierce's disease, Xanthomonas campestris in bean blight, Salmonella enterica serovar typhi in typhoid fever and Leishmania spp. related infections. Special emphasis will be given to those targets that have been further investigated for the development of novel vaccine, diagnostic and/or antibiotherapy strategies. This encompasses a new point-of-care serological diagnostic test for chronic periodontal diseases. Finally, Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vivo induced products will be described as providing a rational basis for differentiating subjects with primary, dormant or secondary tuberculosis infections, from control subjects who have or did not have prior vaccination with BCG.

  6. Simultaneous presence of endogenous retrovirus and herpes virus antigens has profound effect on cell-mediated immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Christensen, Tove; Hansen, Hans Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Retroviruses have been suggested as possible pathogenic factors in multiple sclerosis (MS), supported by the observation that endogenous retroviruses are activated in MS patients. Different members of the herpes family of which several are neurotropic have also been suggested as factors in MS...... pathogenesis. Further, interactions between retroviruses and herpes viruses have been implied in the development of MS. The objective of the study was investigation of cell-mediated immune responses of MS patients to retrovirus and herpes virus antigens, particularly antigen combinations, with analyses...... retrovirus HERV-H and herpes virus antigens resulted in highly increased cellular immune responses among both the MS patients and healthy subjects. The increase was synergistic in character in most samples. Very pronounced effects were obtained using HHV-6A and HSV-1 antigens. Blast transformation assays...

  7. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

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    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  8. The anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are attractive tumor-associated antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2010-01-01

    -cancer immunotherapeutic strategies, alone or in the combination with conventional therapy. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of Bcl-2 family proteins as T-cell antigens, which has set the stage for the first explorative trial using these antigens in therapeutic vaccinations against cancer, and discuss future...

  9. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a microorganism are continuously modified. As a consequence, the host is forced to constantly adapt its humoral immune response against this pathogen. An antigenic change thus provides the microorganism with an opp...

  10. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

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    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  11. Restriction enzyme-mediated DNA family shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendorff, James B Y H; Johnston, Wayne A; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2014-01-01

    DNA shuffling is an established recombinatorial method that was originally developed to increase the speed of directed evolution experiments beyond what could be accomplished using error-prone PCR alone. To achieve this, mutated copies of a protein-coding sequence are fragmented with DNase I and the fragments are then reassembled in a PCR without primers. The fragments anneal where there is sufficient sequence identity, resulting in full-length variants of the original gene that have inherited mutations from multiple templates. Subsequent studies demonstrated that directed evolution could be further accelerated by shuffling similar native protein-coding sequences from the same gene family, rather than mutated variants of a single gene. Generally at least 65-75 % global identity between parental sequences is required in DNA family shuffling, with recombination mostly occurring at sites with at least five consecutive nucleotides of local identity. Since DNA shuffling was originally developed, many variations on the method have been published. In particular, the use of restriction enzymes in the fragmentation step allows for greater customization of fragment lengths than DNase I digestion and avoids the risk that parental sequences may be over-digested into unusable very small fragments. Restriction enzyme-mediated fragmentation also reduces the occurrence of undigested parental sequences that would otherwise reduce the number of unique variants in the resulting library. In the current chapter, we provide a brief overview of the alternative methods currently available for DNA shuffling as well as a protocol presented here that improves on several previous implementations of restriction enzyme-mediated DNA family shuffling, in particular with regard to purification of DNA fragments for reassembly.

  12. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Vink (Cornelis); L. Rudenko (Larisa); H.S. Seifert (H. Steven)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a mic

  13. Efficacy of family mediation and the role of family violence: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Cleak, Helen; Schofield, Margot; Bickerdike, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Family law reforms in Australia require separated parents in dispute to attempt mandatory family dispute resolution (FDR) in community-based family services before court attendance. However, there are concerns about such services when clients present with a history of high conflict and family violence. This study protocol describes a longitudinal study of couples presenting for family mediation services. The study aims to describe the profile of family mediation clients, including ...

  14. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-09-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its own, but upon being presented with PPD was able to instruct monocytes to increase their expression of PCA. Antigen presentation could be performed only by autologous monocytes; allogeneic monocytes from donors unrelated to the donor of the reactive clone could not present antigen to cells of the clone in a way that would initiate the procoagulant response. Cells of the reactive clone did not mediate increased monocyte PCA in response to Candida, even though peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the donor demonstrated increased PCA to both Candida and PPD. Thus, the PCA response to specific antigen can be mediated by a single clone of cells that shows specificity in the recognition of both antigen and antigen presenting cell.

  15. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

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    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kang, Myung-Soo, E-mail: mkang@skku.edu [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated

  16. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

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    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-05-15

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism.

  17. The role of adjuvant in mediating antigen structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Latoya Jones; Eldridge, Aimee M; Cummiskey, Jessica; Arthur, Kelly K; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to probe the fate of a model antigen, a cysteine-free mutant of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme, to the level of fine structural detail, as a consequence of its interaction with an aluminum (Al)-containing adjuvant. Fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare the thermal stability of the protein in solution versus adsorbed onto an Al-containing adjuvant. Differences in accessible hydrophobic surface areas were investigated using an extrinsic fluorescence probe, 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). As has been observed with other model antigens, the apparent thermal stability of the protein decreased following adsorption onto the adjuvant. ANS spectra suggested that adsorption onto the adjuvant caused an increase in exposure of hydrophobic regions of the protein. Electrostatic interactions drove the adsorption, and disruption of these interactions with high ionic strength buffers facilitated the collection of two-dimensional (15) N heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance data of protein released from the adjuvant. Although the altered stability of the adsorbed protein suggested changes to the protein's structure, the fine structure of the desorbed protein was nearly identical to the protein's structure in the adjuvant-free formulation. Thus, the adjuvant-induced changes to the protein that were responsible for the reduced thermal stability were not observed upon desorption.

  18. Multivalent TB vaccines targeting the esx gene family generate potent and broad cell-mediated immune responses superior to BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Walters, Jewell; Laddy, Dominick J; Yan, Jian; Weiner, David B

    2014-01-01

    Development of a broad-spectrum synthetic vaccine against TB would represent an important advance to the limited vaccine armamentarium against TB. It is believed that the esx family of TB antigens may represent important vaccine candidates. However, only 4 esx antigens have been studied as potential vaccine antigens. The challenge remains to develop a vaccine that simultaneously targets all 23 members of the esx family to induce enhanced broad-spectrum cell-mediated immunity. We sought to investigate if broader cellular immune responses could be induced using a multivalent DNA vaccine representing the esx family protein members delivered via electroporation. In this study, 15 designed esx antigens were created to cross target all members of the esx family. They were distributed into groups of 3 self-processing antigens each, resulting in 5 trivalent highly optimized DNA plasmids. Vaccination with all 5 constructs elicited robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses to all encoded esx antigens and induced multifunctional CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell responses. Importantly, we show that when all constructs are combined into a cocktail, the RSQ-15 vaccine, elicited substantial broad Ag-specific T cell responses to all esx antigens as compared with vaccination with BCG. Moreover, these vaccine-induced responses were highly cross-reactive with BCG encoded esx family members and were highly immune effective in a BCG DNA prime-boost format. Furthermore, we demonstrate the vaccine potential and immunopotent profile of several novel esx antigens never previously studied. These data highlight the likely importance of these novel immunogens for study as preventative or therapeutic synthetic TB vaccines in combination or as stand alone antigens.

  19. Family Structure and Mediators of Adolescent Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, Clifford L.; Li, Xin; Reckase, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates how family structure is associated with adolescent drug use and how parenting, peer use, religiosity, and neighborhood problems may mediate the relationship. The authors use structural equation modeling to examine the relationship between family structure and drug use across race, and examine potential mediators. Using data…

  20. The extended family of CD1d-restricted T cells: sifting through a mixed bag of TCRs, antigens and functions

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    Elodie eMacho-Fernandez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells comprise a family of specialized T cells that recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d. Based on their T cell receptor (TCR usage and antigen-specificities, CD1d-restricted NKT cells have been divided into two main subsets: type I NKT cells that use a canonical invariant TCR α-chain and recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, and type II NKT cells that use a more diverse αβ TCR repertoire and do not recognize α-GalCer. In addition, α-GalCer-reactive NKT cells that use non-canonical αβ TCRs and CD1d-restricted T cells that use γδ or δ/αβ TCRs have recently been identified, revealing further diversity among CD1d-restricted T cells. Importantly, in addition to their distinct antigen specificities, functional differences are beginning to emerge between the different members of the CD1d-restricted T cell family. In this review, while using type I NKT cells as comparison, we will focus on type II NKT cells and the other non-invariant CD1d-restricted T cell subsets, and discuss our current understanding of the antigens they recognize, the formation of stimulatory CD1d/antigen complexes, the modes of TCR-mediated antigen recognition, and the mechanisms and consequences of their activation that underlie their function in antimicrobial responses, antitumor immunity, and autoimmunity.

  1. A Critique of Private Sessions in Family Mediation

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    Don Bowen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study represents a critical examination of private sessions (caucuses, seen as a sub-process within the core family mediation process and defined as involving separate and confidential conversations between mediator(s and each disputant during the main session. In the study, the views of family mediators were explored revealing that considerable support for the use of the tool was juxtaposed with a range of fundamental ethical concerns. Emerging from the study is strong evidence of coercive practice as an inherent component of caucusing thus posing a challenge to the positive benefits.

  2. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

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    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  3. Expression and evolution of members of the Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote surface antigen multigene family.

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    Ruef, B J; Dawson, B D; Tewari, D; Fouts, D L; Manning, J E

    1994-01-01

    The trypomastigote specific surface antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi are encoded by a supergene family which includes the TSA family. The TSA family is characterized by the presence of a 27-bp tandem repeat array in the coding region. Here, we report the characterization and analysis of the three TSA family members in the Esmeraldo strain of the parasite. In this strain 2 distinct telomeric members are expressed abundantly as 3.7-kb mRNAs, while the remaining member is located at an internal chromosomal site and is expressed at less than 2% of the level seen for the telomeric members. Based on hybridization to DNA separated by PFGE, 3 chromosomes of sizes 1.8 Mb, 0.98 Mb, and 0.90 Mb each contain one of the telomeric members. In addition, the two smaller chromosomes also contain the single internal member. Since both chromosomes contain similar TSA family members, and vary only slightly in size, we suggest that they are homologues. Comparisons of the nucleotide sequences of the different members of the family show that the internal gene differs from the telomeric genes primarily in sequences found 3' of the repeat array. These comparisons also reveal that the three genes are analogous, supporting the hypothesis that short segments between the family members are exchanged by gene conversion events. We propose that similar conversion events between members of different gene families may generate some of the diversity found within the supergene family.

  4. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd;

    2010-01-01

    in humans)-a conserved gene family that includes ORMDL3, which has recently been identified as a potential risk factor for childhood asthma. Starting from an unbiased functional genomic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we identify Orm proteins as negative regulators of sphingolipid synthesis that form...... a conserved complex with serine palmitoyltransferase, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in sphingolipid production. We also define a regulatory pathway in which phosphorylation of Orm proteins relieves their inhibitory activity when sphingolipid production is disrupted. Changes in ORM gene expression...

  5. Cell-mediated immune response of synovial fluid lymphocytes to ureaplasma antigen in Reiter's syndrome

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    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Reiter's syndrome (RS is an seronegative arthritis that occurs after urogenital or enteric infection which in addition with occular and/or mucocutaneous manifestations presents complete form of disease. According to previous understanding arthritis in the RS is the reactive one, which means that it is impossible to isolate its causative agent. However, there are the more and more authors suggesting that arthritis in the urogenital form of disease is caused by the infective agent in the affected joint. This suggestion is based on numerous studies on the presence of Chlmaydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in the inflamed joint by using new diagnostic methods in molecular biology published in the recent literature [1-3]. Besides, numerous studies of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response to "triggering" bacteria in the affected joint have supported previous suggestions [4-7]. Aim of the study was to determine whether synovial fluid T-cells specifically recognize the "triggering" bacteria presumably responsible for the Reiter's syndrome. METHOD The 3H-thymidine uptake procedure for measuring lymphocyte responses was applied to lymphocytes derived concurrently from synovial fluid (SF and from peripheral blood (PB [8]. Ureaplasma antigen and mitogen PHA stimulated lymphocytes in 24 RS patients (24 PB samples, 9 SF samples and the results were compared with those found in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (10 PB samples, 5 SF samples. Preparation of ureaplasma antigen. Ureaplasma was cultured on cell-free liquid medium [9]. Sample of 8 ml was heat-inactivated for 15 minutes at 601C and permanently stirred with magnetic mixer. The sample was centrifuged at 2000 x g for 40 minutes and than deposits carefully carried to other sterile glass tubes (Corex and recentrifuged at 9000 x g for 30 minutes. The deposit was washed 3 times in sterile 0.9% NaCl, and final sediment was resuspended in 1.2 ml sterile 0.9% Na

  6. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-01-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its o...

  7. Modulation of TCR-mediated signaling pathway by thymic shared antigen-1 (TSA-1)/stem cell antigen-2 (Sca-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, S; Kosugi, A; Noda, S; Yamamoto, N; Ogata, M; Minami, Y; Miyake, K; Hamaoka, T

    1995-12-15

    Thymic shared antigen-1 (TSA-1) is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored differentiation Ag expressed on murine lymphocytes, and is identical to stem cell Ag-2 (Sca-2). Using newly established mAb against TSA-1/Sca-2, we have previously shown that surface TSA-1 expression is induced upon activation in T cells, and that anti-TSA-1 inhibits IL-2 production induced by anti-CD3 stimulation in T cell hybridomas. In the present study, we have analyzed the functional role of TSA-1 during T cell activation using normal T cells, T cell hybridomas, and transfected Jurkat cell lines that expressed either GPI-anchored or transmembrane form of TSA-1. Anti-TSA-1 inhibited IL-2 production from normal T cells stimulated with soluble anti-CD3 plus accessory cells. Anti-TSA-1 exhibited the inhibitory effect on T cells, but not on accessory cells, because anti-TSA-1 inhibited IL-2 production in Jurkat cells transfected with TSA-1 cDNA, but not in control transfectant. A transmembrane form of TSA-1 was expressed in Jurkat cells by fusing the extracellular portion of TSA-1 to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of the class 1 Db. The analysis using this transfectant revealed that anti-TSA-1-mediated inhibition of IL-2 production did not require the GPI anchor of TSA-1. Finally, in addition to the inhibition of IL-2 production, tyrosine phosphorylation of CD3 zeta-chains observed following TCR stimulation, one of the important early activation events, was markedly reduced by anti-TSA-1. These results imply that TSA-1/Sca-2 plays an important regulatory role in the TCR signaling pathway of activated T cells in addition to its role in T cell differentiation.

  8. In vitro cell-mediated cytotoxicity to the male specific (H-Y) antigen in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, D P; Wadia, Y J; Naipaul, N

    1981-02-01

    We have studied the role of HLA antigens in restricting specificity of the cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL). CTL's developed between female responder/male stimulator combinations, were tested for H-Y antigen killing in cell-mediated lympholysis. Two CTL's demonstrated HLA-restricted H-Y cytotoxicity. In both instances, the responders are married parous females and both are positive for HLA-A2. These CTL's lysed target cells from donors who are either positive for the sensitizing HLA antigen or who are HLA-A2-positive males. On the other hand, one CTL where the HLA-A2-positive responder is not a parous female did not show HLA-restricted H-Y cytotoxicity. Also, CTL's where responders do not carry HLA-A2 showed no H-Y cytotoxicity. The data suggest that pregnancy(ies) is sufficient in itself to induce HLA-restricted H-Y cytotoxicity and that it can be recalled by in vitro stimulation with lymphocytes from an unrelated male donor. Also, in these studies HLA-restricted H-Y cytotoxicity was obtained only with targets that shared HLA-A2 with the effectors.

  9. Role of very late antigen-1 in T-cell-mediated immunity to systemic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Kauffmann, Susanne; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice lacking very late antigen-1 (VLA-1). The generation of virus-specific effector T cells was unimpaired in VLA-1(-/-) mice. In the memory phase, VLA-1 deficiency did not influence the number of memory CD8(+) T cells or th......, the current findings indicate that the expression of VLA-1 is not pivotal for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity to a systemic infection.......-cell-mediated inflammation, no significant influence of VLA-1 was found either in the primary response or in the memory phase. However, alpha-VLA-4 antibody reduced the DTH-like reaction in VLA-1(-/-) mice to a higher degree than in wt mice, suggesting a synergistic effect of blocking both integrins. Taken together...

  10. Positive and negative regulation of antigen receptor signaling by the Shc family of protein adapters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Francesca; Savino, Maria Teresa; Baldari, Cosima T

    2009-11-01

    The Shc adapter family includes four members that are expressed as multiple isoforms and participate in signaling by a variety of cell-surface receptors. The biological relevance of Shc proteins as well as their variegated function, which relies on their highly conserved modular structure, is underscored by the distinct and dramatic phenotypic alterations resulting from deletion of individual Shc isoforms both in the mouse and in two model organisms, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. The p52 isoform of ShcA couples antigen and cytokine receptors to Ras activation in both lymphoid and myeloid cells. However, the recognition of the spectrum of activities of p52ShcA in the immune system has been steadily expanding in recent years to other fundamental processes both at the cell and organism levels. Two other Shc family members, p66ShcA and p52ShcC/Rai, have been identified recently in T and B lymphocytes, where they antagonize survival and attenuate antigen receptor signaling. These developments reveal an unexpected and complex interplay of multiple Shc proteins in lymphocytes.

  11. Neural mediators of the intergenerational transmission of family aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxbe, Darby; Del Piero, Larissa Borofsky; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Kaplan, Jonas Todd; Margolin, Gayla

    2016-05-01

    Youth exposed to family aggression may become more aggressive themselves, but the mechanisms of intergenerational transmission are understudied. In a longitudinal study, we found that adolescents' reduced neural activation when rating their parents' emotions, assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, mediated the association between parents' past aggression and adolescents' subsequent aggressive behavior toward parents. A subsample of 21 youth, drawn from the larger study, underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning proximate to the second of two assessments of the family environment. At Time 1 (when youth were on average 15.51 years old) we measured parents' aggressive marital and parent-child conflict behaviors, and at Time 2 (≈2 years later), we measured youth aggression directed toward parents. Youth from more aggressive families showed relatively less activation to parent stimuli in brain areas associated with salience and socioemotional processing, including the insula and limbic structures. Activation patterns in these same areas were also associated with youths' subsequent parent-directed aggression. The association between parents' aggression and youths' subsequent parent-directed aggression was statistically mediated by signal change coefficients in the insula, right amygdala, thalamus, and putamen. These signal change coefficients were also positively associated with scores on a mentalizing measure. Hypoarousal of the emotional brain to family stimuli may support the intergenerational transmission of family aggression.

  12. Family material hardship and chinese adolescents' problem behaviors: a moderated mediation analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Wenqiang; Li, Dongping; Zhang, Wei; Bao, Zhenzhou; Wang, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    ...; we used the family stress model framework to investigate parental depression and negative parenting as potential mediators of the relation between family material hardship and adolescents' problem behaviors...

  13. Strategy for eliciting antigen-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response against a cryptic CTL epitope of merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Bianca P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a relatively new addition to the expanding category of oncovirus-induced cancers. Although still comparably rare, the number of cases has risen dramatically in recent years. Further complicating this trend is that MCC is an extremely aggressive neoplasm with poor patient prognosis and limited treatment options for advanced disease. The causative agent of MCC has been identified as the merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. The MCPyV-encoded large T (LT antigen is an oncoprotein that is theorized to be essential for virus-mediated tumorigenesis and is therefore, an excellent MCC antigen for the generation of antitumor immune responses. As a foreign antigen, the LT oncoprotein avoids the obstacle of immune tolerance, which normally impedes the development of antitumor immunity. Ergo, it is an excellent target for anti-MCC immunotherapy. Since tumor-specific CD8+ T cells lead to better prognosis for MCC and numerous other cancers, we have generated a DNA vaccine that is capable of eliciting LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine (pcDNA3-CRT/LT encodes the LT antigen linked to a damage-associated molecular pattern, calreticulin (CRT, as it has been demonstrated that the linkage of CRT to antigens promotes the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Results The present study shows that DNA vaccine-induced generation of LT-specific CD8+ T cells is augmented by linking CRT to the LT antigen. This is relevant since the therapeutic effects of the pcDNA3-CRT/LT DNA vaccine is mediated by LT-specific CD8+ T cells. Mice vaccinated with the DNA vaccine produced demonstrably more LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine was also able to confer LT-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated protective and therapeutic effects to prolong the survival of mice with LT-expressing tumors. In the interest of determining the LT epitope which most MCC-specific CD8+ T cells recognize, we identified the amino acid sequence of the

  14. Video-mediated communication to support distant family connectedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Ryoko; Driessnack, Martha

    2013-02-01

    It can be difficult to maintain family connections with geographically distant members. However, advances in computer-human interaction (CHI) systems, including video-mediated communication (VMC) are emerging. While VMC does not completely substitute for physical face-to-face communication, it appears to provide a sense of virtual copresence through the addition of visual and contextual cues to verbal communication between family members. The purpose of this study was to explore current patterns of VMC use, experiences, and family functioning among self-identified VMC users separated geographically from their families. A total of 341 participants (ages 18 to above 70) completed an online survey and Family APGAR. Ninty-six percent of the participants reported that VMC was the most common communication method used and 60% used VMC at least once/week. The most common reason cited for using VMC over other methods of communication was the addition of visual cues. A significant difference between the Family APGAR scores and the number of positive comments about VMC experience was also found. This exploratory study provides insight into the acceptance of VMC and its usefulness in maintaining connections with distant family members.

  15. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in Australian men: the influence of family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Michelle E; Occhipinti, Stefano; Gardiner, Robert A; Chambers, Suzanne K

    2012-04-01

    To describe how a family history of prostate cancer influences men's prostate cancer testing behaviours, information support preferences, and motives for testing. Men with a first-degree family history (239 men) and a comparison sample from the general population of Queensland, Australia (289) aged 40-65 years, and no prior history of cancer. Cross-sectional, retrospective survey assessing: prevalence of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and digital rectal examination (DRE); discussion of prostate cancer risks and benefits with a physician; prostate cancer information needs and preferences; motivations for testing. Men with a family history were more likely to report: having ever had a PSA test (odds ratio [OR] 4.98; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.16-7.85), more PSA tests in their lifetimes (b 1.04; se 0.40; 95% CI 0.26-1.82); to have had a DRE (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.54-3.23); to have spoken to a doctor about prostate cancer (OR 3.72; 95% CI 2.30-6.02); and to have instigated these discussions (OR 1.74; 95%CI 1.13-2.70). Most men from both groups did not recall any discussion of the 'cons' of prostate cancer testing with a doctor. Men with a family history reported a greater desire for information about prostate cancer prevention than did men without a family history. Men with a family history are more concerned about getting prostate cancer and are tested more often; however, information needs, discussions about prostate cancer, and motivations for testing are similar to those of all men. There appears to be a disparity between public health approaches that promote informed decision-making and what is happening in practice. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  16. Neural mediators of the intergenerational transmission of family aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Saxbe, Darby; Del Piero, Larissa Borofsky; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Kaplan, Jonas Todd; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-01-01

    Youth exposed to family aggression may become more aggressive themselves, but the mechanisms of intergenerational transmission are understudied. In a longitudinal study, we found that adolescents’ reduced neural activation when rating their parents’ emotions, assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, mediated the association between parents’ past aggression and adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior toward parents. A subsample of 21 youth, drawn from the larger study, underwent magnetic r...

  17. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of carcinoembryonic antigen by rat liver Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1985-01-01

    In vivo, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is removed from the circulation by the liver Kupffer cells. Immunologically identifiable CEA is transferred from these macrophages to the hepatocytes, where degradation is completed. Circulatory clearance of CEA is specific, rapid [t1/2 = 3.7 +/- 0.9 (S.D.) min], and saturable. In vitro, Kupffer cells take up CEA by a saturable process which is time/temperature dependent and colchicine sensitive. Isolated Kupffer cells endocytose CEA with an apparent Km of 6 X 10(-8) M. There are approximately 16,000 CEA binding sites per cell. Nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), a glycoprotein structurally similar to CEA, is recognized with lower affinity by the same receptor. Endocytosis is independent of the nonreducing terminal sugars on the molecule: CEA modified by Smith degradation inhibits Kupffer cell recognition of native CEA. Since performic acid oxidized CEA also inhibits endocytosis, receptor binding is similarly independent of intact protein conformation. Isolated Kupffer cells have mannose and/or N-acetyl glucosamine receptor activity but do not internalize CEA by that mechanism. Galactose-terminated glycoproteins impede CEA and NCA clearance in vivo but not Kupffer cell endocytosis in vitro. Radiolabeled CEA released from isolated Kupffer cells following endocytosis shows no apparent molecular weight change. However, the released CEA contains species with higher isoelectric points, suggesting that perhaps the removal of sialic acid and the resulting exposure of galactose residues mediate the subsequent transfer to the hepatocyte.

  18. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas Salhøj

    2014-01-01

    -wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum......-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers...... of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens....

  19. Sarcocystis neurona merozoites express a family of immunogenic surface antigens that are orthologues of the Toxoplasma gondii surface antigens (SAGs) and SAG-related sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Daniel K; Gaji, Rajshekhar Y; Mroz-Barrett, Meaghan; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Striepen, Boris; Stamper, Shelby

    2005-02-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the Apicomplexa that causes myelitis and encephalitis in horses but normally cycles between the opossum and small mammals. Analysis of an S. neurona expressed sequence tag (EST) database revealed four paralogous proteins that exhibit clear homology to the family of surface antigens (SAGs) and SAG-related sequences of Toxoplasma gondii. The primary peptide sequences of the S. neurona proteins are consistent with the two-domain structure that has been described for the T. gondii SAGs, and each was predicted to have an amino-terminal signal peptide and a carboxyl-terminal glycolipid anchor addition site, suggesting surface localization. All four proteins were confirmed to be membrane associated and displayed on the surface of S. neurona merozoites. Due to their surface localization and homology to T. gondii surface antigens, these S. neurona proteins were designated SnSAG1, SnSAG2, SnSAG3, and SnSAG4. Consistent with their homology, the SnSAGs elicited a robust immune response in infected and immunized animals, and their conserved structure further suggests that the SnSAGs similarly serve as adhesins for attachment to host cells. Whether the S. neurona SAG family is as extensive as the T. gondii SAG family remains unresolved, but it is probable that additional SnSAGs will be revealed as more S. neurona ESTs are generated. The existence of an SnSAG family in S. neurona indicates that expression of multiple related surface antigens is not unique to the ubiquitous organism T. gondii. Instead, the SAG gene family is a common trait that presumably has an essential, conserved function(s).

  20. Sarcocystis neurona Merozoites Express a Family of Immunogenic Surface Antigens That Are Orthologues of the Toxoplasma gondii Surface Antigens (SAGs) and SAG-Related Sequences†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Daniel K.; Gaji, Rajshekhar Y.; Mroz-Barrett, Meaghan; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Striepen, Boris; Stamper, Shelby

    2005-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the Apicomplexa that causes myelitis and encephalitis in horses but normally cycles between the opossum and small mammals. Analysis of an S. neurona expressed sequence tag (EST) database revealed four paralogous proteins that exhibit clear homology to the family of surface antigens (SAGs) and SAG-related sequences of Toxoplasma gondii. The primary peptide sequences of the S. neurona proteins are consistent with the two-domain structure that has been described for the T. gondii SAGs, and each was predicted to have an amino-terminal signal peptide and a carboxyl-terminal glycolipid anchor addition site, suggesting surface localization. All four proteins were confirmed to be membrane associated and displayed on the surface of S. neurona merozoites. Due to their surface localization and homology to T. gondii surface antigens, these S. neurona proteins were designated SnSAG1, SnSAG2, SnSAG3, and SnSAG4. Consistent with their homology, the SnSAGs elicited a robust immune response in infected and immunized animals, and their conserved structure further suggests that the SnSAGs similarly serve as adhesins for attachment to host cells. Whether the S. neurona SAG family is as extensive as the T. gondii SAG family remains unresolved, but it is probable that additional SnSAGs will be revealed as more S. neurona ESTs are generated. The existence of an SnSAG family in S. neurona indicates that expression of multiple related surface antigens is not unique to the ubiquitous organism T. gondii. Instead, the SAG gene family is a common trait that presumably has an essential, conserved function(s). PMID:15664946

  1. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  2. IgE/FcεRI-Mediated Antigen Cross-Presentation by Dendritic Cells Enhances Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Platzer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies discovered an inverse association between immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated allergies and cancer, implying tumor-protective properties of IgE. However, the underlying immunologic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs is of key importance for anti-tumor immunity because it induces the generation of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs with specificity for tumor antigens. We demonstrate that DCs use IgE and FcεRI, the high-affinity IgE receptor, for cross-presentation and priming of CTLs in response to free soluble antigen at low doses. Importantly, IgE/FcεRI-mediated cross-presentation is a distinct receptor-mediated pathway because it does not require MyD88 signals or IL-12 induction in DCs. Using passive immunization with tumor antigen-specific IgE and DC-based vaccination experiments, we demonstrate that IgE-mediated cross-presentation significantly improves anti-tumor immunity and induces memory responses in vivo. Our findings suggest a cellular mechanism for the tumor-protective features of IgE and expand the known physiological functions of this immunoglobulin.

  3. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Madsen

    Full Text Available Membrane bound mucins are up-regulated and aberrantly glycosylated during malignant transformation in many cancer cells. This results in a negatively charged glycoprotein coat which may protect cancer cells from immune surveillance. However, only limited data have so far demonstrated the critical steps in glycan elongation that make aberrantly glycosylated mucins affect the interaction between cancer cells and cytotoxic effector cells of the immune system. Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr, STn (NeuAcα2-6GalNAc-Ser/Thr, T (Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr, and ST (NeuAcα2-6Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr antigens are recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn. Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN knockout (KO of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps, as demonstrated for glycan elongation beyond Tn and STn, can be important for fine tuning of the immune escape mechanisms in cancer cells.

  4. Quantifying cell binding kinetics mediated by surface-bound blood type B antigen to immobilized antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BaoXia; CHEN Juan; LONG Mian

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion is crucial to many biological processes, such as inflammatory responses, tumor metastasis and thrombosis formation. Recently a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based BIAcore biosensor has been extended to determine cell binding mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions. How such cell binding is quantitatively governed by kinetic rates and regulating factors, however, has been poorly understood. Here we developed a novel assay to determine the binding kinetics of surface-bound biomolecular interactions using a commercial BIAcore 3000 biosensor. Human red blood cells (RBCs) presenting blood group B antigen and CM5 chip bearing immobilized anti-B monoclonal antibody (mAb) were used to obtain the time courses of response unit, or sensorgrams, when flowing RBCs over the chip surface. A cellular kinetic model was proposed to correlate the sensorgrams with kinetic rates. Impacts of regulating factors, such as cell concentration,flow duration and rate, antibody-presenting level, as well as Ph value and osmotic pressure of suspending medium were tested systematically, which imparted the confidence that the approach can be applied to kinetic measurements of cell adhesion mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions.These results provided a new insight into quantifying cell binding using a commercial SPR-based BIAcore biosensor.

  5. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to chlamydial antigens in guinea pigs infected ocularly with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyk, G; Kerlan, R; Stites, D P; Schanzlin, D J; Ostler, H B; Hanna, L; Keshishyan, H; Jawetz, E

    1981-04-01

    Cell-mediated immune response and humoral response to chlamydial antigens were investigated in guinea pigs infected with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Pronounced cell-mediated immune response to the homologous antigen, as well as to two other chlamydial antigens, 6BC (Chlamydia psittaci) and LB-1 (C. trachomatis), occurred in all infected animals. Cell-mediated immune response to GPIC, and to a lesser extent to 6BC and LB-1 as well, was enhanced with time after infection even without the re-inoculation of the infectious agent. Extensive cross-reactions among the three chlamydial antigens during the cell-mediated immune response appeared to be due to shared species-specific and group-reactive antigens. Serum antibody response was pronounced and uniform to GPIC; it was less marked to 6BC and LB-1, with fewer cross-reactions than seen in tests for cell-mediated immunity.

  6. Novel antigens used to detect cell-mediated immune responses over time in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    at third sampling. The resulted showed that PPDj detect a high percentage as MAP positive animals, as this crude antigen mixture is expected to induce non-specific IFN-γ production. However, the tested latency antigens, some secreted proteins and some peptides of the ESAT-6 family detected a comparable......-6 family and 10 hypothetical proteins: 4 latency proteins, 3 secreted proteins, 2 proteins not present in Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) and 1 from an immunological hot spot region. To determine variation of IFN-γ responses, three repeated tests was done with 4 and 5 week intervals...... high percentage of animals as MAP positives. By combining novel antigens higher specificity might be obtained....

  7. Mitotic evolution of Plasmodium falciparum shows a stable core genome but recombination in antigen families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina E R Bopp

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites elude eradication attempts both within the human host and across nations. At the individual level, parasites evade the host immune responses through antigenic variation. At the global level, parasites escape drug pressure through single nucleotide variants and gene copy amplification events conferring drug resistance. Despite their importance to global health, the rates at which these genomic alterations emerge have not been determined. We studied the complete genomes of different Plasmodium falciparum clones that had been propagated asexually over one year in the presence and absence of drug pressure. A combination of whole-genome microarray analysis and next-generation deep resequencing (totaling 14 terabases revealed a stable core genome with only 38 novel single nucleotide variants appearing in seventeen evolved clones (avg. 5.4 per clone. In clones exposed to atovaquone, we found cytochrome b mutations as well as an amplification event encompassing the P. falciparum multidrug resistance associated protein (mrp1 on chromosome 1. We observed 18 large-scale (>1 kb on average deletions of telomere-proximal regions encoding multigene families, involved in immune evasion (9.5×10(-6 structural variants per base pair per generation. Six of these deletions were associated with chromosomal crossovers generated during mitosis. We found only minor differences in rates between genetically distinct strains and between parasites cultured in the presence or absence of drug. Using these derived mutation rates for P. falciparum (1.0-9.7×10(-9 mutations per base pair per generation, we can now model the frequency at which drug or immune resistance alleles will emerge under a well-defined set of assumptions. Further, the detection of mitotic recombination events in var gene families illustrates how multigene families can arise and change over time in P. falciparum. These results will help improve our understanding of how P. falciparum

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis and its association with HLA-DR antigens. I. Cell mediated immune response against connective tissue antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, C M; Pesoa, S A; Onetti, C M; Riera, C M

    1987-04-01

    HLA-DR antigens and cellular sensitivity to native bovine type I and type II collagen and proteoglycans were examined in patients with classic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and normal individuals. Fifty eight percent of patients with RA (n = 88) and 28% of normals (n = 52) were DR4+ (pc less than 0.01). DR4 phenotype was significantly increased in patients with severe disease stages (III-IV), as defined by the ARA criteria, in contrast to those showing mild disease stages (I-II) (p less than 0.05). Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 55 patients and 30 controls were evaluated for the in vitro production of leukocyte inhibitory factor in response to native type I and type II collagen and proteoglycans. By using this assay, cells from the arthritic group exhibited a statistically significant response when stimulated with native type I collagen and proteoglycans. The cellular immune response was not associated with any particular HLA-DR antigens, or to the disease stage or severity.

  9. T-cell receptor V(alpha) usage by effector CD4+Vbeta11+ T cells mediating graft-versus-host disease directed to minor histocompatibility antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiRienzo, Christine G; Murphy, George F; Friedman, Thea M; Korngold, Robert

    2007-03-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) Valpha (TRAV) and Vbeta (TRBV) chains provide the T-cell specificity for recognition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound antigens. However, there is limited information on the diversity of TRAV use within an antigen response. Previous investigation of CD4(+) T-cell-mediated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched C57BL/6 (B6)-->BALB.B irradiated murine model determined that Vbeta11(+) T cells were associated with disease severity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3)-sized spectratype analysis of B6 Vbeta11(+) T cells from the spleens of recipient BALB.B mice undergoing GVHD indicated biased use within the V(alpha)6, 9, 13, 14, 18, and 22 families. To probe deeper into this limited V(alpha) response, the current study was undertaken to further define TRAV-Jalpha (TRAJ) nucleotide sequences found in host-presensitized B6 Vbeta11(+) T cells proliferating in response to in vitro stimulation with BALB.B splenocytes. Using the nonpalindromic adaptor PCR method, we found dominant use of the TRAV13-TRAJ16 transcript combination. Then, using laser capture microdissection, we found use of the identical TRAV-TRAJ nucleotide sequence in areas dominated by infiltrating Vbeta11(+) CD4(+) T cells during the development of GVHD in both the rete-like prominences of the dorsal lingual epithelium and the ileal crypts of the small intestine.

  10. TCRVα usage by effector CD4+Vβ11+ T cells mediating graft-versus-host disease directed to minor histocompatibility antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiRienzo, Christine G.; Murphy, George F.; Friedman, Thea M.; Korngold, Robert

    2007-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) Vα (TRAV) and Vβ (TRBV) chains provide the T cell specificity for recognition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound antigens. However, there is limited information on the diversity of TRAV usage within an antigen response. Previous investigation of CD4+ T cell-mediated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the minor histocompatibility antigen (miHA)-mismatched C57BL/6 (B6) -> BALB.B irradiated murine model determined that Vβ11+ T cells were involved in the severity of disease. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based complementarity determining region-3 (CDR3)-size spectratype analysis of B6 Vβ11+ T cells from the spleens of recipient BALB.B mice undergoing GVHD indicated biased usage within the Vα6, 9, 13, 14, 18, and 22 families. In order to probe deeper into this limited Vα response, the current study was undertaken to further define TRAV-Jα (TRAJ) nucleotide sequences found in host-presensitized B6 Vβ11+ T cells proliferating in response to in vitro stimulation with BALB.B splenocytes. Using the nonpalindromic adaptor-PCR method, we found dominant usage of the TRAV13-TRAJ16 transcript combination. Then, using laser capture microdissection (LMD), we found use of the identical TRAV-TRAJ nucleotide sequence in areas dominated by infiltrating Vβ11+ CD4+ T cells during development of GVHD in both the rete-like prominences of the dorsal lingual epithelium and the ileal crypts of the small intestine. PMID:17317580

  11. Identification of a New Member of the Ep-CAM (17-1A)Tumor-Associated Antigen Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦莉; 陈应华

    2002-01-01

    The tumor-associated antigen Ep-CAM (17-1A antigen), defined by the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 17-1A, has been identified as a 42-kD glycoprotein. The mAb 17-1A has been used for immunotherapy of colorectal cancer. We obtained mAb 19F4 using a synthetic peptide containing antigen determinants of 17-1A antigen. The mAb 19F4 can bind the corresponding dominants of the 17-1A antigen in ELISA. Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mAb 19F4 recognized a 50-kD protein from cell lysates of MCF-7 (breast cancer cell line). Both mAb 19F4 and 17-1A detected a 42-kD protein in the cell lysates of HT-29 (colorectal cancer cell line). The results suggest that new members of the tumor-associated antigen family 17-1A may exist.

  12. Aire mediates thymic expression and tolerance of pancreatic antigens via an unconventional transcriptional mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso-Abeam, Dina; Staats, Kim A; Franckaert, Dean; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Liston, Adrian; Gray, Daniel H D; Dooley, James

    2013-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire), mediates central tolerance of peripheral self. Its activity in thymic epithelial cells (TECs) directs the ectopic expression of thousands of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), causing the deletion of autoreactive thymocytes. The molecular mechanisms orchestrating the breadth of transcriptional regulation by Aire remain unknown. One prominent model capable of explaining both the uniquely high number of Aire-dependent targets and their specificity posits that tissue-specific transcription factors induced by Aire directly activate their canonical targets, exponentially adding to the total number of Aire-dependent TRAs. To test this "Hierarchical Transcription" model, we analysed mice deficient in the pancreatic master transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1), specifically in TECs (Pdx1(ΔFoxn1) ), for the expression and tolerance of pancreatic TRAs. Surprisingly, we found that lack of Pdx1 in TECs did not reduce the transcription of insulin or somatostatin, or alter glucagon expression. Moreover, in a model of thymic deletion driven by a neo-TRA under the control of the insulin promoter, Pdx1 in TECs was not required to affect thymocyte deletion or the generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. These findings suggest that the capacity of Aire to regulate expression of a huge array of TRAs relies solely on an unconventional transcriptional mechanism, without intermediary transcription factors. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. IFNG-mediated immune responses enhance autophagy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Recalde, Gabriela M; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Bigi, Fabiana; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gutierrez, Marisa; Colombo, María I; García, Verónica E

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires IFNG. Besides, IFNG-mediated induction of autophagy suppresses survival of virulent Mtb in macrophage cell lines. We investigated the contribution of autophagy to the defense against Mtb antigen (Mtb-Ag) in cells from tuberculosis patients and healthy donors (HD). Patients were classified as high responders (HR) if their T cells produced significant IFNG against Mtb-Ag; and low responders (LR) when patients showed weak or no T cell responses to Mtb-Ag. The highest autophagy levels were detected in HD cells whereas the lowest quantities were observed in LR patients. Interestingly, upon Mtb-Ag stimulation, we detected a positive correlation between IFNG and MAP1LC3B-II/LC3-II levels. Actually, blockage of Mtb-Ag-induced IFNG markedly reduced autophagy in HR patients whereas addition of limited amounts of IFNG significantly increased autophagy in LR patients. Therefore, autophagy collaborates with human immune responses against Mtb in close association with specific IFNG secreted against the pathogen. PMID:25426782

  14. Inhibition of the function of the FcgammaRIIB by a monoclonal antibody to thymic shared antigen-1, a Ly-6 family antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, L; Shevach, E M

    2001-09-01

    Thymic shared antigen-1 (TSA-1) is a member of the Ly-6 family of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins. While it has been proposed that TSA-1 may play a role in thymic development, a physiological ligand for this antigen has not been identified. Here we report that a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to TSA-1, generated by immunizing a hamster with CD40 ligand (CD40L)-activated B cells, interferes with the function of FcgammaRIIB on splenic B cells and the B-cell lymphoma cell line, M12, by binding to TSA on the same cells. The interaction of anti-TSA with FcgammaRIIB resulted in an inhibition of the ability of the FcgammaRIIB to cross-link and/or aggregate soluble anti-CD3 or soluble anti-Cbeta T-cell receptor (TCR), leading to an inhibition of induction of expression of CD25 and CD69, interleukin (IL)-2 production and proliferation of naive T cells. Cross-blocking studies with mAbs strongly suggested that a physical association exists between TSA-1 and the FcgammaRIIB on the surface of activated B cells and favour the view that a functional intermolecular association exists between these two distinct membrane antigens.

  15. ENDEAVOUR: Phase 3 Multicenter Study of Revusiran (ALN-TTRSC) in Patients With Transthyretin (TTR) Mediated Familial Amyloidotic Cardiomyopathy (FAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Transthyretin (TTR) Mediated Familial Amyloidotic Cardiomyopathy (FAC); Amyloidosis, Hereditary; Amyloid Neuropathies, Familial; Amyloid Neuropathies; Amyloidosis, Hereditary, Transthyretin-Related; Familial Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis

  16. Neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, NF2, induces proteasome-mediated degradation of JC virus T-antigen in human glioblastoma.

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    Sarah Beltrami

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 protein (NF2 has been shown to act as tumor suppressor primarily through its functions as a cytoskeletal scaffold. However, NF2 can also be found in the nucleus, where its role is less clear. Previously, our group has identified JC virus (JCV tumor antigen (T-antigen as a nuclear binding partner for NF2 in tumors derived from JCV T-antigen transgenic mice. The association of NF2 with T-antigen in neuronal origin tumors suggests a potential role for NF2 in regulating the expression of the JCV T-antigen. Here, we report that NF2 suppresses T-antigen protein expression in U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells, which subsequently reduces T-antigen-mediated regulation of the JCV promoter. When T-antigen mRNA was quantified, it was determined that increasing expression of NF2 correlated with an accumulation of T-antigen mRNA; however, a decrease in T-antigen at the protein level was observed. NF2 was found to promote degradation of ubiquitin bound T-antigen protein via a proteasome dependent pathway concomitant with the accumulation of the JCV early mRNA encoding T-antigen. The interaction between T-antigen and NF2 maps to the FERM domain of NF2, which has been shown previously to be responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a ternary complex among NF2, T-antigen, and the tumor suppressor protein, p53 within a glioblastoma cell line. Further, these proteins were detected in various degrees in patient tumor tissue, suggesting that these associations may occur in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NF2 negatively regulates JCV T-antigen expression by proteasome-mediated degradation, and suggest a novel role for NF2 as a suppressor of JCV T-antigen-induced cell cycle regulation.

  17. BMP4 signaling mediates Zeb family in developing mouse tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong-Oh; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Kyoung-Won; Nakagawa, Eizo; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Sung-Won; Jung, Han-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Tooth morphogenesis is regulated by sequential and reciprocal interaction between oral epithelium and neural-crest-derived ectomesenchyme. The interaction is controlled by various signal molecules such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and Wnt. Zeb family is known as a transcription factor, which is essential for neural development and neural-crest-derived tissues, whereas the role of the Zeb family in tooth development remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the expression profiles of Zeb1 and Zeb2 during craniofacial development focusing on mesenchyme of palate, hair follicle, and tooth germ from E12.5 to E16.5. In addition, we examined the interaction between Zeb family and BMP4 during tooth development. Both Zeb1 and Zeb2 were expressed at mesenchyme of the palate, hair follicle, and tooth germ throughout the stages. In the case of tooth germ at the cap stage, the expression of Zeb1 and Zeb2 was lost in epithelium-separated dental mesenchyme. However, the expression of Zeb1 and Zeb2 in the dental mesenchyme was recovered by Bmp4 signaling via BMP4-soaked bead and tissue recombination. Our results suggest that Zeb1 and Zeb2, which were mediated by BMP4, play an important role in neural-crest-derived craniofacial organ morphogenesis, such as tooth development.

  18. Acidosis Promotes Bcl-2 Family-mediated Evasion of Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Christopher; McColl, Karen; Zhong, Fei; Distelhorst, Clark W.

    2012-01-01

    Acidosis arises in solid and lymphoid malignancies secondary to altered nutrient supply and utilization. Tumor acidosis correlates with therapeutic resistance, although the mechanism behind this effect is not fully understood. Here we show that incubation of lymphoma cell lines in acidic conditions (pH 6.5) blocks apoptosis induced by multiple cytotoxic metabolic stresses, including deprivation of glucose or glutamine and treatment with dexamethasone. We sought to examine the role of the Bcl-2 family of apoptosis regulators in this process. Interestingly, we found that acidic culture causes elevation of both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, while also attenuating glutamine starvation-induced elevation of p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and Bim. We confirmed with knockdown studies that these shifts direct survival decisions during starvation and acidosis. Importantly, the promotion of a high anti- to pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member ratio by acidosis renders cells exquisitely sensitive to the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL antagonist ABT-737, suggesting that acidosis causes Bcl-2 family dependence. This dependence appears to be mediated, in part, by the acid-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, GPR65, via a MEK/ERK pathway. PMID:22685289

  19. Myelin-reactive antibodies initiate T cell-mediated CNS autoimmune disease by opsonization of endogenous antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Silke; Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Torke, Sebastian; Häusler, Darius; Winkler, Anne; Stadelmann, Christine; Payne, Natalie; Feldmann, Linda; Saiz, Albert; Reindl, Markus; Lalive, Patrice H; Bernard, Claude C; Brück, Wolfgang; Weber, Martin S

    2016-07-01

    In the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorders, antigen-specific B cells are implicated to act as potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), eliciting waves of inflammatory CNS infiltration. Here, we provide the first evidence that CNS-reactive antibodies (Ab) are similarly capable of initiating an encephalitogenic immune response by targeting endogenous CNS antigen to otherwise inert myeloid APC. In a transgenic mouse model, constitutive production of Ab against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was sufficient to promote spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the absence of B cells, when mice endogenously contained MOG-recognizing T cells. Adoptive transfer studies corroborated that anti-MOG Ab triggered activation and expansion of peripheral MOG-specific T cells in an Fc-dependent manner, subsequently causing EAE. To evaluate the underlying mechanism, anti-MOG Ab were added to a co-culture of myeloid APC and MOG-specific T cells. At otherwise undetected concentrations, anti-MOG Ab enabled Fc-mediated APC recognition of intact MOG; internalized, processed and presented MOG activated naïve T cells to differentiate in an encephalitogenic manner. In a series of translational experiments, anti-MOG Ab from two patients with an acute flare of CNS inflammation likewise facilitated detection of human MOG. Jointly, these observations highlight Ab-mediated opsonization of endogenous CNS auto-antigen as a novel disease- and/or relapse-triggering mechanism in CNS demyelinating disorders.

  20. The Shc family protein adaptor, Rai, negatively regulates T cell antigen receptor signaling by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment and activation.

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    Micol Ferro

    Full Text Available Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neurons, cell survival. Here we have addressed the mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Rai on TCR signaling. We show that Rai interferes with the TCR signaling cascade one of the earliest steps--recruitment of the initiating kinase ZAP-70 to the phosphorylated subunit of the TCR/CD3 complex, which results in a generalized dampening of the downstream signaling events. The inhibitory activity of Rai is associated to its inducible recruitment to phosphorylated CD3, which occurs in the physiological signaling context of the immune synapse. Rai is moreover found as a pre-assembled complex with ZAP-70 and also constitutively interacts with the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K, similar to neuronal cells, notwithstanding the opposite biological outcome, i.e. impairment of PI-3K/Akt activation. The data highlight the ability of Rai to establish interactions with the TCR and key signaling mediators which, either directly (e.g. by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment to the TCR or sequestering ZAP-70/PI3K in the cytosol or indirectly (e.g. by promoting the recruitment of effectors responsible for signal extinction prevent full triggering of the TCR signaling cascade.

  1. AFRICAN-STYLE MEDIATION AND WESTERN-STYLE DIVORCE AND FAMILY MEDIATION: REFLECTIONS FOR THE SOUTH AFRICAN CONTEXT

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    AE Boniface

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both Western-styled mediation and African-styled mediation are practised in South Africa. Each of these models is applied in specific social contexts. In this article a brief explanation of what is meant by the term divorce and family mediation is provided. Thereafter the principles and processes of both Western-styled divorce and family mediation and African-styled group mediation are explored. Attention is given to the roles of mediators in both of these models as well as the ubuntu-styled values found in African group mediation. In Africa, there is a tradition of family neighbourhood negotiation facilitated by elders and an attitude of togetherness in the spirit of humanhood. Both of these show a commitment to the community concerned and a comprehensive view of life. In Africa conflicts are viewed as non-isolated events and are viewed in their social contexts. Not only are consequences for the disputing parties taken into account but also consequences for others in their families. These methods can be found in present-day methods, which are either used independently of imported Western structures or used alternatively to such structures. In this article the concept of mediation circles, as currently found in Western-styled mediation are also covered. Additionally, the provisions of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005 referring to mediation as well as the provisions of the Child Justice Act 75 of 2008 and family group conferencing in the realm of restorative justice in South Africa are critiqued. It is suggested that divorce and family mediation can learn from the principles of restorative justice applied during family group conferencing as well as from African-styled group mediation.

  2. Bovine lactoferrin counteracts Toll-like receptor mediated activation signals in antigen presenting cells.

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    Patrizia Puddu

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin (LF, a key element in mammalian immune system, plays pivotal roles in host defence against infection and excessive inflammation. Its protective effects range from direct antimicrobial activities against a large panel of microbes, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, to antinflammatory and anticancer activities. In this study, we show that monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs generated in the presence of bovine LF (bLF fail to undergo activation by up-modulating CD83, co-stimulatory and major histocompatibility complex molecules, and cytokine/chemokine secretion. Moreover, these cells are weak activators of T cell proliferation and retain antigen uptake activity. Consistent with an impaired maturation, bLF-MD-DC primed T lymphocytes exhibit a functional unresponsiveness characterized by reduced expression of CD154 and impaired expression of IFN-γ and IL-2. The observed imunosuppressive effects correlate with an increased expression of molecules with negative regulatory functions (i.e. immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 and programmed death ligand 1, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3. Interestingly, bLF-MD-DCs produce IL-6 and exhibit constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. Conversely, bLF exposure of already differentiated MD-DCs completely fails to induce IL-6, and partially inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR agonist-induced activation. Cell-specific differences in bLF internalization likely account for the distinct response elicited by bLF in monocytes versus immature DCs, providing a mechanistic base for its multiple effects. These results indicate that bLF exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity by skewing monocyte differentiation into DCs with impaired capacity to undergo activation and to promote Th1 responses. Overall, these bLF-mediated effects may represent a strategy to block excessive DC activation upon TLR-induced inflammation, adding

  3. Identification of Leishmania proteins preferentially released in infected cells using change mediated antigen technology (CMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kima, Peter E; Bonilla, J Alfredo; Cho, Eumin; Ndjamen, Blaise; Canton, Johnathan; Leal, Nicole; Handfield, Martin

    2010-10-05

    Although Leishmania parasites have been shown to modulate their host cell's responses to multiple stimuli, there is limited evidence that parasite molecules are released into infected cells. In this study, we present an implementation of the change mediated antigen technology (CMAT) to identify parasite molecules that are preferentially expressed in infected cells. Sera from mice immunized with cell lysates prepared from L. donovani or L. pifanoi-infected macrophages were adsorbed with lysates of axenically grown amastigotes of L. donovani or L. pifanoi, respectively, as well as uninfected macrophages. The sera were then used to screen inducible parasite expression libraries constructed with genomic DNA. Eleven clones from the L. pifanoi and the L. donovani screen were selected to evaluate the characteristics of the molecules identified by this approach. The CMAT screen identified genes whose homologs encode molecules with unknown function as well as genes that had previously been shown to be preferentially expressed in the amastigote form of the parasite. In addition a variant of Tryparedoxin peroxidase that is preferentially expressed within infected cells was identified. Antisera that were then raised to recombinant products of the clones were used to validate that the endogenous molecules are preferentially expressed in infected cells. Evaluation of the distribution of the endogenous molecules in infected cells showed that some of these molecules are secreted into parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs) and that they then traffic out of PVs in vesicles with distinct morphologies. This study is a proof of concept study that the CMAT approach can be applied to identify putative Leishmania parasite effectors molecules that are preferentially expressed in infected cells. In addition we provide evidence that Leishmania molecules traffic out of the PV into the host cell cytosol and nucleus.

  4. Identification of Leishmania proteins preferentially released in infected cells using change mediated antigen technology (CMAT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Kima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Leishmania parasites have been shown to modulate their host cell's responses to multiple stimuli, there is limited evidence that parasite molecules are released into infected cells. In this study, we present an implementation of the change mediated antigen technology (CMAT to identify parasite molecules that are preferentially expressed in infected cells. Sera from mice immunized with cell lysates prepared from L. donovani or L. pifanoi-infected macrophages were adsorbed with lysates of axenically grown amastigotes of L. donovani or L. pifanoi, respectively, as well as uninfected macrophages. The sera were then used to screen inducible parasite expression libraries constructed with genomic DNA. Eleven clones from the L. pifanoi and the L. donovani screen were selected to evaluate the characteristics of the molecules identified by this approach. The CMAT screen identified genes whose homologs encode molecules with unknown function as well as genes that had previously been shown to be preferentially expressed in the amastigote form of the parasite. In addition a variant of Tryparedoxin peroxidase that is preferentially expressed within infected cells was identified. Antisera that were then raised to recombinant products of the clones were used to validate that the endogenous molecules are preferentially expressed in infected cells. Evaluation of the distribution of the endogenous molecules in infected cells showed that some of these molecules are secreted into parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs and that they then traffic out of PVs in vesicles with distinct morphologies. This study is a proof of concept study that the CMAT approach can be applied to identify putative Leishmania parasite effectors molecules that are preferentially expressed in infected cells. In addition we provide evidence that Leishmania molecules traffic out of the PV into the host cell cytosol and nucleus.

  5. An inducible transgenic mouse model for immune mediated hepatitis showing clearance of antigen expressing hepatocytes by CD8+ T cells.

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    Marcin Cebula

    Full Text Available The liver has the ability to prime immune responses against neo antigens provided upon infections. However, T cell immunity in liver is uniquely modulated by the complex tolerogenic property of this organ that has to also cope with foreign agents such as endotoxins or food antigens. In this respect, the nature of intrahepatic T cell responses remains to be fully characterized. To gain deeper insight into the mechanisms that regulate the CD8+ T cell responses in the liver, we established a novel OVA_X_CreER(T2 mouse model. Upon tamoxifen administration OVA antigen expression is observed in a fraction of hepatocytes, resulting in a mosaic expression pattern. To elucidate the cross-talk of CD8+ T cells with antigen-expressing hepatocytes, we adoptively transferred K(b/OVA257-264-specific OT-I T cells to OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice or generated triple transgenic OVA_X CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice. OT-I T cells become activated in OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice and induce an acute and transient hepatitis accompanied by liver damage. In OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice, OVA induction triggers an OT-I T cell mediated, fulminant hepatitis resulting in 50% mortality. Surviving mice manifest a long lasting hepatitis, and recover after 9 weeks. In these experimental settings, recovery from hepatitis correlates with a complete loss of OVA expression indicating efficient clearance of the antigen-expressing hepatocytes. Moreover, a relapse of hepatitis can be induced upon re-induction of cured OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice indicating absence of tolerogenic mechanisms. This pathogen-free, conditional mouse model has the advantage of tamoxifen inducible tissue specific antigen expression that reflects the heterogeneity of viral antigen expression and enables the study of intrahepatic immune responses to both de novo and persistent antigen. It allows following the course of intrahepatic immune responses: initiation, the acute phase and antigen clearance.

  6. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikado, Hideto [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko [Laboratory of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, BioMedical Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takai, Toshiro, E-mail: t-takai@juntendo.ac.jp [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity.

  7. The relationship between family functioning and caregiving appraisal of dementia family caregivers: caregiving self-efficacy as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Lian-Hua

    2016-12-21

    The aim of this study was to explore caregiving self-efficacy as a mediator for the association between family functioning and caregiving appraisal of dementia family caregivers in Taiwan. This study adopted a cross-sectional correlational design. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 115 dyads of dementia patients and family caregivers from the outpatient neurological clinics of two hospitals in northern Taiwan. Data were gathered through interviews with a structured questionnaire, which included demographic characteristics for caregivers and patients, family functioning, caregiving self-efficacy, as well as positive and negative aspects of caregiving appraisal. Family functioning, patients' activities of daily living score, Neuropsychiatric Inventory caregiver distress, and three domains of self-efficacy were significantly associated with caregiver burden. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that self-efficacy for obtaining respite (SE-OR) significantly explained 20.5% of the variance in caregiver esteem. Caregiver perceived worsened health status, family functioning, and SE-OR significantly explained 59% of the variance in caregiver burden. The mediation test only supported the partially mediating role of SE-OR on the relationship between family functioning and caregiver burden, while the mediating effect of self-efficacy for responding to disruptive behaviours and controlling upsetting thoughts were insignificant. Our findings provided preliminary evidence for health professionals recommending that future studies should assess the family dynamic and health problems of caregivers, and develop appropriate family-centred interventions that focus on strengthening interfamily support and respite services to alleviate caregiver burden.

