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Sample records for family gtp binding

  1. The MB2 gene family of Plasmodium species has a unique combination of S1 and GTP-binding domains

    Ogunjumo Oluwasanmi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification and characterization of novel Plasmodium gene families is necessary for developing new anti-malarial therapeutics. The products of the Plasmodium falciparum gene, MB2, were shown previously to have a stage-specific pattern of subcellular localization and proteolytic processing. Results Genes homologous to MB2 were identified in five additional parasite species, P. knowlesi, P. gallinaceum, P. berghei, P. yoelii, and P. chabaudi. Sequence comparisons among the MB2 gene products reveal amino acid conservation of structural features, including putative S1 and GTP-binding domains, and putative signal peptides and nuclear localization signals. Conclusions The combination of domains is unique to this gene family and indicates that MB2 genes comprise a novel family and therefore may be a good target for drug development.

  2. The MB2 gene family of Plasmodium species has a unique combination of S1 and GTP-binding domains

    Romero, Lisa C; Nguyen, Thanh V; Deville, Benoit; Ogunjumo, Oluwasanmi; James, Anthony A

    2004-01-01

    Background Identification and characterization of novel Plasmodium gene families is necessary for developing new anti-malarial therapeutics. The products of the Plasmodium falciparum gene, MB2, were shown previously to have a stage-specific pattern of subcellular localization and proteolytic processing. Results Genes homologous to MB2 were identified in five additional parasite species, P. knowlesi, P. gallinaceum, P. berghei, P. yoelii, and P. chabaudi. Sequence comparisons among the MB2 gene products reveal amino acid conservation of structural features, including putative S1 and GTP-binding domains, and putative signal peptides and nuclear localization signals. Conclusions The combination of domains is unique to this gene family and indicates that MB2 genes comprise a novel family and therefore may be a good target for drug development. PMID:15222903

  3. Small GTP-binding proteins in human endothelial cells

    de Leeuw, H. P.; Koster, P. M.; Calafat, J.; Janssen, H.; van Zonneveld, A. J.; van Mourik, J. A.; Voorberg, J.

    1998-01-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily control an extensive number of intracellular events by alternating between GDP- and GTP-bound conformation. The presence of members of this protein family was examined in human umbilical vein endothelial cells employing RT-PCR. Sequence analysis of

  4. Partial characterization of GTP-binding proteins in Neurospora

    Hasunuma, K.; Miyamoto-Shinohara, Y.; Furukawa, K.

    1987-01-01

    Six fractions of GTP-binding proteins separated by gel filtration of a mycelial extract containing membrane components of Neurospora crassa were partially characterized. [ 35 S]GTP gamma S bound to GTP-binding protein was assayed by repeated treatments with a Norit solution and centrifugation. The binding of [ 35 S]GTP gamma S to GTP-binding proteins was competitively prevented in the presence of 0.1 to 1 mM GTP but not in the presence of ATP. These GTP-binding proteins fractionated by the gel column had Km values of 20, 7, 4, 4, 80 and 2 nM. All six fractions of these GTP-binding proteins showed the capacity to be ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin

  5. GTP-binding proteins in rat liver nuclear envelopes

    Rubins, J.B.; Benditt, J.O.; Dickey, B.F.; Riedel, N.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear transport as well as reassembly of the nuclear envelope (NE) after completion of mitosis are processes that have been shown to require GTP and ATP. To study the presence and localization of GTP-binding proteins in the NE, we have combined complementary techniques of [alpha-32P]GTP binding to Western-blotted proteins and UV crosslinking of [alpha-32P]GTP with well-established procedures for NE subfractionation. GTP binding to blotted NE proteins revealed five low molecular mass GTP-binding proteins of 26, 25, 24.5, 24, and 23 kDa, and [alpha-32P]GTP photoaffinity labeling revealed major proteins with apparent molecular masses of 140, 53, 47, 33, and 31 kDa. All GTP-binding proteins appear to localize preferentially to the inner nuclear membrane, possibly to the interface between inner nuclear membrane and lamina. Despite the evolutionary conservation between the NE and the rough endoplasmic reticulum, the GTP-binding proteins identified differed between these two compartments. Most notably, the 68- and 30-kDa GTP-binding subunits of the signal recognition particle receptor, which photolabeled with [alpha-32P]GTP in the rough endoplasmic reticulum fraction, were totally excluded from the NE fraction. Conversely, a major 53-kDa photolabeled protein in the NE was absent from rough endoplasmic reticulum. Whereas Western-blotted NE proteins bound GTP specifically, all [alpha-32P]GTP photolabeled proteins could be blocked by competition with ATP, although with a competition profile that differed from that obtained with GTP. In comparative crosslinking studies with [alpha-32P]ATP, we have identified three specific ATP-binding proteins with molecular masses of 160, 78, and 74 kDa. The localization of GTP- and ATP-binding proteins within the NE appears appropriate for their involvement in nuclear transport and in the GTP-dependent fusion of nuclear membranes

  6. m-Acetylanilido-GTP, a novel photoaffinity label for GTP-binding proteins: synthesis and application.

    Zor, T; Halifa, I; Kleinhaus, S; Chorev, M; Selinger, Z

    1995-01-01

    A novel photoaffinity label, m-acetylanilido-GTP (m-AcAGTP), was synthesized and used to identify GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins). This GTP analogue is easily prepared and can be used for photoaffinity labelling of G-proteins without chromatographic purification. In the presence of the beta-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline, it activates turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase. This activation persists even when the beta-adrenergic receptor is subsequently blocked by antagonist, indicating that ...

  7. GTP-dependent binding and nuclear transport of RNA polymerase II by Npa3 protein

    Staresincic, Lidija; Walker, Jane; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2011-01-01

    in yeast extracts. Indeed, Npa3 depletion in vivo affects nuclear localization of RNAPII; the polymerase accumulates in the cytoplasm. Npa3 is a member of the GPN-LOOP family of GTPases. Npa3 mutants that either cannot bind GTP or that bind but cannot hydrolyze it are inviable and unable to support nuclear...... transport of RNAPII. Surprisingly, we were unable to detect interactions between Npa3 and proteins in the classical importin a/ß pathway for nuclear import. Interestingly, Npa3-RNAPII binding is significantly increased by the addition of GTP or its slowly hydrolyzable analogue guanosine 5'-3-O......-(thio)triphosphate (GTP¿S). Moreover, the Npa3 mutant that binds GTP, but cannot hydrolyze it, binds RNAPII even in the absence of added GTP, whereas the mutant that cannot bind GTP is unable to bind the polymerase. Together, our data suggest that Npa3 defines an unconventional pathway for nuclear import of RNAPII, which...

  8. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on LRRK2 GTP binding capacity but independent of LRRK2 GTP binding.

    Jean-Marc Taymans

    Full Text Available Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is a Parkinson's disease (PD gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound "on" state and a GDP bound "off" state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC.

  9. Blue news update: BODIPY-GTP binds to the blue-light receptor YtvA while GTP does not.

    Matthias Dorn

    Full Text Available Light is an important environmental factor for almost all organisms. It is mainly used as an energy source but it is also a key factor for the regulation of multiple cellular functions. Light as the extracellular stimulus is thereby converted into an intracellular signal by photoreceptors that act as signal transducers. The blue-light receptor YtvA, a bacterial counterpart of plant phototropins, is involved in the stress response of Bacillus subtilis. The mechanism behind its activation, however, remains unknown. It was suggested based on fluorescence spectroscopic studies that YtvA function involves GTP binding and that this interaction is altered by absorption of light. We have investigated this interaction by several biophysical methods and show here using fluorescence spectroscopy, ITC titrations, and three NMR spectroscopic assays that while YtvA interacts with BODIPY-GTP as a fluorescent GTP analogue originally used for the detection of GTP binding, it does not bind GTP.

  10. Immunochemical similarity of GTP-binding proteins from different systems

    Kalinina, S.N.

    1986-01-01

    It was found that antibodies against the GTP-binding proteins of bovine retinal photoreceptor membranes blocked the inhibitory effect of estradiol on phosphodiesterase from rat and human uterine cytosol and prevented the cumulative effect of catecholamines and guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate on rat skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase. It was established by means of double radial immunodiffusion that these antibodies form a precipitating complex with purified bovine brain tubulin as well as with retinal preparations obtained from eyes of the bull, pig, rat, frog, some species of fish, and one reptile species. Bands of precipitation were not observed with these antibodies when retinal preparations from invertebrates (squid and octopus) were used as the antigens. The antibodies obtained interacted with the α- and β-subunits of GTP-binding proteins from bovine retinal photoreceptor membranes

  11. GTP-binding-defective ARL4D alters mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential.

    Chun-Chun Li

    Full Text Available ARL4D, ARL4A, and ARL4C are closely related members of the ADP-ribosylation factor/ARF-like protein (ARF/ARL family of GTPases. All three ARL4 proteins contain nuclear localization signals (NLSs at their C-termini and are primarily found at the plasma membrane, but they are also present in the nucleus and cytoplasm. ARF function and localization depends on their controlled binding and hydrolysis of GTP. Here we show that GTP-binding-defective ARL4D is targeted to the mitochondria, where it affects mitochondrial morphology and function. We found that a portion of endogenous ARL4D and the GTP-binding-defective ARL4D mutant ARL4D(T35N reside in the mitochondria. The N-terminal myristoylation of ARL4D(T35N was required for its localization to mitochondria. The localization of ARL4D(T35N to the mitochondria reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and caused mitochondrial fragmentation. Furthermore, the C-terminal NLS region of ARL4D(T35N was required for its effect on the mitochondria. This study is the first to demonstrate that the dysfunctional GTP-binding-defective ARL4D is targeted to mitochondria, where it subsequently alters mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential.

  12. The nucleolar GTP-binding proteins Gnl2 and nucleostemin are required for retinal neurogenesis in developing zebrafish

    Paridaen, J.T.M.; Janson, E.; Utami, K.H.; Pereboom, T.C.; Essers, P.; van Rooijen, C.R.; Zivkovic, D.; MacInnes, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleostemin (NS), a member of a family of nucleolar GTP-binding proteins, is highly expressed in proliferating cells such as stem and cancer cells and is involved in the control of cell cycle progression. Both depletion and overexpression of NS result in stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53

  13. In silico docking of forchlorfenuron (FCF to septins suggests that FCF interferes with GTP binding.

    Dimitrios Angelis

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that form cytoskeleton-like filaments, which are essential for many functions in eukaryotic organisms. Small molecule compounds that disrupt septin filament assembly are valuable tools for dissecting septin functions with high temporal control. To date, forchlorfenuron (FCF is the only compound known to affect septin assembly and functions. FCF dampens the dynamics of septin assembly inducing the formation of enlarged stable polymers, but the underlying mechanism of action is unknown. To investigate how FCF binds and affects septins, we performed in silico simulations of FCF docking to all available crystal structures of septins. Docking of FCF with SEPT2 and SEPT3 indicated that FCF interacts preferentially with the nucleotide-binding pockets of septins. Strikingly, FCF is predicted to form hydrogen bonds with residues involved in GDP-binding, mimicking nucleotide binding. FCF docking with the structure of SEPT2-GppNHp, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, and SEPT7 showed that FCF may assume two alternative non-overlapping conformations deeply into and on the outer side of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Surprisingly, FCF was predicted to interact with the P-loop Walker A motif GxxxxGKS/T, which binds the phosphates of GTP, and the GTP specificity motif AKAD, which interacts with the guanine base of GTP, and highly conserved amino acids including a threonine, which is critical for GTP hydrolysis. Thus, in silico FCF exhibits a conserved mechanism of binding, interacting with septin signature motifs and residues involved in GTP binding and hydrolysis. Taken together, our results suggest that FCF stabilizes septins by locking them into a conformation that mimics a nucleotide-bound state, preventing further GTP binding and hydrolysis. Overall, this study provides the first insight into how FCF may bind and stabilize septins, and offers a blueprint for the rational design of FCF derivatives that could target septins with

  14. Phytochrome regulates GTP-binding protein activity in the envelope of pea nuclei

    Clark, G. B.; Memon, A. R.; Thompson, G. A. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Three GTP-binding proteins with apparent molecular masses of 27, 28 and 30 kDa have been detected in isolated nuclei of etiolated pea plumules. After LDS-PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose these proteins bind [32P]GTP in the presence of excess ATP, suggesting that they are monomeric G proteins. When nuclei are disrupted, three proteins co-purify with the nuclear envelope fraction and are highly enriched in this fraction. The level of [32P]GTP-binding for all three protein bands is significantly increased when harvested pea plumules are irradiated by red light, and this effect is reversed by far-red light. The results indicate that GTP-binding activity associated with the nuclear envelope of plant cells is photoreversibly regulated by the pigment phytochrome.

  15. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Disturbing the GTP/GDP Binding Pocket of RAB11B Cause Intellectual Disability and a Distinctive Brain Phenotype.

    Lamers, Ideke J C; Reijnders, Margot R F; Venselaar, Hanka; Kraus, Alison; Jansen, Sandra; de Vries, Bert B A; Houge, Gunnar; Gradek, Gyri Aasland; Seo, Jieun; Choi, Murim; Chae, Jong-Hee; van der Burgt, Ineke; Pfundt, Rolph; Letteboer, Stef J F; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Dusseljee, Simone; Brunner, Han G; Doherty, Dan; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Roepman, Ronald

    2017-11-02

    The Rab GTPase family comprises ∼70 GTP-binding proteins, functioning in vesicle formation, transport and fusion. They are activated by a conformational change induced by GTP-binding, allowing interactions with downstream effectors. Here, we report five individuals with two recurrent de novo missense mutations in RAB11B; c.64G>A; p.Val22Met in three individuals and c.202G>A; p.Ala68Thr in two individuals. An overlapping neurodevelopmental phenotype, including severe intellectual disability with absent speech, epilepsy, and hypotonia was observed in all affected individuals. Additionally, visual problems, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and microcephaly were present in the majority of cases. Re-evaluation of brain MRI images of four individuals showed a shared distinct brain phenotype, consisting of abnormal white matter (severely decreased volume and abnormal signal), thin corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia and mild ventriculomegaly. To compare the effects of both variants with known inactive GDP- and active GTP-bound RAB11B mutants, we modeled the variants on the three-dimensional protein structure and performed subcellular localization studies. We predicted that both variants alter the GTP/GDP binding pocket and show that they both have localization patterns similar to inactive RAB11B. Evaluation of their influence on the affinity of RAB11B to a series of binary interactors, both effectors and guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), showed induction of RAB11B binding to the GEF SH3BP5, again similar to inactive RAB11B. In conclusion, we report two recurrent dominant mutations in RAB11B leading to a neurodevelopmental syndrome, likely caused by altered GDP/GTP binding that inactivate the protein and induce GEF binding and protein mislocalization. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  16. Specific binding of [alpha-32P]GTP to cytosolic and membrane-bound proteins of human platelets correlates with the activation of phospholipase C

    Lapetina, E.G.; Reep, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    We have assessed the binding of [alpha- 32 P]GTP to platelet proteins from cytosolic and membrane fractions. Proteins were separated by NaDodSO 4 /PAGE and electrophoretically transferred to nitrocellulose. Incubation of the nitrocellulose blots with [alpha- 32 P]GTP indicated the presence of specific and distinct GTP-binding proteins in cytosol and membranes. Binding was prevented by 10-100 nM GTP and by 100 nM guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[gamma S]) or GDP; binding was unaffected by 1 nM-1 microM ATP. One main GTP-binding protein (29.5 kDa) was detected in the membrane fraction, while three others (29, 27, and 21 kDa) were detected in the soluble fraction. Two cytosolic GTP-binding proteins (29 and 27 kDa) were degraded by trypsin; another cytosolic protein (21 kDa) and the membrane-bound protein (29.5 kDa) were resistant to the action of trypsin. Treatment of intact platelets with trypsin or thrombin, followed by lysis and fractionation, did not affect the binding of [alpha- 32 P]GTP to the membrane-bound protein. GTP[gamma S] still stimulated phospholipase C in permeabilized platelets already preincubated with trypsin. This suggests that trypsin-resistant GTP-binding proteins might regulate phospholipase C stimulated by GTP[gamma S

  17. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation

  18. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. (Univ. of Miami Medical School, FL (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  19. Resonance energy transfer study on the proximity relationship between the GTP binding site and the rifampicin binding site of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase

    Kumar, K.P.; Chatterji, D.

    1990-01-01

    Terbium(III) upon complexation with guanosine 5'-triphosphate showed remarkable enhancement of fluorescence emission at 488 and 545 nm when excited at 295 nm. Analysis of the binding data yielded a value for the mean K d between Tb(III) and GTP of 0.2 μM, with three binding sites for TB(III) on GTP. 31 P and 1 H NMR measurements revealed that Tb(III) mainly binds the phosphate moiety of GTP. Fluorescence titration of the emission signals of the TbGTP complex with varying concentrations of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase resulted in a K d values of 4 μM between the TbGTP and the enzyme. It was observed that TbGTP can be incorporated in the place of GTP during E. coli RNA polymerase catalyzed abortive synthesis of dinucleotide tetraphosphate at T7A2 promoter. Both the substrate TbGTP and the inhibitor of the initiation of transcription rifampicin bind to the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase. This allows the measurement of the fluorescence excited-state energy transfer from the donor TbGTP-RNA polymerase to the acceptor rifampicin. Both emission bands of Tb(III) overlap with the rifampicin absorption, and the distances at 50% efficiency of energy transfer were calculated to be 28 and 24 angstrom for the 488- and 545-nm emission bands, respectively. The distance between the substrate binding site and the rifampicin binding site on the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase was measured to be around 30 angstrom. This suggest that the nature of inhibition of transcription by rifampicin is essentially noncompetitive with the substrate

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    Wu Hao,; Sun, L.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Fu, S.; Akerboom, A.P.; Li, X.; Oost, van der J.

    2007-01-01

    A predicted GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, termed SsGBP, has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in the presence of 0.05 M cadmium sulfate and 0.8

  1. Ras p21 and other Gn proteins are detected in mammalian cell lines by [gamma-35S]GTP gamma S binding

    Comerford, J.G.; Gibson, J.R.; Dawson, A.P.; Gibson, I.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in mouse and human cell lines was investigated using [gamma- 35 S]GTP gamma S and [gamma-32P]GTP. Cell lysate polypeptides were separated by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose. Incubation of the nitrocellulose blots with [gamma- 35 S]GTP gamma S identified 9 distinct GTP-binding polypeptides in all lysates. One of these is the ras oncogene product, p21, as demonstrated by subsequent immunochemical staining of the nitrocellulose blots. We have shown that this procedure provides a sensitive method for detection of p21 in culture cell lines

  2. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells

    Cerny, Alexander C.; Altendorfer, André; Schopf, Krystina; Baltner, Karla; Maag, Nathalie; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Huber, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1) and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14), which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L) in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3)P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14 P75L mutant. The ttd14 P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14 P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane. PMID:26509977

  3. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells.

    Alexander C Cerny

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP and TRP-like (TRPL and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1 and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14, which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14P75L mutant. The ttd14P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane.

  4. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein Gp (G25K): Identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42

    Shinjo, K.; Koland, J.G.; Hart, M.J.; Narasimhan, V.; Cerione, R.A.; Johnson, D.I.; Evans, T.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated G p (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human G p protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins and the rac proteins. The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which they designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein

  5. Cloning and molecular characterization of the salt-regulated jojoba ScRab cDNA encoding a small GTP-binding protein.

    Mizrahi-Aviv, Ela; Mills, David; Benzioni, Aliza; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2002-10-01

    Salt stress results in a massive change in gene expression. An 837 bp cDNA designated ScRab was cloned from shoot cultures of the salt tolerant jojoba (Simmondsia chinesis). The cloned cDNA encodes a full length 200 amino acid long polypeptide that bears high homology to the Rab subfamily of small GTP binding proteins, particularly, the Rab5 subfamily. ScRab expression is reduced in shoots grown in the presence of salt compared to shoots from non-stressed cultures. His6-tagged ScRAB protein was expressed in E. coli, and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein bound radiolabelled GTP. The unlabelled guanine nucleotides GTP, GTP gamma S and GDP but not ATP, CTP or UTP competed with GTP binding.

  6. Developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 is required for stabilization of Rac1-positive membrane tubules.

    Mani, Muralidharan; Lee, Unn Hwa; Yoon, Nal Ae; Yoon, Eun Hye; Lee, Byung Ju; Cho, Wha Ja; Park, Jeong Woo

    2017-11-04

    Previously we have reported that developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 (DRG2) localizes on Rab5 endosomes and plays an important role in transferrin (Tfn) recycling. We here identified DRG2 as a key regulator of membrane tubule stability. At 30 min after Tfn treatment, DRG2 localized to membrane tubules which were enriched with phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate [PI(4)P] and did not contain Rab5. DRG2 interacted with Rac1 more strongly with GTP-bound Rac1 and tubular localization of DRG2 depended on Rac1 activity. DRG2 depletion led to destabilization of membrane tubules, while ectopic expression of DRG2 rescued the stability of the membrane tubules in DRG2-depleted cells. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for regulation of membrane tubule stability mediated by DRG2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site*

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4BWT-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. PMID:26453300

  8. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site.

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-11-27

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4B(WT)-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. The Inner Nuclear Membrane Protein Nemp1 Is a New Type of RanGTP-Binding Protein in Eukaryotes.

    Takashi Shibano

    Full Text Available The inner nuclear membrane (INM protein Nemp1/TMEM194A has previously been suggested to be involved in eye development in Xenopus, and contains two evolutionarily conserved sequences in the transmembrane domains (TMs and the C-terminal region, named region A and region B, respectively. To elucidate the molecular nature of Nemp1, we analyzed its interacting proteins through those conserved regions. First, we found that Nemp1 interacts with itself and lamin through the TMs and region A, respectively. Colocalization of Nemp1 and lamin at the INM suggests that the interaction with lamin participates in the INM localization of Nemp1. Secondly, through yeast two-hybrid screening using region B as bait, we identified the small GTPase Ran as a probable Nemp1-binding partner. GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays using region B and Ran mutants revealed that region B binds directly to the GTP-bound Ran through its effector domain. Immunostaining experiments using transfected COS-7 cells revealed that full-length Nemp1 recruits Ran near the nuclear envelope, suggesting a role for Nemp1 in the accumulation of RanGTP at the nuclear periphery. At the neurula-to-tailbud stages of Xenopus embryos, nemp1 expression overlapped with ran in several regions including the eye vesicles. Co-knockdown using antisense morpholino oligos for nemp1 and ran caused reduction of cell densities and severe eye defects more strongly than either single knockdown alone, suggesting their functional interaction. Finally we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Nemp1-orthologous proteins interact with A. thaliana Ran, suggesting their evolutionally conserved physical and functional interactions possibly in basic cellular functions including nuclear transportation. Taken together, we conclude that Nemp1 represents a new type of RanGTP-binding protein.

  10. A putative ATP/GTP binding protein affects Leishmania mexicana growth in insect vectors and vertebrate hosts

    Hlaváčová, Jana; Zimmer, Sara L.; Butenko, Anzhelika; Podešvová, Lucie; Leštinová, Tereza; Lukeš, Julius; Kostygov, Alexei; Votýpka, Jan; Volf, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Background Leishmania virulence factors responsible for the complicated epidemiology of the various leishmaniases remain mainly unidentified. This study is a characterization of a gene previously identified as upregulated in two of three overlapping datasets containing putative factors important for Leishmania’s ability to establish mammalian intracellular infection and to colonize the gut of an insect vector. Methodology/Principal findings The investigated gene encodes ATP/GTP binding motif-containing protein related to Leishmania development 1 (ALD1), a cytosolic protein that contains a cryptic ATP/GTP binding P-loop. We compared differentiation, growth rates, and infective abilities of wild-type and ALD1 null mutant cell lines of L. mexicana. Loss of ALD1 results in retarded growth kinetics but not defects in differentiation in axenic culture. Similarly, when mice and the sand fly vector were infected with the ALD1 null mutant, the primary difference in infection and colonization phenotype relative to wild type was an inability to achieve maximal host pathogenicity. While ability of the ALD1 null mutant cells to infect macrophages in vitro was not affected, replication within macrophages was clearly curtailed. Conclusions/Significance L. mexicana ALD1, encoding a protein with no assigned functional domains or motifs, was identified utilizing multiple comparative analyses with the related and often experimentally overlooked monoxenous flagellates. We found that it plays a role in Leishmania infection and colonization in vitro and in vivo. Results suggest that ALD1 functions in L. mexicana’s general metabolic network, rather than function in specific aspect of virulence as anticipated from the compared datasets. This result validates our comparative genomics approach for finding relevant factors, yet highlights the importance of quality laboratory-based analysis of genes tagged by these methods. PMID:28742133

  11. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates β-adrenoceptor affinity towards β-agonists

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of β-adrenoceptor (βAR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of 125 I-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the βAR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of 125 I-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the βAR affinity towards β-agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound βAR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation

  12. Tandem duplications of a degenerated GTP-binding domain at the origin of GTPase receptors Toc159 and thylakoidal SRP

    Hernandez Torres, Jorge; Maldonado, Monica Alexandra Arias; Chomilier, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of some nuclear encoded proteins that translocate proteins across the chloroplast envelope remains unknown. Therefore, sequences of GTPase proteins constituting the Arabidopsis thaliana translocon at the outer membrane of chloroplast (atToc) complexes were analyzed by means of HCA. In particular, atToc159 and related proteins (atToc132, atToc120, and atToc90) do not have proven homologues of prokaryotic or eukaryotic ancestry. We established that the three domains commonly referred to as A, G, and M originate from the GTPase G domain, tandemly repeated, and probably evolving toward an unstructured conformation in the case of the A domain. It resulted from this study a putative common ancestor for these proteins and a new domain definition, in particular the splitting of A into three domains (A1, A2, and A3), has been proposed. The family of Toc159, previously containing A. thaliana and Pisum sativum, has been extended to Medicago truncatula and Populus trichocarpa and it has been revised for Oryza sativa. They have also been compared to GTPase subunits involved in the cpSRP system. A distant homology has been revealed among Toc and cpSRP GTP-hydrolyzing proteins of A. thaliana, and repetitions of a GTPase domain were also found in cpSRP protein receptors, by means of HCA analysis

  13. Distinct forms of the β subunit of GTP-binding regulatory proteins identified by molecular cloning

    Fong, H.K.W.; Amatruda, T.T. III; Birren, B.W.; Simon, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    Two distinct β subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins have been identified by cDNA cloning and are referred to as β 1 and β 1 subunits. The bovine transducin β subunit (β 1 ) has been cloned previously. The author now isolated and analyzed cDNA clones that encode the β 2 subunit from bovine adrenal, bovine brain, and a human myeloid leukemia cell line, HL-60. The 340-residue M/sub r/ 37,329 Β 2 protein is 90% identical with β 1 in predicted amino acid sequence, and it is also organized as a series of repetitive homologous segments. The major mRNA that encodes the bovine β 2 subunit is 1.7 kilobases in length. It is expressed at lower levels than β 1 subunit mRNA in all tissues examined. The β 1 and β 2 messages are expressed in cloned human cell lines. Hybridization of cDNA probes to bovine DNA showed that β 1 and β 2 are encoded by separate genes. The amino acid sequences for the bovine and human β 2 subunit are identical, as are the amino acid sequences for the bovine and human β 1 subunit. This evolutionary conservation suggests that the two β subunits have different roles in the signal transduction process

  14. Pertussis toxin modifies the characteristics of both the inhibitory GTP binding proteins and the somatostatin receptor in anterior pituitary tumor cells

    Mahy, N.; Woolkalis, M.; Thermos, K.; Carlson, K.; Manning, D.; Reisine, T.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of somatostatin receptors in the anterior pituitary tumor cell line AtT-20 were examined. Pertussis toxin selectively catalyzed the ADP ribosylation of the alpha subunits of the inhibitory GTP binding proteins in AtT-20 cells. Toxin treatment abolished somatostatin inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity and somatostatin stimulation of GTPase activity. To examine the effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of the somatostatin receptor, the receptor was labeled by the somatostatin analog [125I]CGP 23996. [125I]CGP 23996 binding to AtT-20 cell membranes was saturable and within a limited concentration range was to a single high affinity site. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced the apparent density of the high affinity [125I]CGP 23996 binding sites in AtT-20 cell membranes. Inhibition of [125I]CGP 23996 binding by a wide concentration range of CGP 23996 revealed the presence of two binding sites. GTP predominantly reduced the level of high affinity sites in control membranes. Pertussis toxin treatment also diminished the amount of high affinity sites. GTP did not affect [125I]CGP 23996 binding in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. The high affinity somatostatin receptors were covalently labeled with [125I] CGP 23996 and the photoactivated crosslinking agent n-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate. No high affinity somatostatin receptors, covalently bound to [125I]CGP 23996, were detected in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. These results are most consistent with pertussis toxin uncoupling the inhibitory G proteins from the somatostatin receptor thereby converting the receptor from a mixed population of high and low affinity sites to only low affinity receptors

  15. Kinesin-1 and mitochondrial motility control by discrimination of structurally equivalent but distinct subdomains in Ran-GTP-binding domains of Ran-binding protein 2.

    Patil, Hemangi; Cho, Kyoung-in; Lee, James; Yang, Yi; Orry, Andrew; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2013-03-27

    The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain is a versatile fold that mediates a variety of protein-protein and protein-phosphatidylinositol lipid interactions. The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2) contains four interspersed Ran GTPase-binding domains (RBD(n = 1-4)) with close structural homology to the PH domain of Bruton's tyrosine kinase. The RBD2, kinesin-binding domain (KBD) and RBD3 comprise a tripartite domain (R2KR3) of RanBP2 that causes the unfolding, microtubule binding and biphasic activation of kinesin-1, a crucial anterograde motor of mitochondrial motility. However, the interplay between Ran GTPase and R2KR3 of RanBP2 in kinesin-1 activation and mitochondrial motility is elusive. We use structure-function, biochemical, kinetic and cell-based assays with time-lapse live-cell microscopy of over 260,000 mitochondrial-motility-related events to find mutually exclusive subdomains in RBD2 and RBD3 towards Ran GTPase binding, kinesin-1 activation and mitochondrial motility regulation. The RBD2 and RBD3 exhibit Ran-GTP-independent, subdomain and stereochemical-dependent discrimination on the biphasic kinetics of kinesin-1 activation or regulation of mitochondrial motility. Further, KBD alone and R2KR3 stimulate and suppress, respectively, multiple biophysical parameters of mitochondrial motility. The regulation of the bidirectional transport of mitochondria by either KBD or R2KR3 is highly coordinated, because their kinetic effects are accompanied always by changes in mitochondrial motile events of either transport polarity. These studies uncover novel roles in Ran GTPase-independent subdomains of RBD2 and RBD3, and KBD of RanBP2, that confer antagonizing and multi-modal mechanisms of kinesin-1 activation and regulation of mitochondrial motility. These findings open new venues towards the pharmacological harnessing of cooperative and competitive mechanisms regulating kinesins, RanBP2 or mitochondrial motility in disparate human disorders.

  16. Family-wide characterization of the DENN domain Rab GDP-GTP exchange factors.

    Yoshimura, Shin-ichiro; Gerondopoulos, Andreas; Linford, Andrea; Rigden, Daniel J; Barr, Francis A

    2010-10-18

    A key requirement for Rab function in membrane trafficking is site-specific activation by GDP-GTP exchange factors (GEFs), but the majority of the 63 human Rabs have no known GEF. We have performed a systematic characterization of the 17 human DENN domain proteins and demonstrated that they are specific GEFs for 10 Rabs. DENND1A/1B localize to clathrin patches at the plasma membrane and activate Rab35 in an endocytic pathway trafficking Shiga toxin to the trans-Golgi network. DENND2 GEFs target to actin filaments and control Rab9-dependent trafficking of mannose-6-phosphate receptor to lysosomes. DENND4 GEFs target to a tubular membrane compartment adjacent to the Golgi, where they activate Rab10, which suggests a function in basolateral polarized sorting in epithelial cells that compliments the non-DENN GEF Sec2 acting on Rab8 in apical sorting. DENND1C, DENND3, DENND5A/5B, MTMR5/13, and MADD activate Rab13, Rab12, Rab39, Rab28, and Rab27A/27B, respectively. Together, these findings provide a basis for future studies on Rab regulation and function.

  17. The domain architecture of large guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTP-binding protein Arf

    Geldner Niko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small G proteins, which are essential regulators of multiple cellular functions, are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs that stimulate the exchange of the tightly bound GDP nucleotide by GTP. The catalytic domain responsible for nucleotide exchange is in general associated with non-catalytic domains that define the spatio-temporal conditions of activation. In the case of small G proteins of the Arf subfamily, which are major regulators of membrane trafficking, GEFs form a heterogeneous family whose only common characteristic is the well-characterized Sec7 catalytic domain. In contrast, the function of non-catalytic domains and how they regulate/cooperate with the catalytic domain is essentially unknown. Results Based on Sec7-containing sequences from fully-annotated eukaryotic genomes, including our annotation of these sequences from Paramecium, we have investigated the domain architecture of large ArfGEFs of the BIG and GBF subfamilies, which are involved in Golgi traffic. Multiple sequence alignments combined with the analysis of predicted secondary structures, non-structured regions and splicing patterns, identifies five novel non-catalytic structural domains which are common to both subfamilies, revealing that they share a conserved modular organization. We also report a novel ArfGEF subfamily with a domain organization so far unique to alveolates, which we name TBS (TBC-Sec7. Conclusion Our analysis unifies the BIG and GBF subfamilies into a higher order subfamily, which, together with their being the only subfamilies common to all eukaryotes, suggests that they descend from a common ancestor from which species-specific ArfGEFs have subsequently evolved. Our identification of a conserved modular architecture provides a background for future functional investigation of non-catalytic domains.

  18. The amphiphilic peptide adenoregulin enhances agonist binding to A1-adenosine receptors and [35S]GTP gamma S to brain membranes.

    Moni, R W; Romero, F S; Daly, J W

    1995-08-01

    1. Adenoregulin is an amphilic peptide isolated from skin mucus of the tree frog, Phyllomedusa bicolor. Synthetic adenoregulin enhanced the binding of agonists to several G-protein-coupled receptors in rat brain membranes. 2. The maximal enhancement of agonist binding, and in parentheses, the concentration of adenoregulin affording maximal enhancement were as follows: 60% (20 microM) for A1-adenosine receptors, 30% (100 microM) for A2a-adenosine receptors, 20% (2 microM) for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, and 30% (10 microM) for 5HT1A receptors. High affinity agonist binding for A1-, alpha 2-, and 5HT1A-receptors was virtually abolished by GTP gamma S in the presence of adenoregulin, but was only partially abolished in its absence. Magnesium ions increased the binding of agonists to receptors and reduced the enhancement elicited by adenoregulin. 3. The effect of adenoregulin on binding of N6-cyclohexyladenosine ([3H]CHA) to A1-receptors was relatively slow and was irreversible. Adenoregulin increased the Bmax value for [3H]CHA binding sites, and the proportion of high affinity states, and slowed the rate of [3H]CHA dissociation. Binding of the A1-selective antagonist, [3H]DPCPX, was maximally enhanced by only 13% at 2 microM adenoregulin. Basal and A1-adenosine receptor-stimulated binding of [35S]GTP gamma S were maximally enhanced 45% and 23%, respectively, by 50 microM adenoregulin. In CHAPS-solubilized membranes from rat cortex, the binding of both [3H]CHA and [3H]DPCPX were enhanced by adenoregulin. Binding of [3H]CHA to membranes from DDT1 MF-2 cells was maximally enhanced 17% at 20 microM adenoregulin. In intact DDT1 MF-2 cells, 20 microM adenoregulin did not potentiate the inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation mediated via the adenosine A1 receptor. 4. It is proposed that adenoregulin enhances agonist binding through a mechanism involving enhancement of guanyl nucleotide exchange at G-proteins, resulting in a conversion of receptors into a high affinity state

  19. Differential regulation of serotonin-1A receptor-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus by citalopram and escitalopram.

    Rossi, Dania V; Burke, Teresa F; Hensler, Julie G

    2008-03-31

    The effect of chronic citalopram or escitalopram administration on 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus was determined by measuring [35S]GTP gamma S binding stimulated by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-OH-DPAT (1nM-10 microM). Although chronic administration of citalopram or escitalopram has been shown to desensitize somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, we found that escitalopram treatment decreased the efficacy of 5-HT1A receptors to activate G proteins, whereas citalopram treatment did not. The binding of [3H]8-OH-DPAT to the coupled, high affinity agonist state of the receptor was not altered by either treatment. Interestingly, escitalopram administration resulted in greater occupancy of serotonin transporter sites as measured by the inhibition of [3H]cyanoimipramine binding. As the binding and action of escitalopram is limited by the inactive enantiomer R-citalopram present in racemic citalopram, we propose that the regulation of 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus at the level of receptor-G protein interaction may be a result of greater inhibition of the serotonin transporter by escitalopram.

  20. GTP- and GDP-Dependent Rab27a Effectors in Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) participate in a wide variety of cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and intracellular transport. Conventionally, only the guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-bound small GTPase interacts with effector proteins, and the resulting downstream signals control specific cellular functions. Therefore, the GTP-bound form is regarded as active, and the focus has been on searching for proteins that bind the GTP form to look for their effectors. The Rab family small GTPase Rab27a is highly expressed in some secretory cells and is involved in the control of membrane traffic. The present study reviews recent progress in our understanding of the roles of Rab27a and its effectors in pancreatic beta-cells. In the basal state, GTP-bound Rab27a controls insulin secretion at pre-exocytic stages via its GTP-dependent effectors. We previously identified novel guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-bound Rab27-interacting proteins. Interestingly, GDP-bound Rab27a controls endocytosis of the secretory membrane via its interaction with these proteins. We also demonstrated that the insulin secretagogue glucose converts Rab27a from its GTP- to GDP-bound forms. Thus, GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate pre-exocytic and endocytic stages in membrane traffic, respectively. Since the physiological importance of GDP-bound GTPases has been largely overlooked, we consider that the investigation of GDP-dependent effectors for other GTPases is necessary for further understanding of cellular function.

  1. Pertussis toxin substrate is a guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate-, N-ethylmaleimide-, Mg2+- and temperature-sensitive GTP-binding protein.

    Wong, S K; Martin, B R; Tolkovsky, A M

    1985-01-01

    We compared the effects of guanine nucleotides and Mg2+ on ADP-ribosylation of rat brain and liver membrane proteins catalysed by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) and cholera toxin (CT). Labelling of proteins in the presence of [alpha-32P]NAD+, ATP and CT required GTP or guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP [S]). In contrast, labelling of one (liver) or two (brain) polypeptides by IAP was enhanced by guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP[S]) or GTP, but was blocked by GTP[S] or guano...

  2. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of a GTP-binding protein (MiRab5) in Mangifera indica.

    Liu, Zhao-liang; Luo, Cong; Dong, Long; Van Toan, Can; Wei, Peng-xiao; He, Xin-hua

    2014-04-25

    The Rab family, the largest branch of Ras small GTPases, plays a crucial role in the vesicular transport in plants. The members of Rab family act as molecular switches that regulate the fusion of vesicles with target membranes through conformational changes. However, little is known about the Rab5 gene involved in fruit ripening and stress response. In this study, the MiRab5 gene was isolated from stress-induced Mangifera indica. The full-length cDNA sequence was 984bp and contained an open reading frame of 600bp, which encoded a 200 amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 21.83kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 6.99. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited high homology with tomato (91% similarity) and contains all five characteristic Rab motifs. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that MiRab5 was ubiquitously expressed in various mango tree tissues at different levels. The expression of MiRab5 was up-regulated during later stages of fruit ripening. Moreover, MiRab5 was generally up-regulated in response to various abiotic stresses (cold, salinity, and PEG treatments). Recombinant MiRab5 protein was successfully expressed and purified. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis indicated that the expressed protein was recognized by the anti-6-His antibody. These results provide insights into the role of the MiRab5 gene family in fruit ripening and stress responses in the mango plant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of a GTP-binding protein α subunit that lacks an apparent ADP-ribosylation site for pertussis toxin

    Fong, H.K.W.; Yoshimoto, K.K.; Eversole-Cire, P.; Simon, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    Recent molecular cloning of cDNA for the α subunit of bovine transducin (a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein, or G protein) has revealed the presence of two retinal-specific transducins, called T/sub r/ and T/sub c/, which are expressed in rod or cone photoreceptor cells. In a further study of G-protein diversity and signal transduction in the retina, the authors have identified a G-protein α subunit, which they refer to as G/sub z/α, by isolating a human retinal cDNA clone that cross-hybridizes at reduced stringency with bovine T/sub r/ α-subunit cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence of G/sub z/α is 41-67% identical with those of other known G-protein α subunits. However, the 355-residue G/sub z/α lacks a consensus site for ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin, and its amino acid sequence varies within a number of regions that are strongly conserved among all of the other G-protein α subunits. They suggest that G/sub z/α, which appears to be highly expressed in neural tissues, represents a member of a subfamily of G proteins that mediate signal transduction in pertussis toxin-insensitive systems

  4. Proteins that interact with GTP during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis

    Mitchell, C.; Vary, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    During sporulation of Bacillus subtilis, several proteins were shown to interact with GTP in specific ways. UV light was used to cross-link [α- 32 P]GTP to proteins in cell extracts at different stages of growth. After electrophoresis, 11 bands of radioactivity were found in vegetative cells, 4 more appeared during sporulation, and only 9 remained in mature spores. Based on the labeling pattern with or without UV light to cross-link either [α- 32 P]GTP or [γ- 32 P]GTP, 11 bands of radioactivity were apparent guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, and 5 bands appeared to be phosphorylated and/or guanylated. Similar results were found with Bacillus megaterium. Assuming the GTP might be a type of signal for sporulation, it could interact with and regulate proteins by at least three mechanisms

  5. Rheb Protein Binds CAD (Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase 2, Aspartate Transcarbamoylase, and Dihydroorotase) Protein in a GTP- and Effector Domain-dependent Manner and Influences Its Cellular Localization and Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase (CPSase) Activity*

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-01

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. PMID:25422319

  6. Rheb protein binds CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase) protein in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner and influences its cellular localization and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) activity.

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-09

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Identification of potential small molecule binding pockets on Rho family GTPases.