  8. Antibody-mediated immunity induced by engineered Escherichia coli OMVs carrying heterologous antigens in their lumen

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    Laura Fantappiè

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs from Gram-negative bacteria are gaining increasing attention as vaccine platform for their built-in adjuvanticity and for their potential use as carriers of heterologous antigens. These 2 properties offer the opportunity to make highly effective, easy to produce multi-valent vaccines. OMVs can be loaded with foreign antigens by targeting protein expression either to the outer membrane or to the periplasm of the OMV-producing strain. Periplasmic expression is simple and relatively efficient but leads to the accumulation of recombinant antigens in the lumen of OMVs and the ability of OMVs carrying internalized antigens to induce antigen-specific antibody responses has been only marginally investigated and is considered to be sub-optimal. Methods: We have systematically analyzed in qualitative and quantitative terms antibody responses induced by OMVs carrying different heterologous antigens in their lumen. Group A Streptococcus (GAS Slo, SpyCEP, Spy0269 and Group B Streptococcus (GBS SAM_1372 were fused to the OmpA leader sequence for secretion and expressed in Escherichia coli. OMVs from the recombinant strains were purified and tested for immunogenicity and protective activity. Results: All proteins were incorporated into the OMVs lumen in their native conformation. Upon mice immunization, OMVs induced high functional antibody titers against the recombinant proteins. Furthermore, immunization with Slo-OMVs and SpyCEP-OMVs protected mice against GAS lethal challenge. Conclusions: The efficiency of antigen delivery to the vesicular lumen via periplasmic expression, and the surprisingly high immunogenicity and protective activity of OMVs carrying internalized recombinant antigens further strengthens the potential of OMVs as vaccine platform.

  9. Unusual Water-mediated Antigenic Recognition of the Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argiriadi, Maria A.; Xiang, Tao; Wu, Chengbin; Ghayur, Tariq; Borhani, David W.; (Abbott)

    2009-10-21

    The unique cytokine interleukin-18 (IL-18) acts synergistically with IL-12 to regulate T-helper 1 and 2 lymphocytes and, as such, seems to underlie the pathogenesis of various autoimmune and allergic diseases. Several anti-IL-18 agents are in clinical development, including the recombinant human antibody ABT-325, which is entering trials for autoimmune diseases. Given competing cytokine/receptor and cytokine/receptor decoy interactions, understanding the structural basis for recognition is critical for effective development of anti-cytokine therapies. Here we report three crystal structures: the murine antibody 125-2H Fab fragment bound to human IL-18, at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution; the 125-2H Fab (2.3 {angstrom}); and the ABT-325 Fab (1.5 {angstrom}). These structures, along with human/mouse IL-18 chimera binding data, allow us to make three key observations relevant to the biology and antigenic recognition of IL-18 and related cytokines. First, several IL-18 residues shift dramatically (>10 {angstrom}) upon binding 125-2H, compared with unbound IL-18 (Kato, Z., Jee, J., Shikano, H., Mishima, M., Ohki, I., Ohnishi, H., Li, A., Hashimoto, K., Matsukuma, E., Omoya, K., Yamamoto, Y., Yoneda, T., Hara, T., Kondo, N., and Shirakawa, M. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 966-971). IL-18 thus exhibits plasticity that may be common to its interactions with other receptors. Related cytokines may exhibit similar plasticity. Second, ABT-325 and 125-2H differ significantly in combining site character and architecture, thus explaining their ability to bind IL-18 simultaneously at distinct epitopes. These data allow us to define the likely ABT-325 epitope and thereby explain the distinct neutralizing mechanisms of both antibodies. Third, given the high 125-2H potency, 10 well ordered water molecules are trapped upon complex formation in a cavity between two IL-18 loops and all six 125-2H complementarity-determining regions. Thus, counterintuitively, tight and specific antibody

  10. Stage and strain specific expression of the tandemly repeated 90 kDa surface antigen gene family in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, C A; Wrightsman, R A; Manning, J E

    1988-04-01

    A recombinant cDNA library constructed in the expression vector lambda gtll using mRNA from the trypomastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi was screened with two monoclonal antibodies that have been shown to react with a 105 kDa and a 90 kDa surface antigen in trypomastigotes of the Peru and Y strains of T. cruzi. One recombinant lambda phage, designated Tcc-20, was reactive to both monoclonals. The beta-galactosidase/T. cruzi hybrid protein encoded in Tcc-20 is recognized by the monoclonal antibodies and by serum antibodies from mice infected with strains of T. cruzi which contain the 90 kDa antigen. Antibodies immunoselected from serum of mice infected with the Peru strain by adsorption to Tcc-20 fusion protein react specifically with a 90 kDa polypeptide in trypomastigote but not epimastigote lysates of T. cruzi. The mRNA complementary to the DNA insert in Tcc-20 is present only in those stages and strains of T. cruzi which express the 90 kDa surface antigen. These characteristics are strong evidence that the T. cruzi DNA fragment cloned into Tcc-20 encodes a portion of the 90 kDa surface antigen. The gene(s) which encodes this polypeptide is shown to be present in approximately 20 copies per haploid genome and most, and possibly all, of the copies are found in a tandemly linked multigene family.

  11. Vaccination with TAT-antigen fusion protein induces protective, CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity against Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Katharina; Brosch, Sven; Butsch, Florian; Tada, Yayoi; Shibagaki, Naotaka; Udey, Mark C; von Stebut, Esther

    2010-11-01

    In murine leishmaniasis, healing is mediated by IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Thus, an efficacious vaccine should induce Th1 and Tc1 cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with exogenous proteins primarily induce strong CD4-dependent immunity; induction of CD8 responses has proven to be difficult. We evaluated the immunogenicity of fusion proteins comprising the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT and the Leishmania antigen LACK (Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated C kinase), as TAT-fusion proteins facilitate major histocompatibility complex class I-dependent antigen presentation. In vitro, TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs induced stronger proliferation of Leishmania-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with DCs incubated with LACK alone. Vaccination with TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs or fusion proteins plus adjuvant in vivo significantly improved disease outcome in Leishmania major-infected mice and was superior to vaccination with DCs treated with LACK alone. Vaccination with DC+TAT-LACK resulted in stronger proliferation of CD8(+) T cells when compared with immunization with DC+LACK. Upon depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells, TAT-LACK-mediated protection was lost. TAT-LACK-pulsed IL-12p40-deficient DCs did not promote protection in vivo. In summary, these data show that TAT-fusion proteins are superior in activating Leishmania-specific Tc1 cells when compared with antigen alone and suggest that IL-12-dependent preferential induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cells promotes significant protection against this important human pathogen.

  12. Surface proteome analysis and characterization of surface cell antigen (Sca or autotransporter family of Rickettsia typhi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandra T Sears

    Full Text Available Surface proteins of the obligate intracellular bacterium Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine or endemic typhus fever, comprise an important interface for host-pathogen interactions including adherence, invasion and survival in the host cytoplasm. In this report, we present analyses of the surface exposed proteins of R. typhi based on a suite of predictive algorithms complemented by experimental surface-labeling with thiol-cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin and identification of labeled peptides by LC MS/MS. Further, we focus on proteins belonging to the surface cell antigen (Sca autotransporter (AT family which are known to be involved in rickettsial infection of mammalian cells. Each species of Rickettsia has a different complement of sca genes in various states; R. typhi, has genes sca1 thru sca5. In silico analyses indicate divergence of the Sca paralogs across the four Rickettsia groups and concur with previous evidence of positive selection. Transcripts for each sca were detected during infection of L929 cells and four of the five Sca proteins were detected in the surface proteome analysis. We observed that each R. typhi Sca protein is expressed during in vitro infections and selected Sca proteins were expressed during in vivo infections. Using biotin-affinity pull down assays, negative staining electron microscopy, and flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the Sca proteins in R. typhi are localized to the surface of the bacteria. All Scas were detected during infection of L929 cells by immunogold electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrate that Scas 1-3 and 5 are expressed in the spleens of infected Sprague-Dawley rats and Scas 3, 4 and 5 are expressed in cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis. Sca proteins may be crucial in the recognition and invasion of different host cell types. In short, continuous expression of all Scas may ensure that rickettsiae are primed i to infect mammalian cells should the flea bite a host, ii to remain

  13. Antigenicity and protective efficacy of a Leishmania amastigote-specific protein, member of the super-oxygenase family, against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian T Martins

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate a hypothetical Leishmania amastigote-specific protein (LiHyp1, previously identified by an immunoproteomic approach performed in Leishmania infantum, which showed homology to the super-oxygenase gene family, attempting to select a new candidate antigen for specific serodiagnosis, as well as to compose a vaccine against VL.The LiHyp1 DNA sequence was cloned; the recombinant protein (rLiHyp1 was purified and evaluated for its antigenicity and immunogenicity. The rLiHyp1 protein was recognized by antibodies from sera of asymptomatic and symptomatic animals with canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL, but presented no cross-reactivity with sera of dogs vaccinated with Leish-Tec, a Brazilian commercial vaccine; with Chagas' disease or healthy animals. In addition, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rLiHyp1 plus saponin was evaluated in BALB/c mice challenged subcutaneously with virulent L. infantum promastigotes. rLiHyp1 plus saponin vaccinated mice showed a high and specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with the recombinant protein. Immunized and infected mice, as compared to the control groups (saline and saponin, showed significant reductions in the number of parasites found in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and in the paws' draining lymph nodes. Protection was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ, produced mainly by CD4 T cells. In these mice, a decrease in the parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 response could also be observed.The present study showed that this Leishmania oxygenase amastigote-specific protein can be used for a more sensitive and specific serodiagnosis of asymptomatic and symptomatic CVL and, when combined with a Th1-type adjuvant, can also be employ as a candidate antigen to develop vaccines against VL.

  14. T cells bearing a chimeric antigen receptor against prostate-specific membrane antigen mediate vascular disruption and result in tumor regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Stephen P; Kim, Soorin; Motz, Gregory T; Alatzoglou, Dimitrios; Li, Chunsheng; Irving, Melita; Powell, Daniel J; Coukos, George

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant blood vessels enable tumor growth, provide a barrier to immune infiltration, and serve as a source of protumorigenic signals. Targeting tumor blood vessels for destruction, or tumor vascular disruption therapy, can therefore provide significant therapeutic benefit. Here, we describe the ability of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-bearing T cells to recognize human prostate-specific membrane antigen (hPSMA) on endothelial targets in vitro as well as in vivo. CAR T cells were generated using the anti-PSMA scFv, J591, and the intracellular signaling domains: CD3ζ, CD28, and/or CD137/4-1BB. We found that all anti-hPSMA CAR T cells recognized and eliminated PSMA(+) endothelial targets in vitro, regardless of the signaling domain. T cells bearing the third-generation anti-hPSMA CAR, P28BBζ, were able to recognize and kill primary human endothelial cells isolated from gynecologic cancers. In addition, the P28BBζ CAR T cells mediated regression of hPSMA-expressing vascular neoplasms in mice. Finally, in murine models of ovarian cancers populated by murine vessels expressing hPSMA, the P28BBζ CAR T cells were able to ablate PSMA(+) vessels, cause secondary depletion of tumor cells, and reduce tumor burden. Taken together, these results provide a strong rationale for the use of CAR T cells as agents of tumor vascular disruption, specifically those targeting PSMA. Cancer Immunol Res; 3(1); 68-84. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Family Material Hardship and Chinese Adolescents’ Problem Behaviors: A Moderated Mediation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wenqiang Sun; Dongping Li; Wei Zhang; Zhenzhou Bao; Yanhui Wang

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we examined a moderated mediation model using the risk and resilience framework. Specifically, the impact of family material hardship on adolescent problem behaviors was examined in a Chinese sample; we used the family stress model framework to investigate parental depression and negative parenting as potential mediators of the relation between family material hardship and adolescents' problem behaviors. In addition, based on resilience theory, we investigated adolescent...

  16. Novel antigens used to detect cell-mediated immune responses over time in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection of cattle can be detected by measuring specific cell mediated immune responses, using the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) test. Available IFN-γ tests are using purified protein derivatives of MAP (PPDj) which are crude products...... on the same 30 heifers from a known MAP infected herd. Determination of cut-off for each antigen was based on samples from a non-infected herd, including 60 heifers. Based on PPDj stimulations, more than 50% of the heifers tested MAP positive at the first two samplings, whereas only 20% tested positive...

  17. Lipid motif of a bacterial antigen mediates immune responses via TLR2 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit A Lugade

    Full Text Available The cross-talk between the innate and the adaptive immune system is facilitated by the initial interaction of antigen with dendritic cells. As DCs express a large array of TLRs, evidence has accumulated that engagement of these molecules contributes to the activation of adaptive immunity. We have evaluated the immunostimulatory role of the highly-conserved outer membrane lipoprotein P6 from non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI to determine whether the presence of the lipid motif plays a critical role on its immunogenicity. We undertook a systematic analysis of the role that the lipid motif plays in the activation of DCs and the subsequent stimulation of antigen-specific T and B cells. To facilitate our studies, recombinant P6 protein that lacked the lipid motif was generated. Mice immunized with non-lipidated rP6 were unable to elicit high titers of anti-P6 Ig. Expression of the lipid motif on P6 was also required for proliferation and cytokine secretion by antigen-specific T cells. Upregulation of T cell costimulatory molecules was abrogated in DCs exposed to non-lipidated rP6 and in TLR2(-/- DCs exposed to native P6, thereby resulting in diminished adaptive immune responses. Absence of either the lipid motif on the antigen or TLR2 expression resulted in diminished cytokine production from stimulated DCs. Collectively, our data suggest that the lipid motif of the lipoprotein antigen is essential for triggering TLR2 signaling and effective stimulation of APCs. Our studies establish the pivotal role of a bacterial lipid motif on activating both innate and adaptive immune responses to an otherwise poorly immunogenic protein antigen.

  18. Comparative case control study of clinical features and human leukocyte antigen susceptibility between familial and nonfamilial vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misri Rachita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various studies worldwide suggest that human leukocyte antigen (HLA region may be involved in the genetic susceptibility of vitiligo but little information is available from India. Aim: To find the HLA associated susceptibility to develop vitiligo in Indian patients and to detect role of HLA in familial vitiligo. Methods: This was a case controlled study which included all patients suffering from vitiligo over a period of one and half years. Clinical details were noted and sera collected from these patients were screened for the presence of HLA class I antibodies. The clinical features and HLA antigens were assessed and comparison was made between patients with familial and nonfamilial vitiligo. Results: Out of 114 patients studied, 84 had family history and 30 had no family history. Patients with family history of vitiligo have higher chances of acquiring vitiligo if first degree relatives are affected compared to if second degree relatives are affected. Family history of vitiligo is associated with an early onset of vitiligo (< 20 years. There was no statistically significant difference in the type, stability, and severity of vitiligo in both the groups. HLA results in both the groups revealed increase in HLA A2, A11, A31, A33, B17, B35, B40, and B44 alleles while HLA A9, B13, and B53 alleles were decreased. Family history was associated with HLA A2, A28, A31, and B44 alleles. Early onset of vitiligo (< 20 years was significantly associated with HLA A2, A11, B17, B35, and B44 alleles. The patients with severe affection (> 10% area showed in significant association with HLA A10 and B8. Conclusion: Family history of vitiligo is associated with an early onset of vitiligo. There is no correlation of family history with the type of vitiligo, stability of lesions, and areas involved. Severity is not associated with family history. Apart from other alleles, alleles A2, and B44 play a significant role in vitiligo in the Indian patients.

  19. Characterization of cDNA from the miracidial antigen family of Schistosoma japonicum (Chinese strain)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余传信; 平山謙二; 朱荫昌; 菊池三惠子; 殷旭仁

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify the egg antigens related to the formation of hepatic granulomas and fibrosis of Schistosomiasis japonica.Methods The egg cDNA library of Schistosoma japonicum (S.japonicum) was constructed and screened by immunological methods with the pooled sera of advanced schistosomiasis patients. The inserted foreign DNA fragments of positive clones were sequenced. The sequence data were analyzed using Wdnasis 2.5 and compared with Genebank data using blast software. Conclusion The cDNA sequence of the miracidial antigen of S.japonicum (Chinese strain) was obtained for the first time.

  20. C-Terminal Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin-Mediated Antigen Delivery for Nasal Pneumococcal Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko Suzuki

    Full Text Available Efficient vaccine delivery to mucosal tissues including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. We previously reported that claudin-4 was highly expressed on the epithelium of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT and thus claudin-4-targeting using C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE effectively delivered fused antigen to NALT and consequently induced antigen-specific immune responses. In this study, we applied the C-CPE-based vaccine delivery system to develop a nasal pneumococcal vaccine. We fused C-CPE with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA, an important antigen for the induction of protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, (PspA-C-CPE. PspA-C-CPE binds to claudin-4 and thus efficiently attaches to NALT epithelium, including antigen-sampling M cells. Nasal immunization with PspA-C-CPE induced PspA-specific IgG in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF as well as IgA in the nasal wash and BALF. These immune responses were sufficient to protect against pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that C-CPE is an efficient vaccine delivery system for the development of nasal vaccines against pneumococcal infection.

  1. Antigen-43-mediated autoaggregation of Escherichia coli is blocked by fimbriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Chakraborty, Trinad; Klemm, Per

    1999-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43), the product of the flu gene, is a surface-displayed autotransporter protein of Escherichia coli. Ag43 is responsible for the autoaggregation and flocculation of static liquid cultures of many E. coli strains. The expression of Ag43 has been reported to be phase variable...

  2. Personality variables as mediators and moderators of family history risk for alcoholism: conceptual and methodological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogosch, F; Chassin, L; Sher, K J

    1990-07-01

    Recently there has been great interest in possible mediators and moderators of family history risk for alcoholism. However, previous studies have failed to employ appropriate designs and data analytic strategies to identify moderators and mediators. This article uses a large data set to illustrate such analyses. In the current data, both presumed personality risk and dispositional self-awareness were found to play moderator (rather than mediator) roles. The conceptual, methodological and data analytic implications of the mediator-moderator distinction are discussed.

  3. Stigma by association and family burden among family members of people with mental illness: the mediating role of coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, Remko L M; Pryor, John B; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E R

    2016-09-01

    When someone has a mental illness, family members may share the experience of stigma. Past research has established that family members' experiences of stigma by association predict psychological distress and lower quality-of-life. The present study, conducted with 503 family members of people with mental illness examined the prevalence of 14 different coping strategies. Of greater importance, we examined the role of these coping strategies as mediators of the relationships between stigma by association and family burden, on the one hand, and outcomes, such as psychological distress and quality-of-life, on the other. The results showed that both perceived stigma by association and family burden are associated with greater psychological distress and lower quality-of-life, and that most coping strategies mediate these relationships. Adaptive coping strategies were related to reduced negative outcomes, while most maladaptive coping strategies were related to enhanced negative outcomes. Implications for intervention development are discussed.

  4. Familial occurrence of subacute thyroiditis associated with human leukocyte antigen-B35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, AB; Roozendaal, C; Dullaart, RPF

    2004-01-01

    Subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is a spontaneously remitting inflammatory disorder of the thyroid, associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B35, and may be virally induced in genetically predisposed individuals. A 57-year-old Caucasian man presented with symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as enlarg

  5. Combination of small interfering RNAs mediates greater inhibition of human hepatitis B virus replication and antigen expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhe; XU Ze-feng; YE Jing-jia; YAO Hang-ping; ZHENG Shu; DING Jia-yi

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the inhibitory effect mediated by combination of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting different sites of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcripts on the viral replication and antigen expression in vitro. Methods: (1) Seven siRNAs targeting surface (S), polymerase (P) or precore (PreC) region ofHBV genome were designed and chemically synthesized.(2) HBV-producing HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with or without siRNAs for 72 h. (3) HBsAg and HBeAg in the cell culture medium were detected by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay. (4) Intracellular viral DNA was quantified by real-time PCR(Polymerase Chain Reaction). (5) HBV viral mRNA was reverse transcribed and quantified by real-time PCR. (6) The change of cell cycle and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. Results: Our data demonstrated that synthetic small interfering RNAs(siRNAs) targeting S and PreC gene could efficiently and specifically inhibit HBV replication and antigen expression. The expression of HBsAg and HBeAg and the replication of HBV could be specifically inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by siRNAs.Furthermore, our results showed that the combination of siRNAs targeting various regions could inhibit HBV replication and antigen expression in a more efficient way than the use of single siRNA at the same final concentration. No apoptotic change was observed in the cell after siRNA treatment. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that siRNAs exerted robust and specific inhibition on HBV replication and antigen expression in a cell culture system and combination of siRNAs targeting different regions exhibited more potency.

  6. Family socioeconomic status, family health, and changes in students' math achievement across high school: A mediational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ashley Brooke

    2015-09-01

    In response to recent calls to integrate understandings of socioeconomic disparities in health with understandings of socioeconomic disparities in academic achievement, this study tested a mediational model whereby family socioeconomic status predicted gains in academic achievement across high school through its impact on both student and parent health. Data on over 8000 high school students in the U.S. were obtained from wave 1 (2009-2010) and wave 2 (2012) of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09), and structural equation modeling with latent difference scores was used to determine the role of family health problems in mediating the well-established link between family SES and gains in academic achievement. Using both static and dynamic indicators of family SES, support was found for this mediational model. Higher family SES in 9th grade reduced the probability of students and their parents experiencing a serious health problem in high school, thereby promoting growth in academic achievement. In addition, parent and student health problems mediated the effect of changes in family SES across high school on math achievement gains. Results emphasize the importance of considering the dynamic nature of SES and that both student and parent health should be considered in understanding SES-related disparities in academic achievement. This relational process provides new mechanisms for understanding the intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic status and the status attainment process more broadly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure of the C-terminal domain of AspA (antigen I/II-family protein from Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hall

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes can cause an array of diseases in humans, including moderate infections such as pharyngitis (strep throat as well as life threatening conditions such as necrotizing fasciitis and puerperal fever. The antigen I/II family proteins are cell wall anchored adhesin proteins found on the surfaces of most oral streptococci and are involved in host colonization and biofilm formation. In the present study we have determined the crystal structure of the C2–3-domain of the antigen I/II type protein AspA from S. pyogenes M type 28. The structure was solved to 1.8 Å resolution and shows that the C2–3-domain is comprised of two structurally similar DEv-IgG motifs, designated C2 and C3, both containing a stabilizing covalent isopeptide bond. Furthermore a metal binding site is identified, containing a bound calcium ion. Despite relatively low sequence identity, interestingly, the overall structure shares high similarity to the C2–3-domains of antigen I/II proteins from Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans, although certain parts of the structure exhibit distinct features. In summary this work constitutes the first step in the full structure determination of the AspA protein from S. pyogenes.

  8. The MASP family of Trypanosoma cruzi: changes in gene expression and antigenic profile during the acute phase of experimental infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lopes dos Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a debilitating illness that affects millions of people in the Americas. A major finding of the T. cruzi genome project was the discovery of a novel multigene family composed of approximately 1,300 genes that encode mucin-associated surface proteins (MASPs. The high level of polymorphism of the MASP family associated with its localization at the surface of infective forms of the parasite suggests that MASP participates in host-parasite interactions. We speculate that the large repertoire of MASP sequences may contribute to the ability of T. cruzi to infect several host cell types and/or participate in host immune evasion mechanisms. METHODS: By sequencing seven cDNA libraries, we analyzed the MASP expression profile in trypomastigotes derived from distinct host cells and after sequential passages in acutely infected mice. Additionally, to investigate the MASP antigenic profile, we performed B-cell epitope prediction on MASP proteins and designed a MASP-specific peptide array with 110 putative epitopes, which was screened with sera from acutely infected mice. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: We observed differential expression of a few MASP genes between trypomastigotes derived from epithelial and myoblast cell lines. The more pronounced MASP expression changes were observed between bloodstream and tissue-culture trypomastigotes and between bloodstream forms from sequential passages in acutely infected mice. Moreover, we demonstrated that different MASP members were expressed during the acute T. cruzi infection and constitute parasite antigens that are recognized by IgG and IgM antibodies. We also found that distinct MASP peptides could trigger different antibody responses and that the antibody level against a given peptide may vary after sequential passages in mice. We speculate that changes in the large repertoire of MASP antigenic peptides during an infection may contribute to

  9. Museum signage as distributed mediation to encourage family learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungyoun

    Many prior studies conducted in museums have focused primarily on exhibits as the main objects for learning. Less progress has been made in studying signage as another meaning-making tool in museums. The present study was designed to understand the role of signage in family learning by answering the following research questions, "How does signage about exhibit content or interaction strategies affect parents' and children's learning and their engagement?" and "What is the role of parent prior knowledge on parents' and children's learning and their engagement?" To address these questions, 45 parent-child dyads with children aged six to seven years were recruited to engage with two exhibits about cars. Fifteen parent-child dyads were assigned to each of three conditions, created by two different types of signage: (1) Content and interaction signage condition, (2) Content signage condition, and (3) No signage condition. In each condition, eight parents with low knowledge in the car domain and seven parents with high knowledge were recruited. Findings showed that parents and children learned and engaged differently across the three signage conditions. Both children and parents in the conditions with signage learned more than children and parents in the no signage condition. By using information from signage, parents in the two signage conditions were able to identify the content of the exhibit more quickly and to shape appropriate educational messages in their conversations with children. Findings also showed that parents with high knowledge were more likely to have the exhibit-focused engagement, which was often oriented to their own interpretation and not always beneficial for children's learning. However, by showing that parent-child dyads in the content and interaction signage condition were most likely to operate and observe the exhibit appropriately and most likely to describe evidence and make appropriate inferences, this study suggested that the interaction

  10. CD4+ T cell-mediated presentation of non-infectious HIV-1virion antigens to HIV-specific CD8+ T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jian-qing; Franco Lori; Julianna Lisziewicz

    2006-01-01

    Background The mechanism of chronic immune activation and impairment of HIV-specific immune responses during chronic infection is not fully understood. However, it is known that high immune activation leads to more rapid progression to AIDS. We hypothesize that CD4+ T cell-mediated viral antigen presentation contributes to this pathologic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals.Methods HIV-specific T cells, responding to noninfectious HIV-1 virions as antigen, were measured by flow cytometric assays. These experimental conditions reflect the in vivo condition where noninfectious HIV-1 represents more than 99% of the antigens.Results CD4+ T cells purified from HIV-infected individuals were capable of cross presenting exogenous noninfectious HIV-1 virions to HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells. Cross presentation required the entry of HIV-1 to CD4+ T cells and antigen translocation from endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex. Blocking CD4+mediated activation of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and redirecting the viral antigens to antigen presenting cells improved HIV-specific T cell responses.Conclusions One possible cause of chronic immune activation and impairment of HIV-1 specific T cell responses is represented by HIV-1 harboring CD4+ T cells cross presenting HIV-1 antigen to activate CD8+ T cells. This new mechanism provides the first evidence that cross presentation of noninfectious HIV-1. Virions play a role in the immunopathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  11. Examining behavioural coping strategies as mediators between work-family conflict and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazami, Sanaz; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Akmal, Syaqirah

    2015-01-01

    We examined the mediating role of behavioral coping strategies in the association between work-family conflict and psychological distress. In particular, we examined the two directions of work-family conflict, namely, work interference into family and family interference into work. Furthermore, two coping styles in this study were adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 429 Malaysian working women using self-reported data. The results of mediational analysis in the present study showed that adaptive coping strategy does not significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. However, maladaptive coping strategies significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. These results show that adaptive coping strategies, which aimed to improve the stressful situation, are not effective in managing stressor such as work-family conflict. We found that experiencing interrole conflict steers employees toward frequent use of maladaptive coping strategies which in turn lead to psychological distress. Interventions targeted at improvement of coping skills which are according to individual's needs and expectation may help working women to balance work and family demands. The important issue is to keep in mind that effective coping strategies are to control the situations not to eliminate work-family conflict.

  12. Examining Behavioural Coping Strategies as Mediators between Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Aazami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the mediating role of behavioral coping strategies in the association between work-family conflict and psychological distress. In particular, we examined the two directions of work-family conflict, namely, work interference into family and family interference into work. Furthermore, two coping styles in this study were adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 429 Malaysian working women using self-reported data. The results of mediational analysis in the present study showed that adaptive coping strategy does not significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. However, maladaptive coping strategies significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. These results show that adaptive coping strategies, which aimed to improve the stressful situation, are not effective in managing stressor such as work-family conflict. We found that experiencing interrole conflict steers employees toward frequent use of maladaptive coping strategies which in turn lead to psychological distress. Interventions targeted at improvement of coping skills which are according to individual’s needs and expectation may help working women to balance work and family demands. The important issue is to keep in mind that effective coping strategies are to control the situations not to eliminate work-family conflict.

  13. Antigen 43-mediated autotransporter display, a versatile bacterial cell surface presentation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Hasman, Henrik; Schembri, Mark;

    2002-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43), a self-recognizing outer membrane protein of Escherichia coli, has been converted into an efficient and versatile tool for surface display of foreign protein segments. Ag43 is an autotransporter protein characterized by the feature that all information required for transport...... to the outer membrane and secretion through the cell envelope is contained within the protein itself. Ag43 consists of two subunits (alpha and beta), where the beta-subunit forms an integral outer membrane translocator to which the alpha-subunit is noncovalently attached. The simplicity of the Ag43 system...

  14. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines mediates chemokine endocytosis through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhao

    Full Text Available The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC shows high affinity binding to multiple inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines and is expressed by erythrocytes and endothelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial DARC facilitates chemokine transcytosis to promote neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanism of chemokine endocytosis by DARC remains unclear.We investigated the role of several endocytic pathways in DARC-mediated ligand internalization. Here we report that, although DARC co-localizes with caveolin-1 in endothelial cells, caveolin-1 is dispensable for DARC-mediated (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis as knockdown of caveolin-1 failed to inhibit ligand internalization. (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis by DARC was also independent of clathrin and flotillin-1 but required cholesterol and was, in part, inhibited by silencing Dynamin II expression.(125I-CXCL1 endocytosis was inhibited by amiloride, cytochalasin D, and the PKC inhibitor Gö6976 whereas Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF enhanced ligand internalization through DARC. The majority of DARC-ligand interactions occurred on the endothelial surface, with DARC identified along plasma membrane extensions with the appearance of ruffles, supporting the concept that DARC provides a high affinity scaffolding function for surface retention of chemokines on endothelial cells.These results show DARC-mediated chemokine endocytosis occurs through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells and caveolin-1 is dispensable for CXCL1 internalization.

  15. Aguacate virus, a new antigenic complex of the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Gustavo; da Rosa, Amelia Travassos; Savji, Nazir; Sze, Wilson; Wick, Ivan; Guzman, Hilda; Hutchison, Stephen; Tesh, Robert; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-06-01

    Genomic and antigenic characterization of Aguacate virus, a tentative species of the genus Phlebovirus, and three other unclassified viruses, Armero virus, Durania virus and Ixcanal virus, demonstrate a close relationship to one another. They are distinct from the other nine recognized species within the genus Phlebovirus. We propose to designate them as a new (tenth) serogroup or species (Aguacate virus) within the genus. The four viruses were all isolated from phlebotomine sandflies (Lutzomyia sp.) collected in Central and South America. Aguacate virus appears to be a natural reassortant and serves as one more example of the high frequency of reassortment in this genus.

  16. T cell re-targeting to EBV antigens following TCR gene transfer: CD28-containing receptors mediate enhanced antigen-specific IFNgamma production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Schaft (Niels); B. Lankiewicz (Birgit); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); D.J. Moss (Denis); V. Levitsky (Victor); M. Bonneville (Marc); S.P. Lee (Steven); A.J. McMichael (Andrew); J.W. Gratama (Jan-Willem); R.L.H. Bolhuis (Reinder); R.A. Willemsen (Ralph); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAbstract EBV is associated with a broad range of malignancies. Adoptive immunotherapy of these tumors with EBV-specific CTL proved useful. We generated a panel of primary human T cells specific to various EBV antigens (i.e. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 3A, 3B and BamHI-M leftward reading

  17. Youth Experiences of Family Violence and Teen Dating Violence Perpetration: Cognitive and Emotional Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N.; McDonald, Renee; Mueller, Victoria; Grych, John H.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a conceptual model of cognitive and emotional processes proposed to mediate the relation between youth exposure to family violence and teen dating violence perpetration. Explicit beliefs about violence, internal knowledge structures, and executive functioning are hypothesized as cognitive mediators, and their potential…

  18. Nature of the suppressor cells mediating prolonged graft survival after administration of extracted histocompatibility antigen and cyclosporine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, N.; Kahan, B.D.

    1985-02-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor T cells are induced by donor histocompatibility antigen extracted from spleen cells with 3M KCl combined with cyclosporine (Ag-CsA). A single i.v. injection of 5 mg 3M-KCl-extracted donor Buffalo (Buf, RT1b) antigen (Ag) combined with a three day course of CsA prolonged renal allograft survival in Wistar-Furth (WFu, RT1u) hosts to a greater extent (MST 26.5 days) than CsA alone (MST 11.8 days). Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) or spleen cells harvested from Ag-CsA-treated recipients ten days after transplantation inhibited the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) between normal responder WFu cells and irradiated Buf cells (55.6% and 64.4% suppression, respectively, P less than 0.025), but not third-party Brown-Norway (BN, RT1n) stimulator cells (13.6% and -18.3% suppression, respectively, NS). The suppressor effect was not mediated by cytolytic cells; there was neither primary nor secondary cytolytic activity against /sup 51/Cr-labeled Con-A blastoid Buf cells. The suppressor cells were neither adherent to plastic dishes nor to nylon-wool columns. PBL irradiated with 800 rads, but not 1500 rads, suppressed the MLR. A single injection of cyclophosphamide (CY, 25 mg/kg) seven days after transplantation abrogated the suppression induced by Ag-CsA treatment. Moreover, PBL from Ag-CsA recipients failed to suppress the MLR, if depleted either of all T cells by treatment with monoclonal antibody (Mab) W3/13 HLK (pan T cells; % suppression -15.8), or of cytotoxic/suppressor cells with Mab OX-8 (-19.3% suppression) together with rabbit antimouse immunoglobulin and complement.

  19. αβ TCR-mediated recognition: relevance to tumor-antigen discovery and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinherz, Ellis L

    2015-04-01

    αβ T lymphocytes sense perturbations in host cellular body components induced by infectious pathogens, oncogenic transformation, or chemical or physical damage. Millions to billions of these lymphocytes are generated through T-lineage development in the thymus, each endowed with a clonally restricted surface T-cell receptor (TCR). An individual TCR has the capacity to recognize a distinct "foreign" peptide among the myriad of antigens that the mammalian host must be capable of detecting. TCRs explicitly distinguish foreign from self-peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. This is a daunting challenge, given that the MHC-linked peptidome consists of thousands of distinct peptides with a relevant nonself target antigen often embedded at low number, among orders of magnitude higher frequency self-peptides. In this Masters of Immunology article, I review how TCR structure and attendant mechanobiology involving nonlinear responses affect sensitivity as well as specificity to meet this requirement. Assessment of human tumor-cell display using state-of-the-art mass spectrometry physical detection methods that quantify epitope copy number can help to provide information about requisite T-cell functional avidity affording protection and/or therapeutic immunity. Future rational CD8 cytotoxic T-cell-based vaccines may follow, targeting virally induced cancers, other nonviral immunogenic tumors, and potentially even nonimmunogenic tumors whose peptide display can be purposely altered by MHC-binding drugs to stimulate immune attack. © 2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Antigen-specific T cell–mediated gene therapy in collagen-induced arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Atsuo; Seroogy, Christine M.; Sandora, Matthew R.; Tarner, Ingo H.; Costa, Gina L.; Taylor-Edwards, Cariel; Bachmann, Michael H.; Contag, Christopher H.; Fathman, C. Garrison

    2001-01-01

    Autoantigen-specific T cells have tissue-specific homing properties, suggesting that these cells may be ideal vehicles for the local delivery of immunoregulatory molecules. We tested this hypothesis by using type II collagen–specific (CII-specific) CD4+ T hybridomas or primary CD4+ T cells after gene transfer, as vehicles to deliver an immunoregulatory protein for the treatment of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CII-specific T cells or hybridomas were transduced using retroviral vectors to constitutively express the IL-12 antagonist, IL-12 p40. Transfer of engineered CD4+ T cells after immunization significantly inhibited the development of CIA, while cells transduced with vector control had no effect. The beneficial effect on CIA of IL-12 p40-transduced T cells required TCR specificity against CII, since transfer of T cells specific for another antigen producing equivalent amounts of IL-12 p40 had no effect. In vivo cell detection using bioluminescent labels and RT-PCR showed that transferred CII-reactive T-cell hybridomas accumulated in inflamed joints in mice with CIA. These results indicate that the local delivery of IL-12 p40 by T cells inhibited CIA by suppressing autoimmune responses at the site of inflammation. Modifying antigen-specific T cells by retroviral transduction for local expression of immunoregulatory proteins thus offers a promising strategy for treating RA. PMID:11375419

  1. Antigen binding of human IgG Fabs mediate ERK-associated proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yue-Jin; Mancino, Anne; Pashov, Anastas; Whitehead, Tracy; Stanley, Joseph; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Serum-circulating antibody can be linked to poor outcomes in some cancer patients. To investigate the role of human antibodies in regulating tumor cell growth, we constructed a recombinant cDNA expression library of human IgG Fab from a patient with breast cancer. Clones were screened from the library with breast tumor cell lysate. Sequence analysis of the clones showed somatic hypermutations when compared to their closest VH/VL germ-line genes. Initial characterizations focused on five clones. All tested clones displayed stronger binding to antigen derived from primary breast cancers and established breast cancer cell lines than to normal breast tissues. In vitro functional studies showed that four out of five tested clones could stimulate the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and one out of five was able to promote MCF-7 cell growth as well. Involvement of ERK2 pathway was observed. By 1H-NMR spectra and Western blot analysis, it was evident that two tested antibody Fabs are capable of interacting with sialic acid. Our study suggests a possible role for human antibody in promoting tumor cell growth by direct binding of IgG Fab to breast tumor antigen. Such studies prompt speculation regarding the role of serum antibodies in mediating tumor growth as well as their contribution to disease progression.

  2. Effects of Economic Hardship on Adolescent Self-Esteem: A Family Mediation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Camilla S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between economic hardship, family relationships, and adolescent self-esteem in a sample of 387 Midwestern families. Results showed that economic hardship negatively affected adolescent self-esteem and that this effect was primarily mediated through the parent-adolescent relationship. Supports other findings that…

  3. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C stabilizes Gemin3 to block p53-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliang Cai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C, one of the essential latent antigens for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-induced immortalization of primary human B lymphocytes in vitro, has been implicated in regulating cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis via interaction with several cellular and viral factors. Gemin3 (also named DDX20 or DP103 is a member of DEAD RNA helicase family which exhibits diverse cellular functions including DNA transcription, recombination and repair, and RNA metabolism. Gemin3 was initially identified as a binding partner to EBNA2 and EBNA3C. However, the mechanism by which EBNA3C regulates Gemin3 function remains unclear. Here, we report that EBNA3C directly interacts with Gemin3 through its C-terminal domains. This interaction results in increased stability of Gemin3 and its accumulation in both B lymphoma cells and EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Moreover, EBNA3C promotes formation of a complex with p53 and Gemin3 which blocks the DNA-binding affinity of p53. Small hairpin RNA based knockdown of Gemin3 in B lymphoma or LCL cells remarkably attenuates the ability of EBNA3C to inhibit the transcription activity of p53 on its downstream genes p21 and Bax, as well as apoptosis. These findings provide the first evidence that Gemin3 may be a common target of oncogenic viruses for driving cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic activities.

  4. Glycoproteins of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family are expressed in sweat and sebaceous glands of human fetal and adult skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metze, D; Bhardwaj, R; Amann, U; Eades-Perner, A M; Neumaier, M; Wagener, C; Jantscheff, P; Grunert, F; Luger, T A

    1996-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family comprises a group of glycoproteins including the classical CEA, nonspecific cross-reacting antigens (NCA), and biliary glycoprotein (BGP). CEA glycoproteins have been identified in many glandular and mucosal tissues. In view of their putative role in cell adhesion, protein sorting, and signal transduction, CEA glycoproteins are thought to be involved in embryogenesis, architectual integrity, and secretory mechanisms of glandular epithelia. Since there are few data available on the expression of CEA-like proteins in human skin, the aim of this study was to immunohistochemically specify and localize the CEA glycoproteins in cutaneous adult and fetal glands using a panel of well-characterized antibodies. The secretory parts of eccrine sweat glands expressed CEA, NCA-90, and BGP, whereas apocrine glands remained unreactive for CEA glycoproteins. The ductal epithelia of both eccrine and apocrine glands contained CEA and NCA-90. Sebaceous glands were stained for BGP only. Electron microscopy of sweat glands showed CEA glycoprotein expression in cytoplasmic organelles and on microvilli lining the ductal surface. In sebaceous glands, BGP were demonstrated in small vesicles and along the cell membranes of differentiating sebocytes. Fetal development of cutaneous glands was associated with early expression of CEA glycoproteins. Additionally, mice transgenic for human CEA were shown to express CEA in sweat glands. The overall distribution of CEA glycoproteins in cutaneous glands was consistent with that in epithelia of other glandular tissues.

  5. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J N; Platt, Jesse M; Johnson, F Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2015-04-01

    This study compared second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS, and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9). Here, we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to 3 months following a single stimulation through the T-cell receptor (TCR). Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet (TBX21), EOMES, and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-κB, AKT, ERK, and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire, and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore, the design of CARs that have a nonconstitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or nonconstitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials.

  6. Vaccine priming is restricted to draining lymph nodes and controlled by adjuvant-mediated antigen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Frank; Lindgren, Gustaf; Sandgren, Kerrie J; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Francica, Joseph R; Seubert, Anja; De Gregorio, Ennio; Barnett, Susan; O'Hagan, Derek T; Sullivan, Nancy J; Koup, Richard A; Seder, Robert A; Loré, Karin

    2017-06-07

    The innate immune mechanisms by which adjuvants enhance the potency and protection of vaccine-induced adaptive immunity are largely unknown. We introduce a model to delineate the steps of how adjuvant-driven innate immune activation leads to priming of vaccine responses using rhesus macaques. Fluorescently labeled HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) was administered together with the conventional aluminum salt (alum) adjuvant. This was compared to Env given with alum with preabsorbed Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) ligand (alum-TLR7) or the emulsion MF59 because they show superiority over alum for qualitatively and quantitatively improved vaccine responses. All adjuvants induced rapid and robust immune cell infiltration to the injection site in the muscle. This resulted in substantial uptake of Env by neutrophils, monocytes, and myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) and migration exclusively to the vaccine-draining lymph nodes (LNs). Although less proficient than monocytes and DCs, neutrophils were capable of presenting Env to memory CD4(+) T cells. MF59 and alum-TLR7 showed more pronounced cell activation and overall higher numbers of Env(+) cells compared to alum. This resulted in priming of higher numbers of Env-specific CD4(+) T cells in the vaccine-draining LNs, which directly correlated with increased T follicular helper cell differentiation and germinal center formation. Thus, strong innate immune activation promoting efficient vaccine antigen delivery to infiltrating antigen-presenting cells in draining LNs is an important mechanism by which superior adjuvants enhance vaccine responses. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. An overview of the GAGE cancer/testis antigen family with the inclusion of newly identified members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Ditzel, H J

    2008-01-01

    GAGE cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in many different types of cancer, whereas their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune-privileged organs, testis and ovary. Thus, GAGE proteins may be attractive candidates for immunotherapy of cancer....... This review describes the structure and phylogeny of the GAGE family members and presents a revised nomenclature, which will enable a more clear distinction of genes and gene products. The GAGE gene locus at chromosome X p11.23 consists of at least 16 genes, each of which is located in one of an equal number...... cell biology. When expressed in tumor cells, GAGE proteins can elicit both cellular and humoral immune responses, indicating that they are appropriate targets for cancer immunotherapy. The potential use of GAGE proteins in cancer immunotherapy, including possible limitations, is also discussed....

  8. Understanding how family socioeconomic status mediates the maternal intelligence-child cognitive outcomes relationship: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, D Diego

    2013-01-01

    In a model of moderated mediation using matched data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, Children and Young Adults, I test (1) whether family socioeconomic status (SES) mediates the maternal intelligence-child cognitive outcomes relationship and (2) the extent to which this mediating impact is dependent on the level of maternal intelligence. Results reveal that the mediating impact of SES on the maternal intelligence-child cognitive outcomes relationship varies as a function of the level of maternal intelligence. The positive effect of higher SES on children's academic ability decreases as the cognitive ability of mothers increases, such that children in low IQ households benefit most from higher SES, while children in high IQ households benefit somewhat less.

  9. The anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are attractive tumor-associated antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2010-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Mcl-2) are pivotal regulators of apoptotic cell death. They are all highly overexpressed in cancers of different origin in which they enhance the survival of the cancer cells. Consequently, they represent prime candidates for anti-ca...

  10. Communication Processes that Mediate Family Communication Patterns and Mental Well-Being: A Mean and Covariance Structures Analysis of Young Adults from Divorced and Nondivorced Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrodt, Paul; Ledbetter, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, demand/withdraw patterns and feeling caught were tested as mediators of family communication patterns and young adults' mental well-being. Participants included 567 young adults from divorced and nondivorced families. For young adults in nondivorced families, family conversation orientations had both a positive, direct effect on…

  11. Work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses: the mediating effect of psychological capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout among nurses not only threatens their own health, but also that of their patients. Exploring risk factors of nurse’ burnout is important to improve nurses’ health and to increase the quality of health care services. This study aims to explore the relationship between work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses and the mediating role of psychological capital in this relationship. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed during the period of September and October 2010. A questionnaire that consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS, the work-family conflict scale and the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24 scale, as well as demographic and working factors, was distributed to nurses in Liaoning province, China. A total of 1,332 individuals (effective response rate: 78.35% became our subjects. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of psychological capital. Results Both work interfering family conflict and family interfering work conflict were positively related with emotional exhaustion and cynicism. However, work interfering family conflict was positively related with professional efficacy whereas family interfering work conflict was negatively related with it. Psychological capital partially mediated the relationship of work interfering family conflict with emotional exhaustion and cynicism; and partially mediated the relationship of family interfering work conflict with emotional exhaustion, cynicism and professional efficacy. Conclusion Work-family conflict had effects on burnout and psychological capital was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Psychological capital was a positive resource for fighting against nurses’ burnout.

  12. IL-4 abrogates TH17 cell-mediated inflammation by selective silencing of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenova, Emmanuella; Skabytska, Yuliya; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Weindl, Günther; Sauer, Karin; Tham, Manuela; Kim, Kyu-Won; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Seo, Ji Hae; Ignatova, Desislava; Cozzio, Antonio; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Volz, Thomas; Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Thomas, Peter; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Schäkel, Knut; Amarov, Boyko; Eichner, Martin; Schaller, Martin; Clark, Rachael A.; Röcken, Martin; Biedermann, Tilo

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) can suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions (DTHRs), including organ-specific autoimmune diseases in mice and humans. Despite the broadly documented antiinflammatory effect of IL-4, the underlying mode of action remains incompletely understood, as IL-4 also promotes IL-12 production by dendritic cells (DCs) and IFN-γ–producing TH1 cells in vivo. Studying the impact of IL-4 on the polarization of human and mouse DCs, we found that IL-4 exerts opposing effects on the production of either IL-12 or IL-23. While promoting IL-12–producing capacity of DCs, IL-4 completely abrogates IL-23. Bone marrow chimeras proved that IL-4–mediated suppression of DTHRs relies on the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6)-dependent abrogation of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IL-4 therapy attenuated DTHRs by STAT6- and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-dependent suppression of the IL-23/TH17 responses despite simultaneous enhancement of IL-12/TH1 responses. As IL-4 therapy also improves psoriasis in humans and suppresses IL-23/TH17 responses without blocking IL-12/TH1, selective IL-4–mediated IL-23/TH17 silencing is promising as treatment against harmful inflammation, while sparing the IL-12–dependent TH1 responses. PMID:25646481

  13. Museum Signage as Distributed Mediation to Encourage Family Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungyoun

    2009-01-01

    Many prior studies conducted in museums have focused primarily on exhibits as the main objects for learning. Less progress has been made in studying signage as another meaning-making tool in museums. The present study was designed to understand the role of signage in family learning by answering the following research questions, "How does signage…

  14. Suicide Disclosure in Suicide Attempt Survivors: Does Family Reaction Moderate or Mediate Disclosure's Effect on Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Laura M; Hans, Jason D; Cerel, Julie

    2016-02-01

    Existing literature has found a link between disclosure of a stigmatized identity and improved mental health; however, research on the impact of suicide disclosure to family members is scarce. Suicide attempt survivors (n = 74) in the United States were examined to assess whether family reaction moderates or mediates the relationship between suicide disclosure and subsequent depression symptoms. Family reaction did not moderate but did mediate the relationship between disclosure and depression symptoms while controlling for time since most recent attempt. Higher rates of disclosure predicted more positive family reactions, which in turn predicted less severe depression symptoms. Findings indicate that family members can play an essential role in the recovery process after an attempt occurs, which has important implications for both researchers and clinicians who seek to decrease stigma for attempt survivors while simultaneously decreasing the likelihood of future attempts.

  15. Family functioning mediates adaptation in caregivers of individuals with Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Amanda E; Biesecker, Barbara B; Umstead, Kendall L; Muratori, Michelle; Biesecker, Leslie G; Erby, Lori H

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate factors related to family functioning and adaptation in caregivers of individuals with Rett syndrome (RS). A cross-sectional quantitative survey explored the relationships between demographics, parental self-efficacy, coping methods, family functioning and adaptation. A forward-backward, step-wise model selection procedure was used to evaluate variables associated with both family functioning and adaptation. Analyses also explored family functioning as a mediator of the relationship between other variables and adaptation. Bivariate analyses (N=400) revealed that greater parental self-efficacy, a greater proportion of problem-focused coping, and a lesser proportion of emotion-focused coping were associated with more effective family functioning. In addition, these key variables were significantly associated with greater adaptation, as was family functioning, while controlling for confounders. Finally, regression analyses suggest family functioning as a mediator of the relationships between three variables (parental self-efficacy, problem-focused coping, and emotion-focused coping) with adaptation. This study demonstrates the potentially predictive roles of expectations and coping methods and the mediator role of family functioning in adaptation among caregivers of individuals with RS, a chronic developmental disorder. A potential target for intervention is strengthening of caregiver competence in the parenting role to enhance caregiver adaptation. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Caroline Benedicte Kjærulff; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Wandall, Hans H.;

    2013-01-01

    Membrane bound mucins are up-regulated and aberrantly glycosylated during malignant transformation in many cancer cells. This results in a negatively charged glycoprotein coat which may protect cancer cells from immune surveillance. However, only limited data have so far demonstrated the critical...... steps in glycan elongation that make aberrantly glycosylated mucins affect the interaction between cancer cells and cytotoxic effector cells of the immune system. Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr), STn (NeuAcα2-6GalNAc-Ser/Thr), T (Galβ1–3GalNAc-Ser/Thr), and ST (NeuAcα2-6Galβ1–3GalNAc-Ser/Thr) antigens...... only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn). Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) knockout (KO) of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast...

  17. Altered cell-mediated immunity to group A haemolytic streptococcal antigens in chronic plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B S; Powles, A V; Malkani, A K; Lewis, H; Valdimarsson, H; Fry, L

    1991-07-01

    The proliferative lymphocyte response to sonicated group A, beta-haemolytic streptococci (Strep-A) was measured by thymidine incorporation in 78 patients with psoriasis (guttate, chronic plaque or both). Lymphocytes from 72 of these patients were also cultured with streptokinase/streptodornase (SK/SD), and 20 of the patients with chronic plaque psoriasis were further tested with PPD, Candida albicans and sonicated Streptococcus mutans, a bacterial type not associated clinically with psoriasis. The median stimulation index (SI) of the psoriasis group to the Strep-A preparation was significantly higher than that of a group of 27 non-psoriatic individuals (P less than 0.05). Within this group, only the patients with chronic plaque psoriasis (n = 42) showed a significantly increased proliferative response compared to the non-psoriatic controls (median SI = 123.8 and 31.9, respectively, P less than 0.01). Although the lymphocyte response of the chronic plaque group to SK/SD was also markedly higher than that of the control group, this difference did not reach statistical significance. In addition, these patients did not show significantly increased responses to any of the other antigens tested, including S. mutans. No correlation was observed between the degree of proliferation to Strep-A and disease extent or activity. Similarly, ASO titres, which were raised in 11 out of 23 guttate and three out of nine chronic plaque psoriasis patients tested, did not correlate with the proliferative responses observed.

  18. Antigenic role of stress-induced catalase of Salmonella typhimurium in cell-mediated immunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Kagaya, K; Miyakawa, Y; Watanabe, K; Fukazawa, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of the H2O2-induced catalase of Salmonella typhimurium to induce cell-mediated immunity against S. typhimurium infection in mice was examined. When exponentially growing cells of S. typhimurium were treated with 20 microM H2O2, the cells resisted killing by 1 mM H2O2 and showed the induction of a new species of catalase in addition to the constitutively produced one. Two molecules of catalases in S. typhimurium were isolated from mutant strains: H2O2-induced catalase (catalase II,...

  19. A method of identifying and isolating a unique member of a multigene family: application to a trypanosome surface antigen gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruef, B J; Hecht, J H; Manning, J E

    1991-04-25

    A chimeric oligonucleotide was constructed using DNA sequences from two distal regions of a cDNA which encodes a major surface antigen (TSA-1) of Trypanosoma cruzi. Conditions were found that allowed the chimeric oligonucleotide to hybridize only to a 5.4 kb EcoRI fragment in a Southern blot of total genomic DNA. The 5.4 kb EcoRI genomic DNA fragment has previously been shown to be located at a telomeric site, thus the studies described here directly demonstrate that the TSA-1 gene is telomeric in location. It is also shown that the chimeric oligonucleotide can be used to selectively identify recombinant lambda phage which harbor the TSA-1 gene using standard library screening procedures. Since these studies demonstrate that a chimeric oligonucleotide can be used to identify in both Southern blots and library screens a single member among the more than sixty members of the TSA-1 gene family, it seems likely that chimeric oligonucleotides may be of general use in studies involving repetitive DNA sequence families.

  20. Low expression of soluble human leukocyte antigen G in early gestation and subsequent placenta-mediated complications of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozio, Luca; Garofalo, Anna; Berchialla, Paola; Tavella, Anna Maria; Salton, Loredana; Cavallo, Franco; Benedetto, Chiara

    2017-07-10

    Abnormal placentation is a common pathogenic mechanism of many placenta-mediated complications of late pregnancy, including pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, stillbirth, and placental abruption. During successful placentation, the trophoblast (which is a semi-allograft) is not rejected by decidual immune cells because of maternal immune tolerance, mainly induced by human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G). Deficient HLA-G expression seems to be associated with the development of complications of pregnancy. The aim of this study was to determine whether low soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels in maternal blood at the beginning of pregnancy may be associated with subsequent placenta-mediated complications. For this retrospective case-control study, 117 cases of placenta-mediated complications of pregnancy and 234 controls with uneventful pregnancy were selected. Plasma sHLA-G levels were measured at 11-13 weeks' gestation by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method in blood samples previously obtained at first-trimester prenatal screening for chromosomal fetal abnormalities. Women who subsequently developed placenta-mediated complications had significantly lower sHLA-G levels at the beginning of pregnancy (median, 43.08 IU/mL) than controls (median, 49.10 IU/mL; P = 0.008). An sHLA-G level lower than 43.50 IU/mL at the end of the first trimester was associated with a twofold increased risk of developing a pregnancy complication (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-2.73). The strongest association, although only moderately strong, was observed with severe pre-eclampsia (odds ratio, 2.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-6.56). Placenta-mediated complications of pregnancy may be associated with low sHLA-G levels in the first trimester, suggesting a potential role of sHLA-G in the early stages of placentation. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Immunisation with ID83 fusion protein induces antigen-specific cell mediated and humoral immune responses in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth J; Steinbach, Sabine; Clifford, Derek; Baldwin, Susan L; Ireton, Gregory C; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G; Vordermeier, H Martin

    2013-10-25

    In this study we have investigated the potential of mycobacterial proteins as candidate subunit vaccines for bovine tuberculosis. In addition, we have explored the use of TLR-ligands as potential adjuvants in cattle. In vitro screening assays with whole blood from Mycobacterium bovis-infected and BCG-vaccinated cattle demonstrated that fusion protein constructs were most commonly recognised, and the ID83 fusion protein was selected for further immunisation studies. Furthermore, glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) and resiquimod (R848), agonists for TLR4 and TLR7/8 respectively, stimulated cytokine production (IL-12, TNF-α, MIP-1β and IL-10) in bovine dendritic cell cultures, and these were formulated as novel oil-in-water emulsions (GLA-SE and R848-SE) for immunisation studies. Immunisation with ID83 in a water-in-oil emulsion adjuvant (ISA70) induced both cell mediated and humoral immune responses, as characterised by antigen-specific IFN-γ production, cell proliferation, IgG1 and IgG2 antibody production. In comparison, ID83 immunisation with the novel adjuvants induced weaker (ID83/R848-SE) or no (ID83/GLA-SE) antigen-specific IFN-γ production and cell proliferation. However, both did induce ID83-specific antibody production, which was restricted to IgG1 antibody isotype. Overall, these results provide encouraging preliminary data for the further development of ID83 in vaccine strategies for bovine TB. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joëlle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P; Bertin, Gérard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2008-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 microg pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IFN-gamma) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-gamma and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1.

  3. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhai

    Full Text Available Depression is a major health concern for college students due to its substantial morbidity and mortality. Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students' depression are not well understood. We tested whether adverse family and college environments mediate the relationship between parental educational level and depression among Chinese college students.A total of 5180 respondents were selected using a cross-sectional survey. We examined the association of parental education, adverse family and college environments with depression in college students using the Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Checklist, Beck Depression Inventory and socio-demographic questionnaires.Lower parental educational level is significantly correlated with depression in college students in our sample. Additionally, low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, having been scolded and beaten by parents, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends, heavy course load and failure in selection processes are also associated with parental education. Low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends and heavy course load mediated the relationship between parental education and depression in college students.Adverse family and college environments could explain the influence of parental educational level on depression in college students.

  4. Work-Family Enrichment: It’s Mediating Role in the Relationships between Dispositional Factors and Job Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ng Swee Fung; Aminah Ahmad; Zoharah Omar

    2012-01-01

    The growing interest in understanding the interface of work and family roles, in particular work-family enrichment, and its antecedents and outcomes, has stimulated the development of a mediation model. The mediation model developed includes dispositional factors (optimism, self-efficacy) as antecedents, job satisfaction as the outcome, and work-family enrichment as the mediator. This present model is developed based on the conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989), the model of work-f...

  5. Asian Americans' family cohesion and suicide ideation: moderating and mediating effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel Wong, Y; Uhm, Soo Yun; Li, Peiwei

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between family cohesion and suicide ideation in a national, adult community sample of Asian Americans (N=2072). The data for this study were drawn from the National Latino and Asian American Study, the first national epidemiological study of Asian Americans' mental health. The results indicate that family cohesion was negatively related to suicide ideation. In addition, English language proficiency moderated the relationship between family cohesion and suicide ideation. Family cohesion was related to lower odds of suicide ideation among low English proficiency Asian Americans. In contrast, family cohesion was not significantly related to suicide ideation among high English proficiency Asian Americans. Further, the findings are consistent with a model in which the relationship between family cohesion and suicide ideation was partially mediated by psychological distress. Practical implications for addressing suicide ideation among Asian Americans are discussed.

  6. Moderating effects of the family environment for parental mediation and pathological internet use in youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Grace S; Li, Dongdong; Liau, Albert K; Khoo, Angeline

    2015-01-01

    Pathological Internet use (PIU) occurs when excessive Internet use results in addictive symptoms that exert detrimental consequences on one's overall functioning and well-being. Poor family functioning has been found to be associated with youths' addictive Internet use, and parental use of active and restrictive mediation has been found to reduce online risk. The current study aims to test if parental active and restrictive mediation strategies are negatively associated with youths' PIU. Additionally, it also tests the effectiveness of these strategies as a function of the broader family environment with measures of parent-child attachment, family communication, and the youth's comfort with living at home. The data of 3,079 students in Singapore were analyzed through a series of logistic regressions. The results revealed that the family environment for students with PIU was significantly less positive. Only restrictive mediation was found to be negatively associated with PIU. This relation was stronger for higher levels of attachment, communication, and comfort at home, implying that the effectiveness of restrictive mediation varies with the degree of warmth and support in the general family environment. The implications are discussed.

  7. Maternal Emotion Regulation and Adolescent Behaviors: The Mediating Role of Family Functioning and Parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, AliceAnn; Ghazarian, Sharon R; Day, Randal D; Riley, Anne W

    2016-11-01

    Prior research links poor maternal emotion regulation to maladaptive parenting and child behaviors, but little research is available on these relationships during the adolescent period. We use structural equation modeling to assess the influence of poor maternal emotion regulation, measured as emotional reactivity and distancing, on adolescent behaviors (measured as aggression and prosocial behaviors) among 478 adolescents (53 % female; baseline age 10-13 years) and their mothers over a 5 year period. We also tested the possible mediating roles of family functioning and parenting behaviors between maternal emotion regulation and adolescent behaviors. Results indicated that higher baseline maternal emotional distancing and reactivity were not directly predictive of adolescents' behaviors, but they were indirectly related through family functioning and parenting. Specifically, indulgent parenting mediated the relationship between maternal emotional reactivity and adolescent aggression. Maternal-reported family functioning significantly mediated the relationship between maternal emotional distancing and adolescent aggression. Family functioning also mediated the relationship between emotional distancing and regulation parenting. The results imply that poor maternal emotion regulation during their child's early adolescence leads to more maladaptive parenting and problematic behaviors during the later adolescent period. However, healthy family processes may ameliorate the negative impact of low maternal emotion regulation on parenting and adolescent behavioral outcomes. The implications for future research and interventions to improve parenting and adolescent outcomes are discussed.

  8. EBV Nuclear Antigen 3C Mediates Regulation of E2F6 to Inhibit E2F1 Transcription and Promote Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yonggang; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Saha, Abhik; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is considered a ubiquitous herpesvirus with the ability to cause latent infection in humans worldwide. EBV-association is evidently linked to different types of human malignancies, mainly of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Of interest is the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) which is critical for EBV-mediated immortalization. Recently, EBNA3C was shown to bind the E2F1 transcription regulator. The E2F transcription factors have crucial roles in various cellular functions, including cell cycle, DNA replication, DNA repair, cell mitosis, and cell fate. Specifically, E2F6, one of the unique E2F family members, is known to be a pRb-independent transcription repressor of E2F-target genes. In our current study, we explore the role of EBNA3C in regulating E2F6 activities. We observed that EBNA3C plays an important role in inducing E2F6 expression in LCLs. Our study also shows that EBNA3C physically interacts with E2F6 at its amino and carboxy terminal domains and they form a protein complex in human cells. In addition, EBNA3C stabilizes the E2F6 protein and is co-localized in the nucleus. We also demonstrated that both EBNA3C and E2F6 contribute to reduction in E2F1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, E2F1 forms a protein complex with EBNA3C and E2F6, and EBNA3C competes with E2F1 for E2F6 binding. E2F6 is also recruited by EBNA3C to the E2F1 promoter, which is critical for EBNA3C-mediated cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical role for E2F family members in EBV-induced malignancies, and provide new insights for targeting E2F transcription factors in EBV-associated cancers as potential therapeutic intervention strategies.

  9. Work-Family Enrichment: It’s Mediating Role in the Relationships between Dispositional Factors and Job Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Swee Fung

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in understanding the interface of work and family roles, in particular work-family enrichment, and its antecedents and outcomes, has stimulated the development of a mediation model. The mediation model developed includes dispositional factors (optimism, self-efficacy as antecedents, job satisfaction as the outcome, and work-family enrichment as the mediator. This present model is developed based on the conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989, the model of work-family enrichment (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006 and the social exchange theory (Blau, 1964. This model presents the mechanism of how dispositional factors could influence job satisfaction among employees through work-family enrichment.

  10. TGF-β1-mediated Smad3 enhances PD-1 expression on antigen-specific T cells in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Benjamin V.; Freeman, Zachary T.; Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Chattergoon, Michael A.; Rutebemberwa, Alleluiah; Steigner, Jordana; Winter, Matthew E.; Huynh, Thanh V.; Sebald, Suzanne M.; Lee, Se-Jin; Pan, Fan; Pardoll, Drew M.; Cox, Andrea L.

    2017-01-01

    Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) is a co-inhibitory receptor that down-regulates the activity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in cancer and of virus-specific T cells in chronic infection. The molecular mechanisms driving high PD-1 expression on TIL have not been fully investigated. We demonstrate that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) directly enhances antigen-induced PD-1 expression through Smad3-dependent, Smad2-independent transcriptional activation in T cells in vitro and in TIL in vivo. The PD-1hi subset seen in CD8+ TIL is absent in Smad3-deficient tumor-specific CD8+ TIL, resulting in enhanced cytokine production by TIL and in draining lymph nodes and of anti-tumor activity. In addition to TGF-β1’s previously known effects on T cell function, our findings suggest that TGF-β1 mediates T cell suppression via PD-1 upregulation in the TME. They highlight bidirectional crosstalk between effector TIL and TGF-β-producing cells that upregulates multiple components of the PD-1 signaling pathway to inhibit anti-tumor immunity. PMID:27683557

  11. TLR4 ligand formulation causes distinct effects on antigen-specific cell-mediated and humoral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher B; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Vergara, Julie; Desbien, Anthony L; Nana, Ghislain I; Vedvick, Thomas S; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2013-12-02

    The formulation of TLR ligands and other immunomodulators has a critical effect on their vaccine adjuvant activity. In this work, the synthetic TLR4 ligand GLA was formulated with three distinct vaccine delivery system platforms (aqueous suspension, liposome, or oil-in-water emulsion). The effect of the different formulations on the adaptive immune response to protein subunit vaccines was evaluated in the context of a recombinant malaria antigen, Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein (PbCSP). Antibody responses in vaccinated mice were similar for the different formulations of GLA. However, cell-mediated responses differed significantly depending on the adjuvant system; in particular, the emulsion formulation of the TLR4 ligand induced significantly enhanced cellular IFN-γ and TNF-α responses compared to the other formulations. The effects of differences in adjuvant formulation composition and physical characteristics on biological activity are discussed. These results illustrate the importance of formulation of immunostimulatory adjuvants (e.g. TLR ligands) on the resulting immune responses to adjuvanted vaccines and may play a critical role for combating diseases where T cell immunity is advantageous. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Emotional intelligence and job performance: The mediating role of work-family balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzimmer, Laurence G; Baumann, Heidi M; Gullifor, Daniel P; Koubova, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examine the dynamics between emotional intelligence, work-family balance, and job performance. A review of the literature to date has shown distinct relationships between emotional intelligence to job performance and work-family balance to job performance. We utilize a sample of 233 respondents to empirically test our set of hypotheses that contend work-family balance mediates the relationship between emotional intelligence and job performance. Our results support these hypotheses. Practical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  13. Sublethal exposure to alpha radiation (223Ra dichloride) enhances various carcinomas' sensitivity to lysis by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes through calreticulin-mediated immunogenic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamas, Anthony S; Gameiro, Sofia R; Knudson, Karin M; Hodge, James W

    2016-12-27

    Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®; 223Ra) is an alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical FDA-approved for the treatment of bone metastases in patients with advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. It is also being examined clinically in patients with breast and lung carcinoma and patients with multiple myeloma. As with other forms of radiation, the aim of 223Ra is to reduce tumor burden by directly killing tumor cells. External beam (photon) and proton radiation have been shown to augment tumor sensitivity to antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, little is known about whether treatment with 223Ra can also induce such immunogenic modulation in tumor cells that survive irradiation. We examined these effects in vitro by exposing human prostate, breast, and lung carcinoma cells to sublethal doses of 223Ra. 223Ra significantly enhanced T cell-mediated lysis of each tumor type by CD8+ CTLs specific for MUC-1, brachyury, and CEA tumor antigens. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the increase in CTL killing was accompanied by augmented protein expression of MHC-I and calreticulin in each tumor type, molecules that are essential for efficient antigen presentation. Enhanced tumor-cell lysis was facilitated by calreticulin surface translocation following 223Ra exposure. The phenotypic changes observed after treatment appear to be mediated by induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response pathway. By rendering tumor cells more susceptible to T cell-mediated lysis, 223Ra may potentially be effective in combination with various immunotherapies, particularly cancer vaccines that are designed to generate and expand patients' endogenous antigen-specific T-cell populations against specific tumor antigens.

  14. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8⁺ cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (Mφ). The present studies investigated the role of Mφ in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of Mφ antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of Mφ by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of Mφ, demonstrating the substantial role of Mφ in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed Mφ and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated Mφ. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated Mφ mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated Mφ in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of Mφ in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation.

  15. Book Reading Mediation, SES, Home Literacy Environment, and Children's Literacy: Evidence from Arabic-Speaking Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korat, Ofra; Arafat, Safieh H.; Aram, Dorit; Klein, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the contribution of maternal mediation in storybook reading, socioeconomic status (SES), and home literacy environment (HLE) to children's literacy level in kindergarten and first grade in Israeli Arabic-speaking families. A total of 109 kindergarten children and their mothers participated. Children's literacy level was…

  16. Parenting and Family Stress as Mediators of the Long-Term Effects of Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Tiffany Weissmann; Silvern, Louise

    1994-01-01

    Data on child physical/sexual abuse, family stress histories, perceived parental warmth, and current psychological functioning were gathered from 259 working women. Multiple regression analyses showed that parental warmth strongly influenced or mediated the relationship of intrafamilial child abuse to depression and self-esteem levels. However,…

  17. Self-Regulation Mediates the Link between Family Context and Socioemotional Competence in Turkish Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Gizem; Yagmurlu, Bilge; Harma, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: In this study, we examined self-regulatory skills, namely, effortful control and executive function, in Turkish preschoolers (N = 217) and their mediating roles in the associations between parenting and children's socioemotional competence. We also investigated the role of family socioeconomic status and maternal psychological…

  18. Family Communication Patterns and Relational Maintenance Behavior: Direct and Mediated Associations with Friendship Closeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, both face-to-face and online relational maintenance behaviors were tested as mediators of family communication patterns and closeness with a same-sex friend. Participants included 417 young adults recruited from communication courses at a large university in the Midwestern United States. The obtained structural model demonstrated…

  19. Mediation with Families in Separation and Divorce in the United Kingdom: Links with Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    Gives a brief account of recent developments in matrimonial law related to divorce, custody, and visitation to the children of divorcing couples. Discusses the development of mediation, its organizational structure, and its place within the context of the legal system of the United Kingdom. Outlines the principles of conciliation. (Author/ABL)

  20. LMX, Breach Perceptions, Work-Family Conflict, and Well-Being: A Mediational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rachel T; Morganson, Valerie J; Matthews, Russell A; Atkinson, Theresa P

    2016-01-01

    Despite research advances, work-family scholars still lack an understanding of how leadership constructs relate to an employee's ability to effectively manage the work-family interface. In addition, there remains a need to examine the process through which leadership and work-family conflict influence well-being outcomes. Using a sample of 312 workers, a mediated process model grounded in social exchange theory is tested wherein the authors seek to explain how leaders shape employee perceptions, which, in turn, impact organizational fulfillment of expectations (i.e., psychological contract breach), work-family conflict, and well-being. A fully latent structural equation model was used to test study hypotheses, all of which were supported. Building on existing theory, findings suggest that the supervisor plays a critical role as a frontline representative for the organization and that work-family conflict is reduced and well-being enhanced through a process of social exchange between the supervisor and worker.

  1. Family Material Hardship and Chinese Adolescents’ Problem Behaviors: A Moderated Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenqiang; Li, Dongping; Zhang, Wei; Bao, Zhenzhou; Wang, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we examined a moderated mediation model using the risk and resilience framework. Specifically, the impact of family material hardship on adolescent problem behaviors was examined in a Chinese sample; we used the family stress model framework to investigate parental depression and negative parenting as potential mediators of the relation between family material hardship and adolescents’ problem behaviors. In addition, based on resilience theory, we investigated adolescents’ resilience as a potential protective factor in the development of their internalizing and externalizing problems. Participants included 1,419 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 15.38 years, SD = 1.79) and their primary caregivers. After controlling for covariates (age, gender, location of family residence, and primary caregiver), we found that parental depression and negative parenting mediated the association between family material hardship and adolescents’ problem behaviors. Furthermore, the adolescent resilience moderated the relationship between negative parenting and internalizing problems in a protective-stabilizing pattern; in addition, a protective-reactive pattern also emerged when adolescent resilience was examined as a moderator of the relationship between negative parenting and externalizing problems. These findings contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of risk and resilience in youth development. Moreover, the findings have important implications for the prevention of adolescent problem behaviors. PMID:26010256

  2. Family material hardship and chinese adolescents' problem behaviors: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenqiang; Li, Dongping; Zhang, Wei; Bao, Zhenzhou; Wang, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we examined a moderated mediation model using the risk and resilience framework. Specifically, the impact of family material hardship on adolescent problem behaviors was examined in a Chinese sample; we used the family stress model framework to investigate parental depression and negative parenting as potential mediators of the relation between family material hardship and adolescents' problem behaviors. In addition, based on resilience theory, we investigated adolescents' resilience as a potential protective factor in the development of their internalizing and externalizing problems. Participants included 1,419 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 15.38 years, SD = 1.79) and their primary caregivers. After controlling for covariates (age, gender, location of family residence, and primary caregiver), we found that parental depression and negative parenting mediated the association between family material hardship and adolescents' problem behaviors. Furthermore, the adolescent resilience moderated the relationship between negative parenting and internalizing problems in a protective-stabilizing pattern; in addition, a protective-reactive pattern also emerged when adolescent resilience was examined as a moderator of the relationship between negative parenting and externalizing problems. These findings contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of risk and resilience in youth development. Moreover, the findings have important implications for the prevention of adolescent problem behaviors.

  3. Family material hardship and chinese adolescents' problem behaviors: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Sun

    Full Text Available In the current study, we examined a moderated mediation model using the risk and resilience framework. Specifically, the impact of family material hardship on adolescent problem behaviors was examined in a Chinese sample; we used the family stress model framework to investigate parental depression and negative parenting as potential mediators of the relation between family material hardship and adolescents' problem behaviors. In addition, based on resilience theory, we investigated adolescents' resilience as a potential protective factor in the development of their internalizing and externalizing problems. Participants included 1,419 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 15.38 years, SD = 1.79 and their primary caregivers. After controlling for covariates (age, gender, location of family residence, and primary caregiver, we found that parental depression and negative parenting mediated the association between family material hardship and adolescents' problem behaviors. Furthermore, the adolescent resilience moderated the relationship between negative parenting and internalizing problems in a protective-stabilizing pattern; in addition, a protective-reactive pattern also emerged when adolescent resilience was examined as a moderator of the relationship between negative parenting and externalizing problems. These findings contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of risk and resilience in youth development. Moreover, the findings have important implications for the prevention of adolescent problem behaviors.

  4. Participation of CD45, NKR-P1A and ANK61 antigen in rat hepatic NK cell (pit cell)-mediated target cell cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dian Zhong Luo; David Vermijlen; B lent Ahishali; Vasilis Triantis; Eddie Wisse; Karin Vanderkerken; Peter J.K. Kuppen

    2000-01-01

    AIM Several triggering receptors have been described to be involved in natural killer (NK) cellmediated target cytotoxicity. In these studies, NK cells derived from blood or spleen were used. Pit cells are liver-specific NK cells that possess a higher level of natural cytotoxicity and a different morphology when compared to blood NK cells. The aim of this study was to characterize the role of the NK-triggering molecules NKR-P1A, ANK61 antigen, and CD45 in pit cell-mediated killing of target cells. METHODS 51 Cr-release and DNA fragmentation were used to quantify target cell lysis and apoptosis, respectively. RESULTS Flow cytometric analysis showed that pit cells expressed CD45, NKR-P1A, and ANK61 antigen. Treatment of pit cells with monoclonal antibody ( mAb ) to CD45 ( ANK74 ) not only inhibited CC531s or YAC-1 target lysis but also apoptosis induced by pit cells. The mAbs to NKRP1A (3.2.3) and ANK61 antigen (ANK61) had no effect on pit cell-mediated CC531s or YAC-1 target cytolysis or apoptosis, while they did increase the Fcγ receptor positive (FcγR+) P815 cytolysis and apoptosis. This enhanced cytotoxicity could he inhibited by 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, an inhibitor of granzymes. CONCLUSION These results indicate that CD45 participates in pit cell-mediated CC531s and YAC-1 target cytolysis and apoptosis. NKR-P1A and ANK61 antigen on pit cells function as activation structures against FcγR+ P815 cells, which was mediated by the perforin/granzyme pathway.

  5. Interrole conflict and self-efficacy to manage work and family demands mediate the relationships of job and family demands with stress in the job and family domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoktunowicz, Ewelina; Cieslak, Roman; Demerouti, Evangelia

    2017-09-01

    This study derives from Work-Home Resources model (ten Brummelhuis, L. L., & Bakker, A. B. (2012). A resource perspective on the work-home interface: The work-home resources model. American Psychologist, 67(7), 545-556. doi: 10.1037/a0027974 ) and Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ, US: Prentice-Hall, Inc.) to investigate mechanisms responsible for the effect of job and family demands on work- and family-related perceived stress. We hypothesized that interrole conflict and self-efficacy to manage work and family demands operate either independently or sequentially transmitting the effects of demands on perceived stress. A sample of 100 employees of various occupations participated in the study conducted online in two waves: Time 1 (T1) and Time 2 (T2) with a three-month interval. Regression analysis with bootstrapping was applied. Interrole conflict (T1) did not mediate the relationships between demands (T1) and perceived stress (T2), whereas self-efficacy (T1) mediated only those between family demands (T1) and stress (T2). However, data supported the sequential mediation hypotheses: Demands (T1) were associated with increased interrole conflict (T1) which in turn decreased self-efficacy (T1) and ultimately resulted in the elevated perceived stress at work and in the family (T2). Demands originating in one domain can impact stress both in the same and other life areas through the sequence of interrole conflict and context-specific self-efficacy.

  6. Arbitration Of Family Separation Issues – A Useful Adjunct To Mediation And The Court Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M (Leentjie de Jong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For over half a century now, section 2(a of the Arbitration Act 42 of 1965 has prohibited arbitration in respect of matrimonial and related matters. In this article it will be illustrated that this prohibition is clearly incompatible with present-day demands. Today there is a strong tendency in public policy towards alternative dispute resolution processes such as arbitration. As any recommendations that arbitration should be applied to family law disputes must be anchored in an analysis of the specific character of the arbitral remedy, the article begins by giving a broad overview of the nature of arbitration. This is followed by a discussion of the present-day demand for family arbitration, which examines the problems experienced with the adversarial system of litigation in resolving family law disputes, party autonomy, the development of alternative dispute resolution processes such as mediation and arbitration, the special synergy between mediation and arbitration, the success of arbitration in other fields of law and possible forerunners for family arbitration in South Africa. Inherent in the demand for family law arbitration are the many advantages of arbitration, which are also touched upon. Thirdly, current trends in England, Australia, the United States of America, Canada and India are analysed so as to identify a suitable family law arbitration model for South Africa. Special attention is paid to the matters that should be referred to arbitration – for example, should it be confined to matrimonial property and financial disputes or extended to all matters incidental to divorce or family breakdown, including children's issues? Other questions examined include whether family arbitration should comply with substantive law only, who should act as arbitrators, whether family arbitration should be voluntary or compulsory, what the court's role in the family arbitration process should be, and whether family law arbitration should be

  7. Anthrax lethal factor (LF) mediated block of the anthrax protective antigen (PA) ion channel: effect of ionic strength and voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, Tobias; Tonello, Fiorella; Dal Molin, Federica; Schiffler, Bettina; Orlik, Frank; Benz, Roland

    2006-03-07

    The anthrax toxin complex consists of three different molecules, protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). The activated form of PA, PA(63), forms heptamers that insert at low pH in biological membranes forming ion channels and that are necessary to translocate EF and LF in the cell cytosol. LF and EF are intracellular active enzymes that inhibit the host immune system promoting bacterial outgrowth. Here, PA(63) was reconstituted into artificial lipid bilayer membranes and formed ion-permeable channels. The heptameric PA(63) channel contains a binding site for LF on the cis side of the channel. Full-size LF was found to block the PA(63) channel in a dose- and ionic-strength-dependent way with half-saturation constants in the nanomolar concentration range. The binding curves suggest a 1:1 relationship between (PA(63))(7) and bound LF that blocks the channel. The presence of a His(6) tag at the N-terminal end of LF strongly increases the affinity of LF toward the PA(63) channel, indicating that the interaction between LF and the PA(63) channel occurs at the N terminus of the enzyme. The LF-mediated block of the PA(63)-induced membrane conductance is highly asymmetric with respect to the sign of the applied transmembrane potential. The result suggested that the PA(63) heptamers contain a high-affinity binding site for LF inside domain 1 or the channel vestibule and that the binding is ionic-strength-dependent.

  8. Balancing selection maintains a form of ERAP2 that undergoes nonsense-mediated decay and affects antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Aida M; Dennis, Megan Y; Kretzschmar, Warren W; Cannons, Jennifer L; Lee-Lin, Shih-Queen; Hurle, Belen; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Williamson, Scott H; Bustamante, Carlos D; Nielsen, Rasmus; Clark, Andrew G; Green, Eric D

    2010-10-14

    A remarkable characteristic of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is its extreme genetic diversity, which is maintained by balancing selection. In fact, the MHC complex remains one of the best-known examples of natural selection in humans, with well-established genetic signatures and biological mechanisms for the action of selection. Here, we present genetic and functional evidence that another gene with a fundamental role in MHC class I presentation, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2), has also evolved under balancing selection and contains a variant that affects antigen presentation. Specifically, genetic analyses of six human populations revealed strong and consistent signatures of balancing selection affecting ERAP2. This selection maintains two highly differentiated haplotypes (Haplotype A and Haplotype B), with frequencies 0.44 and 0.56, respectively. We found that ERAP2 expressed from Haplotype B undergoes differential splicing and encodes a truncated protein, leading to nonsense-mediated decay of the mRNA. To investigate the consequences of ERAP2 deficiency on MHC presentation, we correlated surface MHC class I expression with ERAP2 genotypes in primary lymphocytes. Haplotype B homozygotes had lower levels of MHC class I expressed on the surface of B cells, suggesting that naturally occurring ERAP2 deficiency affects MHC presentation and immune response. Interestingly, an ERAP2 paralog, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), also shows genetic signatures of balancing selection. Together, our findings link the genetic signatures of selection with an effect on splicing and a cellular phenotype. Although the precise selective pressure that maintains polymorphism is unknown, the demonstrated differences between the ERAP2 splice forms provide important insights into the potential mechanism for the action of selection.

  9. Perceived Workplace Culture as an Antecedent of Job Stress: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminah Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Few studies have tested the mediating effect of work-family conflict on the relationship between workplace culture and job stress. Approach: This study tested a mediation model consisting of job stress as the dependent variable, perceived family-supportive work culture as the independent variable and work-family conflict as the mediator. Data were gathered from 693 employees from private service organizations in the Klang Valley, Malaysia, using self-administered questionnaires. The data were analyzed using correlation and multiple regression analyses. Results: Results of correlation analysis revealed that perceived family-supportive work culture was related to work-family conflict and job stress and work-family conflict was related to job stress. Results of a series of multiple regression analyses indicated that work-family conflict partially mediates the relationship between perceived family-supportive work culture and job stress. Conclusion/Recommendations: Employees who perceive that their organizations are family-supportive seem to experience less stress at the workplace and less work-family conflict. Employers should take into consideration employees’ perceptions of how supportive the organization is of their family needs as a factor that could reduce the experience of work-family conflict and job stress. Employers should also look into the possibility of developing programmes to assist employees in managing work-family roles.

  10. The herpes virus Fc receptor gE-gI mediates antibody bipolar bridging to clear viral antigens from the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndjamen, Blaise; Farley, Alexander H; Lee, Terri; Fraser, Scott E; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2014-03-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein gE-gI is a transmembrane Fc receptor found on the surface of infected cells and virions that binds human immunoglobulin G (hIgG). gE-gI can also participate in antibody bipolar bridging (ABB), a process by which the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) of the IgG bind a viral antigen while the Fc binds to gE-gI. IgG Fc binds gE-gI at basic, but not acidic, pH, suggesting that IgG bound at extracellular pH by cell surface gE-gI would dissociate and be degraded in acidic endosomes/lysosomes if endocytosed. The fate of viral antigens associated with gE-gI-bound IgG had been unknown: they could remain at the cell surface or be endocytosed with IgG. Here, we developed an in vitro model system for ABB and investigated the trafficking of ABB complexes using 4-D confocal fluorescence imaging of ABB complexes with transferrin or epidermal growth factor, well-characterized intracellular trafficking markers. Our data showed that cells expressing gE-gI and the viral antigen HSV-1 gD endocytosed anti-gD IgG and gD in a gE-gI-dependent process, resulting in lysosomal localization. These results suggest that gE-gI can mediate clearance of infected cell surfaces of anti-viral host IgG and viral antigens to evade IgG-mediated responses, representing a general mechanism for viral Fc receptors in immune evasion and viral pathogenesis.

  11. The herpes virus Fc receptor gE-gI mediates antibody bipolar bridging to clear viral antigens from the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaise Ndjamen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1 glycoprotein gE-gI is a transmembrane Fc receptor found on the surface of infected cells and virions that binds human immunoglobulin G (hIgG. gE-gI can also participate in antibody bipolar bridging (ABB, a process by which the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs of the IgG bind a viral antigen while the Fc binds to gE-gI. IgG Fc binds gE-gI at basic, but not acidic, pH, suggesting that IgG bound at extracellular pH by cell surface gE-gI would dissociate and be degraded in acidic endosomes/lysosomes if endocytosed. The fate of viral antigens associated with gE-gI-bound IgG had been unknown: they could remain at the cell surface or be endocytosed with IgG. Here, we developed an in vitro model system for ABB and investigated the trafficking of ABB complexes using 4-D confocal fluorescence imaging of ABB complexes with transferrin or epidermal growth factor, well-characterized intracellular trafficking markers. Our data showed that cells expressing gE-gI and the viral antigen HSV-1 gD endocytosed anti-gD IgG and gD in a gE-gI-dependent process, resulting in lysosomal localization. These results suggest that gE-gI can mediate clearance of infected cell surfaces of anti-viral host IgG and viral antigens to evade IgG-mediated responses, representing a general mechanism for viral Fc receptors in immune evasion and viral pathogenesis.

  12. Transcription analysis of the major antigenic protein 1 multigene family of three in vitro-cultured Ehrlichia ruminantium isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Cornelis P J; Postigo, Milagros; Taoufik, Amar; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Ferraz, Conchita; Martinez, Dominique; Jongejan, Frans

    2005-07-01

    Ehrlichia ruminantium, an obligate intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyomma, causes heartwater disease in ruminants. The gene coding for the major antigenic protein MAP1 is part of a multigene family consisting of a cluster containing 16 paralogs. In the search for differentially regulated genes between E. ruminantium grown in endothelial and tick cell lines that could be used in vaccine development and to determine if differences in the map1 gene cluster exist between different isolates of E. ruminantium, we analyzed the map1 gene cluster of the Senegal and Gardel isolates of E. ruminantium. Both isolates contained the same number of genes, and the same organization as found in the genome sequence of the Welgevonden isolate (H. Van Heerden, N. E. Collins, K. A. Brayton, C. Rademeyer, and B. A. Allsopp, Gene 330:159-168, 2004). However, comparison of two subpopulations of the Gardel isolate maintained in different laboratories demonstrated that recombination between map1-3 and map1-2 had occurred in one subpopulation with deletion of one entire gene. Reverse transcription-PCR on E. ruminantium derived mRNA from infected cells using gene-specific primers revealed that all 16 map1 paralogs were transcribed in endothelial cells. In one vector (Amblyomma variegatum) and several nonvector tick cell lines infected with E. ruminantium, transcripts were found for between 4 and 11 paralogs. In all these cases the transcript for the map1-1 gene was detected and was predominant. Our results indicate that the map1 gene cluster is relatively conserved but can be subject to recombination, and differences in the transcription of map1 multigenes in host and vector cell environments exist.

  13. The promastigote surface antigen gene family of the Leishmania parasite: differential evolution by positive selection and recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bañuls Anne-Laure

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSA (promastigote surface antigen is one of the major classes of membrane proteins present at the surface of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. While it harbours leucine rich repeats, which are suggestive of its involvement in parasite-to-host physical interactions, its exact role is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent of diversity of this gene family, both in copy number and sequence has not been established. Results From the newly available complete genome sequences of L. major, L. infantum and L. braziliensis, we have established the complete list of PSA genes, based on the conservation of specific domain architecture. The latter includes an array of leucine rich repeats of unique signature flanked by conserved cysteine-rich domains. All PSA genes code either for secreted or membrane-anchored surface proteins. Besides the few previously identified PSA genes, which are shown here to be part of a relatively large subclass of PSA genes located on chromosome 12, this study identifies seven other PSA subtypes. The latter, whose genes lie on chromosomes 5, 9, 21 and 31 in all three species, form single gene (two genes in one instance subfamilies, which phylogenetically cluster as highly related orthologs. On the other hand, genes found on chromosome 12 generally show high diversification, as reflected in greater sequence divergence between species, and in an extended set of divergent paralogs. Moreover, we show that the latter genes are submitted to strong positive selection. We also provide evidence that evolution of these genes is driven by intra- and intergenic recombination, thereby modulating the number of LRRs in protein and generating chimeric genes. Conclusion PSA is a Leishmania family of membrane-bound or secreted proteins, whose main signature consists in a specific LRR sequence. All PSA genes found in the genomes of three sequenced Leishmania species unambiguously distribute into eight subfamilies of orthologs

  14. Family incivility and job performance: a moderated mediation model of psychological distress and core self-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sandy; Tai, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    This study extends the stress literature by exploring the relationship between family incivility and job performance. We examine whether psychological distress mediates the link between family incivility and job performance. We also investigate how core self-evaluation might moderate this mediated relationship. Data from a 2-wave study indicate that psychological distress mediates the relationship between family incivility and job performance. In addition, core self-evaluation moderates the relationship between family incivility and psychological distress but not the relationship between psychological distress and job performance. The results hold while controlling for general job stress, family-to-work conflict, and work-to-family conflict. The findings suggest that family incivility is linked to poor performance at work, and psychological distress and core self-evaluation are key mechanisms in the relationship.

  15. Positive family relationships and religious affiliation as mediators between negative environment and illicit drug symptoms in American Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mansoo; Stiffman, Arlene R

    2010-07-01

    The present study tests how positive family relationships and religious affiliation mediate between negative familial and social environments, and adolescent illicit drug abuse/dependence symptoms. The theoretical framework is based on an integration of two theories: the ecological model of human development (Bronfenbrenner, 1979) and the social development model (Hawkins & Weis, 1985). We used a stratified random sample of 401 American Indian adolescents. A path analysis tested the integrative theoretical model. Findings showed that positive family relationships mediated the negative impact of addicted family members, violence victimization, and negative school environment on illicit drug abuse/dependence symptoms. Religious affiliation mediated the negative effect of deviant peers on positive family relationships. Intervention and prevention efforts may benefit from promoting positive family relationships and religious affiliation to reduce the impact of complex familial and social problems on illicit drug symptoms.

  16. Empathy and Self-Regulation as Mediators between Parenting and Adolescents' Prosocial Behavior toward Strangers, Friends, and Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Walker, Laura M.; Christensen, Katherine J.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the role of empathy and self-regulation as mediators between positive parenting (mothering and fathering) and early adolescents' prosocial behavior toward 3 targets (strangers, friends, and family). Data were taken from Time 1 and Time 2 of the "Flourishing Families Project," and included reports from 500 families with…

  17. Interleukin 10 (IL-10)-mediated Immunosuppression: MARCH-I INDUCTION REGULATES ANTIGEN PRESENTATION BY MACROPHAGES BUT NOT DENDRITIC CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sharad K; Cho, Kyung-Jin; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A

    2015-11-06

    Efficient immune responses require regulated antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. IL-10 inhibits the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages to stimulate antigen-specific CD4 T cells; however, the mechanisms by which IL-10 suppresses antigen presentation remain poorly understood. We now report that IL-10 stimulates expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I in activated macrophages, thereby down-regulating MHC-II, CD86, and antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. By contrast, IL-10 does not stimulate March-I expression in DCs, does not suppress MHC-II or CD86 expression on either resting or activated DCs, and does not affect antigen presentation by activated DCs. IL-10 does, however, inhibit the process of DC activation itself, thereby reducing the efficiency of antigen presentation in a March-I-independent manner. Thus, IL-10 suppression of antigen presenting cell function in macrophages is March-I-dependent, whereas in DCs, suppression is March- I-independent.

  18. Depression and resilience mediates the effect of family function on quality of life of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canjie; Yuan, Lexin; Lin, Weiquan; Zhou, Ying; Pan, Shengmao

    2017-07-01

    Family function, which improves individual resilience and strongly link to quality of life (QOL) among the elderly, increases the risk of depression. Because of these demonstrated relationships, it can be hypothesized that both depression and resilience are mediators of the association between family function and QOL. To test this hypothesis, the structural equation model (SEM) constructed by Amos 21.0 was employed to assess the indirect effect of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale, GDS) and resilience (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, CD-RISC) on the relationship between family function (Family APGAR Score, APGAR) and QOL (12-item Short Form health survey, SF-12) in 474 elderly adults from three communities in Guangzhou, China. Correlation matrix showed that depression is significantly negatively correlated with family functioning (r=-0.54, Presilience (r=-0.46, Presilience is significantly positively correlated with family functioning (r=0.35, Presilience (β=0.089) and depression (β=0.307; combined β=0.056) on QOL (R(2)=0.55). The model fit indices showed a good fit of the model of the data (χ(2)/df=1.362, P>0.05, SRMR=0.023, RMSEA=0.028, GFI=0.985, NFI=0.987, TLI=0.993, CFI=0.996). The finding supports the assumption that depression and resilience are consistent intermediary factors of the relationship between family function and QOL among the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Epigenetic regulations in the IFNγ signalling pathway: IFNγ-mediated MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells is associated with DNA demethylation of antigen-presenting machinery genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlková, Veronika; Štěpánek, Ivan; Hrušková, Veronika; Šenigl, Filip; Mayerová, Veronika; Šrámek, Martin; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Hejhal, Tomáš; Dérian, Nicolas; Klatzmann, David; Six, Adrien; Reiniš, Milan

    2014-08-30

    Downregulation of MHC class I expression on tumour cells, a common mechanism by which tumour cells can escape from specific immune responses, can be associated with coordinated silencing of antigen-presenting machinery genes. The expression of these genes can be restored by IFNγ. In this study we documented association of DNA demethylation of selected antigen-presenting machinery genes located in the MHC genomic locus (TAP-1, TAP-2, LMP-2, LMP-7) upon IFNγ treatment with MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells in several MHC class I-deficient murine tumour cell lines (TC-1/A9, TRAMP-C2, MK16 and MC15). Our data also documented higher methylation levels in these genes in TC-1/A9 cells, as compared to their parental MHC class I-positive TC-1 cells. IFNγ-mediated DNA demethylation was relatively fast in comparison with demethylation induced by DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine, and associated with increased histone H3 acetylation in the promoter regions of APM genes. Comparative transcriptome analysis in distinct MHC class I-deficient cell lines upon their treatment with either IFNγ or epigenetic agents revealed that a set of genes, significantly enriched for the antigen presentation pathway, was regulated in the same manner. Our data demonstrate that IFNγ acts as an epigenetic modifier when upregulating the expression of antigen-presenting machinery genes.

  20. Child language and parent discipline mediate the relation between family income and false belief understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Virginia; Logan, Jessica A R; Blosser, Daniel F; Duffy, Kaylin

    2017-06-01

    Achieving false belief understanding is an important cognitive milestone that allows children to understand that thoughts and reality can differ. Researchers have found that low-income children score significantly lower than middle-income children on false belief understanding but have not examined why this difference exists. We hypothesized that children's language and parent discipline mediate the income-false belief relation. Participants were 174 3- to 6-year-olds. False belief understanding was significantly correlated with family income, children's vocabulary, parents' self-reported discussion of children's behavior, discussion of emotions, and power assertion. Family income had a significant indirect effect on false belief understanding through children's vocabulary and parent discipline when examined independently, but only through children's vocabulary when using parallel multiple mediation. This study contributes to our knowledge of individual differences in false belief understanding.

  1. T cell antigen receptor stimulation induces MALT1 paracaspase-mediated cleavage of the NF-kappaB inhibitor A20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coornaert, Beatrice; Baens, Mathijs; Heyninck, Karen; Bekaert, Tine; Haegman, Mira; Staal, Jens; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhijian J; Marynen, Peter; Beyaert, Rudi

    2008-03-01

    The paracaspase MALT1 mediates T cell antigen receptor-induced signaling to the transcription factor NF-kappaB and is indispensable for T cell activation and proliferation. Enhanced expression of MALT1 or aberrant expression of a fusion protein of the apoptosis inhibitor API2 and MALT1 has been linked to mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Despite the presence of a caspase-like domain, MALT1 proteolytic activity has not yet been demonstrated. Here we show that T cell antigen receptor stimulation induced recruitment of the NF-kappaB inhibitor A20 into a complex of MALT1 and the adaptor protein Bcl-10, leading to MALT1-mediated processing of A20. API2-MALT1 expression likewise resulted in cleavage of A20. MALT1 cleaved human A20 after arginine 439 and impaired its NF-kappaB-inhibitory function. Our studies identify A20 as a substrate of MALT1 and emphasize the importance of MALT1 proteolytic activity in the 'fine tuning' of T cell antigen receptor signaling.

  2. Abl family kinases regulate FcγR-mediated phagocytosis in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuber, Emileigh K; Pendergast, Ann Marie

    2012-12-01

    Phagocytosis of Ab-coated pathogens is mediated through FcγRs, which activate intracellular signaling pathways to drive actin cytoskeletal rearrangements. Abl and Arg define a family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases that regulate actin-dependent processes in a variety of cell types, including those important in the adaptive immune response. Using pharmacological inhibition as well as dominant negative and knockout approaches, we demonstrate a role for the Abl family kinases in phagocytosis by macrophages and define a mechanism whereby Abl kinases regulate this process. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from mice lacking Abl and Arg kinases exhibit inefficient phagocytosis of sheep erythrocytes and zymosan particles. Treatment with the Abl kinase inhibitors imatinib and GNF-2 or overexpression of kinase-inactive forms of the Abl family kinases also impairs particle internalization in murine macrophages, indicating Abl kinase activity is required for efficient phagocytosis. Further, Arg kinase is present at the phagocytic cup, and Abl family kinases are activated by FcγR engagement. The regulation of phagocytosis by Abl family kinases is mediated in part by the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Loss of Abl and Arg expression or treatment with Abl inhibitors reduced Syk phosphorylation in response to FcγR ligation. The link between Abl family kinases and Syk may be direct, as purified Arg kinase phosphorylates Syk in vitro. Further, overexpression of membrane-targeted Syk in cells treated with Abl kinase inhibitors partially rescues the impairment in phagocytosis. Together, these findings reveal that Abl family kinases control the efficiency of phagocytosis in part through the regulation of Syk function.

  3. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME therapy following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stokes Emma

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744

  4. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a major health concern for college students due to its substantial morbidity and mortality. Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students’ depression are not well understood. We tested whether adverse family and college environments mediate the relationship between parental educational level and depression among Chinese college students. ...

  5. Psychological Capital and Performance: The Mediating Role of Work Family Spillover and Psychological Well-Being

    OpenAIRE

    Sema Polatcı; Asuman Akdoğan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between psychological capital and performance and to identify work family spillover and psychological well-being as a mediator of the effects of psychological capital on performance. Data was gathered from 361 white-collar employees from different occupations. The results based on Structural Equation Modeling reveal that psychological capital plays an important role in providing employees to have high performance. The results also i...

  6. Home environment as a predictor of child's language: A mediating role of family literacy activities and symbolic play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Fekonja-Peklaj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In our study, we explored the ways in which SES-related factors of family environment affect child's language across toddlerhood and early childhood. We proposed a mediational path model in which we presumed that family literacy activities and parental encouragement of symbolic play acted as mediating variables, mediating the effect of parental education, family possessions and parent-to-child speech on child's language. The sample included 99 families with children, aged from 1 to 6 years. The data were collected in the family home, mostly via direct observation and by using a semi-structured interview with parents. The findings suggest that high-SES parents and parents who used a more complex and supportive speech, more frequently involved their children in different literacy activities. The effect of the parent-to-child speech on child's language proved to be mediated by parental use of mental transformations during symbolic play with a child.

  7. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and antigen I/II deficient mutant to laminin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, H.J.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant I

  8. Detection of Rare Antigen Presenting Cells through T cell-intrinsic meandering motility, mediated by Myo1g

    OpenAIRE

    Gérard, Audrey; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Beemiller, Peter; Nambiar, Rajalakshmi; Ben-Aissa, Khadija; Liu, Yin; Totah, Fadi J.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Shaw, Stephen; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    To mount an immune response, T lymphocytes must successfully search for foreign material bound to the surface of antigen-presenting cells. How T cells optimize their chances of encountering and responding to these antigens is unknown. T cell motility in tissues resembles a random or Levy walk and is regulated in part by external factors including chemokines and lymph node topology, but motility parameters such as speed and propensity to turn may also be cell-intrinsic. Here we found that the ...

  9. Functional balance between T cell chimeric receptor density and tumor associated antigen density: CTL mediated cytolysis and lymphokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijtens, M E; Hart, E H; Bolhuis, R L

    2000-01-01

    Genetically engineered expression of tumor-specific single chain antibody chimeric receptors (ch-Rec) on human T lymphocytes endow these cells with the parental monoclonal antibody (mAb) dictated tumor specificity and may be useful for clinical immuno-genetherapy. Therefore it was of importance to assess how the densities of tumor-specific receptors and tumor associated antigens (TAA), respectively, affect primary human T lymphocyte functions in relation to target cell susceptibilities to lysis. We therefore studied the functional balance between ch-Rec densities on human T lymphocytes and TAA on tumor cells. The gene construct encoding a ch-Rec derived from (1) a renal carcinoma cell (RCC) specific mouse mAb (G250), and (2) the human signal transducing Fc(epsilon)RI gamma-chain was used. To obtain ch-RecHIGH-POS and ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes, two distinct retroviral vectors were used to introduce the gene constructs into primary human T lymphocytes. Levels of ch-Rec-redirected T lymphocyte mediated tumor cell lysis, as well as lymphokine production were determined using RCC lines as target/stimulator cells, which express either no or increasing densities of the TAA. A functional and dynamic balance between ch-Rec densities on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) on the one hand and TAA densities on RCCs on the other, was found. In short, ch-RecHIGH-POS CTLs are triggered by TAAHIGH-POS as well as TAALOW-POS RCCs to lyse tumor cells and produce (IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha) lymphokine. In contrast, ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes are only triggered for cytolysis and lymphokine production by relatively TAAHIGH-POS RCCs. In conclusion, (1) the activation of T lymphocyte responses is co-determined by the expression levels of the ch-Rec on T lymphocytes and the TAA on tumor cells and (2) at relatively high T lymphocyte ch-Rec expression levels the CTLs lyse tumor cells with a wide range of TAA densities. Gene Therapy (2000) 7, 35-42.

  10. Family functioning mediates the association between parental depression and low self-esteem in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Susann; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lieb, Roselind; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Knappe, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    The negative impact of parental depression on offsprings' development has been repeatedly documented. There is however little research on the potential pathways contributing to this association. The present study examined the relationship between parental depressive disorders, family functioning and adolescents' self-esteem. A community-based sample of 1040 participants aged 14-17 years and their parents was assessed including direct and indirect information on parental psychopathology based on the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI). Family functioning and youth self-esteem were assessed by self-report questionnaires using the McMaster Family Assessment Device (FAD) in parents and the "Aussagen-Liste zum Selbstwertgefühl" in adolescents. Findings from multiple regression analyses indicated positive associations between parental depressive disorders and dimensions of dysfunctional family functioning as well as between dysfunctional familial affective involvement and youth's positive self-esteem. The relationship between parental depression and self-esteem was partly mediated by familial affective involvement. Associations may be underestimated, since incidence for depressive disorders spans to the third decade of life. Consensus diagnoses for parental depressive disorders were based on direct and indirect information for maximum use of available data, neglecting familial load, chronicity of parental depressive disorders or comorbid conditions. Thus, specificity of the findings for the family transmission of depressive disorders remains yet to be determined. Findings contribute to understanding of the pathways on how parental depression impairs offsprings' view of themselves, and to consider family functioning as a possible target for preventive interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Family functioning, self-esteem and substance use in adolescents: a mediational model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musitu, Gonzalo; Jiménez, Teresa I; Murgui, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    This research analyzes the direct and indirect relationships among family functioning, multidimensional self-esteem (family, academic, social, and physical self-esteem) and substance use. The study participants were composed of two independent samples of Spanish adolescents who provided information during the 2003-2004 academic year (n1 = 414, Castilla and León; n2 = 625, Comunidad Valenciana). The statistical analyses were carried out using structural equation modelling and the procedure of mediation effects analysis (Holmbeck, 1997). Results showed a significant mediational effect of self-esteem on the relation between family functioning and adolescent substance use. Moreover, results showed, on the one hand, a protection effect of family and academic self-esteem in the face of substance use and, on the other hand, a risk effect of social and physical self-esteem. It is necessary to adopt a multidimensional perspective when analyzing the self-esteem of adolescents with substance use and to prevent the over-valuation of social and physical dimensions.

  12. [Family and school violence: the mediator role of self-esteem and attitudes towards institutional authority].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cava, María Jesús; Musitu, Gonzalo; Murgui, Sergio

    2006-08-01

    This study analyses the influence of family communication and parental valuation of school on adolescent violent behaviour at school. By means of a structural equation model, both its direct and indirect influence through school and family self-esteem of the adolescent and his attitude towards school authority are analysed. The sample is composed of 665 adolescents whose ages range from 12 to 16 years old. The results confirm the existence of an indirect relationship but not direct influence of the family on school violence. The attitude of the adolescent towards school authority is the mediator variable which shows the strongest direct effect on school violence. Also, the two dimensions of self-esteem considered are significant intermediate variables. These results and their implications are analysed.

  13. CD1d-mediated Presentation of Endogenous Lipid Antigens by Adipocytes Requires Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Gijzel, Sanne M. W.; Siersbæk, Rasmus; Broekema, Marjoleine F.; de Haar, Colin; Schipper, Henk S.; Boes, Marianne; Mandrup, Susanne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-induced adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction results in a chronic low-grade inflammation that predisposes to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. During the development of obesity, the AT-resident immune cell profile alters to create a pro-inflammatory state. Very recently, CD1d-restricted invariant (i) natural killer T (NKT) cells, a unique subset of lymphocytes that are reactive to so called lipid antigens, were implicated in AT homeostasis. Interestingly, recent data also suggest that human and mouse adipocytes can present such lipid antigens to iNKT cells in a CD1d-dependent fashion, but little is known about the lipid antigen presentation machinery in adipocytes. Here we show that CD1d, as well as the lipid antigen loading machinery genes pro-saposin (Psap), Niemann Pick type C2 (Npc2), α-galactosidase (Gla), are up-regulated in early adipogenesis, and are transcriptionally controlled by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-β and -δ. Moreover, adipocyte-induced Th1 and Th2 cytokine release by iNKT cells also occurred in the absence of exogenous ligands, suggesting the display of endogenous lipid antigen-D1d complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, we identified microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which we show is also under the transcriptional regulation of C/EBPβ and –δ, as a novel player in the presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes. Overall, our findings indicate that adipocytes can function as non-professional lipid antigen presenting cells, which may present an important aspect of adipocyte-immune cell communication in the regulation of whole body energy metabolism and immune homeostasis. PMID:24966328

  14. CD1d-mediated presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes requires microsomal triglyceride transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Gijzel, Sanne M W; Siersbæk, Rasmus; Broekema, Marjoleine F; de Haar, Colin; Schipper, Henk S; Boes, Marianne; Mandrup, Susanne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2014-08-08

    Obesity-induced adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction results in a chronic low-grade inflammation that predisposes to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. During the development of obesity, the AT-resident immune cell profile alters to create a pro-inflammatory state. Very recently, CD1d-restricted invariant (i) natural killer T (NKT) cells, a unique subset of lymphocytes that are reactive to so called lipid antigens, were implicated in AT homeostasis. Interestingly, recent data also suggest that human and mouse adipocytes can present such lipid antigens to iNKT cells in a CD1d-dependent fashion, but little is known about the lipid antigen presentation machinery in adipocytes. Here we show that CD1d, as well as the lipid antigen loading machinery genes pro-saposin (Psap), Niemann Pick type C2 (Npc2), α-galactosidase (Gla), are up-regulated in early adipogenesis, and are transcriptionally controlled by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-β and -δ. Moreover, adipocyte-induced Th1 and Th2 cytokine release by iNKT cells also occurred in the absence of exogenous ligands, suggesting the display of endogenous lipid antigen-D1d complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, we identified microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which we show is also under the transcriptional regulation of C/EBPβ and -δ, as a novel player in the presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes. Overall, our findings indicate that adipocytes can function as non-professional lipid antigen presenting cells, which may present an important aspect of adipocyte-immune cell communication in the regulation of whole body energy metabolism and immune homeostasis.

  15. Enhanced Dendritic Cell-Mediated Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cell Responses: IFN-Gamma Aids TLR Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Ching Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic maturation and T cell stimulation are two functional attributes of DCs critical for immune induction. The combination of antigens, including those from cancer, with Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands induces far superior cellular immune responses compared to antigen alone. In this study, IFN-gamma treatment of bone marrow-derived DC, followed by incubation with the TLR2, TLR4, or TLR9 agonists, enhanced DC activation compared to TLR ligation alone. Most notably, the upregulation of CD40 with LPS stimulation and CD86 with CpG stimulation was observed in in vitro cultures. Similarly, IFN-gamma coinjected with TLR ligands was able to promote DC activation in vivo, with DCs migrating from the site of immunization to the popliteal lymph nodes demonstrating increased expression of CD80 and CD86. The heightened DC activation translated to a drastic increase in T cell stimulatory capacity in both antigen independent and antigen dependent fashions. This is the first time that IFN-gamma has been shown to have a combined effect with TLR ligation to enhance DC activation and function. The results demonstrate the novel use of IFN-gamma together with TLR agonists to enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, for applications in the development of enhanced vaccines and drug targets against diseases including cancer.

  16. Metabolic factors and genetic risk mediate familial type 2 diabetes risk in the Framingham Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Sridharan; Porneala, Bianca; McKeown, Nicola; Fox, Caroline S.; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 2 diabetes mellitus in parents is a strong determinant of diabetes risk in their offspring. We hypothesise that offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes is mediated by metabolic risk factors. Methods We studied initially non-diabetic participants of the Framingham Offspring Study. Metabolic risk was estimated using beta cell corrected insulin response (CIR), HOMA-IR or a count of metabolic syndrome components (metabolic syndrome score [MSS]). Dietary risk and physical activity were estimated using questionnaire responses. Genetic risk score (GRS) was estimated as the count of 62 type 2 diabetes risk alleles. The outcome of incident diabetes in offspring was examined across levels of parental diabetes exposure, accounting for sibling correlation and adjusting for age, sex and putative mediators. The proportion mediated was estimated by comparing regression coefficients for parental diabetes with (βadj) and without (βunadj) adjustments for CIR, HOMA-IR, MSS and GRS (percentage mediated = 1 – βadj / βunadj). Results Metabolic factors mediated 11% of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.96. GRS mediated 9% of risk, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.99. Conclusions/interpretation Metabolic risk factors partially mediated offspring type 2 diabetes risk conferred by parental diabetes to a similar magnitude as genetic risk. However, a substantial proportion of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes remains unexplained by metabolic factors, genetic risk, diet and physical activity, suggesting that important familial influences on diabetes risk remain undiscovered. PMID:25619168

  17. Testing Cermak's hypothesis: is dissociation the mediating variable that links substance abuse in the family of origin with offspring codependency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, D

    2001-01-01

    This is a pilot study of substance abuse in the family of origin and its relation to offspring dissociation and offspring codependency. Cermak contends that substance abuse in the family of origin exposes offspring to trauma, that exposure to trauma in the family of origin engenders offspring dissociation, and that dissociation is the process underlying offspring codependency. Assuming that substance abuse in the family of origin exposes offspring to trauma, this experiment tested the hypothesis that dissociation mediates the relationship between substance abuse in the family of origin and offspring codependency. Although it was found that substance abuse in the family of origin, offspring dissociation, and offspring codependency were associated, no support was found for the prediction that dissociation mediates the relationship between substance abuse in the family of origin and offspring codependency. Replications are called for.

  18. The mediating effects of self-esteem and delinquency on the relationship between family social capital and adolescents’ educational achievement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omolola Abiola Adedokun; Mark A Balschweid

    2008-01-01

    ... achievement of rural adolescents. Structural equation modeling analyses reveal that the combination of self-esteem and delinquency completely mediates the influence of family social capital on educational achievement...

  19. The TEAD/TEF Family Protein Scalloped Mediates Transcriptional Output of the Hippo Growth-Regulatory Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Shian; Liu, Yi; Zheng, Yonggang; Dong, Jixin; Pan, Duojia

    2008-01-01

    .... Here we identify the TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped (Sd) as a DNA-binding transcription factor that partners with Yki to mediate the transcriptional output of the Hpo growth-regulatory pathway. The diap1 (th...

  20. Simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression of melanoma antigen-A family and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens represents an independent marker for poor survival in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Simon; Atanackovic, Djordje; Luetkens, Tim; Knecht, Rainald; Busch, Chia-Jung; Freytag, Marcus; Spagnoli, Giulio; Ritter, Gerd; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Knuth, Alexander; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Blessmann, Marco; Borgmann, Kerstin; Muenscher, Adrian; Clauditz, Till S

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients remains poor. The identification of high-risk subgroups is needed for the development of custom-tailored therapies. The expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) has been linked to a worse prognosis in other cancer types; however, their prognostic value in HNSCC is unclear because only few patients have been examined and data on CTA protein expression are sparse. A tissue microarray consisting of tumor samples from 453 HNSCC patients was evaluated for the expression of CTA proteins using immunohistochemistry. Frequency of expression and the subcellular expression pattern (nuclear, cytoplasmic, or both) was recorded. Protein expression of melanoma antigen (MAGE)-A family CTA, MAGE-C family CTA and NY-ESO-1 was found in approximately 30, 7 and 4% of tumors, respectively. The subcellular expression pattern in particular had a marked impact on the patients' prognosis. Median overall survival (OS) of patients with (i) simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear expression compared to (ii) either cytoplasmic or nuclear expression and (iii) negative patients was 23.0 versus 109.0 versus 102.5 months, for pan-MAGE (p < 0.0001), 46.6 versus 50.0 versus 109.0 for MAGE-A3/A4 (p = 0.0074) and 13.3 versus 50.0 versus 100.2 months for NY-ESO-1 (p = 0.0019). By multivariate analysis, these factors were confirmed as independent markers for poor survival. HNSCC patients showing protein expression of MAGE-A family members or NY-ESO-1 represent a subgroup with an extraordinarily poor survival. The development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeting these CTA may, therefore, be a promising approach to improve the outcome of HNSCC patients.

  1. CD1d-mediated presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes requires microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Gijzel, Sanne M W; Siersbæk, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-induced adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction results in a chronic low-grade inflammation that predisposes to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. During the development of obesity, the AT-resident immune cell profile alters to create a pro-inflammatory state. Very recently......-dependent fashion, but little is known about the lipid antigen presentation machinery in adipocytes. Here we show that CD1d, as well as the lipid antigen loading machinery genes pro-saposin (Psap), Niemann Pick type C2 (Npc2), α-galactosidase (Gla), are upregulated in early adipogenesis, and are transcriptionally...

  2. Increased translocation of antigens to endosomes and TLR4 mediated endosomal recruitment of TAP contribute to nicotine augmented cross-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Yan; Hu, Chun Fang; Li, Juan; You, Xiang; Gao, Feng Guang

    2016-06-21

    Cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) requires surface molecules such as lectin, CD40, langerin, heat shock protein, mannose receptor, mediated endocytosis, the endosomal translocation of internalized antigen, and the relocation of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). Although the activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) up-regulate surface molecule expression, augment endocytosis, and enhance cross-presentation, the molecular mechanism of α7 nAchR activation-increased cross-presentation is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of mannose receptor in nicotine-increased cross-presentation and the mechanism that endotoxins orchestrating the recruitment of TAP toward endosomes. We demonstrated that nicotine increase the expressiones of mannose receptor and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) via PI3K-Akt-mTOR-p70S6 pathway. Both endosomal translocation of mannose receptor-internalized antigens and TLR4 sig- naling are necessary for nicotine-augmented cross-presentation and cross-priming. Importantly, the recruitment of TAP toward endosomes via TLR4-MyD88-IRAK4 signaling contributes to nicotine-increased cross-presentation and cross-activation of T cells. Thus, these data suggest that increased recruitment of TAP to Ag-containing vesicles contributes to the superior cross-presentation efficacy of α7 nAchR activated DCs.

  3. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I;

    2000-01-01

    Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtrate...... in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from human tuberculosis (TB) patients, Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated donors, and nonvaccinated donors. The two ESAT-6 family members, TB10.4 and CFP10, were very strongly recognized and induced gamma interferon release at the same level (CFP10...

  4. Genetic vaccination against the melanocyte lineage-specific antigen gp100 induces cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated tumor protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, M W; de Boer, A J; Figdor, C G; Adema, G J

    1998-06-15

    Melanocyte lineage-specific antigens, such as gp100, have been shown to induce both cellular and humoral immune responses against melanoma. Therefore, these antigens are potential targets for specific antimelanoma immunotherapy. A novel approach to induce both cellular and humoral immunity is genetic vaccination, the injection of antigen-encoding naked plasmid DNA. In a mouse model, we investigated whether genetic vaccination against the human gp100 antigen results in specific antitumor immunity. The results demonstrate that vaccinated mice were protected against a lethal challenge with syngeneic B16 melanoma-expressing human gp100, but not control-transfected B16. Both cytotoxic T cells and IgG specific for human gp100 could be detected in human gp100-vaccinated mice. However, only adoptive transfer of spleen-derived lymphocytes, not of the serum, isolated from protected mice was able to transfer antitumor immunity to nonvaccinated recipients, indicating that CTLs are the predominant effector cells. CTI, lines generated from human gp100-vaccinated mice specifically recognized human gp100. Interestingly, one of the CTL lines cross-reacted between human and mouse gp100, indicating the recognition of a conserved epitope. However, these CTLs did not appear to be involved in the observed tumor protection. Collectively, our results indicate that genetic vaccination can result in a potent antitumor response in vivo and constitutes a potential immunotherapeutic strategy to fight cancer.