    Juan Manuel Ortiz-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Rho GTPases are conformational switches that control a wide variety of signaling pathways critical for eukaryotic cell development and proliferation. They represent attractive targets for drug design as their aberrant function and deregulated activity is associated with many human diseases including cancer. Extensive high-resolution structures (>100 and recent mutagenesis studies have laid the foundation for the design of new structure-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Although the inhibition of Rho signaling with drug-like compounds is an active area of current research, very little attention has been devoted to directly inhibiting Rho by targeting potential allosteric non-nucleotide binding sites. By avoiding the nucleotide binding site, compounds may minimize the potential for undesirable off-target interactions with other ubiquitous GTP and ATP binding proteins. Here we describe the application of molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, sequence conservation analysis, and ensemble small-molecule fragment mapping to provide an extensive mapping of potential small-molecule binding pockets on Rho family members. Characterized sites include novel pockets in the vicinity of the conformationaly responsive switch regions as well as distal sites that appear to be related to the conformations of the nucleotide binding region. Furthermore the use of accelerated molecular dynamics simulation, an advanced sampling method that extends the accessible time-scale of conventional simulations, is found to enhance the characterization of novel binding sites when conformational changes are important for the protein mechanism.

  8. Aluminium fluoride and magnesium, activators of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins, affect high-affinity binding of the fungal toxin fusicoccin to the fusicoccin-binding protein in oat root plasma membranes.

    de Boer, A.H.; Van der Molen, G.W.; Prins, H.B.A.; Korthout, H.A.A.J.; van der Hoeven, P.C.J.

    1994-01-01

    The fusicoccin-binding protein was solubilised from purified oat root plasma membranes. The solubilised protein retained full binding activity, provided that protease inhibitors were included. Sodium fluoride reduced the high-affinity [H-3]fusicoccin binding to almost zero in a

  9. Rho family GTP binding proteins are involved in the regulatory volume decrease process in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts

    Pedersen, Stine F; Beisner, Kristine H; Willumsen, Berthe M

    2002-01-01

    The role of Rho GTPases in the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) process following osmotic cell swelling is controversial and has so far only been investigated for the swelling-activated Cl- efflux. We investigated the involvement of RhoA in the RVD process in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts, using wild......-type cells and three clones expressing constitutively active RhoA (RhoAV14). RhoAV14 expression resulted in an up to fourfold increase in the rate of RVD, measured by large-angle light scattering. The increase in RVD rate correlated with RhoAV14 expression. RVD in wild-type cells was unaffected by the Rho...

  10. On the binding of BODIPY-GTP by the photosensory protein YtvA from the common soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    Nakasone, Y.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    The YtvA protein, which is one of the proteins that comprises the network carrying out the signal transfer inducing the general stress response in Bacillus subtilis, is composed of an N-terminal LOV domain (that binds a flavin [FMN]) and a C-terminal STAS domain. This latter domain shows sequence

  11. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-κB in H1299 human lung cancer cells

    Seo, Mi Ran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (Gαi1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of Gαi1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of Gαi1QL. Gαi1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-κB, which resulted from an increase in NF-κB p50 protein. We conclude that Gαi1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-κB activation.

  12. The fibronectin-binding integrins alpha5beta1 and alphavbeta3 differentially modulate RhoA-GTP loading, organization of cell matrix adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis

    Danen, Erik H J; Sonneveld, Petra; Brakebusch, Cord

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the formation of different types of cell matrix adhesions in cells that bind to fibronectin via either alpha5beta1 or alphavbeta3. In both cases, cell adhesion to fibronectin leads to a rapid decrease in RhoA activity. However, alpha5beta1 but not alphavbeta3 supports high levels ...... receptors expressed on a cell dictates the ability of fibronectin to stimulate RhoA-mediated organization of cell matrix adhesions.......We have studied the formation of different types of cell matrix adhesions in cells that bind to fibronectin via either alpha5beta1 or alphavbeta3. In both cases, cell adhesion to fibronectin leads to a rapid decrease in RhoA activity. However, alpha5beta1 but not alphavbeta3 supports high levels...... of RhoA activity at later stages of cell spreading, which are associated with a translocation of focal contacts to peripheral cell protrusions, recruitment of tensin into fibrillar adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis. Expression of an activated mutant of RhoA stimulates alphavbeta3-mediated...

  13. Mutation analysis of inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci in young and familial pituitary adenomas.

    Demir, Hande; Donner, Iikki; Kivipelto, Leena; Kuismin, Outi; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; De Menis, Ernesto; Karhu, Auli

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are neoplasms of the anterior pituitary lobe and account for 15-20% of all intracranial tumors. Although most pituitary tumors are benign they can cause severe symptoms related to tumor size as well as hypopituitarism and/or hypersecretion of one or more pituitary hormones. Most pituitary adenomas are sporadic, but it has been estimated that 5% of patients have a familial background. Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) predispose to hereditary pituitary neoplasia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AIP mutations predispose to pituitary tumorigenesis through defective inhibitory GTP binding protein (Gαi) signaling. This finding prompted us to examine whether germline loss-of-function mutations in inhibitory guanine nucleotide (GTP) binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci are involved in genetic predisposition of pituitary tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first time GNAI genes are sequenced in order to examine the occurrence of inactivating germline mutations. Thus far, only somatic gain-of-function hot-spot mutations have been studied in these loci. Here, we have analyzed the coding regions of GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 in a set of young sporadic somatotropinoma patients (n = 32; mean age of diagnosis 32 years) and familial index cases (n = 14), thus in patients with a disease phenotype similar to that observed in AIP mutation carriers. In addition, expression of Gαi proteins was studied in human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and non-functional pituitary tumors. No pathogenic germline mutations affecting the Gαi proteins were detected. The result suggests that loss-of-function mutations of GNAI loci are rare or nonexistent in familial pituitary adenomas.

  14. Ties that Bind: Families in YA Books.

    Nelms, Beth; Nelms, Ben

    1984-01-01

    Describes novels and poetry anthologies that treat the family with some sympathy: there are stories of warm families, realistic stories of normal tensions, and stories that deal fairly with children estranged from their parents. (CRH)

  15. Structural insight into the rearrangement of the switch I region in GTP-bound G12A K-Ras

    Xu, Shenyuan; Long, Brian N.; Boris, Gabriel H.; Chen, Anqi; Ni, Shuisong; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2017-11-10

    K-Ras, a molecular switch that regulates cell growth, apoptosis and metabolism, is activated when it undergoes a conformation change upon binding GTP and is deactivated following the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. Hydrolysis of GTP in water is accelerated by coordination to K-Ras, where GTP adopts a high-energy conformation approaching the transition state. The G12A mutation reduces intrinsic K-Ras GTP hydrolysis by an unexplained mechanism. Here, crystal structures of G12A K-Ras in complex with GDP, GTP, GTPγS and GppNHp, and of Q61A K-Ras in complex with GDP, are reported. In the G12A K-Ras–GTP complex, the switch I region undergoes a significant reorganization such that the Tyr32 side chain points towards the GTP-binding pocket and forms a hydrogen bond to the GTP γ-phosphate, effectively stabilizing GTP in its precatalytic state, increasing the activation energy required to reach the transition state and contributing to the reduced intrinsic GTPase activity of G12A K-Ras mutants.

  16. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

  17. ABFs, a family of ABA-responsive element binding factors.

    Choi, H; Hong, J; Ha, J; Kang, J; Kim, S Y

    2000-01-21

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in environmental stress responses of higher plants during vegetative growth. One of the ABA-mediated responses is the induced expression of a large number of genes, which is mediated by cis-regulatory elements known as abscisic acid-responsive elements (ABREs). Although a number of ABRE binding transcription factors have been known, they are not specifically from vegetative tissues under induced conditions. Considering the tissue specificity of ABA signaling pathways, factors mediating ABA-dependent stress responses during vegetative growth phase may thus have been unidentified so far. Here, we report a family of ABRE binding factors isolated from young Arabidopsis plants under stress conditions. The factors, isolated by a yeast one-hybrid system using a prototypical ABRE and named as ABFs (ABRE binding factors) belong to a distinct subfamily of bZIP proteins. Binding site selection assay performed with one ABF showed that its preferred binding site is the strong ABRE, CACGTGGC. ABFs can transactivate an ABRE-containing reporter gene in yeast. Expression of ABFs is induced by ABA and various stress treatments, whereas their induction patterns are different from one another. Thus, a new family of ABRE binding factors indeed exists that have the potential to activate a large number of ABA/stress-responsive genes in Arabidopsis.

  18. Light- and GTP-activated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in squid photoreceptor membranes

    Baer, K.M.; Saibil, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    Light stimulates the hydrolysis of exogenous, [ 3 H]inositol-labeled phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PtdInsP2) added to squid photoreceptor membranes, releasing inositol trisphosphate (InsP3). At free calcium levels of 0.05 microM or greater, hydrolysis of the labeled lipid is stimulated up to 4-fold by GTP and light together, but not separately. This activity is the biochemical counterpart of observations on intact retina showing that a rhodopsin-activated GTP-binding protein is involved in visual transduction in invertebrates, and that InsP3 release is correlated with visual excitation and adaptation. Using an in vitro assay, we investigated the calcium and GTP dependence of the phospholipase activity. At calcium concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 microM, some hydrolysis occurs independently of GTP and light, with a light- and GTP-activated component superimposed. At 1 microM calcium there is no background activity, and hydrolysis absolutely requires both GTP and light. Ion exchange chromatography on Dowex 1 (formate form) of the water-soluble products released at 1 microM calcium reveals that the product is almost entirely InsP3. Invertebrate rhodopsin is homologous in sequence and function to vertebrate visual pigment, which modulates the concentration of cyclic GMP through the mediation of the GTP-binding protein transducin. While there is some evidence that light also modulates PtdInsP2 content in vertebrate photoreceptors, the case for its involvement in phototransduction is stronger for the invertebrate systems. The results reported here support the scheme of rhodopsin----GTP-binding protein----phospholipase C activation in invertebrate photoreceptors

  19. Thermodynamics of the GTP-GDP-operated conformational switch of selenocysteine-specific translation factor SelB.

    Paleskava, Alena; Konevega, Andrey L; Rodnina, Marina V

    2012-08-10

    SelB is a specialized translation factor that binds GTP and GDP and delivers selenocysteyl-tRNA (Sec-tRNA(Sec)) to the ribosome. By analogy to elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), SelB is expected to control the delivery and release of Sec-tRNA(Sec) to the ribosome by the structural switch between GTP- and GDP-bound conformations. However, crystal structures of SelB suggested a similar domain arrangement in the apo form and GDP- and GTP-bound forms of the factor, raising the question of how SelB can fulfill its delivery function. Here, we studied the thermodynamics of guanine nucleotide binding to SelB by isothermal titration calorimetry in the temperature range between 10 and 25 °C using GTP, GDP, and two nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs, guanosine 5'-O-(γ-thio)triphosphate (GTPγS) and guanosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)-triphosphate (GDPNP). The binding of SelB to either guanine nucleotide is characterized by a large heat capacity change (-621, -467, -235, and -275 cal × mol(-1) × K(-1), with GTP, GTPγS, GDPNP, and GDP, respectively), associated with compensatory changes in binding entropy and enthalpy. Changes in heat capacity indicate a large decrease of the solvent-accessible surface area in SelB, amounting to 43 or 32 amino acids buried upon binding of GTP or GTPγS, respectively, and 15-19 amino acids upon binding GDP or GDPNP. The similarity of the GTP and GDP forms in the crystal structures can be attributed to the use of GDPNP, which appears to induce a structure of SelB that is more similar to the GDP than to the GTP-bound form.

  20. Modeling the mechanisms of biological GTP hydrolysis

    Carvalho, Alexandra T.P.; Szeler, Klaudia; Vavitsas, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that hydrolyze GTP are currently in the spotlight, due to their molecular switch mechanism that controls many cellular processes. One of the best-known classes of these enzymes are small GTPases such as members of the Ras superfamily, which catalyze the hydrolysis of the γ-phosphate bond...... in GTP. In addition, the availability of an increasing number of crystal structures of translational GTPases such as EF-Tu and EF-G have made it possible to probe the molecular details of GTP hydrolysis on the ribosome. However, despite a wealth of biochemical, structural and computational data, the way...

  1. Sugar-Binding Profiles of Chitin-Binding Lectins from the Hevein Family: A Comprehensive Study

    Yoko Itakura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chitin-binding lectins form the hevein family in plants, which are defined by the presence of single or multiple structurally conserved GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine-binding domains. Although they have been used as probes for chito-oligosaccharides, their detailed specificities remain to be investigated. In this study, we analyzed six chitin-binding lectins, DSA, LEL, PWM, STL, UDA, and WGA, by quantitative frontal affinity chromatography. Some novel features were evident: WGA showed almost comparable affinity for pyridylaminated chitotriose and chitotetraose, while LEL and UDA showed much weaker affinity, and DSA, PWM, and STL had no substantial affinity for the former. WGA showed selective affinity for hybrid-type N-glycans harboring a bisecting GlcNAc residue. UDA showed extensive binding to high-mannose type N-glycans, with affinity increasing with the number of Man residues. DSA showed the highest affinity for highly branched N-glycans consisting of type II LacNAc (N-acetyllactosamine. Further, multivalent features of these lectins were investigated by using glycoconjugate and lectin microarrays. The lectins showed substantial binding to immobilized LacNAc as well as chito-oligosaccharides, although the extents to which they bound varied among them. WGA showed strong binding to heavily sialylated glycoproteins. The above observations will help interpret lectin-glycoprotein interactions in histochemical studies and glyco-biomarker investigations.

  2. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    Simonetti, Angelita; Marzi, Stefano; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue

  3. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    Simonetti, Angelita [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Marzi, Stefano [Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, UPR 9002 CNRS, IBMC (Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology), 15 Rue R. Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg, France, Université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Fabbretti, Attilio [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale -INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Gualerzi, Claudio O. [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  4. The nucleoporin MEL-28 promotes RanGTP-dependent γ-tubulin recruitment and microtubule nucleation in mitotic spindle formation.

    Yokoyama, Hideki; Koch, Birgit; Walczak, Rudolf; Ciray-Duygu, Fulya; González-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Devos, Damien P; Mattaj, Iain W; Gruss, Oliver J

    2014-01-01

    The GTP-bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP), produced around chromosomes, drives nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex (NPC) re-assembly after mitosis. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS binds chromatin in a RanGTP-regulated manner and acts to seed NPC assembly. Here we show that, upon mitotic NPC disassembly, MEL-28 dissociates from chromatin and re-localizes to spindle microtubules and kinetochores. MEL-28 directly binds microtubules in a RanGTP-regulated way via its C-terminal chromatin-binding domain. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we demonstrate that MEL-28 is essential for RanGTP-dependent microtubule nucleation and spindle assembly, independent of its function in NPC assembly. Specifically, MEL-28 interacts with the γ-tubulin ring complex and recruits it to microtubule nucleation sites. Our data identify MEL-28 as a RanGTP target that functions throughout the cell cycle. Its cell cycle-dependent binding to chromatin or microtubules discriminates MEL-28 functions in interphase and mitosis, and ensures that spindle assembly occurs only after NPC breakdown.

  5. Mitochondrial GTP Regulates Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion

    Kibbey, Richard G.; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Romanelli, Anthony J.; Wollheim, Claes B.; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2007-01-01

    Substrate-level mitochondrial GTP (mtGTP) and ATP (mtATP) synthesis occurs by nucleotide-specific isoforms of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme succinyl CoA synthetase (SCS). Unlike mtATP, each molecule of glucose metabolized produces approximately one mtGTP in pancreatic β-cells independent of coupling with oxidative phosphorylation making mtGTP a potentially important fuel signal. siRNA suppression of the GTP-producing pathway (ΔSCS-GTP) reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion ...

  6. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2017-07-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  7. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone.

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F

    2017-09-15

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes , Culex , and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary "long" D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10 R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  8. GDP-to-GTP exchange on the microtubule end can contribute to the frequency of catastrophe.

    Piedra, Felipe-Andrés; Kim, Tae; Garza, Emily S; Geyer, Elisabeth A; Burns, Alexander; Ye, Xuecheng; Rice, Luke M

    2016-11-07

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of αβ-tubulin that have essential roles in chromosome segregation and organization of the cytoplasm. Catastrophe-the switch from growing to shrinking-occurs when a microtubule loses its stabilizing GTP cap. Recent evidence indicates that the nucleotide on the microtubule end controls how tightly an incoming subunit will be bound (trans-acting GTP), but most current models do not incorporate this information. We implemented trans-acting GTP into a computational model for microtubule dynamics. In simulations, growing microtubules often exposed terminal GDP-bound subunits without undergoing catastrophe. Transient GDP exposure on the growing plus end slowed elongation by reducing the number of favorable binding sites on the microtubule end. Slower elongation led to erosion of the GTP cap and an increase in the frequency of catastrophe. Allowing GDP-to-GTP exchange on terminal subunits in simulations mitigated these effects. Using mutant αβ-tubulin or modified GTP, we showed experimentally that a more readily exchangeable nucleotide led to less frequent catastrophe. Current models for microtubule dynamics do not account for GDP-to-GTP exchange on the growing microtubule end, so our findings provide a new way of thinking about the molecular events that initiate catastrophe. © 2016 Piedra et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  10. The RanGTP pathway: from nucleo-cytoplasmic transport to spindle assembly and beyond

    Tommaso eCavazza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Ran regulates the interaction of transport receptors with a number of cellular cargo proteins. The high affinity binding of the GTP-bound form of Ran to import receptors promotes cargo release, whereas its binding to export receptors stabilizes their interaction with the cargo. This basic mechanism linked to the asymmetric distribution of the two nucleotide-bound forms of Ran between the nucleus and the cytoplasm generates a switch like mechanism controlling nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Since 1999, we have known that after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD Ran and the above transport receptors also provide a local control over the activity of factors driving spindle assembly and regulating other aspects of cell division. The identification and functional characterization of RanGTP mitotic targets is providing novel insights into mechanisms essential for cell division. Here we review our current knowledge on the RanGTP system and its regulation and we focus on the recent advances made through the characterization of its mitotic targets. We then briefly review the novel functions of the pathway that were recently described. Altogether, the RanGTP system has moonlighting functions exerting a spatial control over protein interactions that drive specific functions depending on the cellular context.

  11. The starch-binding domain family CBM41 - an in silico analysis of evolutionary relationships

    Janeček, Štefan; Majzlová, Katarína; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Within the CAZy database, there are 81 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families. A CBM represents a non-catalytic domain in a modular arrangement of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). The present in silico study has been focused on starch-binding domains from the family CBM41 that are usually part...

  12. Allosteric regulation of the GTP activated and CTP inhibited uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Arent, Susan; Larsen, Sine

    2005-01-01

    The upp gene, encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It behaved as a tetramer in solution and showed optimal activity at pH 5.5 when...... assayed at 60 °C. Enzyme activity was strongly stimulated by GTP and inhibited by CTP. GTP caused an approximately 20-fold increase in the turnover number kcat and raised the Km values for 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) and uracil by two- and >10-fold, respectively. The inhibition by CTP...... was complex as it depended on the presence of the reaction product UMP. Neither CTP nor UMP were strong inhibitors of the enzyme, but when present in combination their inhibition was extremely powerful. Ligand binding analyses showed that GTP and PRPP bind cooperatively to the enzyme and that the inhibitors...

  13. Identification of cDNA encoding an additional α subunit of a human GTP-binding protein: Expression of three αi subtypes in human tissues and cell lines

    Kim, S.; Ang, S.L.; Bloch, D.B.; Bloch, K.D.; Kawahara, Y.; Tolman, C.; Lee, R.; Seidman, J.G.; Neer, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), which mediate hormonal regulation of many membrane functions, are composed of α, β, and γ subunits. The authors have cloned and characterized cDNA from a human T-cell library encoding a form of α i that is different from the human α i subtypes previously reported. α i is the α subunit of a class of G proteins that inhibits adenylate cyclase and regulates other enzymes and ion channels. This cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 354 amino acids and is assigned to encode the α i-3 subtype of G proteins on the basis of its similarity to other α i -like cDNAs and the presence of a predicted site for ADP ribosylation by pertussis toxin. They have determined the expression of mRNA for this and two other subtypes of human α i (α i-1 and α i-2 ) in a variety of human fetal tissues and in human cell lines. All three α i subtypes were present in the tissues tested. However, analysis of individual cell types reveals specificity of α i-1 expression. mRNA for α i-1 is absent in T cells, B cells, and monocytes but is present in other cell lines. The finding of differential expression of α i-1 genes may permit characterization of distinct physiological roles for this α i subunit. mRNA for α i-2 and α i-3 was found in all the primary and transformed cell lines tested. Thus, some cells contain all three α i subtypes. This observation raises the question of how cells prevent cross talk among receptors that are coupled to effectors through such similar α proteins

  14. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer’s disease

    Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E.; Londoño, Ana C.; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer’s disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer’s disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer’s disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer’s disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer’s disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer’s disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding

  15. Mitochondrial GTP Regulates Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    Kibbey, Richard G.; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Romanelli, Anthony J.; Wollheim, Claes B.; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide-specific isoforms of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) catalyze substrate-level synthesis of mitochondrial GTP (mtGTP) and ATP (mtATP). While mtATP yield from glucose metabolism is coupled with oxidative phosphorylation and can vary, each molecule of glucose metabolized within pancreatic beta cells produces approximately one mtGTP, making mtGTP a potentially important fuel signal. In INS-1 832/13 cells and cultured rat islets, siRNA suppression...

  16. Dopa-responsive dystonia and early-onset Parkinson's disease in a patient with GTP cyclohydrolase I deficiency?

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Johannsen, Lis Gitte; Blau, Nenad

    2006-01-01

    We describe a patient with a combination of dystonic and parkinsonian signs. Paraclinical studies revealed a mutation in the GTP cyclohydrolase I gene (GCH1) and a decrease in [123I]-N-omega-fluoropropyl-2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane (123I-FP-CIT) binding ratios indicative...

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Rab6A′(Q72L): a GTP-locked form

    Shin, Young-Cheul; Jang, Tae-Ho; Yoon, Jong Hwan; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Park, Hyun Ho

    2012-01-01

    Rab6A′(Q72L), a constitutively active GTP-binding form of Rab6A, was purified and crystallized. The crystals were found to belong to space group P22 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 36.84, b = 96.78, c = 109.99 Å. The crystals were obtained at 293 K and diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å. Rab6A, a member of the Ras superfamily of small G proteins, is involved in the regulation of vesicle trafficking, which is critical for endocytosis, cell differentiation and cell growth. Rab6A can exist in two isoforms termed Rab6A and Rab6A′. The substitution of Gln72 by Leu (Q72L) in the Rab6A family blocks GTP-hydrolysis activity, and this mutation usually causes the Rab6A protein to be in a constitutively active form. In this study, in order to understand the functional uniqueness of Rab6A′ and the molecular mechanism of the control of activity by GTP and GDP from the crystal structure, a Rab6A′(Q72L) mutant form was overexpressed in Escherichia coli with an engineered N-terminal His tag. Rab6A′(Q72L) was then purified to homogeneity and crystallized at 293 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å from a crystal belonging to space group P22 1 2 1 with unit-cell parameters a = 36.84, b = 96.78, c = 109.99 Å. The asymmetric unit was estimated to contain two molecules

  18. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK) family proteins contain an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain, whose function has been elusive. Here, this domain is revealed as a new type of phospho-peptide-binding module, in which the GMP-binding site has evolved to accommodate phospho-serines or -threonines.

  19. Mitochondrial GTP Regulates Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion

    Kibbey, Richard G.; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Romanelli, Anthony J.; Wollheim, Claes B.; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Substrate-level mitochondrial GTP (mtGTP) and ATP (mtATP) synthesis occurs by nucleotide-specific isoforms of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme succinyl CoA synthetase (SCS). Unlike mtATP, each molecule of glucose metabolized produces approximately one mtGTP in pancreatic β-cells independent of coupling with oxidative phosphorylation making mtGTP a potentially important fuel signal. siRNA suppression of the GTP-producing pathway (ΔSCS-GTP) reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) by 50%, whereas suppression of the parallel ATP-producing isoform (ΔSCS-ATP) increased GSIS by two-fold in INS-1 832/13 cells and cultured rat islets. Insulin secretion correlated with increases in cytosolic calcium but not with changes in NAD(P)H or the ATP/ADP ratio. These data suggest an important role for mtGTP in mediating GSIS in β-cells by modulation of mitochondrial metabolism possibly via influencing mitochondrial calcium. Furthermore, by virtue of its tight coupling to TCA oxidation rates, mtGTP production may serve as an important molecular signal of TCA cycle activity. PMID:17403370

  20. Familial defective apolipoprotein B-100: low density lipoproteins with abnormal receptor binding

    Innerarity, T.L.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Arnold, K.S.; Mahley, R.W.; Krauss, R.M.; Vega, G.L.; Grundy, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Previous in vivo turnover studies suggested that retarded clearance of low density lipoproteins (LDL) from the plasma of some hypercholesterolemic patients is due to LDL with defective receptor binding. The present study examined this postulate directly by receptor binding experiments. The LDL from a hypercholesterolemic patient (G.R.) displayed a reduced ability to bind to the LDL receptors on normal human fibroblasts. The G.R. LDL possessed 32% of normal receptor binding activity. Likewise, the G.R. LDL were much less effective than normal LDL in competing with 125 I-labeled normal LDL for cellular uptake and degradation and in stimulating intracellular cholesteryl ester synthesis. The defect in LDL binding appears to be due to a genetic abnormality of apolipoprotein B-100: two brothers of the proband possess LDL defective in receptor binding, whereas a third brother and the proband's son have normally binding LDL. Further, the defect in receptor binding does not appear to be associated wit an abnormal lipid composition or structure of the LDL. Normal and abnormal LDL subpopulations were partially separated from plasma of two subjects by density-gradient ultracentrifugation, a finding consistent with the presence of a normal and a mutant allele. The affected family members appear to be heterozygous for this disorder, which has been designated familial defective apolipoprotein B-100. These studies indicate that the defective receptor binding results in inefficient clearance of LDL and the hypercholesterolemia observed in these patients

  1. Identification of a GTP-bound Rho specific scFv molecular sensor by phage display selection

    Chinestra Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rho GTPases A, B and C proteins, members of the Rho family whose activity is regulated by GDP/GTP cycling, function in many cellular pathways controlling proliferation and have recently been implicated in tumorigenesis. Although overexpression of Rho GTPases has been correlated with tumorigenesis, only their GTP-bound forms are able to activate the signalling pathways implicated in tumorigenesis. Thus, the focus of much recent research has been to identify biological tools capable of quantifying the level of cellular GTP-bound Rho, or determining the subcellular location of activation. However useful, these tools used to study the mechanism of Rho activation still have limitations. The aim of the present work was to employ phage display to identify a conformationally-specific single chain fragment variable (scFv that recognizes the active, GTP-bound, form of Rho GTPases and is able to discriminate it from the inactive, GDP-bound, Rho in endogenous settings. Results After five rounds of phage selection using a constitutively activated mutant of RhoB (RhoBQ63L, three scFvs (A8, C1 and D11 were selected for subsequent analysis. Further biochemical characterization was pursued for the single clone, C1, exhibiting an scFv structure. C1 was selective for the GTP-bound form of RhoA, RhoB, as well as RhoC, and failed to recognize GTP-loaded Rac1 or Cdc42, two other members of the Rho family. To enhance its production, soluble C1 was expressed in fusion with the N-terminal domain of phage protein pIII (scFv C1-N1N2, it appeared specifically associated with GTP-loaded recombinant RhoA and RhoB via immunoprecipitation, and endogenous activated Rho in HeLa cells as determined by immunofluorescence. Conclusion We identified an antibody, C1-N1N2, specific for the GTP-bound form of RhoB from a phage library, and confirmed its specificity towards GTP-bound RhoA and RhoC, as well as RhoB. The success of C1-N1N2 in discriminating activated

  2. Formation of a Trimeric Xpo1-Ran[GTP]-Ded1 Exportin Complex Modulates ATPase and Helicase Activities of Ded1.

    Glenn Hauk

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1, which is essential in yeast and known as DDX3 in humans, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and takes part in several basic processes including RNA processing and translation. A key interacting partner of Ded1 is the exportin Xpo1, which together with the GTP-bound state of the small GTPase Ran, facilitates unidirectional transport of Ded1 out of the nucleus. Here we demonstrate that Xpo1 and Ran[GTP] together reduce the RNA-stimulated ATPase and helicase activities of Ded1. Binding and inhibition of Ded1 by Xpo1 depend on the affinity of the Ded1 nuclear export sequence (NES for Xpo1 and the presence of Ran[GTP]. Association with Xpo1/Ran[GTP] reduces RNA-stimulated ATPase activity of Ded1 by increasing the apparent KM for the RNA substrate. Despite the increased KM, the Ded1:Xpo1:Ran[GTP] ternary complex retains the ability to bind single stranded RNA, suggesting that Xpo1/Ran[GTP] may modulate the substrate specificity of Ded1. These results demonstrate that, in addition to transport, exportins such as Xpo1 also have the capability to alter enzymatic activities of their cargo.

  3. Influence of GTP/GDP and magnesium ion on the solvated structure of the protein FtsZ: a molecular dynamics study.

    Jamous, Carla; Basdevant, Nathalie; Ha-Duong, Tap

    2014-01-01

    We present here a structural analysis of ten extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the monomeric protein FtsZ in various binding states. Since the polymerization and GTPase activities of FtsZ depend on the nature of a bound nucleotide as well as on the presence of a magnesium ion, we studied the structural differences between the average conformations of the following five systems: FtsZ-Apo, FtsZ-GTP, FtsZ-GDP, FtsZ-GTP-Mg, and FtsZ-GDP-Mg. The in silico solvated average structure of FtsZ-Apo significantly differs from the crystallographic structure 1W59 of FtsZ which was crystallized in a dimeric form without nucleotide and magnesium. The simulated Apo form of the protein also clearly differs from the FtsZ structures when it is bound to its ligand, the most important discrepancies being located in the loops surrounding the nucleotide binding pocket. The three average structures of FtsZ-GTP, FtsZ-GDP, and FtsZ-GTP-Mg are overall similar, except for the loop T7 located at the opposite side of the binding pocket and whose conformation in FtsZ-GDP notably differs from the one in FtsZ-GTP and FtsZ-GTP-Mg. The presence of a magnesium ion in the binding pocket has no impact on the FtsZ conformation when it is bound to GTP. In contrast, when the protein is bound to GDP, the divalent cation causes a translation of the nucleotide outwards the pocket, inducing a significant conformational change of the loop H6-H7 and the top of helix H7.

  4. VIP receptors from porcine liver: High yield solubilization in a GTP-insensitive form

    Voisin, T.; Couvineau, A.; Guijarro, L.; Laburthe, M.

    1990-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors were solubilized from porcine liver membranes using CHAPS. The binding of 125 I-VIP to solubilized receptors was reversible, saturable and specific. Scatchard analysis indicated the presence of one binding site with a Kd of 6.5 ± 0.3 nM and a Bmax of 1.20 ± 0.15 pmol/mg protein. Solubilized and membrane-bound receptors displayed the same pharmacological profile since VIP and VIP-related peptides inhibited 125 I-VIP binding to both receptor preparations with the same rank order of potency e.g. VIP>helodermin>rat GRF>rat PHI>secretin>human GRF. GTP inhibited 125 I-VIP binding to membrane-bound receptors but not to solubilized receptors supporting functional uncoupling of VIP receptor and G protein during solubilization. Affinity labeling of solubilized and membrane-bound VIP receptors with 125 I-VIP revealed the presence of a single molecular component with Mr 55,000 in both cases. It is concluded that VIP receptors from porcine liver can be solubilized with a good yield, in a GTP-insensitive, G protein-free form. This represents a major advance towards the purification of VIP receptors

  5. Familial Risk for Major Depression is Associated with Lower Striatal 5-HT4 Receptor Binding

    Madsen, Karine; Torstensen, Eva; Holst, Klaus K

    2014-01-01

    was to determine whether familial risk for MDD is associated with cerebral 5-HT4 receptor binding as measured with [(11)C]SB207145 brain PET imaging. Familial risk is the most potent risk factor of MDD. METHODS: We studied 57 healthy individuals (mean age 36 yrs, range 20-86; 21 women), 26 of which had first......-degree relatives treated for MDD. RESULTS: We found that having a family history of MDD was associated with lower striatal 5-HT4 receptor binding (p = 0.038; in individuals below 40 years, p = 0.013). Further, we found evidence for a "risk-dose effect" on 5-HT4 receptor binding, since the number of first......-degree relatives with a history of MDD binding correlated negatively with 5-HT4 receptor binding in both the striatum (p = 0.001) and limbic regions (p = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the 5-HT4 receptor is involved in the neurobiological mechanism underlying familial risk for depression...

  6. The carbohydrate-binding module family 20-diversity, structure, and function

    Christiansen, Camilla; Abou Hachem, Maher; Janecek, S.

    2009-01-01

    , laforins. The clear evolutionary relatedness of CBM20s to CBM21s, CBM48s and CBM53s suggests a common clan hosting most of the known SBDs. This review surveys the diversity within the CBM20 family, and makes an evolutionary comparison with CBM21s, CBM48s and CBM53s, discussing intrafamily and interfamily......Starch-active enzymes often possess starch-binding domains (SBDs) mediating attachment to starch granules and other high molecular weight substrates. SBDs are divided into nine carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families, and CBM20 is the earliest-assigned and best characterized family. High...... diversity characterizes CBM20s, which occur in starch-active glycoside hydrolase families 13, 14, 15, and 77, and enzymes involved in starch or glycogen metabolism, exemplified by the starch-phosphorylating enzyme glucan, water dikinase 3 from Arabidopsis thaliana and the mammalian glycogen phosphatases...

  7. Delineation of the Pasteurellaceae-specific GbpA-family of glutathione-binding proteins

    Vergauwen Bjorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus influenzae is a glutathione auxotroph and acquires the redox-active tripeptide by import. The dedicated glutathione transporter belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC-transporter superfamily and displays more than 60% overall sequence identity with the well-studied dipeptide (Dpp permease of Escherichia coli. The solute binding protein (SBP that mediates glutathione transport in H. influenzae is a lipoprotein termed GbpA and is 54% identical to E. coli DppA, a well-studied member of family 5 SBP's. The discovery linking GbpA to glutathione import came rather unexpectedly as this import-priming SBP was previously annotated as a heme-binding protein (HbpA, and was thought to mediate heme acquisition. Nonetheless, although many SBP's have been implicated in more than one function, a prominent physiological role for GbpA and its partner permease in heme acquisition appears to be very unlikely. Here, we sought to characterize five representative GbpA homologs in an effort to delineate the novel GbpA-family of glutathione-specific family 5 SBPs and to further clarify their functional role in terms of ligand preferences. Results Lipoprotein and non-lipoprotein GbpA homologs were expressed in soluble form and substrate specificity was evaluated via a number of ligand binding assays. A physiologically insignificant affinity for hemin was observed for all five GbpA homologous test proteins. Three out of five test proteins were found to bind glutathione and some of its physiologically relevant derivatives with low- or submicromolar affinity. None of the tested SBP family 5 allocrites interacted with the remaining two GbpA test proteins. Structure-based sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that the two binding-inert GbpA homologs clearly form a separate phylogenetic cluster. To elucidate a structure-function rationale for this phylogenetic differentiation, we determined the crystal

  8. Ties That Bind: Family and Community. First Edition. Our Human Family Series.

    Clay, Rebecca

    This book examines the cultural universal of family and community from a multicultural perspective. The text is written for juveniles, and includes many color photographs. Chapters include: (1) "Families Are Everywhere"; (2) "The Americas"; (3) "Africa"; (4) "Europe and the Middle East"; (5) "Asia"; and (6) "Australia and the South Pacific." The…

  9. Disease-Causing Mutations in the G Protein Gαs Subvert the Roles of GDP and GTP.

    Hu, Qi; Shokat, Kevan M

    2018-05-17

    The single most frequent cancer-causing mutation across all heterotrimeric G proteins is R201C in Gαs. The current model explaining the gain-of-function activity of the R201 mutations is through the loss of GTPase activity and resulting inability to switch off to the GDP state. Here, we find that the R201C mutation can bypass the need for GTP binding by directly activating GDP-bound Gαs through stabilization of an intramolecular hydrogen bond network. Having found that a gain-of-function mutation can convert GDP into an activator, we postulated that a reciprocal mutation might disrupt the normal role of GTP. Indeed, we found R228C, a loss-of-function mutation in Gαs that causes pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP-Ia), compromised the adenylyl cyclase-activating activity of Gαs bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog. These findings show that disease-causing mutations in Gαs can subvert the canonical roles of GDP and GTP, providing new insights into the regulation mechanism of G proteins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Guanine nucleotide binding proteins in zucchini seedlings: Characterization and interactions with the NPA receptor

    Lindeberg, M.; Jacobs, M.

    1989-01-01

    A microsomal membrane preparation from hypocotyls of dark-grown Cucurbita pepo L. seedlings contains specific high-affinity binding sites for the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5'-[γ-thio] triphosphate (GTP-γ-S). Both the binding affinity and the pattern of binding specificity for GTP and GTP analogs are similar to animal G-proteins, and two zucchini membrane proteins are recognized in western blots by antiserum specific for the σ subunit of platelet G s protein. GTP-γ-S can increase specific naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) binding in zucchini microsomal membrane preparations, with its stimulation increasing with large tissue age. Al +3 and F - agents known to activate G-proteins - decreased NPA specific binding by ca. 15%. In tests of in vitro auxin transport employing zucchini plasma membrane vesicles, AlF - 4 strongly inhibited 3 H-indoleacetic acid nor accumulation; GTP-γ-S effects on this system will be discussed

  11. Mammalian translation elongation factor eEF1A2: X-ray structure and new features of GDP/GTP exchange mechanism in higher eukaryotes.

    Crepin, Thibaut; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Vlasenko, Dmytro O; McCarthy, Andrew; Negrutskii, Boris S; Tukalo, Michail A; El'skaya, Anna V

    2014-11-10

    Eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A transits between the GTP- and GDP-bound conformations during the ribosomal polypeptide chain elongation. eEF1A*GTP establishes a complex with the aminoacyl-tRNA in the A site of the 80S ribosome. Correct codon-anticodon recognition triggers GTP hydrolysis, with subsequent dissociation of eEF1A*GDP from the ribosome. The structures of both the 'GTP'- and 'GDP'-bound conformations of eEF1A are unknown. Thus, the eEF1A-related ribosomal mechanisms were anticipated only by analogy with the bacterial homolog EF-Tu. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the mammalian eEF1A2*GDP complex which indicates major differences in the organization of the nucleotide-binding domain and intramolecular movements of eEF1A compared to EF-Tu. Our results explain the nucleotide exchange mechanism in the mammalian eEF1A and suggest that the first step of eEF1A*GDP dissociation from the 80S ribosome is the rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain observed after GTP hydrolysis. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. A CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Florideophyceae) has a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module.

    Matthews, Peter R; Schindler, Michael; Howles, Paul; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2010-10-01

    Cellulose synthases form rosette terminal complexes in the plasma membranes of Streptophyta and various linear terminal complexes in other taxa. The sequence of a putative CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Floridiophyceae) was deduced using a cloning strategy involving degenerate primers, a cDNA library screen, and 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). RACE identified two alternative transcriptional starts and four alternative polyadenylation sites. The first translation start codon provided an open reading frame of 2610 bp encoding 870 amino acids and was PCR amplified without introns from genomic DNA. Southern hybridization indicated one strongly hybridizing gene with possible weakly related genes or pseudogenes. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) upstream of the protein's first predicted transmembrane domain. There are broad similarities in predicted 3D structures of the family 48 modules from CESA, from several glycogen- and starch-binding enzymes, and from protein kinases, but there are substitutions at some residues thought to be involved in ligand binding. The module in G. monilis CESA will be on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane so that it could potentially bind either low molecular weight ligands or starch which is cytosolic rather than inside membrane-bound plastids in red algae. Possible reasons why red algal CESAs have evolved family 48 modules perhaps as part of a system to regulate cellulose synthase activity in relation to cellular carbohydrate status are briefly discussed.

  13. A CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Florideophyceae) has a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module

    Matthews, Peter R.; Schindler, Michael; Howles, Paul; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose synthases form rosette terminal complexes in the plasma membranes of Streptophyta and various linear terminal complexes in other taxa. The sequence of a putative CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Floridiophyceae) was deduced using a cloning strategy involving degenerate primers, a cDNA library screen, and 5′ and 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). RACE identified two alternative transcriptional starts and four alternative polyadenylation sites. The first translation start codon provided an open reading frame of 2610 bp encoding 870 amino acids and was PCR amplified without introns from genomic DNA. Southern hybridization indicated one strongly hybridizing gene with possible weakly related genes or pseudogenes. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) upstream of the protein's first predicted transmembrane domain. There are broad similarities in predicted 3D structures of the family 48 modules from CESA, from several glycogen- and starch-binding enzymes, and from protein kinases, but there are substitutions at some residues thought to be involved in ligand binding. The module in G. monilis CESA will be on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane so that it could potentially bind either low molecular weight ligands or starch which is cytosolic rather than inside membrane-bound plastids in red algae. Possible reasons why red algal CESAs have evolved family 48 modules perhaps as part of a system to regulate cellulose synthase activity in relation to cellular carbohydrate status are briefly discussed. PMID:20702566

  14. Multiple ETS family proteins regulate PF4 gene expression by binding to the same ETS binding site.

    Yoshiaki Okada

    Full Text Available In previous studies on the mechanism underlying megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, several ETS motifs were found in each megakaryocyte-specific gene promoter. Although these studies suggested that several ETS family proteins regulate megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, only a few ETS family proteins have been identified. Platelet factor 4 (PF4 is a megakaryocyte-specific gene and its promoter includes multiple ETS motifs. We had previously shown that ETS-1 binds to an ETS motif in the PF4 promoter. However, the functions of the other ETS motifs are still unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate a novel functional ETS motif in the PF4 promoter and identify proteins binding to the motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP bound to the -51 ETS site. Expression of FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP activated the PF4 promoter in HepG2 cells. Mutation of a -51 ETS site attenuated FLI-1-, ELF-1-, and GABP-mediated transactivation of the promoter. siRNA analysis demonstrated that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression in HEL cells. Among these three proteins, only FLI-1 synergistically activated the promoter with GATA-1. In addition, only FLI-1 expression was increased during megakaryocytic differentiation. Finally, the importance of the -51 ETS site for the activation of the PF4 promoter during physiological megakaryocytic differentiation was confirmed by a novel reporter gene assay using in vitro ES cell differentiation system. Together, these data suggest that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression through the -51 ETS site in megakaryocytes and implicate the differentiation stage-specific regulation of PF4 gene expression by multiple ETS factors.

  15. The Role of Nuclear Receptor-Binding SET Domain Family Histone Lysine Methyltransferases in Cancer.

    Bennett, Richard L; Swaroop, Alok; Troche, Catalina; Licht, Jonathan D

    2017-06-01

    The nuclear receptor-binding SET Domain (NSD) family of histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferases is comprised of NSD1, NSD2 (MMSET/WHSC1), and NSD3 (WHSC1L1). These enzymes recognize and catalyze methylation of histone lysine marks to regulate chromatin integrity and gene expression. The growing number of reports demonstrating that alterations or translocations of these genes fundamentally affect cell growth and differentiation leading to developmental defects illustrates the importance of this family. In addition, overexpression, gain of function somatic mutations, and translocations of NSDs are associated with human cancer and can trigger cellular transformation in model systems. Here we review the functions of NSD family members and the accumulating evidence that these proteins play key roles in tumorigenesis. Because epigenetic therapy is an important emerging anticancer strategy, understanding the function of NSD family members may lead to the development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. A high-affinity inhibitor of yeast carboxypeptidase Y is encoded by TFS1 and shows homology to a family of lipid binding proteins

    Bruun, A W; Svendsen, I; Sørensen, S O

    1998-01-01

    signals for transport into the endoplasmic reticulum. Surprisingly, Ic is encoded by TFS1, which has previously been isolated as a high-copy suppressor of cdc25-1. CDC25 encodes the putative GTP exchange factor for Ras1p/Ras2p in yeast. In an attempt to rationalize this finding, we looked...... degree of specificity, showing a 200-fold higher Ki toward a carboxypeptidase from Candida albicans which is highly homologous to carboxypeptidase Y. The TFS1 gene product shows extensive similarity to a class of proteins termed "21-23-kDa lipid binding proteins", members of which are found in several...

  17. High familial risk for mood disorder is associated with low dorsolateral prefrontal cortex serotonin transporter binding

    Frokjaer, Vibe G; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David

    2009-01-01

    at risk for developing depression. The aim of this study was to explore whether abnormalities in SERT might be present in healthy individuals with familial predisposition to mood disorder. Nine individuals at high familial risk (mean age 32.2+/-4.2 years) and 11 individuals at low risk (mean age 32......Mood disorders are elicited through a combination of genetic and environmental stress factors, and treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors ameliorates depressive symptoms. Changes in the serotonin transporter (SERT) binding may therefore occur in depressive patients and in subjects.......4+/-5.0 years) for developing mood disorder were included. The subjects were healthy twins with or without a co-twin history of mood disorder identified by linking information from the Danish Twin Register and the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. Regional in vivo brain serotonin transporter binding...

  18. Biochemical profiling of histone binding selectivity of the yeast bromodomain family.

    Qiang Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that molecular interactions between site-specific chemical modifications such as acetylation and methylation on DNA-packing histones and conserved structural modules present in transcriptional proteins are closely associated with chromatin structural changes and gene activation. Unlike methyl-lysine that can interact with different protein modules including chromodomains, Tudor and MBT domains, as well as PHD fingers, acetyl-lysine (Kac is known thus far to be recognized only by bromodomains. While histone lysine acetylation plays a crucial role in regulation of chromatin-mediated gene transcription, a high degree of sequence variation of the acetyl-lysine binding site in the bromodomains has limited our understanding of histone binding selectivity of the bromodomain family. Here, we report a systematic family-wide analysis of 14 yeast bromodomains binding to 32 lysine-acetylated peptides derived from known major acetylation sites in four core histones that are conserved in eukaryotes.The histone binding selectivity of purified recombinant yeast bromodomains was assessed by using the native core histones in an overlay assay, as well as N-terminally biotinylated lysine-acetylated histone peptides spotted on streptavidin-coated nitrocellulose membrane in a dot blot assay. NMR binding analysis further validated the interactions between histones and selected bromodomain. Structural models of all yeast bromodomains were built using comparative modeling to provide insights into the molecular basis of their histone binding selectivity.Our study reveals that while not all members of the bromodomain family are privileged to interact with acetylated-lysine, identifiable sequence features from those that bind histone emerge. These include an asparagine residue at the C-terminus of the third helix in the 4-helix bundle, negatively charged residues around the ZA loop, and preponderance of aromatic amino acid residues in the binding pocket

  19. Conserved binding of GCAC motifs by MEC-8, couch potato, and the RBPMS protein family

    Soufari, Heddy

    2017-01-01

    Precise regulation of mRNA processing, translation, localization, and stability relies on specific interactions with RNA-binding proteins whose biological function and target preference are dictated by their preferred RNA motifs. The RBPMS family of RNA-binding proteins is defined by a conserved RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain found in metazoan RBPMS/Hermes and RBPMS2, Drosophila couch potato, and MEC-8 from Caenorhabditis elegans. In order to determine the parameters of RNA sequence recognition by the RBPMS family, we have first used the N-terminal domain from MEC-8 in binding assays and have demonstrated a preference for two GCAC motifs optimally separated by >6 nucleotides (nt). We have also determined the crystal structure of the dimeric N-terminal RRM domain from MEC-8 in the unbound form, and in complex with an oligonucleotide harboring two copies of the optimal GCAC motif. The atomic details reveal the molecular network that provides specificity to all four bases in the motif, including multiple hydrogen bonds to the initial guanine. Further studies with human RBPMS, as well as Drosophila couch potato, confirm a general preference for this double GCAC motif by other members of the protein family and the presence of this motif in known targets. PMID:28003515

  20. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules.

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-11-25

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are a large family of scaffold proteins that play essential roles in tissue developments, cell-cell communications, cell polarity control, and cellular signal transductions. Despite extensive studies over the past two decades, the functions of the signature guanylate kinase domain (GK) of MAGUKs are poorly understood. Here we show that the GK domain of DLG1/SAP97 binds to asymmetric cell division regulatory protein LGN in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The structure of the DLG1 SH3-GK tandem in complex with a phospho-LGN peptide reveals that the GMP-binding site of GK has evolved into a specific pSer/pThr-binding pocket. Residues both N- and C-terminal to the pSer are also critical for the specific binding of the phospho-LGN peptide to GK. We further demonstrate that the previously reported GK domain-mediated interactions of DLGs with other targets, such as GKAP/DLGAP1/SAPAP1 and SPAR, are also phosphorylation dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that other MAGUK GKs also function as phospho-peptide-binding modules. The discovery of the phosphorylation-dependent MAGUK GK/target interactions indicates that MAGUK scaffold-mediated signalling complex organizations are dynamically regulated.

  1. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  2. Visual short-term memory binding deficit in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Liang, Yuying; Pertzov, Yoni; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Henley, Susie M D; Crutch, Sebastian; Woodward, Felix; Leung, Kelvin; Fox, Nick C; Husain, Masud

    2016-05-01

    Long-term episodic memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are well characterised but, until recently, short-term memory (STM) function has attracted far less attention. We employed a recently-developed, delayed reproduction task which requires participants to reproduce precisely the remembered location of items they had seen only seconds previously. This paradigm provides not only a continuous measure of localization error in memory, but also an index of relational binding by determining the frequency with which an object is misplaced to the location of one of the other items held in memory. Such binding errors in STM have previously been found on this task to be sensitive to medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage in focal lesion cases. Twenty individuals with pathological mutations in presenilin 1 or amyloid precursor protein genes for familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) were tested together with 62 healthy controls. Participants were assessed using the delayed reproduction memory task, a standard neuropsychological battery and structural MRI. Overall, FAD mutation carriers were worse than controls for object identity as well as in gross localization memory performance. Moreover, they showed greater misbinding of object identity and location than healthy controls. Thus they would often mislocalize a correctly-identified item to the location of one of the other items held in memory. Significantly, asymptomatic gene carriers - who performed similarly to healthy controls on standard neuropsychological tests - had a specific impairment in object-location binding, despite intact memory for object identity and location. Consistent with the hypothesis that the hippocampus is critically involved in relational binding regardless of memory duration, decreased hippocampal volume across FAD participants was significantly associated with deficits in object-location binding but not with recall precision for object identity or localization. Object-location binding may therefore

  3. The Msi Family of RNA-Binding Proteins Function Redundantly as Intestinal Oncoproteins

    Ning Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Msi family of RNA-binding proteins have recently emerged as potent oncoproteins in a range of malignancies. MSI2 is highly expressed in hematopoietic cancers, where it is required for disease maintenance. In contrast to the hematopoietic system, colorectal cancers can express both Msi family members, MSI1 and MSI2. Here, we demonstrate that, in the intestinal epithelium, Msi1 and Msi2 have analogous oncogenic effects. Further, comparison of Msi1/2-induced gene expression programs and transcriptome-wide analyses of Msi1/2-RNA-binding targets reveal significant functional overlap, including induction of the PDK-Akt-mTORC1 axis. Ultimately, we demonstrate that concomitant loss of function of both MSI family members is sufficient to abrogate the growth of human colorectal cancer cells, and Msi gene deletion inhibits tumorigenesis in several mouse models of intestinal cancer. Our findings demonstrate that MSI1 and MSI2 act as functionally redundant oncoproteins required for the ontogeny of intestinal cancers.

  4. Diversity, expansion, and evolutionary novelty of plant DNA-binding transcription factor families.

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D; Panchy, Nicholas; Wang, Peipei; Uygun, Sahra; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2017-01-01

    Plant transcription factors (TFs) that interact with specific sequences via DNA-binding domains are crucial for regulating transcriptional initiation and are fundamental to plant development and environmental response. In addition, expansion of TF families has allowed functional divergence of duplicate copies, which has contributed to novel, and in some cases adaptive, traits in plants. Thus, TFs are central to the generation of the diverse plant species that we see today. Major plant agronomic traits, including those relevant to domestication, have also frequently arisen through changes in TF coding sequence or expression patterns. Here our goal is to provide an overview of plant TF evolution by first comparing the diversity of DNA-binding domains and the sizes of these domain families in plants and other eukaryotes. Because TFs are among the most highly expanded gene families in plants, the birth and death process of TFs as well as the mechanisms contributing to their retention are discussed. We also provide recent examples of how TFs have contributed to novel traits that are important in plant evolution and in agriculture.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Specific deficit of colour-colour short-term memory binding in sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Parra, Mario A; Sala, Sergio Della; Abrahams, Sharon; Logie, Robert H; Méndez, Luis Guillermo; Lopera, Francisco

    2011-06-01

    Short-term memory binding of visual features which are processed across different dimensions (shape-colour) is impaired in sporadic Alzheimer's disease, familial Alzheimer's disease, and in asymptomatic carriers of familial Alzheimer's disease. This study investigated whether Alzheimer's disease also impacts on within-dimension binding processes. The study specifically explored whether visual short-term memory binding of features of the same type (colour-colour) is sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. We used a neuropsychological battery and a short-term memory binding task to assess patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (Experiment 1), familial Alzheimer's disease (Experiment 2) due to the mutation E280A of the Presenilin-1 gene and asymptomatic carriers of the mutation. The binding task assessed change detection within arrays of unicoloured objects (Colour Only) or bicoloured objects the colours of which had to be remembered separately (Unbound Colours) or together (Bound Colours). Performance on the Bound Colours condition (1) explained the largest proportion of variance between patients (sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease), (2) combined more sensitivity and specificity for the disease than other more traditional neuropsychological tasks, (3) identified asymptomatic carriers of the mutation even when traditional neuropsychological measures and other measures of short-term memory did not and, (4) contrary to shape-colour binding, correlated with measures of hippocampal functions. Colour-colour binding and shape-colour binding both appear to be sensitive to AD even though they seem to rely on different brain mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular characterization of two sub-family specific monoclonal antibodies to meningococcal Factor H binding protein

    C. Lo Passo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Factor H binding protein (FHbp is a component of two licensed vaccines for prevention of sepsis and meningitis caused by serogroup B meningococci. FHbp binds human Factor H (FH, which contributes to evasion of host immunity and FHbp sequence variants can be classified into two sub-families. Antibodies against FHbp elicit complement-mediated killing and can inhibit recruitment of FH to the bacterial surface. We report epitope mapping studies of two murine IgG mAbs, designated JAR 31 and JAR 36, isolated from a mouse immunized with FHbp in sub-family A, which is present in ∼30–40% of invasive isolates. In the present study, we tested the reactivity of mAbs JAR 31 and JAR 36 with seven natural FHbp sequence variants from different phylogenic groups. We screened bacteriophage-displayed peptide libraries to identify amino acid residues contributing to the JAR 36 epitope. Based on the reactivities of mAbs JAR 31 and JAR 36 with the seven FHbp variants, and the frequent occurrences of aspartate (D and lysine (K residues in the JAR 36-bound phage peptides, we selected six residues in the carboxyl-terminal region of FHbp for replacement with alanine (A. The D201A and K203A substitutions respectively eliminated and decreased binding of mAbs JAR 31 and JAR 36 to FHbp. These substitutions did not affect binding of the control mAb JAR 33 or of human FH. JAR 31 or JAR 36 mediated cooperative complement-mediated bactericidal activity with other anti-FHbp mAbs. The identification of two amino acid residues involved in the epitopes recognized by these anti-FHbp mAbs may contribute to a more complete understanding of the spatial requirements for cooperative anti-FHbp mAb bactericidal activity. Keywords: Biochemistry, Immunology, Microbiology, Molecular biology

  7. Characterization of the Carbohydrate Binding Module 18 gene family in the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Liu, Peng; Stajich, Jason E

    2015-04-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is the causative agent of chytridiomycosis responsible for worldwide decline in amphibian populations. Previous analysis of the Bd genome revealed a unique expansion of the carbohydrate-binding module family 18 (CBM18) predicted to be a sub-class of chitin recognition domains. CBM expansions have been linked to the evolution of pathogenicity in a variety of fungal species by protecting the fungus from the host. Based on phylogenetic analysis and presence of additional protein domains, the gene family can be classified into 3 classes: Tyrosinase-, Deacetylase-, and Lectin-like. Examination of the mRNA expression levels from sporangia and zoospores of nine of the cbm18 genes found that the Lectin-like genes had the highest expression while the Tyrosinase-like genes showed little expression, especially in zoospores. Heterologous expression of GFP-tagged copies of four CBM18 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated that two copies containing secretion signal peptides are trafficked to the cell boundary. The Lectin-like genes cbm18-ll1 and cbm18-ll2 co-localized with the chitinous cell boundaries visualized by staining with calcofluor white. In vitro assays of the full length and single domain copies from CBM18-LL1 demonstrated chitin binding and no binding to cellulose or xylan. Expressed CBM18 domain proteins were demonstrated to protect the fungus, Trichoderma reeseii, in vitro against hydrolysis from exogenously added chitinase, likely by binding and limiting exposure of fungal chitin. These results demonstrate that cbm18 genes can play a role in fungal defense and expansion of their copy number may be an important pathogenicity factor of this emerging infectious disease of amphibians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 dictates its degradation.

    Yu Zhao

    Full Text Available GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1 is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4. GTPCH1 protein degradation has been reported in animal models of several diseases, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GTPCH1 is degraded remain uncharacterized. Here we report a novel non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTPCH1 in vitro and in vivo. The non-covalent binding of GTPCH1 to polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD results in ubiquitination and degradation. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin in cultured cells accelerated GTPCH1 degradation. In cultured cells and in vitro assays, Lys48-linked ubiquitin chains, but not Lys63-linked chains, interacted with GTPCH1 and targeted it for degradation. Consistently, proteasome inhibition attenuated GTPCH1 degradation. Finally, direct mutagenesis of an isoleucine (Ile131 in the hydrophobic patch of the GTPCH1 UBD affected its ubiquitin binding and the enzyme stability. Taken together, we conclude that GTPCH1 non-covalently interacts with polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain. The polyubiquitin binding directs GTPCH1 ubiquitination and proteasome degradation.

  9. Serum retinol binding protein 4 in patients with familial partial lipodystrophy.

    Godoy-Matos, Amélio F; Moreira, Rodrigo O; MacDowell, Renata; Bendet, Izidro; Mory, Patrícia B; Moises, Regina S

    2009-07-01

    To determine Retinol Binding Protein 4 (RBP4) levels in patients with Familial Partial Lipodystrophy (FPLD). Ten patients with FPLD and a control group (9 patients) were selected to participate in the study. RBP4-log levels were lower in patients with FPLD in comparison to control group (1.52 +/- 0.32 vs 1.84+/-0.25, p=0.029). A statistical trend was observed between Waist-to-Hip Ratio and RBP4-log (r=-0.44, p=0.054). RBP4 levels are decreased in FPLD.

  10. Familial Risk for Major Depression is Associated with Lower Striatal 5-HT4 Receptor Binding

    Madsen, Karine; Torstensen, Eva; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2015-01-01

    was to determine whether familial risk for MDD is associated with cerebral 5-HT4 receptor binding as measured with [(11)C]SB207145 brain PET imaging. Familial risk is the most potent risk factor of MDD. METHODS: We studied 57 healthy individuals (mean age 36 yrs, range 20-86; 21 women), 26 of which had first...

  11. A potential link between insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation: Association of Rab10-GTP with the exocyst subunit Exoc6/6b

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Peck, Grantley R. [Department of Biochemistry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Blachon, Stephanie [Hybrigenics Services SAS, 3-5 Impasse Reille, 75014 Paris (France); Lienhard, Gustav E., E-mail: gustav.e.lienhard@dartmouth.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Insulin increases glucose transport in fat and muscle cells by stimulating the exocytosis of specialized vesicles containing the glucose transporter GLUT4. This process, which is referred to as GLUT4 translocation, increases the amount of GLUT4 at the cell surface. Previous studies have provided evidence that insulin signaling increases the amount of Rab10-GTP in the GLUT4 vesicles and that GLUT4 translocation requires the exocyst, a complex that functions in the tethering of vesicles to the plasma membrane, leading to exocytosis. In the present study we show that Rab10 in its GTP form binds to Exoc6 and Exoc6b, which are the two highly homologous isotypes of an exocyst subunit, that both isotypes are found in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and that knockdown of Exoc6, Exoc6b, or both inhibits GLUT4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These results suggest that the association of Rab10-GTP with Exoc6/6b is a molecular link between insulin signaling and the exocytic machinery in GLUT4 translocation. - Highlights: • Insulin stimulates the fusion of vesicles containing GLUT4 with the plasma membrane. • This requires vesicular Rab10-GTP and the exocyst plasma membrane tethering complex. • We find that Rab10-GTP associates with the Exoc6 subunit of the exocyst. • We find that knockdown of Exoc6 inhibits fusion of GLUT4 vesicles with the membrane. • The interaction of Rab10-GTP with Exoc6 potentially links signaling to exocytosis.

  12. Structural and functional diversification in the teleost S100 family of calcium-binding proteins

    Korsching Sigrun I

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the EF-Hand calcium-binding proteins the subgroup of S100 proteins constitute a large family with numerous and diverse functions in calcium-mediated signaling. The evolutionary origin of this family is still uncertain and most studies have examined mammalian family members. Results We have performed an extensive search in several teleost genomes to establish the s100 gene family in fish. We report that the teleost S100 repertoire comprises fourteen different subfamilies which show remarkable similarity across six divergent teleost species. Individual species feature distinctive subsets of thirteen to fourteen genes that result from local gene duplications and gene losses. Eight of the fourteen S100 subfamilies are unique for teleosts, while six are shared with mammalian species and three of those even with cartilaginous fish. Several S100 family members are found in jawless fish already, but none of them are clear orthologs of cartilaginous or bony fish s100 genes. All teleost s100 genes show the expected structural features and are subject to strong negative selection. Many aspects of the genomic arrangement and location of mammalian s100 genes are retained in the teleost s100 gene family, including a completely conserved intron/exon border between the two EF hands. Zebrafish s100 genes exhibit highly specific and characteristic expression patterns, showing both redundancy and divergence in their cellular expression. In larval tissue expression is often restricted to specific cell types like keratinocytes, hair cells, ionocytes and olfactory receptor neurons as demonstrated by in situ hybridization. Conclusion The origin of the S100 family predates at least the segregation of jawed from jawless fish and some extant family members predate the divergence of bony from cartilaginous fish. Despite a complex pattern of gene gains and losses the total repertoire size is remarkably constant between species. On the expression

  13. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveals Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelihood for RNA-Binding Function

    Rao, K.N.; Swaminathan, S.; Burley, S. K.

    2008-12-11

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  14. COMPARATIVE MODELLING AND LIGAND BINDING SITE PREDICTION OF A FAMILY 43 GLYCOSIDE HYDROLASE FROM Clostridium thermocellum

    Shadab Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 showed close evolutionary relation with carbohydrate binding family 6 proteins from C. cellulolyticum, C. papyrosolvens, C. cellulyticum, and A. cellulyticum. Comparative modeling of CtGH43 was performed based on crystal structures with PDB IDs 3C7F, 1YIF, 1YRZ, 2EXH and 1WL7. The structure having lowest MODELLER objective function was selected. The three-dimensional structure revealed typical 5-fold beta–propeller architecture. Energy minimization and validation of predicted model with VERIFY 3D indicated acceptability of the proposed atomic structure. The Ramachandran plot analysis by RAMPAGE confirmed that family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 contains little or negligible segments of helices. It also showed that out of 301 residues, 267 (89.3% were in most favoured region, 23 (7.7% were in allowed region and 9 (3.0% were in outlier region. IUPred analysis of CtGH43 showed no disordered region. Active site analysis showed presence of two Asp and one Glu, assumed to form a catalytic triad. This study gives us information about three-dimensional structure and reaffirms the fact that it has the similar core 5-fold beta–propeller architecture and so probably has the same inverting mechanism of action with the formation of above mentioned catalytic triad for catalysis of polysaccharides.

  15. Amino Groups of Chitosan Are Crucial for Binding to a Family 32 Carbohydrate Binding Module of a Chitosanase from Paenibacillus elgii*

    Das, Subha Narayan; Wagenknecht, Martin; Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Bhuvanachandra, Bhoopal; Niddana, Ramana; Balamurugan, Rengarajan; Swamy, Musti J.; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.; Podile, Appa Rao

    2016-01-01

    We report here the role and mechanism of specificity of a family 32 carbohydrate binding module (CBM32) of a glycoside hydrolase family 8 chitosanase from Paenibacillus elgii (PeCsn). Both the activity and mode of action of PeCsn toward soluble chitosan polymers were not different with/without the CBM32 domain of P. elgii (PeCBM32). The decreased activity of PeCsn without PeCBM32 on chitosan powder suggested that PeCBM32 increases the relative concentration of enzyme on the substrate and thereby enhanced enzymatic activity. PeCBM32 specifically bound to polymeric and oligomeric chitosan and showed very weak binding to chitin and cellulose. In isothermal titration calorimetry, the binding stoichiometry of 2 and 1 for glucosamine monosaccharide (GlcN) and disaccharide (GlcN)2, respectively, was indicative of two binding sites in PeCBM32. A three-dimensional model-guided site-directed mutagenesis and the use of defined disaccharides varying in the pattern of acetylation suggested that the amino groups of chitosan and the polar residues Glu-16 and Glu-38 of PeCBM32 play a crucial role for the observed binding. The specificity of CBM32 has been further elucidated by a generated fusion protein PeCBM32-eGFP that binds to the chitosan exposing endophytic infection structures of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CBM32s appended to chitosanases are highly conserved across different chitosanase families suggesting their role in chitosan recognition and degradation. We have identified and characterized a chitosan-specific CBM32 useful for in situ staining of chitosans in the fungal cell wall during plant-fungus interaction. PMID:27405759

  16. Prickly pear induces upregulation of liver LDL binding in familial heterozygous hypercholesterolemia

    Palumbo, B.; Palumbo, R.; Efthimiou, Y.; Stamatopoulos, J.; Sinzinger, H.; Oguogho, A.; Budinsky, A.; Sinzinger, H.

    2003-01-01

    The hypoglycemic effect of prickly pear is well known by native local Indian population since a long time. Beside the beneficial effects on lipid metabolism, oxidation injury and platelet function has been claimed in experimental animals. We recently found an upregulation of apo-B/E receptor. We therefore examined 10 patients with isolated heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) being enrolled in a dietary run-in phase of 6 weeks after dietary counselling and a further 6 weeks of prickly pear addition. Uptake of autologous 123 I-radiolabeled LDL was determined at entry as well as after 6 weeks of daily prickly pear ingestion. We found a significant (p 176.4 mg/dl; p 123 I-LDL binding by prickly pear in FH-patients in vivo and indicate that prickly pear exerts a significant hypolipidemic action via receptor upregulation. (author)

  17. Novel structural features drive DNA binding properties of Cmr, a CRP family protein in TB complex mycobacteria.

    Ranganathan, Sridevi; Cheung, Jonah; Cassidy, Michael; Ginter, Christopher; Pata, Janice D; McDonough, Kathleen A

    2018-01-09

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) encodes two CRP/FNR family transcription factors (TF) that contribute to virulence, Cmr (Rv1675c) and CRPMt (Rv3676). Prior studies identified distinct chromosomal binding profiles for each TF despite their recognizing overlapping DNA motifs. The present study shows that Cmr binding specificity is determined by discriminator nucleotides at motif positions 4 and 13. X-ray crystallography and targeted mutational analyses identified an arginine-rich loop that expands Cmr's DNA interactions beyond the classical helix-turn-helix contacts common to all CRP/FNR family members and facilitates binding to imperfect DNA sequences. Cmr binding to DNA results in a pronounced asymmetric bending of the DNA and its high level of cooperativity is consistent with DNA-facilitated dimerization. A unique N-terminal extension inserts between the DNA binding and dimerization domains, partially occluding the site where the canonical cAMP binding pocket is found. However, an unstructured region of this N-terminus may help modulate Cmr activity in response to cellular signals. Cmr's multiple levels of DNA interaction likely enhance its ability to integrate diverse gene regulatory signals, while its novel structural features establish Cmr as an atypical CRP/FNR family member. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. 6-Acetyldihydrohomopterin and sepiapterin affect some GTP cyclohydrolase I's and not others

    Jacobson, K.B.; Manos, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The first enzyme in pteridine biosynthesis, GTP cyclohydrolase I, is a likely site for regulation of pteridine biosynthesis to occur. GTP cyclohydrolase I responds to hormonal treatment and is found altered in a variety of mice with genetically based neurological and immunological disorders. Genetic loci can greatly modify the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase: Punch mutant in Drosophila hph-1 in mouse and atypical phenylketonuria in human. This report examines the ability of Ahp and sepiapterin to alter the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I from mouse liver, rat liver and Drosophila head. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. 6-Acetyldihydrohomopterin and sepiapterin affect some GTP cyclohydrolase I's and not others

    Jacobson, K.B.; Manos, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The first enzyme in pteridine biosynthesis, GTP cyclohydrolase I, is a likely site for regulation of pteridine biosynthesis to occur. GTP cyclohydrolase I responds to hormonal treatment and is found altered in a variety of mice with genetically based neurological and immunological disorders. Genetic loci can greatly modify the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase: Punch mutant in Drosophila hph-1 in mouse and atypical phenylketonuria in human. This report examines the ability of Ahp and sepiapterin to alter the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I from mouse liver, rat liver and Drosophila head. 20 refs., 2 tabs

  20. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  1. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko [Toyota Memorial Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein (MBD) Family: Epigenomic Read-Outs Functions and Roles in Tumorigenesis and Psychiatric Diseases.

    Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Smith, Marilia Arruda Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics is the study of the heritable changes on gene expression that are responsible for the regulation of development and that have an impact on several diseases. However, it is of equal importance to understand how epigenetic machinery works. DNA methylation is the most studied epigenetic mark and is generally associated with the regulation of gene expression through the repression of promoter activity and by affecting genome stability. Therefore, the ability of the cell to interpret correct methylation marks and/or the correct interpretation of methylation plays a role in many diseases. The major family of proteins that bind methylated DNA is the methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, or the MBDs. Here, we discuss the structure that makes these proteins a family, the main functions and interactions of all protein family members and their role in human disease such as psychiatric disorders and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Solution Structural Studies of GTP:Adenosylcobinamide-Phosphateguanylyl Transferase (CobY from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    Kiran K Singarapu

    Full Text Available GTP:adenosylcobinamide-phosphate (AdoCbi-P guanylyl transferase (CobY is an enzyme that transfers the GMP moiety of GTP to AdoCbi yielding AdoCbi-GDP in the late steps of the assembly of Ado-cobamides in archaea. The failure of repeated attempts to crystallize ligand-free (apo CobY prompted us to explore its 3D structure by solution NMR spectroscopy. As reported here, the solution structure has a mixed α/β fold consisting of seven β-strands and five α-helices, which is very similar to a Rossmann fold. Titration of apo-CobY with GTP resulted in large changes in amide proton chemical shifts that indicated major structural perturbations upon complex formation. However, the CobY:GTP complex as followed by 1H-15N HSQC spectra was found to be unstable over time: GTP hydrolyzed and the protein converted slowly to a species with an NMR spectrum similar to that of apo-CobY. The variant CobYG153D, whose GTP complex was studied by X-ray crystallography, yielded NMR spectra similar to those of wild-type CobY in both its apo- state and in complex with GTP. The CobYG153D:GTP complex was also found to be unstable over time.

  4. Interconversion of two GDP-bound conformations and their selection in an Arf-family small G protein.

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishikiori, Masaki; Xiang, Hongyu; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Katoh, Etsuko

    2011-07-13

    ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) and other Arf-family small G proteins participate in many cellular functions via their characteristic GTP/GDP conformational cycles, during which a nucleotide(∗)Mg(2+)-binding site communicates with a remote N-terminal helix. However, the conformational interplay between the nucleotides, the helix, the protein core, and Mg(2+) has not been fully delineated. Herein, we report a study of the dynamics of an Arf-family protein, Arl8, under various conditions by means of NMR relaxation spectroscopy. The data indicated that, when GDP is bound, the protein core, which does not include the N-terminal helix, reversibly transition between an Arf-family GDP form and another conformation that resembles the Arf-family GTP form. Additionally, we found that the N-terminal helix and Mg(2+), respectively, stabilize the aforementioned former and latter conformations in a population-shift manner. Given the dynamics of the conformational changes, we can describe the Arl8 GTP/GDP cycle in terms of an energy diagram. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional evolution in the plant SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL gene family

    Jill Christine Preston

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL family of transcription factors is functionally diverse, controlling a number of fundamental aspects of plant growth and development, including vegetative phase change, flowering time, branching, and leaf initiation rate. In natural plant populations, variation in flowering time and shoot architecture have major consequences for fitness. Likewise, in crop species, variation in branching and developmental rate impact biomass and yield. Thus, studies aimed at dissecting how the various functions are partitioned among different SPL genes in diverse plant lineages are key to providing insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation and have already garnered attention by crop breeders. Here we use phylogenetic reconstruction to reveal nine major SPL gene lineages, each of which is described in terms of function and diversification. To assess evidence for ancestral and derived functions within each SPL gene lineage, we use ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analyses suggest an emerging pattern of sub-functionalization, neo-functionalization, and possible convergent evolution following both ancient and recent gene duplication. Based on these analyses we suggest future avenues of research that may prove fruitful for elucidating the importance of SPL gene evolution in plant growth and development.

  6. Functional analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family of Tribolium castaneum.

    Broehan, Gunnar; Kroeger, Tobias; Lorenzen, Marcé; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-16

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. Most are integral membrane proteins that transport a broad spectrum of substrates across lipid membranes. In insects, ABC transporters are of special interest because of their role in insecticide resistance. We have identified 73 ABC transporter genes in the genome of T. castaneum, which group into eight subfamilies (ABCA-H). This coleopteran ABC family is significantly larger than those reported for insects in other taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this increase is due to gene expansion within a single clade of subfamily ABCC. We performed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen to study the function of ABC transporters during development. In ten cases, injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into larvae caused developmental phenotypes, which included growth arrest and localized melanization, eye pigmentation defects, abnormal cuticle formation, egg-laying and egg-hatching defects, and mortality due to abortive molting and desiccation. Some of the ABC transporters we studied in closer detail to examine their role in lipid, ecdysteroid and eye pigment transport. The results from our study provide new insights into the physiological function of ABC transporters in T. castaneum, and may help to establish new target sites for insect control.

  7. Effector region of the translation elongation factor EF-Tu.GTP complex stabilizes an orthoester acid intermediate structure of aminoacyl-tRNA in a ternary complex.

    Förster, C; Limmer, S; Zeidler, W; Sprinzl, M

    1994-01-01

    tRNA(Val) from Escherichia coli was aminoacylated with [1-13C]valine and its complex with Thermus thermophilus elongation factor EF-Tu.GTP was analyzed by 13C NMR spectroscopy. The results suggest that the aminoacyl residue of the valyl-tRNA in ternary complex with bacterial EF-Tu and GTP is not attached to tRNA by a regular ester bond to either a 2'- or 3'-hydroxyl group; instead, an intermediate orthoester acid structure with covalent linkage to both vicinal hydroxyls of the terminal adenosine-76 is formed. Mutation of arginine-59 located in the effector region of EF-Tu, a conserved residue in protein elongation factors and the alpha subunits of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins), abolishes the stabilization of the orthoester acid structure of aminoacyl-tRNA. PMID:8183898

  8. Ties That Bind: Building and Maintaining Strong Parent-Child Relationships through Family Traditions and Rituals.

    Franklin, Diane, Ed.; Bankston, Karen, Ed.

    This booklet discusses the importance of family rituals as a way of staying connected to children as they move through adolescence. Family rituals give teens a sense of being part of a family that values its time together. Even something as simple as a family meal together can have great impact on maintaining a bond between parents and children.…

  9. Deficiency of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein family DNA binding prevents malignant conversion of adenoma to carcinoma in NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis in the mouse

    Kimura Shioko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs play important roles in carcinogenesis of many tumors including the lung. Since multiple C/EBPs are expressed in lung, the combinatorial expression of these C/EBPs on lung carcinogenesis is not known. Methods A transgenic mouse line expressing a dominant negative A-C/EBP under the promoter of lung epithelial Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP gene in doxycycline dependent fashion was subjected to 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis bioassay in the presence and absence of doxycycline, and the effect of abolition of DNA binding activities of C/EBPs on lung carcinogenesis was examined. Results A-C/EBP expression was found not to interfere with tumor development; however, it suppressed the malignant conversion of adenoma to carcinoma during NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis. The results suggested that Ki67 may be used as a marker for lung carcinomas in mouse. Conclusions The DNA binding of C/EBP family members can be used as a potential molecular target for lung cancer therapy.

  10. Structure of BT-3984, a member of the SusD/RagB family of nutrient-binding molecules

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Xu, Qingping; Rife, Christopher L.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of BT-3984, a SusD-family protein, reveals a TPR N-terminal region providing support for a loop-rich C-terminal subdomain and suggests possible interfaces involved in sus complex formation. The crystal structure of the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron protein BT-3984 was determined to a resolution of 1.7 Å and was the first structure to be determined from the extensive SusD family of polysaccharide-binding proteins. SusD is an essential component of the sus operon that defines the paradigm for glycan utilization in dominant members of the human gut microbiota. Structural analysis of BT-3984 revealed an N-terminal region containing several tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs), while the signature C-terminal region is less structured and contains extensive loop regions. Sequence and structure analysis of BT-3984 suggests the presence of binding interfaces for other proteins from the polysaccharide-utilization complex

  11. A family of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding proteins represses translation in late development

    Nielsen, J; Christiansen, J; Lykke-Andersen, J

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major fetal growth factor. The IGF-II gene generates multiple mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) that are translated in a differential manner during development. We have identified a human family of three IGF-II mRNA-binding proteins.......5 followed by a decline towards birth, and, similar to IGF-II, IMPs are especially expressed in developing epithelia, muscle, and placenta in both mouse and human embryos. The results imply that cytoplasmic 5' UTR-binding proteins control IGF-II biosynthesis during late mammalian development....... and are homologous to the Xenopus Vera and chicken zipcode-binding proteins. IMP localizes to subcytoplasmic domains in a growth-dependent and cell-specific manner and causes a dose-dependent translational repression of IGF-II leader 3 -luciferase mRNA. Mouse IMPs are produced in a burst at embryonic day 12...

  12. Identification of cytosolic peroxisome proliferator binding protein as a member of the heat shock protein HSP70 family.

    Alvares, K; Carrillo, A; Yuan, P M; Kawano, H; Morimoto, R I; Reddy, J K

    1990-01-01

    Clofibrate and many of its structural analogues induce proliferation of peroxisomes in the hepatic parenchymal cells of rodents and certain nonrodent species including primates. This induction is tissue specific, occurring mainly in the liver parenchymal cells and to a lesser extent in the kidney cortical epithelium. The induction of peroxisomes is associated with a predictable pleiotropic response, characterized by hepatomegaly, and increased activities and mRNA levels of certain peroxisomal enzymes. Using affinity chromatography, we had previously isolated a protein that binds to clofibric acid. We now show that this protein is homologous with the heat shock protein HSP70 family by analysis of amino acid sequences of isolated peptides from trypsin-treated clofibric acid binding protein and by cross-reactivity with a monoclonal antibody raised against the conserved region of the 70-kDa heat shock proteins. The clofibric acid-Sepharose column could bind HSP70 proteins isolated from various species, which could then be eluted with either clofibric acid or ATP. Conversely, when a rat liver cytosol containing multiple members of the HSP70 family was passed through an ATP-agarose column, and eluted with clofibric acid, only P72 (HSC70) was eluted. These results suggest that clofibric acid, a peroxisome proliferator, preferentially interacts with P72 at or near the ATP binding site. Images PMID:2371272

  13. Alternative binding modes identified for growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein (GASP) family antagonism of myostatin.

    Walker, Ryan G; Angerman, Elizabeth B; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B

    2015-03-20

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Alternative Binding Modes Identified for Growth and Differentiation Factor-associated Serum Protein (GASP) Family Antagonism of Myostatin*

    Walker, Ryan G.; Angerman, Elizabeth B.; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. PMID:25657005

  15. GTP plus water mimics ATP in the active site of protein kianse CK2

    Niefind, K; Pütter, M; Guerra, B

    1999-01-01

    The structures of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays complexed with Mg2+ and with analogs of ATP or GTP were determined to 2.2 A resolution. Unlike most other protein kinases, CK2 from various sources shows 'dual-cosubstrate specificity', that is, the ability to efficiently...... use either ATP or GTP as a cosubstrate. The structures of these complexes demonstrate that water molecules are critical to switch the active site of CK2 from an ATP- to a GTP-compatible state. An understanding of the structural basis of dual-cosubstrate specificity may help in the design of drugs...

  16. Functional studies of ssDNA binding ability of MarR family protein TcaR from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Yu-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available The negative transcription regulator of the ica locus, TcaR, regulates proteins involved in the biosynthesis of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG. Absence of TcaR increases PNAG production and promotes biofilm formation in Staphylococci. Previously, the 3D structure of TcaR in its apo form and its complex structure with several antibiotics have been analyzed. However, the detailed mechanism of multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR family proteins such as TcaR is unclear and only restricted on the binding ability of double-strand DNA (dsDNA. Here we show by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, electron microscopy (EM, circular dichroism (CD, and Biacore analysis that TcaR can interact strongly with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, thereby identifying a new role in MarR family proteins. Moreover, we show that TcaR preferentially binds 33-mer ssDNA over double-stranded DNA and inhibits viral ssDNA replication. In contrast, such ssDNA binding properties were not observed for other MarR family protein and TetR family protein, suggesting that the results from our studies are not an artifact due to simple charge interactions between TcaR and ssDNA. Overall, these results suggest a novel role for TcaR in regulation of DNA replication. We anticipate that the results of this work will extend our understanding of MarR family protein and broaden the development of new therapeutic strategies for Staphylococci.

  17. Molecular Characterization of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL Gene Family in Betula luminifera

    Xiu-Yun Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available As a major family of plant-specific transcription factors, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL genes play vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. In this study, 18 SPL genes were identified and cloned from Betula luminifera. Two zinc finger-like structures and a nuclear location signal (NLS segments were existed in the SBP domains of all BlSPLs. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these genes were clustered into nine groups (group I-IX. The intron/exon structure and motif composition were highly conserved within the same group. 12 of the 18 BlSPLs were experimentally verified as the targets of miR156, and two cleavage sites were detected in these miR156-targeted BlSPL genes. Many putative cis-elements, associated with light, stresses and phytohormones response, were identified in the promoter regions of BlSPLs, suggesting that BlSPL genes are probably involved in important physiological processes and developmental events. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that miR156-targeted BlSPLs exhibited a more differential expression pattern, while most miR156-nontargeted BlSPLs tended to be constitutively expressed, suggesting the distinct roles of miR156-targeted and nontargeted BlSPLs in development and growth of B. luminifera. Further expression analysis revealed that miR156-targeted BlSPLs were dramatically up-regulated with age, whereas mature BlmiR156 level was apparently declined with age, indicating that miR156/SPL module plays important roles in vegetative phase change of B. luminifera. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid assay indicated that several miR156-targeted and nontargeted BlSPLs could interact with two DELLA proteins (BlRGA and BlRGL, which suggests that certain BlSPLs take part in the GA regulated processes through protein interaction with DELLA proteins. All these results provide an important basis for further exploring the biological functions of BlSPLs in B. luminifera.

  18. The Ties That Bind: Materiality, Identity, and the Life Course in the "Things" Families Keep.

    Gloyn, Liz; Crewe, Vicky; King, Laura; Woodham, Anna

    2018-04-01

    Using an interdisciplinary research methodology across three archaeological and historical case studies, this article explores "family archives." Four themes illustrate how objects held in family archives, curation practices, and intergenerational narratives reinforce a family's sense of itself: people-object interactions, gender, socialization and identity formation, and the "life course." These themes provide a framework for professional archivists to assist communities and individuals working with their own family archives. We argue that the family archive, broadly defined, encourages a more egalitarian approach to history. We suggest a multiperiod analysis draws attention to historical forms of knowledge and meaning-making practices over time.

  19. Two amino acid residues confer different binding affinities of Abelson family kinase SRC homology 2 domains for phosphorylated cortactin.