  5. Identifying the Associated Factors of Mediation and Due Process in Families of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan M.; Goldman, Samantha E.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to families of students with other types of disabilities, families of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are significantly more likely to enact their procedural safeguards such as mediation and due process. However, we do not know which school, child, and parent characteristics are associated with the enactment of safeguards.…

  6. Trait Mindfulness and Work-Family Balance among Working Parents: The Mediating Effects of Vitality and Sleep Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Tammy D.; Kiburz, Kaitlin M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between trait mindfulness and work-family balance among a sample of working parents. Sleep quality and vitality are tested as mediators of this relationship. Results indicate that those with greater mindfulness report greater work-family balance, better sleep quality, and greater vitality. As…

  7. Trait Mindfulness and Work-Family Balance among Working Parents: The Mediating Effects of Vitality and Sleep Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Tammy D.; Kiburz, Kaitlin M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between trait mindfulness and work-family balance among a sample of working parents. Sleep quality and vitality are tested as mediators of this relationship. Results indicate that those with greater mindfulness report greater work-family balance, better sleep quality, and greater vitality. As…

  8. Parents' Relative Socioeconomic Status and Paternal Involvement in Chinese Families: The Mediating Role of Coparenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wu, Xinchun; Zou, Shengqi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the mediating role of coparenting in the association between differences/similarities in paternal and maternal socioeconomic status (SES) and paternal involvement in Chinese families. The sample included 244 couples with children aged 3-7 years. Fathers and mothers reported their individual incomes, educational levels, occupations, and coparenting behavior (measured using the Coparenting Scale), and fathers completed the Father Involvement Questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was performed to examine the associations between SES and paternal involvement. Results suggested that SES indicator measures were outcome specific. Occupational differences/similarities were associated with paternal involvement indirectly, via fathers' family integrity practices. Income and educational differences/similarities did not affect paternal involvement. The results suggested that the traditional Chinese view that "men are chiefly responsible for activity in society, while women are responsible for the home" has faded.

  9. Structural and Functional Variation within the Alanine-Rich Repetitive Domain of Streptococcal Antigen I/II

    OpenAIRE

    Demuth, Donald R; Irvine, Douglas C.

    2002-01-01

    Members of the antigen I/II family of cell surface proteins are highly conserved, multifunctional adhesins that mediate interactions of oral streptococci with other oral bacteria, with cell matrix proteins (e.g., type I collagen), and with salivary glycoproteins, e.g., gp340. The interaction of gp340 (formerly designated salivary agglutinin) with Streptococcus mutans requires an alanine-rich repetitive domain (A region) of antigen I/II that is highly conserved in all members of this family of...

  10. Family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being: a contextually dependent mediated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Russell A; Mills, Maura J; Trout, Rachel C; English, Lucy

    2014-04-01

    Grounded in a multistudy framework, we examined the relationship between family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being as a contextually dependent mediated process. In Study 1 (N = 310), based on broaden-and-build and conservation of resources theories, we tested the proposed mediated process while controlling for perceived organizational support and perceived managerial effectiveness. We also demonstrated that family-supportive supervisor behaviors are distinguishable from general supervisor behaviors. In Study 2 (N = 1,640), using multigroup structural equation modeling, we validated and extended Study 1 results by examining how the mediated model varied based on 2 contextualizing constructs: (a) dependent care responsibilities and (b) availability of family-friendly benefits. Although the mediational results were contextually dependent, they were not necessarily consistent with hypothesizing based on conservation of resources theory. Practical implications are emphasized in addition to future research directions.

  11. Seasonal changes in cell mediated immune responses to soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens in children with haemoglobin AA and haemoglobin AS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Zeid, Y A; Abdulhadi, N H; Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    In this longitudinal study peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained before and during the malaria season from healthy HbAA and HbAS children. Cells were compared for proliferation in response to stimulation by soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens (SPAg) or purified derivative of ......AS children during the malaria season. No distinct seasonal change in the response to PPD was found in relation to the haemoglobin phenotype. The study points to the role of the sickle cell trait in modulating the cellular immune responses to falciparum malaria.......In this longitudinal study peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained before and during the malaria season from healthy HbAA and HbAS children. Cells were compared for proliferation in response to stimulation by soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens (SPAg) or purified derivative...

  12. Chlamydophila felis CF0218 is a novel TMH family protein with potential as a diagnostic antigen for diagnosis of C. felis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Kenji; Takahara, Yu; Kuroda, Etsuko; Koyasu, Saori; Hagiwara, Shigeyuki; Sakamoto, Maki; Hisaka, Mitsuaki; Morizane, Kazuko; Ishiguro, Shinryou; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Fukushi, Hideto

    2008-10-01

    Chlamydophila felis is a causative agent of acute and chronic conjunctivitis and pneumonia in cats (feline chlamydiosis). Also, C. felis is a suspected zoonotic agent of such diseases as non-Chlamydia trachomatis conjunctivitis in humans, although this is controversial. At present, there is no serodiagnostic system that specifically detects C. felis infection conveniently. Current systems use antigens such as lipopolysaccharide that cross-react with all chlamydia species. In addition, it is difficult to distinguish between cats that are vaccinated with the commercial vaccine against C. felis and cats that are infected with C. felis. Here, we describe a new candidate diagnostic antigen for diagnosis of C. felis infection, CF0218, that was obtained by screening a genomic expression library of C. felis Fe/C-56 with C. felis-immunized serum. CF0218 was a putative transmembrane head (TMH) family protein with bilobed hydrophobic motifs at its N terminus, and orthologues of CF0218 were not found in the Chlamydophila pneumoniae or Chlamydia trachomatis genomes. The recombinant CF0218 was not recognized by antiserum against C. trachomatis, suggesting that CF0218 is C. felis specific. CF0218 transcription during the course of C. felis infection was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR. By indirect immunofluorescence analysis, CF0218 was colocalized with the C. felis-formed inclusion bodies in the infected cells. The antibody response against CF0218 was elevated following C. felis infection but not by vaccination in experimentally vaccinated and infected cats. These results suggest that CF0218, a novel TMH family protein of C. felis, possesses potential as a C. felis infection-specific diagnostic antigen.

  13. Association of Autophagy in the Cell Death Mediated by Dihydrotestosterone in Autoreactive T Cells Independent of Antigenic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ting; Anandhan, Annandurai; Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Rajasekaran, Rajkumar A; Franco, Rodrigo; Reddy, Jay

    2015-12-01

    Gender disparity is well documented in the mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced with proteolipid protein (PLP) 139-151, in which female, but not male, SJL mice show a chronic relapsing-remitting paralysis. Furthermore, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) has been shown to ameliorate the severity of EAE, but the underlying mechanisms of its protective effects are unclear. Using major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II dextramers for PLP 139-151, we tested the hypothesis that DHT selectively modulates the expansion and functionalities of antigen-specific T cells. Unexpectedly, we noted that DHT induced cell death in antigen-specific, autoreactive T cells, but the effects were not selective, because both proliferating and non-proliferating cells were equally affected independent of antigenic stimulation. Furthermore, DHT-exposed PLP 139-151-specific T cells did not show any shift in cytokine production; rather, frequencies of cytokine-producing PLP-specific T cells were significantly reduced, irrespective of T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 subsets of cytokines. By evaluating cell death and autophagy pathways, we provide evidence for the induction of autophagy to be associated with cell death caused by DHT. Taken together, the data provide new insights into the role of DHT and indicate that cell death and autophagy contribute to the therapeutic effects of androgens in autoreactive T cells.

  14. Targeted antigen delivery to dendritic cells elicits robust antiviral T cell-mediated immunity in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckmar, Julia; Gereke, Marcus; Ebensen, Thomas; Riese, Peggy; Philipsen, Lars; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Wohlleber, Dirk; Klopfleisch, Robert; Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Müller, Andreas J.; Gruber, Achim D.; Knolle, Percy; Guzman, Carlos A.; Bruder, Dunja

    2017-01-01

    Hepatotropic viruses such as hepatitis C virus cause life-threatening chronic liver infections in millions of people worldwide. Targeted in vivo antigen-delivery to cross-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) has proven to be extraordinarily efficient in stimulating antigen-specific T cell responses. To determine whether this approach would as well be suitable to induce local antiviral effector T cells in the liver we compared different vaccine formulations based on either the targeting of DEC-205 or TLR2/6 on cross-presenting DCs or formulations not involving in vivo DC targeting. As read-outs we used in vivo hepatotropic adenovirus challenge, histology and automated multidimensional fluorescence microscopy (MELC). We show that targeted in vivo antigen delivery to cross-presenting DCs is highly effective in inducing antiviral CTLs capable of eliminating virus-infected hepatocytes, while control vaccine formulation not involving DC targeting failed to induce immunity against hepatotropic virus. Moreover, we observed distinct patterns of CD8+ T cell interaction with virus-infected and apoptotic hepatocytes in the two DC-targeting groups suggesting that the different vaccine formulations may stimulate distinct types of effector functions. Our findings represent an important step toward the future development of vaccines against hepatotropic viruses and the treatment of patients with hepatic virus infection after liver transplantation to avoid reinfection. PMID:28266658

  15. The mediation police in family and couple conflict: analysis of the agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Becerril

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediation is an alternative, increasingly implemented, for the resolution of conflicts outside the judicial sphere and one of its applications in conflicts reported to the police. The present work is part of an experience of police mediation that has been carried out during the years 2012-2014. Two data collection techniques have been applied: on the one hand, in the analysis of the files, with the whole set of variables that may be applicable; And by performing questionnaires to the parties involved. The two conditions adopted as a criterion in the selection of cases that refer to family conflicts of partners and which were registered in a resolution agreement. With these data, the analysis affects, beyond the characteristics, in the satisfaction of the process and the permanence of the conflict. As conclusions, the incidence of sociodemographic variables, especially the level of studies and occupational and the high degree of satisfaction and recommendation of the service, stands out. However, there is a high rate of repetition of conflicts, especially in cases of family conflicts.

  16. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and an antigen I/II-deficient mutant to laminin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Norde, Willem; Petersen, Fernanda C.; Scheie, Anne A.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant I

  17. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated “Missing-Self” Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells’ ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated “missing-self” reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors. PMID:27054584

  18. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated "Missing-Self" Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells' ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated "missing-self" reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors.

  19. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF/FIZZ1/RELMα in chronic hypoxia- and antigen-mediated pulmonary vascular remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelini Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both chronic hypoxia and allergic inflammation induce vascular remodeling in the lung, but only chronic hypoxia appears to cause PH. We investigate the nature of the vascular remodeling and the expression and role of hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF/FIZZ1/RELMα in explaining this differential response. Methods We induced pulmonary vascular remodeling through either chronic hypoxia or antigen sensitization and challenge. Mice were evaluated for markers of PH and pulmonary vascular remodeling throughout the lung vascular bed as well as HIMF expression and genomic analysis of whole lung. Results Chronic hypoxia increased both mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP and right ventricular (RV hypertrophy; these changes were associated with increased muscularization and thickening of small pulmonary vessels throughout the lung vascular bed. Allergic inflammation, by contrast, had minimal effect on mPAP and produced no RV hypertrophy. Only peribronchial vessels were significantly thickened, and vessels within the lung periphery did not become muscularized. Genomic analysis revealed that HIMF was the most consistently upregulated gene in the lungs following both chronic hypoxia and antigen challenge. HIMF was upregulated in the airway epithelial and inflammatory cells in both models, but only chronic hypoxia induced HIMF upregulation in vascular tissue. Conclusions The results show that pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice induced by chronic hypoxia or antigen challenge is associated with marked increases in HIMF expression. The lack of HIMF expression in the vasculature of the lung and no vascular remodeling in the peripheral resistance vessels of the lung is likely to account for the failure to develop PH in the allergic inflammation model.

  20. The Mediating Effect of Work-Family Conflict on the Relationship Between Locus of Control and Job Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noryati Ngah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Based on the literature review, few studies have tested the mediating effect of work-family conflict on the relationship between locus of control and job satisfaction. Approach: This study tested a mediation model consisting of job satisfaction as the dependent variable, locus of control as the independent variable and work-family conflict as the mediator. Data were gathered from 159 single mother employees, aged 45 and below and having at least one child, using self-administered questionnaires. The data were analyzed using correlation and multiple regression analyses. Results: Results of correlation analysis revealed that locus of control was related to work-family conflict and job satisfaction and work-family conflict was related to job satisfaction. Results of a series of multiple regression analyses indicated that work-family conflict partially mediates the relationship between locus of control and job satisfaction. During the screening process of potential recruits, employers should take into consideration locus of control as one of the important dispositional characteristics of candidates. Employers should look into the possibility of designing training programmes to assist employees in taking more control of events in their work situations. Conclusion: Single mother employees who believe that they are in control of the events that happen in their lives seem to be more satisfied with their jobs and seem to experience less work-family conflict.

  1. Nuclear export signal-interacting protein forms complexes with lamin A/C-Nups to mediate the CRM1-independent nuclear export of large hepatitis delta antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Jiang, Jia-Yin; Chang, Shin C; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Chen, Mei-Ru; Chang, Ming-Fu

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear export is an important process that not only regulates the functions of cellular factors but also facilitates the assembly of viral nucleoprotein complexes. Chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) that mediates the transport of proteins bearing the classical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) is the best-characterized nuclear export receptor. Recently, several CRM1-independent nuclear export pathways were also identified. The nuclear export of the large form of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg-L), a nucleocapsid protein of hepatitis delta virus (HDV), which contains a CRM1-independent proline-rich NES, is mediated by the host NES-interacting protein (NESI). The mechanism of the NESI protein in mediating nuclear export is still unknown. In this study, NESI was characterized as a highly glycosylated membrane protein. It interacted and colocalized well in the nuclear envelope with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. Importantly, HDAg-L could be coimmunoprecipitated with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. In addition, binding of the cargo HDAg-L to the C terminus of NESI was detected for the wild-type protein but not for the nuclear export-defective HDAg-L carrying a P205A mutation [HDAg-L(P205A)]. Knockdown of lamin A/C effectively reduced the nuclear export of HDAg-L and the assembly of HDV. These data indicate that by forming complexes with lamin A/C and nucleoporins, NESI facilitates the CRM1-independent nuclear export of HDAg-L.

  2. A method of identifying and isolating a unique member of a multigene family: application to a trypanosome surface antigen gene.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A chimeric oligonucleotide was constructed using DNA sequences from two distal regions of a cDNA which encodes a major surface antigen (TSA-1) of Trypanosoma cruzi. Conditions were found that allowed the chimeric oligonucleotide to hybridize only to a 5.4 kb EcoRI fragment in a Southern blot of total genomic DNA. The 5.4 kb EcoRI genomic DNA fragment has previously been shown to be located at a telomeric site, thus the studies described here directly demonstrate that the TSA-1 gene is telomer...

  3. Archaeosomes varying in lipid composition differ in receptor-mediated endocytosis and differentially adjuvant immune responses to entrapped antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dennis Sprott

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaeosomes prepared from total polar lipids extracted from six archaeal species with divergent lipid compositions had the capacity to deliver antigen for presentation via both MHC class I and class II pathways. Lipid extracts from Halobacterium halobium and from Halococcus morrhuae strains 14039 and 16008 contained archaetidylglycerol methylphosphate and sulfated glycolipids rich in mannose residues, and lacked archaetidylserine, whereas the opposite was found in Methanobrevibacter smithii, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanococcus jannaschii. Annexin V labeling revealed a surface orientation of phosphoserine head groups in M. smithii, M. mazei and M. jannaschii archaeosomes. Uptake of rhodamine-labeled M. smithii or M. jannaschii archaeosomes by murine peritoneal macrophages was inhibited by unlabeled liposomes containing phosphatidylserine, by the sulfhydryl inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide, and by ATP depletion using azide plus fluoride, but not by H. halobium archaeosomes. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide failed to inhibit uptake of the four other rhodamine-labeled archaeosome types, and azide plus fluoride did not inhibit uptake of H. halobium or H. morrhuae archaeosomes. These results suggest endocytosis of archaeosomes rich in surface-exposed phosphoserine head groups via a phosphatidylserine receptor, and energy-independent surface adsorption of certain other archaeosome composition classes. Lipid composition affected not only the endocytic mechanism, but also served to differentially modulate the activation of dendritic cells. The induction of IL-12 secretion from dendritic cells exposed to H. morrhuae 14039 archaeosomes was striking compared with cells exposed to archaeosomes from 16008. Thus, archaeosome types uniquely modulate antigen delivery and dendritic cell activation.

  4. Relation between parent symptomatology and youth problems: multiple mediation through family income and parent-youth stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleider, Jessica L; Patel, Anushka; Krumholz, Lauren; Chorpita, Bruce F; Weisz, John R

    2015-02-01

    This study tested whether family income and stress in the parent-youth relationship might mediate links between parent symptoms and youth problems, and whether the process might differ for youth externalizing versus internalizing problems. We used a multiple mediation technique to test pathways by which family income and stress in the parent-child relationship might relate to parent-youth symptom associations in a sample of clinically-referred 7-13 year-olds (32% female; M age = 10.16 years). Family income and stress jointly mediated the relation between parent symptoms and youth externalizing problems but not between parent symptoms and youth internalizing problems. Future longitudinal research should investigate whether low income and parent-youth stress may deplete the parental resources needed to manage youth externalizing behavior. This study extends existing literature by suggesting a specific pattern by which two identified risk factors for youth problems may operate jointly, and by showing specificity to externalizing problems.

  5. Adolescent appraisals of family security as a mediator of the effect of family instability on adolescent self-esteem/Procjene adolescenta o sigurnosti u obitelj kao medijator ucinka obiteljske nestabilnosti na samopostovanje adolescenta

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merkas, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this two-wave study was to examine the mediating role of adolescent appraisals of family security in the relation between family instability and adolescent self-esteem in a sample of 377...

  6. The impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) micropolymorphism on ligand specificity within the HLA-B*41 allotypic family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bade-Döding, Christina; Theodossis, Alex; Gras, Stephanie; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Seltsam, Axel; Huyton, Trevor; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Blasczyk, Rainer (Springe); (Hannover-MED); (Monash); (Melbourne)

    2011-09-28

    Polymorphic differences between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules affect the specificity and conformation of their bound peptides and lead to differential selection of the T-cell repertoire. Mismatching during allogeneic transplantation can, therefore, lead to immunological reactions. We investigated the structure-function relationships of six members of the HLA-B*41 allelic group that differ by six polymorphic amino acids, including positions 80, 95, 97 and 114 within the antigen-binding cleft. Peptide-binding motifs for B*41:01, *41:02, *41:03, *41:04, *41:05 and *41:06 were determined by sequencing self-peptides from recombinant B*41 molecules by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 bound to a natural 16-mer self-ligand (AEMYGSVTEHPSPSPL) and HLA-B*41:04 bound to a natural 11-mer self-ligand (HEEAVSVDRVL) were solved. Peptide analysis revealed that all B*41 alleles have an identical anchor motif at peptide position 2 (glutamic acid), but differ in their choice of C-terminal p{Omega} anchor (proline, valine, leucine). Additionally, B*41:04 displayed a greater preference for long peptides (>10 residues) when compared to the other B*41 allomorphs, while the longest peptide to be eluted from the allelic group (a 16mer) was obtained from B*41:03. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 and HLA-B*41:04 revealed that both alleles interact in a highly conserved manner with the terminal regions of their respective ligands, while micropolymorphism-induced changes in the steric and electrostatic properties of the antigen-binding cleft account for differences in peptide repertoire and auxiliary anchoring. Differences in peptide repertoire, and peptide length specificity reflect the significant functional evolution of these closely related allotypes and signal their importance in allogeneic transplantation, especially B*41:03 and B*41:04, which accommodate longer peptides, creating structurally distinct peptide

  7. Family dynamics and alcohol and marijuana use among adolescents: The mediating role of negative emotional symptoms and sensation seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Ángela; Obando, Diana; Trujillo, Carlos A

    2016-11-01

    The literature indicates a close relationship between family dynamics and psychoactive substance use among adolescents, and multi-causality among substance use-related problems, including personal adolescent characteristics as potential influential aspects in this relationship. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of emotional symptoms and sensation seeking as mediators in the relationship between family dynamics and alcohol and marijuana use among adolescents. The sample consisted of 571 high school students with a mean age of 14.63, who completed the Communities That Care Youth Survey in its Spanish version. We propose and test a mediation-in-serial model to identify the relationships between the study variables. The results of the mediation models indicate that, in most cases, the relationship between family dynamics and the substance use variables is meaningfully carried through the proposed mediators, first through negative emotional symptoms, and then through sensation seeking. The meaning of the mediation varies as a function of the facet of family dynamics (conflict or attachment) and the use aspect (age of onset, frequency of use, and use intention). We discuss the implications of these findings for intervention and prevention strategies.

  8. The mediating effects of self-esteem and delinquency on the relationship between family social capital and adolescents’ educational achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolola Abiola Adedokun

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Using a nationally representative data of rural adolescent boys and girls in 10th grade through 12th grade, this study explored the mediating effects of self-esteem and delinquency on the educational achievement of rural adolescents. Structural equation modeling analyses reveal that the combination of self-esteem and delinquency completely mediates the influence of family social capital on educational achievement. The findings of the models make a compelling case that the impact of family processes on educational achievement is indirect rather than direct.

  9. Novel antigens for detection of cell mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    2011-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic infection of the intestine of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Early stage MAP infection can be detected by measuring specific cell mediated immune responses, using the whole blood interferon-γ (IFN-γ) assay. Available IFN-γ assa...

  10. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    -mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest...

  11. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after AB0-incomptible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    -mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest...

  12. Cell-mediated immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum purified soluble antigens in sickle-cell trait subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayoumi, R A; Abu-Zeid, Y A; Abdulhadi, N H

    1990-01-01

    To determine the possible differences in the immune response to Plasmodium falciparum between sickle-cell trait (Hb AS) and normal haemoglobin (Hb AA) individuals, we examined 35 Hb AS and 24 Hb AA subjects matched for age and microenvironment. Their age was 2-55 years and all lived in a malaria...... individuals (P less than 0.025). Responses of BMNCs to PPD and PHA were also higher among Hb AS individuals and correlated positively with responses to SPAg. These findings support the hypotheses that the sickle-cell trait protects individuals from P. falciparum infections, at least in part, by modulating...... endemic area 300 km south of Khartoum. Antibodies to ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (Pf155/RESA) and to circumsporozoite (CS) protein (anti-NANP40) indicated equal exposure to falciparum malaria. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (BMNCs) from 20/35 (57%) Hb AS subjects compared with 10/24 (42...

  13. Fibrosis Related Inflammatory Mediators: Role of the IL-10 Cytokine Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Sziksz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance of chronic fibroproliferative diseases (FDs including pulmonary fibrosis, chronic kidney diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, and cardiovascular or liver fibrosis is rapidly increasing and they have become a major public health problem. According to some estimates about 45% of all deaths are attributed to FDs in the developed world. Independently of their etiology the common hallmark of FDs is chronic inflammation. Infiltrating immune cells, endothelial, epithelial, and other resident cells of the injured organ release an orchestra of inflammatory mediators, which stimulate the proliferation and excessive extracellular matrix (ECM production of myofibroblasts, the effector cells of organ fibrosis. Abnormal amount of ECM disturbs the original organ architecture leading to the decline of function. Although our knowledge is rapidly expanding, we still have neither a diagnostic tool to detect nor a drug to specifically target fibrosis. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the more comprehensive understanding of the pathomechanism of fibrosis and development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. In the present review we provide an overview of the common key mediators of organ fibrosis highlighting the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10 cytokine family members (IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, and IL-26, which recently came into focus as tissue remodeling-related inflammatory cytokines.

  14. The roles of familial alcoholism and adolescent family harmony in young adults' substance dependence disorders: mediated and moderated relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; King, Kevin M; Chassin, Laurie

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the prospective relations among family history density of alcoholism (FHD), adolescent family harmony, and young adults' alcohol and drug dependence. Family harmony was rated by mothers and fathers in adolescence, and young adults' substance dependence diagnoses were obtained through structured interviews. Higher FHD predicted lower adolescent family harmony, which in turn increased young adults' odds of being diagnosed with drug dependence (with and without alcohol dependence) compared to no diagnoses or to alcohol dependence only. Family harmony also interacted with FHD such that the protective effect of family harmony on young adults' drug dependence with or without alcohol dependence decreased as FHD rose, and was nonsignificant at high levels of FHD. The findings suggest the importance of distinguishing among alcohol and drug dependence disorders and examining their differential etiological pathways, and also suggest that the protective effects of harmonious family environments on substance dependence may be limited at high levels of FHD.

  15. Cirsium maritimum Makino Inhibits the Antigen/Immunoglobulin-E-Mediated Allergic Response In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mamoru; Suzuki, Masanobu; Takei, Yuichiro; Okamoto, Takeaki; Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-27

    We investigated whether Cirsium maritimum Makino can inhibit immunoglobulin-E-mediated allergic response in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in BALB/c mice. In vitro, the ethyl acetate extract of C. maritimum Makino (ECMM) significantly inhibited β-hexosaminidase release and decreased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in RBL-2H3 cells. Moreover, ECMM leaves more strongly suppressed the release of β-hexosaminidase than ECMM flowers. ECMM leaves also significantly suppressed the PCA reaction in the murine model. High-performance liquid chromatography and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance indicated that cirsimaritin, a flavonoid, was concentrated in active fractions of the extract. Our findings suggest that ECMM leaves have a potential regulatory effect on allergic reactions that may be mediated by mast cells. Furthermore, cirsimaritin may be the active anti-allergic component in C. maritimum Makino.

  16. Individual and family factors associated with self-esteem in young people with epilepsy: A multiple mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Judith; Haase, Anne M; Carpenter, John

    2017-01-01

    As young people experience added demands from living with epilepsy, which may lead to poor psychosocial adjustment, it is essential to examine mechanisms of change to provide practitioners with knowledge to develop effective interventions. The aim of this study was to examine individual and family-level factors - stress and illness perceptions, coping behaviors and family resilience - that promote or maintain young people's self-esteem. From November 2013 to August 2014, young people attending a neurology clinic in KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore, participated in a cross-sectional survey (n=152; 13-16years old). Multiple mediation analyses were conducted to evaluate whether these variables mediated the relationship between illness severity (i.e., low, moderate, high) and self-esteem. Multiple mediation analyses demonstrated that illness severity had a direct effect on young people's self-esteem. Compared to those with moderate illness severity (reference group), young people with low severity had significantly higher self-esteem (c=3.42, pself-esteem through its effects on mediators, such as perceived stress, illness perceptions and family resilience (D1: Total ab=3.46, 95% CI 1.13, 5.71; D2: Total ab=-2.80, 95% CI -4.35, -1.30). However, young people's coping levels did not predict their self-esteem, when accounting for the effects of other variables. The continued presence of seizure occurrences is likely to place greater demands on young people and their families: in turn, increased stress and negative illness perceptions negatively affected family processes that promote resilience. As the mediating effect of these modifiable factors were above and beyond the contributions of illness characteristics and young people's levels of coping, this has implications for developing individual and family interventions aimed to support young people living with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) interacts with Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5) and mediates oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wenbin; Zhou, You; Li, Jiwei; Mysore, Raghavendra; Luo, Wei; Li, Shiqian; Chang, Mau-Sun; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Yan, Daoguang

    2014-04-01

    We earlier identified OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) as an endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope oxysterol-binding protein implicated in cellular lipid homeostasis, migration, and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen identified Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5)/Astrin as interaction partner of ORP8. The putative interaction was further confirmed by pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. ORP8 did not colocalize with kinetochore-associated SPAG5 in mitotic HepG2 or HuH7 cells, but overexpressed ORP8 was capable of recruiting SPAG5 onto endoplasmic reticulum membranes in interphase cells. In our experiments, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) retarded the HepG2 cell cycle, causing accumulation in G2/M phase; ORP8 overexpression resulted in the same phenotype. Importantly, ORP8 knock-down dramatically inhibited the oxysterol effect on HepG2 cell cycle, suggesting a mediating role of ORP8. Furthermore, knock-down of SPAG5 significantly reduced the effects of both ORP8 overexpression and 25OHC on the cell cycle, placing SPAG5 downstream of the two cell-cycle interfering factors. Taken together, the present results suggest that ORP8 may via SPAG5 mediate oxysterol interference of the HepG2 cell cycle.

  18. Clinicians' perspective of the relational processes for family and individual development during the mediation of religious and sexual identity disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etengoff, Chana; Daiute, Colette

    2015-01-01

    Although the psychological literature regarding gay men from religious families is continually expanding, it is also limited in that few studies focus on the use of therapy in the negotiation of the interrelated systems of religion, sexuality, and family. Utilizing a cultural historical activity theory-based process of analysis, this study focuses on the narratives of 12 clinicians discussing 230 conflicts and how those conflicts are mediated in both productive (e.g., seeking secular support) and unproductive ways (e.g., bringing one's son to an exorcist) by gay men and their religious families independent of and at the advice of their therapists.

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi as an effective cancer antigen delivery vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Caroline; Santos, Luara I; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Teixeira, Santuza M; Rodrigues, Flávia G; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Chiari, Egler; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2011-12-06

    One of the main challenges in cancer research is the development of vaccines that induce effective and long-lived protective immunity against tumors. Significant progress has been made in identifying members of the cancer testis antigen family as potential vaccine candidates. However, an ideal form for antigen delivery that induces robust and sustainable antigen-specific T-cell responses, and in particular of CD8(+) T lymphocytes, remains to be developed. Here we report the use of a recombinant nonpathogenic clone of Trypanosoma cruzi as a vaccine vector to induce vigorous and long-term T cell-mediated immunity. The rationale for using the highly attenuated T. cruzi clone was (i) the ability of the parasite to persist in host tissues and therefore to induce a long-term antigen-specific immune response; (ii) the existence of intrinsic parasite agonists for Toll-like receptors and consequent induction of highly polarized T helper cell type 1 responses; and (iii) the parasite replication in the host cell cytoplasm, leading to direct antigen presentation through the endogenous pathway and consequent induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, we found that parasites expressing a cancer testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) were able to elicit human antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and solid protection against melanoma in a mouse model. Furthermore, in a therapeutic protocol, the parasites expressing NY-ESO-1 delayed the rate of tumor development in mice. We conclude that the T. cruzi vector is highly efficient in inducing T cell-mediated immunity and protection against cancer cells. More broadly, this strategy could be used to elicit a long-term T cell-mediated immunity and used for prophylaxis or therapy of chronic infectious diseases.

  20. Family functioning as a mediator between neighborhood conditions and children's health: evidence from a national survey in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yingling; Chen, Qian

    2012-06-01

    This study examines whether the associations between neighborhood conditions and children's health can be indirect and operate through aspects of family functioning. We use data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health in the United States with the interviewed parents/guardians as the only source of the data. Our study sample includes 53,023 children aged between 6 and 17 years. Using structural equation modeling, we test both direct and indirect relationships between a family functioning index, a general indicator of children's health status, and three neighborhood factors: neighborhood physical resources, environmental threats, and collective efficacy. Covariates in the analysis include gender, age, income, race, family structure, parental education, and health insurance coverage. All the three neighborhood factors show direct associations with children's general health status, as well as indirect associations mediated by aspects of family functioning. Among the three neighborhood factors, collective efficacy and environmental threats are found to have much stronger associations with children's general health than physical resources. When designing health-promoting neighborhoods for children and families, it may be more efficient for urban planners and health professionals to focus on community programs that reduce environmental stressors and foster neighborhood cohesion than programs that solely improve physical infrastructure. This study also verifies that aspects of family functioning mediate the associations between neighborhood conditions and children's health. It is recommended that both family and neighborhood are critical points for child health intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential transcription of the major antigenic protein 1 multigene family of Ehrlichia ruminantium in Amblyomma variegatum ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo, M; Taoufik, A; Bell-Sakyi, L; de Vries, E; Morrison, W I; Jongejan, F

    2007-06-21

    The rickettsial pathogen Ehrlichia ruminantium causes heartwater in ruminants and is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyomma. The map1 gene, encoding the major surface protein MAP1, is a member of a multigene family containing 16 paralogs. In order to investigate differential transcription of genes of the map1 multigene family in vivo in unfed and feeding ticks, RNA was extracted from midguts and salivary glands of E. ruminantium-infected adult female Amblyomma variegatum ticks and analysed by RT-PCR using MAP1 paralog-specific primers. In unfed ticks, only transcripts from the map1-1 gene were observed in midguts and no transcripts were detected in salivary glands. In feeding ticks, map1-1 transcripts were more abundant in midguts whereas high levels of map1 transcripts were observed in salivary glands. Our results show that differential transcription of genes of the E. ruminantium map1 cluster occurs in vivo in different tissues of infected ticks before and during transmission feeding, indicating that this multigene family may be involved in functions of biological relevance in different stages of the life cycle of E. ruminantium.

  2. Perceived Family Support and Self-Esteem: The Mediational Role of Emotional Experience in Adults with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalavany, Blace A.; Carawan, Lena W.

    2012-01-01

    Although a growing body of literature shows that perceived family support (PFS) influences self-esteem in adults with dyslexia, little empirical attention has been given to the mechanisms through which this effect operates across early, middle, and late adulthood. The present study examined the mediational effect of emotional experience with…

  3. Attachment and Parenting: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Balance in Portuguese Parents of Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Joana Marina; AVila, Marisa; Matos, Paula Mena

    2012-01-01

    Given the increasingly challenging task of balancing multiple adult life roles in contemporary society, this study examined the influences of both conflicting and (positively) synergistic work and family roles in mediating associations between the quality of adult attachment and both parental satisfaction and parenting stress. Participants were…

  4. Mediation and Moderation Effects of an In-Home Family Intervention : the "In control: No alcohol!" Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen-Smit, Evelien; Mares, Suzanne H. W.; Verdurmen, Jacqueline E. E.; van der Vorst, Haske; Schulten, Ingrid G. H.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a theory-based in-home family intervention (In control: No alcohol!) on adolescent alcohol cognitions via its putative mediators using a randomized controlled design. In the South Holland region of the Netherlands, a total of 213 children (11-12 yea

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Viscum coloratum Extract on IgE/Antigen-Activated Mast Cells and Mast Cell-Derived Inflammatory Mediator-Activated Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Myung Yoo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation and infiltration of mast cells are found in osteoarthritic lesions in humans and rodents. Nonetheless, the roles of mast cells in osteoarthritis are almost unknown. Although Viscum coloratum has various beneficial actions, its effect on allergic and osteoarthritic responses is unknown. In this study, we established an in vitro model of mast cell-mediated osteoarthritis and investigated the effect of the ethanol extract of Viscum coloratum (VEE on IgE/antigen (IgE/Ag-activated mast cells and mast cell-derived inflammatory mediator (MDIM-stimulated chondrocytes. The anti-allergic effect of VEE was evaluated by degranulation, inflammatory mediators, and the FcεRI signaling cascade in IgE/Ag-activated RBL-2H3 cells. The anti-osteoarthritic action of VEE was evaluated by cell migration, and the expression, secretion, and activity of MMPs in MDIM-stimulated SW1353 cells. VEE significantly inhibited degranulation (IC50: 93.04 μg/mL, the production of IL-4 (IC50: 73.28 μg/mL, TNF-α (IC50: 50.59 μg/mL, PGD2 and LTC4, and activation of the FcεRI signaling cascade in IgE/Ag-activated RBL-2H3 cells. Moreover, VEE not only reduced cell migration but also inhibited the expression, secretion, and/or activity of MMP-1, MMP-3, or MMP-13 in MDIM-stimulated SW1353 cells. In conclusion, VEE possesses both anti-allergic and anti-osteoarthritic properties. Therefore, VEE could possibly be considered a new herbal drug for anti-allergic and anti-osteoarthritic therapy. Moreover, the in vitro model may be useful for the development of anti-osteoarthritic drugs.

  6. H-2g, a glucose analog of blood group H antigen, mediates monocyte recruitment in vitro and in vivo via IL-8/CXCL8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabquer BJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bradley J Rabquer,1,2 Yong Hou,1 Jeffrey H Ruth,1 Wei Luo,1 Daniel T Eitzman,1 Alisa E Koch,3,1 Mohammad A Amin11University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Albion College, Biology Department, Albion, MI, USA; 3VA Medical Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor, MI, USAObjective: Monocyte (MN recruitment is an essential inflammatory component of many autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In this study we investigated the ability of 2-fucosyllactose (H-2g, a glucose analog of blood group H antigen to induce MN migration in vivo and determined if H-2g-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8 plays a role in MN ingress in RA.Methods: Sponge granuloma and intravital microscopy assays were performed to examine H-2g-induced in vivo MN migration and rolling, respectively. MNs were stimulated with H-2g, and the production of IL-8/CXCL8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Lastly, in vitro MN migration assays and an in vivo RA synovial tissue severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model were used to determine the role of IL-8/CXCL8 in H-2g-induced MN migration.Results: In vivo, H-2g induced significantly greater MN migration compared to phosphate buffered saline. Intravital microscopy revealed that H-2g mediates MN migration in vivo by inducing MN rolling. In addition, H-2g induced MN production of IL-8/CXCL8, a process that was dependent on Src kinase. Moreover, we found that H-2g mediated MN migration in vitro, and in vivo migration was inhibited by a neutralizing anti-IL-8/CXCL8 antibody.Conclusion: These findings suggest that H-2g mediates MN recruitment in vitro and in vivo (in part via IL-8/CXCL8.Keywords: inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, chemokine, migration

  7. OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) interacts with Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5) and mediates oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Wenbin [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhou, You [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland); Li, Jiwei [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Mysore, Raghavendra [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland); Luo, Wei; Li, Shiqian [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Chang, Mau-Sun [Institute of Biochemical Sciences, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Olkkonen, Vesa M. [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland); Yan, Daoguang, E-mail: tydg@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-04-01

    We earlier identified OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) as an endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope oxysterol-binding protein implicated in cellular lipid homeostasis, migration, and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen identified Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5)/Astrin as interaction partner of ORP8. The putative interaction was further confirmed by pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. ORP8 did not colocalize with kinetochore-associated SPAG5 in mitotic HepG2 or HuH7 cells, but overexpressed ORP8 was capable of recruiting SPAG5 onto endoplasmic reticulum membranes in interphase cells. In our experiments, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) retarded the HepG2 cell cycle, causing accumulation in G2/M phase; ORP8 overexpression resulted in the same phenotype. Importantly, ORP8 knock-down dramatically inhibited the oxysterol effect on HepG2 cell cycle, suggesting a mediating role of ORP8. Furthermore, knock-down of SPAG5 significantly reduced the effects of both ORP8 overexpression and 25OHC on the cell cycle, placing SPAG5 downstream of the two cell-cycle interfering factors. Taken together, the present results suggest that ORP8 may via SPAG5 mediate oxysterol interference of the HepG2 cell cycle. - Highlights: • The oxysterol-binding protein ORP8 was found to interact with the mitotic regulator SPAG5/Astrin. • Treatment of HepG2 cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol caused cell cycle retardation in G2/M. • ORP8 overexpression caused a similar G2/M accumulation, and ORP8 knock-down reversed the 25-hydroxycholesterol effect. • Reduction of cellular of SPAG5/Astrin reversed the cell cycle effects of both 25-hydroxycholesterol and ORP8 overexpression. • Our results suggest that ORP8 mediates via SPAG5/Astrin the oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle.

  8. Work-family conflict and safety participation of high-speed railway drivers: Job satisfaction as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Guo, Ming; Ye, Long; Liao, Ganli; Yang, Zhehan

    2016-10-01

    Despite the large body of work on the work-family interface, hardly any literature has addressed the work-family interface in safety-critical settings. This study draws from social exchange theory to examine the effect of employees' strain-based work-to-family conflict on their supervisors' rating of their safety participation through job satisfaction. The sample consisted of 494 drivers from a major railway company in China. The results of a structural equation model revealed that drivers' strain-based work-to-family conflict negatively influences safety participation, and the relationship was partially mediated by job satisfaction. These findings highlight the importance of reducing employees' work-to-family conflict in safety-critical organizations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Family economic hardship and Chinese adolescents' sleep quality: A moderated mediation model involving perceived economic discrimination and coping strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhenzhou; Chen, Chuansheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Jianjun; Jiang, Yanping; Lai, Xuefen

    2016-07-01

    The association between family economic hardship and adolescent adjustment outcomes, including sleep quality, is well-established. Few studies, however, have examined the mediating and moderating mechanisms underlying the relation between family economic hardship and adolescents' sleep quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of family economic hardship on Chinese adolescents' sleep quality, as well as the role of perceived economic discrimination as a mediator and the role of coping strategy as a moderator. Survey data from a cross-sectional sample of 997 Chinese adolescents (45% male, mean age = 15.04 years) were analyzed using path analysis in Mplus 7.0. The results of this study indicated that family economic hardship was significantly associated with adolescents' sleep quality. This association was mediated by adolescents' perceived economic discrimination. In addition, adolescents' coping strategy significantly moderated the path from perceived economic discrimination to sleep quality, with the "shift" coping strategy as a protective factor. The present study contributes to our understanding of key mechanisms underlying the association between family economic hardship and adolescent sleep quality and highlights the importance of improving sleep quality for adolescents exposed to economic hardship.

  10. Cathepsin B in antigen-presenting cells controls mediators of the Th1 immune response during Leishmania major infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris J Gonzalez-Leal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb and L (Ctsl play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC and macrophages (BMM from Ctsb-/- and Ctsl-/- mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb-/- BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT and Ctsl-/- BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb-/- mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12 expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb-/- BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl-/- counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression.

  11. Cathepsin B in antigen-presenting cells controls mediators of the Th1 immune response during Leishmania major infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Leal, Iris J; Röger, Bianca; Schwarz, Angela; Schirmeister, Tanja; Reinheckel, Thomas; Lutz, Manfred B; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-09-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb) and L (Ctsl) play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and macrophages (BMM) from Ctsb-/- and Ctsl-/- mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb-/- BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT) and Ctsl-/- BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb-/- mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb-/- BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl-/- counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression.

  12. The 15 SCR flexible extracellular domains of human complement receptor type 2 can mediate multiple ligand and antigen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Hannah E; Asokan, Rengasamy; Holers, V Michael; Perkins, Stephen J

    2006-10-01

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) is a cell surface protein that links the innate and adaptive immune response during the activation of B cells. The extracellular portion of CR2 comprises 15 or 16 short complement regulator (SCR) domains, for which the overall arrangement in solution is unknown. This was determined by constrained scattering and ultracentrifugation modelling. The radius of gyration of CR2 SCR 1-15 was determined to be 11.5 nm by both X-ray and neutron scattering, and that of its cross-section was 1.8 nm. The distance distribution function P(r) showed that the overall length of CR2 SCR 1-15 was 38 nm. Sedimentation equilibrium curve fits gave a mean molecular weight of 135,000 (+/- 13,000) Da, in agreement with a fully glycosylated structure. Velocity experiments using the g*(s) derivative method gave a sedimentation coefficient of 4.2 (+/- 0.1) S. In order to construct a model of CR2 SCR 1-15 for constrained fitting, homology models for the 15 SCR domains were combined with randomised linker peptides generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Using an automated procedure, the analysis of 15,000 possible CR2 SCR 1-15 models showed that only those models in which the 15 SCR domains were flexible but partially folded back accounted for the scattering and sedimentation data. The best-fit CR2 models provided a visual explanation for the versatile interaction of CR2 with four ligands C3d, CD23, gp350 and IFN-alpha. The flexible location of CR2 SCR 1-2 is likely to facilitate interactions of C3d-antigen complexes with the B cell receptor.

  13. The CRF family of neuropeptides and their receptors - mediators of the central stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedic, Nina; Chen, Alon; Deussing, Jan M

    2017-03-01

    Dysregulated stress neurocircuits, caused by genetic and/or environmental changes, underlie the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the major physiological activator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and consequently a primary regulator of the mammalian stress response. Together with its three family members, urocortins (UCNs) 1, 2, and 3, CRF integrates the neuroendocrine, autonomic, metabolic and behavioral responses to stress by activating its cognate receptors CRFR1 and CRFR2. Here we review the past and current state of the CRH/CRHR field, ranging from pharmacological studies to genetic mouse models and virus-mediated manipulations. Although it is well established that CRF/CRFR1 signaling mediates aversive responses, including anxiety and depression-like behaviors, a number of recent studies have challenged this viewpoint by revealing anxiolytic and appetitive properties of specific CRF/CRFR1 circuits. In contrast, the UCN/CRFR2 system is less well understood and may possibly also exert divergent functions on physiology and behavior depending on the brain region,underlying circuit, and/or experienced stress conditions. A plethora of available genetic tools, including conventional and conditional mouse mutants targeting CRF system components, has greatly advanced our understanding about the endogenous mechanisms underlying HPA system regulation and CRH/UCN-related neuronal circuits involved in stress-related behaviors. Yet, the deailed pathways and molecular mechanism by which the CRH/UCN-system translates negative or positive stimuli into the final, integrated biological response are not completely understood. The utilization of future complementary methodologies, such as cell-type specific Cre-driver lines, viral and optogenetic tools will help to further dissect the function of genetically defined CRH/UCN neurocircuits in the context of adaptive and maladaptive stress responses. Copyright

  14. Psychological processes mediate the impact of familial risk, social circumstances and life events on mental health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kinderman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite widespread acceptance of the 'biopsychosocial model', the aetiology of mental health problems has provoked debate amongst researchers and practitioners for decades. The role of psychological factors in the development of mental health problems remains particularly contentious, and to date there has not been a large enough dataset to conduct the necessary multivariate analysis of whether psychological factors influence, or are influenced by, mental health. This study reports on the first empirical, multivariate, test of the relationships between the key elements of the biospychosocial model of mental ill-health. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants were 32,827 (age 18-85 years self-selected respondents from the general population who completed an open-access online battery of questionnaires hosted by the BBC. An initial confirmatory factor analysis was performed to assess the adequacy of the proposed factor structure and the relationships between latent and measured variables. The predictive path model was then tested whereby the latent variables of psychological processes were positioned as mediating between the causal latent variables (biological, social and circumstantial and the outcome latent variables of mental health problems and well-being. This revealed an excellent fit to the data, S-B χ(2 (3199, N = 23,397 = 126654.8, p<.001; RCFI = .97; RMSEA = .04 (.038-.039. As hypothesised, a family history of mental health difficulties, social deprivation, and traumatic or abusive life-experiences all strongly predicted higher levels of anxiety and depression. However, these relationships were strongly mediated by psychological processes; specifically lack of adaptive coping, rumination and self-blame. CONCLUSION: These results support a significant revision of the biopsychosocial model, as psychological processes determine the causal impact of biological, social, and circumstantial risk factors on mental health. This has clear

  15. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Chopra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA. Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site.

  16. NG2, a member of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans family mediates the inflammatory response of activated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Q; Lu, J; Huo, Y; Baby, N; Ling, E A; Dheen, S T

    2010-01-20

    Activation of microglial cells, the resident immune cells of the CNS causes neurotoxicity through the release of a wide array of inflammatory mediators including proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen species. In this study, we have investigated the expression of NG2 (also known as CSPG4), one of the members of transmembrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans family, in microglial cells and its role on inflammatory reaction of microglia by analyzing the expression of the proinflammation cytokines (interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)), chemokines (stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha and monocyte chemotactic protein-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). NG2 expression was not detectable in microglial cells expressing OX-42 in the brains of 1-day old postnatal rat pups and adult rats; it was, however, induced in activated microglial cells in pups and adult rats injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In vitro analysis further confirmed that LPS induced the expression of NG2 in primary microglial cells and this was inhibited by dexamethasone. It has been well demonstrated that LPS induces the expression of iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines in microglia. However in this study, LPS did not induce the mRNA expression of iNOS and cytokines including IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha in microglial cells transfected with CSPG4 siRNA. On the contrary, mRNA expression of chemokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) was significantly increased in LPS-activated microglial cells after CSPG4 siRNA transfection in comparison with the control. The above results indicate that NG2 mediates the induction of iNOS and inflammatory cytokine expression, but not the chemokine expression in activated microglia.

  17. The MLK family mediates c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation in neuronal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z; Maroney, A C; Dobrzanski, P; Kukekov, N V; Greene, L A

    2001-07-01

    Neuronal apoptotic death induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation is reported to be in part mediated through a pathway that includes Rac1 and Cdc42, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 4 and 7 (MKK4 and -7), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), and c-Jun. However, additional components of the pathway remain to be defined. We show here that members of the mixed-lineage kinase (MLK) family (including MLK1, MLK2, MLK3, and dual leucine zipper kinase [DLK]) are expressed in neuronal cells and are likely to act between Rac1/Cdc42 and MKK4 and -7 in death signaling. Overexpression of MLKs effectively induces apoptotic death of cultured neuronal PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons, while expression of dominant-negative forms of MLKs suppresses death evoked by NGF deprivation or expression of activated forms of Rac1 and Cdc42. CEP-1347 (KT7515), which blocks neuronal death caused by NGF deprivation and a variety of additional apoptotic stimuli and which selectively inhibits the activities of MLKs, effectively protects neuronal PC12 cells from death induced by overexpression of MLK family members. In addition, NGF deprivation or UV irradiation leads to an increase in both level and phosphorylation of endogenous DLK. These observations support a role for MLKs in the neuronal death mechanism. With respect to ordering the death pathway, dominant-negative forms of MKK4 and -7 and c-Jun are protective against death induced by MLK overexpression, placing MLKs upstream of these kinases. Additional findings place the MLKs upstream of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase activation.

  18. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and witho

  19. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and

  20. The complexity of trauma types in the lives of women in families referred for family violence: Multiple mediators of mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Victoria L; Williams, Linda M; Saunders, Benjamin E; Fitzgerald, Monica M

    2008-10-01

    Responding to calls for further research about the impact of multiple types of trauma across the life span, this study examines the interconnections among types of trauma in childhood and adulthood in a convenience clinical sample of 283 women obtaining social services for family violence. In particular, variables including family of-origin dysfunction and other childhood risk factors, relationship victimization in adulthood, and the presence of adult resources were examined as mediators of links between child maltreatment and adult mental health symptoms. Variables were assessed at different time points, 3 years apart. Path analysis revealed that the conceptual model of multiple pathways between childhood family violence exposure and adult outcomes fit the data well. In particular, the link between child maltreatment and adult trauma symptoms was mediated by more proximal adult sexual and intimate partner violence and its association with childhood risk markers (e.g., negative family environment) and decreased markers of resources. This link was not significant for a more general index of mental health symptoms in adulthood.

  1. Perceived family support and self-esteem: the mediational role of emotional experience in adults with dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalavany, Blace A; Carawan, Lena W

    2012-02-01

    Although a growing body of literature shows that perceived family support (PFS) influences self-esteem in adults with dyslexia, little empirical attention has been given to the mechanisms through which this effect operates across early, middle, and late adulthood. The present study examined the mediational effect of emotional experience with dyslexia (EED, emotions stemming from living with an often misunderstood and stereotyped learning difficulty) that may account for the empirical link between PFS and self-esteem. The participants were 224 adults with self-identified dyslexia (average age = 49.1 years, males = 64.7%) who participated in a Web-based survey. A bootstrapping analysis (a new approach to mediational analysis) revealed that EED mediated the relationship between PFS and self-esteem across the entire sample and in early and middle adulthood. The mediational effect was strongest in early adulthood. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  3. Damage to dopaminergic neurons is mediated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen through the p53 pathway under conditions of oxidative stress in a cell model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Wei; Li, Guang-Ren; Zhang, Bei-Lin; Feng, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative stress is widely considered as a central event in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms underlying the oxidative damage-mediated loss of dopaminergic neurons in PD are not yet fully understood. Accumulating evidence has indicated that oxidative DNA damage plays a crucial role in programmed neuronal cell death, and is considered to be at least partly responsible for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in PD. This process involves a number of signaling cascades and molecular proteins. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a pleiotropic protein affecting a wide range of vital cellular processes, including chromatin remodelling, DNA repair and cell cycle control, by interacting with a number of enzymes and regulatory proteins. In the present study, the exposure of PC12 cells to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) led to the loss of cell viability and decreased the expression levels of PCNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner, indicating that this protein may be involved in the neurotoxic actions of MPP+ in dopaminergic neuronal cells. In addition, a significant upregulation in p53 expression was also observed in this cellular model of PD. p53 is an upstream inducer of PCNA and it has been recognized as a key contributor responsible for dopaminergic neuronal cell death in mouse models of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD. This indicates that MPP+-induced oxidative damage is mediated by the downregulation of PCNA through the p53 pathway in a cellular model of PD. Thus, our results may provide some novel insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of PD and provide new possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of PD.

  4. CXCR2-specific chemokines mediate leukotriene B4-dependent recruitment of neutrophils to inflamed joints in mice with antigen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grespan, Renata; Fukada, Sandra Y; Lemos, Henrique P; Vieira, Silvio M; Napimoga, Marcelo H; Teixeira, Mauro M; Fraser, Alasdair R; Liew, Foo Y; McInnes, Iain B; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the mechanism underlying neutrophil migration into the articular cavity in experimental arthritis and, by extension, human inflammatory synovitis. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was generated in mice with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA). Migration assays and histologic analysis were used to evaluate neutrophil recruitment to knee joints. Levels of inflammatory mediators were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies and pharmacologic inhibitors were used in vivo to determine the role of specific disease mediators. Samples of synovial tissue and synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis patients were evaluated for CXCL1 and CXCL5 expression. High levels of CXCL1, CXCL5, and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were expressed in the joints of arthritic mice. Confirming their respective functional roles, repertaxin (a CXCR1/CXCR2 receptor antagonist), anti-CXCL1 antibody, anti-CXCL5 antibody, and MK886 (a leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) reduced mBSA-induced neutrophil migration to knee joints. Repertaxin reduced LTB4 production in joint tissue, and neutrophil recruitment induced by CXCL1 or CXCL5 was inhibited by MK886, suggesting a sequential mechanism. Levels of both CXCL1 and CXCL5 were elevated in synovial fluid and were released in vitro by RA synovial tissues. Moreover, RA synovial fluid neutrophils stimulated with CXCL1 or CXCL5 released significant amounts of LTB4. Our data implicate CXCL1, CXCL5, and LTB4, acting sequentially, in neutrophil migration in AIA. Elevated levels of CXCL1 and CXCL5 in the synovial compartment of RA patients provide robust comparative data indicating that this mechanism plays a role in inflammatory joint disease. Together, these results suggest that inhibition of CXCL1, CXCL5, or LTB4 may represent a potential therapeutic strategy in RA.

  5. Shrugging it off: Does psychological detachment from work mediate the relationship between workplace aggression and work-family conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demsky, Caitlin A; Ellis, Allison M; Fritz, Charlotte

    2014-04-01

    The current study investigates workplace aggression and psychological detachment from work as possible antecedents of work-family conflict. We draw upon Conservation of Resources theory and the Effort-Recovery Model to argue that employees who fail to psychologically detach from stressful events in the workplace experience a relative lack of resources that is negatively associated with functioning in the nonwork domain. Further, we extend prior research on antecedents of work-family conflict by examining workplace aggression, a prevalent workplace stressor. Utilizing multisource data (i.e., employee, significant other, and coworker reports), our findings indicate that self-reported psychological detachment mediates the relationship between coworker-reported workplace aggression and both self- and significant other-reported work-family conflict. Findings from the current study speak to the value of combining perspectives from research on recovery from work stress and the work-family interface, and point toward implications for research and practice.

  6. The Tol2 transposon system mediates the genetic engineering of T-cells with CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors for B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, T; Iwase, N; Kawakami, K; Iwasaki, M; Yamamoto, C; Ohmine, K; Uchibori, R; Teruya, T; Ido, H; Saga, Y; Urabe, M; Mizukami, H; Kume, A; Nakamura, M; Brentjens, R; Ozawa, K

    2015-02-01

    Engineered T-cell therapy using a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CD19-CAR) is a promising strategy for the treatment of advanced B-cell malignancies. Gene transfer of CARs to T-cells has widely relied on retroviral vectors, but transposon-based gene transfer has recently emerged as a suitable nonviral method to mediate stable transgene expression. The advantages of transposon vectors compared with viral vectors include their simplicity and cost-effectiveness. We used the Tol2 transposon system to stably transfer CD19-CAR into human T-cells. Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were co-nucleofected with the Tol2 transposon donor plasmid carrying CD19-CAR and the transposase expression plasmid and were selectively propagated on NIH3T3 cells expressing human CD19. Expanded CD3(+) T-cells with stable and high-level transgene expression (~95%) produced interferon-γ upon stimulation with CD19 and specifically lysed Raji cells, a CD19(+) human B-cell lymphoma cell line. Adoptive transfer of these T-cells suppressed tumor progression in Raji tumor-bearing Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) immunodeficient mice compared with control mice. These results demonstrate that the Tol2 transposon system could be used to express CD19-CAR in genetically engineered T-cells for the treatment of refractory B-cell malignancies.

  7. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Lisbeth N; Zeuthen, Louise H; Ferlazzo, Guido; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2007-12-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for homeostasis of the local and systemic immune system, and particularly strains of lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli have been shown to have balancing effects on inflammatory conditions such as allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. However, in vitro assessment of the immunomodulatory effects of distinct strains may depend strongly on the cell type used as a model. To select the most appropriate model for screening of beneficial bacteria in human cells, the response to strains of intestinal bacteria of three types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was compared; blood myeloid dendritic cells (DC), monocyte-derived DC and monocytes, and the effector response of natural killer cells and naïve T cells was characterized. Maturation induced by gut-derived bacteria differed between APC, with blood DC and monocytes responding with the production of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha to bacteria, which elicited mainly IL-10 in monocyte-derived DC. In contrast, comparable IFN-gamma production patterns were found in both natural killer cells and T cells induced by all bacteria-matured APC. An inhibitory effect of certain strains on this IFN-gamma production was also mediated by all types of APC. The most potent responses were induced by monocyte-derived DC, which thus constitute a sensitive screening model.

  8. LAMP-2C Inhibits MHC Class II Presentation of Cytoplasmic Antigens by Disrupting Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Liliana; McLetchie, Shawna; Gardiner, Gail J; Deffit, Sarah N; Zhou, Delu; Blum, Janice S

    2016-03-15

    Cells use multiple autophagy pathways to sequester macromolecules, senescent organelles, and pathogens. Several conserved isoforms of the lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) regulate these pathways influencing immune recognition and responses. LAMP-2A is required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), which promotes Ag capture and MHC class II (MHCII) presentation in B cells and signaling in T cells. LAMP-2B regulates lysosome maturation to impact macroautophagy and phagocytosis. Yet, far less is known about LAMP-2C function. Whereas LAMP2A and LAMP2B mRNA were broadly detected in human tissues, LAMP2C expression was more limited. Transcripts for the three LAMP2 isoforms increased with B cell activation, although specific gene induction varied depending on TLR versus BCR engagement. To examine LAMP-2C function in human B cells and specifically its role in Ag presentation, we used ectopic gene expression. Increased LAMP-2C expression in B cells did not alter MHCII expression or invariant chain processing, but did perturb cytoplasmic Ag presentation via CMA. MHCII presentation of epitopes from exogenous and membrane Ags was not affected by LAMP-2C expression in B cells. Similarly, changes in B cell LAMP-2C expression did not impact macroautophagy. The gene expression of other LAMP2 isoforms and proteasome and lysosomal proteases activities were unperturbed by LAMP-2C ectopic expression. LAMP-2C levels modulated the steady-state expression of several cytoplasmic proteins that are targeted for degradation by CMA and diminished peptide translocation via this pathway. Thus, LAMP-2C serves as a natural inhibitor of CMA that can selectively skew MHCII presentation of cytoplasmic Ags.