    Gifford, Stacey M; Liu, Weizhi; Mader, Christopher C; Halo, Tiffany L; Machida, Kazuya; Boggon, Titus J; Koleske, Anthony J

    2014-07-11

    The closely related Abl family kinases, Arg and Abl, play important non-redundant roles in the regulation of cell morphogenesis and motility. Despite similar N-terminal sequences, Arg and Abl interact with different substrates and binding partners with varying affinities. This selectivity may be due to slight differences in amino acid sequence leading to differential interactions with target proteins. We report that the Arg Src homology (SH) 2 domain binds two specific phosphotyrosines on cortactin, a known Abl/Arg substrate, with over 10-fold higher affinity than the Abl SH2 domain. We show that this significant affinity difference is due to the substitution of arginine 161 and serine 187 in Abl to leucine 207 and threonine 233 in Arg, respectively. We constructed Abl SH2 domains with R161L and S187T mutations alone and in combination and find that these substitutions are sufficient to convert the low affinity Abl SH2 domain to a higher affinity "Arg-like" SH2 domain in binding to a phospho-cortactin peptide. We crystallized the Arg SH2 domain for structural comparison to existing crystal structures of the Abl SH2 domain. We show that these two residues are important determinants of Arg and Abl SH2 domain binding specificity. Finally, we expressed Arg containing an "Abl-like" low affinity mutant Arg SH2 domain (L207R/T233S) and find that this mutant, although properly localized to the cell periphery, does not support wild type levels of cell edge protrusion. Together, these observations indicate that these two amino acid positions confer different binding affinities and cellular functions on the distinct Abl family kinases. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The primary structure of fatty-acid-binding protein from nurse shark liver. Structural and evolutionary relationship to the mammalian fatty-acid-binding protein family.

    Medzihradszky, K F; Gibson, B W; Kaur, S; Yu, Z H; Medzihradszky, D; Burlingame, A L; Bass, N M

    1992-02-01

    The primary structure of a fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) isolated from the liver of the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) was determined by high-performance tandem mass spectrometry (employing multichannel array detection) and Edman degradation. Shark liver FABP consists of 132 amino acids with an acetylated N-terminal valine. The chemical molecular mass of the intact protein determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (Mr = 15124 +/- 2.5) was in good agreement with that calculated from the amino acid sequence (Mr = 15121.3). The amino acid sequence of shark liver FABP displays significantly greater similarity to the FABP expressed in mammalian heart, peripheral nerve myelin and adipose tissue (61-53% sequence similarity) than to the FABP expressed in mammalian liver (22% similarity). Phylogenetic trees derived from the comparison of the shark liver FABP amino acid sequence with the members of the mammalian fatty-acid/retinoid-binding protein gene family indicate the initial divergence of an ancestral gene into two major subfamilies: one comprising the genes for mammalian liver FABP and gastrotropin, the other comprising the genes for mammalian cellular retinol-binding proteins I and II, cellular retinoic-acid-binding protein myelin P2 protein, adipocyte FABP, heart FABP and shark liver FABP, the latter having diverged from the ancestral gene that ultimately gave rise to the present day mammalian heart-FABP, adipocyte FABP and myelin P2 protein sequences. The sequence for intestinal FABP from the rat could be assigned to either subfamily, depending on the approach used for phylogenetic tree construction, but clearly diverged at a relatively early evolutionary time point. Indeed, sequences proximately ancestral or closely related to mammalian intestinal FABP, liver FABP, gastrotropin and the retinoid-binding group of proteins appear to have arisen prior to the divergence of shark liver FABP and should therefore also be present in elasmobranchs

  1. Direct evidence for GTP and GDP-Pi intermediates in microtubule assembly

    Melki, R.; Carlier, M.F.; Pantaloni, D.

    1990-01-01

    Identification of the kinetic intermediates in GTP hydrolysis on microtubules and characterization of their assembly properties is essential in understanding microtubule dynamics. By using an improved glass filter assay that selectively traps microtubules with a dead time of 2 s and monitoring taxol-induced rapid assembly of microtubules from [γ- 32 P, 3 H]GTP-tubulin 1:1 complex, direct evidence has been obtained for GTP- and GDP-P i -microtubule transient states in the early stages of the polymerization process. A simple kinetic analysis of GTP hydrolysis on microtubules within two sequential pseudo-first-order processes led to apparent first-order rate constants of 0.065 s -1 for the cleavage of the γ-phosphate and 0.02 s -1 for the liberation of P i , assuming a simple random model. Apparent rate constants for GTP hydrolysis and P i release were independent of the composition of the buffer used to polymerize tubulin. The significance of these values with respect to those derived from previous studies from this and other laboratories and the possibility of a vectorial model for GTP hydrolysis are discussed

  2. HIV-1 Nef interaction influences the ATP-binding site of the Src-family kinase, Hck

    Pene-Dumitrescu Teodora

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nef is an HIV-1 accessory protein essential for viral replication and AIDS progression. Nef interacts with a multitude of host cell signaling partners, including members of the Src kinase family. Nef preferentially activates Hck, a Src-family kinase (SFK strongly expressed in macrophages and other HIV target cells, by binding to its regulatory SH3 domain. Recently, we identified a series of kinase inhibitors that preferentially inhibit Hck in the presence of Nef. These compounds also block Nef-dependent HIV replication, validating the Nef-SFK signaling pathway as an antiretroviral drug target. Our findings also suggested that by binding to the Hck SH3 domain, Nef indirectly affects the conformation of the kinase active site to favor inhibitor association. Results To test this hypothesis, we engineered a "gatekeeper" mutant of Hck with enhanced sensitivity to the pyrazolopyrimidine tyrosine kinase inhibitor, NaPP1. We also modified the RT loop of the Hck SH3 domain to enhance interaction of the kinase with Nef. This modification stabilized Nef:Hck interaction in solution-based kinase assays, as a way to mimic the more stable association that likely occurs at cellular membranes. Introduction of the modified RT loop rendered Hck remarkably more sensitive to activation by Nef, and led to a significant decrease in the Km for ATP as well as enhanced inhibitor potency. Conclusions These observations suggest that stable interaction with Nef may induce Src-family kinase active site conformations amenable to selective inhibitor targeting.

  3. Structural insight into gene transcriptional regulation and effector binding by the Lrp/AsnC family

    Thaw, P.; Sedelnikova, S.E.; Muranova, T.; Wiese, S.; Ayora, S.; Alonso, J.C.; Brinkman, A.B.; Akerboom, A.P.; Oost, van der J.; Rafferty, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins is found in both archaea and bacteria. Members of the family influence cellular metabolism in both a global (Lrp) and specific (AsnC) manner, often in response to exogenous amino acid effectors. In the present study we have determined both

  4. Brain Information Sharing During Visual Short-Term Memory Binding Yields a Memory Biomarker for Familial Alzheimer's Disease.

    Parra, Mario A; Mikulan, Ezequiel; Trujillo, Natalia; Sala, Sergio Della; Lopera, Francisco; Manes, Facundo; Starr, John; Ibanez, Agustin

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a disconnection syndrome which disrupts both brain information sharing and memory binding functions. The extent to which these two phenotypic expressions share pathophysiological mechanisms remains unknown. To unveil the electrophysiological correlates of integrative memory impairments in AD towards new memory biomarkers for its prodromal stages. Patients with 100% risk of familial AD (FAD) and healthy controls underwent assessment with the Visual Short-Term Memory binding test (VSTMBT) while we recorded their EEG. We applied a novel brain connectivity method (Weighted Symbolic Mutual Information) to EEG data. Patients showed significant deficits during the VSTMBT. A reduction of brain connectivity was observed during resting as well as during correct VSTM binding, particularly over frontal and posterior regions. An increase of connectivity was found during VSTM binding performance over central regions. While decreased connectivity was found in cases in more advanced stages of FAD, increased brain connectivity appeared in cases in earlier stages. Such altered patterns of task-related connectivity were found in 89% of the assessed patients. VSTM binding in the prodromal stages of FAD are associated to altered patterns of brain connectivity thus confirming the link between integrative memory deficits and impaired brain information sharing in prodromal FAD. While significant loss of brain connectivity seems to be a feature of the advanced stages of FAD increased brain connectivity characterizes its earlier stages. These findings are discussed in the light of recent proposals about the earliest pathophysiological mechanisms of AD and their clinical expression. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. The Puf-family RNA-binding protein Puf2 controls sporozoite conversion to liver stages in the malaria parasite.

    Katja Müller

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by unicellular, obligate intracellular parasites of the genus Plasmodium. During host switch the malaria parasite employs specialized latent stages that colonize the new host environment. Previous work has established that gametocytes, sexually differentiated stages that are taken up by the mosquito vector, control expression of genes required for mosquito colonization by translational repression. Sexual parasite development is controlled by a DEAD-box RNA helicase of the DDX6 family, termed DOZI. Latency of sporozoites, the transmission stage injected during an infectious blood meal, is controlled by the eIF2alpha kinase IK2, a general inhibitor of protein synthesis. Whether RNA-binding proteins participate in translational regulation in sporozoites remains to be studied. Here, we investigated the roles of two RNA-binding proteins of the Puf-family, Plasmodium Puf1 and Puf2, during sporozoite stage conversion. Our data reveal that, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei, Puf2 participates in the regulation of IK2 and inhibits premature sporozoite transformation. Inside mosquito salivary glands puf2⁻ sporozoites transform over time to round forms resembling early intra-hepatic stages. As a result, mutant parasites display strong defects in initiating a malaria infection. In contrast, Puf1 is dispensable in vivo throughout the entire Plasmodium life cycle. Our findings support the notion of a central role for Puf2 in parasite latency during switch between the insect and mammalian hosts.

  6. Cadherin-related family member 3, a childhood asthma susceptibility gene product, mediates rhinovirus C binding and replication.

    Bochkov, Yury A; Watters, Kelly; Ashraf, Shamaila; Griggs, Theodor F; Devries, Mark K; Jackson, Daniel J; Palmenberg, Ann C; Gern, James E

    2015-04-28

    Members of rhinovirus C (RV-C) species are more likely to cause wheezing illnesses and asthma exacerbations compared with other rhinoviruses. The cellular receptor for these viruses was heretofore unknown. We report here that expression of human cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) enables the cells normally unsusceptible to RV-C infection to support both virus binding and replication. A coding single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6967330, C529Y) was previously linked to greater cell-surface expression of CDHR3 protein, and an increased risk of wheezing illnesses and hospitalizations for childhood asthma. Compared with wild-type CDHR3, cells transfected with the CDHR3-Y529 variant had about 10-fold increases in RV-C binding and progeny yields. We developed a transduced HeLa cell line (HeLa-E8) stably expressing CDHR3-Y529 that supports RV-C propagation in vitro. Modeling of CDHR3 structure identified potential binding sites that could impact the virus surface in regions that are highly conserved among all RV-C types. Our findings identify that the asthma susceptibility gene product CDHR3 mediates RV-C entry into host cells, and suggest that rs6967330 mutation could be a risk factor for RV-C wheezing illnesses.

  7. The Small GTP-Binding Protein Rhes Influences Nigrostriatal-Dependent Motor Behavior During Aging.

    Pinna, Annalisa; Napolitano, Francesco; Pelosi, Barbara; Di Maio, Anna; Wardas, Jadwiga; Casu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Giulia; Migliarini, Sara; Calabresi, Paolo; Pasqualetti, Massimo; Morelli, Micaela; Usiello, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Here we aimed to evaluate: (1) Rhes mRNA expression in mouse midbrain, (2) the effect of Rhes deletion on the number of dopamine neurons, (3) nigrostriatal-sensitive behavior during aging in knockout mice. Radioactive in situ hybridization was assessed in adult mice. The beam-walking test was executed in 3-, 6- and 12-month-old mice. Immunohistochemistry of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons was performed in 6- and 12-month-old mice. Rhes mRNA is expressed in TH-positive neurons of SNpc and the ventral tegmental area. Moreover, lack of Rhes leads to roughly a 20% loss of nigral TH-positive neurons in both 6- and 12-month-old mutants, when compared with their age-matched controls. Finally, lack of Rhes triggers subtle alterations in motor performance and coordination during aging. Our findings indicate a fine-tuning role of Rhes in regulating the number of TH-positive neurons of the substantia nigra and nigrostriatal-sensitive motor behavior during aging. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Modulation of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins in immune system and brain

    Kovářů, H.; Fišerová, Anna; Kovářů, F.; Pospíšil, Miloslav; Lisá, V.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2001), s. 62-67 ISSN 1212-1819 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/98/0347; GA ČR GV312/98/K034; GA ČR GA304/01/0850 Keywords : cell signal transduction * neuroimmunomodulation * g proteins Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 0.147, year: 2001

  9. The lipid kinase PI5P4Kβ is an intracellular GTP sensor for metabolism and tumorigenesis

    Sumita, Kazutaka; Lo, Yu-Hua; Takeuchi, Koh; Senda, Miki; Kofuji, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yoshiki; Terakawa, Jumpei; Sasaki, Mika; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Majd, Nazanin; Zheng, Yuxiang; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Yokota, Takehiro; Emerling, Brooke M.; Asara, John M.; Ishida, Tetsuo; Locasale, Jason W.; Daikoku, Takiko; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Senda, Toshiya; Sasaki, Atsuo T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary While cellular GTP concentration dramatically changes in response to an organism’s cellular status, whether it serves as a metabolic cue for biological signaling remains elusive due to the lack of molecular identification of GTP sensors. Here we report that PI5P4Kβ, a phosphoinositide kinase that regulates PI(5)P levels, detects GTP concentration and converts them into lipid second messenger signaling. Biochemical analyses show that PI5P4Kβ preferentially utilizes GTP, rather than ATP, for PI(5)P phosphorylation and its activity reflects changes in direct proportion to the physiological GTP concentration. Structural and biological analyses reveal that the GTP-sensing activity of PI5P4Kβ is critical for metabolic adaptation and tumorigenesis. These results demonstrate that PI5P4Kβ is the missing GTP sensor and that GTP concentration functions as a metabolic cue via PI5P4Kβ. The critical role of the GTP-sensing activity of PI5P4Kβ in cancer signifies this lipid kinase as a cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26774281

  10. The Ties That Bind. The Chinese American Family in Transnational Chinese Cinema

    Han, Q.

    2014-01-01

    The primary research question raised in the thesis is how have films been able to construct the identity of ethnic Chinese in the United States? This question is addressed through three sub-questions. First, why is the family narrative so characteristic of films about Chinese Americans in

  11. DNA Binding Drugs Targeting the Regulatory DNA Binding Site of the ETS Domain Family Transcription Factor Associated With Human Breast Cancer

    Wang, Yong-Dong

    1999-01-01

    .... The key approach is to prevent the binding of two transcription factors, ESX and AP-2, to the consensus DNA binding sites contained within the Her2/neu promoter resulting in inhibition of transcription factor function...

  12. Strengthening the systemic ties that bind: integrating common factors into marriage and family therapy curricula.

    Karam, Eli A; Blow, Adrian J; Sprenkle, Douglas H; Davis, Sean D

    2015-04-01

    Specific models guide the training of marriage and family therapists (MFTs) as they offer both structure and organization for both therapists and clients. Learning models may also benefit therapists-in-training by instilling confidence and preventing atheoretical eclecticism. The moderate common factors perspective argues that models are essential, but should not be taught as "the absolute truth," given there is no evidence for relative efficacy of one empirically validated model versus another, and no single model works in all instances. The following article provides a blueprint for infusing a common factors perspective into MFT programmes by reviewing innovations in course design, outlining specific teaching strategies, and highlighting potential implementation challenges. © 2014 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  13. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins

    Gervais, Virginie; Campagne, Sébastien; Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer.

  14. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins

    Gervais, Virginie, E-mail: virginie.gervais@ipbs.fr [IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), CNRS (France); Campagne, Sebastien [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain, E-mail: alain.milon@ipbs.fr [IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), CNRS (France)

    2013-05-15

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer.

  15. Different effects of guanine nucleotides (GDP and GTP) on protein-mediated mitochondrial proton leak.

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration)-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration) transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers), carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP.

  16. Mitochondrial NUDIX hydrolases: A metabolic link between NAD catabolism, GTP and mitochondrial dynamics.

    Long, Aaron; Klimova, Nina; Kristian, Tibor

    2017-10-01

    NAD + catabolism and mitochondrial dynamics are important parts of normal mitochondrial function and are both reported to be disrupted in aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and acute brain injury. While both processes have been extensively studied there has been little reported on how the mechanisms of these two processes are linked. This review focuses on how downstream NAD + catabolism via NUDIX hydrolases affects mitochondrial dynamics under pathologic conditions. Additionally, several potential targets in mitochondrial dysfunction and fragmentation are discussed, including the roles of mitochondrial poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1(mtPARP1), AMPK, AMP, and intra-mitochondrial GTP metabolism. Mitochondrial and cytosolic NUDIX hydrolases (NUDT9α and NUDT9β) can affect mitochondrial and cellular AMP levels by hydrolyzing ADP- ribose (ADPr) and subsequently altering the levels of GTP and ATP. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is activated after DNA damage, which depletes NAD + pools and results in the PARylation of nuclear and mitochondrial proteins. In the mitochondria, ADP-ribosyl hydrolase-3 (ARH3) hydrolyzes PAR to ADPr, while NUDT9α metabolizes ADPr to AMP. Elevated AMP levels have been reported to reduce mitochondrial ATP production by inhibiting the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), allosterically activating AMPK by altering the cellular AMP: ATP ratio, and by depleting mitochondrial GTP pools by being phosphorylated by adenylate kinase 3 (AK3), which uses GTP as a phosphate donor. Recently, activated AMPK was reported to phosphorylate mitochondria fission factor (MFF), which increases Drp1 localization to the mitochondria and promotes mitochondrial fission. Moreover, the increased AK3 activity could deplete mitochondrial GTP pools and possibly inhibit normal activity of GTP-dependent fusion enzymes, thus altering mitochondrial dynamics. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Karyopherin alpha7 (KPNA7), a divergent member of the importin alpha family of nuclear import receptors.

    Kelley, Joshua B; Talley, Ashley M; Spencer, Adam; Gioeli, Daniel; Paschal, Bryce M

    2010-08-11

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) dependent nuclear import is carried out by a heterodimer of importin alpha and importin beta. NLS cargo is recognized by importin alpha, which is bound by importin beta. Importin beta mediates translocation of the complex through the central channel of the nuclear pore, and upon reaching the nucleus, RanGTP binding to importin beta triggers disassembly of the complex. To date, six importin alpha family members, encoded by separate genes, have been described in humans. We sequenced and characterized a seventh member of the importin alpha family of transport factors, karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), which is most closely related to KPNA2. The domain of KPNA7 that binds Importin beta (IBB) is divergent, and shows stronger binding to importin beta than the IBB domains from of other importin alpha family members. With regard to NLS recognition, KPNA7 binds to the retinoblastoma (RB) NLS to a similar degree as KPNA2, but it fails to bind the SV40-NLS and the human nucleoplasmin (NPM) NLS. KPNA7 shows a predominantly nuclear distribution under steady state conditions, which contrasts with KPNA2 which is primarily cytoplasmic. KPNA7 is a novel importin alpha family member in humans that belongs to the importin alpha2 subfamily. KPNA7 shows different subcellular localization and NLS binding characteristics compared to other members of the importin alpha family. These properties suggest that KPNA7 could be specialized for interactions with select NLS-containing proteins, potentially impacting developmental regulation.

  18. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family.

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain ("BEN-solo" factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  20. The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants: phylogeny, structural modeling, activity and subcellular localization

    Tam Michael WC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puf proteins have important roles in controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by promoting RNA decay and repressing translation. The Pumilio homology domain (PUM-HD is a conserved region within Puf proteins that binds to RNA with sequence specificity. Although Puf proteins have been well characterized in animal and fungal systems, little is known about the structural and functional characteristics of Puf-like proteins in plants. Results The Arabidopsis and rice genomes code for 26 and 19 Puf-like proteins, respectively, each possessing eight or fewer Puf repeats in their PUM-HD. Key amino acids in the PUM-HD of several of these proteins are conserved with those of animal and fungal homologs, whereas other plant Puf proteins demonstrate extensive variability in these amino acids. Three-dimensional modeling revealed that the predicted structure of this domain in plant Puf proteins provides a suitable surface for binding RNA. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift experiments showed that the Arabidopsis AtPum2 PUM-HD binds with high affinity to BoxB of the Drosophila Nanos Response Element I (NRE1 RNA, whereas a point mutation in the core of the NRE1 resulted in a significant reduction in binding affinity. Transient expression of several of the Arabidopsis Puf proteins as fluorescent protein fusions revealed a dynamic, punctate cytoplasmic pattern of localization for most of these proteins. The presence of predicted nuclear export signals and accumulation of AtPuf proteins in the nucleus after treatment of cells with leptomycin B demonstrated that shuttling of these proteins between the cytosol and nucleus is common among these proteins. In addition to the cytoplasmically enriched AtPum proteins, two AtPum proteins showed nuclear targeting with enrichment in the nucleolus. Conclusions The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants consists of a greater number of members than any other model species studied to

  1. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding

    Di Palma, Francesco; Tramontano, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody–antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation.

  2. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding

    Di Palma, Francesco

    2017-08-03

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody–antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation.

  3. Structural Conservation Despite Huge Sequence Diversity Allows EPCR Binding by the PfEMP1 Family Implicated in Severe Childhood Malaria

    Lau, Clinton K.Y.; Turner, Louise; Jespersen, Jakob S.

    2015-01-01

    with severe childhood malaria. We combine crystal structures of CIDRa1:EPCR complexes with analysis of 885 CIDRa1 sequences, showing that the EPCR-binding surfaces of CIDRa1 domains are conserved in shape and bonding potential, despite dramatic sequence diversity. Additionally, these domains mimic features...... of the natural EPCR ligand and can block this ligand interaction. Using peptides corresponding to the EPCR-binding region, antibodies can be purified from individuals in malaria-endemic regions that block EPCR binding of diverse CIDRa1 variants. This highlights the extent to which such a surface protein family......The PfEMP1 family of surface proteins is central for Plasmodium falciparum virulence and must retain the ability to bind to host receptors while also diversifying to aid immune evasion. The interaction between CIDRa1 domains of PfEMP1 and endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) is associated...

  4. Tissue-type plasminogen activator-binding RNA aptamers inhibiting low-density lipoprotein receptor family-mediated internalisation.

    Bjerregaard, Nils; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A; Helsen, Nicky; Andreasen, Peter A; Dupont, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, trade name Alteplase), currently the only drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke, has been implicated in a number of adverse effects reportedly mediated by interactions with the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) family receptors, including neuronal cell death and an increased risk of cerebral haemorrhage. The tissue-type plasminogen activator is the principal initiator of thrombolysis in human physiology, an effect that is mediated directly via localised activation of the plasmin zymogen plasminogen at the surface of fibrin clots in the vascular lumen. Here, we sought to identify a ligand to tPA capable of inhibiting the relevant LDL family receptors without interfering with the fibrinolytic activity of tPA. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was employed to isolate tPA-binding RNA aptamers, which were characterised in biochemical assays of tPA association to low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, an LDL receptor family member); tPA-mediated in vitro and ex vivo clot lysis; and tPA-mediated plasminogen activation in the absence and presence of a stimulating soluble fibrin fragment. Two aptamers, K18 and K32, had minimal effects on clot lysis, but were able to efficiently inhibit tPA-LRP-1 association and LDL receptor family-mediated endocytosis in human vascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. These observations suggest that coadministration alongside tPA may be a viable strategy to improve the safety of thrombolytic treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke by restricting tPA activity to the vascular lumen.

  5. A starch-binding domain identified in α-amylase (AmyP) represents a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules that contribute to enzymatic hydrolysis of soluble starch.

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Yunyun; Chen, Maojiao; Wang, Ying; Xiao, Yazhong; Gao, Yi

    2014-04-02

    A novel starch-binding domain (SBD) that represents a new carbohydrate-binding module family (CBM69) was identified in the α-amylase (AmyP) of the recently established alpha-amylase subfamily GH13_37. The SBD and its homologues come mostly from marine bacteria, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that they are closely related to the CBM20 and CBM48 families. The SBD exhibited a binding preference toward raw rice starch, but the truncated mutant (AmyPΔSBD) still retained similar substrate preference. Kinetic analyses revealed that the SBD plays an important role in soluble starch hydrolysis because different catalytic efficiencies have been observed in AmyP and the AmyPΔSBD. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. SECRET domain of variola virus CrmB protein can be a member of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins family

    Shchelkunov Sergei N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variola virus (VARV the causative agent of smallpox, eradicated in 1980, have wide spectrum of immunomodulatory proteins to evade host immunity. Recently additional biological activity was discovered for VARV CrmB protein, known to bind and inhibit tumour necrosis factor (TNF through its N-terminal domain homologous to cellular TNF receptors. Besides binding TNF, this protein was also shown to bind with high affinity several chemokines which recruit B- and T-lymphocytes and dendritic cells to sites of viral entry and replication. Ability to bind chemokines was shown to be associated with unique C-terminal domain of CrmB protein. This domain named SECRET (Smallpox virus-Encoded Chemokine Receptor is unrelated to the host proteins and lacks significant homology with other known viral chemokine-binding proteins or any other known protein. Findings De novo modelling of VARV-CrmB SECRET domain spatial structure revealed its apparent structural homology with cowpox virus CC-chemokine binding protein (vCCI and vaccinia virus A41 protein, despite low sequence identity between these three proteins. Potential ligand-binding surface of modelled VARV-CrmB SECRET domain was also predicted to bear prominent electronegative charge which is characteristic to known orthopoxviral chemokine-binding proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest that SECRET should be included into the family of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins and that it might have been evolved from the vCCI-like predecessor protein.

  7. SECRET domain of variola virus CrmB protein can be a member of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins family.

    Antonets, Denis V; Nepomnyashchikh, Tatyana S; Shchelkunov, Sergei N

    2010-10-27

    Variola virus (VARV) the causative agent of smallpox, eradicated in 1980, have wide spectrum of immunomodulatory proteins to evade host immunity. Recently additional biological activity was discovered for VARV CrmB protein, known to bind and inhibit tumour necrosis factor (TNF) through its N-terminal domain homologous to cellular TNF receptors. Besides binding TNF, this protein was also shown to bind with high affinity several chemokines which recruit B- and T-lymphocytes and dendritic cells to sites of viral entry and replication. Ability to bind chemokines was shown to be associated with unique C-terminal domain of CrmB protein. This domain named SECRET (Smallpox virus-Encoded Chemokine Receptor) is unrelated to the host proteins and lacks significant homology with other known viral chemokine-binding proteins or any other known protein. De novo modelling of VARV-CrmB SECRET domain spatial structure revealed its apparent structural homology with cowpox virus CC-chemokine binding protein (vCCI) and vaccinia virus A41 protein, despite low sequence identity between these three proteins. Potential ligand-binding surface of modelled VARV-CrmB SECRET domain was also predicted to bear prominent electronegative charge which is characteristic to known orthopoxviral chemokine-binding proteins. Our results suggest that SECRET should be included into the family of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins and that it might have been evolved from the vCCI-like predecessor protein.

  8. The retinoblastoma protein binds to a family of E2F transcription factors

    Lees, J A; Saito, M; Vidal, M

    1993-01-01

    E2F is a transcription factor that helps regulate the expression of a number of genes that are important in cell proliferation. Recently, several laboratories have isolated a cDNA clone that encodes an E2F-like protein, known as E2F-1. Subsequent characterization of this protein showed that it had...... the properties of E2F, but it was difficult to account for all of the suggested E2F activities through the function of this one protein. Using low-stringency hybridization, we have isolated cDNA clones that encode two additional E2F-like proteins, called E2F-2 and E2F-3. The chromosomal locations of the genes...... protein in vivo. Finally, E2F-2 and E2F-3 were able to activate transcription of E2F-responsive genes in a manner that was dependent upon the presence of at least one functional E2F binding site. These observations suggest that the E2F activities described previously result from the combined action...

  9. Characterizing interaction forces between actin and proteins of the tropomodulin family reveals the presence of the N-terminal actin-binding site in leiomodin.

    Arslan, Baran; Colpan, Mert; Gray, Kevin T; Abu-Lail, Nehal I; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2018-01-15

    Tropomodulin family of proteins includes several isoforms of tropomodulins (Tmod) and leiomodins (Lmod). These proteins can sequester actin monomers or nucleate actin polymerization. Although it is known that their actin-binding properties are isoform-dependent, knowledge on how they vary in strengths of interactions with G-actin is missing. While it is confirmed in many studies that Tmods have two actin-binding sites, information on number and location of actin-binding sites in Lmod2 is controversial. We used atomic force microscopy to study interactions between G-actin and proteins of the tropomodulin family. Unbinding forces between G-actin and Tmod1, Tmod2, Tmod3, or Lmod2 were quantified. Our results indicated that Tmod1 and Tmod3 had unimodal force distributions, Tmod2 had a bimodal distribution and Lmod2 had a trimodal distribution. The number of force distributions correlates with the proteins' abilities to sequester actin or to nucleate actin polymerization. We assigned specific unbinding forces to the individual actin-binding sites of Tmod2 and Lmod2 using mutations that destroy actin-binding sites of Tmod2 and truncated Lmod2. Our results confirm the existence of the N-terminal actin-binding site in Lmod2. Altogether, our data demonstrate how the differences between the number and the strength of actin-binding sites of Tmod or Lmod translate to their functional abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent.

    Liu, Wei; Ning, Jin-Feng; Meng, Qing-Wei; Hu, Jing; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Liu, Chao; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10) against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase-ligand interaction space in the PDB.

  11. Structural Dynamics Investigation of Human Family 1 & 2 Cystatin-Cathepsin L1 Interaction: A Comparison of Binding Modes.

    Suman Kumar Nandy

    Full Text Available Cystatin superfamily is a large group of evolutionarily related proteins involved in numerous physiological activities through their inhibitory activity towards cysteine proteases. Despite sharing the same cystatin fold, and inhibiting cysteine proteases through the same tripartite edge involving highly conserved N-terminal region, L1 and L2 loop; cystatins differ widely in their inhibitory affinity towards C1 family of cysteine proteases and molecular details of these interactions are still elusive. In this study, inhibitory interactions of human family 1 & 2 cystatins with cathepsin L1 are predicted and their stability and viability are verified through protein docking & comparative molecular dynamics. An overall stabilization effect is observed in all cystatins on complex formation. Complexes are mostly dominated by van der Waals interaction but the relative participation of the conserved regions varied extensively. While van der Waals contacts prevail in L1 and L2 loop, N-terminal segment chiefly acts as electrostatic interaction site. In fact the comparative dynamics study points towards the instrumental role of L1 loop in directing the total interaction profile of the complex either towards electrostatic or van der Waals contacts. The key amino acid residues surfaced via interaction energy, hydrogen bonding and solvent accessible surface area analysis for each cystatin-cathepsin L1 complex influence the mode of binding and thus control the diverse inhibitory affinity of cystatins towards cysteine proteases.

  12. Clinical features and prognostic implications of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy related to the cardiac myosin-binding protein C gene.

    Charron, P; Dubourg, O; Desnos, M; Bennaceur, M; Carrier, L; Camproux, A C; Isnard, R; Hagege, A; Langlard, J M; Bonne, G; Richard, P; Hainque, B; Bouhour, J B; Schwartz, K; Komajda, M

    1998-06-09

    Little information is available on phenotype-genotype correlations in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that are related to the cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) gene. The aim of this study was to perform this type of analysis. We studied 76 genetically affected subjects from nine families with seven recently identified mutations (SASint20, SDSint7, SDSint23, branch point int23, Glu542Gln, a deletion in exon 25, and a duplication/deletion in exon 33) in the MYBPC3 gene. Detailed clinical, ECG, and echocardiographic parameters were analyzed. An intergene analysis was performed by comparing the MYBPC3 group to seven mutations in the beta-myosin heavy-chain gene (beta-MHC) group (n=52). There was no significant phenotypic difference among the different mutations in the MYBPC3 gene. However, in the MYBPC3 group compared with the beta-MHC group, (1) prognosis was significantly better (P<0.0001), and no deaths occurred before the age of 40 years; (2) the age at onset of symptoms was delayed (41+/-19 versus 35+/-17 years, P<0.002); and (3) before 30 years of age, the phenotype was particularly mild because penetrance was low (41% versus 62%), maximal wall thicknesses lower (12+/-4 versus 16+/-7 mm, P<0.03), and abnormal T waves less frequent (9% versus 45%, P<0.02). These results are consistent with specific clinical features related to the MYBPC3 gene: onset of the disease appears delayed and the prognosis is better than that associated with the beta-MHC gene. These findings could be particularly important for the purpose of clinical management and genetic counseling in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  13. Insight into temperature dependence of GTPase activity in human guanylate binding protein-1.

    Anjana Rani

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1 belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1.

  14. Identification and characterization of a chitin-binding protein purified from coelomic fluid of the lugworm Arenicola marina defining a novel protein sequence family

    Vitashenkova, Nina; Moeller, Jesper Bonnet; Leth-Larsen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    by coelomocytes, in the nephridium and in round cells in epidermis and in eggs. Moreover, AML-1 expression was up-regulated in response to a parasitic infection. We conclude that AML-1 purified from coelomic fluid is encoded by AML-1b and represents a novel type of protein family that binds acetylated components....

  15. Structure-guided identification of a family of dual receptor-binding PfEMP1 that is associated with cerebral malaria

    Lennartz, Frank; Adams, Yvonne; Bengtsson, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a deadly outcome of infection by Plasmodium falciparum, occurring when parasite-infected erythrocytes accumulate in the brain. These erythrocytes display parasite proteins of the PfEMP1 family that bind various endothelial receptors. Despite the importance of cerebral malaria...

  16. DIPA-family coiled-coils bind conserved isoform-specific head domain of p120-catenin family: potential roles in hydrocephalus and heterotopia.

    Markham, Nicholas O; Doll, Caleb A; Dohn, Michael R; Miller, Rachel K; Yu, Huapeng; Coffey, Robert J; McCrea, Pierre D; Gamse, Joshua T; Reynolds, Albert B

    2014-09-01

    p120-catenin (p120) modulates adherens junction (AJ) dynamics by controlling the stability of classical cadherins. Among all p120 isoforms, p120-3A and p120-1A are the most prevalent. Both stabilize cadherins, but p120-3A is preferred in epithelia, whereas p120-1A takes precedence in neurons, fibroblasts, and macrophages. During epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, E- to N-cadherin switching coincides with p120-3A to -1A alternative splicing. These isoforms differ by a 101-amino acid "head domain" comprising the p120-1A N-terminus. Although its exact role is unknown, the head domain likely mediates developmental and cancer-associated events linked to p120-1A expression (e.g., motility, invasion, metastasis). Here we identified delta-interacting protein A (DIPA) as the first head domain-specific binding partner and candidate mediator of isoform 1A activity. DIPA colocalizes with AJs in a p120-1A- but not 3A-dependent manner. Moreover, all DIPA family members (Ccdc85a, Ccdc85b/DIPA, and Ccdc85c) interact reciprocally with p120 family members (p120, δ-catenin, p0071, and ARVCF), suggesting significant functional overlap. During zebrafish neural tube development, both knockdown and overexpression of DIPA phenocopy N-cadherin mutations, an effect bearing functional ties to a reported mouse hydrocephalus phenotype associated with Ccdc85c. These studies identify a novel, highly conserved interaction between two protein families that may participate either individually or collectively in N-cadherin-mediated development. © 2014 Markham et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase interferes with GTP γS stimulated IP3 formation in differentiated HL-60 cell membranes

    Misaki, Naoyuki; Imaizumi, Taro; Watanabe, Yashuiro

    1989-01-01

    The effects of addition of activated cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on the function of islet-activating protein (IAP)-sensitive GTP-binding (G) protein were studied in the plasma membranes of 3 H-inositol-labeled differentiated human leukemic (HL-60) cells. Pretreatment of the membranes with activated PKA in the presence of MgATP for 15 min. at 37 degree C decreased GTP γS-stimulated inositol trisphosphate (IP 3 ) formation by about 30%, but had no influence on Ca 2+ -stimulated IP 3 formation. And autoradiography in the phosphorylation experiments of solubilized HL-60 cell membranes by PKA showed some 32 P incorporated bands, and among them one of the major bands showed the migration at 40 kDa supporting that the G protein coupling with PI response was phosphorylated by PKA. These results showed that pretreatment with activated PKA inhibited the mediating function of the G protein between the fMLP receptor and phospholipase C by its phosphorylation

  18. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent

    Liu W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wei Liu,1,* Jin-Feng Ning,2,* Qing-Wei Meng,1 Jing Hu,1 Yan-Bin Zhao,1 Chao Liu,3 Li Cai11The Fourth Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 2The Thoracic Surgery Department, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 3General Surgery Department, Mudanjiang Guanliju Central Hospital, Mishan, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10 against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase–ligand interaction space in the PDB.Keywords: EGFR, kinase

  19. Promoter Engineering Reveals the Importance of Heptameric Direct Repeats for DNA Binding by Streptomyces Antibiotic Regulatory Protein-Large ATP-Binding Regulator of the LuxR Family (SARP-LAL) Regulators in Streptomyces natalensis.

    Barreales, Eva G; Vicente, Cláudia M; de Pedro, Antonio; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Aparicio, Jesús F

    2018-05-15

    The biosynthesis of small-size polyene macrolides is ultimately controlled by a couple of transcriptional regulators that act in a hierarchical way. A Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein-large ATP-binding regulator of the LuxR family (SARP-LAL) regulator binds the promoter of a PAS-LuxR regulator-encoding gene and activates its transcription, and in turn, the gene product of the latter activates transcription from various promoters of the polyene gene cluster directly. The primary operator of PimR, the archetype of SARP-LAL regulators, contains three heptameric direct repeats separated by four-nucleotide spacers, but the regulator can also bind a secondary operator with only two direct repeats separated by a 3-nucleotide spacer, both located in the promoter region of its unique target gene, pimM A similar arrangement of operators has been identified for PimR counterparts encoded by gene clusters for different antifungal secondary metabolites, including not only polyene macrolides but peptidyl nucleosides, phoslactomycins, or cycloheximide. Here, we used promoter engineering and quantitative transcriptional analyses to determine the contributions of the different heptameric repeats to transcriptional activation and final polyene production. Optimized promoters have thus been developed. Deletion studies and electrophoretic mobility assays were used for the definition of DNA-binding boxes formed by 22-nucleotide sequences comprising two conserved heptameric direct repeats separated by four-nucleotide less conserved spacers. The cooperative binding of PimR SARP appears to be the mechanism involved in the binding of regulator monomers to operators, and at least two protein monomers are required for efficient binding. IMPORTANCE Here, we have shown that a modulation of the production of the antifungal pimaricin in Streptomyces natalensis can be accomplished via promoter engineering of the PAS-LuxR transcriptional activator pimM The expression of this gene is

  20. Familial risk for mood disorder and the personality risk factor, neuroticism, interact in their association with frontolimbic serotonin 2A receptor binding

    Frøkjær, Vibe Gedsø; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    Life stress is a robust risk factor for later development of mood disorders, particularly for individuals at familial risk. Likewise, scoring high on the personality trait neuroticism is associated with an increased risk for mood disorders. Neuroticism partly reflects stress vulnerability...... stress reactivity in individuals at high familial risk for mood disorders might enhance the effect of neuroticism in shaping the impact of potential environmental stress and thereby influence serotonergic neurotransmission....... and is positively correlated to frontolimbic serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor binding. Here, we investigate whether neuroticism interacts with familial risk in relation to frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. Twenty-one healthy twins with a co-twin history of mood disorder and 16 healthy twins without a co...

  1. The spacing between adjacent binding sites in the family of repeats affects the functions of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 in transcription activation and stable plasmid maintenance.

    Hebner, Christy; Lasanen, Julie; Battle, Scott; Aiyar, Ashok

    2003-07-05

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the closely related Herpesvirus papio (HVP) are stably replicated as episomes in proliferating latently infected cells. Maintenance and partitioning of these viral plasmids requires a viral sequence in cis, termed the family of repeats (FR), that is bound by a viral protein, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1). Upon binding FR, EBNA1 maintains viral genomes in proliferating cells and activates transcription from viral promoters required for immortalization. FR from either virus encodes multiple binding sites for the viral maintenance protein, EBNA1, with the FR from the prototypic B95-8 strain of EBV containing 20 binding sites, and FR from HVP containing 8 binding sites. In addition to differences in the number of EBNA1-binding sites, adjacent binding sites in the EBV FR are typically separated by 14 base pairs (bp), but are separated by 10 bp in HVP. We tested whether the number of binding sites, as well as the distance between adjacent binding sites, affects the function of EBNA1 in transcription activation or plasmid maintenance. Our results indicate that EBNA1 activates transcription more efficiently when adjacent binding sites are separated by 10 bp, the spacing observed in HVP. In contrast, using two separate assays, we demonstrate that plasmid maintenance is greatly augmented when adjacent EBNA1-binding sites are separated by 14 bp, and therefore, presumably lie on the same face of the DNA double helix. These results provide indication that the functions of EBNA1 in transcription activation and plasmid maintenance are separable.

  2. The spacing between adjacent binding sites in the family of repeats affects the functions of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 in transcription activation and stable plasmid maintenance

    Hebner, Christy; Lasanen, Julie; Battle, Scott; Aiyar, Ashok

    2003-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the closely related Herpesvirus papio (HVP) are stably replicated as episomes in proliferating latently infected cells. Maintenance and partitioning of these viral plasmids requires a viral sequence in cis, termed the family of repeats (FR), that is bound by a viral protein, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1). Upon binding FR, EBNA1 maintains viral genomes in proliferating cells and activates transcription from viral promoters required for immortalization. FR from either virus encodes multiple binding sites for the viral maintenance protein, EBNA1, with the FR from the prototypic B95-8 strain of EBV containing 20 binding sites, and FR from HVP containing 8 binding sites. In addition to differences in the number of EBNA1-binding sites, adjacent binding sites in the EBV FR are typically separated by 14 base pairs (bp), but are separated by 10 bp in HVP. We tested whether the number of binding sites, as well as the distance between adjacent binding sites, affects the function of EBNA1 in transcription activation or plasmid maintenance. Our results indicate that EBNA1 activates transcription more efficiently when adjacent binding sites are separated by 10 bp, the spacing observed in HVP. In contrast, using two separate assays, we demonstrate that plasmid maintenance is greatly augmented when adjacent EBNA1-binding sites are separated by 14 bp, and therefore, presumably lie on the same face of the DNA double helix. These results provide indication that the functions of EBNA1 in transcription activation and plasmid maintenance are separable

  3. Evidence for in vivo phosphorylation of the Grb2 SH2-domain binding site on focal adhesion kinase by Src-family protein-tyrosine kinases.

    Schlaepfer, D D; Hunter, T

    1996-10-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) that associates with integrin receptors and participates in extracellular matrix-mediated signal transduction events. We showed previously that the c-Src nonreceptor PTK and the Grb2 SH2/SH3 adaptor protein bound directly to FAK after fibronectin stimulation (D. D. Schlaepfer, S.K. Hanks, T. Hunter, and P. van der Geer, Nature [London] 372:786-791, 1994). Here, we present evidence that c-Src association with FAK is required for Grb2 binding to FAK. Using a tryptic phosphopeptide mapping approach, the in vivo phosphorylation of the Grb2 binding site on FAK (Tyr-925) was detected after fibronectin stimulation of NIH 3T3 cells and was constitutively phosphorylated in v-Src-transformed NIH 3T3 cells. In vitro, c-Src phosphorylated FAK Tyr-925 in a glutathione S-transferase-FAK C-terminal domain fusion protein, whereas FAK did not. Using epitope-tagged FAK constructs, transiently expressed in human 293 cells, we determined the effect of site-directed mutations on c-Src and Grb2 binding to FAK. Mutation of FAK Tyr-925 disrupted Grb2 binding, whereas mutation of the c-Src binding site on FAK (Tyr-397) disrupted both c-Src and Grb2 binding to FAK in vivo. These results support a model whereby Src-family PTKs are recruited to FAK and focal adhesions following integrin-induced autophosphorylation and exposure of FAK Tyr-397. Src-family binding and phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-925 creates a Grb2 SH2-domain binding site and provides a link to the activation of the Ras signal transduction pathway. In Src-transformed cells, this pathway may be constitutively activated as a result of FAK Tyr-925 phosphorylation in the absence of integrin stimulation.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Xie, Xiaodong; Cheng, Tingcai; Wang, Genhong; Duan, Jun; Niu, Weihuan; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily is a larger protein family with diverse physiological functions in all kingdoms of life. We identified 53 ABC transporters in the silkworm genome, and classified them into eight subfamilies (A-H). Comparative genome analysis revealed that the silkworm has an expanded ABCC subfamily with more members than Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, or Homo sapiens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the ABCE and ABCF genes were highly conserved in the silkworm, indicating possible involvement in fundamental biological processes. Five multidrug resistance-related genes in the ABCB subfamily and two multidrug resistance-associated-related genes in the ABCC subfamily indicated involvement in biochemical defense. Genetic variation analysis revealed four ABC genes that might be evolving under positive selection. Moreover, the silkworm ABCC4 gene might be important for silkworm domestication. Microarray analysis showed that the silkworm ABC genes had distinct expression patterns in different tissues on day 3 of the fifth instar. These results might provide new insights for further functional studies on the ABC genes in the silkworm genome.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family in sea lamprey and Japanese lamprey.

    Ren, Jianfeng; Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Scott, Camille; Brown, Titus; Li, Weiming

    2015-06-06

    Lampreys are extant representatives of the jawless vertebrate lineage that diverged from jawed vertebrates around 500 million years ago. Lamprey genomes contain information crucial for understanding the evolution of gene families in vertebrates. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family is found from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The recent availability of two lamprey draft genomes from sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus and Japanese lamprey Lethenteron japonicum presents an opportunity to infer early evolutionary events of ABC genes in vertebrates. We conducted a genome-wide survey of the ABC gene family in two lamprey draft genomes. A total of 37 ABC transporters were identified and classified into seven subfamilies; namely seven ABCA genes, 10 ABCB genes, 10 ABCC genes, three ABCD genes, one ABCE gene, three ABCF genes, and three ABCG genes. The ABCA subfamily has expanded from three genes in sea squirts, seven and nine in lampreys and zebrafish, to 13 and 16 in human and mouse. Conversely, the multiple copies of ABCB1-, ABCG1-, and ABCG2-like genes found in sea squirts have contracted in the other species examined. ABCB2 and ABCB3 seem to be new additions in gnathostomes (not in sea squirts or lampreys), which coincides with the emergence of the gnathostome-specific adaptive immune system. All the genes in the ABCD, ABCE and ABCF subfamilies were conserved and had undergone limited duplication and loss events. In the sea lamprey transcriptomes, the ABCE and ABCF gene subfamilies were ubiquitously and highly expressed in all tissues while the members in other gene subfamilies were differentially expressed. Thirteen more lamprey ABC transporter genes were identified in this study compared with a previous study. By concatenating the same gene sequences from the two lampreys, more full length sequences were obtained, which significantly improved both the assignment of gene names and the phylogenetic trees compared with a previous analysis using partial sequences. The ABC

  6. Structural Dynamics Control Allosteric Activation of Cytohesin Family Arf GTPase Exchange Factors

    Malaby, Andrew W.; Das, Sanchaita; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Irving, Thomas C.; Bilsel, Osman; Lambright, David G.

    2018-01-01

    Membrane dynamic processes including vesicle biogenesis depend on Arf guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) containing a catalytic Sec7 domain and a membrane-targeting module such as a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. The catalytic output of cytohesin family Arf GEFs is controlled by autoinhibitory interactions that impede accessibility of the exchange site in the Sec7 domain. These restraints can be relieved through activator Arf-GTP binding to an allosteric site comprising the PH domain and proximal autoinhibitory elements (Sec7-PH linker and C-terminal helix). Small-angle X-ray scattering and negative-stain electron microscopy were used to investigate the structural organization and conformational dynamics of cytohesin-3 (Grp1) in autoinhibited and active states. The results support a model in which hinge dynamics in the autoinhibited state expose the activator site for Arf-GTP binding, while subsequent C-terminal helix unlatching and repositioning unleash conformational entropy in the Sec7-PH linker to drive exposure of the exchange site.

  7. Binding Properties of Streptococcus gordonii SspA and SspB (Antigen I/II Family) Polypeptides Expressed on the Cell Surface of Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    Holmes, Ann R.; Gilbert, Christophe; Wells, Jeremy M.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    1998-01-01

    The oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii expresses two cell wall-associated polypeptides, designated SspA (1,542 amino acid residues) and SspB (1,462 amino acid residues), that have 70% sequence identity. These polypeptides are members of the antigen I/II family of oral streptococcal adhesins and mediate the binding of streptococci to salivary glycoproteins, collagen, and other oral microorganisms such as Actinomyces naeslundii. To determine if SspA and SspB have differential binding propert...

  8. ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENT OF FAMILY 6 CARBOHYDRATE BINDING MODULE (CTCBM6B OF ALPHA-L-ARABINOFURANOSIDASE FROM CLOSTRIDIUM THERMOCELLUM

    Shadab Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid sequence of a family 6 carbohydrate binding module (CtCBM6B from Clostridium thermocellum alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase showed close evolutionary relationship with some other member of family 6 carbohydrate binding modules. The CD spectrum analysis confirmed the secondary structure prediction of CtCBM6B as both showed beta-sheets (44-48% and random coils (52-54% and no alpha-helix. The hydrogen bonding plot of CtCBM6B showed many segments of parallel and anti-parallel beta-strands which was similar to the secondary structure prediction by PSIPRED VIEW. The three dimensional structure of CtCBM6B generated by MODELLER revealed a typical beta-sandwich architecture at its core, characteristic of beta-jelly roll CBM superfamily. The Ramachandran plot analysis by PROCHECK showed that out of 134 residues, 92.9% were in most favoured region, 6.2% in additionally allowed region and only 0.9% in generously allowed region which indicated a stable conformation of 3D model of CtCBM6B. The docking analysis of CtCBM6B for finding putative ligand binding sites showed that it has high binding affinity for arabinobiose, beta-L-arabinofuranose and beta-D-xylopyranose indicated by lower ligand binding energy (-14.28 kcal mol–1, -12.5 kcal mol–1 and -11.3 kcal mol–1, respectively. CtCBM6B also showed appreciable binding affinity with alpha-D-xylopyranose (–10.8 kcal mol–1, beta-L-arabinopyranose (–10.2 kcal mol-1, alpha-L-arabinopyranose (–10.0 kcal mol–1 and alpha-L-arabinofuranose (–8.75 kcal mol–1. The results indicated that CtCBM6B has high potential for binding arabinan, xylans and substituted xylans.

  9. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction-dependent manner.

    Aniko Keller-Pinter

    Full Text Available The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs. Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4. SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1-RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways.

  10. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction–dependent manner

    Keller-Pinter, Aniko; Ughy, Bettina; Domoki, Monika; Pettko-Szandtner, Aladar; Letoha, Tamas; Tovari, Jozsef; Timar, Jozsef

    2017-01-01

    The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu) mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4). SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1) to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1–RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s) reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways. PMID:29121646

  11. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction-dependent manner.

    Keller-Pinter, Aniko; Ughy, Bettina; Domoki, Monika; Pettko-Szandtner, Aladar; Letoha, Tamas; Tovari, Jozsef; Timar, Jozsef; Szilak, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu) mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4). SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1) to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1-RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s) reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways.

  12. The Ties That Bind: Understanding Today's Families--What They Look Like, What They Do, How They Feel. Perspectives.

    Glossop, Robert

    Asserting the need for social scientists and policymakers to acknowledge that there is no single, standard image of the family, this report describes the mandate of the Vanier Institute of the Family and examines family relationships, focusing on families in Canada. The report identifies several reasons for the emergence of the dual wage-earning…

  13. Further characterization of the red beet plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase using GTP as an alternative substrate

    Williams, L.E.; Schueler, S.B.; Briskin, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The GTP-driven component of Ca 2+ uptake in red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plasma membrane vesicles was further characterized to confirm its association with the plasma membrane Ca 2+ -translocating ATPase and assess its utility as a probe for this transport system. Uptake of 45 Ca 2+ in the presence of GTP demonstrated similar properties to those previously observed for red beet plasma membrane vesicles utilizing ATP with respect to pH optimum sensitivity to orthovanadate, dependence on Mg:substrate concentration and dependence on Ca 2+ concentration. Calcium uptake in the presence of GTP was also strongly inhibited by erythrosin B, a potent inhibitor of the plant plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase. Furthermore, after treatment with EGTA to remove endogenous calmodulin, the stimulation of 45 Ca 2+ -uptake by exogeneous calmodulin was nearly equivalent in the presence of either ATP or GTP. Taken together these results support the proposal that GTP-driven 45 Ca 2+ uptake represents the capacity of the plasma membrane Ca 2+ -translocating ATPase to utilize this nucleoside triphosphate as an alternative substrate. When plasma membrane vesicles were phosphorylated with [γ- 32 P]GTP, a rapidly turning over, 100 kilodalton phosphorylated peptide was observed which contained an acyl-phosphate linkage. While it is proposed that this peptide could represent the catalytic subunit of the plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase, it is noted that this molecular weight is considerably lower than the 140 kilodalton size generally observed for plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPases present in animal cells

  14. Dynamic conformational change regulates the protein-DNA recognition: an investigation on binding of a Y-family polymerase to its target DNA.

    Xiakun Chu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4 during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates.

  15. Structure of calmodulin complexed with an olfactory CNG channel fragment and role of the central linker: Residual dipolar couplings to evaluate calmodulin binding modes outside the kinase family

    Contessa, Gian Marco; Orsale, Maria; Melino, Sonia; Torre, Vincent; Paci, Maurizio; Desideri, Alessandro; Cicero, Daniel O.

    2005-01-01

    The NMR high-resolution structure of calmodulin complexed with a fragment of the olfactory cyclic-nucleotide gated channel is described. This structure shows features that are unique for this complex, including an active role of the linker connecting the N- and C-lobes of calmodulin upon binding of the peptide. Such linker is not only involved in the formation of an hydrophobic pocket to accommodate a bulky peptide residue, but it also provides a positively charged region complementary to a negative charge of the target. This complex of calmodulin with a target not belonging to the kinase family was used to test the residual dipolar coupling (RDC) approach for the determination of calmodulin binding modes to peptides. Although the complex here characterized belongs to the (1--14) family, high Q values were obtained with all the 1:1 complexes for which crystalline structures are available. Reduction of the RDC data set used for the correlation analysis to structured regions of the complex allowed a clear identification of the binding mode. Excluded regions comprise calcium binding loops and loops connecting the EF-hand motifs

  16. Rab11-family of interacting protein 2 associates with chlamydial inclusions through its Rab-binding domain and promotes bacterial multiplication.

    Leiva, Natalia; Capmany, Anahí; Damiani, María Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular pathogen, survives within host cells in a special compartment named 'inclusion' and takes advantage of host vesicular transport pathways for its growth and replication. Rab GTPases are key regulatory proteins of intracellular trafficking. Several Rabs, among them Rab11 and Rab14, are implicated in chlamydial development. FIP2, a member of the Rab11-Family of Interacting Proteins, presents at the C-terminus a Rab-binding domain that interacts with both Rab11 and Rab14. In this study, we determined and characterized the recruitment of endogenous and GFP-tagged FIP2 to the chlamydial inclusions. The recruitment of FIP2 is specific since other members of the Rab11-Family of Interacting Proteins do not associate with the chlamydial inclusions. The Rab-binding domain of FIP2 is essential for its association. Our results indicate that FIP2 binds to Rab11 at the chlamydial inclusion membrane through its Rab-binding domain. The presence of FIP2 at the chlamydial inclusion favours the recruitment of Rab14. Furthermore, our results show that FIP2 promotes inclusion development and bacterial replication. In agreement, the silencing of FIP2 decreases the bacterial progeny. C. trachomatis likely recruits FIP2 to hijack host intracellular trafficking to redirect vesicles full of nutrients towards the inclusion. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Analysis of surface binding sites (SBSs) in carbohydrate active enzymes with focus on glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 77

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Ruzanski, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Surface binding sites (SBSs) interact with carbohydrates outside of the enzyme active site. They are frequently situated on catalytic domains and are distinct from carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). SBSs are found in a variety of enzymes and often seen in crystal structures. Notably about half ...

  18. Identification of the divergent calmodulin binding motif in yeast Ssb1/Hsp75 protein and in other HSP70 family members.

    Heinen, R C; Diniz-Mendes, L; Silva, J T; Paschoalin, V M F

    2006-11-01

    Yeast soluble proteins were fractionated by calmodulin-agarose affinity chromatography and the Ca2+/calmodulin-binding proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. One prominent protein of 66 kDa was excised from the gel, digested with trypsin and the masses of the resultant fragments were determined by MALDI/MS. Twenty-one of 38 monoisotopic peptide masses obtained after tryptic digestion were matched to the heat shock protein Ssb1/Hsp75, covering 37% of its sequence. Computational analysis of the primary structure of Ssb1/Hsp75 identified a unique potential amphipathic alpha-helix in its N-terminal ATPase domain with features of target regions for Ca2+/calmodulin binding. This region, which shares 89% similarity to the experimentally determined calmodulin-binding domain from mouse, Hsc70, is conserved in near half of the 113 members of the HSP70 family investigated, from yeast to plant and animals. Based on the sequence of this region, phylogenetic analysis grouped the HSP70s in three distinct branches. Two of them comprise the non-calmodulin binding Hsp70s BIP/GR78, a subfamily of eukaryotic HSP70 localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, and DnaK, a subfamily of prokaryotic HSP70. A third heterogeneous group is formed by eukaryotic cytosolic HSP70s containing the new calmodulin-binding motif and other cytosolic HSP70s whose sequences do not conform to those conserved motif, indicating that not all eukaryotic cytosolic Hsp70s are target for calmodulin regulation. Furthermore, the calmodulin-binding domain found in eukaryotic HSP70s is also the target for binding of Bag-1 - an enhancer of ADP/ATP exchange activity of Hsp70s. A model in which calmodulin displaces Bag-1 and modulates Ssb1/Hsp75 chaperone activity is discussed.

  19. Identification of the divergent calmodulin binding motif in yeast Ssb1/Hsp75 protein and in other HSP70 family members

    R.C. Heinen

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Yeast soluble proteins were fractionated by calmodulin-agarose affinity chromatography and the Ca2+/calmodulin-binding proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. One prominent protein of 66 kDa was excised from the gel, digested with trypsin and the masses of the resultant fragments were determined by MALDI/MS. Twenty-one of 38 monoisotopic peptide masses obtained after tryptic digestion were matched to the heat shock protein Ssb1/Hsp75, covering 37% of its sequence. Computational analysis of the primary structure of Ssb1/Hsp75 identified a unique potential amphipathic alpha-helix in its N-terminal ATPase domain with features of target regions for Ca2+/calmodulin binding. This region, which shares 89% similarity to the experimentally determined calmodulin-binding domain from mouse, Hsc70, is conserved in near half of the 113 members of the HSP70 family investigated, from yeast to plant and animals. Based on the sequence of this region, phylogenetic analysis grouped the HSP70s in three distinct branches. Two of them comprise the non-calmodulin binding Hsp70s BIP/GR78, a subfamily of eukaryotic HSP70 localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, and DnaK, a subfamily of prokaryotic HSP70. A third heterogeneous group is formed by eukaryotic cytosolic HSP70s containing the new calmodulin-binding motif and other cytosolic HSP70s whose sequences do not conform to those conserved motif, indicating that not all eukaryotic cytosolic Hsp70s are target for calmodulin regulation. Furthermore, the calmodulin-binding domain found in eukaryotic HSP70s is also the target for binding of Bag-1 - an enhancer of ADP/ATP exchange activity of Hsp70s. A model in which calmodulin displaces Bag-1 and modulates Ssb1/Hsp75 chaperone activity is discussed.

  20. Deletion in the first cysteine-rich repeat of low density lipoprotein receptor impairs its transport but not lipoprotein binding in fibroblasts from a subject with familial hypercholesterolemia

    Leitersdorf, E.; Hobbs, H.H.; Fourie, A.M.; Jacobs, M.; Van Der Westhuyzen, D.R.; Coetzee, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The ligand-binding domain of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is composed of seven cysteine-rich repeats, each ∼ 40 amino acids long. Previous studies showed that if the first repeat of the ligand-binding domain (encoded by exon 2) is deleted, the receptor fails to bind an anti-LDL receptor monoclonal antibody (IgG-C7) but continues to bind LDL with high affinity. Cultured fibroblasts from a Black South African Xhosa patient (TT) with the clinical syndrome of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia demonstrated high-affinity cell-surface binding of 125 I-labeled LDL but not 125 I-labeled IgG-C7. previous haplotype analysis, using 10 restriction fragment length polymorphic sites, suggested that the patient inherited two identical LDL receptor alleles. The polymerase chain reaction technique was used to selectively amplify exon 2 of the LDL receptor gene from this patient. Sequence analysis of the amplified fragment disclosed a deletion of six base pairs that removes two amino acids, aspartic acid and glycine, from the first cysteine-rich ligand binding repeat. The mutation creates a new Pst I restriction site that can be used to detect the deletion. The existence of this mutant allele confirms that the epitope of IgG-C7 is located in the first cysteine-rich repeat and that this repeat is not necessary for LDL binding. The mutant gene produced a normally sized 120-kilodalton LDL receptor precursor protein that matured to the 160-kilodalton form at less than one-fourth the normal rate

  1. Genome-wide identification, sequence characterization, and protein-protein interaction properties of DDB1 (damaged DNA binding protein-1)-binding WD40-repeat family members in Solanum lycopersicum.

    Zhu, Yunye; Huang, Shengxiong; Miao, Min; Tang, Xiaofeng; Yue, Junyang; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-06-01

    One hundred DDB1 (damaged DNA binding protein-1)-binding WD40-repeat domain (DWD) family genes were identified in the S. lycopersicum genome. The DWD genes encode proteins presumably functioning as the substrate recognition subunits of the cullin4-ring ubiquitin E3 ligase complex. These findings provide candidate genes and a research platform for further gene functionality and molecular breeding study. A subclass of DDB1 (damaged DNA binding protein-1)-binding WD40-repeat domain (DWD) family proteins has been demonstrated to function as the substrate recognition subunits of the cullin4-ring ubiquitin E3 ligase complex. However, little information is available about the cognate subfamily genes in tomato (S. lycopersicum). In this study, based on the recently released tomato genome sequences, 100 tomato genes encoding DWD proteins that potentially interact with DDB1 were identified and characterized, including analyses of the detailed annotations, chromosome locations and compositions of conserved amino acid domains. In addition, a phylogenetic tree, which comprises of three main groups, of the subfamily genes was constructed. The physical interaction between tomato DDB1 and 14 representative DWD proteins was determined by yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. The subcellular localization of these 14 representative DWD proteins was determined. Six of them were localized in both nucleus and cytoplasm, seven proteins exclusively in cytoplasm, and one protein either in nucleus and cytoplasm, or exclusively in cytoplasm. Comparative genomic analysis demonstrated that the expansion of these subfamily members in tomato predominantly resulted from two whole-genome triplication events in the evolution history.

  2. A novel RUNX2 missense mutation predicted to disrupt DNA binding causes cleidocranial dysplasia in a large Chinese family with hyperplastic nails

    Wang Xiaoqin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by hypoplastic or absent clavicles, large fontanels, dental dysplasia, and delayed skeletal development. The purpose of this study is to investigate the genetic basis of Chinese family with CCD. Methods Here, a large Chinese family with CCD and hyperplastic nails was recruited. The clinical features displayed a significant intrafamilial variation. We sequenced the coding region of the RUNX2 gene for the mutation and phenotype analysis. Results The family carries a c.T407C (p.L136P mutation in the DNA- and CBFβ-binding Runt domain of RUNX2. Based on the crystal structure, we predict this novel missense mutation is likely to disrupt DNA binding by RUNX2, and at least locally affect the Runt domain structure. Conclusion A novel missense mutation was identified in a large Chinese family with CCD with hyperplastic nails. This report further extends the mutation spectrum and clinical features of CCD. The identification of this mutation will facilitate prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  3. Association between housing type and γ-GTP increase after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Murakami, Aya; Sugawara, Yumi; Tomata, Yasutake; Sugiyama, Kemmyo; Kaiho, Yu; Tanji, Fumiya; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2017-09-01

    It has been reported that alcohol consumption increases after natural disasters, with an impact on health. However, the impact of relocation upon drinking behavior has been unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the association between housing type and the impact of alcohol consumption on health after the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE) of 2011. We analyzed 569 residents living in devastated areas of Ishinomaki city, who had undergone assessment of their γ-GTP levels at health check-ups in both 2010 and 2013, and had given details of the type of housing they occupied in 2013. The housing types were categorized into five groups: "same housing as that before the GEJE", "prefabricated temporary housing", "privately rented temporary housing/rental housing", "homes of relatives", and "reconstructed housing". We used fixed-effect regression analysis to examine the association between housing type after the GEJE and changes in γ-GTP after adjustment for age, BMI, housing damage, number of people in household, smoking status, presence of illness, psychological distress, and social network. The mean age of the participants was 71.5 years and 46.2% of them were men. The proportion of individuals who drank heavily, and suffered from psychological distress and insomnia, was highest among those living in privately rented temporary housing/rental housing. Compared with individuals who continued to occupy the same housing as those before the GEJE, the effect of change in γ-GTP was significantly higher in individuals who had moved to privately rented temporary housing/rental housing (b = 9.5, SE = 4.4, p housing/rental housing are at highest risk of negative health effects due to alcohol drinking. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Members of a novel protein family containing microneme adhesive repeat domains act as sialic acid-binding lectins during host cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites.

    Friedrich, Nikolas; Santos, Joana M; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S; Leon, Ester; Saouros, Savvas; Kiso, Makoto; Blackman, Michael J; Matthews, Stephen; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-15

    Numerous intracellular pathogens exploit cell surface glycoconjugates for host cell recognition and entry. Unlike bacteria and viruses, Toxoplasma gondii and other parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa actively invade host cells, and this process critically depends on adhesins (microneme proteins) released onto the parasite surface from intracellular organelles called micronemes (MIC). The microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain of T. gondii MIC1 (TgMIC1) recognizes sialic acid (Sia), a key determinant on the host cell surface for invasion by this pathogen. By complementation and invasion assays, we demonstrate that TgMIC1 is one important player in Sia-dependent invasion and that another novel Sia-binding lectin, designated TgMIC13, is also involved. Using BLAST searches, we identify a family of MAR-containing proteins in enteroparasitic coccidians, a subclass of apicomplexans, including T. gondii, suggesting that all these parasites exploit sialylated glycoconjugates on host cells as determinants for enteric invasion. Furthermore, this protein family might provide a basis for the broad host cell range observed for coccidians that form tissue cysts during chronic infection. Carbohydrate microarray analyses, corroborated by structural considerations, show that TgMIC13, TgMIC1, and its homologue Neospora caninum MIC1 (NcMIC1) share a preference for alpha2-3- over alpha2-6-linked sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine sequences. However, the three lectins also display differences in binding preferences. Intense binding of TgMIC13 to alpha2-9-linked disialyl sequence reported on embryonal cells and relatively strong binding to 4-O-acetylated-Sia found on gut epithelium and binding of NcMIC1 to 6'sulfo-sialyl Lewis(x) might have implications for tissue tropism.

  5. EFAM GTP 02 - the GKSS test procedure for determining the fracture behaviour of materials

    Schwalbe, K.H.; Heerens, J.; Zerbst, U.; Kocak, M.

    2002-01-01

    This document describes a unified fracture mechanics test method in procedural form for quasi-static testing of materials. It is based on the ESIS Procedures P1 and P2 and introduces additional features, such as middle cracked tension specimens, shallow cracks, the δ 5 crack tip opening displacement, the crack tip opening angle, the rate of dissipated energy, testing of weldments, and guidance for statistical treatment of scatter. Special validity criteria are given for tests on specimens with low constraint. This document represents an updated version of EFAM GTP 94. (orig.) [de

  6. Climate change impact of livestock CH4 emission in India: Global temperature change potential (GTP) and surface temperature response.

    Kumari, Shilpi; Hiloidhari, Moonmoon; Kumari, Nisha; Naik, S N; Dahiya, R P

    2018-01-01

    Two climate metrics, Global surface Temperature Change Potential (GTP) and the Absolute GTP (AGTP) are used for studying the global surface temperature impact of CH 4 emission from livestock in India. The impact on global surface temperature is estimated for 20 and 100 year time frames due to CH 4 emission. The results show that the CH 4 emission from livestock, worked out to 15.3 Tg in 2012. In terms of climate metrics GTP of livestock-related CH 4 emission in India in 2012 were 1030 Tg CO 2 e (GTP 20 ) and 62 Tg CO 2 e (GTP 100 ) at the 20 and 100 year time horizon, respectively. The study also illustrates that livestock-related CH 4 emissions in India can cause a surface temperature increase of up to 0.7mK and 0.036mK over the 20 and 100 year time periods, respectively. The surface temperature response to a year of Indian livestock emission peaks at 0.9mK in the year 2021 (9 years after the time of emission). The AGTP gives important information in terms of temperature change due to annual CH 4 emissions, which is useful when comparing policies that address multiple gases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The CREC family, a novel family of multiple EF-hand, low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins localised to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H

    2000-01-01

    The CREC family consists of a number of recently discovered multiple (up to seven) EF-hand proteins that localise to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells. At present, the family includes reticulocalbin, ERC-55/TCBP-49/E6BP, Cab45, calumenin and crocalbin/CBP-50. Similar proteins are found......(2+)-regulated activities. Recent evidence has been obtained that some CREC family members are involved in pathological activities such as malignant cell transformation, mediation of the toxic effects of snake venom toxins and putative participation in amyloid formation. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-21...

  8. pocketZebra: a web-server for automated selection and classification of subfamily-specific binding sites by bioinformatic analysis of diverse protein families.

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Kirilin, Eugeny; Arbatsky, Mikhail; Takhaveev, Vakil; Svedas, Vytas

    2014-07-01

    The new web-server pocketZebra implements the power of bioinformatics and geometry-based structural approaches to identify and rank subfamily-specific binding sites in proteins by functional significance, and select particular positions in the structure that determine selective accommodation of ligands. A new scoring function has been developed to annotate binding sites by the presence of the subfamily-specific positions in diverse protein families. pocketZebra web-server has multiple input modes to meet the needs of users with different experience in bioinformatics. The server provides on-site visualization of the results as well as off-line version of the output in annotated text format and as PyMol sessions ready for structural analysis. pocketZebra can be used to study structure-function relationship and regulation in large protein superfamilies, classify functionally important binding sites and annotate proteins with unknown function. The server can be used to engineer ligand-binding sites and allosteric regulation of enzymes, or implemented in a drug discovery process to search for potential molecular targets and novel selective inhibitors/effectors. The server, documentation and examples are freely available at http://biokinet.belozersky.msu.ru/pocketzebra and there are no login requirements. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Mutation-Induced Population Shift in the MexR Conformational Ensemble Disengages DNA Binding: A Novel Mechanism for MarR Family Derepression.

    Anandapadamanaban, Madhanagopal; Pilstål, Robert; Andresen, Cecilia; Trewhella, Jill; Moche, Martin; Wallner, Björn; Sunnerhagen, Maria

    2016-08-02

    MexR is a repressor of the MexAB-OprM multidrug efflux pump operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, where DNA-binding impairing mutations lead to multidrug resistance (MDR). Surprisingly, the crystal structure of an MDR-conferring MexR mutant R21W (2.19 Å) presented here is closely similar to wild-type MexR. However, our extended analysis, by molecular dynamics and small-angle X-ray scattering, reveals that the mutation stabilizes a ground state that is deficient of DNA binding and is shared by both mutant and wild-type MexR, whereas the DNA-binding state is only transiently reached by the more flexible wild-type MexR. This population shift in the conformational ensemble is effected by mutation-induced allosteric coupling of contact networks that are independent in the wild-type protein. We propose that the MexR-R21W mutant mimics derepression by small-molecule binding to MarR proteins, and that the described allosteric model based on population shifts may also apply to other MarR family members. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ribosome-induced changes in elongation factor Tu conformation control GTP hydrolysis

    Villa, Elizabeth; Sengupta, Jayati; Trabuco, Leonard G.

    2009-01-01

    In translation, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) molecules deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs to the mRNA-programmed ribosome. The GTPase activity of EF-Tu is triggered by ribosome-induced conformational changes of the factor that play a pivotal role in the selection of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. We present a 6.......7-A cryo-electron microscopy map of the aminoacyl-tRNA x EF-Tu x GDP x kirromycin-bound Escherichia coli ribosome, together with an atomic model of the complex obtained through molecular dynamics flexible fitting. The model reveals the conformational changes in the conserved GTPase switch regions...... of EF-Tu that trigger hydrolysis of GTP, along with key interactions, including those between the sarcin-ricin loop and the P loop of EF-Tu, and between the effector loop of EF-Tu and a conserved region of the 16S rRNA. Our data suggest that GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu is controlled through a hydrophobic...

  11. The interaction properties of the human Rab GTPase family--comparative analysis reveals determinants of molecular binding selectivity.

    Matthias Stein

    Full Text Available Rab GTPases constitute the largest subfamily of the Ras protein superfamily. Rab proteins regulate organelle biogenesis and transport, and display distinct binding preferences for effector and activator proteins, many of which have not been elucidated yet. The underlying molecular recognition motifs, binding partner preferences and selectivities are not well understood.Comparative analysis of the amino acid sequences and the three-dimensional electrostatic and hydrophobic molecular interaction fields of 62 human Rab proteins revealed a wide range of binding properties with large differences between some Rab proteins. This analysis assists the functional annotation of Rab proteins 12, 14, 26, 37 and 41 and provided an explanation for the shared function of Rab3 and 27. Rab7a and 7b have very different electrostatic potentials, indicating that they may bind to different effector proteins and thus, exert different functions. The subfamily V Rab GTPases which are associated with endosome differ subtly in the interaction properties of their switch regions, and this may explain exchange factor specificity and exchange kinetics.We have analysed conservation of sequence and of molecular interaction fields to cluster and annotate the human Rab proteins. The analysis of three dimensional molecular interaction fields provides detailed insight that is not available from a sequence-based approach alone. Based on our results, we predict novel functions for some Rab proteins and provide insights into their divergent functions and the determinants of their binding partner selectivity.

  12. The Arf GTPase-activating protein family is exploited by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to invade nonphagocytic host cells.

    Davidson, Anthony C; Humphreys, Daniel; Brooks, Andrew B E; Hume, Peter J; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2015-02-10

    To establish intracellular infections, Salmonella bacteria trigger host cell membrane ruffling and invasion by subverting cellular Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases by promoting GTP binding. A family of cellular Arf GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) can downregulate Arf signaling by stimulating GTP hydrolysis, but whether they do this during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered a remarkable role for distinct Arf GAP family members in Salmonella invasion. The Arf6 GAPs ACAP1 and ADAP1 and the Arf1 GAP ASAP1 localized at Salmonella-induced ruffles, which was not the case for the plasma membrane-localized Arf6 GAPs ARAP3 and GIT1 or the Golgi-associated Arf1 GAP1. Surprisingly, we found that loss of ACAP1, ADAP1, or ASAP1 impaired Salmonella invasion, revealing that GAPs cannot be considered mere terminators of cytoskeleton remodeling. Salmonella invasion was restored in Arf GAP-depleted cells by expressing fast-cycling Arf derivatives, demonstrating that Arf GTP/GDP cycles facilitate Salmonella invasion. Consistent with this view, both constitutively active and dominant-negative Arf derivatives that cannot undergo GTP/GDP cycles inhibited invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Arf GEFs and GAPs colocalize at invading Salmonella and collaborate to drive Arf1-dependent pathogen invasion. This study revealed that Salmonella bacteria exploit a remarkable interplay between Arf GEFs and GAPs to direct cycles of Arf GTPase activation and inactivation. These cycles drive Salmonella cytoskeleton remodeling and enable intracellular infections. To initiate infections, the Salmonella bacterial pathogen remodels the mammalian actin cytoskeleton and invades host cells by subverting host Arf GEFs that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases. Cellular Arf GAPs deactivate Arf GTPases and negatively regulate cell processes, but whether they target Arfs during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered an important role for the Arf GAP

  13. Impaired behavioural pain responses in hph-1 mice with inherited deficiency in GTP cyclohydrolase 1 in models of inflammatory pain

    Nasser, A.; Bjerrum, Ole Jannik; Heegaard, A.-M.

    2013-01-01

    following intraplantar injection of CFA, formalin and capsaicin; whereas decreased basal level of GTP-CH1 activity had no influence in naïve hph-1 mice on acute mechanical and heat pain thresholds. Moreover, the hph-1 mice showed no signs of motor impairment or dystonia-like symptoms......Background: GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), encoded by the GCH1 gene, has been implicated in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain in rats. In humans, homozygous carriers of a " pain-protective" (PP) haplotype...... of the GCH1 gene have been identified exhibiting lower pain sensitivity, but only following pain sensitisation. Ex vivo, the PP GCH1 haplotype is associated with decreased induction of GCH1 after stimulation, whereas the baseline BH4 production is not affected. Contrary, loss of function mutations in the GCH...

  14. Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the extreme thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae is an allosteric enzyme, activated by GTP and inhibited by CTP

    Linde, Lise; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1996-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, which catalyses the formation of UMP and pyrophosphate from uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl a-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), was partly purified from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae. The enzyme required divalent metal ions for activity...... and it showed the highest activity at pH 6.4. The specific activity of the enzyme was 50-times higher at 95°C than at 37°C, but the functional half-life was short at 95°C. The activity of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase was strongly activated by GTP, which increased Vmax of the reaction by approximately 20......-fold without much effect on Km for the substrates. The concentration of GTP required for half-maximal activation was about 80 µM. CTP was a strong inhibitor and acted by raising the concentration of GTP needed for half-maximal activation of the enzyme. We conclude that uracil phosphoribosyltransferase...

  15. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Activities of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Family by One-Hybrid Experiments in Yeast.

    Zsolt Kelemen

    Full Text Available The control of growth and development of all living organisms is a complex and dynamic process that requires the harmonious expression of numerous genes. Gene expression is mainly controlled by the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins called transcription factors (TFs. Amongst the various classes of eukaryotic TFs, the MYB superfamily is one of the largest and most diverse, and it has considerably expanded in the plant kingdom. R2R3-MYBs have been extensively studied over the last 15 years. However, DNA-binding specificity has been characterized for only a small subset of these proteins. Therefore, one of the remaining challenges is the exhaustive characterization of the DNA-binding specificity of all R2R3-MYB proteins. In this study, we have developed a library of Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB open reading frames, whose DNA-binding activities were assayed in vivo (yeast one-hybrid experiments with a pool of selected cis-regulatory elements. Altogether 1904 interactions were assayed leading to the discovery of specific patterns of interactions between the various R2R3-MYB subgroups and their DNA target sequences and to the identification of key features that govern these interactions. The present work provides a comprehensive in vivo analysis of R2R3-MYB binding activities that should help in predicting new DNA motifs and identifying new putative target genes for each member of this very large family of TFs. In a broader perspective, the generated data will help to better understand how TF interact with their target DNA sequences.

  16. Impact of orientation of carbohydrate binding modules family 22 and 6 on the catalytic activity of Thermotoga maritima xylanase XynB.

    Tajwar, Razia; Shahid, Saher; Zafar, Rehan; Akhtar, Muhammad Waheed

    2017-11-01

    Xylanase XynB of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima, which belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10), does not have an associated carbohydrate binding module (CBM) in the native state. CBM6 and CBM22 from a thermophile Clostridium thermocellum were fused to the catalytic domain of XynB (XynB-C) to determine the effects on activity and other properties. XynB-B22C and XynB-CB22, produced by fusing CBM22 to the N- and C-terminal of XynB-C, showed 1.7- and 3.24-fold increase in activity against the insoluble birchwood xylan, respectively. Similarly, CBM6 when attached to the C-terminal of XynB-C resulted in 2.0-fold increase in activity, whereas its attachment to the N-terminal did not show any increase of activity. XynB-B22C and XynB-CB22 retained all the activity, whereas XynB-B6C and XynB-CB6 lost 17 and 11% of activity, respectively, at 60°C for 4h. Thermostability data and the secondary structure contents obtained by molecular modelling are in agreement with the data from circular dichroism analysis. Molecular modelling analysis showed that the active site residues of the catalytic domain and the binding residues of CBM6 and CBM22 were located on the surface of molecule, except XynB-B6C, where the binding residues were found somewhat buried. In the case of XynB-CB22, the catalytic and the binding residues seem to be located favorably adjacent to each other, thus showing higher increase in activity. This study shows that the active site residues of the catalytic domain and the binding residues of the CBM are arranged in a unique fashion, not reported before. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The CREC family, a novel family of multiple EF-hand, low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins localised to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H

    2000-01-01

    (2+)-regulated activities. Recent evidence has been obtained that some CREC family members are involved in pathological activities such as malignant cell transformation, mediation of the toxic effects of snake venom toxins and putative participation in amyloid formation. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-21...

  18. A new clan of CBM families based on bioinformatics of starch-binding domains from families CBM20 and CBM21

    Marhovic, M.; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    many nonamylolytic proteins have been recognized as possessing sequence segments that exhibit similarities with the experimentally observed CBM20 and CBM21. These facts have stimulated interest in carrying out a rigorous bioinformatics analysis of the two CBM families. The present analysis showed...

  19. F-Type Lectins: A Highly Diversified Family of Fucose-Binding Proteins with a Unique Sequence Motif and Structural Fold, Involved in Self/Non-Self-Recognition

    Gerardo R. Vasta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The F-type lectin (FTL family is one of the most recent to be identified and structurally characterized. Members of the FTL family are characterized by a fucose recognition domain [F-type lectin domain (FTLD] that displays a novel jellyroll fold (“F-type” fold and unique carbohydrate- and calcium-binding sequence motifs. This novel lectin family comprises widely distributed proteins exhibiting single, double, or greater multiples of the FTLD, either tandemly arrayed or combined with other structurally and functionally distinct domains, yielding lectin subunits of pleiotropic properties even within a single species. Furthermore, the extraordinary variability of FTL sequences (isoforms that are expressed in a single individual has revealed genetic mechanisms of diversification in ligand recognition that are unique to FTLs. Functions of FTLs in self/non-self-recognition include innate immunity, fertilization, microbial adhesion, and pathogenesis, among others. In addition, although the F-type fold is distinctive for FTLs, a structure-based search revealed apparently unrelated proteins with minor sequence similarity to FTLs that displayed the FTLD fold. In general, the phylogenetic analysis of FTLD sequences from viruses to mammals reveals clades that are consistent with the currently accepted taxonomy of extant species. However, the surprisingly discontinuous distribution of FTLDs within each taxonomic category suggests not only an extensive structural/functional diversification of the FTLs along evolutionary lineages but also that this intriguing lectin family has been subject to frequent gene duplication, secondary loss, lateral transfer, and functional co-option.

  20. A novel mutation in homeobox DNA binding domain of HOXC13 gene underlies pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (ECTD9) in a Pakistani family.

    Khan, Anwar Kamal; Muhammad, Noor; Aziz, Abdul; Khan, Sher Alam; Shah, Khadim; Nasir, Abdul; Khan, Muzammil Ahmad; Khan, Saadullah

    2017-04-12

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) is a congenital disorder of hair abnormalities and nail dysplasia. Both autosomal recessive and dominant inheritance fashion of PHNED occurs. In literature, to date, five different forms of PHNED have been reported at molecular level, having three genes known and two loci with no gene yet. In this study, a four generations consanguineous family of Pakistani origin with autosomal recessive PHNED was investigated. Affected members exhibited PHNED phenotypes with involvement of complete hair loss and nail dysplasia. To screen for mutation in the genes (HOXC13, KRT74, KRT85), its coding exons and exons-intron boundaries were sequenced. The 3D models of normal and mutated HOXC13 were predicted by using homology modeling. Through investigating the family to known loci, the family was mapped to ectodermal dysplasia 9 (ECTD9) loci with genetic address of 12q13.13. Mutation screening revealed a novel missense mutation (c.929A > C; p.Asn310Thr) in homeobox DNA binding domain of HOXC13 gene in affected members of the family. Due to mutation, loss of hydrogen bonding and difference in potential energy occurs, which may resulting in alteration of protein function. This is the first mutation reported in homeodomain, while 5 th mutation reported in HOXC13 gene causing PHNED.