  9. Risk and Protective Self-esteem: A Mediational Role Between Family Environment and Substance Use in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa I. Jiménez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to analyse the direct and indirect relationships among quality of family environment, multidimensional self-esteem (family, academic, social and physical self-esteem and substance use (cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana. The study participants were 414 Spanish adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old, drawn from state secondary schools. Statistical analyses were carried out using structural equation modeling and the procedure of mediation effects analysis (Holmbeck, 1997. Results showed a significant mediational effect of self-esteem on the relation between family functioning and adolescent substance use. Moreover, results showed, on the one hand, a protection effect of family and academic self-esteem and, on the other hand, a risk effect of social and physical self-esteem on substance use. Findings are discussed in relation to previous research. As a conclusion, this investigation confirms that family environment is a relevant precedent of adolescent self-evaluation and that it is necessary to adopt a multidimensional perspective when analyse the self-esteem of substance use adolescents.

  10. Family-supportive organization perceptions and organizational commitment: the mediating role of work-family conflict and enrichment and partner attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Julie Holliday; Casper, Wendy J; Matthews, Russell A; Allen, Tammy D

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims to explain the processes through which family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP) relate to employee affective commitment. We suggest multiple mechanisms through which this relationship transpires-(a) the focal employee's experience of work-to-family conflict and enrichment and (b) the attitudes of the employee's spouse/partner. Hypotheses are tested with data from 408 couples. Results suggest that employee FSOP is positively associated with employee commitment through both employee work-to-family experiences and partner attitudes. FSOP was positively related to employee work-to-family enrichment, which was positively associated with employee affective commitment. FSOP was negatively associated with employee work-to-family conflict, which related to a partner's more positive attitude toward the employee's work schedule and higher commitment to the employee's firm. Partner commitment was positively and reciprocally related to employee affective commitment. These relationships partially mediated the FSOP-employee affective commitment relationship and varied as a function of parental status and single- versus dual-earner couple status but not as a function of employee gender. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  11. Activation-induced expression of thymic shared antigen-1 on T lymphocytes and its inhibitory role for TCR-mediated IL-2 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, A; Saitoh, S; Narumiya, S; Miyake, K; Hamaoka, T

    1994-12-01

    We have produced a hamster mAb, PRST1, which reacts with thymic shared Ag-1 (TSA-1), a product of the Ly6 gene family. By cross-blocking experiments, we found that TSA-1 is identical to stem cell Ag-2 (Sca-2). Using PRST1, the changes of TSA-1/Sca-2 expression on mature T cells during the activation process were analyzed. Although freshly isolated T cells did not express detectable TSA-1 on their cell surface, in vitro stimulation of T cells with concanavalin A induced a marked increase of surface TSA-1 expression. The increased expression of TSA-1 on T cells was detected from 12 h after stimulation and was associated with the increase of TSA-1 mRNA. In vivo injection of mice with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) resulted in the enhanced TSA-1 expression in splenic V beta 8+ T cells. This antigen-specific induction of TSA-1 expression in vivo preceded a detectable increase in numbers of V beta 8- T cells after SEB injection. Functionally, whereas anti-TSA-1 mAb was not mitogenic to T cells, it inhibited anti-CD3-induced IL-2 production by T cell hybridomas. These results indicate that TSA-1/Sca-2 is a unique marker for T cell activation and a signal through this molecule may have a negative feedback role to limit IL-2 production from activated T cells stimulated through the TCR.

  12. Differential recognition of members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family by Afa/Dr adhesins of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Cedric N; Billker, Oliver; Meyer, Thomas F; Servin, Alain L; Kansau, Imad

    2004-05-01

    Little is known about the molecular bases underlying the virulence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) harbouring the Afa/Dr family of adhesins. These adhesins recognize as receptors the GPI-anchored proteins CD55 (decay-accelerating factor, DAF) and CD66e (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). CD66e is a member of the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) family, comprising seven members. We analysed the interactions of Afa/Dr DAEC with the CEACAMs using CEACAM-expressing CHO and HeLa cells. The results demonstrate that only E. coli expressing a subfamily of Afa/Dr adhesins, named here Afa/Dr-I, including Dr, F1845 and AfaE-III adhesins, bound onto CHO cells expressing CEACAM1, CEA or CEACAM6. Whereas all the Afa/Dr adhesins elicit recruitment of CD55 around adhering bacteria, only the Afa/Dr-I subfamily elicits the recruitment of CEACAM1, CEA and CEACAM6. In addition, although CEACAM3 is not recognized as a receptor by the subfamily of Afa/Dr adhesins, it is recruited around bacteria in HeLa cells. The recruited CEACAM1, CEA and CEACAM6 around adhering bacteria resist totally or in part a detergent extraction, whereas the recruited CEACAM3 does not. Finally, the results show that recognition of CEA and CEACAM6, but not CEACAM1, is accompanied by tight attachment to bacteria of cell surface microvilli-like extensions, which are elongated. Moreover, recognition of CEA is accompanied by an activation of the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and by a phosphorylation of ERM, which in turn elicit the observed cell surface microvilli-like extensions.

  13. Epitope distance to the target cell membrane and antigen size determine the potency of T cell-mediated lysis by BiTE antibodies specific for a large melanoma surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, Claudia; Hausmann, Susanne; Fluhr, Petra; Sriskandarajah, Mirnalini; Stallcup, William B; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Kufer, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP; also called CSPG4, NG2, HMW-MAA, MSK16, MCSPG, MEL-CSPG, or gp240) is a surface antigen frequently expressed on human melanoma cells, which is involved in cell adhesion, invasion and spreading, angiogenesis, complement inhibition, and signaling. MCSP has therefore been frequently selected as target antigen for development of antibody- and vaccine-based therapeutic approaches. We have here used a large panel of monoclonal antibodies against human MCSP for generation of single-chain MCSP/CD3-bispecific antibodies of the BiTE (for bispecific T cell engager) class. Despite similar binding affinity to MCSP, respective BiTE antibodies greatly differed in their potency of redirected lysis of CHO cells stably transfected with full-length human MCSP, or with various MCSP deletion mutants and fusion proteins. BiTE antibodies binding to the membrane proximal domain D3 of MCSP were more potent than those binding to more distal domains. This epitope distance effect was corroborated with EpCAM/CD3-bispecific BiTE antibody MT110 by testing various fusion proteins between MCSP and EpCAM as surface antigens. CHO cells expressing small surface target antigens were generally better lysed than those expressing larger target antigens, indicating that antigen size was also an important determinant for the potency of BiTE antibody. The present study for the first time relates the positioning of binding domains and size of surface antigens to the potency of target cell lysis by BiTE-redirected cytotoxic T cells. In case of the MCSP antigen, this provides the basis for selection of a maximally potent BiTE antibody candidate for development of a novel melanoma therapy.

  14. IRES-mediated translation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member PUMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltouki, Atossa; Harford, Terri J; Komar, Anton A; Weyman, Crystal M

    2013-01-01

    The proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member PUMA is a critical regulator of apoptosis. We have previously shown that PUMA plays a pivotal role in the apoptosis associated with skeletal myoblast differentiation and that a MyoD-dependent mechanism is responsible for the increased expression of PUMA in these cells. Herein, we report that the increased expression of PUMA under these conditions involves regulation at the level of translation. Specifically, we have found that the increase in PUMA protein levels occurs under conditions of decreased total protein synthesis, eIF2-alpha phosphorylation and hypophosphorylation of eIF4E-BP, suggesting that PUMA translation is proceeding via an alternative initiation mechanism. Polyribosome analysis of PUMA mRNA further corroborated this suggestion. A combination of in vitro and ex vivo (cellular) approaches has provided evidence suggesting that PUMA mRNA 5'UTR harbors an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) element. Using mono- and bi-cistronic reporter constructs, we have delineated an mRNA fragment that allows for cap-independent translation in vitro and ex vivo (in skeletal myoblasts) in response to culture in differentiation media (DM), or in response to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent, etoposide. This mRNA fragment also supports translation in HeLa and 293T cells. Thus, our data has revealed a novel IRES-mediated regulation of PUMA expression in several cell types and in response to several stimuli. These findings contribute to our understanding and potential manipulation of any developmental or therapeutic scenario involving PUMA.

  15. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes.

  16. The Mediating Role of Family on the Effects of Brand Preferences of Consumer-Based Brand Equity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan YILDIZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effects of the sub-dimension of consumer-based brand equity which are called brand awareness, perceived quality, brand associations and brand loyalty on brand preference and the second goal is to find out the mediating role of family on these relations. For this purpose, a study was conducted with the participation of 295 people in Ankara. According to the research result, perceived quality and brand loyalty positively effects on brand preferences but there is no significant effect of brand awareness and brand association on these preferences. And also it is observed that family does not have any mediating role on these relations.

  17. Siblings' mediated learning strategies in families with and without children with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzuriel, David; Hanuka-Levy, Dikla

    2014-11-01

    Dyads of siblings in which the younger sibling had an intellectual disability (ID, n  =  25) were videotaped interacting. The ID group was compared with typically developing sibling dyads matched on mental age (n  =  25) and chronological age (n  =  25). We observed the mediation strategies, activation, and antimediation behaviors of older siblings and younger siblings' responsiveness to mediation. Mediation strategies were analyzed by the Observation of Mediation Interaction scale. The ID group scored highest on mediation strategies and lowest on activation and antimediation behaviors. Younger siblings' responsiveness to mediation was highest among the ID group. Mediation for Intentionality and Reciprocity and Meaning were positively associated with the verbal responsiveness of the younger siblings. Activation and antimediation behaviors were negatively associated with the verbal responsiveness.

  18. Parallel Bimodal Bilingual Acquisition: A Hearing Child Mediated in a Deaf Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramér-Wolrath, Emelie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal case study was to describe bimodal and bilingual acquisition in a hearing child, Hugo, especially the role his Deaf family played in his linguistic education. Video observations of the family interactions were conducted from the time Hugo was 10 months of age until he was 40 months old. The family language was Swedish…

  19. Socioeconomic disparities in the quality of life in children with cancer or brain tumors: the mediating role of family factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzelman, Kristin; Barker, Emily; Catrine, Kristine; Puccetti, Diane; Possin, Peggy; Witt, Whitney P

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to determine if and to what extent (i) socioeconomic disparities exist in the health-related quality of life (QOL) of children with cancer or brain tumors and healthy children; and (ii) family functioning and burden mediate the relationship between socioeconomic status and children's QOL. In this cross-sectional study, parents of children ages 2-18 with (n = 71) and without (n = 135) cancer or brain tumors completed in-person interviewer-assisted surveys assessing sociodemographics (including income and parental education), child QOL (measure: PedsQL), family functioning (measure: Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale IV) and burden (measure: Impact on the Family Scale). For children with cancer, clinical characteristics were captured through medical record abstraction. Multiple linear regression was used to determine the relationship between income and child QOL; the interaction between group status and income was assessed. Staged multivariate regression models were used to assess the role of family factors in this relationship among children with cancer. In multivariate analyses, the effect of income differed by cancer status; lower income was associated with worse QOL in children with cancer but not among healthy children. Among children with cancer, this relationship was significantly attenuated by family burden. Significant socioeconomic disparities exist in the QOL of children with cancer. Family factors partially explain the relationship between low income and poor QOL outcomes among these children. Lower-income families may have fewer resources to cope with their child's cancer. Increased support, monitoring, and referrals to reduce burden for these families may lead to improved QOL in children with cancer. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. JC virus small T antigen binds phosphatase PP2A and Rb family proteins and is required for efficient viral DNA replication activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Bollag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV produces five tumor proteins encoded by transcripts alternatively spliced from one precursor messenger RNA. Significant attention has been given to replication and transforming activities of JCV's large tumor antigen (TAg and three T' proteins, but little is known about small tumor antigen (tAg functions. Amino-terminal sequences of tAg overlap with those of the other tumor proteins, but the carboxy half of tAg is unique. These latter sequences are the least conserved among the early coding regions of primate polyomaviruses. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We investigated the ability of wild type and mutant forms of JCV tAg to interact with cellular proteins involved in regulating cell proliferation and survival. The JCV P99A tAg is mutated at a conserved proline, which in the SV40 tAg is required for efficient interaction with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, and the C157A mutant tAg is altered at one of two newly recognized LxCxE motifs. Relative to wild type and C157A tAgs, P99A tAg interacts inefficiently with PP2A in vivo. Unlike SV40 tAg, JCV tAg binds to the Rb family of tumor suppressor proteins. Viral DNAs expressing mutant t proteins replicated less efficiently than did the intact JCV genome. A JCV construct incapable of expressing tAg was replication-incompetent, a defect not complemented in trans using a tAg-expressing vector. CONCLUSIONS: JCV tAg possesses unique properties among the polyomavirus small t proteins. It contributes significantly to viral DNA replication in vivo; a tAg null mutant failed to display detectable DNA replication activity, and a tAg substitution mutant, reduced in PP2A binding, was replication-defective. Our observation that JCV tAg binds Rb proteins, indicates all five JCV tumor proteins have the potential to influence cell cycle progression in infected and transformed cells. It remains unclear how these proteins coordinate their unique and overlapping functions.

  1. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  2. Internalization Mediation towards the Relationship between Entrepreneurial Action and Individual Performance for the Next Generation of Family Companies in Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Novi Mustikarini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study  examined the effect of entrepreneurial action for the performance of the next generation using the sample of students who joined the Family Business Community. In this study, there is a high contribution given by the role of entrepreneurship education in preparing the next generation in the family business. In addition, entrepreneurship education is considered possible through the process of internalization of the leaning process that is going on. For example, it is noted that entrepreneurial action can have a significant effect on the performance of the organization. In the context of the family business and entrepreneurial education at the University of Ciputra, both variables (entrepreneurial action and individual performance are necessary to be tested and therefore, the researcher finds it possible to cary out a research that is supposed to have a contribution to the family business. This study uses a hierarchical regression analysis, to test the stages of the mediation process. The results showed that most of relationships mediate internalization Entrepreneurial Action and Individual Performance.

  3. The Role of the Family Environment and Computer-Mediated Social Support on Breast Cancer Patients' Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Woohyun; Shah, Dhavan V.; Shaw, Bret R.; Kim, Eunkyung; Smaglik, Paul; Roberts, Linda J.; Hawkins, Robert P.; Pingree, Suzanne; Mcdowell, Helene; Gustafson, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of family environment and computer-mediated social support (CMSS) for women with breast cancer, little is known about the interplay of these sources of care and assistance on patients' coping strategies. To understand this relation, the authors examined the effect of family environment as a predictor of the use of CMSS groups as well as a moderator of the relation between group participation and forms of coping. Data were collected from 111 patients in CMSS groups in the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System “Living with Breast Cancer” intervention. Results indicate that family environment plays a crucial role in (a) predicting breast cancer patient's participation in CMSS groups and (b) moderating the effects of use of CMSS groups on breast cancer patients' coping strategies such as problem-focused coping and emotion-focused coping. PMID:24511907

  4. Mediators of maternal depression and family structure on child BMI: parenting quality and risk factors for child overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConley, Regina L; Mrug, Sylvie; Gilliland, M Janice; Lowry, Richard; Elliott, Marc N; Schuster, Mark A; Bogart, Laura M; Franzini, Luisa; Escobar-Chaves, Soledad L; Franklin, Frank A

    2011-02-01

    Risk factors for child obesity may be influenced by family environment, including maternal depression, family structure, and parenting quality. We tested a path model in which maternal depression and single parent status are associated with parenting quality, which relates to three risk factors for child obesity: diet, leisure, and sedentary behavior. Participants included 4,601 5th-grade children and their primary caregivers who participated in the Healthy Passages study. Results showed that associations of maternal depression and single parenthood with child BMI are mediated by parenting quality and its relation to children's leisure activity and sedentary behavior. Interventions for child obesity may be more successful if they target family environment, particularly parenting quality and its impact on children's active and sedentary behaviors.

  5. Expression of the SLAM family of receptors adapter EAT-2 as a novel strategy for enhancing beneficial immune responses to vaccine antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Appledorn, Daniel M; Seregin, Sergey S; Liu, Chyong-jy J; Schuldt, Nathaniel J; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2011-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that activation of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors plays an important role in several aspects of immune regulation. However, translation of this knowledge into a useful clinical application has not been undertaken. One important area where SLAM-mediated immune regulation may have keen importance is in the field of vaccinology. Because SLAM signaling plays such a critical role in the innate and adaptive immunity, we endeavored to develop a strategy to improve the efficacy of vaccines by incorporation of proteins known to be important in SLAM-mediated signaling. In this study, we hypothesized that coexpression of the SLAM adapter EWS-FLI1-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) along with a pathogen-derived Ag would facilitate induction of beneficial innate immune responses, resulting in improved induction of Ag-specific adaptive immune responses. To test this hypothesis, we used rAd5 vector-based vaccines expressing murine EAT-2, or the HIV-1-derived Ag Gag. Compared with appropriate controls, rAd5 vectors expressing EAT-2 facilitated bystander activation of NK, NKT, B, and T cells early after their administration into animals. EAT-2 overexpression also augments the expression of APC (macrophages and dendritic cells) surface markers. Indeed, this multitiered activation of the innate immune system by vaccine-mediated EAT-2 expression enhanced the induction of Ag-specific cellular immune responses. Because both mice and humans express highly conserved EAT-2 adapters, our results suggest that human vaccination strategies that specifically facilitate SLAM signaling may improve vaccine potency when targeting HIV Ags specifically, as well as numerous other vaccine targets in general.

  6. Opa+ Neisseria gonorrhoeae exhibits reduced survival in human neutrophils via Src family kinase-mediated bacterial trafficking into mature phagolysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M Brittany; Ball, Louise M; Daily, Kylene P; Martin, Jennifer N; Columbus, Linda; Criss, Alison K

    2015-05-01

    During gonorrhoeal infection, there is a heterogeneous population of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) varied in their expression of opacity-associated (Opa) proteins. While Opa proteins are important for bacterial attachment and invasion of epithelial cells, Opa+ Gc has a survival defect after exposure to neutrophils. Here, we use constitutively Opa- and OpaD+ Gc in strain background FA1090 to show that Opa+ Gc is more sensitive to killing inside adherent, chemokine-treated primary human neutrophils due to increased bacterial residence in mature, degradative phagolysosomes that contain primary and secondary granule antimicrobial contents. Although Opa+ Gc stimulates a potent oxidative burst, neutrophil killing of Opa+ Gc was instead attributable to non-oxidative components, particularly neutrophil proteases and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Blocking interaction of Opa+ Gc with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) or inhibiting Src family kinase signalling, which is downstream of CEACAM activation, enhanced the survival of Opa+ Gc in neutrophils. Src family kinase signalling was required for fusion of Gc phagosomes with primary granules to generate mature phagolysosomes. Conversely, ectopic activation of Src family kinases or coinfection with Opa+ Gc resulted in decreased survival of Opa- Gc in neutrophils. From these results, we conclude that Opa protein expression is an important modulator of Gc survival characteristics in neutrophils by influencing phagosome dynamics and thus bacterial exposure to neutrophils' full antimicrobial arsenal.

  7. The use of reference strand-mediated conformational analysis for the study of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) feline leucocyte antigen class II DRB polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, G J C; Kennedy, L J; Auty, H K; Ryvar, R; Ollier, W E R; Kitchener, A C; Freeman, A R; Radford, A D

    2004-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to suggest the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has limited genetic diversity. However, the extent of this and its significance to the fitness of the cheetah population, both in the wild and captivity, is the subject of some debate. This reflects the difficulty associated with establishing a direct link between low variability at biologically significant loci and deleterious aspects of phenotype in this, and other, species. Attempts to study one such region, the feline leucocyte antigen (FLA), are hampered by a general reliance on cloning and sequencing which is expensive, labour-intensive, subject to PCR artefact and always likely to underestimate true variability. In this study we have applied reference strand-mediated conformational analysis (RSCA) to determine the FLA-DRB phenotypes of 25 cheetahs. This technique was rapid, repeatable and less prone to polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-induced sequence artefacts associated with cloning. Individual cheetahs were shown to have up to three FLA-DRB genes. A total of five alleles were identified (DRB*ha14-17 and DRB*gd01) distributed among four genotypes. Fifteen cheetahs were DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17, three were DRB*ha15/ha16/ha17, six were DRB*ha14/ha16/ha17 and one was DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17/gd01. Sequence analysis of DRB*gd01 suggested it was a recombinant of DRB*ha16 and DRB*ha17. Generation of new alleles is difficult to document, and the clear demonstration of such an event is unusual. This study confirms further the limited genetic variability of the cheetah at a biologically significant region. RSCA will facilitate large-scale studies that will be needed to correlate genetic diversity at such loci with population fitness in the cheetah and other species.

  8. Most-probable-number loop-mediated isothermal amplification-based procedure enhanced with K antigen-specific immunomagnetic separation for quantifying tdh(+) Vibrio parahaemolyticus in molluscan Shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Natsuko; Iwade, Yoshito; Yamazaki, Wataru; Gondaira, Fumio; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2014-07-01

    Although thermostable direct hemolysin-producing (tdh(+)) Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis, the enumeration of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus remains challenging due to its low densities in the environment. In this study, we developed a most-probable-number (MPN)-based procedure designated A-IS(1)-LAMP, in which an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) technique targeting as many as 69 established K antigens and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene were applied in an MPN format. Our IMS employed PickPen, an eight-channel intrasolution magnetic particle separation device, which enabled a straightforward microtiter plate-based IMS procedure (designated as PickPen-IMS). The ability of the procedure to quantify a wide range of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus levels was evaluated by testing shellfish samples in Japan and southern Thailand, where shellfish products are known to contain relatively low and high levels of total V. parahaemolyticus, respectively. The Japanese and Thai shellfish samples showed, respectively, relatively low (tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus, raising concern about the safety of Thai shellfish products sold to domestic consumers at local morning markets. LAMP showed similar or higher performance than conventional PCR in the detection and quantification of a wide range of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus levels in shellfish products. Whereas a positive effect of PickPen-IMS was not observed in MPN determination, PickPen-IMS was able to concentrate tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus 32-fold on average from the Japanese shellfish samples at an individual tube level, suggesting a possibility of using PickPen-IMS as an optional tool for specific shellfish samples. The A-IS(1)-LAMP procedure can be used by any health authority in the world to measure the tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus levels in shellfish products.

  9. Family and community rejection and a Congolese led mediation intervention to reintegrate rejected survivors of sexual violence in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Anjalee; Tosha, Maphie; Ramazani, Paul; Safari, Octave; Bachunguye, Richard; Zahiga, Isaya; Iragi, Aline; Glass, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose in this study is to describe the multiple and inter-related health, economic, and social reasons for rejection and to provide an example of a Congolese-led family mediation program to reintegrate survivors into their families. We conducted this study in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and included two focus group discussions and twenty-seven interviews. Rejection extends beyond physical dislocation to include economic and social aspects. Family mediation is a process requiring knowledge of traditions and norms. Understanding the context of rejection and supporting promising local reintegration efforts will likely improve health, economic, and social outcomes for the survivor, her family, and her community.

  10. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ananda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1 a recruitment page, 2 a summary page, and 3 a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27% enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps

  11. Bicultural competence, acculturative family distancing, and future depression in Latino/a college students: a moderated mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Stephanie G; Wei, Meifen

    2014-07-01

    In his acculturative family distancing (AFD) theory, Hwang (2006b) argued that acculturation gaps among parents and youth may lead to psychological and emotional distancing. AFD includes 2 dimensions: incongruent cultural values and breakdowns in communication. This study examined whether bicultural competence (BC) served as a mediator and moderator for the relationship between AFD and depression using structural equation modeling. Two hundred and forty-one Latino/a college students attending predominantly White, midwestern universities completed an online survey at 2 time points. For mediation, results indicated that BC at Time 2 (T2) mediated the relationship between AFD at Time 1 (T1) and depression at T2 above and beyond the effects of depression, acculturation, and enculturation at T1. A bootstrap method estimated the significance of the indirect effect. Moreover, 16% of the variance in BC at T2 was explained by acculturation, enculturation, and AFD at T1; 30% of the variance in depression at T2 was explained by BC at T2 and depression at T1. Post hoc analyses of the AFD and BC dimensions suggested that (a) positive attitudes toward both groups, communication ability, and social groundedness were significant mediators for the incongruent cultural values-depression link and (b) communication ability and social groundedness were significant mediators for the communication breakdown-depression link. For moderation, the AFD × BC interaction did not significantly predict depression at T2. Limitations, future research directions, and counseling implications are discussed.

  12. The Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis Immunodominant Surface Antigen BrpA Gene, Encoding a 382-Kilodalton Protein Composed of Repetitive Sequences, Is a Member of a Multigene Family Conserved among Bartonella Species

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmore, Robert D.; Bellville, Travis M.; Sviat, Steven L.; Frace, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Bartonella proteins that elicit an antibody response during an infection are poorly defined; therefore, to characterize antigens recognized by the host, a Bartonella genomic expression library was screened with serum from an infected mouse. This process led to the discovery of a Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis gene encoding a 382-kDa protein, part of a gene family encoding large proteins, each containing multiple regions of repetitive segments. The genes were termed brpA to -C (bartonell...

  13. Familial clustering of juvenile thyroid autoimmunity: higher risk is conferred by human leukocyte antigen DR3-DQ2 and thyroid peroxidase antibody status in fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segni, Maria; Pani, Michael A; Pasquino, Anna Maria; Badenhoop, Klaus

    2002-08-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity is one of the most common immune disorders in females, and its polygenic background remains to be elucidated. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ region of chromosome 6 has been shown to confer susceptibility to thyroid autoimmune disease. The aim of our present investigation was to determine whether the transmission of high risk HLA DQ to patients with thyroid autoimmunity differs when transmission is from fathers as opposed to when transmission is from mothers. We studied 91 juvenile patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (68 females and 23 males; mean age, 10.5 +/- 3.9 yr), 12 patients with Graves' disease (all females; mean age, 8.8 +/- 4.0 yr), 53 healthy siblings, and their parents for thyroid function, antibodies, ultrasound, and DNA typing for HLA DQ susceptibility alleles. We observed an increased rate of transmission for the DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 (DQ2) haplotype [35 of 53 transmitted (66%); P = 0.02]. This allele was preferentially transmitted by fathers [21 of 27 (78%); P < 0.004], whereas the maternal DQ2 haplotypes were not transmitted more often than expected. Subsequently, families were stratified as follows according to the parental thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) status: no parent, only mothers, only fathers, and both parents positive. There was no significant maternal transmission disequilibrium in any subset, but the paternal HLA DQ2 was preferentially transmitted [11 of 14 cases (79%); P = 0.03] in the group of TPOAb-positive mothers, and we observed a similar trend in the group of TPOAb- positive fathers (P = 0.08). Also, the portion of offspring affected by Graves' disease was significantly higher in TPOAb-positive than in TPOAb-negative fathers (P < 0.02). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a significant effect of paternal HLA DQ alleles as well as antibody status on susceptibility to thyroid autoimmune disease in juvenile patients.

  14. Distinct complexes of yeast Snx4 family SNX-BARs mediate retrograde trafficking of Snc1 and Atg27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mengxiao; Burd, Christopher G; Chi, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    The yeast SNX4 sub-family of sorting nexin containing a Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs domain (SNX-BAR) proteins, Snx4/Atg24, Snx41 and Atg20/Snx42, are required for endocytic recycling and selective autophagy. Here, we show that Snx4 forms 2 functionally distinct heterodimers: Snx4-Atg20 and Snx4-Snx41. Each heterodimer coats an endosome-derived tubule that mediates retrograde sorting of distinct cargo; the v-SNARE, Snc1, is a cargo of the Snx4-Atg20 pathway, and Snx4-Snx41 mediates retrograde sorting of Atg27, an integral membrane protein implicated in selective autophagy. Live cell imaging of individual endosomes shows that Snx4 and the Vps5-Vps17 retromer SNX-BAR heterodimer operate concurrently on a maturing endosome. Consistent with this, the yeast dynamin family protein, Vps1, which was previously shown to promote fission of retromer-coated tubules, promotes fission of Snx4-Atg20 coated tubules. The results indicate that the yeast SNX-BAR proteins coat 3 distinct types of endosome-derived carriers that mediate endosome-to-Golgi retrograde trafficking.

  15. A pilot study of self-esteem as a mediator between family factors and depressive symptoms in young adult university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restifo, Kathleen; Akse, Joyce; Guzman, Natalie Valle; Benjamins, Caroline; Dick, Katharina

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether self-esteem mediates the relationship between family factors and depressive symptoms in young adults. Participants completed self-report questionnaires about overall family environment, conflict with mother or father, parental rearing, self esteem, and depressive symptoms. Self-esteem was found to mediate the relationship between the combined family factors and depressive symptoms. When examined simultaneously, none of the individual family variables uniquely predicted depressive symptoms or self-esteem. However, separate analysis of each of the three family factors provided evidence for self-esteem mediating the relationship between parental conflict and depressive symptoms, and the relationship between parental care and depressive symptoms. Self-esteem may play a role in the mechanism underlying the link between parent-offspring relationship factors and depressive symptoms.

  16. Multilevel Mediation: Cumulative Contextual Risk, Maternal Differential Treatment, and Children's Behavior within Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Jean Christophe; Boyle, Michael; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that links between contextual risk and children's outcomes are partially explained by differential parenting. Using multi-informant measurement and including up to four children per family (M[subscript age] = 3.51, SD = 2.38) in a sample of 397 families, indirect effects (through maternal differential…

  17. School and Home Connections and Children's Kindergarten Achievement Gains: The Mediating Role of Family Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Claudia; Sheldon, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Children's home and school are the most influential contexts in which learning and development occur, especially during early childhood. This paper builds on Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory and Epstein's theory of overlapping spheres of influence to examine school and family connections and their relationships to family involvement and…

  18. The Relationship Between Family-of-Origin Violence, Hostility, and Intimate Partner Violence in Men Arrested for Domestic Violence: Testing a Mediational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmquist, JoAnna; Shorey, Ryan C; Labrecque, Lindsay; Ninnemann, Andrew; Zapor, Heather; Febres, Jeniimarie; Wolford-Clevenger, Caitlin; Plasencia, Maribel; Temple, Jeff R; Stuart, Gregory L

    2016-09-01

    Although research has shown links between family-of-origin violence (FOV), intimate partner violence (IPV), and hostility, research has not examined whether hostility mediates the relationship between FOV and IPV. The current study examined whether hostility mediates FOV and IPV perpetration in 302 men arrested for domestic violence. Results demonstrated that hostility fully mediated the relationship between father-to-participant FOV and physical and psychological IPV, and the relationship between mother-to-participant FOV and physical IPV. Results indicated that hostility fully mediated the relationship between experiencing and witnessing FOV and physical IPV (composite FOV), and partially mediated the relationship between composite FOV and psychological aggression.

  19. The Work-Family Interface as a Mediator between Job Demands and Employee Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jade S; Heneghan, Camille J; Bailey, Sarah F; Barber, Larissa K

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation, we draw from the job demands-resource model and conservation of resources theory to examine the relationship between job demands, the work-family interface and worker behaviours. Data collected from an online survey of workers revealed that hindrance demands indirectly increase interpersonal and organizational deviance through work interference with family and family interference with work. Challenge demands indirectly predict interpersonal and organizational deviance through work interference with family. Finally, hindrance demands indirectly decreased individual-directed organizational citizenship behaviours through work-to-family enrichment. Taken together, these results stress the relevance of job demand management and resource drain/acquisition to counterproductive and extra-role behaviours. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. EXPRESSION OF HUMAN α-GALACTOSIDASE AND α1,2-FUCOSYL-TRANSFERASE GENES MODIFIES THE CELL SURFACE GALα1,3GAL ANTIGEN AND CONFERS RESISTANCE TO HUMAN SERUM-MEDIATED CYTOLYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾延军; 任会明; 高新; 季守平; 杨军; 刘泽鹏; 李素波; 章扬培

    2004-01-01

    Objective To explore the strategies which reduce the amount of xenoantigen Galα1, 3 Gal. Methods Human α-galactosidase gene and α 1,2-fucosyltransferase gene were transferred into cultured porcine vascular endothelial cells PEDSV.15 and human α-galactosidase transgenic mice were produced. The Galα 1,3Gal on the cell surface and susceptibility of cells to human antibody-mediated lysis were analyzed. Results Human α-galactosidase gene alone reduced 78% of Galα1,3Gal on PEDSV.15 cell surface while human α-galactosidase combined with α 1,2-fucosyltransferase genes removed Galα 1,3Gal completely. Decrease of Galα1,3Gal could reduce susceptibility of cells to human antibody-mediated lysis, especially during co-expression of α-galactosidase gene and α1,2-fucosyltransferase gene. RT-PCR indicated positive human α-galactosidase gene expression in all organs of positive human α-galactosidase transgenic F1 mice including heart, liver, kidney, lung, and spleen, the amount of Galα1,3Gal antigens on which was reduced largely. 58% of spleen cells from F1 mice were destroyed by complement-mediated lysis compared with 24% of those from normal mice. Conclusions Human α-galactosidase gene and α1,2-fucosyltransferase gene effectively reduce the expression of Galα1,3Gal antigens on endothelial cell surface and confers resistance to human serummediated cytolysis. The expression of human α-galactosidase in mice can also eliminate the Galα1,3Gal antigens in most tissues and decrease the susceptibility of spleen cells to human serum-mediated cytolysis.

  1. Mediation and moderation effects of an in-home family intervention: the "in control: no alcohol!" pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen-Smit, Evelien; Mares, Suzanne H W; Verdurmen, Jacqueline E E; Van der Vorst, Haske; Schulten, Ingrid G H; Engels, Rutger C M E; Vollebergh, Wilma A M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a theory-based in-home family intervention (In control: No alcohol!) on adolescent alcohol cognitions via its putative mediators using a randomized controlled design. In the South Holland region of the Netherlands, a total of 213 children (11-12 years) and their mothers were randomly assigned to the prevention program (108 dyads) and the control condition (105 dyads). Mediation effects were analyzed using pretest and two follow-up measurements (5 and 12 months after baseline). A path model was estimated (using Mplus) to examine the effect of the intervention on the putative mediators (frequency- and quality of mother-child communication, rules about alcohol, establishing a nondrinking agreement, and parental monitoring of the child's whereabouts). Outcomes were adolescents' perceived harmfulness of drinking and intention to drink. Multigroup analyses were performed to examine potential differences across gender. The program led to an increase in frequency of alcohol-specific communication, nondrinking agreements, and parental monitoring. Moreover, adolescents in the experimental condition perceived drinking to be more harmful and had less intention to drink compared to adolescents in the control condition. The effect of the program on adolescent alcohol cognitions was significantly mediated through having more frequent conversations about alcohol, yet only among boys. Although results on actual drinking need to be added, findings indicate that this relatively inexpensive, easy-to-administer home intervention is promising.

  2. Racial and Socioeconomic Status Differences in Depressive Symptoms among Black and White Youth: An Examination of the Mediating Effects of Family Structure, Stress and Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Byron; Taylor, John

    2012-01-01

    Stress research shows that race, socioeconomic status (SES), and family context significantly impact an adolescent's psychological well-being, yet little is known about the mediating effects of family context on racial and SES differences in depressive symptoms among Black and White youth. We investigate these associations using a sample of 875…

  3. A cross-cultural examination of the mediating role of family support and parental advice quality on the relationship between family communication patterns and first-year college student adjustment in the United States and Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Dorrance Hall, Elizabeth; McNallie, Jenna; Custers, Kathleen; Timmermans, Elisabeth; Wilson, Steven R; Van den Bulck, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how college students’ family communication environments influence their adjustment during the first year of college in two distinct cultures: Belgium (n = 513) and the United States (n = 431). Three structural equation models were tested to determine the mediating effects of (a) perceived family support, (b) quality of academic advice from parents, and (c) quality of social advice from parents on associations between family communication patterns (FCPs) and student adju...

  4. CT10: a new cancer-testis (CT) antigen homologous to CT7 and the MAGE family, identified by representational-difference analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güre, A O; Stockert, E; Arden, K C; Boyer, A D; Viars, C S; Scanlan, M J; Old, L J; Chen, Y T

    2000-03-01

    Assays relying on humoral or T-cell-based recognition of tumor antigens to identify potential targets for immunotherapy have led to the discovery of a significant number of immunogenic gene products, including cancer-testis (CT) antigens predominantly expressed in cancer cells and male germ cells. The search for cancer-specific antigens has been extended via the technique of representational-difference analysis and SK-MEL-37, a melanoma cell line expressing a broad range of CT antigens. Using this approach, we have isolated CT antigen genes, genes over-expressed in cancer, e. g., PRAME and KOC, and genes encoding neuro-ectodermal markers. The identified CT antigen genes include the previously defined MAGE-A6, MAGE-A4a, MAGE-A10, CT7/MAGE-C1, as well as a novel gene designated CT10, which shows strong homology to CT7/MAGE-C1 both at cDNA and at genomic levels. Chromosome mapping localized CT10 to Xq27, in close proximity to CT7/MAGE-C1 and MAGE-A genes. CT10 mRNA is expressed in testis and in 20 to 30% of various human cancers. A serological survey identified 2 melanoma patients with anti-CT10 antibody, demonstrating the immunogenicity of CT10 in humans.

  5. Improved cell mediated immune responses after successful re-vaccination of non-responders to the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine using the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Jessica; Cardell, Kristina; Björnsdottir, Thora Björg; Fryden, Aril; Hultgren, Catharina; Sällberg, Matti

    2008-11-01

    We successfully re-vaccinated hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine non-responders using a double dose of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine. The hope was to improve priming of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific cell mediated immune response (CMI) by an increased antigen dose and a theoretical adjuvant-effect from the local presence of a HAV-specific CMI. A few non-responders had a detectable HBsAg-specific CMI before re-vaccination. An in vitro detectable HBsAg-specific CMI was primed equally effective in non-responders (58%) as in first time vaccine recipients (68%). After the third dose a weak, albeit significant, association was observed between the magnitude of HBsAg-specific proliferation and anti-HBs levels. This regimen improves the priming of HBsAg-specific CMIs and antibodies.

  6. Family income, parental education and internalizing and externalizing psychopathology among 2-3-year-old Chinese children: the mediator effect of parent-child conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao

    2014-02-01

    Using a sample of 156 Chinese children aged 2-3 years and their parents, this study examined the effects of socio-economic status, specifically family income and parental education, on the children's internalizing and externalizing psychopathology and whether these effects were mediated by mother-child and father-child conflict. Results indicated that family income, maternal education and paternal education all negatively predicted externalizing symptoms. Income also negatively predicted internalizing symptoms among boys but not girls. Maternal education negatively predicted internalizing symptoms among girls but not boys. The effects of income on psychopathology were fully mediated by mother-child and father-child conflict. In contrast, the effects of education were not mediated or only partially mediated by conflict. Findings are discussed in the framework of the family stress model.

  7. Attentional avoidant biases as mediators in the association between experiential avoidance and blood pressure in dementia family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-González, María; Cabrera, Isabel; Losada, Andrés; Knight, Bob G

    2017-03-02

    Experiential avoidance in caregiving (EAC) has been found to be related with dementia family caregivers´ distress and blood pressure (BP). The association between EAC and avoidant attentional biases to emotional stimuli in dementia caregivers, and the potential mediating role of these attentional biases in the association between EAC and increased BP are explored. Seventy nine dementia family caregivers performed a dot-probe task with emotional pictures (distressing and positive) varying in content (general vs. caregiving-related (CR)) and time of exposure (100 vs. 500 ms). They also completed measures of EAC, anxiety, depression, alexithymia and rumination, and their BP was measured. EAC was associated with avoidant attentional biases to CR emotional pictures and negative pictures in general at 100 ms. Experiential Avoidance in Caregiving Questionnaire (EACQ) 'avoidant behaviors' and EACQ 'intolerance of negativity' factors were associated with diastolic and systolic BP, respectively, with attentional avoidance of CR emotional pictures (distressing and positive, respectively) mediating this association. Attentional avoidance of CR emotional stimuli may be the link between EAC and increased BP, as it prevents emotional processing and facilitates the maintenance of physiological activation. EAC may pose a risk for cardiovascular disease in dementia caregivers.

  8. Economic Deprivation and Its Effects on Childhood Conduct Problems: The Mediating Role of Family Stress and Investment Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Sosu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the mechanisms by which experiences of poverty influence the trajectory of conduct problems among preschool children. Drawing on two theoretical perspectives, we focused on family stress (stress and harsh discipline and investment variables (educational investment, nutrition, and cognitive ability as key mediators. Structural equation modeling techniques with prospective longitudinal data from the Growing Up in Scotland survey (N = 3,375 were used. Economic deprivation measured around the first birthday of the sample children had both direct and indirect effects on conduct problems across time (ages 4, 5, and 6. In line with the family stress hypothesis, higher levels of childhood poverty predicted conduct problems across time through increased parental stress and punitive discipline. Consistent with the investment model, childhood deprivation was associated with higher levels of conduct problems via educational investment and cognitive ability. The study extends previous knowledge on the mechanisms of this effect by demonstrating that cognitive ability is a key mediator between poverty and the trajectory of childhood conduct problems. This suggests that interventions aimed at reducing child conduct problems should be expanded to include factors that compromise parenting as well as improve child cognitive ability.

  9. Siblings' Mediated Learning Strategies in Families with and without Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzuriel, David; Hanuka-Levy, Dikla

    2014-01-01

    Dyads of siblings in which the younger sibling had an intellectual disability (ID, n = 25) were videotaped interacting. The ID group was compared with typically developing sibling dyads matched on mental age (n = 25) and chronological age (n = 25). We observed the mediation strategies, activation, and antimediation behaviors of older siblings and…

  10. Hammerhead-mediated processing of satellite pDo500 family transcripts from Dolichopoda cave crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, A A; Vazquez-Tello, A; Ferbeyre, G; Venanzetti, F; Bachmann, L; Paquin, B; Sbordoni, V; Cedergren, R

    2000-10-15

    This work reports the discovery and functional characterization of catalytically active hammerhead motifs within satellite DNA of the pDo500 family from several DOLICHOPODA: cave cricket species. We show that in vitro transcribed RNA of some members of this satellite DNA family do self-cleave in vitro. This self-cleavage activity is correlated with the efficient in vivo processing of long primary transcripts into monomer-sized RNA. The high sequence conservation of the satellite pDo500 DNA family among genetically isolated DOLICHOPODA: schiavazzii populations, as well as other DOLICHOPODA: species, along with the fact that satellite members are actively transcribed in vivo suggests that the hammerhead-encoding satellite transcripts are under selective pressure, perhaps because they fulfil an important physiological role or function. Remarkably, this is the third example of hammerhead ribozyme structures associated with transcribed repetitive DNA sequences from animals. The possibility that such an association may not be purely coincidental is discussed.

  11. Depression as a Mediator in the Relationship between Perceived Familial Criticism and College Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puff, Jayme; Kolomeyer, Ellen; McSwiggan, Meagan; Pearte, Catherine; Lauer, Brea-Anne; Renk, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study examined relationships among emerging adults' perceived familial criticism, their depressive symptoms, and their college adaptation. Participants: The current study examined the responses of 412 emerging adults (300 females and 112 males) who were college students at a large southeastern university. The majority of these…

  12. The Impact of Maternal Depressive Symptoms on Adolescents' Aggression: Role of Parenting and Family Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Kelly L.; Farrell, Albert D.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has found an association between mothers' depressive symptoms and their adolescents' involvement in aggression. The present study examined three mechanisms believed to account for this relation: parenting practices, family functioning, and informant discrepancy. Participants were a high-risk sample of 927 mother-adolescent dyads…

  13. When Work Enriches Family-Life: The Mediational Role of Professional Development Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, Monica; Ghislieri, Chiara; Cortese, Claudio G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have pointed out the importance of work-family enrichment (WFE) for individuals' well-being and organizations and for this reason, it seems important to understand how organizations may promote it. This study attempts to understand the role of organizational resources and, particularly, of opportunities for professional…

  14. Family and Home Literacy Practices: Mediating Factors for Preliterate English Learners at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Maria K.; English, Judith P.; Gerber, Michael M.; Leafstedt, Jill; Ruz, Monica L.

    This paper reports the initial findings of a survey of family and home literacy factors that may influence the development of phonological awareness skills for preliterate English learners during the acquisition phase of reading development in a second language (L2). Preliminary findings are from the first year of a 3-year longitudinal study of…

  15. Do Family Mealtime Interactions Mediate the Association between Asthma Symptoms and Separation Anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiese, Barbara H.; Winter, Marcia A.; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Anbar, Ran D.; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Respiratory problems have been shown to be associated with the development of panic anxiety. Family members play an essential role for children to emotionally manage their symptoms. This study aimed to examine the relation between severity of respiratory symptoms in children with asthma and separation anxiety. Relying on direct…

  16. Identifying Mediators of the Influence of Family Factors on Risky Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Leslie Gordon; Burt, Callie Harbin; Tambling, Rachel Blyskal

    2013-01-01

    Participation in risky sexual behaviors has many deleterious consequences and is a source of concern for parents as well as practitioners, researchers, and public policy makers. Past research has examined the effect of family structure and supportive parenting on risky sexual behaviors among emerging adults. In the present study, we attempt to…

  17. Depression as a Mediator in the Relationship between Perceived Familial Criticism and College Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puff, Jayme; Kolomeyer, Ellen; McSwiggan, Meagan; Pearte, Catherine; Lauer, Brea-Anne; Renk, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study examined relationships among emerging adults' perceived familial criticism, their depressive symptoms, and their college adaptation. Participants: The current study examined the responses of 412 emerging adults (300 females and 112 males) who were college students at a large southeastern university. The majority of these…

  18. The Mediated and Moderated Effects of Family Support on Child Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne; Gardner, Margo; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has linked parents' social support to decreased child maltreatment, but questions remain surrounding the mechanisms explaining this association. Furthermore, it is unclear whether this association applies to support provided by family alone (and not friends), and whether it is moderated by the presence of neighborhood violence.…

  19. Poverty, Family Resources and Children's Early Educational Attainment: The Mediating Role of Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Kathleen E.; Mensah, Fiona K.

    2011-01-01

    This study uses longitudinal data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study to show the extent to which episodic and more persistent poverty in early childhood and the lack of other family resources disadvantage children at the start of their school careers in terms of whether they have achieved the target indicator of "good level of achievement" on the…

  20. 黑色素瘤抗原A家族与肿瘤的关系%Melanoma antigen-A family in tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁春艳; 桑梅香

    2010-01-01

    As a tumor-specific antigen highly expressed in various types of tumors, MACE-A does not exist in normal adult tissues, except for testis and placenta. Therefore MAGE-A antigens are regarded. tumor specific antigen,and have significant significance for cancer immunotherapy.%黑色素瘤抗原A(MAGE-A)基因家族在正常人中除在睾丸和胎盘组织中有表达外,在其他组织中均不表达,而在许多恶性肿瘤组织中却呈高表达状态,被认为是一种肿瘤特异性抗原,在肿瘤免疫治疗中具有重要意义.

  1. The effect of psychological capital between work-family conflict and job burnout in Chinese university teachers: Testing for mediation and moderation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jun; Hou, Hanpo; Ma, Ruiyang; Sang, Jinyan

    2016-03-29

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between work-family conflict and job burnout as well as the potential mediation/moderation effects of psychological capital. Participants were 357 university teachers who completed a questionnaire packet containing a work-family conflict scale, psychological capital questionnaire, and Maslach Burnout Inventory-General survey. According to the results, work-family conflict and psychological capital were both significantly correlated with job burnout. In addition, psychological capital cannot mediate-but can moderate-the relationship between work-family conflict and job burnout. Taken together, our findings shed light on the psychological capital underlying the association of work-family conflict and job burnout.

  2. Induction of mucosal immune responses and protection of cattle against direct-contact challenge by intranasal delivery with foot-and-mouth disease virus antigen mediated by nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan L

    2014-12-01

    a double dose of Chi-Tre-Inactivated nanoparticles and animals immunized by intranasal route three times with Chi-Tre-Inactivated nanoparticles (P<0.05. FMDV-specific IgA antibodies in serum showed a similar pattern. All animals immunized by intranasal route developed low levels of detectable IgG in serum at 10 dpv. Following stimulation with FMDV, the highest levels of proliferation were observed in splenocytes harvested from Chi-PLGA-DNA-immunized animals, followed by proliferation of cells harvested from Chi-Tre-Inactivated nanoparticle-immunized animals (P<0.05. Higher protection rates were associated with the highest sIgA antibody responses induced in the Chi-PLGA-DNA nanoparticle-immunized group. Only one animal was clinically affected with mild signs after 7 days of contact challenge, after a delay of 2–3 days compared with the clinically affected negative-control group. Of the five animals directly challenged that were vaccinated by intranasal route with a double dose of Chi-Tre-Inactivated, four were clinically infected; however, the degree of severity of disease in this group was lower than in control cattle. The number of viral RNA copies in nasal swabs from the vaccinated, severely infected group was significantly higher than in swabs from the vaccinated, clinically protected group. These data suggested that intranasal delivery of Chi-PLGA-DNA nanoparticles resulted in higher levels of mucosal, systemic, and cell-mediated immunity than did of Chi-Tre-Inactivated nanoparticles. In conclusion, although intranasal delivery with FMDV antigen mediated by nanoparticles did not provide complete clinical protection, it reduced disease severity and virus excretion and delayed clinical symptoms. Chi-PLGA-DNA nanoparticle vaccines have potential as a nasal delivery system for vaccines. Keywords: FMDV, nanoparticles, chitosan, trehalose, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA

  3. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described.

  4. Pharmacological and small interference RNA-mediated inhibition of breast cancer-associated fatty acid synthase (oncogenic antigen-519) synergistically enhances Taxol (paclitaxel)-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Vellon, Luciano; Colomer, Ramon; Lupu, Ruth

    2005-05-20

    The relationship between breast cancer-associated fatty acid synthase (FAS; oncogenic antigen-519) and chemotherapy-induced cell damage has not been studied. We examined the ability of C75, a synthetic slow-binding inhibitor of FAS activity, to modulate the cytotoxic activity of the microtubule-interfering agent Taxol (paclitaxel) in SK-Br3, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and multidrug-resistant MDR-1 (P-Glycoprotein)-overexpressing MCF-7/AdrR breast cancer cells. When the combination of C75 with Taxol in either concurrent (C75 + Taxol 24 hr) or sequential (C75 24 hr --> Taxol 24 hr) schedules were tested for synergism, addition or antagonism using the isobologram and the median-effect plot analyses, co-exposure of C75 and Taxol mostly demonstrated synergistic effects, whereas sequential exposure to C75 followed by Taxol mainly showed additive or antagonistic interactions. Because the nature of the cytotoxic interactions was definitely schedule-dependent in MCF-7 cells, we next evaluated the effects of C75 on Taxol-induced apoptosis as well as Taxol-activated cell death and cell survival-signaling pathways in this breast cancer cell model. An ELISA for histone-associated DNA fragments demonstrated that C75 and Taxol co-exposure caused a synergistic enhancement of apoptotic cell death, whereas C75 pre-treatment did not enhance the apoptosis-inducing activity of Taxol. Co-exposure to C75 and Taxol induced a remarkable nuclear accumulation of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), which was accompanied by a synergistic nuclear accumulation of the p53 tumor-suppressor protein that was phosphorylated at Ser46, a p38 MAPK-regulated pro-apoptotic modification of p53. As single agents, FAS blocker C75 and Taxol induced a significant stimulation of the proliferation and cell survival mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/ERK2 MAPK) activity, whereas, in combination, they interfered with ERK1/ERK2 activation. Moreover, the

  5. Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: current and emerging treatment options for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hund E

    2012-01-01

    Ernst HundDepartment of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is a fatal clinical disorder characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal fibrils derived from misfolded, normally soluble transthyretin (TTR) molecules. The disease is most commonly caused by a point mutation within the TTR gene inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Over 100 of such mutations have been identified, leading to destabil...

  6. The role of co-parenting alliance as a mediator between trait anxiety, family system maladjustment, and parenting stress in a sample of non-clinical Italian parents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eDelvecchio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of co-parenting alliance in mediating the influence of parents’ trait anxiety on family system maladjustment and parenting stress. A sample of 1606 Italian parents (803 mothers and 803 fathers of children aged one to thirteen years completed measures of trait anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory - Y, co-parenting alliance (Parenting Alliance Measure, family system maladjustment (Family Assessment Measure - III, and parenting stress (Parenting Stress Inventory - Short Form. These variables were investigated together comparing two structural equations model-fitting including both partners. A model for both mothers and fathers was empirically devised as a series of associations between parent trait anxiety (independent variable, family system maladjustment and parenting stress (dependent variables, mediated by co-parenting alliance, with the insertion of cross predictions between mothers and fathers and correlations between dependent variables for both parents. Results indicated that the relation between mothers and fathers’ trait anxiety, family system maladjustment and parenting stress was mediated by the level of co-parenting alliance. Understanding the role of couples’ co-parenting alliance could be useful during the family assessment and/or treatment, since it is an efficient and effective tool to improve the family system maladjustment and stress.

  7. Associations between sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, and substance use: the mediating role of depressed mood and anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis Bjork; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Gudjonsson, Gisli H; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik

    2011-03-01

    To examine whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior and substance use. A cross-sectional national survey was conducted including 9,085 16-19 year old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004. Participants reported frequency of sexual abuse, family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, substance use, depressed mood, and anger. Sexual abuse and family conflict/violence had direct effects on self-injurious behavior and substance use among both genders, when controlling for age, family structure, parental education, anger, and depressed mood. More importantly, the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior among both males and females were twice as strong through depressed mood as through anger, while the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on substance use were only significant through anger. These results indicate that in cases of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, substance use is similar to externalizing behavior, where anger seems to be a key mediating variable, opposed to internalizing behavior such as self-injurious behavior, where depressed mood is a more critical mediator. Practical implications highlight the importance of focusing on a range of emotions, including depressed mood and anger, when working with stressed adolescents in prevention and treatment programs for self-injurious behavior and substance use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CARB-17 family of β-lactamases mediates intrinsic resistance to penicillins in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Jiachi; Li, Ruichao; Chen, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is commonly resistant to ampicillin, yet the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not clear. In this study, a novel class A carbenicillin-hydrolyzing β-lactamase (CARB) family of β-lactamases, bla(CARB-17), was identified and found to be responsible for the intrinsic penicillin resistance in V. parahaemolyticus. Importantly, bla(CARB-17)-like genes were present in all 293 V. parahaemolyticus genome sequences available in GenBank and detectable in all 91 V. parahaemolyticus food isolates, further confirming the intrinsic nature of this gene. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Boolean network-based model of the Bcl-2 family mediated MOMP regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) is one of the most important points in the majority of apoptotic signaling cascades and it is controlled by a network of interactions between the members of the Bcl-2 family. Methods To understand the role of individual members of this family within the MOMP regulation, we have constructed a Boolean network-based model of interactions between the Bcl-2 proteins. Results Computational simulations have revealed the existence of trapping states which, independently from the incoming stimuli, block the occurrence of MOMP. Our results emphasize the role of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 in the majority of these configurations. We demonstrate here the importance of the Bid and Bim for activation of effectors Bax and Bak, and the irreversibility of this activation. The model further points to the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-w as a key factor preventing Bax activation. Conclusions In spite of relative simplicity, the Boolean network-based model provides useful insight into main functioning logic of the Bcl-2 switch, consistent with experimental findings. PMID:23767791

  10. Ubiquitin-Mediated Regulation of Endocytosis by Proteins of the Arrestin Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Becuwe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In metazoans, proteins of the arrestin family are key players of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRS signaling and trafficking. Following stimulation, activated receptors are phosphorylated, thus allowing the binding of arrestins and hence an “arrest” of receptor signaling. Arrestins act by uncoupling receptors from G proteins and contribute to the recruitment of endocytic proteins, such as clathrin, to direct receptor trafficking into the endocytic pathway. Arrestins also serve as adaptor proteins by promoting the recruitment of ubiquitin ligases and participate in the agonist-induced ubiquitylation of receptors, known to have impact on their subcellular localization and stability. Recently, the arrestin family has expanded following the discovery of arrestin-related proteins in other eukaryotes such as yeasts or fungi. Surprisingly, most of these proteins are also involved in the ubiquitylation and endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins, thus suggesting that the role of arrestins as ubiquitin ligase adaptors is at the core of these proteins' functions. Importantly, arrestins are themselves ubiquitylated, and this modification is crucial for their function. In this paper, we discuss recent data on the intricate connections between arrestins and the ubiquitin pathway in the control of endocytosis.

  11. Sleep problems as a mediator of the association between parental education levels, perceived family economy and poor mental health in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøe, Tormod; Hysing, Mari; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Lundervold, Astri J; Sivertsen, Børge

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between familial socioeconomic status (SES) and children's sleep problems, and the role of sleep problems as a mediator between familial SES and childhood mental health problems. Participants were 5781 11-13 year old children from the Bergen Child Study. Data were collected on family economy, parental education, and children's difficulties initiating and/or maintaining sleep (DIMS), time in bed (TIB) and self-reported mental health problems using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Sleep problems were significantly more common in children from lower SES families. Children from families with poor and average perceived family economy had significantly higher odds of reporting DIMS compared to children from families with very good economy (ORs=3.5 and 1.7, respectively). The odds were reduced by 12-36% adjusting for poor parental health and single parenting, but remained significant. Children from families with a poor economy had increased odds of a short TIB, both in the crude model (OR=1.9) and adjusted for parental characteristics (OR=2.2). Maternal education level was significantly associated with short TIB. Path analysis was conducted to investigate the potential mediating role of DIMS in the relationship between SES and mental health. The significant direct association between perceived family economy and SDQ total problems score was partially mediated by a significant indirect effect of sleep problems. Sleep problems are common among children from families with a lower SES and may be a potential mechanism through which low SES is translated into mental health problems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped mediates transcriptional output of the Hippo growth-regulatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shian; Liu, Yi; Zheng, Yonggang; Dong, Jixin; Pan, Duojia

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) kinase cascade restricts tissue growth by inactivating the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki), which regulates the expression of target genes such as the cell death inhibitor diap1 by unknown mechanisms. Here we identify the TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped (Sd) as a DNA-binding transcription factor that partners with Yki to mediate the transcriptional output of the Hpo growth-regulatory pathway. The diap1 (th) locus harbors a minimal Sd-binding Hpo Responsive Element (HRE) that mediates transcriptional regulation by the Hpo pathway. Sd binds directly to Yki, and a Yki missense mutation that abrogates Sd-Yki binding also inactivates Yki function in vivo. We further demonstrate that sd is required for yki-induced tissue overgrowth and target gene expression, and that sd activity is conserved in its mammalian homolog. Our results uncover a heretofore missing link in the Hpo signaling pathway and provide a glimpse of the molecular events on a Hpo-responsive enhancer element.

  13. A single dose of peripherally infused EGFRvIII-directed CAR T cells mediates antigen loss and induces adaptive resistance in patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Donald M; Nasrallah, MacLean P; Desai, Arati; Melenhorst, Jan J; Mansfield, Keith; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Brem, Steven; Maloney, Eileen; Shen, Angela; Isaacs, Randi; Mohan, Suyash; Plesa, Gabriela; Lacey, Simon F; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Zheng, Zhaohui; Levine, Bruce L; Okada, Hideho; June, Carl H; Brogdon, Jennifer L; Maus, Marcela V

    2017-07-19

    We conducted a first-in-human study of intravenous delivery of a single dose of autologous T cells redirected to the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) mutation by a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We report our findings on the first 10 recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) patients treated. We found that manufacturing and infusion of CAR-modified T cell (CART)-EGFRvIII cells are feasible and safe, without evidence of off-tumor toxicity or cytokine release syndrome. One patient has had residual stable disease for over 18 months of follow-up. All patients demonstrated detectable transient expansion of CART-EGFRvIII cells in peripheral blood. Seven patients had post-CART-EGFRvIII surgical intervention, which allowed for tissue-specific analysis of CART-EGFRvIII trafficking to the tumor, phenotyping of tumor-infiltrating T cells and the tumor microenvironment in situ, and analysis of post-therapy EGFRvIII target antigen expression. Imaging findings after CART immunotherapy were complex to interpret, further reinforcing the need for pathologic sampling in infused patients. We found trafficking of CART-EGFRvIII cells to regions of active GBM, with antigen decrease in five of these seven patients. In situ evaluation of the tumor environment demonstrated increased and robust expression of inhibitory molecules and infiltration by regulatory T cells after CART-EGFRvIII infusion, compared to pre-CART-EGFRvIII infusion tumor specimens. Our initial experience with CAR T cells in recurrent GBM suggests that although intravenous infusion results in on-target activity in the brain, overcoming the adaptive changes in the local tumor microenvironment and addressing the antigen heterogeneity may improve the efficacy of EGFRvIII-directed strategies in GBM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  14. The influence of the perception of a familial climate on job performance: mediation of loyalty to supervisors and moderation of filial behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Chin-Kang; Chou, Li-Fang; Lin, Chu-Yen; Tsai, Ming-Che

    2012-01-01

    With a collectivist cultural perspective, we examined the positive effects of employees' perceptions of a familial climate on loyalty to supervisors, the mediation of loyalty between perception of a familial climate and job performance, and the moderation of employees' filial behaviour on the relationship between perception of a familial climate and loyalty. The participants consisted of 247 supervisor-and-subordinate dyads in Taiwan. The results supported our hypotheses. Through the mechanisms of family behaviour transference, social identification and supervisor-subordinate exchange, perception of an organizational familial climate enhanced loyalty to supervisors. Furthermore, loyalty to supervisors mediated the relationship between perception of a familial climate and job performance. Filial behaviour moderated the relationship between perception of a familial climate and loyalty; thus, the relationship of perception of a familial climate and loyalty was stronger for employees with low levels of filial behaviour and weaker for employees with high levels of filial behaviour. These findings are discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical implications for future research and management practices.

  15. The mediating role of parent-child bonding to prevent adolescent alcohol abuse among Asian American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meme; Kviz, Frederick J; Miller, Arlene M

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe unique culturally-based factors that may increase the vulnerability of Asian American adolescents to engage in alcohol use and abuse and the role of parent-child bonding as a protective factor. In particular, this paper addresses the interactions among acculturation, alcohol use, and parent-child bonding and the challenges Asian American families face in strengthening parent-child bonds. We begin by examining likely causes for alienation that occur as a result of immigration to the United States. We then present the cultural context of Asian American families that can also serve to create distance between parent and child, including the contrasting cultural orientations of individualism and collectivism, Asian traditional values, differences in Eastern and Western parenting styles, and intergenerational cultural dissonance. Next, we present a review of the research that has examined acculturation as a risk factor for alcohol use and abuse among Asian American adolescents, with special attention to the mediating role of parent-child bonding. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for future research on the risk and protective factors for adolescent substance abuse, as well as other risky health behaviors among the growing population of Asian Americans in the United States.

  16. NK cells require antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells to mediate superior effector functions during HSV-2 recall responses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Branson; Lee, Amanda J; Chew, Marianne V; Ashkar, Ali A

    2016-12-14

    Natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in mounting protective innate responses against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections. However their role as effectors in adaptive immune responses against HSV-2 is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that NK cells from C57BL/6 mice in an ex vivo splenocyte culture produce significantly more interferon γ (IFN-γ) upon re-exposure to HSV-2 antigens in a mouse model of genital HSV-2 immunization. We find that naïve NK cells do not require any prior stimulation or priming to be activated to produce IFN-γ. Our results demonstrate that HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells have a crucial role in coordinating NK cell activation and that their presence during HSV-2 antigen presentation is required to activate NK cells in this model of secondary immune response. We also examined the requirement of cell-to-cell contacts for both CD4(+) T cells and NK cells. NK cells are dependent on direct interactions with other HSV-2-experienced splenocytes, and CD4(+) T cells need to be in close proximity to NK cells to activate them. This study revealed that NK cells do not exhibit any memory toward HSV-2 antigens and, in fact, require specific interactions with HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells to produce IFN-γ.

  17. The Balance between CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Clearance of AAV-Encoded Antigen in the Liver and Tolerance Is Dependent on the Vector Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep R P; Hoffman, Brad E; Terhorst, Cox; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2017-04-05

    The liver continuously receives antigens from circulation and the gastrointestinal tract. A complex immune regulatory system has evolved in order to both limit inflammation and promote tolerance in the liver. Although in situ immune tolerance mechanisms enable successful gene therapy and liver transplantation, at the same time they facilitate chronic infections by pathogens such as hepatitis viruses. It is, however, poorly understood why hepatocytes infected with hepatitis viruses or transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors may be rejected by CD8(+) T cells several months later. We found that hepatic transfer of limited doses of an AAV-ovalbumin vector rapidly induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells that only became functionally competent after >2 months. At this time, CD8(+) T cells had downregulated negative checkpoint markers, e.g., the programmed death 1 [PD-1] receptor, and upregulated expression of relevant cytokines. At further reduced vector dose, only intrahepatic rather than systemic CD8(+) T cell responses occurred, showing identical delay in antigen clearance. In contrast, PD-1-deficient mice rapidly cleared ovalbumin. Interestingly, higher vector dose directed sustained transgene expression without CD8(+) T cell responses. Regulatory T cells, IL-10 expression, and Fas-L contributed to high-dose tolerance. Thus, viral vector doses profoundly impact CD8(+) T cell responses.

  18. IL-2 and IL-15 Each Mediate De Novo Induction of FOXP3 Expression in Human Tumor Antigen-specific CD8 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, Mojgan; Antony, Paul A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Although FOXP3 is primarily expressed by regulatory CD4 T cells (Treg) in vivo, polyclonal activation of human CD8 T cells can result in the expression of FOXP3 in a fraction of CD8 T cells. However, the cellular lineage and mechanism of FOXP3 induction in CD8 T cells remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that interleukin-2 (IL-2) induces FOXP3 expression in OKT3-stimulated or antigen-stimulated CD8 T cells, indicating that FOXP3 expression is neither limited to a unique subset of CD8 T cells nor dependent on the mode of T-cell receptor stimulation. In the absence of IL-2, antigen stimulation resulted in T-cell activation and acquisition of effector function without induction of FOXP3, indicating that acquisition of effector function is independent of induction of FOXP3 expression in CD8 T cells. Interestingly, IL-15, but not IL-7 or IL-21, also led to de novo induction of FOXP3 in antigen-specific CD8 T cells, suggesting that signaling by IL-2/IL-15Rβ chain is pivotal for induction of FOXP3 in human CD8 T cells. These findings indicate that induction of FOXP3 is intrinsic to CD8 T cells that are activated in the presence of IL-2 or IL-15, and in vitro-induced expression of FOXP3 cannot be simply interpreted as an indicator of Treg activity or activation marker. PMID:17414320

  19. Role of a hippocampal SRC-family kinase-mediated glutamatergic mechanism in drug context-induced cocaine seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaohu; Arguello, Amy A; Wells, Audrey M; Reittinger, Andrew M; Fuchs, Rita A

    2013-12-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) is necessary for drug context-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in an animal model of drug relapse. Furthermore, in vitro studies suggest that the Src family of tyrosine kinases critically regulates glutamatergic cellular functions within the DH. Thus, Src-family kinases in the DH may similarly control contextual cocaine-seeking behavior. To test this hypothesis, rats were trained to lever press for un-signaled cocaine infusions in a distinct context followed by extinction training in a different context. Cocaine-seeking behavior (non-reinforced active lever pressing) was then assessed in the previously cocaine-paired and extinction contexts after AP5 (N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) antagonist; 0.25 or 2.5 μg/0.5 μl/hemisphere), PP2 (Src-family kinase inhibitor; 6.25 or 62.5 ng/0.5 μl/hemisphere), Ro25-6981 (NR2B subunit-containing NMDAR antagonist; 0.2 or 2 μg/0.5 μl/hemisphere), or vehicle administration into the DH. Administration of AP5, PP2, or Ro25-6981 into the DH dose-dependently impaired drug context-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior relative to vehicle, without altering instrumental behavior in the extinction context or food-reinforced instrumental responding and general motor activity in control experiments. Cocaine-seeking behavior during the first 20 min of the test session in the cocaine-paired context was associated with an increase in NR2B subunit activation, and intra-DH PP2 pretreatment disrupted this relationship. Together, these findings suggest that Src-family kinase activation, NMDAR stimulation, and likely Src-family kinase-mediated NR2B subunit-containing NMDAR activation in the DH are necessary for incentive motivational and/or memory processes that promote contextual cocaine-seeking behavior.

  20. The TEAD/TEF family of transcription factor Scalloped mediates Hippo signaling in organ size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Ren, Fangfang; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yongbin; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway governs cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis by controlling key regulatory genes that execute these processes; however, the transcription factor of the pathway has remained elusive. Here we provide evidence that the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped (Sd) acts together with the coactivator Yorkie (Yki) to regulate Hpo pathway-responsive genes. Sd and Yki form a transcriptional complex whose activity is inhibited by Hpo signaling. Sd overexpression enhances, whereas its inactivation suppresses, tissue overgrowth caused by Yki overexpression or tumor suppressor mutations in the Hpo pathway. Inactivation of Sd diminishes Hpo target gene expression and reduces organ size, whereas a constitutively active Sd promotes tissue overgrowth. Sd promotes Yki nuclear localization, whereas Hpo signaling retains Yki in the cytoplasm by phosphorylating Yki at S168. Finally, Sd recruits Yki to the enhancer of the pathway-responsive gene diap1, suggesting that diap1 is a direct transcriptional target of the Hpo pathway.

  1. Virosomes for antigen and DNA delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; de Jonge, J; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J

    2005-01-01

    Specific targeting and delivery as well as the display of antigens on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key issues in the design and development of new-generation vaccines aimed at the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Prophylactic vaccination agains

  2. evaluation of an antigen-antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    BACKGROUND: Development of “combination” assays detecting in parallel, within a ... METHODS: We compared the Monolisa® HCV Antigen-Antibody Ultra (Bio-Rad Laboratories Limited, ... mediated response in these patients, a rapid viral.

  3. Chloroplast photorelocation movement mediated by phototropin family proteins in green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2007-09-01

    Chloroplasts gather in areas irradiated with weak light to maximize photosynthesis (the accumulation response). They move away from areas irradiated with strong light to minimize damage of the photosynthetic apparatus (the avoidance response). The processes underlying these chloroplast movements can be divided into three parts: photoperception, signal transduction, and chloroplast movement. Photoreceptors for chloroplast movement have been identified recently in various plant species. A blue light receptor phototropin (phot) mediates chloroplast photorelocation movement in the seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris, the moss Physcomitrella patens and possibly the green alga Mougeotia scalaris. A chimeric photoreceptor between phytochrome and phototropin, neochrome (neo), was found in some advanced ferns and in the green alga M. scalaris. While the mechanism of chloroplast movement is not well understood, it is known that actin filaments play an important role in this process. To understand the molecular mechanisms associated with chloroplast movement, several mutants were isolated in A. thaliana (jac1 and chup1) and the corresponding genes were cloned. In this review, recent progress in photoreceptor research into chloroplast movement in various plant species and the possible factors functioning in signal transduction or the regulation of actin filaments identified in A. thaliana is discussed.

  4. Beer flavor provokes striatal dopamine release in male drinkers: mediation by family history of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Brandon G; Dzemidzic, Mario; Tran, Stella M; Soeurt, Christina M; Albrecht, Daniel S; Yoder, Karmen K; Kareken, David A

    2013-08-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) is increased by virtually all drugs of abuse, including alcohol. However, drug-associated cues are also known to provoke striatal DA transmission- a phenomenon linked to the motivated behaviors associated with addiction. To our knowledge, no one has tested if alcohol's classically conditioned flavor cues, in the absence of a significant pharmacologic effect, are capable of eliciting striatal DA release in humans. Employing positron emission tomography (PET), we hypothesized that beer's flavor alone can reduce the binding potential (BP) of [(11)C]raclopride (RAC; a reflection of striatal DA release) in the ventral striatum, relative to an appetitive flavor control. Forty-nine men, ranging from social to heavy drinking, mean age 25, with a varied family history of alcoholism underwent two [(11)C]RAC PET scans: one while tasting beer, and one while tasting Gatorade. Relative to the control flavor of Gatorade, beer flavor significantly increased self-reported desire to drink, and reduced [(11)C]RAC BP, indicating that the alcohol-associated flavor cues induced DA release. BP reductions were strongest in subjects with first-degree alcoholic relatives. These results demonstrate that alcohol-conditioned flavor cues can provoke ventral striatal DA release, absent significant pharmacologic effects, and that the response is strongest in subjects with a greater genetic risk for alcoholism. Striatal DA responses to salient alcohol cues may thus be an inherited risk factor for alcoholism.

  5. Beer Flavor Provokes Striatal Dopamine Release in Male Drinkers: Mediation by Family History of Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Brandon G; Dzemidzic, Mario; Tran, Stella M; Soeurt, Christina M; Albrecht, Daniel S; Yoder, Karmen K; Kareken, David A

    2013-01-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) is increased by virtually all drugs of abuse, including alcohol. However, drug-associated cues are also known to provoke striatal DA transmission- a phenomenon linked to the motivated behaviors associated with addiction. To our knowledge, no one has tested if alcohol's classically conditioned flavor cues, in the absence of a significant pharmacologic effect, are capable of eliciting striatal DA release in humans. Employing positron emission tomography (PET), we hypothesized that beer's flavor alone can reduce the binding potential (BP) of [11C]raclopride (RAC; a reflection of striatal DA release) in the ventral striatum, relative to an appetitive flavor control. Forty-nine men, ranging from social to heavy drinking, mean age 25, with a varied family history of alcoholism underwent two [11C]RAC PET scans: one while tasting beer, and one while tasting Gatorade. Relative to the control flavor of Gatorade, beer flavor significantly increased self-reported desire to drink, and reduced [11C]RAC BP, indicating that the alcohol-associated flavor cues induced DA release. BP reductions were strongest in subjects with first-degree alcoholic relatives. These results demonstrate that alcohol-conditioned flavor cues can provoke ventral striatal DA release, absent significant pharmacologic effects, and that the response is strongest in subjects with a greater genetic risk for alcoholism. Striatal DA responses to salient alcohol cues may thus be an inherited risk factor for alcoholism. PMID:23588036

  6. VEGF165-induced vascular permeability requires NRP1 for ABL-mediated SRC family kinase activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampropoulou, Anastasia; Senatore, Valentina; Brash, James T.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Raimondi, Claudio; Bainbridge, James W.

    2017-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) isoform VEGF165 stimulates vascular growth and hyperpermeability. Whereas blood vessel growth is essential to sustain organ health, chronic hyperpermeability causes damaging tissue edema. By combining in vivo and tissue culture models, we show here that VEGF165-induced vascular leakage requires both VEGFR2 and NRP1, including the VEGF164-binding site of NRP1 and the NRP1 cytoplasmic domain (NCD), but not the known NCD interactor GIPC1. In the VEGF165-bound receptor complex, the NCD promotes ABL kinase activation, which in turn is required to activate VEGFR2-recruited SRC family kinases (SFKs). These results elucidate the receptor complex and signaling hierarchy of downstream kinases that transduce the permeability response to VEGF165. In a mouse model with choroidal neovascularisation akin to age-related macular degeneration, NCD loss attenuated vessel leakage without affecting neovascularisation. These findings raise the possibility that targeting NRP1 or its NCD interactors may be a useful therapeutic strategy in neovascular disease to reduce VEGF165-induced edema without compromising vessel growth. PMID:28289053

  7. The Anatomy of the Role of Morphological Awareness in Chinese Character Learning: The Mediation of Vocabulary and Semantic Radical Knowledge and the Moderation of Morpheme Family Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Duo; Li, Hong; Wong, Kwok Shing Richard

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the mediating roles of syllable awareness, orthographic knowledge, and vocabulary skills and the moderating role of morpheme family size in the association between morphological awareness and Chinese character reading were investigated with 176 second-grade Hong Kong Chinese children. In the path analyses, the results…

  8. Associations between Sexual Abuse and Family Conflict/Violence, Self-Injurious Behavior, and Substance Use: The Mediating Role of Depressed Mood and Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis Bjork; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Gudjonsson, Gisli H.; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior and substance use. Methods: A cross-sectional national survey was conducted including 9,085 16-19 year old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004. Participants reported frequency of…

  9. Mother-Child Relationship Quality and Effective Discipline as Mediators of the 6-Year Effects of the New Beginnings Program for Children from Divorced Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Sandler, Irwin N.; Millsap, Roger E.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Dawson-McClure, Spring R.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines whether program effects on mother-child relationship quality and effective discipline mediated the 6-year longitudinal effects of the New Beginnings Program (NBP) to improve mental health and competence outcomes in 218 adolescents from divorced families in a randomized experimental trial. The NBP is a theory-based and…

  10. The role of pain behaviour and family caregiver responses in the link between pain catastrophising and pain intensity : A moderated mediation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, Somayyeh; Dehghani, Mohsen; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariët

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the mediating role of pain behaviours in the association between pain catastrophising and pain intensity and explored the moderating role of family caregivers' responses to pain in the link between pain behaviours and pain intensity. METHODS: The sample consisted

  11. Tissue-specific transplantation antigen P35B (TSTA3) immune response-mediated metabolism coupling cell cycle to postreplication repair network in no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues (HBV or HCV infection) by biocomputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Minghu; Lin, Hong

    2012-06-01

    We constructed the low-expression tissue-specific transplantation antigen P35B (TSTA3) immune response-mediated metabolism coupling cell cycle to postreplication repair network in no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues (HBV or HCV infection) compared with high-expression (fold change ≥ 2) human hepatocellular carcinoma in GEO data set, by using integration of gene regulatory network inference method with gene ontology analysis of TSTA3-activated up- and downstream networks. Our results showed TSTA3 upstream-activated CCNB2, CKS1B, ELAVL3, GAS7, NQO1, NTN1, OCRL, PLA2G1B, REG3A, SSTR5, etc. and TSTA3 downstream-activated BAP1, BRCA1, CCL20, MCM2, MS4A2, NTN1, REG1A, TP53I11, VCAN, SLC16A3, etc. in no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues. TSTA3-activated network enhanced the regulation of apoptosis, cyclin-dependent protein kinase activity, cell migration, insulin secretion, transcription, cell division, cell proliferation, DNA replication, postreplication repair, cell differentiation, T-cell homeostasis, neutrophil-mediated immunity, neutrophil chemotaxis, interleukin-8 production, inflammatory response, immune response, B-cell activation, humoral immune response, actin filament organization, xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, phospholipid metabolism, leukotriene biosynthesis, organismal lipid catabolism, phosphatidylcholine metabolism, arachidonic acid secretion, activation of phospholipase A2, deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, heterophilic cell adhesion, activation of MAPK activity, signal transduction by p53 class mediator resulting in transcription of p21 class mediator, G-protein-coupled receptor protein signaling pathway, response to toxin, acute-phase response, DNA damage response, intercellular junction assembly, cell communication, and cell recognition, as a result of inducing immune response-mediated metabolism coupling cell cycle to postreplication repair in no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues.

  12. Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: current and emerging treatment options for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is a fatal clinical disorder characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal fibrils derived from misfolded, normally soluble transthyretin (TTR) molecules. The disease is most commonly caused by a point mutation within the TTR gene inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Over 100 of such mutations have been identified, leading to destabilization of the physiological TTR tetramer. As a result, many monomers originate with a tendency for spontaneous conformational changes and self-aggregation. The main clinical feature of TTR-FAP is progressive sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy. In the beginning, this polyneuropathy predominantly involves small unmyelinated nerve fibers with the result of dissociated sensory loss disproportionately affecting sensation of pain and temperature. Autonomic neuropathy typically accompanies sensory deficits early in the disease course. The symptoms include orthostatic hypotension, constipation alternating with diarrhea, erectile dysfunction, anhydrosis, and urinary retention or incontinence. Later, involvement of motor fibers causes rapidly progressive weakness and gait disturbances. In addition to the peripheral nervous system, the heart and the gut are frequently affected. Onset of symptoms is bimodal, with one peak at age 33 years (early onset) and another distinct peak in the sixth decade of life (late onset). The course of TTR-FAP is uniformly progressive and fatal. Death occurs an average of 10.8 years after the onset of symptoms in Portuguese patients, and 7.3 years in late-onset Japanese patients. Common causes include cachexia, cardiac failure, arrhythmia, and secondary infections. Liver transplantation is the standard therapy for patients who are in a clinical condition good enough to tolerate this intervention because it stops progression of neuropathy by removing the main source of mutant TTR. Recently, orally administered tafamidis meglumine has been

  13. Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: current and emerging treatment options for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hund E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ernst HundDepartment of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP is a fatal clinical disorder characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal fibrils derived from misfolded, normally soluble transthyretin (TTR molecules. The disease is most commonly caused by a point mutation within the TTR gene inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Over 100 of such mutations have been identified, leading to destabilization of the physiological TTR tetramer. As a result, many monomers originate with a tendency for spontaneous conformational changes and self-aggregation. The main clinical feature of TTR-FAP is progressive sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy. In the beginning, this polyneuropathy predominantly involves small unmyelinated nerve fibers with the result of dissociated sensory loss disproportionately affecting sensation of pain and temperature. Autonomic neuropathy typically accompanies sensory deficits early in the disease course. The symptoms include orthostatic hypotension, constipation alternating with diarrhea, erectile dysfunction, anhydrosis, and urinary retention or incontinence. Later, involvement of motor fibers causes rapidly progressive weakness and gait disturbances. In addition to the peripheral nervous system, the heart and the gut are frequently affected. Onset of symptoms is bimodal, with one peak at age 33 years (early onset and another distinct peak in the sixth decade of life (late onset. The course of TTR-FAP is uniformly progressive and fatal. Death occurs an average of 10.8 years after the onset of symptoms in Portuguese patients, and 7.3 years in late-onset Japanese patients. Common causes include cachexia, cardiac failure, arrhythmia, and secondary infections. Liver transplantation is the standard therapy for patients who are in a clinical condition good enough to tolerate this intervention because it stops progression of neuropathy by

  14. Human T Cell and Antibody-Mediated Responses to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Recombinant 85A, 85B, and ESAT-6 Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson C. Macedo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a major health problem throughout the world causing large number of deaths. Effective disease control and eradication programs require the identification of major antigens recognized by the protective responses against M. tuberculosis. In this study, we have investigated humoral and cellular immune responses to M. tuberculosis-specific Ag85A, Ag85B, and ESAT-6 antigens in Brazilian patients with pulmonary (P, n=13 or extrapulmonary (EP, n=12 tuberculosis, patients undergoing chemotherapy (PT, n=23, and noninfected healthy individuals (NI, n=7. Compared to NI, we observed increased levels of IgG1 responses to Ag85B and ESAT-6 in P and PT groups. Regarding cellular immunity, Ag85A and ESAT-6 were able to discriminate P, PT, and EP patients from healthy individuals by IFN-γ production and P and PT groups from EP individuals by production of TNF-α. In summary, these findings demonstrate the ability of Ag85A, Ag85B, and ESAT-6 to differentiate TB patients from controls by IgG1, IFN-γ and TNF-α production.

  15. Off-the-shelf adenoviral-mediated immunotherapy via bicistronic expression of tumor antigen and iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnade, Jan Ole; Seethammagari, Mamatha; Narayanan, Priya; Levitt, Jonathan M; McCormick, Alison A; Spencer, David M

    2012-07-01

    Recent modest successes in ex vivo dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy have motivated continued innovation in the area of DC manipulation and activation. Although ex vivo vaccine approaches continue to be proving grounds for new DC manipulation techniques, the intrinsic limits of ex vivo therapy, including high cost, minimal standardization, cumbersome delivery, and poor accessibility, incentivizes the development of vaccines compatible with in vivo DC targeting. We describe here a method to co-deliver both tumor-specific antigen (TSA) and an iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant (iMC), to DCs that combines toll-like receptor (TLR) and CD40 signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that simple TSA delivery via adenoviral vectors results in strong antitumor immunity. Addition of iMC delivered in a separate vector is insufficient to enhance this effect. However, when delivered simultaneously with TSA in a single bicistronic vector (BV), iMC is able to significantly enhance antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses and inhibit established tumor growth. This study demonstrates the spatial-temporal importance of concurrent DC activation and TSA presentation. Further, it demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo molecular enhancement of DCs necessary for effective antitumor immune responses.

  16. The Relationship between Core Self-Evaluations and Work and Family Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyar, Scott L.; Mosley, Donald C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the impact of work-family conflict and work-family facilitation on work and family outcomes and explores the influence of core self-evaluations (CSE) among these relationships. CSE is comprised of self-esteem, neuroticism, locus of control, and general self-efficacy. CSE was found to be negatively related to work interfering…

  17. Chimeric antigen receptor containing ICOS signaling domain mediates specific and efficient antitumor effect of T cells against EGFRvIII expressing glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chan-Juan; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Han, Ethan Q; Cao, Na; Wang, Yun-Fei; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Li-Ming; Cui, Jian; Gupta, Puja; Wong, Albert J; Han, Shuang-Yin

    2013-05-09

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells appears to be a promising immunotherapeutic strategy. CAR combines the specificity of antibody and cytotoxicity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, enhancing T cells' ability to specifically target antigens and to effectively kill cancer cells. Recent efforts have been made to integrate the costimulatory signals in the CAR to improve the antitumor efficacy. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is an attractive therapeutic target as it frequently expresses in glioma and many other types of cancers. Our current study aimed to investigate the specific and efficient antitumor effect of T cells modified with CAR containing inducible costimulator (ICOS) signaling domain. A second generation of EGFRvIII/CAR was generated and it contained the EGFRvIII single chain variable fragment, ICOS signaling domain and CD3ζ chain. Lentiviral EGFRvIII/CAR was prepared and human CD3+ T cells were infected by lentivirus encoding EGFRvIII/CAR. The expression of EGFRvIII/CAR on CD3+ T cells was confirmed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The functions of EGFRvIII/CAR+ T cells were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo methods including cytotoxicity assay, cytokine release assay and xenograft tumor mouse model. Chimeric EGFRvIIIscFv-ICOS-CD3ζ (EGFRvIII/CAR) was constructed and lentiviral EGFRvIII/CAR were made to titer of 106 TU/ml. The transduction efficiency of lentiviral EGFRvIII/CAR on T cells reached around 70% and expression of EGFRvIII/CAR protein was verified by immunoblotting as a band of about 57 kDa. Four hour 51Cr release assays demonstrated specific and efficient cytotoxicity of EGFRvIII/CAR+ T cells against EGFRvIII expressing U87 cells. A robust increase in the IFN-γ secretion was detected in the co-culture supernatant of the EGFRvIII/CAR+ T cells and the EGFRvIII expressing U87 cells. Intravenous and intratumor injection of EGFRvIII/CAR+ T cells inhibited the in vivo growth of the EGFRv

  18. Phylogenetic discordance of human and canine carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM) families, but striking identity of the CEA receptors will impact comparative oncology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichselbaumer, Marlene; Willmann, Michael; Reifinger, Martin; Singer, Josef; Bajna, Erika; Sobanov, Yuriy; Mechtcherikova, Diana; Selzer, Edgar; Thalhammer, Johann G.; Kammerer, Robert; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2011-01-01

    Comparative oncology aims at speeding up developments for both, human and companion animal cancer patients. Following this line, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) could be a therapeutic target not only for human but also for canine (Canis lupus familiaris; dog) patients. CEACAM5 interacts with CEA-receptor (CEAR) in the cytoplasm of human cancer cells. Our aim was, therefore, to phylogenetically verify the antigenic relationship of CEACAM molecules and CEAR in human and canine cancer. Anti-human CEACAM5 antibody Col-1, previously being applied for cancer diagnosis in dogs, immunohistochemically reacted to 23 out of 30 canine mammary cancer samples. In immunoblot analyses Col-1 specifically detected human CEACAM5 at 180 kDa in human colon cancer cells HT29, and the canine antigen at 60, 120, or 180 kDa in CF33 and CF41 mammary carcinoma cells as well as in spontaneous mammary tumors. While according to phylogenicity canine CEACAM1 molecules should be most closely related to human CEACAM5, Col-1 did not react with canine CEACAM1, -23, -24, -25, -28 or -30 transfected to canine TLM-1 cells. By flow cytometry the Col-1 target molecule was localized intracellularly in canine CF33 and CF41 cells, in contrast to membranous and cytoplasmic expression of human CEACAM5 in HT29. Col-1 incubation had neither effect on canine nor human cancer cell proliferation. Yet, Col-1 treatment decreased AKT-phosphorylation in canine CF33 cells possibly suggestive of anti-apoptotic function, whereas Col-1 increased AKT-phosphorylation in human HT29 cells. We report further a 99% amino acid similarity of human and canine CEA receptor (CEAR) within the phylogenetic tree. CEAR could be detected in four canine cancer cell lines by immunoblot and intracellularly in 10 out of 10 mammary cancer specimens from dog by immunohistochemistry. Whether the specific canine Col-1 target molecule may as functional analogue to human CEACAM5 act as ligand to canine CEAR, remains to be defined. This

  19. Cadherin-related family member 3, a childhood asthma susceptibility gene product, mediates rhinovirus C binding and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, Yury A; Watters, Kelly; Ashraf, Shamaila; Griggs, Theodor F; Devries, Mark K; Jackson, Daniel J; Palmenberg, Ann C; Gern, James E

    2015-04-28

    Members of rhinovirus C (RV-C) species are more likely to cause wheezing illnesses and asthma exacerbations compared with other rhinoviruses. The cellular receptor for these viruses was heretofore unknown. We report here that expression of human cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) enables the cells normally unsusceptible to RV-C infection to support both virus binding and replication. A coding single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6967330, C529Y) was previously linked to greater cell-surface expression of CDHR3 protein, and an increased risk of wheezing illnesses and hospitalizations for childhood asthma. Compared with wild-type CDHR3, cells transfected with the CDHR3-Y529 variant had about 10-fold increases in RV-C binding and progeny yields. We developed a transduced HeLa cell line (HeLa-E8) stably expressing CDHR3-Y529 that supports RV-C propagation in vitro. Modeling of CDHR3 structure identified potential binding sites that could impact the virus surface in regions that are highly conserved among all RV-C types. Our findings identify that the asthma susceptibility gene product CDHR3 mediates RV-C entry into host cells, and suggest that rs6967330 mutation could be a risk factor for RV-C wheezing illnesses.

  20. Isolation and partial characterization of an immunogenic antigen of Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Jael; Valdez, Alejandra; Samaniego, Brenda; Lopez-Romero, Gloria; Astiazaran-Garcia, Humberto; Rascon, Lucila; Breci, Linda; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Robles-Zepeda, Ramón; Velazquez, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Humoral and cellular immune responses play an important role during Giardia lamblia infection. Several Giardia proteins have been identified as immunogenic antigens based on their elicited humoral immune response. Poorly is known about Giardia antigens that stimulate a cellular immune response. The main purpose of this study was to isolate and partial characterize an immunogenic antigen (5G8) of G. lamblia. The 5G8 protein was isolated from G. lamblia trophozoite lysates by affinity chromatography using moAb 5G8-coupled CNBr-Sepharose. The isolated protein was analysed by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS), and by diverse bioinformatics tools (GiardiaDB, BLASTn, BLASTp and ExPASy). Additionally, several biochemical and immunological characteristics of the isolated protein were analysed. By ESI-MS/MS the amino acidic 5G8 sequence was deduced. The 5G8 antigen belongs to the VSP family proteins of G. lamblia. This protein is composed by one polypeptide chain (±71kDa). Using the algorithm SYFPHEITI, we identified candidate CD4(+) T-cell epitopes from the 5G8 antigen, which can elicit cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we have identified a G. lamblia protein that induces a strong immune response in infected mice. The biochemical and immunological characterization of the immunogenic 5G8 antigen may contribute to the rational design of a Giardia vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2007-01-01

    , in vitro assessment of the immunomodulatory effects of distinct strains may depend strongly on the cell type used as a model. To select the most appropriate model for screening of beneficial bacteria in human cells, the response to strains of intestinal bacteria of three types of antigen-presenting cells......The intestinal microbiota is essential for homeostasis of the local and systemic immune system, and particularly strains of lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli have been shown to have balancing effects on inflammatory conditions such as allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. However...... (APC) was compared; blood myeloid dendritic cells (DC), monocyte-derived DC and monocytes, and the effector response of natural killer cells and naïve T cells was characterized. Maturation induced by gut-derived bacteria differed between APC, with blood DC and monocytes responding with the production...

  2. A proliferation-inducing ligand sustains the proliferation of human naïve (CD27⁻) B cells and mediates their differentiation into long-lived plasma cells in vitro via transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor and B-cell mature antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoshiko; Haneda, Masataka; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2015-06-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (PCs) contribute to humoral immunity through an undefined mechanism. Memory B cells, but not human naïve B cells, can be induced to differentiate into long-lived PCs in vitro. Because evidence links a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), a tumor necrosis factor family member, to the ability of bone marrow to mediate long-term PC survival, we reasoned that APRIL influences the proliferation and differentiation of naïve B cells. We describe here the development of a simple cell culture system that allowed us to show that APRIL sustained the proliferation of naïve human B cells and induced them to differentiate into long-lived PCs. Blocking the transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor or B-cell mature antigen shows they were required for the differentiation of naïve B cells into long-lived PCs in vitro. Our in vitro culture system will reveal new insights into the biology of long-lived PCs.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 38-kDa antigen induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis via toll-like receptor 2/4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yun-Ji; Choi, Ji-Ae; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2015-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses play critical roles in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. To investigate the regulatory role of the ER stress response in 38-kDa antigen-induced apoptosis, we examined the relationship between the ER stress response and apoptosis in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen (38-kDa Ag). The expression of ER molecular chaperones, including C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), glucose-regulated protein (Bip) and phosphorylated alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, was induced in BMDMs stimulated with the 38-kDa Ag. Interestingly, 38-kDa Ag-stimulation induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-12, -9 and -3. However, 38-kDa Ag-induced apoptosis was significantly reduced in TLR2- and TLR4-deficient macrophages. Because toll-like receptors (TLRs) initiate the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades, we evaluated the effect of MAPK activation on ER stress. The 38-kDa Ag activated Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 phosphorylation. MAPK signaling induced the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6. The 38-kDa Ag-induced MCP-1 was especially associated with the induction of MCP-1-induced protein (MCPIP), which increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ER stress. To investigate the role of MCPIP in ROS-induced ER stress by 38-kDa Ag stimulation, we transfected MCPIP siRNA into RAW264.7 cells before 38-kDa Ag stimulation, and measured the generation of ROS and expression of ER molecular chaperones. ROS production and CHOP expression were decreased by the silencing of MCPIP induction. Our results demonstrate that the expression of MCPIP by 38-kDa Ag stimulation is increased through a TLR-MAPK-dependent signaling pathway, and leads to ER stress-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, MCPIP is important for host defense mechanisms in mycobacterial pathogenesis.

  4. Genetic Immunization Elicits Antigen-Specific Protective Immune Responses and Decreases Disease Severity in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi requires elicitation of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to extracellular trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. In this study, the effectiveness of the T. cruzi trans-sialidase family (ts) genes ASP-1, ASP-2, and TSA-1 as genetic vaccines was assessed. Immunization of mice with plasmids encoding ASP-1, ASP-2, or TSA-1 elicited poor antigen-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and T. cruzi-specific antibody responses. Codelivery of int...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif protein enhances the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and reduces major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ely, Kenneth H; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A; Green, William R; Enelow, Richard I; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-03

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation.

  7. Structure of the p53 binding domain of HAUSP/USP7 bound to Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 implications for EBV-mediated immortalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saridakis, Vivian; Sheng, Yi; Sarkari, Feroz; Holowaty, Melissa N; Shire, Kathy; Nguyen, Tin; Zhang, Rongguang G; Liao, Jack; Lee, Weontae; Edwards, Aled M; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Frappier, Lori

    2005-04-01

    USP7/HAUSP is a key regulator of p53 and Mdm2 and is targeted by the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) protein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We have determined the crystal structure of the p53 binding domain of USP7 alone and bound to an EBNA1 peptide. This domain is an eight-stranded beta sandwich similar to the TRAF-C domains of TNF-receptor associated factors, although the mode of peptide binding differs significantly from previously observed TRAF-peptide interactions in the sequence (DPGEGPS) and the conformation of the bound peptide. NMR chemical shift analyses of USP7 bound by EBNA1 and p53 indicated that p53 binds the same pocket as EBNA1 but makes less extensive contacts with USP7. Functional studies indicated that EBNA1 binding to USP7 can protect cells from apoptotic challenge by lowering p53 levels. The data provide a structural and conceptual framework for understanding how EBNA1 might contribute to the survival of Epstein-Barr virus-infected cells.

  8. Suppression of Ongoing Experimental Arthritis by a Chinese Herbal Formula (Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan Involves Changes in Antigen-Induced Immunological and Biochemical Mediators of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hua Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the major autoimmune diseases of global prevalence. The use of the anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of RA is associated with severe adverse reactions and toxicity. This limitation has necessitated the search for novel therapeutic products. We report here a traditional Chinese medicine-based herbal formula, Huo luo xiao ling dan (HLXL, which has potent antiarthritic activity as validated in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA model. HLXL (2.3 g/Kg was fed to Lewis (RT.11 rats daily by gavage beginning at the onset of arthritis and then continued through the observation period. HLXL inhibited the severity of ongoing AA. This suppression of arthritis was associated with significant alterations in the T cell proliferative and cytokine responses as well as the antibody response against the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65. There was a reduction in the level of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-1β but enhancement of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 level. In addition, there was inhibition of both the anti-Bhsp65 antibody response and the serum level of nitric oxide. Thus, HLXL is a promising CAM modality for further testing in RA patients.

  9. ST2 Requires Th2-, but Not Th17-, Type Airway Inflammation in Epicutaneously Antigen-Sensitized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Morita

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The IL-33/ST2 pathway is crucial for Th2-cytokine-mediated eosinophilic, rather than Th17-cytokine-mediated neutrophilic, airway inflammation in mice that had been epicutaneously sensitized with antigens and then challenged with antigen.

  10. Cloning and molecular characterization of cDNA encoding a mouse male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2): a putative family of the Golgi autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, M; Sutou, S

    1997-01-01

    The male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2) gene was originally identified with a monoclonal histocompatibility Y (H-Y) antibody (mAb4VII). There is no report of the full length cDNA encode for Mea-2 product until this report. In this study, we isolated the full length mouse Mea-2 cDNA by screening a testis cDNA library with a PCR-amplified Mea-2 product, and direct PCR amplification of its upstream sequences from the cDNA library. The primary structure of the Mea-2 peptide, deduced from this nucleotide sequence, shows that it encode a 150 kDa protein, of 1325 amino acid residues, which contained five putative N-glycosylation sites and four leucine zipper motifs. A data bank search indicated that it has high homology with a human Golgi autoantigen (golgin-160) both in its nucleotides (78%) and amino acids sequence (83%). This suggests that Mea-2 gene product may encode a golgi structural protein. In situ hybridization analysis suggested that the Mea-2 gene is expressed in spermatids during spermatogenesis as already shown by Mea-1, suggesting that Mea-2 gene product as well as Mea-1 have also some role for spermatogenesis.

  11. Direct estrogen receptor (ER) / HER family crosstalk mediating sensitivity to lumretuzumab and pertuzumab in ER+ breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Denis; Jacob, Wolfgang; Cejalvo, Juan Miguel; Ceppi, Maurizio; James, Ian; Hasmann, Max; Crown, John; Cervantes, Andrés; Weisser, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Bidirectional cross talk between members of the human epidermal growth factor family of receptors (HER) and the estrogen receptor (ER) is believed to underlie resistance mechanisms that develop in response to treatment with anti-HER agents and endocrine therapy. We investigated the interaction between HER2, HER3 and the ER in vitro using human embryonic kidney cells transfected with human HER2, HER3, and ERα. We also investigated the additive efficacy of combination regimens consisting of anti-HER3 (lumretuzumab), anti-HER2 (pertuzumab), and endocrine (fulvestrant) therapy in vivo. Our data show that both HER2 and HER3 can directly complex with the ER and can mediate phosphorylation of the ER. Phosphorylation of the ER was only observed in cells that expressed both HER2 and ERα or in heregulin-stimulated cells that expressed both HER3 and ERα. Using a mouse xenograft model of ER+/HER2-low (HER2 immunohistochemistry 1+ or 2+ without gene amplification) human breast cancer we show that the combination of lumretuzumab and pertuzumab is highly efficacious and induces long-lasting tumor regression in vivo and adding endocrine therapy (fulvestrant) to this combination further improved efficacy. In addition, a prolonged clinical response was observed with the combination of lumretuzumab and pertuzumab in a patient with ER+/HER2-low breast cancer who had failed endocrine therapy. These preclinical data confirm that direct cross talk exists between HER2/HER3 and ER which may explain the resistance mechanisms to endocrine therapy and monoclonal antibodies that target HER2 and HER3. Our data also indicate that the triplet of anti-HER2, anti-HER3, and endocrine therapy might be an efficacious combination for treating patients with ER+/HER2-low breast cancer, which is an area of significant unmet medical need. PMID:28493933

  12. Antigen-specific inhibition of CD8+ T cell response by immature myeloid cells in cancer is mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Nefedova, Yulia; Yoder, Daniel; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2004-01-15

    Tumor growth is associated with the accumulation of immature myeloid cells (ImC), which in mice are characterized by the expression of Gr-1 and CD11b markers. These cells suppress Ag-specific CD8+ T cells via direct cell-cell contact. However, the mechanism of immunosuppressive activity of tumor-derived ImC remains unclear. In this study we analyzed the function of ImC isolated from tumor-free control and tumor-bearing mice. Only ImC isolated from tumor-bearing mice, not those from their control counterparts, were able to inhibit the Ag-specific response of CD8+ T cells. ImC obtained from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than ImC isolated from tumor-free animals. Accumulation of H2O2, but not superoxide or NO, was a major contributor to this increased pool of ROS. It appears that arginase activity played an important role in H2O2 accumulation in these cells. Inhibition of ROS in ImC completely abrogated the inhibitory effect of these cells on T cells, indicating that ImC generated in tumor-bearing hosts suppress the CD8+ T cell response via production of ROS. Interaction of ImC with Ag-specific T cells in the presence of specific Ags resulted in a significant increase in ROS production compared with control Ags. That increase was independent of IFN-gamma production by T cells, but was mediated by integrins CD11b, CD18, and CD29. Blocking of these integrins with specific Abs abrogated ROS production and ImC-mediated suppression of CD8+ T cell responses. This study demonstrates a new mechanism of Ag-specific T cell inhibition mediated by ROS produced by ImCs in cancer.

  13. HER-2/neu mediated down-regulation of MHC class I antigen processing prevents CTL-mediated tumor recognition upon DNA vaccination in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertuani, Simona; Triulzi, Chiara; Roos, Anna Karin; Charo, Jehad; Norell, Håkan; Lemonnier, François; Pisa, Pavel; Seliger, Barbara; Kiessling, Rolf

    2009-05-01

    To study DNA vaccination directed against human HER-2 in the HHD mouse Tg strain, we created a novel HER-2-expressing syngeneic tumor transplantation model. We found that a DNA vaccine encoding the full length HER-2 DNA protected HHD mice from HER-2(+) tumor challenge by a CTL independent mechanism. A more efficient approach to induce HLA-A2 restricted CTLs, through immunization with a multi-epitope DNA vaccine expressing the HLA-A2 restricted HER-2 369-377, 435-443 and 689-697 epitopes, resulted in high numbers of peptide specific T cells but failed to induce tumor protection. Subsequently we discovered that HER-2 transfected tumor cells down-regulated MHC class I antigen expression and exhibited a series of defects in the antigen processing pathway which impaired the capacity to produce and display MHC class I peptide-ligands to specific CTLs. Our data demonstrate that HER-2 transfection is associated with defects in the MHC class I presentation pathway, which may be the underlying mechanism behind the inability of CTLs to recognize tumors in this HLA-A2 transgenic model. As defective MHC class I presentation may be a common characteristic of HER-2 expressing tumors, vaccines targeting HER-2 should aim at inducing an integrated immune response where also CD4(+) T cells and antibodies are important components.

  14. The mediating effect of effort-reward imbalance in household and family work on the relationship between education and women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Stefanie; Geyer, Siegfried

    2015-04-01

    Occupational stress as a key determinant for explaining health inequalities has been well established while the impact of stress related to family work has rarely been considered. This study investigates whether stress in household and family work may contribute to health inequalities in women. We used a population-based sample of German mothers (n = 3129) to determine the total, direct and indirect effects of education on somatic complaints by means of OLS regression-based mediation models. Inference about indirect effects was determined by 95% bias corrected bootstrap confidence intervals. Education was assessed by a measure combining school education and vocational training. Stress was measured using the adopted effort-reward-imbalance (ERI) questionnaire for household and family work. The von Zerssen list of somatic complaints was used as measure of subjective health. We found a significant total effect of education on somatic complaints (p ≤ 0.001) as well as significant indirect effects through 'effort' (p = 0.006) and 'reward' in household and family work (p ≤ 0.001). However, the subscales of ERI pointed into different directions: while levels of 'effort' increased with women's educational attainment, levels of distress related to low 'reward' decreased with higher levels of education. Our findings suggest that the effect of women's education on somatic complaints is mediated through stress related to low reward for household and family work. In particular, lack of 'societal esteem' for household and family work contributed to health disadvantages in lower educated mothers. We conclude that research on health inequality would benefit from taking stressful experiences in household and family work greater into account.

  15. Characterization of a single b-type heme, FAD, and metal binding sites in the transmembrane domain of six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate (STEAP) family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Mark D; Dlakić, Mensur; Lawrence, C Martin

    2015-09-11

    Six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate 3 (Steap3) is the major ferric reductase in developing erythrocytes. Steap family proteins are defined by a shared transmembrane domain that in Steap3 has been shown to function as a transmembrane electron shuttle, moving cytoplasmic electrons derived from NADPH across the lipid bilayer to the extracellular face where they are used to reduce Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) and potentially Cu(2+) to Cu(1+). Although the cytoplasmic N-terminal oxidoreductase domain of Steap3 and Steap4 are relatively well characterized, little work has been done to characterize the transmembrane domain of any member of the Steap family. Here we identify high affinity FAD and iron biding sites and characterize a single b-type heme binding site in the Steap3 transmembrane domain. Furthermore, we show that Steap3 is functional as a homodimer and that it utilizes an intrasubunit electron transfer pathway through the single heme moiety rather than an intersubunit electron pathway through a potential domain-swapped dimer. Importantly, the sequence motifs in the transmembrane domain that are associated with the FAD and metal binding sites are not only present in Steap2 and Steap4 but also in Steap1, which lacks the N-terminal oxidoreductase domain. This strongly suggests that Steap1 harbors latent oxidoreductase activity.

  16. To have and to hold: codependency as a mediator or moderator of the relationship between substance abuse in the family of origin and adult-offspring medical problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    This pilot study explored the putative role of codependency as a mediator or moderator of the relationship between substance abuse in the family of origin (SAFO) and offspring medical problems in a counterbalanced multiple-treatment experiment with a heterogenous sample of adult males and females. Codependent attitude and behavior were moderators that attenuated the relationship between SAFO and two measures of acute offspring medical problems, but codependent behavior amplified the relationship between SAFO and chronic medical problems. Challenging replications are called for.

  17. Association between Work-Family Conflict and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Female Nurses: The Mediating and Moderating Role of Psychological Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Hao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Depressive symptoms have been in the limelight for many kinds of people, but few studies have explored positive resources for combating depressive symptoms among Chinese nurses. The purpose of this study is to explore the association between work-family conflict (WFC and depressive symptoms among Chinese female nurses, along with the mediating and moderating role of psychological capital (PsyCap in this relationship. This cross-sectional study was completed during the period of September and October 2013. A questionnaire that consisted of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Work-Family Conflict scale and the Psychological Capital Questionnair scale was distributed to nurses in Shenyang, China. A total of 824 individuals (effective response rate: 74.9% participated. Asymptotic and resampling strategies explored the mediating role of PsyCap in the relationship between WFC and depressive symptoms. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the moderating role of PsyCap. Both WFC and family-work conflict (FWC were positively related with depressive symptoms. PsyCap positively moderated the relationship of WFC with depressive symptoms. Self-efficacy and hope positively moderated the relationship of WFC with depressive symptoms. PsyCap partially mediated the relationship of FWC with depressive symptoms. Hope and optimism partially mediated the relationship of FWC with depressive symptoms. Work-family conflict, as the risk factor of depressive symptoms, can increase nurses’ depressive symptoms, and PsyCap is a positive resource to combat nurses’ depressive symptoms. PsyCap can aggravate the effects of WFC on depressive symptoms and FWC can impact PsyCap to increase nurses’ depressive symptoms.

  18. Association between Work-Family Conflict and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Female Nurses: The Mediating and Moderating Role of Psychological Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Junhui; Wu, Di; Liu, Li; Li, Xirui; Wu, Hui

    2015-06-12

    Depressive symptoms have been in the limelight for many kinds of people, but few studies have explored positive resources for combating depressive symptoms among Chinese nurses. The purpose of this study is to explore the association between work-family conflict (WFC) and depressive symptoms among Chinese female nurses, along with the mediating and moderating role of psychological capital (PsyCap) in this relationship. This cross-sectional study was completed during the period of September and October 2013. A questionnaire that consisted of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Work-Family Conflict scale and the Psychological Capital Questionnair scale was distributed to nurses in Shenyang, China. A total of 824 individuals (effective response rate: 74.9%) participated. Asymptotic and resampling strategies explored the mediating role of PsyCap in the relationship between WFC and depressive symptoms. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the moderating role of PsyCap. Both WFC and family-work conflict (FWC) were positively related with depressive symptoms. PsyCap positively moderated the relationship of WFC with depressive symptoms. Self-efficacy and hope positively moderated the relationship of WFC with depressive symptoms. PsyCap partially mediated the relationship of FWC with depressive symptoms. Hope and optimism partially mediated the relationship of FWC with depressive symptoms. Work-family conflict, as the risk factor of depressive symptoms, can increase nurses' depressive symptoms, and PsyCap is a positive resource to combat nurses' depressive symptoms. PsyCap can aggravate the effects of WFC on depressive symptoms and FWC can impact PsyCap to increase nurses' depressive symptoms.

  19. Use of retroviral-mediated gene transfer to deliver and test function of chimeric antigen receptors in human T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Parente-Pereira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are genetically delivered fusion molecules that elicit T-cell activation upon binding of a native cell surface molecule. These molecules can be used to generate a large number of memory and effector T-cells that are capable of recognizing and attacking tumor cells. Most commonly, stable CAR expression is achieved in T-cells using retroviral vectors. In the method described here, retroviral vectors are packaged in a two-step procedure. First, H29D human retroviral packaging cells (a derivative of 293 cells are transfected with the vector of interest, which is packaged transiently in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV G pseudotyped particles. These particles are used to deliver the vector to PG13 cells, which achieve stable packaging of gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV-pseudotyped particles that are suitable for infection of human T-cells. The key advantage of the method reported here is that it robustly generates polyclonal PG13 cells that are 100% positive for the vector of interest. This means that efficient gene transfer may be repeatedly achieved without the need to clone individual PG13 cells for experimental pre-clinical testing. To achieve T-cell transduction, cells must first be activated using a non-specific mitogen. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA provides an economic and robust stimulus to achieve this. After 48-72 h, activated T-cells and virus-conditioned medium are mixed in RetroNectin-coated plasticware, which enhances transduction efficiency. Transduced cells are analyzed for gene transfer efficiency by flow cytometry 48 h following transduction and may then be tested in several assays to evaluate CAR function, including target-dependent cytotoxicity, cytokine production and proliferation.

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are mediated via TNF-R2 (p75) in tolerogenic transforming growth factor-beta-treated antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masli, Sharmila; Turpie, Bruce

    2009-05-01

    Exposure of macrophages to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta is known to alter their functional phenotype such that antigen presentation by these cells leads to tolerance rather than an inflammatory immune response. Typically, eye-derived antigen-presenting cells (APCs) exposed to TGF-beta in the local environment are known to induce a form of peripheral tolerance and protect the eye from inflammatory immune effector-mediated damage. In response to TGF-beta, APCs increase their expression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and TNF receptor 2 (TNF-R2). Although TNF-alpha has been implicated in tolerance and the associated regulation of the inflammatory immune response, its source and the receptors involved remain unclear. In this report we determined the contribution of TNF-alpha and TNF-R2 expressed by TGF-beta-treated APCs to their anti-inflammatory tolerogenic effect. Our results indicate that APC-derived TNF-alpha is essential for the ability of APCs to regulate the immune response and their IL-12 secretion. Moreover, in the absence of TNF-R2, APCs exposed to TGF-beta failed to induce tolerance or regulatory cells known to participate in this tolerance. Also, blocking of TNF-R1 signalling enhanced the ability of the APCs to secrete increased TGF-beta in response to TGF-beta exposure. Together our results support an anti-inflammatory role of TNF-alpha in regulation of an immune response by TGF-beta-treated APCs and suggest that TNF-R2 contributes significantly to this role.

  1. Partial mediation role of self-efficacy between positive social interaction and mental health in family caregivers for dementia patients in Shanghai.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuying Zhang

    Full Text Available We explored the mediation effect of caregiver self-efficacy on the influences of behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD of dementia care recipients (CRs or family caregivers' (CGs social supports (informational, tangible and affectionate support and positive social interaction on CGs' mental health. We interviewed 196 CGs, using a battery of measures including demographic data of the dyads, CRs' dementia-related impairments, and CGs' social support, self-efficacy and the Medical Outcome Study (MOS Short-Form (SF-36 Health Survey. Multiple regression analyses showed that gathering information on self-efficacy and managing CG distress self-efficacy were the partial mediators of the relationship between positive social interaction and CG mental health. Managing caregiving distress self-efficacy also partial mediated the impact of BPSD on CG mental health. We discuss implications of the results for improving mental health of the target population in mainland China.

  2. Non-host Plant Resistance against Phytophthora capsici Is Mediated in Part by Members of the I2 R Gene Family in Nicotiana spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Arreguín, Julio C.; Shimada-Beltrán, Harumi; Sevillano-Serrano, Jacobo; Moffett, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The identification of host genes associated with resistance to Phytophthora capsici is crucial to developing strategies of control against this oomycete pathogen. Since there are few sources of resistance to P. capsici in crop plants, non-host plants represent a promising source of resistance genes as well as excellent models to study P. capsici – plant interactions. We have previously shown that non-host resistance to P. capsici in Nicotiana spp. is mediated by the recognition of a specific P. capsici effector protein, PcAvr3a1 in a manner that suggests the involvement of a cognate disease resistance (R) genes. Here, we have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing dsRNA in Nicotiana spp. to identify candidate R genes that mediate non-host resistance to P. capsici. Silencing of members of the I2 multigene family in the partially resistant plant N. edwardsonii and in the resistant N. tabacum resulted in compromised resistance to P. capsici. VIGS of two other components required for R gene-mediated resistance, EDS1 and SGT1, also enhanced susceptibility to P. capsici in N. edwardsonii, as well as in the susceptible plants N. benthamiana and N. clevelandii. The silencing of I2 family members in N. tabacum also compromised the recognition of PcAvr3a1. These results indicate that in this case, non-host resistance is mediated by the same components normally associated with race-specific resistance. PMID:28261255

  3. Rice Snl6, a cinnamoyl-CoA reductase-like gene family member, is required for NH1-mediated immunity to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S Bart

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice NH1 (NPR1 homolog 1 is a key mediator of innate immunity. In both plants and animals, the innate immune response is often accompanied by rapid cell death at the site of pathogen infection. Over-expression of NH1 in rice results in resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, constitutive expression of defense related genes and enhanced benzothiadiazole (BTH- mediated cell death. Here we describe a forward genetic screen that identified a suppressor of NH1-mediated lesion formation and resistance, snl6. Comparative genome hybridization and fine mapping rapidly identified the genomic location of the Snl6 gene. Snl6 is a member of the cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR-like gene family. We show that Snl6 is required for NH1-mediated resistance to Xoo. Further, we show that Snl6 is required for pathogenesis-related gene expression. In contrast to previously described CCR family members, disruption of Snl6 does not result in an obvious morphologic phenotype. Snl6 mutants have reduced lignin content and increased sugar extractability, an important trait for the production of cellulosic biofuels. These results suggest the existence of a conserved group of CCR-like genes involved in the defense response, and with the potential to alter lignin content without affecting development.

  4. Oncologist burnout and compassion fatigue: investigating time pressure at work as a predictor and the mediating role of work-family conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Sibyl; Wallace, Jean E

    2017-09-11

    Oncologists are at high risk of poor mental health. Prior research has focused on burnout, and has identified heavy workload as a key predictor. Compassion fatigue among physicians has generally received less attention, although medical specialties such as oncology may be especially at risk of compassion fatigue. We contribute to research by identifying predictors of both burnout and compassion fatigue among oncologists. In doing so, we distinguish between quantitative workload (e.g., work hours) and subjective work pressure, and test whether work-family conflict mediates the relationships between work pressure and burnout or compassion fatigue. In a cross-sectional study, oncologists from across Canada (n = 312) completed questionnaires assessing burnout, compassion fatigue, workload, time pressure at work, work-family conflict, and other personal, family, and occupational characteristics. Analyses use Ordinary Least Squares regression. Subjective time pressure at work is a key predictor of both burnout and compassion fatigue. Our results also show that work-family conflict fully mediates these relationships. Overall, the models explain more of the variation in burnout as compared to compassion fatigue. Our study highlights the need to consider oncologists' subjective time pressure, in addition to quantitative workload, in interventions to improve mental health. The findings also highlight a need to better understand additional predictors of compassion fatigue.

  5. Signal transduction mediated by Bid, a pro-death Bcl-2 family proteins, connects the death receptor and mitochondria apoptosis pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Two major apoptosis pathways have been defined in mammalian cells, the Fas/TNF-R1 death receptor pathway and the mitochondria pathway. The Bcl-2 family proteins consist of both anti-apoptosis and pro- apoptosis members that regulate apoptosis, mainly by controlling the release of cytochrome c and other mitochondrial apoptotic events. However, death signals mediated by Fas/TNF-R1 receptors can usually activate caspases directly, bypassing the need for mitochondria and escaping the regulation by Bcl-2 family proteins. Bid is a novel pro-apoptosis Bcl-2 family protein that is activated by caspase 8 in response to Fas/TNF-R1 death receptor signals. Activated Bid is translocated to mitochondria and induces cytochrome c release, which in turn activates downstream caspases. Such a connection between the two apoptosis pathways could be important for induction of apoptosis in certain types of cells and responsible for the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases.