  1. Genome-wide identification and comparative analysis of squamosa-promoter binding proteins (sbp) transcription factor family in gossypium raimondii and arabidopsis thaliana

    Ali, M.A.; Alia, K.B.; Atif, R.M.; Rasulj, I.; Nadeem, H.U.; Shahid, A.; Azeem, F

    2017-01-01

    SQUAMOSA-Promoter Binding Proteins (SBP) are class of transcription factors that play vital role in regulation of plant tissue growth and development. The genes encoding these proteins have not yet been identified in diploid cotton. Thus here, a comprehensive genome wide analysis of SBP genes/proteins was carried out to identify the genes encoding SBP proteins in Gossypium raimondii and Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 17 SBP genes from Arabidopsis thaliana genome and 30 SBP genes from Gossypium raimondii. Chromosome localization studies revealed the uneven distribution of SBP encoding genes both in the genomes of A. thaliana and G. raimondii. In cotton, five SBP genes were located on chromosome no. 2, while no gene was found on chromosome 9. In A. thaliana, maximum seven SBP genes were identified on chromosome 9, while chromosome 4 did not have any SBP gene. Thus, the SBP gene family might have expanded as a result of segmental as well as tandem duplications in these species. The comparative phylogenetic analysis of Arabidopsis and cotton SBPs revealed the presence of eight groups. The gene structure analysis of SBP encoding genes revealed the presence of one to eleven inrons in both Arabidopsis and G. raimondii. The proteins sharing the same phyletic group mostly demonstrated the similar intron-exon occurrence pattern; and share the common conserved domains. The SBP DNA-binding domain shared 24 absolutely conserved residues in Arabidopsis. The present study can serve as a base for the functional characterization of SBP gene family in Gossypium raimondii. (author)

  2. AMPD2 regulates GTP synthesis and is mutated in a potentially treatable neurodegenerative brainstem disorder.

    Akizu, Naiara; Cantagrel, Vincent; Schroth, Jana; Cai, Na; Vaux, Keith; McCloskey, Douglas; Naviaux, Robert K; Van Vleet, Jeremy; Fenstermaker, Ali G; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Scheliga, Judith S; Toyama, Keiko; Morisaki, Hiroko; Sonmez, Fatma M; Celep, Figen; Oraby, Azza; Zaki, Maha S; Al-Baradie, Raidah; Faqeih, Eissa A; Saleh, Mohammed A M; Spencer, Emily; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Scott, Eric; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Gabriel, Stacey; Morisaki, Takayuki; Holmes, Edward W; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2013-08-01

    Purine biosynthesis and metabolism, conserved in all living organisms, is essential for cellular energy homeostasis and nucleic acid synthesis. The de novo synthesis of purine precursors is under tight negative feedback regulation mediated by adenosine and guanine nucleotides. We describe a distinct early-onset neurodegenerative condition resulting from mutations in the adenosine monophosphate deaminase 2 gene (AMPD2). Patients have characteristic brain imaging features of pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) due to loss of brainstem and cerebellar parenchyma. We found that AMPD2 plays an evolutionary conserved role in the maintenance of cellular guanine nucleotide pools by regulating the feedback inhibition of adenosine derivatives on de novo purine synthesis. AMPD2 deficiency results in defective GTP-dependent initiation of protein translation, which can be rescued by administration of purine precursors. These data suggest AMPD2-related PCH as a potentially treatable early-onset neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. AMPD2 Regulates GTP Synthesis and is Mutated in a Potentially-Treatable Neurodegenerative Brainstem Disorder

    Akizu, Naiara; Cantagrel, Vincent; Schroth, Jana; Cai, Na; Vaux, Keith; McCloskey, Douglas; Naviaux, Robert K.; Vleet, Jeremy Van; Fenstermaker, Ali G.; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Scheliga, Judith S.; Toyama, Keiko; Morisaki, Hiroko; Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Celep, Figen; Oraby, Azza; Zaki, Maha S.; Al-Baradie, Raidah; Faqeih, Eissa; Saleh, Mohammad; Spencer, Emily; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Scott, Eric; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Gabriel, Stacey; Morisaki, Takayuki; Holmes, Edward W.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Purine biosynthesis and metabolism, conserved in all living organisms, is essential for cellular energy homeostasis and nucleic acids synthesis. The de novo synthesis of purine precursors is under tight negative feedback regulation mediated by adenosine and guanine nucleotides. We describe a new distinct early-onset neurodegenerative condition resulting from mutations in the adenosine monophosphate deaminase 2 gene (AMPD2). Patients have characteristic brain imaging features of pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH), due to loss of brainstem and cerebellar parenchyma. We found that AMPD2 plays an evolutionary conserved role in the maintenance of cellular guanine nucleotide pools by regulating the feedback inhibition of adenosine derivatives on de novo purine synthesis. AMPD2 deficiency results in defective GTP-dependent initiation of protein translation, which can be rescued by administration of purine precursors. These data suggest AMPD2-related PCH as a new, potentially treatable early-onset neurodegenerative disease. PMID:23911318

  4. Lack of influence of GTP cyclohydrolase gene (GCH1 variations on pain sensitivity in humans

    Dionne Raymond A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To assess the effect of variations in GTP cyclohydrolase gene (GCH1 on pain sensitivity in humans. Methods Thermal and cold pain sensitivity were evaluated in a cohort of 735 healthy volunteers. Among this cohort, the clinical pain responses of 221 subjects after the surgical removal of impacted third molars were evaluated. Genotyping was done for 38 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose heterozygosity > 0.2 in GCH1. Influence of the genetic variations including SNPs and haplotypes on pain sensitivity were analyzed. Results Minor allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium show significant differences in European Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans. Association analyses in European Americans do not replicate the previously reported important influence of GCH1 variations on pain sensitivity. Conclusion Considering population stratification, previously reported associations between GCH1 genetic variations and pain sensitivity appear weak or negligible in this well characterized model of pain.

  5. Structural plasticity mediates distinct GAP-dependent GTP hydrolysis mechanisms in Rab33 and Rab5.

    Majumdar, Soneya; Acharya, Abhishek; Prakash, Balaji

    2017-12-01

    The classical GTP hydrolysis mechanism, as seen in Ras, employs a catalytic glutamine provided in cis by the GTPase and an arginine supplied in trans by a GTPase activating protein (GAP). The key idea emergent from a large body of research on small GTPases is that GTPases employ a variety of different hydrolysis mechanisms; evidently, these variations permit diverse rates of GTPase inactivation, crucial for temporal regulation of different biological processes. Recently, we unified these variations and argued that a steric clash between active site residues (corresponding to positions 12 and 61 of Ras) governs whether a GTPase utilizes the cis-Gln or the trans-Gln (from the GAP) for catalysis. As the cis-Gln encounters a steric clash, the Rab GTPases employ the so-called dual finger mechanism where the interacting GAP supplies a trans-Gln for catalysis. Using experimental and computational methods, we demonstrate how the cis-Gln of Rab33 overcomes the steric clash when it is stabilized by a residue in the vicinity. In effect, this demonstrates how both cis-Gln- and trans-Gln-mediated mechanisms could operate in the same GTPase in different contexts, i.e. depending on the GAP that regulates its action. Interestingly, in the case of Rab5, which possesses a higher intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate, a similar stabilization of the cis-Gln appears to overcome the steric clash. Taken together with the mechanisms seen for Rab1, it is evident that the observed variations in Rab and their GAP partners allow structural plasticity, or in other words, the choice of different catalytic mechanisms. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Relation between the insulin receptor number in cells, autophosphorylation and insulin-stimulated Ras.GTP formation

    Osterop, A.P.R.M.; Medema, R.H.; Bos, J.L.; Zon, G.C.M. van der; Moller, D.E.; Flier, J.S.; Möller, W.; Maassen, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    We showed previously that upon insulin stimulation of an insulin receptor overexpressing cell linme,o st of the p2lras warsa pidly converted into the GTP bound state (Burgering, B. M. T., Medema, R. H., Maassen, J. A., Van de Wetering, M. L., Van der Eb, A. J., McCormick, F., and Bos, J. L.

  7. Host-parasite interaction: selective Pv-fam-a family proteins of Plasmodium vivax bind to a restricted number of human erythrocyte receptors.

    Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh Kumar; Tyagi, Kriti; Alam, Mohd Shoeb; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2015-04-01

    Plasmodium vivax synthesizes the largest number of 36 tryptophan-rich proteins belonging to the Pv-fam-a family. These parasite proteins need to be characterized for their biological function because tryptophan-rich proteins from other Plasmodium species have been proposed as vaccine candidates. Recombinant P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs) were used to determine their erythrocyte-binding activity by a cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and a rosetting assay. Only 4 (PvTRAg26.3, PvTRAg34, PvTRAg36, and PvTRAg36.6) of 21 PvTRAgs bind to host erythrocytes. The cross-competition data indicated that PvTRAg36 and PvTRAg34 share their erythrocyte receptors with previously described proteins PvTRAg38 and PvTRAg33.5, respectively. On the other hand, PvTRAg26.3 and PvTRAg36.6 cross-compete with each other and not with any other PvTRAg, indicating that these 2 proteins bind to the same but yet another set of erythrocyte receptor(s). Together, 10 of 36 PvTRAgs possess erythrocyte-binding activity in which each protein recognizes >1 erythrocyte receptor. Further, each erythrocyte receptor is shared by >1 PvTRAg. This redundancy may be useful for the parasite to invade red blood cells and cause disease pathogenesis, and it can be exploited to develop therapeutics against P. vivax malaria. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site

  9. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.

  10. Deltorphins: a family of naturally occurring peptides with high affinity and selectivity for delta opioid binding sites.

    Erspamer, V; Melchiorri, P; Falconieri-Erspamer, G; Negri, L; Corsi, R; Severini, C; Barra, D; Simmaco, M; Kreil, G

    1989-01-01

    Deltorphins are endogenous linear heptapeptides, isolated from skin extracts of frogs belonging to the genus Phyllomedusa, that have a higher affinity and selectivity for delta opioid binding sites than any other natural compound known. Two deltorphins with the sequence Tyr-Ala-Phe-Asp(or Glu)-Val-Val-Gly-NH2 have been isolated from skin extracts of Phyllomedusa bicolor. The alanine in position 2 is in the D configuration. These peptides, [D-Ala2]deltorphins I and II, show an even higher affi...

  11. Structural and kinetic insights into binding and incorporation of L-nucleotide analogs by a Y-family DNA polymerase

    Gaur, Vineet; Vyas, Rajan; Fowler, Jason D.; Efthimiopoulos, Georgia; Feng, Joy Y.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    Considering that all natural nucleotides (D-dNTPs) and the building blocks (D-dNMPs) of DNA chains possess D-stereochemistry, DNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases (RTs) likely possess strongD-stereoselectivity by preferably binding and incorporating D-dNTPs over unnatural L-dNTPs during DNA synthesis. Surprisingly, a structural basis for the discrimination against L-dNTPs by DNA polymerases or RTs has not been established although L-deoxycytidine analogs (lamivudine and emtricitabine) a...

  12. Light-induced, GTP-binding protein mediated membrane currents of Xenopus oocytes injected with rhodopsin of cephalopods.

    Ando, H; Seidou, M; Kito, Y

    1991-01-01

    Xenopus oocytes that were injected with rhabdomeric membranes of squid and octopus photoreceptors acquired light sensitivity. The injected oocytes showed a light-induced current having characteristics similar to other G-protein-mediated Cl- currents induced by the activation of other membrane receptors. Pretreatment of the oocytes with pertussis toxin before the injection suppressed the generation of the light-induced current, indicating an ability of cephalopod rhodopsin to cross-react with an endogenous G-protein of Xenopus oocytes.

  13. Regulation of vesicular traffic by a GTP-binding protein on the cytoplasmic surface of secretory vesicles in yeast

    Novick, P.J.; Goud, B.; Salminen, A.; Walworth, N.C.; Nair, J.; Potenza, M.

    1988-01-01

    Vesicular transport is an important mechanism for the intracellular traffic of proteins and lipids in eukaryotic cells. Vesicles mediate the passage of proteins between the various organelles of the secretory pathway and the exocytic release of these proteins into the extracellular environment. Vesicles also mediate the uptake of proteins and fluid from the external environment, delivering them to endosomes. Despite the generality of the vesicular transport mechanism, the process is not yet understood at a molecular level. The key questions that are addressed are (1) How are vesicles formed from the membrane of the donor organelle? (2) How are these vesicles transported? (3) How do the vesicles recognize the membrane of the target (acceptor) organelle? (4) How is membrane fusion accomplished? The genetic flexibility of yeast has been exploited to identify components of the cellular machinery required for vesicular transport

  14. A putative ATP/GTP binding protein affects Leishmania mexicana growth in insect vectors and vertebrate hosts

    Ishemgulova, A.; Kraeva, N.; Hlaváčová, J.; Zimmer, S.L.; Butenko, A.; Podešvová, L.; Leštinová, T.; Lukeš, Julius; Kostygov, A.; Votýpka, Jan; Volf, P.; Yurchenko, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 7 (2017), č. článku e0005782. ISSN 1935-2735 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1601 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : multiple sequence alignment * sand flies * trypanosoma-brucei * expression system * p-loop * transmission * evolution * parasites * resource * kinases Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.834, year: 2016

  15. Inactivation of the small GTP binding protein Rho induces multinucleate cell formation and apoptosis in murine T lymphoma EL4.

    Moorman, J P; Bobak, D A; Hahn, C S

    1996-06-01

    The small G-protein Rho regulates the actin microfilament-dependent cytoskeleton. Exoenzyme C3 of Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosylates Rho at Asn41, a modification that functionally inactivates Rho. Using a Sindbis virus-based transient gene expression system, we studied the role of Rho in murine EL4 T lymphoma cells. We generated a double subgenomic infectious Sindbis virus (dsSIN:C3) recombinant which expressed C3 in >95% of EL4 cells. This intracellular C3 resulted in modification and inactivation of virtually all endogenous Rho. dsSIN:C3 infection led to the formation of multinucleate cells, likely by inhibiting the actin microfilament-dependent step of cytokinesis. Intriguingly, in spite of the inhibition of cytokinesis, karyokinesis continued, with the result that cells containing a nuclear DNA content as high as 16N (eight nuclei) were observed. In addition, dsSIN:C3-mediated inactivation of Rho was a potent activator of apoptosis in EL4 cells. To discern whether the formation of multinucleate cells was responsible for the activation of apoptosis, 5-fluorouracil (5-FUra) was used to induce cell cycle arrest. As expected, EL4 cells treated with 5-FUra were prevented from forming multinucleate cells upon infection with dsSIN:C3. dsSIN:C3 infection, however, still caused marked apoptosis in 5-FUra-treated cells, indicating that this activation of apoptosis was independent of multinucleate cell formation.

  16. Whole-transcriptome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family genes in the latex-producing laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis.

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 'full-size', 21 'half-size' and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis.

  17. Genome-wide identification and tissue-specific expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat gene family in Cicer arietinum (kabuli chickpea).

    Sharma, Ranu; Rawat, Vimal; Suresh, C G

    2017-12-01

    The nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins play an important role in the defense mechanisms against pathogens. Using bioinformatics approach, we identified and annotated 104 NBS-LRR genes in chickpea. Phylogenetic analysis points to their diversification into two families namely TIR-NBS-LRR and non-TIR-NBS-LRR. Gene architecture revealed intron gain/loss events in this resistance gene family during their independent evolution into two families. Comparative genomics analysis elucidated its evolutionary relationship with other fabaceae species. Around 50% NBS-LRRs reside in macro-syntenic blocks underlining positional conservation along with sequence conservation of NBS-LRR genes in chickpea. Transcriptome sequencing data provided evidence for their transcription and tissue-specific expression. Four cis -regulatory elements namely WBOX, DRE, CBF, and GCC boxes, that commonly occur in resistance genes, were present in the promoter regions of these genes. Further, the findings will provide a strong background to use candidate disease resistance NBS-encoding genes and identify their specific roles in chickpea.

  18. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Adrian Valli

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  19. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Valli, Adrian; Busnadiego, Idoia; Maliogka, Varvara; Ferrero, Diego; Castón, José R; Rodríguez, José Francisco; García, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  20. PURA, the gene encoding Pur-alpha, member of an ancient nucleic acid-binding protein family with mammalian neurological functions.

    Daniel, Dianne C; Johnson, Edward M

    2018-02-15

    The PURA gene encodes Pur-alpha, a 322 amino acid protein with repeated nucleic acid binding domains that are highly conserved from bacteria through humans. PUR genes with a single copy of this domain have been detected so far in spirochetes and bacteroides. Lower eukaryotes possess one copy of the PUR gene, whereas chordates possess 1 to 4 PUR family members. Human PUR genes encode Pur-alpha (Pura), Pur-beta (Purb) and two forms of Pur-gamma (Purg). Pur-alpha is a protein that binds specific DNA and RNA sequence elements. Human PURA, located at chromosome band 5q31, is under complex control of three promoters. The entire protein coding sequence of PURA is contiguous within a single exon. Several studies have found that overexpression or microinjection of Pura inhibits anchorage-independent growth of oncogenically transformed cells and blocks proliferation at either G1-S or G2-M checkpoints. Effects on the cell cycle may be mediated by interaction of Pura with cellular proteins including Cyclin/Cdk complexes and the Rb tumor suppressor protein. PURA knockout mice die shortly after birth with effects on brain and hematopoietic development. In humans environmentally induced heterozygous deletions of PURA have been implicated in forms of myelodysplastic syndrome and progression to acute myelogenous leukemia. Pura plays a role in AIDS through association with the HIV-1 protein, Tat. In the brain Tat and Pura association in glial cells activates transcription and replication of JC polyomavirus, the agent causing the demyelination disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Tat and Pura also act to stimulate replication of the HIV-1 RNA genome. In neurons Pura accompanies mRNA transcripts to sites of translation in dendrites. Microdeletions in the PURA locus have been implicated in several neurological disorders. De novo PURA mutations have been related to a spectrum of phenotypes indicating a potential PURA syndrome. The nucleic acid, G-rich Pura binding

  1. The ties that bind - A case report about restraining a mentally unwell family member at home for over a decade.

    Tay, Jing Ling; Chan, Christopher Yi Wen; Ho, Zhen Chong; Lal, Manu

    2017-04-01

    This is a case report describing a patient, with schizophrenia, who was physically chained by her mother in their house for more a decade. Illness factors, family dynamics, stigma, lack of mental health literacy and cultural roles contributed to her chaining. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that examines the prolonged use of physical restraints by family members on a patient in a developed urban setting and that explores the cultural and ethical issues surrounding this phenomenon. We have concluded that there remains a need for a national level approach to increase mental health literacy, reduce stigma and promote existing psychiatric community health services in a culturally sensitive manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. CELF family RNA-binding protein UNC-75 regulates two sets of mutually exclusive exons of the unc-32 gene in neuron-specific manners in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Hidehito Kuroyanagi

    Full Text Available An enormous number of alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns in multicellular organisms are coordinately defined by a limited number of regulatory proteins and cis elements. Mutually exclusive alternative splicing should be strictly regulated and is a challenging model for elucidating regulation mechanisms. Here we provide models of the regulation of two sets of mutually exclusive exons, 4a-4c and 7a-7b, of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated (unc-32 gene, encoding the a subunit of V0 complex of vacuolar-type H(+-ATPases. We visualize selection patterns of exon 4 and exon 7 in vivo by utilizing a trio and a pair of symmetric fluorescence splicing reporter minigenes, respectively, to demonstrate that they are regulated in tissue-specific manners. Genetic analyses reveal that RBFOX family RNA-binding proteins ASD-1 and FOX-1 and a UGCAUG stretch in intron 7b are involved in the neuron-specific selection of exon 7a. Through further forward genetic screening, we identify UNC-75, a neuron-specific CELF family RNA-binding protein of unknown function, as an essential regulator for the exon 7a selection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays specify a short fragment in intron 7a as the recognition site for UNC-75 and demonstrate that UNC-75 specifically binds via its three RNA recognition motifs to the element including a UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch. The UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch in the reporter minigenes is actually required for the selection of exon 7a in the nervous system. We compare the amounts of partially spliced RNAs in the wild-type and unc-75 mutant backgrounds and raise a model for the mutually exclusive selection of unc-32 exon 7 by the RBFOX family and UNC-75. The neuron-specific selection of unc-32 exon 4b is also regulated by UNC-75 and the unc-75 mutation suppresses the Unc phenotype of the exon-4b-specific allele of unc-32 mutants. Taken together, UNC-75 is the neuron-specific splicing factor and regulates both sets of the mutually exclusive

  3. Regulation of formyl peptide receptor binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes. Use of monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins to discriminate among different states of the receptor

    Feltner, D.E.; Marasco, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    The regulation by monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins of [3H]FMLP binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes was studied by using dissociation techniques to identify regulatory effects on separate receptor states. Under conditions of low receptor occupancy (1 nM [3H]FMLP) and in both Na+ and K+ buffers, dissociation is heterogenous, displaying two distinct, statistically significant off rates. [3H]FMLP binding was enhanced by substituting other monovalent cations for Na+. In particular, enhanced binding in the presence of K+ relative to Na+ was caused by additional binding to both rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors. Three receptor dissociation rates, two of which appear to correspond to the two affinity states detected in equilibrium binding studies, were defined by specific GTP and pertussis toxin (PT) treatments. Neither GTP, nor PT or cholera toxins (CT) had an effect on the rate of dissociation of [3H]FMLP from the rapidly dissociating form of the receptor. Both 100 microM GTP and PT treatments increased the percentage of rapidly dissociating receptors, correspondingly decreasing the percentage of slowly dissociating receptors. The observed changes in the rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors after GTP, PT, and CT treatments were caused by an absolute decrease in the amount of binding to the slowly dissociating receptors. However, complete inhibition of slowly dissociating receptor binding by GTP, PT, or both was never observed. Both GTP and PT treatments, but not CT treatment, increased by two-fold the rate of dissociation of 1 nM [3H]FMLP from the slowly dissociating form of the receptor, resulting in a third dissociation rate. Thus, slowly dissociating receptors comprise two different receptor states, a G protein-associated guanine nucleotide and PT-sensitive state and a guanine nucleotide-insensitive state

  4. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  5. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in 3 (H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding

  6. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein regulation of melatonin receptors in lizard brain

    Rivkees, S.A.; Carlson, L.L.; Reppert, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Melatonin receptors were identified and characterized in crude membrane preparations from lizard brain by using 125 I-labeled melatonin ( 125 I-Mel), a potent melatonin agonist. 125 I-Mel binding sites were saturable; Scatchard analysis revealed high-affinity and lower affinity binding sites, with apparent K d of 2.3 ± 1.0 x 10 -11 M and 2.06 ± 0.43 x 10 -10 M, respectively. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of crude membranes with the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate (GTP[γS]), significantly reduced the number of high-affinity receptors and increased the dissociation rate of 125 I-Mel from its receptor. Furthermore, GTP[γS] treatment of ligand-receptor complexes solubilized by Triton X-100 also led to a rapid dissociation of 125 I-Mel from solubilized ligand-receptor complexes. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized ligand-receptor complexes revealed two major peaks of radioactivity corresponding to M r > 400,000 and M r ca. 110,000. This elution profile was markedly altered by pretreatment with GTP[γS] before solubilization; only the M r 110,000 peak was present in GTP[γS]-pretreated membranes. The results strongly suggest that 125 I-mel binding sites in lizard brain are melatonin receptors, with agonist-promoted guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupling and that the apparent molecular size of receptors uncoupled from G proteins is about 110,000

  7. Characterization of cap binding proteins associated with the nucleus

    Patzelt, E.

    1986-04-01

    Eucaryotic mRNAs a carry 7-methylguanosine triphosphate residue (called cap structure) at their 5' terminus. The cap plays an important role in RNA recognition. Cap binding proteins (CBP) of HeLa cells were identified by photoaffinity labelling using the cap analogue γ-( 32 P)-(4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido)-7-methylguanosine-5'-triphosphate (BP-m 7 GTP). Photoreaction of this cap analogue with HeLa cell initiation factors resulted in specific labelling of two polypeptides of Msub(r) 37000 and 26000. The latter was also labelled in crude initiation factors prepared from reticulocytes and is identical to the cap binding protein CBP I previously identified. These cap binding proteins were also affinity labelled in poliovirus infected cell extracts. Photoaffinity reaction with BP-m 7 GTP of whole HeLa cell homogenate showed three additional polypeptides with Msub(r) 120000, 89000 and 80000. These cap binding proteins were found to be associated with the nucleus and are therefore referred to as nuclear cap binding proteins, i.e. NCBP 1, NCBP 2 and NCBP 3. They were also present in splicing extracts. Photoaffinity labelling in these nuclear extracts was differentially inhibited by various cap analogues and capped mRNAs. Affinity chromatography on immobilized globin mRNA led to a partial separation of the three nuclear cap binding proteins. Chromatography on m 7 GTP-Sepharose resulted in a specific binding of NCBP 3. The different behaviour of the cap binding proteins suggests that they are functionally distinct and that they might be involved in different processes requiring cap recognition. (Author)

  8. PipY, a Member of the Conserved COG0325 Family of PLP-Binding Proteins, Expands the Cyanobacterial Nitrogen Regulatory Network

    José I. Labella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 is a paradigmatic model organism for nitrogen regulation in cyanobacteria. Expression of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation is positively regulated by the 2-oxoglutarate receptor and global transcriptional regulator NtcA. Maximal activation requires the subsequent binding of the co-activator PipX. PII, a protein found in all three domains of life as an integrator of signals of the nitrogen and carbon balance, binds to PipX to counteract NtcA activity at low 2-oxoglutarate levels. PII-PipX complexes can also bind to the transcriptional regulator PlmA, whose regulon remains unknown. Here we expand the nitrogen regulatory network to PipY, encoded by the bicistronic operon pipXY in S. elongatus. Work with PipY, the cyanobacterial member of the widespread family of COG0325 proteins, confirms the conserved roles in vitamin B6 and amino/keto acid homeostasis and reveals new PLP-related phenotypes, including sensitivity to antibiotics targeting essential PLP-holoenzymes or synthetic lethality with cysK. In addition, the related phenotypes of pipY and pipX mutants are consistent with genetic interactions in the contexts of survival to PLP-targeting antibiotics and transcriptional regulation. We also showed that PipY overexpression increased the length of S. elongatus cells. Taken together, our results support a universal regulatory role for COG0325 proteins, paving the way to a better understanding of these proteins and of their connections with other biological processes.

  9. Differential protein expression, DNA binding and interaction with SV40 large tumour antigen implicate the p63-family of proteins in replicative senescence.

    Djelloul, Siham; Tarunina, Marina; Barnouin, Karin; Mackay, Alan; Jat, Parmjit S

    2002-02-07

    P53 activity plays a key role in mammalian cells when they undergo replicative senescence at their Hayflick limit. To determine whether p63 proteins, members of the family of p53-related genes, are also involved in this process, we examined their expression in serially passaged rat embryo fibroblasts. Upon senescence, two truncated DeltaNp63 proteins decreased in abundance whereas two TAp63 isoforms accumulated. 2-D gel analysis showed that the DeltaNp63 proteins underwent post-translational modifications in both proliferating and senescent cells. Direct binding of DeltaNp63 proteins to a p53 consensus motif was greater in proliferating cells than senescent cells. In contrast p63alpha isoforms bound to DNA in a p53 dependent manner and this was higher in senescent cells than proliferating cells. An interaction of p63alpha proteins with SV40 large tumour antigen was also detected and ectopic expression of DeltaNp63alpha can extend the lifespan of rat embryo fibroblasts. Taken together the results indicate that p63 proteins may play a role in replicative senescence either by competition for p53 DNA binding sites or by direct interaction with p53 protein bound to DNA.

  10. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  11. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone and side-chain resonance assignments of a family 32 carbohydrate-binding module from the Clostridium perfringens NagH.

    Grondin, Julie M; Chitayat, Seth; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Boraston, Alisdair B; Smith, Steven P

    2012-10-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobe Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that secretes a battery of enzymes involved in glycan degradation. These glycoside hydrolases are thought to be involved in turnover of mucosal layer glycans, and in the spread of major toxins commonly associated with the development of gastrointestinal diseases and gas gangrene in humans. These enzymes employ multi-modularity and carbohydrate-binding function to degrade extracellular eukaryotic host sugars. Here, we report the full (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift resonance assignments of the first family 32 carbohydrate-binding module from NagH, a secreted family 84 glycoside hydrolase.

  12. Deltorphins: a family of naturally occurring peptides with high affinity and selectivity for delta opioid binding sites.

    Erspamer, V; Melchiorri, P; Falconieri-Erspamer, G; Negri, L; Corsi, R; Severini, C; Barra, D; Simmaco, M; Kreil, G

    1989-07-01

    Deltorphins are endogenous linear heptapeptides, isolated from skin extracts of frogs belonging to the genus Phyllomedusa, that have a higher affinity and selectivity for delta opioid binding sites than any other natural compound known. Two deltorphins with the sequence Tyr-Ala-Phe-Asp(or Glu)-Val-Val-Gly-NH2 have been isolated from skin extracts of Phyllomedusa bicolor. The alanine in position 2 is in the D configuration. These peptides, [D-Ala2]deltorphins I and II, show an even higher affinity for delta receptors than the previously characterized deltorphin, which contains D-methionine as the second amino acid. These peptides show some similarity to another constituent of Phyllomedusa skin, dermorphin, which is highly selective for mu-opioid receptors. These peptides all have the N-terminal sequence Tyr-D-Xaa-Phe, where D-Xaa is either D-alanine or D-methionine. While this structure seems to be capable of activating both mu and delta opioid receptors, differences in the C-terminal regions of these peptides are probably responsible for the observed high receptor selectivity of dermorphin and deltorphin.

  13. The ties that bind: understanding the impact of sexual assault disclosure on survivors' relationships with friends, family, and partners.

    Ahrens, Courtney E; Aldana, Erendira

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests that the type of social reactions sexual assault survivors receive from others can have a profound impact on their health and well-being. Far less is known about the impact of social reactions on the ensuing relationship between survivors and the people to whom they disclose. The current study sought to address this gap in the literature by examining the impact of disclosure on survivors' relationships with friends, family members, and romantic partners. A total of 76 rape survivors described 153 different disclosures to informal support providers. Qualitative analysis suggested that most relationships either were strengthened or remained strong following the disclosure, but a substantial number of survivors described relationships that deteriorated or remained poor following the disclosure. These outcomes were related to the quality of the relationship prior to the disclosure and to survivors' perceptions of the reactions they received during the disclosure. Implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed.

  14. Novel autophosphorylation sites of Src family kinases regulate kinase activity and SH2 domain-binding capacity.

    Weir, Marion E; Mann, Jacqueline E; Corwin, Thomas; Fulton, Zachary W; Hao, Jennifer M; Maniscalco, Jeanine F; Kenney, Marie C; Roman Roque, Kristal M; Chapdelaine, Elizabeth F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Deming, Paula B; Ballif, Bryan A; Hinkle, Karen L

    2016-04-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) are critical players in normal and aberrant biological processes. While phosphorylation importantly regulates SFKs at two known tyrosines, large-scale phosphoproteomics have revealed four additional tyrosines commonly phosphorylated in SFKs. We found these novel tyrosines to be autophosphorylation sites. Mimicking phosphorylation at the C-terminal site to the activation loop decreased Fyn activity. Phosphomimetics and direct phosphorylation at the three SH2 domain sites increased Fyn activity while reducing phosphotyrosine-dependent interactions. While 68% of human SH2 domains exhibit conservation of at least one of these tyrosines, few have been found phosphorylated except when found in cis to a kinase domain. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. The structure of SSO2064, the first representative of Pfam family PF01796, reveals a novel two-domain zinc-ribbon OB-fold architecture with a potential acyl-CoA-binding role

    Krishna, S. Sri; Aravind, L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Caruthers, Jonathan; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of SSO2064, the first structural representative of Pfam family PF01796 (DUF35), reveals a two-domain architecture comprising an N-terminal zinc-ribbon domain and a C-terminal OB-fold domain. Analysis of the domain architecture, operon organization and bacterial orthologs combined with the structural features of SSO2064 suggests a role involving acyl-CoA binding for this family of proteins. SSO2064 is the first structural representative of PF01796 (DUF35), a large prokaryotic family with a wide phylogenetic distribution. The structure reveals a novel two-domain architecture comprising an N-terminal, rubredoxin-like, zinc ribbon and a C-terminal, oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold domain. Additional N-terminal helical segments may be involved in protein–protein interactions. Domain architectures, genomic context analysis and functional evidence from certain bacterial representatives of this family suggest that these proteins form a novel fatty-acid-binding component that is involved in the biosynthesis of lipids and polyketide antibiotics and that they possibly function as acyl-CoA-binding proteins. This structure has led to a re-evaluation of the DUF35 family, which has now been split into two entries in the latest Pfam release (v.24.0)

  16. Analysis of odorant-binding protein gene family members in the polyembryonic wasp, Copidosoma floridanum: evidence for caste bias and host interaction.

    Donnell, David M

    2014-01-01

    The polyembryonic wasp Copidosoma floridanum produces two larval castes, soldiers and reproductives, during development within its caterpillar host. Primary structures were determined for 6 odorant-binding protein (OBP) gene family members in Copidosoma and then analyzed alongside two formerly sequenced OBP genes from this wasp. The genes were examined for caste-bias in expression patterns using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ expression studies. Six of the 8 genes show a clear bias in gene expression towards one or the other larval caste. Of the 3 distinct in situ probe hybridization patterns observed in this study, none lie in tissues with clear chemosensory functions. Two of the patterns suggest the majority of the Copidosoma OBP gene family members discovered thus far come into contact with host hemolymph. Most of these OBPs are expressed exclusively in the serosal membrane encompassing each of the reproductive larvae. The absence of expression in the membrane surrounding soldier larvae strongly suggests these OBPs are performing caste-specific functions in the host. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    Eunyoung Seo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analyses of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding.

  18. RNA-binding proteins of the NXF (nuclear export factor) family and their connection with the cytoskeleton.

    Mamon, L A; Ginanova, V R; Kliver, S F; Yakimova, A O; Atsapkina, A A; Golubkova, E V

    2017-04-01

    The mutual relationship between mRNA and the cytoskeleton can be seen from two points of view. On the one hand, the cytoskeleton is necessary for mRNA trafficking and anchoring to subcellular domains. On the other hand, cytoskeletal growth and rearrangement require the translation of mRNAs that are connected to the cytoskeleton. β-actin mRNA localization may influence dynamic changes in the actin cytoskeleton. In the cytoplasm, long-lived mRNAs exist in the form of RNP (ribonucleoprotein) complexes, where they interact with RNA-binding proteins, including NXF (Nuclear eXport Factor). Dm NXF1 is an evolutionarily conserved protein in Drosophila melanogaster that has orthologs in different animals. The universal function of nxf1 genes is the nuclear export of different mRNAs in various organisms. In this mini-review, we briefly discuss the evidence demonstrating that Dm NXF1 fulfils not only universal but also specialized cytoplasmic functions. This protein is detected not only in the nucleus but also in the cytoplasm. It is a component of neuronal granules. Dm NXF1 marks nuclear division spindles during early embryogenesis and the dense body on one side of the elongated spermatid nuclei. The characteristic features of sbr mutants (sbr 10 and sbr 5 ) are impairment of chromosome segregation and spindle formation anomalies during female meiosis. sbr 12 mutant sterile males with immobile spermatozoa exhibit disturbances in the axoneme, mitochondrial derivatives and cytokinesis. These data allow us to propose that the Dm NXF1 proteins transport certain mRNAs in neurites and interact with localized mRNAs that are necessary for dynamic changes of the cytoskeleton. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fatty acid binding protein 3 (fabp3) is associated with insulin, lipids and cardiovascular phenotypes of the metabolic syndrome through epigenetic modifications in a Northern European family population.

    Zhang, Yi; Kent, Jack W; Lee, Adam; Cerjak, Diana; Ali, Omar; Diasio, Robert; Olivier, Michael; Blangero, John; Carless, Melanie A; Kissebah, Ahmed H

    2013-03-19

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) play regulatory roles at the nexus of lipid metabolism and signaling. Dyslipidemia in clinical manifestation frequently co-occurs with obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension in the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Animal studies have suggested FABPs play regulatory roles in expressing MetS phenotypes. In our family cohort of Northern European descent, transcript levels in peripheral white blood cells (PWBCs) of a key FABPs, FABP3, is correlated with the MetS leading components. However, evidence supporting the functions of FABPs in humans using genetic approaches has been scarce, suggesting FABPs may be under epigenetic regulation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CpG methylation status of a key regulator of lipid homeostasis, FABP3, is a quantitative trait associated with status of MetS phenotypes in humans. We used a mass-spec based quantitative method, EpiTYPER®, to profile a CpG island that extends from the promoter to the first exon of the FABP3 gene in our family-based cohort of Northern European descent (n=517). We then conducted statistical analysis of the quantitative relationship of CpG methylation and MetS measures following the variance-component association model. Heritability of each methylation and the effect of age and sex on CpG methylation were also assessed in our families. We find that methylation levels of individual CpG units and the regional average are heritable and significantly influenced by age and sex. Regional methylation was strongly associated with plasma total cholesterol (p=0.00028) and suggestively associated with LDL-cholesterol (p=0.00495). Methylation at individual units was significantly associated with insulin sensitivity, lipid particle sizing and diastolic blood pressure (pmetabolism (βWHR=-0.72; βLDL-c=-0.53) while positively correlated with plasma adiponectin (β=0.24). Further, we show that differential methylation of FABP3 affects binding activity with

  20. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    Marquiza Sablón-Carrazana

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP:NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21:NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the

  1. EFAM GTP-CREEP 02 - the GKSS test procedure for determining the creep crack extension of materials

    Schwalbe, K.H.

    2002-01-01

    This document describes a fracture mechanics method in procedural form for determining the creep crack extension of materials. It is based on the unified fracture mechanics test method EFAM GTP 02, the ASTM standard E 1457-98, activities of VAMAS TWA 19, and GKSS experience in creep crack extension testing. It introduces novel features such as the rate of the δ 5 crack tip opening displacement, the crack tip opening angle, and the middle cracked tension specimen. (orig.) [de

  2. A neutron scattering study of the ternary complex EF-Tu.GTP-valyl-tRNAVal1A

    Österberg, R.; Elias, P.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1986-01-01

    The complex formation between elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), GTP, and valyl-tRNAVal1A has been investigated in a hepes buffer of "pH" 7.4 and 0.2 M ionic strength using the small-angle neutron scattering method at concentrations of D2O where EF-Tu (42% D2O) and tRNA (71% D2O) are successively...

  3. Identification and biochemical analysis of Slac2-c/MyRIP as a Rab27A-, myosin Va/VIIa-, and actin-binding protein.

    Kuroda, Taruho S; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2005-01-01

    Slac2-c/MyRIP is a specific Rab27A-binding protein that contains an N-terminal synaptotagmin-like protein (Slp) homology domain (SHD, a newly identified GTP-Rab27A-binding motif), but in contrast to the Slp family proteins, it lacks C-terminal tandem C2 domains. In vitro Slac2-c simultaneously directly interacts with both Rab27A and an actin-based motor protein, myosin Va, via its N-terminal SHD and middle region, respectively, consistent with the fact that the overall structure of Slac2-c is similar to that of Slac2-a/melanophilin, a linker protein between Rab27A and myosin Va in the melanosome transport in melanocytes. Unlike Slac2-a, however, the middle region of Slac2-c interacts with two types of myosins, myosin Va and myosin VIIa. In addition, the most C-terminal part of both Slac2-a and Slac2-c functions as an actin-binding domain: it directly interacts with globular and fibrous actin in vitro, and the actin-binding domain of Slac2-a and Slac2-c colocalizes with actin filaments when it is expressed in living cells (i.e., PC12 cells and mouse melanocytes). In this chapter we describe the methods that have been used to analyze the protein-protein interactions of Slac2-c, specifically with Rab27A, myosin Va/VIIa, and actin.

  4. The electrostatic role of the Zn-Cys2His2 complex in binding of operator DNA with transcription factors: mouse EGR-1 from the Cys2His2 family.

    Chirgadze, Y N; Boshkova, E A; Polozov, R V; Sivozhelezov, V S; Dzyabchenko, A V; Kuzminsky, M B; Stepanenko, V A; Ivanov, V V

    2018-01-07

    The mouse factor Zif268, known also as early growth response protein EGR-1, is a classical representative for the Cys2His2 transcription factor family. It is required for binding the RNA polymerase with operator dsDNA to initialize the transcription process. We have shown that only in this family of total six Zn-finger protein families the Zn complex plays a significant role in the protein-DNA binding. Electrostatic feature of this complex in the binding of factor Zif268 from Mus musculus with operator DNA has been considered. The factor consists of three similar Zn-finger units which bind with triplets of coding DNA. Essential contacts of the factor with the DNA phosphates are formed by three conservative His residues, one in each finger. We describe here the results of calculations of the electrostatic potentials for the Zn-Cys2His2 complex, Zn-finger unit 1, and the whole transcription factor. The potential of Zif268 has a positive area on the factor surface, and it corresponds exactly to the binding sites of each of Zn-finger units. The main part of these areas is determined by conservative His residues, which form contacts with the DNA phosphate groups. Our result shows that the electrostatic positive potential of this histidine residue is enhanced due to the Zn complex. The other contacts of the Zn-finger with DNA are related to nucleotide bases, and they are responsible for the sequence-specific binding with DNA. This result may be extended to all other members of the Cys2His2 transcription factor family.

  5. Involvement of the actin cytoskeleton and p21rho-family GTPases in the pathogenesis of the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    G.D. Godbold

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that infection with the enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills more than 50,000 people a year. Central to the pathogenesis of this organism is its ability to directly lyse host cells and cause tissue destruction. Amebic lesions show evidence of cell lysis, tissue necrosis, and damage to the extracellular matrix. The specific molecular mechanisms by which these events are initiated, transmitted, and effected are just beginning to be uncovered. In this article we review what is known about host cell adherence and contact-dependent cytolysis. We cover the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton and small GTP-binding proteins of the p21rho-family in the process of cell killing and phagocytosis, and also look at how amebic interactions with molecules of the extracellular matrix contribute to its cytopathic effects.

  6. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. A Salmonella typhimurium-translocated Glycerophospholipid:Cholesterol Acyltransferase Promotes Virulence by Binding to the RhoA Protein Switch Regions

    LaRock, Doris L.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Levin, Itay; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; Miller, Samuel I.

    2012-08-24

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium translocates a glycerophospholipid: cholesterol acyltransferase (SseJ) into the host cytosol after its entry into mammalian cells. SseJ is recruited to the cytoplasmic face of the host cell phagosome membrane where it is activated upon binding the small GTPase, RhoA. SseJ is regulated similarly to cognate eukaryotic effectors, as only the GTP-bound form of RhoA family members stimulates enzymatic activity. Using NMR and biochemistry, this work demonstrates that SseJ competes effectively with Rhotekin, ROCK, and PKN1 in binding to a similar RhoA surface. The RhoA surface that binds SseJ includes the regulatory switch regions that control activation of mammalian effectors. These data were used to create RhoA mutants with altered SseJ binding and activation. This structure-function analysis supports a model in which SseJ activation occurs predominantly through binding to residues within switch region II. We further defined the nature of the interaction between SseJ and RhoA by constructing SseJ mutants in the RhoA binding surface. These data indicate that SseJ binding to RhoA is required for recruitment of SseJ to the endosomal network and for full Salmonella virulence for inbred susceptible mice, indicating that regulation of SseJ by small GTPases is an important virulence strategy of this bacterial pathogen. The dependence of a bacterial effector on regulation by a mammalian GTPase defines further how intimately host pathogen interactions have coevolved through similar and divergent evolutionary strategies.