  6. Helicobacter pylori antigen HP0986 (TieA) interacts with cultured gastric epithelial cells and induces IL8 secretion via NF-κB mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Savita; Ansari, Suhail A; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Mégraud, Francis; Tenguria, Shivendra; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2014-02-01

    The envisaged roles and partly understood functional properties of Helicobacter pylori protein HP0986 are significant in the context of proinflammatory and or proapoptotic activities, the two important facilitators of pathogen survival and persistence. In addition, sequence analysis of this gene predicts a restriction endonuclease function which remained unknown thus far. To evaluate the role of HP0986 in gastric inflammation, we studied its expression profile using a large number of clinical isolates but a limited number of biopsies and patient sera. Also, we studied antigenic role of HP0986 in altering cytokine responses of human gastric epithelial (AGS) cells including its interaction with and localization within the AGS cells. For in vitro expression study of HP0986, 110 H. pylori clinical isolates were cultured from patients with functional dyspepsia. For expression analysis by qRT PCR of HP0986, 10 gastric biopsy specimens were studied. HP0986 was also used to detect antibodies in patient sera. AGS cells were incubated with recombinant HP0986 to determine cytokine response and NF-κB activation. Transient transfection with HP0986 cloned in pEGFPN1 was used to study its subcellular localization or homing in AGS cells. Out of 110 cultured H. pylori strains, 34 (31%) were positive for HP0986 and this observation was correlated with in vitro expression profiles. HP0986 mRNA was detected in 7 of the 10 biopsy specimens. Further, HP0986 induced IL-8 secretion in gastric epithelial cells in a dose and time-dependent manner via NF-κB pathway. Serum antibodies against HP0986 were positively associated with H. pylori positive patients. Transient transfection of AGS cells revealed both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of HP0986. HP0986 was moderately prevalent in clinical isolates and its expression profile in cultures and gastric biopsies points to its being naturally expressed. Collective observations including the induction of IL-8 via TNFR1 and NF

  7. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet’s disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes.

  8. Factors Predicting Risk for Antibody-mediated Rejection and Graft Loss in Highly Human Leukocyte Antigen Sensitized Patients Transplanted After Desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Ashley A; Sinha, Aditi; Haas, Mark; Choi, Jua; Mirocha, James; Kahwaji, Joseph; Peng, Alice; Villicana, Rafael; Jordan, Stanley C

    2015-07-01

    Desensitization with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab (I+R) significantly improves transplant rates in highly sensitized patients, but antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) remains a concern. Between July 2006 and December 2012, 226 highly sensitized patients received transplants after desensitization. Most received alemtuzumab induction and standard immunosuppression. Two groups were examined: ABMR (n = 181) and ABMR (n = 45, 20%). Risk factors for ABMR, pathology, and outcomes were assessed. Significant risks for ABMR included previous transplants and pregnancies as sensitizing events, donor-specific antibody (DSA) relative intensity scores greater than 17, presence of both class I and II DSAs at transplant and time on waitlist. The ABMR showed a significant benefit for graft survival and glomerular filtration rate at 5 years (P desensitized with I+R who remain ABMR have long-term graft and patient survival. The ABMR patients have significantly reduced graft survival and glomerular filtration rate at 5 years, especially TMA. Severe ABMR episodes benefit from treatment with PLEX + Eculizumab. The DSA-relative intensity scores at transplant was a strong predictor of ABMR. Donor-specific antibody avoidance and reduction strategies before transplantation are critical to avoiding ABMR and improving long-term outcomes.

  9. Examining the mediating effect of work-to-family conflict on the associations between job stressors and employee psychological distress: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshio, Takashi; Inoue, Akiomi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2017-08-03

    The mediating effect of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on the associations between eight types of job stressors (measured based on the job demands-control, effort-reward imbalance and organisational justice models) and psychological distress in employees was examined. This study employed a prospective design. An occupational cohort study in Japan (Japanese Study of Health, Occupation, and Psychosocial Factors Related Equity; J-HOPE). 5859 men and 1560 women who were working for 11 firms and participated at three consecutive waves of J-HOPE, at 1-year intervals, from 2010 to 2013. Psychological distress, as measured by Kessler 6 scores. Mediation analysis using data on job stressors at baseline, WFC at 1-year follow-up and psychological distress at 2-year follow-up showed that WFC mediated 39.1% (95% CI 29.1% to 49.1%) and 44.5% (95% CI 31.4% to 51.7%) of the associations of psychological distress with job demands and effort, respectively, for men. The mediating effect of WFC was smaller for job stressors indicating reduced job resources, compared with job demands and effort. The mediating effect of WFC was somewhat larger for women than it was for men, with WFC mediating 47.5% (95% CI 22.5% to 72.6%) and 64.0% (95% CI 24.3% to 100.0%) of the associations of psychological distress with job demands and effort, respectively. WFC was a key mediator in the associations between most job stressors and employee psychological distress. Results suggest that policy measures and support from supervisors, to prevent job stressors from adding to WFC, are needed to reduce employee psychological distress. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Stable interaction between the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complex Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC) and DNA polymerase {epsilon} is mediated by the cohesion-specific subunits, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takeshi; Takano, Ryuji; Takeo, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Rina; Ogawa, Kaori; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki

    2010-11-05

    One of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complexes, Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC), is involved in sister chromatid cohesion. To examine its relationship with factors involved in DNA replication, we performed a proteomics analysis of Ctf18-interacting proteins. We found that Ctf18 interacts with a replicative DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase ε (pol ε). Co-immunoprecipitation with recombinant Ctf18-RFC and pol ε demonstrated that their binding is direct and mediated by two distinct interactions, one weak and one stable. Three subunits that are specifically required for cohesion in yeast, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8, formed a trimeric complex (18-1-8) and together enabled stable binding with pol ε. The C-terminal 23-amino acid stretch of Ctf18 was necessary for the trimeric association of 18-1-8 and was required for the stable interaction. The weak interaction was observed with alternative loader complexes including Ctf18-RFC(5), which lacks Dcc1 and Ctf8, suggesting that the common loader structures, including the RFC small subunits (RFC2-5), are responsible for the weak interaction. The two interaction modes, mediated through distinguishable structures of Ctf18-RFC, both occurred through the N-terminal half of pol ε, which includes the catalytic domain. The addition of Ctf18-RFC or Ctf18-RFC(5) to the DNA synthesis reaction caused partial inhibition and stimulation, respectively. Thus, Ctf18-RFC has multiple interactions with pol ε that promote polymorphic modulation of DNA synthesis. We propose that their interaction alters the DNA synthesis mode to enable the replication fork to cooperate with the establishment of cohesion.

  11. Exposure to family violence and attachment styles as predictors of dating violence perpetration among men and women: a mediational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mary; Reese-Weber, Marla; Kahn, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    This study examined a multiple mediator model explaining how sibling perpetration and one's attachment style mediate the relation between parent-to-child victimization and dating violence perpetration. A sample of undergraduate students (n = 392 women, n = 89 men) completed measures of the aforementioned variables on an Internet survey. For men, path analyses found no mediation; parent-to-child victimization had a direct association with dating violence perpetration, no association was found between sibling perpetration and dating violence perpetration, and attachment anxiety, but not attachment avoidance, was positively associated with dating violence perpetration for men. For women, the hypothesized mediation model was supported; parent-to-child victimization had a direct association with dating violence perpetration, and sibling perpetration and attachment anxiety served as mediating variables. Attachment avoidance was not associated with dating violence perpetration for women. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  12. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewerchin, Hannah L; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Noppe, Ytse; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-02-12

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV.

  13. Isolation of a cDNA encoding thymic shared antigen-1. A new member of the Ly6 family with a possible role in T cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, I; Kennedy, J; Godfrey, D I; Jenkins, N A; Masciantonio, M; Mineo, C; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Boyd, R L; Zlotnik, A

    1993-12-15

    We have previously characterized a novel mouse thymocyte marker, defined as thymic shared Ag-1 (TSA-1), present on both immature thymocytes and a subset of thymic medullary epithelial cells. MTS 35, a mAb specific for TSA-1, alters T cell differentiation when added to fetal thymic organ cultures, suggesting TSA-1 may be important for T cell development in the thymus. In this study, we describe the isolation of a cDNA encoding TSA-1 using transient expression of COS-7 cells and selection with MTS 35. The predicted amino acid sequence of this cDNA encodes a 15 to 17-kDa protein and the expressed protein is linked to the membrane via a phosphatidylinositol moiety. TSA-1 is transcriptionally active at various levels in all organs examined, suggesting that its role is not solely intrathymic. TSA-1 shares amino acid sequence homology to the mouse Ly6 multigene family, epidermal growth factor-like receptors, and to cobra venom neurotoxin. The Tsa-1 locus is located on chromosome 15 linked to Ly6 on the mouse genome. We also examined the effects of MTS 35 in fetal thymic organ cultures repopulated with two subsets of thymocytes representing defined stages of T cell development. Our results suggest that TSA-1 may play a role during positive selection and the transition from CD4+CD8+ thymocytes to the mature CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ subsets.

  14. CLEC12A-Mediated Antigen Uptake and Cross-Presentation by Human Dendritic Cell Subsets Efficiently Boost Tumor-Reactive T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutten, Tim J A; Thordardottir, Soley; Fredrix, Hanny; Janssen, Lisanne; Woestenenk, Rob; Tel, Jurjen; Joosten, Ben; Cambi, Alessandra; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Franssen, Gerben M; Boerman, Otto C; Bakker, Lex B H; Jansen, Joop H; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dolstra, Harry; Hobo, Willemijn

    2016-10-01

    Potent immunotherapies are urgently needed to boost antitumor immunity and control disease in cancer patients. As dendritic cells (DCs) are the most powerful APCs, they are an attractive means to reinvigorate T cell responses. An appealing strategy to use the effective Ag processing and presentation machinery, T cell stimulation and cross-talk capacity of natural DC subsets is in vivo tumor Ag delivery. In this context, endocytic C-type lectin receptors are attractive targeting molecules. In this study, we investigated whether CLEC12A efficiently delivers tumor Ags into human DC subsets, facilitating effective induction of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. We confirmed that CLEC12A is selectively expressed by myeloid cells, including the myeloid DC subset (mDCs) and the plasmacytoid DC subset (pDCs). Moreover, we demonstrated that these DC subsets efficiently internalize CLEC12A, whereupon it quickly translocates to the early endosomes and subsequently routes to the lysosomes. Notably, CLEC12A Ab targeting did not negatively affect DC maturation or function. Furthermore, CLEC12A-mediated delivery of keyhole limpet hemocyanin resulted in enhanced proliferation and cytokine secretion by keyhole limpet hemocyanin-experienced CD4(+) T cells. Most importantly, CLEC12A-targeted delivery of HA-1 long peptide resulted in efficient Ag cross-presentation by mDCs and pDCs, leading to strong ex vivo activation of HA-1-specific CD8(+) T cells of patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Collectively, these data indicate that CLEC12A is an effective new candidate with great potential for in vivo Ag delivery into mDCs and pDCs, thereby using the specialized functions and cross-talk capacity of these DC subsets to boost tumor-reactive T cell immunity in cancer patients.

  15. Ethnic Discrimination, Acculturative Stress, and Family Conflict as Predictors of Depressive Symptoms and Cigarette Smoking Among Latina/o Youth: The Mediating Role of Perceived Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Unger, Jennifer B

    2015-10-01

    Latino youth can experience a range of cultural (i.e., ethnic discrimination and acculturative stress) and familial (i.e. family conflict) risk factors that can contribute to their perceived stress, thereby increasing their risk for depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking. To understand the mechanisms by which ethnic discrimination, acculturative stress and family conflict influence the risk for depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking of youth, the current study investigated the mediating role of perceived stress in these associations. The data came from a longitudinal study of acculturation and substance use with 1919 Latino adolescents (52% female; 84% 14 year-olds; 87% U.S. born). Structural equation modeling indicated that discrimination and family conflict (Time 1) related with higher perceived stress (Time 2), which, in turn, related with more depressive symptoms and smoking (Time 3). The results suggest that perceived stress might be one mechanism by which ethnic discrimination and family conflict contribute to Latino youth symptoms of depression and cigarette smoking. The findings highlight the need for prevention and intervention strategies that help youth manage their general perceived stress and/or focus on stress reduction techniques.

  16. Differences in problem behaviour among ethnic minority and majority preschoolers in the Netherlands and the role of family functioning and parenting factors as mediators: the Generation R Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flink Ilse JE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that, compared to native counterparts, preschoolers from ethnic minorities are at an increased risk of problem behaviour. Socio-economic factors only partly explain this increased risk. This study aimed to further unravel the differences in problem behaviour among ethnic minority and native preschoolers by examining the mediating role of family functioning and parenting factors. Methods We included 4,282 preschoolers participating in the Generation R Study, an ethnically-diverse cohort study with inclusion in early pregnancy. At child age 3 years, parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/1,5-5; information on demographics, socio-economic status and measures of family functioning (maternal psychopathology; general family functioning and parenting (parenting stress; harsh parenting were retrieved from questionnaires. CBCL Total Problems scores in each ethnic subgroup were compared with scores in the Dutch reference population. Mediation was evaluated using multivariate regression models. Results After adjustment for confounders, preschoolers from ethnic minorities were more likely to present problem behaviour than the Dutch subgroup (e.g. CBCL Total Problems Turkish subgroup (OR 7.0 (95% CI 4.9; 10.1. When considering generational status, children of first generation immigrants were worse off than the second generation (P Conclusions This study showed that preschoolers from ethnic minorities and particularly children of first generation immigrants are at an increased risk of problem behaviour compared to children born to a Dutch mother. Although socio-economic factors were found to partly explain the association between the ethnic minority status and child problem behaviour, a similar part was explained by family functioning and parenting factors. Considering these findings, it is important for health care workers to also be attentive to symptoms of parental psychopathology (e.g. depression, poor

  17. Effects of exposure to community violence and family violence on school functioning problems among urban youth: The potential mediating role of posttraumatic stress symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tia eMcGill

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents who are exposed to violence during childhood are at an increased risk for developing posttraumatic stress (PTS symptoms. The literature suggests that violence exposure might also have negative effects on school functioning, and that PTS might serve as a potential mediator in this association. The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend prior research by examining PTS symptoms as a mediator of the relationship between two types of violence exposure and school functioning problems among adolescent youth from an urban setting. Participants included a sample of 121 junior high and high school students (M= 15 years; range= 13-16 years; 60 males, 61 females within high-crime neighborhoods. Consistent with our hypotheses, community violence and family violence were associated with PTS symptoms and school functioning problems. Our data suggest that community and family violence were indirectly related to school functioning problems through PTS symptoms. Findings from this study demonstrate that PTS symptoms potentially mediate the relationship between violence exposure and school functioning problems across two settings (community and home. Future research should further examine protective factors that can prevent youth violence exposure as well as negative outcomes related to violence.

  18. Anxiety and Self-Esteem as Mediators of the Relation between Family Communication and Indecisiveness in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cascio, Valentina; Guzzo, Giovanni; Pace, Francesco; Pace, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explored the unique and common contributions of anxiety, self-esteem, and family communication on indecisiveness among adolescents. Three hundred and fifty pupils from 13 to 16 years of age completed self-report measures on indecisiveness, quality of family communication, trait anxiety, and self-esteem. The findings in this study…

  19. Childhood Family Instability and Mental Health Problems during Late Adolescence: A Test of Two Mediation Models--The TRAILS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Martin P.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested whether childhood family instability is associated with mental health problems during adolescence through continued family instability and/or through a preadolescent onset of mental health problems. This test use data from a prospective population cohort of 2,230 Dutch adolescents ("M" age = 11.09, "SD" = 0.56…

  20. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha activates Src-family kinases and controls integrin-mediated responses in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Muranjan, M; Sap, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fyn and c-Src are two of the most widely expressed Src-family kinases. Both are strongly implicated in the control of cytoskeletal organization and in the generation of integrin-dependent signalling responses in fibroblasts. These proteins are representative of a large family of tyros...

  1. Anxiety and Self-Esteem as Mediators of the Relation between Family Communication and Indecisiveness in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cascio, Valentina; Guzzo, Giovanni; Pace, Francesco; Pace, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explored the unique and common contributions of anxiety, self-esteem, and family communication on indecisiveness among adolescents. Three hundred and fifty pupils from 13 to 16 years of age completed self-report measures on indecisiveness, quality of family communication, trait anxiety, and self-esteem. The findings in this study…

  2. Stress as a mediator between work-family conflict and psychological health among the nursing staff: Moderating role of emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Dhar, Rajib Lochan; Tyagi, Akansha

    2016-05-01

    The study examined the extent to which work-family conflicts cause stress among nursing staff and its subsequent impact on their psychological health. It also examined if the emotional intelligence level of the nursing staff acted as a moderator between their level of stress and psychological health. A survey was carried out on 693 nursing staff associated with 33 healthcare institutions in Uttarakhand, India. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was carried out to understand the relationships shared by independent (work-family conflicts) and dependent (psychological health) constructs with the mediator (stress) as well as the moderator (emotional intelligence). The results revealed that stress acted as a mediator between work-family conflict of the nursing staff and their psychological health. However, their emotional intelligence level acted as a moderator between their stress level and psychological health. To conclude, the crucial roles of emotional intelligence in controlling the impact of stress on psychological health along with the practical as well as theoretical implications are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Physical Activity Self-Efficacy and Fitness: Family Environment Relationship Correlates and Self-Esteem as a Mediator among Adolescents Who Are Overweight or Obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Nora L; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E; Dajani, Rachel; Knight, Darryl; Rigda, Alexander; Narasimhan, Sumana; Uli, Naveen

    2016-10-01

    Little is known regarding how dimensions of the family social environment relate to fitness levels and physical activity self-efficacy (PASE) among adolescents who are overweight or obese and whether these relationships are mediated by self-esteem. Potential associations were evaluated between relationship subdomains (cohesion, conflict, expressivity) of the Family Environment Scale (FES), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, RSES), and PASE and fitness, using recovery heart rate [RHR, beats per minute (bpm)] from a 3-minute submaximal step test at baseline. Participants were 108 adolescents who were overweight or obese and were seeking weight-loss treatment as part of the Healthy Kids, Healthy Weight 12-week multidisciplinary pediatric weight management program. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to simultaneously evaluate paths between these variables and test for mediation. In multivariable models, higher FES cohesion (β = -2.18, s.e. = 0.98; p = 0.02), expressivity (β = -1.97, s.e. = 0.99; p relationship between FES conflict and PASE (sum of indirect paths: β = -0.30, s.e. = 0.11; p relationship domain of the family environment on self-esteem, PASE, and physical fitness in adolescents who are overweight or obese.

  4. Internacional family mediation and child abduction / Mediación familiar internacional y sustracción de menores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Carrillo Lerma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the study of the mediation as an amicable dispute settlement mechanism in the area of international child abduction. Its regulation in European law and Spanish law and the advantages of its implementation are analyzed. The result obtained is that mediation could be a good alternative to court proceedings in order to settle these issues since its advantages outweigh its disadvantages, while it is not a very common practice.

  5. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is essential for kit ligand-mediated survival, whereas interleukin-3 and flt3 ligand induce expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Richard; Engström, Maria; Jönsson, Maria;

    2003-01-01

    not sustain their expression. Moreover, use of inhibitors implied that IL-3 was mainly exerting its effect on Bcl-2 at the level of transcription. The addition of LY294002 did not affect the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, and thus, we conclude that expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member genes......Cytokines such as interleukin 3 (IL-3), kit ligand (KL), and flt3 ligand (FL) promote survival of hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitor cells. In many cell types, members of the Bcl-2 gene family are major regulators of survival, but the mediating mechanisms are not fully understood...... is not dependent on PI-3 kinase activity. Our results indicate that cytokines exert distinct survival effects and that FL and IL-3 are capable of sustaining progenitor survival by up-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and related genes....

  6. Functional and transcriptome analysis reveals an acclimatization strategy for abiotic stress tolerance mediated by Arabidopsis NF-YA family members

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2012-01-01

    .... Here we report that five members of the Arabidopsis thaliana NF-YA family are strongly induced by several stress conditions via transcriptional and miR169-related post-transcriptional mechanisms...

  7. Targeted delivery of lipid antigen to macrophages via the CD169/sialoadhesin endocytic pathway induces robust invariant natural killer T cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Norihito; Vela, Jose Luis; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Rademacher, Christoph; Khurana, Archana; van Rooijen, Nico; Crocker, Paul R.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Paulson, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells induce a protective immune response triggered by foreign glycolipid antigens bound to CD1d on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). A limitation of using glycolipid antigens to stimulate immune responses in human patients has been the inability to target them to the most effective APCs. Recent studies have implicated phagocytic CD169+ macrophages as major APCs in lymph nodes for priming iNKT cells in mice immunized with glycolipid antigen in particulate form. CD169 is known as sialoadhesin (Sn), a macrophage-specific adhesion and endocytic receptor of the siglec family that recognizes sialic acid containing glycans as ligands. We have recently developed liposomes decorated with glycan ligands for CD169/Sn suitable for targeted delivery to macrophages via CD169/Sn-mediated endocytosis. Here we show that targeted delivery of a lipid antigen to CD169+ macrophages in vivo results in robust iNKT cell activation in liver and spleen using nanogram amounts of antigen. Activation of iNKT cells is abrogated in Cd169−/− mice and is macrophage-dependent, demonstrating that targeting CD169+ macrophages is sufficient for systemic activation of iNKT cells. When pulsed with targeted liposomes, human monocyte–derived dendritic cells expressing CD169/Sn activated human iNKT cells, demonstrating the conservation of the CD169/Sn endocytic pathway capable of presenting lipid antigens to iNKT cells. PMID:23610394

  8. Parents' work-family experiences and children's problem behaviors: The mediating role of the parent-child relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Joana M; Matias, Marisa; Ferreira, Tiago; Lopez, Frederick G; Matos, Paula Mena

    2016-06-01

    Studies on the impact of work-family dynamics on both parenting and children's outcomes are scarce. The present study addressed this gap by exploring how parents' negative (conflicting) and positive (enriching) experiencing of work and family roles related to children's internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors through its association with the quality of parent-child relationships. A sample of 317 dual-earner couples with preschool children was used to conduct a dyadic analysis of both within- and cross-dyad influences of parents' work-family experiences on child problem behaviors. Our results indicated that the way parents balance work and family is associated with their parent-child relationships, which in turn is differentially linked with their children's behaviors. We found that mothers' work-family conflict (WFC) contributed to children's externalization difficulties through its detrimental associations with their own and with their partners' parent-child relationship quality. By contrast, mothers' work-family enrichment (WFE) was negatively linked to children's externalization difficulties through its positive link with the mother-child relationship. Fathers' experience of WFC was associated with both children's internalization and externalization difficulties through its negative association with their own father-child relationship quality. In addition, fathers' experience of WFE also linked to children's externalization difficulties, but only indirectly, via its positive association with the quality of their relationship with the child. Further implications of these findings for advancing understanding of the impact of work-family dynamics on intrafamily relationships, as well as for individual and organizational interventions, are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Cyclosporin A promotes proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and migration of human cytotrophoblast cells via the mitgen-activated protein kinase-3/1-mediated nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song-Cun; Yu, Min; Li, Yan-Hong; Piao, Hai-Lan; Tang, Chuan-Lin; Sun, Chan; Zhu, Rui; Li, Ming Qing; Jin, Li-Ping; Li, Da-Jin; Du, Mei-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that cyclosporin A (CsA) promotes the proliferation and migration of human trophoblasts via the mitgen-activated protein kinase-3/1 (MAPK3/1) pathway. In the present study, we further investigated the role of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the CsA-induced trophoblast proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and migration, and its relationship to MAPK3/1 signal. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the expression of PCNA in trophoblasts. The migration of human primary trophoblasts was determined by wound-healing assay and transwell migration assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the activation of NF-κB p65 and NF-κB inhibitory protein I-κB in human trophoblasts. We found that treatment with CsA promotes PCNA expression and migration of human trophoblast in a dose-associated manner. Blocking of the MAPK3/1 signal abrogated the enhanced PCNA expression and migration in trophoblasts by CsA. In addition, CsA increased the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and the inhibitor I-κB in human trophoblasts in a time-related manner. Pretreatment with MAPK3/1 inhibitor U0126 abrogated the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and I-κB. Accordingly, the CsA-induced enhancement of PCNA expression and migration in trophoblasts was also decreased. This CsA-induced enhancement in the expression and migration of trophoblasts was abolished by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific NF-κB inhibitor. Thus, our results suggest that CsA promotes PCNA expression and migration of human trophoblasts via MAPK-mediated NF-κB activation.

  10. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on antibody-mediated immune response and gene expression of pattern recognition receptors and cytokines in broiler chickens immunized with T-cell dependent antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Echeverry, H; Crow, G H; Slominski, B A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on innate and antibody mediated immune response in broiler chickens following immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). One-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were randomly assigned to 6 dietary treatments of 9 replicate cages of 5 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of a Control diet without antibiotic, and diets containing 11 mg/kg of virginiamycin, 0.25% of yeast cell wall (YCW), 0.2% of a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus containing processed yeast and nucleotides, 0.05% of nucleotides, or a diet containing 10% of DDGS. On days 21 and 28 post-hatching, 5 birds per treatment were immunized intramuscularly with both SRBC and BSA. One week after each immunization, blood samples were collected. Serum samples were analyzed by hemagglutination test for antibody response to SRBC, and by ELISA for serum IgM and IgG response to BSA. On d 35, 5 birds per treatment were euthanized and the tissue samples from the cecal tonsils were collected to assess the gene expression of toll-like receptors TLR2b, TLR4, and TLR21, monocyte mannose receptor (MMR), and cytokines IL-10, IL-13, IL-4, IL-12p35, and IFN-γ. The results for gene expression analysis demonstrated that the diet supplemented with YCW increased the expression of TLR2b and T-helper type 2 cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and IL-13 relative to the Control; and the expression of TLR4 and IL-13 was upregulated in the nucleotide-containing diet. However, the diets containing antibiotics or Maxi-Gen Plus downregulated the expression of IFN-γ compared to the control. The primary antibody response to SRBC was not affected by diets. However, the diet containing YCW increased the secondary antibody response to SRBC compared to the antibiotic treatment. Neither primary nor secondary IgG and IgM response against BSA were affected by diets. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with YCW stimulated Th2 cell-mediated

  11. The mediating role of maternal warmth in the associations between harsh parental practices and externalizing and internalizing behaviors in Hispanic American, African American, and European American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Elif Dede; Roopnarine, Jaipaul L

    2015-07-01

    Using data from the add-on 5-year cohort of In-Home Longitudinal Study of preschool aged Children of the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study (FFCWS), we examined the mediating role of maternal warmth in the associations between positive and harsh maternal practices and children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors. The sample consisted of 1,922 low-income Hispanic American, African American, and European American families. For European Americans, the links between maternal psychological aggression and hostility and children's externalizing behaviors were direct. Similarly, for Hispanic Americans, the links between maternal psychological aggression, physical assault, and hostility and externalizing behaviors were direct, as was the link between maternal physical assault and internalizing behaviors. For African Americans, maternal warmth partially mediated the links between maternal hostility and physical assault and externalizing behaviors. However, the associations between psychological aggression and externalizing and internalizing behaviors were direct. The data are discussed with respect to similarities in cultural pathways of influence between harsh maternal treatment and children's behavioral difficulties across ethnic groups.

  12. Maternal educational level and preschool children's consumption of high-calorie snacks and sugar-containing beverages: mediation by the family food environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijtzes, Anne I; Jansen, Wilma; Jansen, Pauline W; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Raat, Hein

    2013-11-01

    To examine the associations between maternal educational level and preschoolers' consumption of high-calorie snacks and sugar-containing beverages, and to assess the mediating effects of variables relating to the family food environment. We analyzed data from 2814 native Dutch preschoolers enrolled in a birth cohort study in Rotterdam (the Netherlands), between 2002 and 2006. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios of snacking ≥ 2 times/day and consuming sugar-containing beverages ≥ 3 glasses/day for children of mothers with low, mid-low, and mid-high educational levels (reference group: high educational level), before and after adjustment for mediators. Children of low and mid-low educated mothers were significantly more likely to consume excessive amounts of high-calorie snacks and sugar-containing beverages compared with children of high educated mothers, with the highest odds in children of low educated mothers (OR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.84, 3.23 and OR: 2.46; 95% CI: 1.87, 3.24 respectively). Parental feeding practices, parental consumption of sugar-containing beverages, and children's television time partly explained these associations. Maternal educational level is inversely related to preschoolers' consumption of high-calorie snacks and sugar-containing beverages. Targeting the family food environment may be an effective way of reducing educational inequalities in children's unhealthy dietary behaviors. © 2013.

  13. Does Maternal Supervision Mediate the Impact of Income Source on Behavioral Adjustment in Children from Persistently Poor Families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Civita, Mirella; Pagani, Linda S.; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the influence of income source within the context of persistent poverty on children's disruptive classroom behavior at age 12 and whether these associations were mediated by maternal supervision at ages 10 and 11. Using a subsample (N = 1,112) from the Quebec Longitudinal Study, we coded four economic circumstances indicating…

  14. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, Benjamin S; Abrahamsson, Thomas R; Bernstein, Charles N; Duck, L Wayne; Mannon, Peter J; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C; Elson, Charles O

    2015-11-01

    Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8(+) T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  16. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewoud Bernardus Compeer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I MHC complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells (APC capable of antigen cross-presentation, description of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC, there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlight DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, recycling and maturation including the sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell-surface directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  17. Long-term Effects of Parents' Education on Children's Educational and Occupational Success: Mediation by Family Interactions, Child Aggression, and Teenage Aspirations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubow, Eric F; Boxer, Paul; Huesmann, L Rowell

    2009-07-01

    We examine the prediction of individuals' educational and occupational success at age 48 from contextual and personal variables assessed during their middle childhood and late adolescence. We focus particularly on the predictive role of the parents' educational level during middle childhood, controlling for other indices of socioeconomic status and children's IQ, and the mediating roles of negative family interactions, childhood behavior, and late adolescent aspirations. Data come from the Columbia County Longitudinal Study, which began in 1960 when all 856 third graders in a semi-rural county in New York State were interviewed along with their parents; participants were reinterviewed at ages 19, 30, and 48 (Eron et al, 1971; Huesmann et al., 2002). Parents' educational level when the child was 8 years old significantly predicted educational and occupational success for the child 40 years later. Structural models showed that parental educational level had no direct effects on child educational level or occupational prestige at age 48 but had significant indirect effects that were independent of the other predictor variables' effects. These indirect effects were mediated through age 19 educational aspirations and age 19 educational level. These results provide strong support for the unique predictive role of parental education on adult outcomes 40 years later and underscore the developmental importance of mediators of parent education effects such as late adolescent achievement and achievement-related aspirations.

  18. Psychological distress of parents in conflict areas: the mediating role of war atrocities, normative stressors and family resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Vivian

    2017-04-01

    Despite the ongoing controversy regarding which types of stressors or resources contribute to psychological distress, there has been little research examining the relationship between war trauma, normative stressors, family resources for management and psychopathology. This study investigated the differences between mothers and fathers in psychological distress, normative stressors and war atrocities experienced, and family's resources for management. It was hypothesized that a combination of risk variables and protective variables would be predictive of psychological distress in parents. Questionnaires were used with 205 Palestinian parents from Gaza Strip. Mothers had more psychiatric disorders than did fathers. Although, mothers and fathers were exposed to comparable levels of normative stressors, mothers concerns about intrafamily strains, and family legal violations were greater than they were for fathers. Results revealed that fathers possess a larger repertoire of resources for management when compared to mothers reflected in esteem and communication, mastery and health, extended family social support and financial well-being. However, mastery and health seem to buffer the effect of war traumas and normative stressors on neuroticism in both parents. The different patterns of predictor-outcome relations have practical as well as theoretical implications.

  19. School Variables as Mediators of Personal and Family Factors on School Violence in Taiwanese Junior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Kang; Astor, Ron Avi

    2012-01-01

    Using a nationally representative sample of 3,058 junior high school students in Taiwan, this study examines a model of how personal traits, family factors, and school dynamics influence school violence committed by students against students and teachers. This model proposed that school violence is directly influenced by personal traits,…

  20. Work-family conflict as a mediator between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Norio; Danjo, Kazuma; Furukori, Hanako; Sato, Yasushi; Tomita, Tetsu; Fujii, Akira; Nakagami, Taku; Kitaoka, Kazuyo; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Occupational stress among mental health nurses may affect their psychological health, resulting in reduced performance. To provide high-quality, sustainable nursing care, it is necessary to identify and control the factors associated with psychological health among mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of work-family conflict (WFC) in the well-known relationship between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan. In this cross-sectional study, data were gathered from 180 mental health nurses who had a coresident child or were married. Data from the Work-Family Conflict Scale, the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale were obtained via self-report questionnaires. The effects of occupational stress and WFC on psychological health were explored by hierarchical linear regression analysis. The relationship between emotional exhaustion and occupational factors, including quantitative workload and the variance in workload, disappeared with the addition of WFC (each work interference with family [WIF] or family interference with work [FIW]). The relationship between emotional exhaustion and mental demands disappeared only with the addition of WIF. The relationship between depressive symptoms and variance in workload disappeared with the addition of WFC (each WIF or FIW). Our findings may encourage hospital administrators to consider the risks of medical staff WFC. Furthermore, longitudinal investigations into the factors associated with WFC are required for administrative and psychological interventions.

  1. Childhood poverty and blood pressure reactivity to and recovery from an acute stressor in late adolescence: the mediating role of family conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W; Exner-Cortens, Deinera; Kim, Pilyoung; Bartholomew, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Childhood deprivation is inimical to health throughout the life course. Early experiences of stress could play a role in health inequalities. An important aspect of childhood poverty that has not received much attention is cardiovascular reactivity to and recovery from acute stressors. Piecewise, multilevel growth curve regression was used to examine blood pressure reactivity to and recovery from a mental arithmetic task among late adolescents (mean [standard deviation] = 17.3 [1.0] years, n = 185) as a function of early childhood poverty (9 years). We also tested whether exposure to family conflict at age 13 years mediated expected linkages between childhood poverty and adolescent blood pressure reactivity and recovery to an acute stressor. Blood pressure reactivity was unaffected by household income during childhood, but late adolescents with lower household income during childhood showed slower systolic (b = -0.29, p = .004) and diastolic (b = -0.19, p = .002) recovery. These results include age and sex as statistical covariates. The significant poverty impact on systolic but not on diastolic blood pressure recovery was mediated by exposure to family conflict (95% confidence interval = - 0.1400 to - 0.0012). We show that late adolescents who grew up in poverty have delayed blood pressure recovery from an acute stressor. Furthermore, childhood exposure to family conflict, a well-documented component of early childhood deprivation, accounted for some of the adverse effects of childhood poverty on stressor recovery among these adolescents. We discuss the importance of considering physiological stress accompanying early experiences of deprivation in thinking about health inequalities.

  2. Childhood Poverty and Late Adolescents’ Blood Pressure Reactivity to and Recovery From an Acute Stressor: The Mediating Role of Family Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W.; Exner-Cortens, Deinera; Kim, Pilyoung; Bartholomew, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood deprivation is inimical to health throughout the life-course. Early experiences of stress could play a role in health inequalities. An important aspect of childhood poverty that has not received much attention is cardiovascular reactivity and recovery to acute stressors. Methods Piecewise, multi-level growth curve regression was used to examine blood pressure reactivity and recovery to mental arithmetic among late adolescents (M(SD) = 17.3 (1.0) years; n = 185) as a function of early childhood poverty (9 years). We also tested whether exposure to family conflict at age 13 mediated expected linkages between childhood poverty and adolescent blood pressure reactivity and recovery to an acute stressor. Results Blood pressure reactivity was unaffected by household income during childhood, but late adolescents with lower household income during childhood showed slower systolic (b=−0.29, p=.004) and diastolic (b=−0.19, p=.002) recovery. These results include age and gender as statistical covariates. The significant poverty impact on systolic but not on diastolic blood pressure recovery was mediated by exposure to family conflict [95% confidence interval −0.1400, −0.0012]. Conclusions We show that late adolescents who grew up in poverty have delayed blood pressure recovery from an acute stressor. Furthermore, childhood exposure to family conflict, a well-documented component of early childhood deprivation, accounted for some of the adverse effects of childhood poverty on stressor recovery among these adolescents. We discuss the importance of considering physiological stress accompanying early experiences of deprivation in thinking about health inequalities. PMID:23960158

  3. Synthetic antigens reveal dynamics of BCR endocytosis during inhibitory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Adam H; Bennett, Nitasha R; Zwick, Daniel B; Hudon, Jonathan; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-01-17

    B cells detect foreign antigens through their B cell antigen receptor (BCR). The BCR, when engaged by antigen, initiates a signaling cascade. Concurrent with signaling is endocytosis of the BCR complex, which acts to downregulate signaling and facilitate uptake of antigen for processing and display on the cell surface. The relationship between signaling and BCR endocytosis is poorly defined. Here, we explore the interplay between BCR endocytosis and antigens that either promote or inhibit B cell activation. Specifically, synthetic antigens were generated that engage the BCR alone or both the BCR and the inhibitory co-receptor CD22. The lectin CD22, a member of the Siglec family, binds sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates found on host tissues, inhibiting BCR signaling to prevent erroneous B cell activation. At low concentrations, antigens that can cocluster the BCR and CD22 promote rapid BCR endocytosis; whereas, slower endocytosis occurs with antigens that bind only the BCR. At higher antigen concentrations, rapid BCR endocytosis occurs upon treatment with either stimulatory or inhibitory antigens. Endocytosis of the BCR, in response to synthetic antigens, results in its entry into early endocytic compartments. Although the CD22-binding antigens fail to activate key regulators of antigen presentation (e.g., Syk), they also promote BCR endocytosis, indicating that inhibitory antigens can be internalized. Together, our observations support a functional role for BCR endocytosis in downregulating BCR signaling. The reduction of cell surface BCR levels in the absence of B cell activation should raise the threshold for BCR subsequent activation. The ability of the activating synthetic antigens to trigger both signaling and entry of the BCR into early endosomes suggests strategies for targeted antigen delivery.

  4. Antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum malaria involves a highly structured switching pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Recker

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and protozoa achieve chronic infection through an immune evasion strategy known as antigenic variation. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, this involves transcriptional switching among members of the var gene family, causing parasites with different antigenic and phenotypic characteristics to appear at different times within a population. Here we use a genome-wide approach to explore this process in vitro within a set of cloned parasite populations. Our analyses reveal a non-random, highly structured switch pathway where an initially dominant transcript switches via a set of switch-intermediates either to a new dominant transcript, or back to the original. We show that this specific pathway can arise through an evolutionary conflict in which the pathogen has to optimise between safeguarding its limited antigenic repertoire and remaining capable of establishing infections in non-naïve individuals. Our results thus demonstrate a crucial role for structured switching during the early phases of infections and provide a unifying theory of antigenic variation in P. falciparum malaria as a balanced process of parasite-intrinsic switching and immune-mediated selection.

  5. Members of the Pmp protein family of Chlamydia pneumoniae mediate adhesion to human cells via short repetitive peptide motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölleken, Katja; Schmidt, Eleni; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2010-11-01

    Chlamydiae sp. are obligate intracellular pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans. Adhesion of the infectious elementary body to the eukaryotic host cell is a pivotal step in chlamydial pathogenesis. Here we describe the characterization of members of the polymorphic membrane protein family (Pmp), the largest protein family (with up to 21 members) unique to Chlamydiaceae. We show that yeast cells displaying Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 on their surfaces, or beads coated with the recombinant proteins, adhere to human epithelial cells. A hallmark of the Pmp protein family is the presence of multiple repeats of the tetrapeptide motifs FxxN and GGA(I, L, V) and deletion analysis shows that at least two copies of these motifs are needed for adhesion. Importantly, pre-treatment of human cells with recombinant Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 protein reduces infectivity upon subsequent challenge with Chlamydia pneumoniae and correlates with diminished attachment of Chlamydiae to target cells. Antibodies specific for Pmp21 can neutralize infection in vitro. Finally, a combination of two different Pmp proteins in infection blockage experiments shows additive effects, possibly suggesting similar functions. Our findings imply that Pmp6, Pmp20 and Pmp21 act as adhesins, are vital during infection and thus represent promising vaccine candidates.

  6. ACAM, a novel member of the neural IgCAM family, mediates anterior neural tube closure in a primitive chordate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Diaz, Heidi; Mejares, Emil; Newman-Smith, Erin; Smith, William C

    2016-01-01

    The neural IgCAM family of cell adhesion molecules, which includes NCAM and related molecules, has evolved via gene duplication and alternative splicing to allow for a wide range of isoforms with distinct functions and homophilic binding properties. A search for neural IgCAMs in ascidians (Ciona intestinalis, Ciona savignyi, and Phallusia mammillata) has identified a novel set of truncated family members that, unlike the known members, lack fibronectin III domains and consist of only repeated Ig domains. Within the tunicates this form appears to be unique to the ascidians, and it was designated ACAM, for Ascidian Cell Adhesion Molecule. In C. intestinalis ACAM is expressed in the developing neural plate and neural tube, with strongest expression in the anterior sensory vesicle precursor. Unlike the two other conventional neural IgCAMs in C. intestinalis, which are expressed maternally and throughout the morula and blastula stages, ACAM expression initiates at the gastrula stage. Moreover, C. intestinalis ACAM is a target of the homeodomain transcription factor OTX, which plays an essential role in the development of the anterior central nervous system. Morpholino (MO) knockdown shows that ACAM is required for neural tube closure. In MO-injected embryos neural tube closure was normal caudally, but the anterior neuropore remained open. A similar phenotype was seen with overexpression of a secreted version of ACAM. The presence of ACAM in ascidians highlights the diversity of this gene family in morphogenesis and neurodevelopment.

  7. Work–family conflict as a mediator between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara N

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Norio Sugawara,1,2 Kazuma Danjo,3 Hanako Furukori,4 Yasushi Sato,2,5 Tetsu Tomita,2,6 Akira Fujii,7 Taku Nakagami,2,8 Kazuyo Kitaoka,9 Norio Yasui-Furukori2 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Translational Medical Center, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori, 3Mizoguchi Mental Hospital, Shizuoka, 4Department of Psychiatry, Kuroishi-Akebono Hospital, Kuroishi, 5Department of Psychiatry, Mutsu General Hospital, Mutsu, 6Department of Psychiatry, Hirosaki-Aiseikai Hospital, Kitazono, Hirosaki, 7Department of Psychiatry, Seihoku-Chuoh Hospital, Goshogawara, Aomori, 8Department of Psychiatry, Odate Municipal General Hospital, Odate, Akita, 9Mental Health Nursing, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan Background: Occupational stress among mental health nurses may affect their psychological health, resulting in reduced performance. To provide high-quality, sustainable nursing care, it is necessary to identify and control the factors associated with psychological health among mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of work–family conflict (WFC in the well-known relationship between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data were gathered from 180 mental health nurses who had a coresident child or were married. Data from the Work–Family Conflict Scale, the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale were obtained via self-report questionnaires. The effects of occupational stress and WFC on psychological health were explored by hierarchical linear regression analysis. Results: The relationship between emotional exhaustion and occupational factors, including

  8. MicroRNA-181b inhibits thrombin-mediated endothelial activation and arterial thrombosis by targeting caspase recruitment domain family member 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jibin; He, Shaolin; Sun, Xinghui; Franck, Gregory; Deng, Yihuan; Yang, Dafeng; Haemmig, Stefan; Wara, A K M; Icli, Basak; Li, Dazhu; Feinberg, Mark W

    2016-09-01

    Thrombogenic and inflammatory mediators, such as thrombin, induce NF-κB-mediated endothelial cell (EC) activation and dysfunction, which contribute to pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis. The role of anti-inflammatory microRNA-181b (miR-181b) on thrombosis remains unknown. Our previous study demonstrated that miR-181b inhibits downstream NF-κB signaling in response to TNF-α. Here, we demonstrate that miR-181b uniquely inhibits upstream NF-κB signaling in response to thrombin. Overexpression of miR-181b inhibited thrombin-induced activation of NF-κB signaling, demonstrated by reduction of phospho-IKK-β, -IκB-α, and p65 nuclear translocation in ECs. MiR-181b also reduced expression of NF-κB target genes VCAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and tissue factor. Mechanistically, miR-181b targets caspase recruitment domain family member 10 (Card10), an adaptor protein that participates in activation of the IKK complex in response to signals transduced from protease-activated receptor-1. miR-181b reduced expression of Card10 mRNA and protein, but not protease-activated receptor-1. 3'-Untranslated region reporter assays, argonaute-2 microribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation studies, and Card10 rescue studies revealed that Card10 is a bona fide direct miR-181b target. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Card10 expression phenocopied effects of miR-181b on NF-κB signaling and targets. Card10 deficiency did not affect TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB signaling, which suggested stimulus-specific regulation of NF-κB signaling and endothelial responses by miR-181b in ECs. Finally, in response to photochemical injury-induced arterial thrombosis, systemic delivery of miR-181b reduced thrombus formation by 73% in carotid arteries and prolonged time to occlusion by 1.6-fold, effects recapitulated by Card10 small interfering RNA. These data demonstrate that miR-181b and Card10 are important regulators of thrombin-induced EC activation and

  9. Antigen presentation by MHC-dressed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi eNakayama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional antigen presenting cells (APCs such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide-MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI and/or MHC class II (MHCII from neighboring cells through a process of cell-cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide-MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC.

  10. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  11. The CC chemokine thymus-derived chemotactic agent 4 (TCA-4, secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine, 6Ckine, exodus-2) triggers lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1-mediated arrest of rolling T lymphocytes in peripheral lymph node high endothelial venules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J V; Rot, A; Luo, Y; Narasimhaswamy, M; Nakano, H; Gunn, M D; Matsuzawa, A; Quackenbush, E J; Dorf, M E; von Andrian, U H

    2000-01-03

    T cell homing to peripheral lymph nodes (PLNs) is defined by a multistep sequence of interactions between lymphocytes and endothelial cells in high endothelial venules (HEVs). After initial tethering and rolling via L-selectin, firm adhesion of T cells requires rapid upregulation of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) adhesiveness by a previously unknown pathway that activates a Galpha(i)-linked receptor. Here, we used intravital microscopy of murine PLNs to study the role of thymus-derived chemotactic agent (TCA)-4 (secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine, 6Ckine, Exodus-2) in homing of adoptively transferred T cells from T-GFP mice, a transgenic strain that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) selectively in naive T lymphocytes (T(GFP) cells). TCA-4 was constitutively presented on the luminal surface of HEVs, where it was required for LFA-1 activation on rolling T(GFP) cells. Desensitization of the TCA-4 receptor, CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7), blocked T(GFP) cell adherence in wild-type HEVs, whereas desensitization to stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha (the ligand for CXC chemokine receptor 4 [CXCR4]) did not affect T(GFP) cell behavior. TCA-4 protein was not detected on the luminal surface of PLN HEVs in plt/plt mice, which have a congenital defect in T cell homing to PLNs. Accordingly, T(GFP) cells rolled but did not arrest in plt/plt HEVs. When TCA-4 was injected intracutaneously into plt/plt mice, the chemokine entered afferent lymph vessels and accumulated in draining PLNs. 2 h after intracutaneous injection, luminal presentation of TCA-4 was detectable in a subset of HEVs, and LFA-1-mediated T(GFP) cell adhesion was restored in these vessels. We conclude that TCA-4 is both required and sufficient for LFA-1 activation on rolling T cells in PLN HEVs. This study also highlights a hitherto undocumented role for chemokines contained in afferent lymph, which may modulate leukocyte recruitment in draining PLNs.

  12. Child-street migration among HIV-affected families in Kenya: a mediation analysis from cross-sectional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael L.; Mutambudzi, Miriam S.; Gitari, Stanley; Keiser, Philip H.; Seidel, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Within Kenya, an estimated quarter of a million children live on the streets, and 1.8 million children are orphaned. In this study, we analyze how HIV contributes to the phenomenon of child-street migration. We interviewed a random community sample of caregiving women (n = 1974) in Meru County, Kenya, using a structured questionnaire in summer 2015. Items included reported HIV prevalence of respondent and her partner, social support, overall health, school enrollment of biologically related children and whether the respondent has a child currently living on the streets. Controlling for alcohol use, education, wealth, age and household size, we found a positive-graded association between the number of partners living with HIV and the probability that a child lives on the street. There was little difference in the odds of a child living on the street between maternally affected and paternally affected households. Lower maternal social support, overall health and school enrollment of biologically related children mediated 14% of the association between HIV-affected households and reporting child-street migration. Street-migration of children is strongly associated with household HIV, but the small percentage of mediated effect presents a greater need to focus on interactions between household and community factors in the context of HIV. Programs and policies responding to these findings will involve targeting parents and children in HIV-affected households, and coordinate care between clinical providers, social service providers and schools. PMID:27392012

  13. Antigen cross-presentation of immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzer, Barbara; Stout, Madeleine; Fiebiger, Edda

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to cross-present tumor antigens has long been a focus of interest to physicians, as well as basic scientists, that aim to establish efficient cell-based cancer immune therapy. A prerequisite for exploiting this pathway for therapeutic purposes is a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses when initiated by DCs via cross-presentation. The ability of humans DC to perform cross-presentation is of utmost interest, as this cell type is a main target for cell-based immunotherapy in humans. The outcome of a cross-presentation event is guided by the nature of the antigen, the form of antigen uptake, and the subpopulation of DCs that performs presentation. Generally, CD8α(+) DCs are considered to be the most potent cross-presenting DCs. This paradigm, however, only applies to soluble antigens. During adaptive immune responses, immune complexes form when antibodies interact with their specific epitopes on soluble antigens. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes target Fc-gamma receptors on DCs to shuttle exogenous antigens efficiently into the cross-presentation pathway. This receptor-mediated cross-presentation pathway is a well-described route for the induction of strong CD8(+) T cell responses. IgG-mediated cross-presentation is intriguing because it permits the CD8(-) DCs, which are commonly considered to be weak cross-presenters, to efficiently cross-present. Engaging multiple DC subtypes for cross-presentation might be a superior strategy to boost CTL responses in vivo. We here summarize our current understanding of how DCs use IgG-complexed antigens for the efficient induction of CTL responses. Because of its importance for human cell therapy, we also review the recent advances in the characterization of cross-presentation properties of human DC subsets.

  14. Emotional Exhaustion and Job Satisfaction in Airport Security Officers - Work-Family Conflict as Mediator in the Job Demands-Resources Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Sophie; Krause, Andreas; Schwaninger, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The growing threat of terrorism has increased the importance of aviation security and the work of airport security officers (screeners). Nonetheless, airport security research has yet to focus on emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction as major determinants of screeners' job performance. The present study bridges this research gap by applying the job demands-resources (JD-R) model and using work-family conflict (WFC) as an intervening variable to study relationships between work characteristics (workload and supervisor support), emotional exhaustion, and job satisfaction in 1,127 screeners at a European airport. Results of structural equation modeling revealed that (a) supervisor support as a major job resource predicted job satisfaction among screeners; (b) workload as a major job demand predicted their emotional exhaustion; and (c) WFC proved to be a promising extension to the JD-R model that partially mediated the impact of supervisor support and workload on job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  15. Centrosomal localisation of the cancer/testis (CT) antigens NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 is regulated by proteasome activity in tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Anna; Caballero, Otavia L; Volkmar, Norbert; Devalle, Sylvie; Simpson, Andrew J G; Lu, Xin; Christianson, John C

    2013-01-01

    The Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen family of genes are transcriptionally repressed in most human tissues but are atypically re-expressed in many malignant tumour types. Their restricted expression profile makes CT antigens ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. As little is known about whether CT antigens may be regulated by post-translational processing, we investigated the mechanisms governing degradation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 in selected cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of proteasome-mediated degradation induced the partitioning of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 into a detergent insoluble fraction. Moreover, this treatment also resulted in increased localisation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 at the centrosome. Despite their interaction, relocation of either NY-ESO-1 or MAGE-C1 to the centrosome could occur independently of each other. Using a series of truncated fragments, the regions corresponding to NY-ESO-1(91-150) and MAGE-C1(900-1116) were established as important for controlling both stability and localisation of these CT antigens. Our findings demonstrate that the steady state levels of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 are regulated by proteasomal degradation and that both behave as aggregation-prone proteins upon accumulation. With proteasome inhibitors being increasingly used as front-line treatment in cancer, these data raise issues about CT antigen processing for antigenic presentation and therefore immunogenicity in cancer patients.

  16. Self-Criticism and Depressive Symptoms Mediate the Relationship Between Emotional Experiences With Family and Peers and Self-Injury in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ana; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Cunha, Marina; Carvalho, Sérgio

    2016-10-07

    Although the relationship between negative childhood experiences, peer victimization, depressive symptoms, and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) is widely recognized, the mechanisms involved are not fully understood, especially among adolescents. This study aims to test the mediating role of both self-criticism and depressive symptoms in the relationship between memories of negative or positive experiences, current peer victimization, and NSSI. The sample consists 854 Portuguese adolescents, 451 female and 403 male, with ages between 12 and 18 years (M = 14.89; SD = 1.79), from middle and secondary schools. Participants answered self-report measures. Results from path analysis showed that memories of negative experiences, the absence of positive memories with family in childhood and peer victimization indirectly impact on NSSI through self-criticism and depressive symptoms. In addition, these stressful experiences led to depressive symptoms through self-criticism. Lastly, the most severe form of self-criticism indirectly impacts on NSSI through depressive symptoms, even though it also has a strong direct effect. It suggests that negative experiences with parents and peer victimization, as well as the absence of positive memories with family, have a negative impact on NSSI when these experiences are linked with a sense of self-hatred and depressive symptoms.

  17. Eosinofil Sel Penyaji Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel eosinofil merupakan jenis sel lekosit yang terlibat dalam berbagai patogenesis penyakit. Sel eosinofil pada awalnya dikenal sebagai sel efektor  dari sistem imunitas alamiah. Akan tetapi, kemampuan sel eosinofil dalam memfagositosis patogen menimbulkan dugaan bahwa sel eosinofil ikut berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen. Hal ini dianalogikan dengan sel makrofag dan sel dendritik yang bisa memfagositosis dan menyajikan antigen sebagai hasil dari degradasi patogen yang difagositosis. Untuk menjawab permasalahan ini, penulis melakukan penelusuran artikel tentang eosinofil sebagai sel penyaji antigen melalui US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Healthdengan kata kunci eoshinophil dan antigen presenting cell. Hasil penelusuran adalah ditemukannya 10 artikel yang relevan dengan topik. Hasil dari sintesis kesepuluh jurnal tersebut adalah sel eosinofil mampu berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen yang profesional (professionalantigenpresentng cell

  18. Functional and transcriptome analysis reveals an acclimatization strategy for abiotic stress tolerance mediated by Arabidopsis NF-YA family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) is a heterotrimeric complex formed by NF-YA/NF-YB/NF-YC subunits that binds to the CCAAT-box in eukaryotic promoters. In contrast to other organisms, in which a single gene encodes each subunit, in plants gene families of over 10 members encode each of the subunits. Here we report that five members of the Arabidopsis thaliana NF-YA family are strongly induced by several stress conditions via transcriptional and miR169-related post-transcriptional mechanisms. Overexpression of NF-YA2, 7 and 10 resulted in dwarf late-senescent plants with enhanced tolerance to several types of abiotic stress. These phenotypes are related to alterations in sucrose/starch balance and cell elongation observed in NF-YA overexpressing plants. The use of transcriptomic analysis of transgenic plants that express miR169-resistant versions of NF-YA2, 3, 7, and 10 under an estradiol inducible system, as well as a dominant-repressor version of NF-YA2 revealed a set of genes, whose promoters are enriched in NF-Y binding sites (CCAAT-box) and that may be directly regulated by the NF-Y complex. This analysis also suggests that NF-YAs could participate in modulating gene regulation through positive and negative mechanisms. We propose a model in which the increase in NF-YA transcript levels in response to abiotic stress is part of an adaptive response to adverse environmental conditions in which a reduction in plant growth rate plays a key role.

  19. Vaccination with an adenoviral vector encoding the tumor antigen directly linked to invariant chain induces potent CD4(+) T-cell-independent CD8(+) T-cell-mediated tumor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Maria R; Holst, Peter J; Pircher, Hanspeter

    2009-01-01

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy is an attractive strategy for cancer control. In the context of antiviral vaccines, adenoviral vectors have emerged as a favorable means for immunization. Therefore, we chose a strategy combining use of these vectors with another successful approach, namely linkage...... of the vaccine antigen to invariant chain (Ii). To evaluate this strategy we used a mouse model, in which an immunodominant epitope (GP33) of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP) represents the tumor-associated neoantigen. Prophylactic vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with a replication-deficient human adenovirus 5 vector...... the tumor degradation. Finally, Ad-Ii-GP but not Ad-GP vaccination can break the immunological non-reactivity in GP transgenic mice indicating that our vaccine strategy will prove efficient also against endogenous tumor antigens....

  20. BnSIP1-1, a Trihelix Family Gene, Mediates Abiotic Stress Tolerance and ABA Signaling in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junling; Tang, Shaohua; Mei, Fengling; Peng, Xiaojue; Li, Jun; Li, Xiaofei; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Xinhua; Liu, Fang; Wu, Yuhua; Wu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The trihelix family genes have important functions in light-relevant and other developmental processes, but their roles in response to adverse environment are largely unclear. In this study, we identified a new gene, BnSIP1-1, which fell in the SIP1 (6b INTERACTING PROTEIN1) clade of the trihelix family with two trihelix DNA binding domains and a fourth amphipathic α-helix. BnSIP1-1 protein specifically targeted to the nucleus, and its expression can be induced by abscisic acid (ABA) and different stresses. Overexpression of BnSIP1-1 improved seed germination under osmotic pressure, salt, and ABA treatments. Moreover, BnSIP1-1 decreased the susceptibility of transgenic seedlings to osmotic pressure and ABA treatments, whereas there was no difference under salt stress between the transgenic and wild-type seedlings. ABA level in the transgenic seedlings leaves was higher than those in the control plants under normal condition. Under exogenous ABA treatment and mannitol stress, the accumulation of ABA in the transgenic plants was higher than that in the control plants; while under salt stress, the difference of ABA content before treatment was gradually smaller with the prolongation of salt treatment time, then after 24 h of treatment the ABA level was similar in transgenic and wild-type plants. The transcription levels of several general stress marker genes (BnRD29A, BnERD15, and BnLEA1) were higher in the transgenic plants than the wild-type plants, whereas salt-responsive genes (BnSOS1, BnNHX1, and BnHKT) were not significantly different or even reduced compared with the wild-type plants, which indicated that BnSIP1-1 specifically exerted different regulatory mechanisms on the osmotic- and salt-response pathways in seedling period. Overall, these findings suggested that BnSIP1-1 played roles in ABA synthesis and signaling, salt and osmotic stress response. To date, information about the involvement of the Brassica napus trihelix gene in abiotic response is scarce

  1. A critical role of Src family kinase in SDF-1/CXCR4-mediated bone-marrow progenitor cell recruitment to the ischemic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min; Huang, Kai; Zhou, Junlan; Yan, Dewen; Tang, Yao-Liang; Zhao, Ting C; Miller, Richard J; Kishore, Raj; Losordo, Douglas W; Qin, Gangjian

    2015-04-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 and its ligand stromal-cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1) play a crucial role in directing progenitor cell (PC) homing to ischemic tissue. The Src family protein kinases (SFK) can be activated by, and serve as effectors of, G proteins. In this study we sought to determine whether SFK play a role in SDF-1/CXCR4-mediated PC homing. First, we investigated whether SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling activates SFK. Bone-marrow mononuclear cells (BM MNCs) were isolated from WT and BM-specific CXCR4-KO mice and treated with SDF-1 and/or CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. SDF-1 treatment rapidly induced phosphorylation (activation) of hematopoietic Src (i.e., Lyn, Fgr, and Hck) in WT cells but not in AMD3100-treated cells or CXCR4-KO cells. Then, we investigated whether SFK are involved in SDF-1/CXCR4-mediated PC chemotaxis. In a combined chemotaxis and endothelial-progenitor-cell (EPC) colony assay, Src inhibitor SU6656 dose-dependently inhibited the SDF-1-induced migration of colony-forming EPCs. Next, we investigated whether SFK play a role in SDF-1/CXCR4-mediated BM PC homing to the ischemic heart. BM MNCs from CXCR4BAC:eGFP reporter mice were i.v. injected into WT and SDF-1BAC:SDF1-RFP transgenic mice following surgically-induced myocardial infarction (MI). eGFP(+) MNCs and eGFP(+)c-kit(+) PCs that were recruited in the infarct border zone in SDF-1BAC:SDF1-RFP recipients were significantly more than that in WT recipients. Treatments of mice with SU6656 significantly reduced eGFP(+) and eGFP(+)c-kit(+) cell recruitment in both WT and SDF-1BAC:RFP recipients and abrogated the difference between the two groups. Remarkably, PCs isolated from BM-specific C-terminal Src kinase (CSK)-KO (Src activated) mice were recruited more efficiently than PCs from WT PCs in the WT recipients. In conclusion, SFK are activated by SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and play an essential role in SDF-1/CXCR4-mediated BM PC chemotactic response and ischemic cardiac recruitment.