  8. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 binding to endocytosis receptors of the low density lipoprotein receptor family by a peptide isolated from a phage displayed library

    Jensen, Jan K.; Malmendal, Anders; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    (DVPCFGWCQDA) was determined by NMR. A binding site in the so-called flexible joint region of PAI-1 was suggested by molecular modelling and validated through binding studies with various competitors and site-directed mutagenesis of PAI-1. The peptide with an N-terminal biotin inhibited the binding of the u...

  9. Structures of a bi-functional Kunitz-type STI family inhibitor of serine and aspartic proteases: Could the aspartic protease inhibition have evolved from a canonical serine protease-binding loop?

    Guerra, Yasel; Valiente, Pedro A; Pons, Tirso; Berry, Colin; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    Bi-functional inhibitors from the Kunitz-type soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) family are glycosylated proteins able to inhibit serine and aspartic proteases. Here we report six crystal structures of the wild-type and a non-glycosylated mutant of the bifunctional inhibitor E3Ad obtained at different pH values and space groups. The crystal structures show that E3Ad adopts the typical β-trefoil fold of the STI family exhibiting some conformational changes due to pH variations and crystal packing. Despite the high sequence identity with a recently reported potato cathepsin D inhibitor (PDI), three-dimensional structures obtained in this work show a significant conformational change in the protease-binding loop proposed for aspartic protease inhibition. The E3Ad binding loop for serine protease inhibition is also proposed, based on structural similarity with a novel non-canonical conformation described for the double-headed inhibitor API-A from the Kunitz-type STI family. In addition, structural and sequence analyses suggest that bifunctional inhibitors of serine and aspartic proteases from the Kunitz-type STI family are more similar to double-headed inhibitor API-A than other inhibitors with a canonical protease-binding loop. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. (Parke-Davis Research Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital Site, Cambridge (England))

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  11. Impaired behavioural pain responses in hph-1 mice with inherited deficiency in GTP cyclohydrolase 1 in models of inflammatory pain

    2013-01-01

    Background GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), encoded by the GCH1 gene, has been implicated in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain in rats. In humans, homozygous carriers of a “pain-protective” (PP) haplotype of the GCH1 gene have been identified exhibiting lower pain sensitivity, but only following pain sensitisation. Ex vivo, the PP GCH1 haplotype is associated with decreased induction of GCH1 after stimulation, whereas the baseline BH4 production is not affected. Contrary, loss of function mutations in the GCH1 gene results in decreased basal GCH1 expression, and is associated with DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). So far it is unknown if such mutations affect acute and inflammatory pain. Results In the current study, we examined the involvement of the GCH1 gene in pain models using the hyperphenylalaninemia 1 (hph-1) mouse, a genetic model for DRD, with only 10% basal GTP-CH1 activity compared to wild type mice. The study included assays for determination of acute nociception as well as models for pain after sensitisation. Pain behavioural analysis of the hph-1 mice showed reduced pain-like responses following intraplantar injection of CFA, formalin and capsaicin; whereas decreased basal level of GTP-CH1 activity had no influence in naïve hph-1 mice on acute mechanical and heat pain thresholds. Moreover, the hph-1 mice showed no signs of motor impairment or dystonia-like symptoms. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate novel evidence that genetic mutations in the GCH1 gene modulate pain-like hypersensitivity. Together, the present data suggest that BH4 is not important for basal heat and mechanical pain, but they support the hypothesis that BH4 plays a role in inflammation-induced hypersensitivity. Our studies suggest that the BH4 pathway could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory pain conditions. Moreover, the hph-1 mice provide a valid model to

  12. NDK Interacts with FtsZ and Converts GDP to GTP to Trigger FtsZ Polymerisation--A Novel Role for NDK.

    Mishra, Saurabh; Jakkala, Kishor; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Arumugam, Muthu; Ranjeri, Raghavendra; Gupta, Prabuddha; Rajeswari, Haryadi; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK), conserved across bacteria to humans, synthesises NTP from NDP and ATP. The eukaryotic homologue, the NDPK, uses ATP to phosphorylate the tubulin-bound GDP to GTP for tubulin polymerisation. The bacterial cytokinetic protein FtsZ, which is the tubulin homologue, also uses GTP for polymerisation. Therefore, we examined whether NDK can interact with FtsZ to convert FtsZ-bound GDP and/or free GDP to GTP to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. Recombinant and native NDK and FtsZ proteins of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used as the experimental samples. FtsZ polymersation was monitored using 90° light scattering and FtsZ polymer pelleting assays. The γ32P-GTP synthesised by NDK from GDP and γ32P-ATP was detected using thin layer chromatography and quantitated using phosphorimager. The FtsZ bound 32P-GTP was quantitated using phosphorimager, after UV-crosslinking, followed by SDS-PAGE. The NDK-FtsZ interaction was determined using Ni2+-NTA-pulldown assay and co-immunoprecipitation of the recombinant and native proteins in vitro and ex vivo, respectively. NDK triggered instantaneous polymerisation of GDP-precharged recombinant FtsZ in the presence of ATP, similar to the polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) upon the direct addition of GTP. Similarly, NDK triggered polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) in the presence of free GDP and ATP as well. Mutant NDK, partially deficient in GTP synthesis from ATP and GDP, triggered low level of polymerisation of MsFtsZ, but not of MtFtsZ. As characteristic of NDK's NTP substrate non-specificity, it used CTP, TTP, and UTP also to convert GDP to GTP, to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. The NDK of one mycobacterial species could trigger the polymerisation of the FtsZ of another mycobacterial species. Both the recombinant and the native NDK and FtsZ showed interaction with each other in vitro and ex vivo, alluding to the possibility of direct

  13. NDK Interacts with FtsZ and Converts GDP to GTP to Trigger FtsZ Polymerisation - A Novel Role for NDK

    Mishra, Saurabh; Jakkala, Kishor; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Arumugam, Muthu; Ranjeri, Raghavendra; Gupta, Prabuddha; Rajeswari, Haryadi; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK), conserved across bacteria to humans, synthesises NTP from NDP and ATP. The eukaryotic homologue, the NDPK, uses ATP to phosphorylate the tubulin-bound GDP to GTP for tubulin polymerisation. The bacterial cytokinetic protein FtsZ, which is the tubulin homologue, also uses GTP for polymerisation. Therefore, we examined whether NDK can interact with FtsZ to convert FtsZ-bound GDP and/or free GDP to GTP to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. Methods Recombinant and native NDK and FtsZ proteins of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used as the experimental samples. FtsZ polymersation was monitored using 90° light scattering and FtsZ polymer pelleting assays. The γ32P-GTP synthesised by NDK from GDP and γ32P-ATP was detected using thin layer chromatography and quantitated using phosphorimager. The FtsZ bound 32P-GTP was quantitated using phosphorimager, after UV-crosslinking, followed by SDS-PAGE. The NDK-FtsZ interaction was determined using Ni2+-NTA-pulldown assay and co-immunoprecipitation of the recombinant and native proteins in vitro and ex vivo, respectively. Results NDK triggered instantaneous polymerisation of GDP-precharged recombinant FtsZ in the presence of ATP, similar to the polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) upon the direct addition of GTP. Similarly, NDK triggered polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) in the presence of free GDP and ATP as well. Mutant NDK, partially deficient in GTP synthesis from ATP and GDP, triggered low level of polymerisation of MsFtsZ, but not of MtFtsZ. As characteristic of NDK’s NTP substrate non-specificity, it used CTP, TTP, and UTP also to convert GDP to GTP, to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. The NDK of one mycobacterial species could trigger the polymerisation of the FtsZ of another mycobacterial species. Both the recombinant and the native NDK and FtsZ showed interaction with each other in vitro and ex vivo, alluding

  14. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter VcaM from Vibrio cholerae is Dependent on the Outer Membrane Factor Family for Its Function

    Wen-Jung Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae ATP-binding cassette transporter VcaM (V. cholerae ABC multidrug resistance pump has previously been shown to confer resistance to a variety of medically important drugs. In this study, we set to analyse its properties both in vitro in detergent-solubilised state and in vivo to differentiate its dependency on auxiliary proteins for its function. We report the first detailed kinetic parameters of purified VcaM and the rate of phosphate (Pi production. To determine the possible functional dependencies of VcaM on the tripartite efflux pumps we then utilized different E. coli strains lacking the principal secondary transporter AcrB (Acriflavine resistance protein, as well as cells lacking the outer membrane factor (OMF TolC (Tolerance to colicins. Consistent with the ATPase function of VcaM we found it to be susceptible to sodium orthovanadate (NaOV, however, we also found a clear dependency of VcaM function on TolC. Inhibitors targeting secondary active transporters had no effects on either VcaM-conferred resistance or Hoechst 33342 accumulation, suggesting that VcaM might be capable of engaging with the TolC-channel without periplasmic mediation by additional transporters. Our findings are indicative of VcaM being capable of a one-step substrate translocation from cytosol to extracellular space utilising the TolC-channel, making it the only multidrug ABC-transporter outside of the MacB-family with demonstrable TolC-dependency.

  15. Effect of praziquantel on the differential expression of mouse hepatic genes and parasite ATP binding cassette transporter gene family members during Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    Melissa C Sanchez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease caused by sexually dimorphic blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug widely available to treat the disease but does not kill juvenile parasites. Here we report the use of next generation sequencing to study the transcriptional effect of PZQ on murine hepatic inflammatory, immune and fibrotic responses to Schistosoma mansoni worms and eggs. An initial T helper cell 1 (Th1 response is induced against schistosomes in mice treated with drug vehicle (Vh around the time egg laying begins, followed by a T helper cell 2 (Th2 response and the induction of genes whose action leads to granuloma formation and fibrosis. When PZQ is administered at this time, there is a significant reduction in egg burden yet the hepatic Th1, Th2 and fibrotic responses are still observed in the absence of granuloma formation suggesting some degree of gene regulation may be induced by antigens released from the dying adult worms. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the relative expression of 16 juvenile and adult S. mansoni genes during infection and their response to Vh and PZQ treatment in vivo. While the response of stress genes in adult parasites suggests the worms were alive immediately following exposure to PZQ, they were unable to induce transcription of any of the 9 genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters tested. In contrast, juvenile schistosomes were able to significantly induce the activities of ABCB, C and G family members, underscoring the possibility that these efflux systems play a major role in drug resistance.

  16. Characterization of a gene family encoding SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin-domain proteins with lectin-like and heme-binding properties from Schistosoma japonicum.

    Evaristus Chibunna Mbanefo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously identified a novel gene family dispersed in the genome of Schistosoma japonicum by retrotransposon-mediated gene duplication mechanism. Although many transcripts were identified, no homolog was readily identifiable from sequence information. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we utilized structural homology modeling and biochemical methods to identify remote homologs, and characterized the gene products as SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin-domain containing proteins. A common extracellular domain in this family was structurally similar to SEA-domain. SEA-domain is primarily a structural domain, known to assist or regulate binding to glycans. Recombinant proteins from three members of this gene family specifically interacted with glycosaminoglycans with high affinity, with potential implication in ligand acquisition and immune evasion. Similar approach was used to identify a heme-binding site on the SEA-domain. The heme-binding mode showed heme molecule inserted into a hydrophobic pocket, with heme iron putatively coordinated to two histidine axial ligands. Heme-binding properties were confirmed using biochemical assays and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, which showed high affinity heme-binding (K D = 1.605×10(-6 M and cognate spectroscopic attributes of hexa-coordinated heme iron. The native proteins were oligomers, antigenic, and are localized on adult worm teguments and gastrodermis; major host-parasite interfaces and site for heme detoxification and acquisition. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest potential role, at least in the nucleation step of heme crystallization (hemozoin formation, and as receptors for heme uptake. Survival strategies exploited by parasites, including heme homeostasis mechanism in hemoparasites, are paramount for successful parasitism. Thus, assessing prospects for application in disease intervention is warranted.

  17. Characterization of a Gene Family Encoding SEA (Sea-urchin Sperm Protein, Enterokinase and Agrin)-Domain Proteins with Lectin-Like and Heme-Binding Properties from Schistosoma japonicum

    Mbanefo, Evaristus Chibunna; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Yu, Chuanxin; Wakao, Masahiro; Suda, Yasuo; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously identified a novel gene family dispersed in the genome of Schistosoma japonicum by retrotransposon-mediated gene duplication mechanism. Although many transcripts were identified, no homolog was readily identifiable from sequence information. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we utilized structural homology modeling and biochemical methods to identify remote homologs, and characterized the gene products as SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin)-domain containing proteins. A common extracellular domain in this family was structurally similar to SEA-domain. SEA-domain is primarily a structural domain, known to assist or regulate binding to glycans. Recombinant proteins from three members of this gene family specifically interacted with glycosaminoglycans with high affinity, with potential implication in ligand acquisition and immune evasion. Similar approach was used to identify a heme-binding site on the SEA-domain. The heme-binding mode showed heme molecule inserted into a hydrophobic pocket, with heme iron putatively coordinated to two histidine axial ligands. Heme-binding properties were confirmed using biochemical assays and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, which showed high affinity heme-binding (K D = 1.605×10−6 M) and cognate spectroscopic attributes of hexa-coordinated heme iron. The native proteins were oligomers, antigenic, and are localized on adult worm teguments and gastrodermis; major host-parasite interfaces and site for heme detoxification and acquisition. Conclusions The results suggest potential role, at least in the nucleation step of heme crystallization (hemozoin formation), and as receptors for heme uptake. Survival strategies exploited by parasites, including heme homeostasis mechanism in hemoparasites, are paramount for successful parasitism. Thus, assessing prospects for application in disease intervention is warranted. PMID:24416467

  18. Dynamic release of nuclear RanGTP triggers TPX2-dependent microtubule assembly during the apoptotic execution phase.

    Moss, David K; Wilde, Andrew; Lane, Jon D

    2009-03-01

    During apoptosis, the interphase microtubule network is dismantled then later replaced by a novel, non-centrosomal microtubule array. These microtubules assist in the peripheral redistribution of nuclear fragments in the apoptotic cell; however, the regulation of apoptotic microtubule assembly is not understood. Here, we demonstrate that microtubule assembly depends upon the release of nuclear RanGTP into the apoptotic cytoplasm because this process is blocked in apoptotic cells overexpressing dominant-negative GDP-locked Ran (T24N). Actin-myosin-II contractility provides the impetus for Ran release and, consequently, microtubule assembly is blocked in blebbistatin- and Y27632-treated apoptotic cells. Importantly, the spindle-assembly factor TPX2 (targeting protein for Xklp2), colocalises with apoptotic microtubules, and siRNA silencing of TPX2, but not of the microtubule motors Mklp1 and Kid, abrogates apoptotic microtubule assembly. These data provide a molecular explanation for the assembly of the apoptotic microtubule network, and suggest important similarities with the process of RanGTP- and TPX2-mediated mitotic spindle formation.

  19. A single amino acid substitution in the exoplasmic domain of the human growth hormone (GH) receptor confers familial GH resistance (Laron syndrome) with positive GH-binding activity by abolishing receptor homodimerization.

    Duquesnoy, P; Sobrier, M L; Duriez, B; Dastot, F; Buchanan, C R; Savage, M O; Preece, M A; Craescu, C T; Blouquit, Y; Goossens, M

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) elicits a variety of biological activities mainly mediated by the GH receptor (GHR), a transmembrane protein that, based on in vitro studies, seemed to function as a homodimer. To test this hypothesis directly, we investigated patients displaying the classic features of Laron syndrome (familial GH resistance characterized by severe dwarfism and metabolic dysfunction), except for the presence of normal binding activity of the plasma GH-binding protein, a molecule that derives from the exoplasmic-coding domain of the GHR gene. In two unrelated families, the same GHR mutation was identified, resulting in the substitution of a highly conserved aspartate residue by histidine at position 152 (D152H) of the exoplasmic domain, within the postulated interface sequence involved in homodimerization. The recombinant mutated receptor protein was correctly expressed at the plasma membrane. It displayed subnormal GH-binding activity, a finding in agreement with the X-ray crystal structure data inferring this aspartate residue outside the GH-binding domain. However, mAb-based studies suggested the critical role of aspartate 152 in the proper folding of the interface area. We show that a recombinant soluble form of the mutant receptor is unable to dimerize, the D152H substitution also preventing the formation of heterodimers of wild-type and mutant molecules. These results provide in vivo evidence that monomeric receptors are inactive and that receptor dimerization is involved in the primary signalling of the GH-associated growth-promoting and metabolic actions. Images PMID:8137822

  20. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Yoke-Peng Lee

    Full Text Available Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  1. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  2. Clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium exhibit strain-specific collagen binding mediated by Acm, a new member of the MSCRAMM family.

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Weinstock, George M; Murray, Barbara E

    2003-03-01

    A collagen-binding adhesin of Enterococcus faecium, Acm, was identified. Acm shows 62% similarity to the Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin Cna over the entire protein and is more similar to Cna (60% and 75% similarity with Cna A and B domains respectively) than to the Enterococcus faecalis collagen-binding adhesin, Ace, which shares homology with Acm only in the A domain. Despite the detection of acm in 32 out of 32 E. faecium isolates, only 11 of these (all clinical isolates, including four vancomycin-resistant endocarditis isolates and seven other isolates) exhibited binding to collagen type I (CI). Although acm from three CI-binding vancomycin-resistant E. faecium clinical isolates showed 100% identity, analysis of acm genes and their promoter regions from six non-CI-binding strains identified deletions or mutations that introduced stop codons and/or IS elements within the gene or the promoter region in five out of six strains, suggesting that the presence of an intact functional acm gene is necessary for binding of E. faecium strains to CI. Recombinant Acm A domain showed specific and concentration-dependent binding to collagen, and this protein competed with E. faecium binding to immobilized CI. Consistent with the adherence phenotype and sequence data, probing with Acm-specific IgGs purified from anti-recombinant Acm A polyclonal rabbit serum confirmed the surface expression of Acm in three out of three collagen-binding clinical isolates of E. faecium tested, but in none of the strains with a non-functional pseudo acm gene. Introduction of a functional acm gene into two non-CI-binding natural acm mutant strains conferred a CI-binding phenotype, further confirming that native Acm is sufficient for the binding of E. faecium to CI. These results demonstrate that acm, which encodes a potential virulence factor, is functional only in certain infection-derived clinical isolates of E. faecium, and suggest that Acm is the primary adhesin responsible for the

  3. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. Ann

    2011-01-01

    kinase SNF1 complex, and an adaptor–regulator related to the SNF1/AMPK family, AKINβγ. CBM20s and CBM48s of amylolytic enzymes occur predominantly in the microbial world, whereas the non-amylolytic proteins containing these modules are mostly of plant and animal origin. Comparison of amino acid sequences...... that they exhibit independent behaviour, i.e. each family forms its own part in an evolutionary tree, with enzyme specificity (protein function) being well represented within each family. The distinction between CBM20 and CBM48 families is not sharp since there are representatives in both CBM families that possess...

  4. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Philip D Townsend

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  5. GTP depletion synergizes the anti-proliferative activity of chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner

    Lin, Tao; Meng, Lingjun; Tsai, Robert Y.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Strong synergy between mycophenolic acid (MPA) and 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells. → Cell type-dependent synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents. → The synergy of MPA on 5-FU is recapitulated by RNA polymerase-I inhibition. → The synergy of MPA on 5-FU requires the expression of nucleostemin. -- Abstract: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) depletes intracellular GTP by blocking de novo guanine nucleotide synthesis. GTP is used ubiquitously for DNA/RNA synthesis and as a signaling molecule. Here, we made a surprising discovery that the anti-proliferative activity of MPA acts synergistically with specific chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, MPA shows an extremely potent synergy with 5-FU but not with doxorubicin or etoposide. The synergy between 5-FU and MPA works most effectively against the highly tumorigenic mammary tumor cells compared to the less tumorigenic ones, and does not work in the non-breast cancer cell types that we tested, with the exception of PC3 cells. On the contrary, MPA shows the highest synergy with paclitaxel but not with 5-FU in SCC-25 cells, derived from oral squamous cell carcinomas. Mechanistically, the synergistic effect of MPA on 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells can be recapitulated by inhibiting the RNA polymerase-I activity and requires the expression of nucleostemin. This work reveals that the synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents is determined by cell type-dependent factors.

  6. Characterization and Functional Analysis of the Calmodulin-Binding Domain of Rac1 GTPase

    Xu, Bing; Chelikani, Prashen; Bhullar, Rajinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, has been shown to promote formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and affect cell migration. We previously demonstrated that calmodulin can bind to a region in the C-terminal of Rac1 and that this interaction is important in the activation of platelet Rac1. Now, we have analyzed amino acid residue(s) in the Rac1-calmodulin binding domain that are essential for the interaction and assessed their functional contribution in Rac1 activation. The results demonstrated that region 151–164 in Rac1 is essential for calmodulin binding. Within the 151–164 region, positively-charged amino acids K153 and R163 were mutated to alanine to study impact on calmodulin binding. Mutant form of Rac1 (K153A) demonstrated significantly reduced binding to calmodulin while the double mutant K153A/R163A demonstrated complete lack of binding to calmodulin. Thrombin or EGF resulted in activation of Rac1 in CHRF-288-11 or HeLa cells respectively and W7 inhibited this activation. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that higher amount of CaM was associated with Rac1 during EGF dependent activation. In cells expressing mutant forms of Rac1 (K153A or K153A/R163A), activation induced by EGF was significantly decreased in comparison to wild type or the R163A forms of Rac1. The lack of Rac1 activation in mutant forms was not due to an inability of GDP-GTP exchange or a change in subcelllular distribution. Moreover, Rac1 activation was decreased in cells where endogenous level of calmodulin was reduced using shRNA knockdown and increased in cells where calmodulin was overexpressed. Docking analysis and modeling demonstrated that K153 in Rac1 interacts with Q41 in calmodulin. These results suggest an important role for calmodulin in the activation of Rac1 and thus, in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration. PMID:22905193

  7. Characterization and functional analysis of the calmodulin-binding domain of Rac1 GTPase.

    Bing Xu

    Full Text Available Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, has been shown to promote formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and affect cell migration. We previously demonstrated that calmodulin can bind to a region in the C-terminal of Rac1 and that this interaction is important in the activation of platelet Rac1. Now, we have analyzed amino acid residue(s in the Rac1-calmodulin binding domain that are essential for the interaction and assessed their functional contribution in Rac1 activation. The results demonstrated that region 151-164 in Rac1 is essential for calmodulin binding. Within the 151-164 region, positively-charged amino acids K153 and R163 were mutated to alanine to study impact on calmodulin binding. Mutant form of Rac1 (K153A demonstrated significantly reduced binding to calmodulin while the double mutant K153A/R163A demonstrated complete lack of binding to calmodulin. Thrombin or EGF resulted in activation of Rac1 in CHRF-288-11 or HeLa cells respectively and W7 inhibited this activation. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that higher amount of CaM was associated with Rac1 during EGF dependent activation. In cells expressing mutant forms of Rac1 (K153A or K153A/R163A, activation induced by EGF was significantly decreased in comparison to wild type or the R163A forms of Rac1. The lack of Rac1 activation in mutant forms was not due to an inability of GDP-GTP exchange or a change in subcelllular distribution. Moreover, Rac1 activation was decreased in cells where endogenous level of calmodulin was reduced using shRNA knockdown and increased in cells where calmodulin was overexpressed. Docking analysis and modeling demonstrated that K153 in Rac1 interacts with Q41 in calmodulin. These results suggest an important role for calmodulin in the activation of Rac1 and thus, in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration.

  8. Structural changes of eIF4E upon binding to the mRNA 5' monomethylguanosine and trimethylguanosine Cap.

    Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Stepinski, Janusz; Dadlez, Michal; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Stolarski, Ryszard; Niedzwiecka, Anna

    2008-03-04

    Recognition of the 5' cap by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is the rate-limiting step in the ribosome recruitment to mRNAs. The regular cap consists of 7-monomethylguanosine (MMG) linked by a 5'-5' triphosphate bridge to the first transcribed nucleoside, while some primitive eukaryotes possess a N (2), N (2),7-trimethylguanosine (TMG) cap structure as a result of trans splicing. Mammalian eIF4E is highly specific to the MMG form of the cap in terms of association constants and thermodynamic driving force. We have investigated conformational changes of eIF4E induced by interaction with two cap analogues, 7-methyl-GTP and N (2), N (2),7-trimethyl-GTP. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange and electrospray mass spectrometry were applied to probe local dynamics of murine eIF4E in the apo and cap-bound forms. The data show that the cap binding induces long-range conformational changes in the protein, not only in the cap-binding pocket but also in a distant region of the 4E-BP/eIF4G binding site. Formation of the complex with 7-methyl-GTP makes the eIF4E structure more compact, while binding of N (2), N (2),7-trimethyl-GTP leads to higher solvent accessibility of the protein backbone in comparison with the apo form. The results suggest that the additional double methylation at the N (2)-amino group of the cap causes sterical effects upon binding to mammalian eIF4E which influence the overall solution dynamics of the protein, thus precluding formation of a tight complex.

  9. Human CRF2 α and β splice variants: pharmacological characterization using radioligand binding and a luciferase gene expression assay

    Ardati, A.; Goetschy, V.; Gottowick, J.; Henriot, S.; Deuschle, U.; Kilpatrick, G.J.; Valdenaire, O.

    1999-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors belong to the super-family of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are classified into two subtypes (CRF 1 and CRF 2 ). Both receptors are positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase but they have a distinct pharmacology and distribution in brain. Two isoforms belonging to the CRF 2 subtype receptors, CRF 2α and CRF 2β , have been identified in rat and man. The neuropeptides CRF and urocortin mediate their actions through this CRF G protein-coupled receptor family. In this report, we describe the pharmacological characterization of the recently identified hCRF 2β receptor. We have used radioligand binding with [ 125 I]-tyr 0 -sauvagine and a gene expression assay in which the firefly luciferase gene expression is under the control of cAMP responsive elements. Association kinetics of [ 125 I]-tyr 0 -sauvagine binding to the hCRF 2β receptor were monophasic while dissociation kinetics were biphasic, in agreement with the kinetics results obtained with the hCRF 2α receptor. Saturation binding analysis revealed two affinity states in HEK 293 cells with binding parameters in accord with those determined kinetically and with parameters obtained with the hCRF 2α receptor. A non-hydrolysable GTP analog, Gpp(NH)p, reduced the high affinity binding of [ 125 I]-tyr 0 -sauvagine to both hCRF 2 receptor isoforms in a similar manner. The rank order of potency of CRF agonist peptides in competition experiments was identical for both hCRF 2 α-helical CRF (9-41) oCRF). Similarly, agonist potency was similar for the two isoforms when studied using the luciferase gene reporter system. The peptide antagonist α-helical CRF (9-41) exhibited a non-competitive antagonism of urocortin-stimulated luciferase expression with both hCRF 2 receptor isoforms. Taken together, these results indicate that the pharmacological profiles of the CRF 2 splice variants are identical. This indicates that the region of the N-terminus that varies

  10. Slow Off-rates and Strong Product Binding Are Required for Processivity and Efficient Degradation of Recalcitrant Chitin by Family 18 Chitinases.

    Kurašin, Mihhail; Kuusk, Silja; Kuusk, Piret; Sørlie, Morten; Väljamäe, Priit

    2015-11-27

    Processive glycoside hydrolases are the key components of enzymatic machineries that decompose recalcitrant polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose. The intrinsic processivity (P(Intr)) of cellulases has been shown to be governed by the rate constant of dissociation from polymer chain (koff). However, the reported koff values of cellulases are strongly dependent on the method used for their measurement. Here, we developed a new method for determining koff, based on measuring the exchange rate of the enzyme between a non-labeled and a (14)C-labeled polymeric substrate. The method was applied to the study of the processive chitinase ChiA from Serratia marcescens. In parallel, ChiA variants with weaker binding of the N-acetylglucosamine unit either in substrate-binding site -3 (ChiA-W167A) or the product-binding site +1 (ChiA-W275A) were studied. Both ChiA variants showed increased off-rates and lower apparent processivity on α-chitin. The rate of the production of insoluble reducing groups on the reduced α-chitin was an order of magnitude higher than koff, suggesting that the enzyme can initiate several processive runs without leaving the substrate. On crystalline chitin, the general activity of the wild type enzyme was higher, and the difference was magnifying with hydrolysis time. On amorphous chitin, the variants clearly outperformed the wild type. A model is proposed whereby strong interactions with polymer in the substrate-binding sites (low off-rates) and strong binding of the product in the product-binding sites (high pushing potential) are required for the removal of obstacles, like disintegration of chitin microfibrils. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Meta-analysis of the effect of overexpression of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding family genes on temperature stress tolerance and related responses

    C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding proteins are transcription factors that play a critical role in plant response to temperature stress. Over-expression of CBF/DREB genes has been demonstrated to enhance temperature stress tolerance. A series of physiological and biochemical modificat...

  12. Identification of a novel Arabidopsis thaliana nitric oxide-binding molecule with guanylate cyclase activity in vitro

    Mulaudzi, Takalani

    2011-09-01

    While there is evidence of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent signalling via the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) in plants, guanylate cyclases (GCs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cGMP from guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP) have until recently remained elusive and none of the candidates identified to-date are NO-dependent. Using both a GC and heme-binding domain specific (H-NOX) search motif, we have identified an Arabidopsis flavin monooxygenase (At1g62580) and shown electrochemically that it binds NO, has a higher affinity for NO than for O 2 and that this molecule can generate cGMP from GTP in vitro in an NO-dependent manner. © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal structure of inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) dimerization domain reveals functional organization of ING family of chromatin-binding proteins.

    Culurgioni, Simone; Muñoz, Inés G; Moreno, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Villate, Maider; Palmero, Ignacio; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-03-30

    The protein ING4 binds to histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4 (H3K4me3) through its C-terminal plant homeodomain, thus recruiting the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex to target promoters. The structure of the plant homeodomain finger bound to an H3K4me3 peptide has been described, as well as the disorder and flexibility in the ING4 central region. We report the crystal structure of the ING4 N-terminal domain, which shows an antiparallel coiled-coil homodimer with each protomer folded into a helix-loop-helix structure. This arrangement suggests that ING4 can bind simultaneously two histone tails on the same or different nucleosomes. Dimerization has a direct impact on ING4 tumor suppressor activity because monomeric mutants lose the ability to induce apoptosis after genotoxic stress. Homology modeling based on the ING4 structure suggests that other ING dimers may also exist.

  14. Transcriptional control of the tissue-specific, developmentally regulated osteocalcin gene requires a binding motif for the Msx family of homeodomain proteins.

    Hoffmann, H M; Catron, K M; van Wijnen, A J; McCabe, L R; Lian, J B; Stein, G S; Stein, J L

    1994-12-20

    The OC box of the rat osteocalcin promoter (nt -99 to -76) is the principal proximal regulatory element contributing to both tissue-specific and developmental control of osteocalcin gene expression. The central motif of the OC box includes a perfect consensus DNA binding site for certain homeodomain proteins. Homeodomain proteins are transcription factors that direct proper development by regulating specific temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression. We therefore addressed the role of the homeodomain binding motif in the activity of the OC promoter. In this study, by the combined application of mutagenesis and site-specific protein recognition analysis, we examined interactions of ROS 17/2.8 osteosarcoma cell nuclear proteins and purified Msx-1 homeodomain protein with the OC box. We detected a series of related specific protein-DNA interactions, a subset of which were inhibited by antibodies directed against the Msx-1 homeodomain but which also recognize the Msx-2 homeodomain. Our results show that the sequence requirements for binding the Msx-1 or Msx-2 homeodomain closely parallel those necessary for osteocalcin gene promoter activity in vivo. This functional relationship was demonstrated by transient expression in ROS 17/2.8 osteosarcoma cells of a series of osteocalcin promoter (nt -1097 to +24)-reporter gene constructs containing mutations within and flanking the homeodomain binding site of the OC box. Northern blot analysis of several bone-related cell types showed that all of the cells expressed msx-1, whereas msx-2 expression was restricted to cells transcribing osteocalcin. Taken together, our results suggest a role for Msx-1 and -2 or related homeodomain proteins in transcription of the osteocalcin gene.

  15. Phenobarbital reduces blood glucose and gluconeogenesis through down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) gene expression in rats.

    Oda, Hiroaki; Okuda, Yuji; Yoshida, Yukiko; Kimura, Noriko; Kakinuma, Atsushi

    2015-10-23

    The regulatory mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate carboykinase (GTP) (EC 4.1.1.32) (PEPCK) gene expression and gluconeogenesis by phenobarbital (PB), which is known to induce drug-metabolizing enzymes, was investigated. Higher level of PEPCK mRNA was observed in spherical rat primary hepatocytes on EHS-gel than monolayer hepatocytes on TIC (type I collagen). We found that PB directly suppressed PEPCK gene expression in spherical hepatocytes on EHS-gel, but not in those on TIC. PB strongly suppressed cAMP-dependent induction of PEPCK gene expression. Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT), another gluconeogenic enzyme, was induced by cAMP, but not suppressed by PB. Chronic administration of PB reduced hepatic PEPCK mRNA in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and nondiabetic rats, and PB reduced blood glucose level in diabetic rats. Increased TAT mRNA in diabetic rats was not suppressed by PB. These results indicated that PB-dependent reduction is specific to PEPCK. From pyrvate challenge test, PB suppressed the increased gluconeogenesis in diabetic rats. PEPCK gene promoter activity was suppressed by PB in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, we found that spherical hepatocytes cultured on EHS-gel are capable to respond to PB to suppress PEPCK gene expression. Moreover, our results indicate that hypoglycemic action of PB result from transcriptional repression of PEPCK gene and subsequent suppression of gluconeogenesis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Familial partial lipodystrophy phenotype resulting from a single-base mutation in deoxyribonucleic acid-binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma

    Monajemi, Houshang; Zhang, Lin; Li, Gang; Jeninga, Ellen H.; Cao, Henian; Maas, Mario; Brouwer, C. B.; Kalkhoven, Eric; Stroes, Erik; Hegele, Robert A.; Leff, Todd

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) results from coding sequence mutations either in LMNA, encoding nuclear lamin A/C, or in PPARG, encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). The LMNA form is called FPLD2 (MIM 151660) and the PPARG form is called FPLD3 (MIM

  17. Molecular dynamics investigations of regioselectivity of anionic/aromatic substrates by a family of enzymes: a case study of diclofenac binding in CYP2C isoforms.

    Cui, Ying-Lu; Xu, Fang; Wu, Rongling

    2016-06-29

    The CYP2C subfamily is of particular importance in the metabolism of drugs, food toxins, and procarcinogens. Like other P450 subfamilies, 2C enzymes share a high sequence identity, but significantly contribute in different ways to hepatic capacity to metabolize drugs. They often metabolize the same substrate to more than one product with different catalytic sites. Because it is challenging to characterize experimentally, much still remains unknown about the reason for why the substrate regioselectivity of these closely related subfamily members is different. Here, we have investigated the structural features of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 bound with their shared substrate diclofenac to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism for the substrate regioselectivity of CYP2C subfamily enzymes. The obtained results demonstrate how a sequence divergence for the active site residues causes heterogeneous variations in the secondary structures and in major tunnel selections, and further affects the shape and chemical properties of the substrate-binding site. Structural analysis and free energy calculations showed that the most important determinants of regioselectivity among the CYP2C isoforms are the geometrical features of the active sites, as well as the hydrogen bonds and the hydrophobic interactions, mainly presenting as the various locations of Arg108 and substitutions of Phe205 for Ile205 in CYP2C8. The MM-GB/SA calculations combined with PMF results accord well with the experimental KM values, bridging the gap between the theory and the experimentally observed results of binding affinity differences. The present study provides important insights into the structure-function relationships of CYP2C subfamily enzymes, the knowledge of ligand binding characteristics and key residue contributions could guide future experimental and computational work on the synthesis of drugs with better pharmacokinetic properties so that CYP interactions could be avoided.

  18. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Gene Family in Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) Reveal the Role of AcABCG38 in Pollen Development.

    Chen, Piaojuan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Lihua; Hou, Zhimin; Yan, Maokai; Hu, Bingyan; Liu, Yanhui; Azam, Syed Muhammad; Zhang, Ziyan; Rahman, Zia Ur; Liu, Liping; Qin, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Pineapple ( Ananas comosus L .) cultivation commonly relies on asexual reproduction which is easily impeded by many factors in agriculture production. Sexual reproduction might be a novel approach to improve the pineapple planting. However, genes controlling pineapple sexual reproduction are still remain elusive. In different organisms a conserved superfamily proteins known as ATP binding cassette (ABC) participate in various biological processes. Whereas, till today the ABC gene family has not been identified in pineapple. Here 100 ABC genes were identified in the pineapple genome and grouped into eight subfamilies (5 ABCAs , 20 ABCB s, 16 ABCCs , 2 ABCDs , one ABCEs , 5 ABCFs , 42 ABCGs and 9 ABCIs ). Gene expression profiling revealed the dynamic expression pattern of ABC gene family in various tissues and different developmental stages. AcABCA5, AcABCB6, AcABCC4 , AcABCC7 , AcABCC9 , AcABCG26 , AcABCG38 and AcABCG42 exhibited preferential expression in ovule and stamen. Over-expression of AcABCG38 in the Arabidopsis double mutant abcg1-2abcg16-2 partially restored its pollen abortion defects, indicating that AcABCG38 plays important roles in pollen development. Our study on ABC gene family in pineapple provides useful information for developing sexual pineapple plantation which could be utilized to improve pineapple agricultural production.

  19. The methyltransferase NSD3 has chromatin-binding motifs, PHD5-C5HCH, that are distinct from other NSD (nuclear receptor SET domain) family members in their histone H3 recognition.

    He, Chao; Li, Fudong; Zhang, Jiahai; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2013-02-15

    The NSD (nuclear receptor SET domain-containing) family members, consisting of NSD1, NSD2 (MMSET/WHSC1), and NSD3 (WHSC1L1), are SET domain-containing methyltransferases and aberrant expression of each member has been implicated in multiple diseases. They have specific mono- and dimethylase activities for H3K36, whereas play nonredundant roles during development. Aside from the well characterized catalytic SET domain, NSD proteins have multiple potential chromatin-binding motifs that are clinically relevant, including the fifth plant homeodomain (PHD5) and the adjacent Cys-His-rich domain (C5HCH) located at the C terminus. Herein, we report the crystal structures of the PHD5-C5HCH module of NSD3, in the free state and in complex with H3(1-7) (H3 residues 1-7), H3(1-15) (H3 residues 1-15), and H3(1-15)K9me3 (H3 residues 1-15 with trimethylation on K9) peptides. These structures reveal that the PHD5 and C5HCH domains fold into a novel integrated PHD-PHD-like structural module with H3 peptide bound only on the surface of PHD5 and provide the molecular basis for the recognition of unmodified H3K4 and trimethylated H3K9 by NSD3 PHD5. Structural studies and binding assays show that differences exist in histone binding specificity of the PHD5 domain between three members of the NSD family. For NSD2, the PHD5-C5HCH:H3 N terminus interaction is largely conserved, although with a stronger preference for unmethylated H3K9 (H3K9me0) than trimethylated H3K9 (H3K9me3), and NSD1 PHD5-C5HCH does not bind to H3 peptides. Our results shed light on how NSD proteins that mediate H3K36 methylation are localized to specific genomic sites and provide implications for the mechanism of functional diversity of NSD proteins.

  20. Human CRF{sub 2} {alpha} and {beta} splice variants: pharmacological characterization using radioligand binding and a luciferase gene expression assay

    Ardati, A. [Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, Cardiovascular Biology, NW4, 500 Arcola Road, Collegeville, PA (United States); Goetschy, V.; Gottowick, J.; Henriot, S.; Deuschle, U.; Kilpatrick, G.J. [Central Nervous System, Pharma Division, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, CH-4070 Basel (Switzerland); Valdenaire, O. [Cardiovascular Research, Pharma Division, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, CH-4070 Basel (Switzerland)

    1999-03-14

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors belong to the super-family of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are classified into two subtypes (CRF{sub 1} and CRF{sub 2}). Both receptors are positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase but they have a distinct pharmacology and distribution in brain. Two isoforms belonging to the CRF{sub 2} subtype receptors, CRF{sub 2{alpha}} and CRF{sub 2{beta}}, have been identified in rat and man. The neuropeptides CRF and urocortin mediate their actions through this CRF G protein-coupled receptor family. In this report, we describe the pharmacological characterization of the recently identified hCRF{sub 2{beta}} receptor. We have used radioligand binding with [{sup 125}I]-tyr{sup 0}-sauvagine and a gene expression assay in which the firefly luciferase gene expression is under the control of cAMP responsive elements. Association kinetics of [{sup 125}I]-tyr{sup 0}-sauvagine binding to the hCRF{sub 2{beta}} receptor were monophasic while dissociation kinetics were biphasic, in agreement with the kinetics results obtained with the hCRF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor. Saturation binding analysis revealed two affinity states in HEK 293 cells with binding parameters in accord with those determined kinetically and with parameters obtained with the hCRF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor. A non-hydrolysable GTP analog, Gpp(NH)p, reduced the high affinity binding of [{sup 125}I]-tyr{sup 0}-sauvagine to both hCRF{sub 2} receptor isoforms in a similar manner. The rank order of potency of CRF agonist peptides in competition experiments was identical for both hCRF{sub 2}{alpha}-helical CRF{sub (9-41)}oCRF). Similarly, agonist potency was similar for the two isoforms when studied using the luciferase gene reporter system. The peptide antagonist {alpha}-helical CRF{sub (9-41)} exhibited a non-competitive antagonism of urocortin-stimulated luciferase expression with both hCRF{sub 2} receptor isoforms. Taken together, these results indicate that the

  1. Analysis of coupling of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors to Gi/o, Gs and Gq heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins

    Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. S1 (2006), s. 361-361 ISSN 1671-4083. [World Congress of Pharmacology /15./. 02.07.2006-07.07.2006, Beijing] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : M2 receptor * heterotrimeric G-proteins * analysis of coupling Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  2. Small GTP-Binding Protein Rac Is an Essential Mediator of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Endothelial Fenestrations and Vascular Permeability

    Eriksson, A.; Cao, R.; Tritsaris, K.