  2. Mn tolerance in rice is mediated by MTP8.1, a member of the cation diffusion facilitator family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Daisei

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient for plants, but is toxic when present in excess. The rice plant (Oryza sativa L.) accumulates high concentrations of Mn in the aerial parts; however, the molecular basis for Mn tolerance is poorly understood. In the present study, genes encoding Mn tolerance were screened for by expressing cDNAs of genes from rice shoots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A gene encoding a cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family member, OsMTP8.1, was isolated, and its expression was found to enhance Mn accumulation and tolerance in S. cerevisiae. In plants, OsMTP8.1 and its transcript were mainly detected in shoots. High or low supply of Mn moderately induced an increase or decrease in the accumulation of OsMTP8.1, respectively. OsMTP8.1 was detected in all cells of leaf blades through immunohistochemistry. OsMTP8.1 fused to green fluorescent protein was localized to the tonoplast. Disruption of OsMTP8.1 resulted in decreased chlorophyll levels, growth inhibition in the presence of high concentrations of Mn, and decreased accumulation of Mn in shoots and roots. However, there was no difference in the accumulation of other metals, including Zn, Cu, Fe, Mg, Ca, and K. These results suggest that OsMTP8.1 is an Mn-specific transporter that sequesters Mn into vacuoles in rice and is required for Mn tolerance in shoots. PMID:23963678

  3. Antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized with mouse antiserum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurose,Masao

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Marked IgE-mediated histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized in vitro with mouse antiserum occurs in the presence of added Ca++ and phosphatidylserine (PS, although a considerable degree of antigen-induced histamine release which may utilize intracellular or cell-bound calcium is also observed. The decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ of the sensitized cells stimulated by antigen in Ca++-free medium in the presence of PS is relatively slow, and maximum release is produced by Ca++ added 1 min after antigen. Histamine release also occurs when Ca++ is added after PS in the absence of antigen to the sensitized cells suspended in Ca++-free medium. Unlike the antigen-induced release, the intensity of this non-antigen-induced release varies depending on both mast-cell and antiserum pools. A heat-labile factor(s, which is different from antigen-specific IgE antibody and is also contained in normal mouse serum, is involved in this reaction. In the antigen-nondependent (PS + Ca++-induced release, no decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ is observed after PS addition. Both the antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced release are completed fairly rapidly and are dependent of temperature, pH and energy.

  4. Depletion in LpA-I:A-II particles enhances HDL-mediated endothelial protection in familial LCAT deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaraschi, Monica; Ossoli, Alice; Castelnuovo, Samuela; Simonelli, Sara; Pavanello, Chiara; Balzarotti, Gloria; Arca, Marcello; Di Costanzo, Alessia; Sampietro, Tiziana; Vaudo, Gaetano; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the vasoprotective effects of HDL isolated from carriers of LCAT deficiency, which are characterized by a selective depletion of LpA-I:A-II particles and predominance of preβ migrating HDL. HDLs were isolated from LCAT-deficient carriers and tested in vitro for their capacity to promote NO production and to inhibit vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in cultured endothelial cells. HDLs from carriers were more effective than control HDLs in promoting eNOS activation with a gene-dose-dependent effect (PTrend = 0.048). As a consequence, NO production induced by HDL from carriers was significantly higher than that promoted by control HDL (1.63 ± 0.24-fold vs. 1.34 ± 0.07-fold, P = 0.031). HDLs from carriers were also more effective than control HDLs in inhibiting the expression of VCAM-1 (homozygotes, 65.0 ± 8.6%; heterozygotes, 53.1 ± 7.2%; controls, 44.4 ± 4.1%; PTrend = 0.0003). The increased efficiency of carrier HDL was likely due to the depletion in LpA-I:A-II particles. The in vitro findings might explain why carriers of LCAT deficiency showed flow-mediated vasodilation and plasma-soluble cell adhesion molecule concentrations comparable to controls, despite low HDL-cholesterol levels. These results indicate that selective depletion of apoA-II-containing HDL, as observed in carriers of LCAT deficiency, leads to an increased capacity of HDL to stimulate endothelial NO production, suggesting that changes in HDL apolipoprotein composition may be the target of therapeutic interventions designed to improve HDL functionality. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Mediatized Parenthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne Damkjær, Maja

    2017-01-01

    to parenthood? The dissertation explores this question on the basis of a synchronous study within an overall mediatization perspective. The first part of the dissertation focuses on a conceptualization of the relationship between digital media and parenting as well as an exploration of theoretical perspectives...... and methods that make it possible to study the interactions between the two. Concretely, the dissertation builds on a number of key studies within audience research, which have contributed knowledge about the media’s role in the family and the home. This is done by including three approaches to mediatization......) a family-oriented, b) a peer-oriented, c) an oppositional, and d) non-use. Secondary contribution: Based on qualitative audience research and mediatization theory, the dissertation contributes a conceptualization of the relationship between media and parenthood. This is carried out in a study design...

  6. Improving the malaria transmission-blocking activity of a Plasmodium falciparum 48/45 based vaccine antigen by SpyTag/SpyCatcher mediated virus-like display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Susheel K; Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph M

    2017-01-01

    Malaria is a devastating disease caused by Plasmodium parasites, resulting in almost 0.5 million deaths per year. The Pfs48/45 protein exposed on the P. falciparum sexual stages is one of the most advanced antigen candidates for a transmission-blocking (TB) vaccine in the clinical pipeline. Howev...

  7. Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. Experimental Parasitology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, ...

  8. CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: CEA Formal name: Carcinoembryonic Antigen Related tests: Tumor Markers , CSF Analysis , Body Fluid Analysis , CA 19-9 , Calcitonin , AFP Tumor Markers All content on Lab Tests Online has been ...

  9. Superexpression of tuberculosis antigens in plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Sheveleva, Anna A; Frolova, Olga Y; Komarova, Tatjana V; Zvereva, Anna S; Ivanov, Peter A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2007-05-01

    Recent developments in genetic engineering allow the employment of plants as factories for 1/foreign protein production. Thus, tuberculosis (TB) ESAT6 antigen was expressed in different plant systems, but the level of vaccine protein accumulation was extremely low. We describe the technology for superexpression of TB vaccine proteins (Ag85B, ESAT6, and ESAT6:Ag85B fusion) in plant leaves which involves: (i) construction of tobacco mosaic virus-based vectors with the coat protein genes substituted by those for TB antigens; (ii) Agrobacterium-mediated delivery to plant leaf tissues of binary vectors containing the cDNA copy of the vector virus genome; and (iii) replication of virus vectors in plant cells under conditions suppressing the virus-induced gene silencing. This technology enables efficient production of the TB vaccine proteins in plants; in particular, the level of Ag85B antigen accumulation was not less than 800 mg/kg of fresh leaves. Expression of TB antigens in plant cells as His(6)-tagged proteins promoted their isolation and purification by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Deletion of transmembrane domains from Ag85B caused a dramatic increase in its intracellular stability. We propose that the strategy of TB antigens superproduction in a plant might be used as a basis for the creation of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against TB.

  10. Mediation and surrogate decision-making for LGBTQ families in the absence of an advance directive : comment on "Ethical challenges in end-of-life care for GLBTI individuals" by Colleen Cartwright.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlert, Lance; Fiester, Autumn

    2012-09-01

    In this commentary on a clinical ethics case pertaining to a same-sex couple that does not have explicit surrogate decision-making or hospital-visitation rights (in the face of objections from the family-of-origin of one of the queer partners), the authors invoke contemporary legal and policy standards on LGBTQ health care in the United States and abroad. Given this historical moment in which some clinical rights are guaranteed for LGBTQ families whilst others are in transition, the authors advocate for the implementation of clinical ethics mediation as the soundest and most humane form of resolution in matters where there is a dispute between family members about an incapacitated loved one. They argue that clinical ethics mediation is an ideal alternative solution because it works toward consensus about outcome, even where consensus about values is not achievable.

  11. Work-family conflict as a mediator in the association between work stress and depressive symptoms: cross-sectional evidence from the German lidA-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Peter, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The demographic change leads to a shrinking German work force. Depressive symptoms cause many days absent at work, loss of productivity and early retirement. Therefore, pathways for prevention of depressive symptoms are important for the maintenance of global competitiveness. We investigated the role of work-family conflict (WFC) in the well-known association between work stress and depressive symptoms. A total of 6,339 employees subject to social insurance, born in 1959 or 1965 and randomly drawn from 222 sample points in Germany participated in the first wave of the leben in der Arbeit-study. In the analysis, 5,906 study subjects working in full-time or part-time positions were included. Work stress was measured by effort-reward imbalance ratio, depressive symptoms by the applied Becks depression inventory (BDI-V) and WFC by items of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ)-scale. Multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for age, education, negative affectivity (PANAS), overcommitment and number of children was performed. Mediation was defined according to the criteria of Baron and Kenny. Work stress was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (BDI-V) in all full-time [ß1female = 6.61 (95 % CI 3.95-9.27); ß1male = 8.02 (95 % CI 5.94-10.09)] and female part-time employees [ß2female = 4.87 (95 % CI 2.16-7.59)]. When controlling for WFC effect, estimates became smaller in men and were even halved in women. WFC was also significantly associated with work stress and depressive symptoms: All criteria for partial mediation between work stress and depressiveness were fulfilled. Prevention of WFC may help to reduce days absent at work and early retirement due to work stress-related depressive symptoms in middle-aged women and men.

  12. Effects of the Family Bereavement Program on academic outcomes, educational expectations and job aspirations 6 years later: the mediating role of parenting and youth mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Erin N; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Wolchik, Sharlene; Sandler, Irwin N

    2015-02-01

    Experiencing the death of a parent during childhood is associated with a variety of difficulties, including lower academic achievement, that have implications for functioning in childhood and adulthood. This study examines effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a preventive intervention for parentally-bereaved youth and their caregivers, on grade point averages (GPA), educational expectations and job aspirations of youths 6 years after the intervention. A total of 244 bereaved youths ages 8-16 and their caregivers were randomized to either the FBP or a comparison group that received books about bereavement. Assessments occurred at pretest, post-test, and 11-month and 6-year follow-ups. Direct program effects on educational outcomes and job aspirations 6 years later were non-significant, although the program improved educational expectations for children with fewer behavior problems at program entry, and GPA for younger children. Mediational pathways for program effects on educational outcomes were also tested. Program-induced improvements in effective parenting at 11-month follow-up were associated with higher GPAs at 6-year follow-up for youth who were younger or for whom more time had passed since the loss. Program-induced improvements in parenting and teacher-rated youth mental health problems at the 6-year follow-up mediated program effects on youths' educational expectations for those with fewer behavior problems at program entry. The implications of these findings for understanding processes related to academic and educational outcomes following the death of a parent and for prevention efforts to help bereaved and other high-risk children succeed in school are discussed.

  13. Harsh Parenting As a Potential Mediator of the Association Between Intimate Partner Violence and Child Disruptive Behavior in Families With Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Damion J; Henry, David; Kestler, Jacqueline; Nieto, Ricardo; Wakschlag, Lauren S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J

    2016-07-01

    Young children living with intimate partner violence (IPV) are often also exposed to harsh parenting. Both forms of violence increase children's risk for clinically significant disruptive behavior, which can place them on a developmental trajectory associated with serious psychological impairment later in life. Although it is hypothesized that IPV behaviors may spillover into harsh parenting, and thereby influence risk for disruptive behavior, relatively little is known about these processes in families with young children. The current study examines the overlap of the quality and frequency of psychological and physical forms of IPV and harsh parenting, and tests whether harsh parenting mediates the relationship between IPV and child disruptive behavior in a diverse cross-sectional sample of 81 children ages 4 to 6 years. Results suggest that mothers reporting a greater occurrence of psychologically aggressive IPV (e.g., yelling, name-calling) more often engage in psychological and physical aggression toward their children (odds ratios [ORs] = 4.6-9.9). Mothers reporting a greater occurrence of IPV in the form of physical assault more often engage in mild to more severe forms of physical punishment with potential harm to the child (ORs = 3.8-5.0). Psychological and physical forms of IPV and harsh parenting all significantly correlated with maternal reports of child disruptive behavior (r = .29-.40). Psychological harsh parenting partially mediated the association between psychological IPV and child disruptive behavior. However, a significant direct effect of psychological IPV on preschool children's disruptive behavior remained. Implications for child welfare policy and practice and intervention, including the need for increased awareness of the negative impact of psychological IPV on young children, are discussed.

  14. Toxicity and SidJ-Mediated Suppression of Toxicity Require Distinct Regions in the SidE Family of Legionella pneumophila Effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havey, James C; Roy, Craig R

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular bacteria use a variety of strategies to evade degradation and create a replicative niche. Legionella pneumophila is an intravacuolar pathogen that establishes a replicative niche through the secretion of more than 300 effector proteins. The function of most effectors remains to be determined. Toxicity in yeast has been used to identify functional domains and elucidate the biochemical function of effectors. A library of L. pneumophila effectors was screened using an expression plasmid that produces low levels of each protein. This screen identified the effector SdeA as a protein that confers a strong toxic phenotype that inhibits yeast replication. The toxicity of SdeA was suppressed in cells producing the effector SidJ. The effector SdeA is a member of the SidE family of L. pneumophila effector proteins. All SidE orthologs encoded by the Philadelphia isolate of Legionella pneumophila were toxic to yeast, and SidJ suppressed the toxicity of each. We identified a conserved central region in the SidE proteins that was sufficient to mediate yeast toxicity. Surprisingly, SidJ did not suppress toxicity when this central region was produced in yeast. We determined that the amino-terminal region of SidE was essential for SidJ-mediated suppression of toxicity. Thus, there is a genetic interaction that links the activity of SidJ and the amino-terminal region of SidE, which is required to modulate the toxic activity displayed by the central region of the SidE protein. This suggests a complex mechanism by which the L. pneumophila effector SidJ modulates the function of the SidE proteins after translocation into host cells.

  15. A special member of the rice SRO family, OsSRO1c, mediates responses to multiple abiotic stresses through interaction with various transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jun; Zong, Wei; Du, Hao; Hu, Honghong; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-04-01

    SIMILAR TO RCD ONE (SRO) is a plant-specific gene family involved in development and abiotic stress responses. SRO proteins are characterized by containing poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase catalytic (PARP) and C-terminal RCD1-SRO-TAF4 domains, and can be classified into two groups and five subgroups on the basis of their PARP domain. Expression analysis of rice SRO genes in response to various abiotic stresses showed that OsSRO1c, a rice SRO gene which functions downstream of the stress-responsive transcription factor SNAC1, is the major stress-responsive gene in the rice SRO family. The ossro1c-1 mutant showed resistance not only to chloroplastic oxidative stress, but also to apoplastic oxidative stress. However, the ossro1c-1 mutant and artificial microRNA-OsSRO1c transgenic rice were significantly impaired in cold tolerance. When compared with the well-characterized Arabidopsis SRO protein radical-induced cell death 1 (RCD1), OsSRO1c has considerable variation in the protein sequence, and the two genes exhibit different expression profiles under abiotic stresses. Furthermore, ossro1c-1 and rcd1 showed different responses to multiple abiotic stresses. By screening an Arabidopsis transcription factor library, 29 transcription factors interacted with OsSRO1c in yeast, but only two of these transcription factors were reported to interact with RCD1, which may partly explain the different responses of the two mutants under various stresses. The data presented in this report provide important clues for further elucidating the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of OsSRO1c in mediating responses to multiple abiotic stresses.

  16. Genetic immunization elicits antigen-specific protective immune responses and decreases disease severity in Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Nisha; Tarleton, Rick L

    2002-10-01

    Immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi requires elicitation of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to extracellular trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. In this study, the effectiveness of the T. cruzi trans-sialidase family (ts) genes ASP-1, ASP-2, and TSA-1 as genetic vaccines was assessed. Immunization of mice with plasmids encoding ASP-1, ASP-2, or TSA-1 elicited poor antigen-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and T. cruzi-specific antibody responses. Codelivery of interleukin-12 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor plasmids with antigen-encoding plasmids resulted in a substantial increase in CTL activity and antibody production and in increased resistance to T. cruzi infection. In pooled results from two to four experiments, 30 to 60% of mice immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids and 60 to 80% of mice immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids plus cytokine adjuvants survived a lethal challenge with T. cruzi. In comparison, 90% of control mice injected with empty plasmid DNA died during the acute phase of infection. However, the pool of three ts genes provided no greater protection than the most effective single gene (ASP-2) either with or without coadministration of cytokine plasmids. Importantly, the extent of tissue parasitism, inflammation, and associated tissue damage in skeletal muscles during the chronic phase of T. cruzi infection in mice immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids plus cytokine adjuvants was remarkably reduced compared to mice immunized with only cytokine adjuvants or empty plasmid DNA. These results identify new vaccine candidates and establish some of the methodologies that might be needed to develop effective vaccine-mediated control of T. cruzi infection. In addition, this work provides the first evidence that prophylactic genetic immunization can prevent the development of Chagas' disease.

  17. Emotional Exhaustion and Job Satisfaction in Airport Security Officers – Work–Family Conflict as Mediator in the Job Demands–Resources Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Sophie; Krause, Andreas; Schwaninger, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The growing threat of terrorism has increased the importance of aviation security and the work of airport security officers (screeners). Nonetheless, airport security research has yet to focus on emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction as major determinants of screeners’ job performance. The present study bridges this research gap by applying the job demands–resources (JD–R) model and using work–family conflict (WFC) as an intervening variable to study relationships between work characteristics (workload and supervisor support), emotional exhaustion, and job satisfaction in 1,127 screeners at a European airport. Results of structural equation modeling revealed that (a) supervisor support as a major job resource predicted job satisfaction among screeners; (b) workload as a major job demand predicted their emotional exhaustion; and (c) WFC proved to be a promising extension to the JD–R model that partially mediated the impact of supervisor support and workload on job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:27242581

  18. Src Family Kinases Mediate Betel Quid-Induced Oral Cancer Cell Motility and Could Be a Biomarker for Early Invasion in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Yi-Fu Chen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Betel quid (BQ-chewing oral cancer is a prevalent disease in many countries of Southeast Asia. Yet, the precise disease mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we show that BQ extract-induced cell motility in three oral cancer cells (Ca9-22, SAS, and SCC9 presumably involves the Src family kinases (SFKs. Besides, BQ extract can markedly induce cell migration of wild type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs but not MEFs lacking three SFK members, namely, Src, Yes, and Fyn, indicating the requirement of SFKs for BQ-induced cell motility. Betel quid extract can also elevate cellular SFK activities because phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 at the catalytic domain is increased, which in turn promotes phosphorylation of an in vitro substrate, enolase. Furthermore, we identified that areca nut, a major component of BQ, is the key factor accounting for BQ-induced cell migration and invasion through SFKs-mediated signaling pathways. Immunohistochemistry revealed that, particularly in BQ-chewing cases, the activity of SFKs was significantly higher in tumor-adjacent mucosa than that in solid tumor areas (P < .01. These results suggest a possible role of SFKs in tumor-host interface and thus in early tumor invasion in vivo. Consistent with this is the observation that activation of SFKs is colocalized with invasive tumor fronts in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Together, we conclude that SFKs may represent a potential biomarker of invasion and therapeutic target in BQ-induced oral cancer.

  19. The pan-HER family tyrosine kinase inhibitor afatinib overcomes HER3 ligand heregulin-mediated resistance to EGFR inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonesaka, Kimio; Kudo, Keita; Nishida, Satomi; Takahama, Takayuki; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kaoru; Takeda, Masayuki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-20

    Afatinib is a second generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) characterized as an irreversible pan-human EGFR (HER) family inhibitor. Afatinib remains effective for a subpopulation of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with acquired resistance to first generation EGFF-TKIs such as erlotinib. Heregulin activates HER3 in an autocrine fashion and causes erlotinib resistance in NSCLC. Here we examine whether afatinib is effective against heregulin-overexpressing NSCLCs harboring EGFR activating mutations. Afatinib but not erlotinib decreased EGFR mutant NSCLC PC9HRG cell proliferation in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Afatinib inhibited phosphorylation of the cell signaling pathway proteins HER3, EGFR, HER2, and HER4, likely by prevention of trans-phosphorylation as HER3 kinase activity is inadequate for auto-phosphorylation. Afatinib, unlike erlotinib, inhibited AKT activation, resulting in elevated apoptosis in PC9HRG cells. Clinically, a subpopulation of 33 patients with EGFR mutations and NSCLC who had received first generation EGFR-TKIs exhibited elevated plasma heregulin levels compared to healthy volunteers; one of these achieved a response with afatinib therapy despite having previously developed erlotinib resistance. Afatinib can overcome heregulin-mediated resistance to erlotinib in EGFR mutant NSCLC. Further studies are necessary to determine whether heregulin can predict afatinib efficacy after development offirst generation EGFR-TKI resistance.

  20. Women's health and fertility, family planning and pregnancy in immune-mediated rheumatic diseases: a report from a south-eastern European Expert Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntali, Stella; Damjanov, Nemanja; Drakakis, Peter; Ionescu, Ruxandra; Kalinova, Desislava; Rashkov, Rasho; Malamitsi-Puchner, Ariadne; Mantzaris, Gerassimos; Michala, Lina; Pamfil, Cristina; Rednic, Simona; Tektonidou, Maria G; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios; Vojinovic, Jelena; Bertsias, George K; Boumpas, Dimitrios T

    2014-01-01

    With current advances in medical treatment, reproductive issues have become more important for women with chronic immune-mediated diseases. Most, if not all, patients report that their disease affects their personal relationships, their decision to have children, and the size of their family. These decisions are multi-factorial, influenced mainly by concerns over the effect of pregnancy on the rheumatic disease, the impact of disease activity during pregnancy on foetal health, the patient's ability to care for the child, and the possible harmful effects medication could have on the child, both pre- and post-natally during breastfeeding. Apart from that, women's health issues tend to be overlooked in favour of the management of the underlying rheumatic disease. To this end, we convened an expert panel to review the published literature on women's health and reproductive issues and provide evidence- and eminence-based points to consider for the treating physicians. We conclude that there is a need for a change in mind-set from one which 'cautions against pregnancy' to one which 'embraces pregnancy' through the practice of individualised, pre- and post-conceptual, multi-disciplinary care.

  1. Emotional Exhaustion and Job Satisfaction in Airport Security Officers − Work−Family Conflict as Mediator in the Job Demands–Resources Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eBaeriswyl

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing threat of terrorism has increased the importance of aviation security and the work of airport security officers (screeners. Nonetheless, airport security research has yet to focus on emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction as major determinants of screeners’ job performance. The present study bridges this research gap by applying the job demands–resources (JD−R model and using work–family conflict (WFC as an intervening variable to study relationships between work characteristics (workload and supervisor support, emotional exhaustion, and job satisfaction in 1,127 screeners at a European airport. Results of structural equation modeling revealed that (a supervisor support as a major job resource predicted job satisfaction among screeners; (b workload as a major job demand predicted their emotional exhaustion; and (c WFC proved to be a promising extension to the JD–R model that partially mediated the impact of supervisor support and workload on job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  2. Surface antigens of metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The surface antigen makeup of metacyclic trypomastigote forms of strain G of Trypanosoma cruzi, which produce a subpatent infection in mice, differed from those of the virulent strains Y and CL. A 100,000-molecular-weight protein, barely detectable on the Y or CL cell surface, appeared as the main surface antigen of the G metacyclic trypomastigotes. In addition, the G metacyclic forms differed from those of the virulent strains in their susceptibility to complement-mediated immunolysis.

  3. Clinical characteristics and HLA alleles of a family with simultaneously occurring alopecia areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Selma; Metin, Ahmet; Caykoylu, Ali; Akoglu, Gulsen; Ceylan, Gülay G; Oztekin, Aynure; Col, Esra S

    2016-06-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease resulting in partial or total noncicatricial hair loss. HLA class II antigens are the most important markers that constitute genetic predisposition to AA. Various life events and intense psychological stress may play an important role in triggering AA attacks. We report an unusual case series of 4 family members who had simultaneously occurring active AA lesions. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical and psychiatric features of 4 cases of active AA lesions occurring simultaneously in a family and determine HLA alleles. The clinical and psychological features of all patients were examined. HLA antigen DNA typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. All patients had typical AA lesions over the scalp and/or beard area. Psychological examinations revealed obsessive-compulsive personality disorder in the proband's parents as well as anxiety and lack of self-confidence in both the proband and his sister. HLA antigen types were not commonly shared with family members. These findings suggest that AA presenting concurrently in members of the same family was not associated with genetic predisposition. Shared psychological disorders and stressful life events might be the major key points in the concurrent presentation of these familial AA cases and development of resistance against treatments.

  4. Regulation of Hemichannels and Gap Junction Channels by Cytokines in Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo J. Sáez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autocrine and paracrine signals coordinate responses of several cell types of the immune system that provide efficient protection against different challenges. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs coordinate activation of this system via homocellular and heterocellular interactions. Cytokines constitute chemical intercellular signals among immune cells and might promote pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. During the last two decades, two membrane pathways for intercellular communication have been demonstrated in cells of the immune system. They are called hemichannels (HCs and gap junction channels (GJCs and provide new insights into the mechanisms of the orchestrated response of immune cells. GJCs and HCs are permeable to ions and small molecules, including signaling molecules. The direct intercellular transfer between contacting cells can be mediated by GJCs, whereas the release to or uptake from the extracellular milieu can be mediated by HCs. GJCs and HCs can be constituted by two protein families: connexins (Cxs or pannexins (Panxs, which are present in almost all APCs, being Cx43 and Panx1 the most ubiquitous members of each protein family. In this review, we focus on the effects of different cytokines on the intercellular communication mediated by HCs and GJCs in APCs and their impact on purinergic signaling.

  5. Isolation and purification of antigenic components of Cryptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Karen L; Levitz, Stuart M

    2009-01-01

    The encapsulated fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are significant agents of life-threatening infections, particularly in persons with suppressed cell-mediated immunity. This chapter provides detailed methodology for the purification of two of the major antigen fractions of C. neoformans: glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) and mannoprotein (MP). GXM is the primary component of the polysaccharide capsule, which is the major cryptococcal virulence factor. In contrast, MPs have been identified as key antigens that stimulate T-cell responses. Purification of GXM and MP should assist investigators studying the antigenic, biochemical, and virulence properties of Cryptococcus species.

  6. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical applicationof antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunizationtargeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received muchattention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigendelivery. The skin has important immunological functions withunique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermalLangerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years,novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually beendeveloped; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yetbeen fully exploited due to the penetration barrier representedby the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport ofantigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievementsin transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the variousstrategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery andvaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1: 17-24

  7. Erythrocyte Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC):diagnostic and therapeutic implications in atherosclerotic Cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stavros APOSTOLAKIS; Georgios K CHALIKIAS; Dimitrios N TZIAKAS; Stavros KONSTANTINIDES

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease.The last three decades efforts have been made to elucidate the biochemical pathways that are implicated in the process of atherogenesis and plaque development.Chemokines are crucial mediators in every step of this process.Additionally.cellular components of the peripheral blood have been proved important mediators in the formation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions.However,until recently data were mostly focusing on leukocytes and platelets.Erythrocytes were considered unreceptive bystanders and limited data supported their importance in the progression and destabilization of the atherosclerotic plaque.Recently erythrocytes, through their Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines(DARC),have been proposed as appealing regulators of chemokine-induced pathways.Dissimilar to every other chemokine receptor DARC possesses high affinity for severalligands from both CC and CXC chemokine sub-families.Moreover,DARC is not coupled to a G-protein or any other intracellular signalling system;thus it is incapable of generating second messages.The exact biochemical role of erythrocyte DARC remains to be determined.It is however challenging the fact that DARC is a regulator of almost every CC and CXC chemokine ligand and therefore DARC antagonism could efiectively block the complex pre-inflammatory chemokine network.In the present review we intent to provid recent evidence supporting the role of erythrocytes in atherosclerosis focusing on the erythrocyte-chemokine interaction through the Duffy antigen system.

  8. Presensitization to Ascaris antigens promotes induction of mite-specific IgE upon mite antigen inhalation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayu Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrated that the immunization of naïve mice with Ascaris antigens induced production of antibodies and differentiation of Th2 cells, which were cross-reactive to HDM antigens, and accelerated induction of serum HDM-specific IgE upon subsequent airway exposure to HDM antigens in mice. These results suggest that sensitization to HDM towards IgE-mediated allergic diseases is faster in individuals with a previous history of Ascaris infection than in those without presensitization to Ascaris.

  9. NLRC5 regulates MHC class Ⅰ antigen presentation in host defense against intracellular pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yikun Yao; Yalong Wang; Fuxiang Chen; Yin Huang; Shu Zhu; Qibin Leng; Hongyan Wang; Yufang Shi; Youcun Qian

    2012-01-01

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are a family of intracellular proteins that play critical roles in innate immunity against microbial infection.NLRC5,the largest member of the NLR family,has recently attracted much attention.However,in vitro studies have reported inconsistent results about the roles of NLRC5 in host defense and in regulating immune signaling pathways.The in vivo function of NLRC5 remains unknown.Here,we report that NLRC5 is a critical regulator of host defense against intraeellular pathogens in vivo.NLRC5 was specifically required for the expression of genes involved in MHC class Ⅰ antigen presentation.NLRC5-deficient mice showed a profound defect in the expression of MHC class Ⅰ genes and a concomitant failure to activate L.monocytogenes-specific CD8+ T cell responses,including activation,proliferation and cytotoxicity,and the mutant mice were more susceptible to the pathogen infection.NLRP3-mediated inflammasome activation was also partially impaired in NLRC5-deficient mice.However,NLRC5 was dispensable for pathogen-induced expression of NF-KB-dependent pro-inflammatory genes as well as type I interferon genes.Thus,NLRC5 critically regulates MHC class Ⅰ antigen presentation to control intracellular pathogen infection.

  10. Pars planitis in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, P; Sanz, A; Criado, D

    1994-01-01

    The familial occurrence of pars planitis is rare. We have found ten cases reported previously. We describe a new case of pars planitis in a family. The affected members included a mother and two of her four children. The family was tested for HLA antigens in order to establish a comparison with others HLA types by different authors. We have not identified any cause for the familial occurrence of this disease. We discuss the role of genetic and ambiental factors.

  11. Sublingual administration of an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vaccine confirms Toll-like receptor agonist activity in the oral cavity and elicits improved mucosal and systemic cell-mediated responses against HIV antigens despite preexisting Ad5 immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appledorn, Daniel M; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Godbehere, Sarah; Seregin, Sergey S; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS continue to devastate populations worldwide. Recent studies suggest that vaccines that induce beneficial immune responses in the mucosal compartment may improve the efficacy of HIV vaccines. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors remain a promising platform for the development of effective vaccines. In an effort to improve the efficacy of Ad5-based vaccines, even in the presence of preexisting Ad5 immunity, we evaluated the potential for an Ad5-based HIV vaccine to induce antigen-specific immune responses following sublingual (s.l.) administration, a route not previously tested in regard to Ad-based vaccines. s.l. vaccination with an Ad5-based HIV-Gag vaccine resulted in a significant induction of Gag-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in both the systemic and the mucosal compartment. We also show that s.l. immunization not only avoided preexisting Ad5 immunity but also elicited a broad repertoire of antigen-specific CTL clones. Additionally, we confirm for the first time that oral delivery of a vaccine expressing a potent Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist can stimulate innate immune responses through induction of cytokines and chemokines and activation of NK cells, NKT cells, and macrophages in vivo. These results positively correlated with improved antigen-specific CTL responses. These results could be achieved both in Ad5-naïve mice and in mice with preexisting immunity to Ad5. The simplicity of the s.l. vaccination regimen coupled with augmentation of TLR-dependent pathways active in the oral cavity makes s.l. delivery a promising method for HIV vaccine development specifically, as well as for many other vaccine applications in general.

  12. Analysis of tomato plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase gene family suggests a mycorrhiza-mediated regulatory mechanism conserved in diverse plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junli; Liu, Jianjian; Chen, Aiqun; Ji, Minjie; Chen, Jiadong; Yang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Mian; Qu, Hongye; Xu, Guohua

    2016-10-01

    In plants, the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (HA) is considered to play a crucial role in regulating plant growth and respoding to environment stresses. Multiple paralogous genes encoding different isozymes of HA have been identified and characterized in several model plants, while limited information of the HA gene family is available to date for tomato. Here, we describe the molecular and expression features of eight HA-encoding genes (SlHA1-8) from tomato. All these genes are interrupted by multiple introns with conserved positions. SlHA1, 2, and 4 were widely expressed in all tissues, while SlHA5, 6, and 7 were almost only expressed in flowers. SlHA8, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal or nutrient-/salt-stress growth conditions, was strongly activated in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal-colonized roots. Extreme lack of SlHA8 expression in M161, a mutant defective to AM fungal colonization, provided genetic evidence towards the dependence of its expression on AM symbiosis. A 1521-bp SlHA8 promoter could direct the GUS reporter expression specifically in colonized cells of transgenic tobacco, soybean, and rice mycorrhizal roots. Promoter deletion assay revealed a 223-bp promoter fragment of SlHA8 containing a variant of AM-specific cis-element MYCS (vMYCS) sufficient to confer the AM-induced activity. Targeted deletion of this motif in the corresponding promoter region causes complete abolishment of GUS staining in mycorrhizal roots. Together, these results lend cogent evidence towards the evolutionary conservation of a potential regulatory mechanism mediating the activation of AM-responsive HA genes in diverse mycorrhizal plant species.

  13. The familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutation K1336E affects direct G protein-mediated regulation of neuronal P/Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-López, Edgar; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A; Sandoval, Alejandro; Felix, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal dominant form of migraine with aura characterized by recurrent migraine, hemiparesis and ataxia. FHM-1 has been linked to missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.1α1). Here, we explored the effects of the FHM-1 K1336E mutation on G protein-dependent modulation of the recombinant P/Q-type channel. The mutation was introduced into the human CaV2.1α1 subunit and its functional consequences investigated after heterologous expression in HEK-293 cells using patch-clamp recordings. Functional analysis of the K1336E mutation revealed a reduction of Ca(2+) current densities, a ∼10 mV left-shift in the current-voltage relationship, and the slowing of current inactivation kinetics. When co-expressed along with the human μ-opioid receptor, application of the agonist DAMGO inhibited whole-cell currents through both the wild-type and the mutant channels. Prepulse facilitation was also reduced by the K1336E mutation. Likewise, the kinetic analysis of the onset and decay of facilitation showed that the mutation affects the apparent dissociation and reassociation rates of the Gβγ dimer from the channel complex. These results suggest that the extent of G-protein-mediated inhibition is significantly reduced in the K1336E mutant CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels. This alteration would contribute to render the neuronal network hyperexcitable, possibly as a consequence of reduced presynaptic inhibition, and may help to explain some aspects of the FHM-1 pathophysiology.

  14. CHANGES IN PARADIGMS IN SUITS REGARDING THE FAMILY IN THE WAKE OF THE NEW CODE OF CIVIL LAW: FROM ARRAIGNMENT TO MEDIATION AND THE IMPORTANCE OF JURIDICAL LANGUAGE IN A SOLUTION OF CONFLICTS

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolai, Luís Henrique; Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie.

    2015-01-01

    The implications of the Brazilian juridical order within the future code of Civil Law are analyzed. This is especially true when mediation is introduced at the start of the demand through the actions of lawyers and parties to rationalize conflicts by different mechanisms of solutions. It is important to highlight suits involving the family which are of special attention in the new code, especially with regard to arraignment without the need to present the copy of notice. The above is a polemi...

  15. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. (Wistar Inst. of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  16. Immunochemical analysis of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowtell, D D; Saint, R B; Rickard, M D; Mitchell, G F

    1986-12-01

    Previously we reported the isolation of several Escherichia coli clones expressing fragments of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens as beta-galactosidase fused proteins (Bowtell, Saint, Rickard & Mitchell, 1984). Here we describe the isolation of additional antigen-expressing clones from a larval cDNA library and the assignment of these clones to 7 antigen families. These were isolated with a polyspecific rabbit antiserum raised to the oncosphere. Since this serum was capable of reacting with a large number of antigens, it was important to develop techniques for rapidly determining the identity of the native T. taeniaeformis molecule corresponding to a cloned antigen gene. These included active immunization of rabbits with fused proteins and several techniques involving affinity purification on immobilized fused proteins. The reactivity of the antigen-positive clones with sera from humans infected with related parasites was also assessed. Finally, immunization of mice with several fused proteins failed to protect against subsequent infection, although antigens previously identified as candidate host-protective antigens (Bowtell, Mitchell, Anders, Lightowlers & Rickard, 1983) have yet to be identified in the expression library.

  17. Co-incubation with IL-18 potentiates antigen-specific IFN-γ response in a whole-blood stimulation assay for measurement of cell-mediated immune responses in pigs experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Boesen, Henriette Toft; Jakobsen, Jeanne Toft

    2011-01-01

    The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in-vitro assay for a direct read out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult to evalu......The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in-vitro assay for a direct read out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult...

  18. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  19. PfEMP1 – A Parasite Protein Family of Key Importance in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Immunity and Pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars; Jensen, Anja T R

    2015-01-01

    to be a central element in the pathogenesis of the disease. It is mediated by the interaction of parasite ligands on the erythrocyte surface and a range of host receptor molecules in many organs and tissues. Among several proteins and protein families implicated in this process, the P. falciparum erythrocyte...... membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of high-molecular weight and highly variable antigens appears to be the most prominent. In this chapter, we aim to provide a systematic overview of the current knowledge about these proteins, their structure, their function, how they are presented on the erythrocyte...

  20. Bm-CPI-2, a cystatin from Brugia malayi nematode parasites, differs from Caenorhabditis elegans cystatins in a specific site mediating inhibition of the antigen-processing enzyme AEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Janice; Manoury, Bénédicte; Balic, Adam; Watts, Colin; Maizels, Rick M

    2005-02-01

    The filarial parasite Brugia malayi survives for many years in the human lymphatic system. One immune evasion mechanism employed by Brugia is thought to be the release of cysteine protease inhibitors (cystatins), and we have previously shown that the recombinant cystatin Bm-CPI-2 interferes with protease-dependent antigen processing in the MHC class II antigen presentation pathway. Analogy with vertebrate cystatins suggested that Bm-CPI-2 is bi-functional, with one face of the protein blocking papain-like proteases, and the other able to inhibit legumains such as asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP). Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out on Bm-CPI-2 at Asn-77, the residue on which AEP inhibition is dependent in vertebrate homologues. Two mutations at this site (to Asp and Lys) showed 10-fold diminished and ablated activity respectively, in assays of AEP inhibition, while blocking of papain-like proteases was reduced by only a small degree. Comparison of the B. malayi cystatins with two homologues encoded by the free-living model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans, suggested that while the papain site may be intact, the AEP site would not be functional. This supposition was tested with recombinant C. elegans proteins, Ce-CPI-1 (K08B4.6) and Ce-CPI-2 (R01B10.1), both of which block cathepsins and neither of which possess the ability to block AEP. Thus, Brugia CPI-2 may have convergently evolved to inhibit an enzyme important only in the mammalian environment.

  1. A "new" primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) defined DP-antigen associated with a private HLA--DR antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Jakobsen, B K; Platz, P

    1980-01-01

    We have recently described a "new" private HLA-DR antigen, DR"LTM", which has a frequency of approximately 0.6% in Danes. Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells directed towards DR"LTM"-associated determinants were generated in vitro by haplotype primings in two unrelated families with DR"LTM" posi......We have recently described a "new" private HLA-DR antigen, DR"LTM", which has a frequency of approximately 0.6% in Danes. Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells directed towards DR"LTM"-associated determinants were generated in vitro by haplotype primings in two unrelated families with DR...

  2. Immunosensing procedures for carcinoembryonic antigen using graphene and nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, John H T; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar

    2017-03-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) graphene, sp(2)-hybridized carbon, and its two major derivatives, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have played an important role in immunoassays (IAs) and immunosensing (IMS) platforms for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), an implicated tumor biomarker found in several types of cancer. The graphene family with high surface area is functionalized to form stable nanocomposites with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and electron mediators. The capture anti-CEA antibody (Ab) with high density can be anchored on AuNPs of such composites to provide remarkable detection sensitivity, significantly below the level found in normal subjects and cancer patients. Electrochemical and fluorescence/chemiluminescence-quenching properties of graphene-based nanocomposites are exploited in various detection schemes. Future endeavors are envisioned for the development of an array platform with high-throughput for CEA together with other tumor biomarkers and C-reactive protein, a universal biomarker for infection and inflammation. The ongoing efforts dedicated to the replacement of a lab-based detector by a cellphone with smart applications will further enable cost-effective and frequent monitoring of CEA in order to establish its clinical relevance and provide tools for real-time monitoring of patients during chemotherapy.

  3. The Antigen Presenting Cells Instruct Plasma Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eXu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional antigen presenting cells (APCs, including many subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages, not only mediate prompt but nonspecific response against microbes, but also bridge the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through antigen presentation. In the latter, typically activated B cells acquire cognate signals from T helper cells in the germinal center of lymphoid follicles to differentiate into plasma cells, which generate protective antibodies. Recent advances have revealed that many APC subsets provide not only signal 1 (the antigen, but also signal 2 to directly instruct the differentiation process of plasma cells in a T cell-independent manner. Herein, the different signals provided by these APC subsets to direct B cell proliferation, survival, class switching and terminal differentiation are discussed. We furthermore propose that the next generation of vaccines for boosting antibody response could be designed by targeting APCs.

  4. Chromatofocusing purification of CD1b-antigen complexes and their analysis by isoelectric focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Alles, Luis Fernando; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    The presentation of lipid antigens to T cells is mediated by the CD1 proteins. Purified functional CD1/lipid complexes are valuable tools to investigate such immune processes. Here, we describe how these complexes can be prepared in vitro, how they can be purified by chromatofocusing and how to control their antigen-loading status by isoelectric focusing.

  5. Study of the structure and impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G-A, HLA-G-B, and HLA-G-DRB1 haplotypes in families with recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid Marie; Steffensen, Rudi Nora; Nielsen, Henriette S

    2010-01-01

    of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Due to existence of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the HLA region, the primary susceptibility genes for RM in the HLA-G region have not yet been identified. HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, and -G14bp polymorphisms were investigated in 29 Caucasian families with two or more siblings...

  6. Cloning of two members of the SIRP alpha family of protein tyrosine phosphatase binding proteins in cattle that are expressed on monocytes and a subpopulation of dendritic cells and which mediate binding to CD4 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, G P; Parsons, K R; Howard, C J

    1998-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have greatly clarified the function of cell surface molecules in the induction and modulation of T cell responses by antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, the differences in ability to stimulate T cells evident for different types and subpopulations of the same APC, such as dendritic cell subsets, is less well understood. This report details an investigation of an antigen expressed on monocytes that is also expressed on a subset of cattle afferent lymph veiled cells (ALVC). A cDNA library derived from cattle monocytes was screened with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for expression in COS-7 cells. Using separate mAb for screening, two cDNA were cloned, the sequences of which showed a single long open reading frame encoding a predicted type I glycoprotein of 506 amino acids that contained three immunoglobulin superfamily domains and a long 112-amino acid cytoplasmic tail. We have termed this antigen MyD-1, reflecting its myeloid and dendritic cell distribution. Analysis of the EMBL database revealed that the molecule is a member of the recently described family of signal regulatory proteins (SIRP). The outeremost Ig domain was of the adhesion/receptor I-type, suggesting that MyD-1 might bind to a ligand on another cell. Evidence for this was subsequently obtained by demonstrating that COS-7 cells transfected with MyD-1 cDNA bound CD4 T cells and this binding was blocked by specific mAb. The potential importance of this interaction was supported by the finding that the proliferation of resting memory CD4 T cells to ovalbumin-pulsed monocytes was significantly reduced in the presence of mAb to MyD-1. A role for the molecule in the modulation of the monocyte/dendritic APC response is also predicted from the existence of multiple potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain, including the presence of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and the observation that the SIRP alpha family members have been

  7. Anger Feelings and Anger Expression as a Mediator of the Effects of Witnessing Family Violence on Anxiety and Depression in Japanese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Toshinori; Hasui, Chieko

    2006-01-01

    The effects of anger feelings (rated by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory) and witnessing family violence on anxiety and depression (rated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were examined in 457 junior high school students. Anxiety and depression scores were correlated with frequencies of witnessing family violence. In a…

  8. Coinvasion of dentinal tubules by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus gordonii depends upon binding specificity of streptococcal antigen I/II adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R M; McMillan, M D; Park, Y; Jenkinson, H F

    2000-03-01

    Cell wall-anchored polypeptides of the antigen I/II family are produced by many species of oral streptococci. These proteins mediate adhesion of streptococci to salivary glycoproteins and to other oral microorganisms and promote binding of cells to collagen type I and invasion of dentinal tubules. Since infections of the root canal system have a mixed anaerobic bacterial etiology, we investigated the hypothesis that coadhesion of anaerobic bacteria with streptococci may facilitate invasive endodontic disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 cells were able to invade dentinal tubules when cocultured with Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis) but not when cocultured with Streptococcus mutans NG8. An isogenic noninvasive mutant of S. gordonii, with production of SspA and SspB (antigen I/II family) polypeptides abrogated, was deficient in binding to collagen and had a 40% reduced ability to support adhesion of P. gingivalis. Heterologous expression of the S. mutans SpaP (antigen I/II) protein in this mutant restored collagen binding and tubule invasion but not adhesion to P. gingivalis or the ability to promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. An isogenic afimbrial mutant of P. gingivalis had 50% reduced binding to S. gordonii cells but was unaffected in the ability to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii wild-type cells. Expression of the S. gordonii SspA or SspB polypeptide on the surface of Lactococcus lactis cells endowed these bacteria with the abilities to bind P. gingivalis, penetrate dentinal tubules, and promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. The results demonstrate that collagen-binding and P. gingivalis-binding properties of antigen I/II polypeptides are discrete functions. Specificity of antigen I/II polypeptide recognition accounts for the ability of P. gingivalis to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii but not with S. mutans. This provides evidence that the specificity of interbacterial coadhesion may influence directly the etiology

  9. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E.; Baillie, Les W. J.; Pasetti, Marcela F.

    2010-01-01

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-γ-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin-neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  10. Protein kinase Cβ is critical for the metabolic switch to glycolysis following B-cell antigen receptor engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Derek; Dufort, Fay J; Chiles, Thomas C

    2012-11-15

    Signals derived from the BCR (B-cell antigen receptor) control survival, development and antigenic responses. One mechanism by which BCR signals may mediate these responses is by regulating cell metabolism. Indeed, the bioenergetic demands of naïve B-cells increase following BCR engagement and are characterized by a metabolic switch to aerobic glycolysis; however, the signalling pathways involved in this metabolic reprogramming are poorly defined. The PKC (protein kinase C) family plays an integral role in B-cell survival and antigenic responses. Using pharmacological inhibition and mice deficient in PKCβ, we demonstrate an essential role of PKCβ in BCR-induced glycolysis in B-cells. In contrast, mice deficient in PKCδ exhibit glycolytic rates comparable with those of wild-type B-cells following BCR cross-linking. The induction of several glycolytic genes following BCR engagement is impaired in PKCβ-deficient B-cells. Moreover, blocking glycolysis results in decreased survival of B-cells despite BCR engagement. The results establish a definitive role for PKCβ in the metabolic switch to glycolysis following BCR engagement of naïve B-cells.

  11. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippen, Keli L; Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B; Merkel, Sarah C; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N; Suhoski, Megan M; Miller, Jeffrey S; Wagner, John E; June, Carl H; Riley, James L; Blazar, Bruce R

    2008-10-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)-coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL.

  12. An Empirical Study on Relations Between Occupational Characteristics of High-Tech Enterprise Employees and Work-Family Satisfaction Under Family Friendly Culture: The Mediating Role of Work-To-Family Facilitation%高新技术企业员工职业特征对满意度影响的实证研究——以家庭亲善文化与员工工作一家庭促进为视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伶; 聂婷; 连智华

    2012-01-01

    通过对全国12个省市自治区662名高新技术企业员工的职业特征、工作一家庭促进感知、工作和家庭满意度、家庭亲善文化的调查,检验工作一家庭促进的中介效应以及家庭亲善文化的调节效应。统计分析发现:工作发展机会、工作自主性均会通过工作一家庭促进对于员工的工作满意度和家庭满意度产生积极影响;家庭亲善文化可以通过职业特征影响员工的工作一家庭促进感知;家庭亲善文化会调节发展机会以及工作自主性同家庭满意度的关系,家庭亲善文化的实施会增强发展机会以及工作自主性对家庭满意度的积极影响;而家庭亲善文化对于发展机会以及工作自主性同工作满意度的调节效应在本研究中没有得到证实。%In this study, we investigate 662 high-tech enterprise employees 12 provinces and autonomous regions and discuss the relations between occupational characteristics work-to-family facilitation, satisfaction and family friendly culture. Through statistical analysis, we found that: developmental experiences and job autonomy have a positive impact on employees' job, satisfaction and family satisfaction through the mediator of work-to-family facili- tation; family friendly culture have a positive impact on work-to-family facilitation through the mediator of occupa- tional characteristics; family friendly culture will moderate the relations between development opportunities, job au- tonomy and family satisfaction. The implementation of family friendly culture will enhance the perceived develop- mental experiences and job autonomy on family satisfaction; the moderating effect of family friendly cultural on development opportunities, job autonomy and job satisfaction has not been confirmed in this study.

  13. Privacy in the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newell, Bryce; Metoyer, Cheryl A.; Moore, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Popular access to increasingly sophisticated forms of electronic surveillance technologies has altered the dynamics of family relationships. Monitoring, mediated and facilitated by practices of both covert and overt electronic surveillance, has changed the nature of privacy within the family. In thi

  14. Islet antigen-pulsed dendritic cells expressing ectopic IL-35Ig protect nonobese diabetic mice from autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondanelli, Giada; Volpi, Claudia; Bianchi, Roberta; Allegrucci, Massimo; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola; Grohmann, Ursula; Belladonna, Maria Laura

    2015-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells capable of orchestrating either stimulatory or regulatory immune responses mediated by T cells. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) is an immunosuppressive, heterodimeric cytokine belonging to the IL-12 family and known to be produced by regulatory T cells but not DCs. In this study, we explored the possible immunosuppressive effect of IL-35 ectopically expressed by splenic DCs from nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a prototypical model of autoimmune diabetes. After pulsing with the IGRP peptide (a dominant, diabetogenic autoantigen in NOD mice) and transfer in vivo, IL-35Ig- but not Ig-transfected DCs suppressed antigen specific, T cell-mediated responses in a skin test assay. More importantly, transfer of IL-35Ig-transfected, IGRP-pulsed DCs into prediabetic NOD mice induced a delayed and less severe form of diabetes, an effect accompanied by the increase of CD4(+)CD39(+) suppressive T cells in pancreatic lymph nodes. Our data therefore suggest that DCs overexpressing ectopic IL-35Ig might represent a powerful tool in negative vaccination strategies.

  15. 工作家庭增益在家庭支持型主管行为与护士职业韧性间的中介作用%The mediating effect of work-family enrichment between family supportive supervisor behavior and nurses'career resilience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章雷钢; 金婷婷; 王志娟; 林艳红

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨工作家庭增益在家庭支持型主管行为与护士职业韧性间的中介作用。方法整群随机抽取727名护士,采用家庭支持型主管行为量表、工作家庭增益量表和职业韧性量表对其进行调查。结果护士家庭支持型主管行为得分为(3.74±0.68)分,工作对家庭增益得分为(3.36±0.77)分,家庭对工作增益得分为(3.59±0.72)分,职业韧性得分为(3.41±0.84)分;家庭支持型主管行为( r=0.31, P<0.01)、工作对家庭增益( r=0.32, P<0.01)、家庭对工作增益( r=0.30, P<0.01)与职业韧性呈显著正相关;家庭支持型主管行为对职业韧性具有直接正向预测作用(P<0.01);工作家庭增益在家庭支持型主管行为与职业韧性间起部分中介作用(P<0.01),中介效应占总效应的37.7%。结论医疗卫生机构努力营造家庭支持型组织氛围,提升护士工作家庭增益和职业韧性水平,提高工作绩效和工作满意度。%Objective To examine the mediating role of work⁃family enrichment between family supportive supervisor behavior and nurses'career resilience. Methods Totally 727 nurses selected by clus⁃ter⁃random⁃sampling were investigated by the family supportive supervisor behaviors scale( FSSBS) ,the wok⁃family enrichment scale( WFES) and the career resilience scale( CRS) . Results The scores of family sup⁃portive supervisor behavior,work to family enrichment,family to work enrichment and career resilience were (3.74±0.68),(3.36±0.77),(3.59±0.72) and (3.41±0.84) respectively. The family supportive supervisor behavior( r=0.31, P<0.01) ,work to family enrichment( r=0.32, P<0.01) and family to wok enrichment( r=0.30, P<0.01) were positively related to career resilience. The family supportive supervisor behavior posi⁃tively influenced career resilience(P<0.01). Work⁃family enrichment partially

  16. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi: circulating antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bongertz

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating antigens were detected in sera of mice experimentally infected with a high close of Trypanosoma cruzi by reaction with sera from chronically infected mice. The immunodiffusion reaction between homologous acute and chronic sera produced four precipitation lines. By reaction with chronic mouse serum, circulating antingens were detected in sera from heavily infected hamsters, dogs, rabbits and in sera from chagasic patients. A reaction was also found in urine from acutely infected mice and dogs. Trypanosoma cruzi exoantigen was detected in trypanosome culture medium and in the supernatant of infected cell cultures. Attempts to isolate the antigens are described.Antígenos circulantes foram detectados em soros de camundongos infectados experimentalmente com elevadas doses de Trypanosoma cruzi pela reação com soros obtidos de camundongos em fase crônica de infecção. A reação de imunodifusão entre soros homólogos agudo e crônico produziu quatro linhas de precipitação. Por reação com soro crônico de camundongo antígenos circulantes foram detectados em soros de crícetos, cães e coelhos infectados com doses elevadas de Trypanosoma cruzi e em soros de pacientes chagásicos. Uma reação foi também observada com urina de camundongos e cães infectados de forma aguda. Exoantígeno de Trypanosoma cruzi foi detectado em meio de cultura de tripanosomas e em sobrenadantes de culturas de células infectadas. Tentativas de isolamento dos antigenos são descritas.

  18. The 5S rDNA high dynamism in Diplodus sargus is a transposon-mediated mechanism. Comparison with other multigene families and Sparidae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Manuel A; Cross, Ismael; Manchado, Manuel; Cárdenas, Salvador; Rebordinos, Laureana

    2013-03-01

    There has been considerable discussion in recent years on the evolution of the tandemly repeated multigene families, since some organisms show a concerted model whereas others show a birth-and-death model. This controversial subject extends to several species of fish. In this study, three species of the Sparidae family (Pagrus pagrus, P. auriga and Diplodus sargus) and an interspecific hybrid (P. pagrus (♀) × P. auriga (♂)) have been studied at both molecular and cytogenetic level, taking three different multigene families (5S rDNA, 45S rDNA and U2 snDNA). Results obtained with the 5S rDNA in P. pagrus and P. auriga are characterized by a considerable degree of conservation at the two levels; however, an extraordinary variation was observed in D. sargus at the two levels, which has never been found in other fishes studied to date. As a consequence of this, the evolutionary model of the multigene families is discussed considering the results obtained and others from the bibliography. The result obtained in the hybrid allowed the recombination frequency in each multigene family to be estimated.

  19. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    KAUST Repository

    Domina, Maria

    2014-12-04

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  20. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domina

    Full Text Available There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  1. Temporal expression and localization patterns of variant surface antigens in clinical Plasmodium falciparum isolates during erythrocyte schizogony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bachmann

    Full Text Available Avoidance of antibody-mediated immune recognition allows parasites to establish chronic infections and enhances opportunities for transmission. The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses a number of multi-copy gene families, including var, rif, stevor and pfmc-2tm, which encode variant antigens believed to be expressed on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes. However, most studies of these antigens are based on in vitro analyses of culture-adapted isolates, most commonly the laboratory strain 3D7, and thus may not be representative of the unique challenges encountered by P. falciparum in the human host. To investigate the expression of the var, rif-A, rif-B, stevor and pfmc-2tm family genes under conditions that mimic more closely the natural course of infection, ex vivo clinical P. falciparum isolates were analyzed using a novel quantitative real-time PCR approach. Expression patterns in the clinical isolates at various time points during the first intraerythrocytic developmental cycle in vitro were compared to those of strain 3D7. In the clinical isolates, in contrast to strain 3D7, there was a peak of expression of the multi-copy gene families rif-A, stevor and pfmc-2tm at the young ring stage, in addition to the already known expression peak in trophozoites. Furthermore, most of the variant surface antigen families were overexpressed in the clinical isolates relative to 3D7, with the exception of the pfmc-2tm family, expression of which was higher in 3D7 parasites. Immunofluorescence analyses performed in parallel revealed two stage-dependent localization patterns of RIFIN, STEVOR and PfMC-2TM. Proteins were exported into the infected erythrocyte at the young trophozoite stage, whereas they remained inside the parasite membrane during schizont stage and were subsequently observed in different compartments in the merozoite. These results reveal a complex pattern of expression of P. falciparum multi-copy gene families during

  2. Antigen-specific immune reactions to ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xabier eUrra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain proteins are detected in the CSF and blood of stroke patients and their concentration is related to the extent of brain damage. Antibodies against brain antigens develop after stroke, suggesting a humoral immune response to the brain injury. Furthermore, induced immune tolerance is beneficial in animal models of cerebral ischemia. The presence of circulating T cells sensitized against brain antigens, and antigen presenting cells (APCs carrying brain antigens in draining lymphoid tissue of stroke patients support the notion that stroke might induce antigen-specific immune responses. After stroke, brain proteins that are normally hidden from the periphery, inflammatory