    2003-01-01

    fenestrated endothelium, a feature linked with increased vascular permeability. A cell-permeable Rac antagonist (TAT-RacN17) converted VEGF-induced, leaky vascular plexuses into well-defined vascular networks. In addition, this Rac mutant blocked formation of VEGF-induced endothelial fenestrations...... in mediation of VEGF-induced vascular permeability but less so in neovascularization. This may have conceptual implications for applying Rac antagonists in treatment and prevention of VEGF-induced vascular leakage and edema in connection with ischemic disorders....

  3. Induction of cytoplasmic rods and rings structures by inhibition of the CTP and GTP synthetic pathway in mammalian cells.

    Wendy C Carcamo

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic filamentous rods and rings (RR structures were identified using human autoantibodies as probes. In the present study, the formation of these conserved structures in mammalian cells and functions linked to these structures were examined.Distinct cytoplasmic rods (∼3-10 µm in length and rings (∼2-5 µm in diameter in HEp-2 cells were initially observed in immunofluorescence using human autoantibodies. Co-localization studies revealed that, although RR had filament-like features, they were not enriched in actin, tubulin, or vimentin, and not associated with centrosomes or other known cytoplasmic structures. Further independent studies revealed that two key enzymes in the nucleotide synthetic pathway cytidine triphosphate synthase 1 (CTPS1 and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2 were highly enriched in RR. CTPS1 enzyme inhibitors 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine and Acivicin as well as the IMPDH2 inhibitor Ribavirin exhibited dose-dependent induction of RR in >95% of cells in all cancer cell lines tested as well as mouse primary cells. RR formation by lower concentration of Ribavirin was enhanced in IMPDH2-knockdown HeLa cells whereas it was inhibited in GFP-IMPDH2 overexpressed HeLa cells. Interestingly, RR were detected readily in untreated mouse embryonic stem cells (>95%; upon retinoic acid differentiation, RR disassembled in these cells but reformed when treated with Acivicin.RR formation represented response to disturbances in the CTP or GTP synthetic pathways in cancer cell lines and mouse primary cells and RR are the convergence physical structures in these pathways. The availability of specific markers for these conserved structures and the ability to induce formation in vitro will allow further investigations in structure and function of RR in many biological systems in health and diseases.

  4. The application of strand invasion phenomenon, directed by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) for the recognition of specific sequences of human endogenous retroviral HERV-W family.

    Machnik, Grzegorz; Bułdak, Łukasz; Ruczyński, Jarosław; Gąsior, Tomasz; Huzarska, Małgorzata; Belowski, Dariusz; Alenowicz, Magdalena; Mucha, Piotr; Rekowski, Piotr; Okopień, Bogusław

    2017-05-01

    The HERV-W family of human endogenous retroviruses represents a group of numerous sequences that show close similarity in genetic composition. It has been documented that some members of HERV-W-derived expression products are supposed to play significant role in humans' pathology, such as multiple sclerosis or schizophrenia. Other members of the family are necessary to orchestrate physiological processes (eg, ERVWE1 coding syncytin-1 that is engaged in syncytiotrophoblast formation). Therefore, an assay that would allow the recognition of particular form of HERV-W members is highly desirable. A peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated technique for the discrimination between multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus and ERVWE1 sequence has been developed. The assay uses a PNA probe that, being fully complementary to the ERVWE1 but not to multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus (MSRV) template, shows high selective potential. Single-stranded DNA binding protein facilitates the PNA-mediated, sequence-specific formation of strand invasion complex and, consequently, local DNA unwinding. The target DNA may be then excluded from further analysis in any downstream process such as single-stranded DNA-specific exonuclease action. Finally, the reaction conditions have been optimized, and several PNA probes that are targeted toward distinct loci along whole HERV-W env sequences have been evaluated. We believe that PNA/single-stranded DNA binding protein-based application has the potential to selectively discriminate particular HERV-W molecules as they are at least suspected to play pathogenic role in a broad range of medical conditions, from psycho-neurologic disorders (multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia) and cancers (breast cancer) to that of an auto-immunologic background (psoriasis and lupus erythematosus). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Allergenic relevance of nonspecific lipid transfer proteins 2: Identification and characterization of Api g 6 from celery tuber as representative of a novel IgE-binding protein family.

    Vejvar, Eva; Himly, Martin; Briza, Peter; Eichhorn, Stephanie; Ebner, Christof; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Ferreira, Fatima; Gadermaier, Gabriele

    2013-11-01

    Apium graveolens represents a relevant food allergen source linked with severe systemic reactions. We sought to identify an IgE-binding nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) in celery tuber. A low molecular weight protein exclusively present in celery tuber was purified and designated Api g 6. The entire protein sequence was obtained by MS and classified as member of the nsLTP2 family. Api g 6 is monomeric in solution with a molecular mass of 6936 Da. The alpha-helical disulfide bond-stabilized structure confers tremendous thermal stability (Tm > 90°C) and high resistance to gastrointestinal digestion. Endolysosomal degradation demonstrated low susceptibility and the presence of a dominant peptide cluster at the C-terminus. Thirty-eight percent of A. graveolens allergic patients demonstrated IgE reactivity to purified natural Api g 6 in ELISA and heat treatment did only partially reduce its allergenic activity. No correlation in IgE binding and limited cross-reactivity was observed with Api g 2 and Art v 3, nsLTP1 from celery stalks and mugwort pollen. Api g 6, a novel nsLTP2 from celery tuber represents the first well-characterized allergen in this protein family. Despite similar structural and physicochemical features as nsLTP1, immunological properties of Api g 6 are distinct which warrants its inclusion in molecule-based diagnosis of A. graveolens allergy. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Inhibition by Siomycin and Thiostrepton of Both Aminoacyl-tRNA and Factor G Binding to Ribosomes

    Ll, Juan Modole; Cabrer, Bartolomé; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Azquez, David V

    1971-01-01

    Siomycin, a peptide antibiotic that interacts with the 50S ribosomal subunit and inhibits binding of factor G, is shown also to inhibit binding of aminoacyl-tRNA; however, it does not impair binding of fMet-tRNA and completion of the initiation complex. Moreover, unlike other inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA binding (tetracycline, sparsomycin, and streptogramin A), siomycin completely abolishes the GTPase activity associated with the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA catalyzed by factor Tu. A single-site interaction of siomycin appears to be responsible for its effect on both the binding of the aminoacyl-tRNA-Tu-GTP complex and that of factor G. PMID:4331558

  7. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Jiang, Meisheng; Tran, V.T.; Fong, H.K.W. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Pandey, S. (Doheny Eye Inst., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein {alpha} subunits (G{alpha}) including G{sub s}{alpha}, G{sub i-1}{alpha}, G{sub i-2}{alpha}, G{sub i-3}{alpha}, and G{sub z}{alpha} (or G{sub x}{alpha}), where G{sub s} and G{sub i} are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and G{sub z} is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensitive events. Other G{alpha}-related mRNA transcripts were detected in fetal RPE cells by low-stringency hybridization to G{sub i-2}{alpha} and G{sub s}{alpha} protein-coding cDNA probes. The diversity of G proteins in RPE cells was further studied by cDNA amplification with reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction. This approach revealed that, besides the above mentioned members of the G{alpha} gene family, at least two other G{alpha} subunits are expressed in RPE cells. Human retinal cDNA clones that encode one of the additional G{alpha} subunits were isolated and characterized. The results indicate that this G{alpha} subunit belongs to a separate subfamily of G proteins that may be insensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  8. RanGTP-mediated nuclear export of karyopherin α involves its interaction with the nucleoporin Nup153

    Moroianu, Junona; Blobel, Günter; Radu, Aurelian

    1997-01-01

    Using binding assays, we discovered an interaction between karyopherin α2 and the nucleoporin Nup153 and mapped their interacting domains. We also isolated a 15-kDa tryptic fragment of karyopherin β1, termed β1*, that contains a determinant for binding to the peptide repeat containing nucleoporin Nup98. In an in vitro assay in which export of endogenous nuclear karyopherin α from nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized cells was quantitatively monitored by indirect immunofluorescence with anti-kary...

  9. Fasciola spp: Mapping of the MF6 epitope and antigenic analysis of the MF6p/HDM family of heme-binding proteins.

    Victoria Martínez-Sernández

    Full Text Available MF6p/FhHDM-1 is a small cationic heme-binding protein which is recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb MF6, and abundantly present in parenchymal cells and secreted antigens of Fasciola hepatica. Orthologs of this protein (MF6p/HDMs also exist in other causal agents of important foodborne trematodiasis, such as Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini and Paragonimus westermani. Considering that MF6p/FhHDM-1 is relevant for heme homeostasis in Fasciola and was reported to have immunomodulatory properties, this protein is expected to be a useful target for vaccination. Thus, in this study we mapped the epitope recognized by mAb MF6 and evaluated its antigenicity in sheep. The sequence of the MF6p/FhHDM-1 ortholog from F. gigantica (MF6p/FgHDM-1 was also reported. By means of ELISA inhibitions with overlapping synthetic peptides, we determined that the epitope recognized by mAb MF6 is located within the C-terminal moiety of MF6p/FhHDM-1, which is the most conserved region of MF6p/HDMs. By immunoblotting analysis of parasite extracts and ELISA inhibitions with synthetic peptides we also determined that mAb MF6 reacted with the same intensity with F. hepatica and F. gigantica, and in decreasing order of intensity with C. sinensis, O.viverrini and P. westermani orthologs. On the contrary, mAb MF6 showed no reactivity against Dicrocoelium dendriticum and Schistosoma mansoni. The study of the recognition of peptides covering different regions of MF6p/FhHDM-1 by sera from immunized sheep revealed that the C-terminal moiety is the most antigenic, thus being of potential interest for vaccination. We also demonstrated that the production of antibodies to MF6p/FhHDM-1 in sheep infected by F. hepatica occurs relatively early and follows the same pattern as those produced against L-cathepsins.

  10. The Lepidoptera Odorant Binding Protein gene family: Gene gain and loss within the GOBP/PBP complex of moths and butterflies.

    Vogt, Richard G; Große-Wilde, Ewald; Zhou, Jing-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Butterflies and moths differ significantly in their daily activities: butterflies are diurnal while moths are largely nocturnal or crepuscular. This life history difference is presumably reflected in their sensory biology, and especially the balance between the use of chemical versus visual signals. Odorant Binding Proteins (OBP) are a class of insect proteins, at least some of which are thought to orchestrate the transfer of odor molecules within an olfactory sensillum (olfactory organ), between the air and odor receptor proteins (ORs) on the olfactory neurons. A Lepidoptera specific subclass of OBPs are the GOBPs and PBPs; these were the first OBPs studied and have well documented associations with olfactory sensilla. We have used the available genomes of two moths, Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori, and two butterflies, Danaus plexippus and Heliconius melpomene, to characterize the GOBP/PBP genes, attempting to identify gene orthologs and document specific gene gain and loss. First, we identified the full repertoire of OBPs in the M. sexta genome, and compared these with the full repertoire of OBPs from the other three lepidopteran genomes, the OBPs of Drosophila melanogaster and select OBPs from other Lepidoptera. We also evaluated the tissue specific expression of the M. sexta OBPs using an available RNAseq databases. In the four lepidopteran species, GOBP2 and all PBPs reside in single gene clusters; in two species GOBP1 is documented to be nearby, about 100 kb from the cluster; all GOBP/PBP genes share a common gene structure indicating a common origin. As such, the GOBP/PBP genes form a gene complex. Our findings suggest that (1) the lepidopteran GOBP/PBP complex is a monophyletic lineage with origins deep within Lepidoptera phylogeny, (2) within this lineage PBP gene evolution is much more dynamic than GOBP gene evolution, and (3) butterflies may have lost a PBP gene that plays an important role in moth pheromone detection, correlating with a shift from

  11. Characterization of the heterotrimeric G-protein family and its transmembrane regulator from capsicum (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Romero-Castillo, Rafael A; Roy Choudhury, Swarup; León-Félix, Josefina; Pandey, Sona

    2015-05-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have created numerous mechanisms to sense and respond to their environment. One such highly conserved mechanism involves regulation by heterotrimeric G-protein complex comprised of alpha (Gα), beta (Gβ) and gamma (Gγ) subunits. In plants, these proteins play important roles in signal transduction pathways related to growth and development including response to biotic and abiotic stresses and consequently affect yield. In this work, we have identified and characterized the complete heterotrimeric G-protein repertoire in the Capsicum annuum (Capsicum) genome which consists of one Gα, one Gβ and three Gγ genes. We have also identified one RGS gene in the Capsicum genome that acts as a regulator of the G-protein signaling. Biochemical activities of the proteins were confirmed by assessing the GTP-binding and GTPase activity of the recombinant Gα protein and its regulation by the GTPase acceleration activity of the RGS protein. Interaction between different subunits was established using yeast- and plant-based analyses. Gene and protein expression profiles of specific G-protein components revealed interesting spatial and temporal regulation patterns, especially during root development and during fruit development and maturation. This research thus details the characterization of the first heterotrimeric G-protein family from a domesticated, commercially important vegetable crop. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Jiang, M; Pandey, S; Tran, V T; Fong, H K

    1991-01-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein alpha subunits (G alpha) including Gs alpha, Gi-1 alpha, Gi-2 alpha, Gi-3 alpha, and Gz alpha (or Gx alpha), where Gs and Gi are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and Gz is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensi...

  13. hebp3, a novel member of the heme-binding protein gene family, is expressed in the medaka meninges with higher abundance in females due to a direct stimulating action of ovarian estrogens.

    Nakasone, Kiyoshi; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Okubo, Kataaki

    2013-02-01

    The brains of teleost fish exhibit remarkable sexual plasticity throughout their life span. To dissect the molecular basis for the development and reversal of sex differences in the teleost brain, we screened for genes differentially expressed between sexes in the brain of medaka (Oryzias latipes). One of the genes identified in the screen as being preferentially expressed in females was found to be a new member of the heme-binding protein gene family that includes hebp1 and hebp2 and was designated here as hebp3. The medaka hebp3 is expressed in the meninges with higher abundance in females, whereas there is no expression within the brain parenchyma. This female-biased expression of hebp3 is not attributable to the direct action of sex chromosome genes but results from the transient and reversible action of estrogens derived from the ovary. Moreover, estrogens directly activate the transcription of hebp3 via a palindromic estrogen-responsive element in the hebp3 promoter. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that hebp3 is a novel transcriptional target of estrogens, with female-biased expression in the meninges. The definite but reversible sexual dimorphism of the meningeal hebp3 expression may contribute to the development and reversal of sex differences in the teleost brain.

  14. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  15. Suppression of phospho-p85α-GTP-Rac1 lipid raft interaction by bichalcone analog attenuates cancer cell invasion.

    Lu, Hui-Li; Chen, Shih-Shun; Hsu, Wen-Tung; Lu, Yao-Cheng; Lee, Chuan-Chun; Wu, Tian-Shung; Lin, Meng-Liang

    2016-12-01

    The p85α subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) acts as a key regulator of cell proliferation and motility, which mediates signals that confer chemoresistance to many human cancer cells. Using small interfering RNAs against matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and the MMP-2 promoter-driven luciferase assay, we showed that the new synthetic bichalcone analog TSWU-CD4 inhibits the invasion of human cancer cells by down-regulating MMP-2 expression. Treatment with TSWU-CD4 inhibited MMP-2 expression and cell invasion, which were restored by ectopic wild type (wt) p85α or a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase 3 (CA MKK3), CA MKK6, or CA p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The attenuated formation of lipid raft-associated phospho (p)-p85α-GTP-Rac1 complexes, protein kinase B (Akt) Ser 473 phosphorylation, and cell invasion by TSWU-CD4 was reversed by overexpression of wt p85α or the p85α Brc-homology (BH) domain. The ectopic expression of CA Rac1 L61 (but not wt Rac1) could overcome the suppression of Ser 473 phosphorylation, lipid raft association of Akt, the interaction between GTP-bound Rac1 and p85α in lipid rafts, and cell invasion by TSWU-CD4. The involvement of Akt activity in the functions of NF-κB-mediated MMP-2 was further confirmed through the attenuation of Akt phosphorylation signaling using the Akt-specific inhibitor MK-2206 and ectopic expression of NF-κB p65. Collectively, the inhibitory effect of TSWU-CD4 on cancer cell invasion was likely to suppress the p-p85α-GTP-Rac1 interaction in lipid rafts by targeting the p85α BH domain, which resulted in the suppression of MMP-2 expression via the PI3K-Akt-mediated ERK-MKK3/MKK6-p38 MAPK-NF-κB signaling pathway. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor up-regulates GTP-cyclohydrolase I activity and tetrahydrobiopterin levels in primary dopaminergic neurones

    Bauer, M; Suppmann, S; Meyer, M

    2002-01-01

    in tetrahydrobiopterin levels whereas tyrosine 3-monooxygenase activity was not altered. Actinomycin D, asan inhibitor of de novo biosynthesis, abolished any GDNF-mediated up-regulation of GTPCH I activity. However, GTPCH I mRNA levels in primary dopaminergic neurones were not altered by GDNF treatment, suggesting...... by triggering activation of GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I), a key enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis. GDNF stimulation of primary dopaminergic neurones expressing both tyrosine 3-monooxygenase and GTPCH I resulted in a dose-dependent doubling of GTPCH I activity, and a concomitant increase...... that the mode of action for that up-regulation is not directly connected to the regulation of GTPCH I transcription. We conclude that GDNF, in addition to its action in structural differentiation, also promotes differentiation regarding expression and enzymatic activity of a crucial component...

  17. A novel missense variant (Gln220Arg) of GNB4 encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein, subunit beta-4 in a Japanese family with autosomal dominant motor and sensory neuropathy.

    Miura, Shiroh; Morikawa, Takuya; Fujioka, Ryuta; Noda, Kazuhito; Kosaka, Kengo; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroki

    2017-09-01

    Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease F (CMTDIF) is an autosomal dominant hereditary form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) caused by variations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, subunit beta-4 gene (GNB4). We examined two Japanese familial cases with CMT. Case 1 was a 49-year-old male whose chief complaint was slowly progressive gait disturbance and limb dysesthesia that appeared at the age of 47. On neurological examination, he showed hyporeflexia or areflexia, distal limb muscle weakness, and distal sensory impairment with lower dominancy. Nerve conduction studies demonstrated demyelinating sensorimotor neuropathy with reduced action potentials in the lower limbs. Case 2 was an 80-year-old man, Case 1's father, who reported difficulty in riding a bicycle at the age of 76. On neurological examination, he showed areflexia in the upper and lower limbs. Distal sensory impairment in the lower limbs was also observed. Nerve conduction studies revealed mainly axonal involvement. Exome sequencing identified a novel heterozygous nonsynonymous variant (NM_021629.3:c.659T > C [p.Gln220Arg]) in GNB4 exon 8, which is known to be responsible for CMT. Sanger sequencing confirmed that both patients are heterozygous for the variation, which causes an amino acid substitution, Gln220Arg, in the highly conserved region of the WD40 domain of GNB4. The frequency of this variant in the Exome Aggregation Consortium Database was 0.000008247, and we confirmed its absence in 502 Japanese control subjects. We conclude that this novel GNB4 variant is causative for CMTDIF in these patients, who represent the first record of the disease in the Japanese population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  19. A method for predicting individual residue contributions to enzyme specificity and binding-site energies, and its application to MTH1.

    Stewart, James J P

    2016-11-01

    A new method for predicting the energy contributions to substrate binding and to specificity has been developed. Conventional global optimization methods do not permit the subtle effects responsible for these properties to be modeled with sufficient precision to allow confidence to be placed in the results, but by making simple alterations to the model, the precisions of the various energies involved can be improved from about ±2 kcal mol -1 to ±0.1 kcal mol -1 . This technique was applied to the oxidized nucleotide pyrophosphohydrolase enzyme MTH1. MTH1 is unusual in that the binding and reaction sites are well separated-an advantage from a computational chemistry perspective, as it allows the energetics involved in docking to be modeled without the need to consider any issues relating to reaction mechanisms. In this study, two types of energy terms were investigated: the noncovalent interactions between the binding site and the substrate, and those responsible for discriminating between the oxidized nucleotide 8-oxo-dGTP and the normal dGTP. Both of these were investigated using the semiempirical method PM7 in the program MOPAC. The contributions of the individual residues to both the binding energy and the specificity of MTH1 were calculated by simulating the effect of mutations. Where comparisons were possible, all calculated results were in agreement with experimental observations. This technique provides fresh insight into the binding mechanism that enzymes use for discriminating between possible substrates.

  20. Structural and mechanistic investigations on Salmonella typhimurium acetate kinase (AckA: identification of a putative ligand binding pocket at the dimeric interface

    Chittori Sagar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium can utilize acetate as the sole source of carbon and energy. Acetate kinase (AckA and phosphotransacetylase (Pta, key enzymes of acetate utilization pathway, regulate flux of metabolites in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, glyoxylate bypass and fatty acid metabolism. Results Here we report kinetic characterization of S. typhimurium AckA (StAckA and structures of its unliganded (Form-I, 2.70 Å resolution and citrate-bound (Form-II, 1.90 Å resolution forms. The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity with kcat/Km in the order of acetate > propionate > formate. Further, the Km for acetyl-phosphate was significantly lower than for acetate and the enzyme could catalyze the reverse reaction (i.e. ATP synthesis more efficiently. ATP and Mg2+ could be substituted by other nucleoside 5′-triphosphates (GTP, UTP and CTP and divalent cations (Mn2+ and Co2+, respectively. Form-I StAckA represents the first structural report of an unliganded AckA. StAckA protomer consists of two domains with characteristic βββαβαβα topology of ASKHA superfamily of proteins. These domains adopt an intermediate conformation compared to that of open and closed forms of ligand-bound Methanosarcina thermophila AckA (MtAckA. Spectroscopic and structural analyses of StAckA further suggested occurrence of inter-domain motion upon ligand-binding. Unexpectedly, Form-II StAckA structure showed a drastic change in the conformation of residues 230–300 compared to that of Form-I. Further investigation revealed electron density corresponding to a citrate molecule in a pocket located at the dimeric interface of Form-II StAckA. Interestingly, a similar dimeric interface pocket lined with largely conserved residues could be identified in Form-I StAckA as well as in other enzymes homologous to AckA suggesting that ligand binding at this pocket may influence the function of these

  1. Functional reconstitution of prostaglandin E receptor from bovine adrenal medulla with guanine nucleotide binding proteins

    Negishi, M.; Ito, S.; Yokohama, H.; Hayashi, H.; Katada, T.; Ui, M.; Hayaishi, O.

    1988-01-01

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PEG 2 ) was found to bind specifically to a 100,000 x g pellet prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. The PGE receptor was associated with a GTP-binding protein (G-protein) and could be covalently cross-linked with this G-protein by dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate) in the 100,000 x g pellet. In order to characterize the G-protein associated with the PGE receptor and reconstitute these proteins in phospholipid vesicles, the authors purified the G-protein to apparent homogeneity from the 100,000 x g pellet. The G-protein served as a substrate of pertussis toxin but differed in its α subunit from two known pertussis toxin substrate G-proteins (G/sub i/ and G 0 ) purified from bovine brain. The molecular weight of the α subunit was 40,000, which is between those of G/sub i/ and G 0 . The purified protein was also distinguished immunologically from G/sub i/ and G 0 and was referred to as G/sub am/. Reconstitution of the PGE receptor with pure C/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G 0 in phospholipid vesicles resulted in a remarkable restoration of [ 3 H]PGE 2 binding activity in a GTP-dependent manner. The efficiency of these three G-proteins in this capacity was roughly equal. When pertussis toxin- or N-ethylmaleimide-treated G-proteins, instead of the native ones, were reconstituted into vesicles, the restoration of binding activity was no longer observed. These results indicate that the PGE receptor can couple functionally with G/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G 0 in phospholipid vesicles and suggest that G/sub am/ may be involved in signal transduction of the PGE receptor in bovine adrenal medulla

  2. NMR studies of internal dynamics of serine proteinase protein inhibitors: Binding region mobilities of intact and reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor (CMTI)-III of the squash family and comparison with those of counterparts of CMTI-V of the potato I family.

    Liu, J; Gong, Y; Prakash, O; Wen, L; Lee, I; Huang, J K; Krishnamoorthi, R

    1998-01-01

    Serine proteinase protein inhibitors follow the standard mechanism of inhibition (Laskowski M Jr, Kato I, 1980, Annu Rev Biochem 49:593-626), whereby an enzyme-catalyzed equilibrium between intact (I) and reactive-site hydrolyzed inhibitor (I*) is reached. The hydrolysis constant, Khyd, is defined as [I*]/[I]. Here, we explore the role of internal dynamics in the resynthesis of the scissile bond by comparing the internal mobility data of intact and cleaved inhibitors belonging to two different families. The inhibitors studied are recombinant Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (rCMTI-III; Mr 3 kDa) of the squash family and rCMTI-V (Mr approximately 7 kDa) of the potato I family. These two inhibitors have different binding loop-scaffold interactions and different Khyd values--2.4 (CMTI-III) and 9 (CMTI-V)--at 25 degrees C. The reactive-site peptide bond (P1-P1') is that between Arg5 and Ile6 in CMTI-III, and that between Lys44 and Asp45 in CMTI-V. The order parameters (S2) of backbone NHs of uniformly 15N-labeled rCMTI-III and rCMTI-III* were determined from measurements of 15N spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rates, and [1H]-15N steady-state heteronuclear Overhauser effects, using the model-free formalism, and compared with the data reported previously for rCMTI-V and rCMTI-V*. The backbones of rCMTI-III [(S2) = 0.71] and rCMTI-III* [(S2) = 0.63] are more flexible than those of rCMTI-V [(S2) = 0.83] and rCMTI-V* [(S2) = 0.85]. The binding loop residues, P4-P1, in the two proteins show the following average order parameters: 0.57 (rCMTI-III) and 0.44 (rCMTI-III*); 0.70 (rCMTI-V) and 0.40 (rCMTI-V*). The P1'-P4' residues, on the other hand, are associated with (S2) values of 0.56 (rCMTI-III) and 0.47 (rCMTI-III*); and 0.73 (rCMTI-V) and 0.83 (rCMTI-V*). The newly formed C-terminal (Pn residues) gains a smaller magnitude of flexibility in rCMTI-III* due to the Cys3-Cys20 crosslink. In contrast, the newly formed N-terminal (Pn' residues) becomes more flexible

  3. The tubby family proteins

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Jackson, Peter K

    2011-01-01

    The tubby mouse shows a tripartite syndrome characterized by maturity-onset obesity, blindness and deafness. The causative gene Tub is the founding member of a family of related proteins present throughout the animal and plant kingdoms, each characterized by a signature carboxy-terminal tubby domain. This domain consists of a β barrel enclosing a central α helix and binds selectively to specific membrane phosphoinositides. The vertebrate family of tubby-like proteins (TULPs) includes the foun...

  4. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein isolated from bovine liver by virtue of its ability to bind and induce the synthesis of medium-chain acyl-CoA esters. Surprisingly, it turned out to be identical to a protein named diazepam-binding Inhibitor (DBI) claimed to be an endogenous mod...... have molecularly cloned and characterized the ACBP/DBI gene family in rat. The rat ACBP/DBI gene family comprises one expressed gene and four processed pseudogenes of which one was shown to exist in two allelic forms. The expressed gene is organized into four exons and three introns...

  5. C5a binding to human polymorphonuclear leukocyte plasma membrane (PMNLM) receptors

    Conway, R.G.; Mollison, K.W.; Carter, G.W.; Lane, B.

    1986-01-01

    Previous investigations of the C5a receptor have been performed using intact human PMNL. To circumvent some of the potential problems with such whole cell assays (e.g. internalization or metabolism of radioligand) the authors have developed a PMNLM binding assay. Human PMNLM were prepared by nitrogen cavitation and Percoll gradient centrifugation. Specific binding of [ 125 I]C5a to PMNLM was: high affinity, K/sub D/ = 0.6 nM; saturable, B/sub max/ = 8.7 pmol/mg protein; and reversible. Kinetic measurements agree with the K/sub D/ value obtained by Scatchard analysis. Furthermore, the binding activity of C5a correlates with biological activity as measured by myeloperoxidase release from human PMNL. Human serum C5a and recombinant C5a bind with similar affinities when measured by competition or direct binding and label the same number of sites in human PMNLM. The nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, GppNHp, induces a low affinity state of the C5a receptor (4-6 fold shift in K/sub D/) with little effect on B/sub max/. In summary, the criteria have been satisfied for identification of a biologically relevant C5a binding site in human PMNLM. Regulation of the C5a receptor and its membrane transduction mechanism(s) appears to involve guanyl nucleotides, as has been found for other chemoattractant receptors

  6. Advanced technology components for model GTP305-2 aircraft auxiliary power system. Final report 6 May 75-15 Jul 79

    Kidwell, J.R.; Large, G.D.

    1980-02-01

    The GTP305-2 Advanced APU is a single shaft, all shaft power engine incorporating an axial-centrifugal compressor, a reverse flow annular combustor and a radial-axial turbine. Cycle analyses indicated a 10-percent high pressure compressor flow increase improved matching characteristics with the low pressure compressor. The combustion system is a reverse flow annular combustor with an air-assist/airblast fuel injection system. The radial-axial turbine stage is characterized by an integrally cast turbine rotor and a cast exhaust duct assembly. The Integrated Components Assembly (ICA) rig consists of the combustor and turbines with a dummy mass on the shaft to simulate the compressor. ICA testing was conducted to establish component performance at design operating conditions. ICA and cold air aerodynamic testing of the turbine stage and cooling flow effects, indicates design efficiency goals were exceeded. ICA test results, cold-air testing and combustion system parameters were input to the cycle model. Room temperature strain-control LCF tests were performed and results analyzed on a Weibull distribution. Data analysis indicated LCF life improvement was obtained through HIP and heat treatment.

  7. Myristoylated α subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the α subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (α 45 and α 52 ), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (α 41 ), a 40-kDa protein (α 40 ), and the 36-kDa β subunit. No protein that comigrated with the α subunit of G 0 (unknown function) (α 39 ) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of [ 3 H]myristic acid, α 41 and α 40 contained 3 H label, while the β subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified α 41 and α 39 from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein β and γ subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (α, β, and γ) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with α 41 , α 40 , and α 39 was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins

  8. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  9. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  10. Receptor binding of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 in rat brain: differential modulation by nucleotides and ions.

    Srikant, C B; Dahan, A; Craig, C

    1990-02-04

    The tissue-selective binding of the two principal bioactive forms of somatostatin, somatostatin-14 (SS-14) and somatostatin-28 (SS-28), their ability to modulate cAMP-dependent and -independent regulation of post-receptor events to different degrees and the documentation of specific labelling of SS receptor subtypes with SS-28 but not SS-14 in discrete regions of rat brain suggest the existence of distinct SS-14 and SS-28 binding sites. Receptor binding of SS-14 ligands has been shown to be modulated by nucleotides and ions, but the effect of these agents on SS-28 binding has not been studied. In the present study we investigated the effects of adenine and guanine nucleotides as well as monovalent and divalent cations on rat brain SS receptors quantitated with radioiodinated analogs of SS-14 ([125I-Tyr11]SS14, referred to in this paper as SS-14) and SS-28 ([Leu8, D-Trp22, 125I-Tyr25] SS-28, referred to as LTT* SS-28) in order to determine if distinct receptor sites for SS-14 and SS-28 could be distinguished on the basis of their modulation by nucleotides and ions. GTP as well as ATP exerted a dose-dependent inhibition (over a concentration range of 10(-7)-10(-3) M) of the binding of the two radioligands. The nucleotide inhibition of binding resulted in a decrease the Bmax of the SS receptors, the binding affinity remaining unaltered. GTP (10(-4) M) decreased the Bmax of LTT* SS-28 binding sites to a greater extent than ATP (145 +/- 10 and 228 +/- 16 respectively, compared to control value of 320 +/- 20 pmol mg-1). Under identical conditions GTP was less effective than ATP in reducing the number of T* SS-14 binding sites (Bmax = 227 +/- 8 and 182 +/- 15, respectively, compared to 340 +/- 15 pmol mg-1 in the absence of nucleotides). Monovalent cations inhibited the binding of both radioligands, Li+ and Na+ inhibited the binding of T* SS-14 to a greater extent than K+. The effect of divalent cations on the other hand was varied. At low concentration (2 mM) Mg2+, Ba2

  11. Interaction of ATP with acid-denatured cytochrome c via coupled folding-binding mechanism

    Ahluwalia, Unnati; Deep, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Interaction between ATP and cyt c takes place via coupled binding–folding mechanism. ► Binding of ATP to cyt c is endothermic. ► GTP and CTP induce similar level of helicity in acid-denatured cyt c as with ATP. ► Compactness induced by ATP is far greater than ADP or AMP. - Abstract: The non-native conformations of the cytochrome c (cyt c) are believed to play key roles in a number of physiological processes. Nucleotides are supposed to act as allosteric effectors in these processes by regulating structural transitions among different conformations of cyt c. To understand the interaction between acid denatured cytochrome c and nucleotides, spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques were utilized to observe the structural features of the induced conformation and the energetics of interaction of acid denatured cyt c with different nucleotides. Structure induction in the acid denatured cyt c was observed on the addition of the ∼1 mM nucleotide tri-phosphates (ATP/GTP/CTP) at 25 °C, however, not in the presence of 1 mM nucleotide mono and diphosphates. ATP-bound cyt c at pH 2.0 is likely to have a conformation that has intact α-helical domain. However, Met80-Fe(III) axial bond is still ruptured. Observed thermodynamics reflect interaction between nucleotide and cyt c via coupled binding–folding mechanism. DSC data suggest the preferential binding of the ATP to the folded conformation with respect to the acid denatured cyt c. ITC data indicate that the exothermic folding of cyt c was accompanied by endothermic binding of ATP to cyt c.

  12. Production of small starch granules by expression of a tandem-repeat of a family 20 starch-binding domain (SBD3-SBD5) in an amylose-free potato genetic background

    Nazarian, F.; Trindade, L.M.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Starch exists typically as semicrystalline granules of varying size. Granule size plays an important role for many industrial starch applications. Microbial non-catalytic starch binding domains (SBD) exhibit an affinity for starch granules on their own. Three different constructs were introduced in

  13. Family Therapy

    Family therapy Overview Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided by a psychologist, ...

  14. Dissolved families

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The situation in the family preceding a family separation is studied here, to identify risk factors for family dissolution. Information registers covering prospective statistics about health aspects, demographic variables, family violence, self-destructive behaviour, unemployment, and the spousal...

  15. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...... profile of the integrin-linked kinase associated phosphatase (ILKAP), a member of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family. Phosphatases can potentially dephosphorylate these phosphopeptide substrates but, interestingly, performing the binding studies at 4 °C allowed efficient binding to phosphopeptides......, without the need for phosphopeptide mimics or phosphatase inhibitors. As no proven ILKAP substrates were available, we selected phosphopeptide substrates among known PP2Cδ substrates including the protein kinases: p38, ATM, Chk1, Chk2 and RSK2 and synthesized directly on PEGA solid supports through a BAL...

  16. Effective relief of neuropathic pain by adeno-associated virus-mediated expression of a small hairpin RNA against GTP cyclohydrolase 1

    Chang Jin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies show that transcriptional activation of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG is significantly involved in the development and persistency of pain symptoms. We thus hypothesize that neuropathic pain may be attenuated by down-regulation of GCH1 expression, and propose a gene silencing system for this purpose. Results To interrupt GCH1 synthesis, we designed a bidirectional recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding both a small hairpin RNA against GCH1 and a GFP reporter gene (rAAV-shGCH1. After rAAV-shGCH1 was introduced into the sciatic nerve prior to or following pain-inducing surgery, therapeutic efficacy and the underlying mechanisms were subsequently validated in animal models. The GFP expression data indicates that rAAV effectively delivered transgenes to DRG. Subsequently reduced GCH1 expression was evident from immunohistochemistry and western-blotting analysis. Along with the down-regulation of GCH1, the von Frey test correspondingly indicated a sharp decline in pain symptoms upon both pre- and post-treatment with rAAV-shGCH1. Interestingly, GCH1 down-regulation additionally led to decreased microglial activation in the dorsal horn, implying an association between pain attenuation and reduced inflammation. Conclusion Therefore, the data suggests that GCH1 levels can be reduced by introducing rAAV-shGCH1, leading to pain relief. Based on the results, we propose that GCH1 modulation may be developed as a clinically applicable gene therapy strategy to treat neuropathic pain.

  17. Total iron binding capacity

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  18. Identification of four families of yCCR4- and Mg2+-dependent endonuclease-related proteins in higher eukaryotes, and characterization of orthologs of yCCR4 with a conserved leucine-rich repeat essential for hCAF1/hPOP2 binding

    Corbo Laura

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yeast yCCR4 factor belongs to the CCR4-NOT transcriptional regulatory complex, in which it interacts, through its leucine-rich repeat (LRR motif with yPOP2. Recently, yCCR4 was shown to be a component of the major cytoplasmic mRNA deadenylase complex, and to contain a fold related to the Mg2+-dependent endonuclease core. Results Here, we report the identification of nineteen yCCR4-related proteins in eukaryotes (including yeast, plants and animals, which all contain the yCCR4 endonuclease-like fold, with highly conserved CCR4-specific residues. Phylogenetic and genomic analyses show that they form four distinct families, one of which contains the yCCR4 orthologs. The orthologs in animals possess a leucine-rich repeat domain. We show, using two-hybrid and far-Western assays, that the human member binds to the human yPOP2 homologs, i.e. hCAF1 and hPOP2, in a LRR-dependent manner. Conclusions We have identified the mammalian orthologs of yCCR4 and have shown that the human member binds to the human yPOP2 homologs, thus strongly suggesting conservation of the CCR4-NOT complex from yeast to human. All members of the four identified yCCR4-related protein families show stricking conservation of the endonuclease-like catalytic motifs of the yCCR4 C-terminal domain and therefore constitute a new family of potential deadenylases in mammals.

  19. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein–ligand binding affinities and structures

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D.; Clark, Jordan J.; Dunbar, James B.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein–ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23 269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. PMID:25378330

  20. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein-ligand binding affinities and structures.

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D; Clark, Jordan J; Dunbar, James B; Carlson, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein-ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23,269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Preaxial polydactyly/triphalangeal thumb is associated with changed transcription factor-binding affinity in a family with a novel point mutation in the long-range cis-regulatory element ZRS

    Farooq, Muhammad; Troelsen, Jesper T; Boyd, Mette

    2010-01-01

    A cis-regulatory sequence also known as zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) regulatory sequence (ZRS) located in intron 5 of LMBR1 is essential for expression of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the developing posterior limb bud mesenchyme. Even though many point mutations causing preaxial duplication defects...... demonstrated a marked difference between wild-type and the mutant probe, which uniquely bound one or several transcription factors extracted from Caco-2 cells. This finding supports a model in which ectopic anterior SHH expression in the developing limb results from abnormal binding of one or more...

  2. Family Meals

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Family Meals KidsHealth / For Parents / Family Meals What's in ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  3. Family Arguments

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  4. Family History

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  5. Family Issues

    ... Some have two parents, while others have a single parent. Sometimes there is no parent and grandparents raise grandchildren. Some children live in foster families, adoptive families, or in stepfamilies. Families are much ...

  6. Family Disruptions

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Disruptions Page Content Article Body No matter how ...

  7. A role for calcium in the regulation of ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C, member 3 (ABCC3) gene expression in a model of epidermal growth factor-mediated breast cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Stewart, Teneale A; Azimi, Iman; Thompson, Erik W; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-03-13

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process implicated in cancer metastasis, is associated with the transcriptional regulation of members of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux pumps, and drug resistance in breast cancer cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced EMT in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent. In this study induction of EMT was shown to result in the transcriptional up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 3 (ABCC3), a member of the ABC transporter superfamily, which has a recognized role in multidrug resistance. Buffering of cytosolic free calcium inhibited EGF-mediated ABCC3 increases, indicating a calcium-dependent mode of regulation. Silencing of TRPM7 (an ion channel involved in EMT associated vimentin induction) did not inhibit ABCC3 up-regulation. Silencing of the store operated calcium entry (SOCE) pathway components ORAI1 and STIM1 also did not alter ABCC3 induction by EGF. However, the calcium permeable ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 1 (TRPC1) appears to contribute to the regulation of both basal and EGF-induced ABCC3 mRNA. Improved understanding of the relationship between calcium signaling, EMT and the regulation of genes important in therapeutic resistance may help identify novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    Bolton Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120 and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM. Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC. A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

  9. A web server for analysis, comparison and prediction of protein ligand binding sites.

    Singh, Harinder; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-03-25

    One of the major challenges in the field of system biology is to understand the interaction between a wide range of proteins and ligands. In the past, methods have been developed for predicting binding sites in a protein for a limited number of ligands. In order to address this problem, we developed a web server named 'LPIcom' to facilitate users in understanding protein-ligand interaction. Analysis, comparison and prediction modules are available in the "LPIcom' server to predict protein-ligand interacting residues for 824 ligands. Each ligand must have at least 30 protein binding sites in PDB. Analysis module of the server can identify residues preferred in interaction and binding motif for a given ligand; for example residues glycine, lysine and arginine are preferred in ATP binding sites. Comparison module of the server allows comparing protein-binding sites of multiple ligands to understand the similarity between ligands based on their binding site. This module indicates that ATP, ADP and GTP ligands are in the same cluster and thus their binding sites or interacting residues exhibit a high level of similarity. Propensity-based prediction module has been developed for predicting ligand-interacting residues in a protein for more than 800 ligands. In addition, a number of web-based tools have been integrated to facilitate users in creating web logo and two-sample between ligand interacting and non-interacting residues. In summary, this manuscript presents a web-server for analysis of ligand interacting residue. This server is available for public use from URL http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lpicom .

  10. Feature Binding in Zebrafish

    P Neri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Binding operations are primarily ascribed to cortex or similarly complex avian structures. My experiments show that the zebrafish, a lower vertebrate lacking cortex, supports visual feature binding of form and motion for the purpose of social behavior. These results challenge the notion that feature binding may require highly evolved neural structures and demonstrate that the nervous system of lower vertebrates can afford unexpectedly complex computations.

  11. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  12. Family Privilege

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  13. Correlation of binding-loop internal dynamics with stability and function in potato I inhibitor family: relative contributions of Arg(50) and Arg(52) in Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V as studied by site-directed mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy.

    Cai, Mengli; Gong, Yu-Xi; Wen, Lisa; Krishnamoorthi, Ramaswamy

    2002-07-30

    The side chains of Arg(50) and Arg(52) at positions P(6)' and P(8)', respectively, anchor the binding loop to the protein scaffold by means of hydrogen bonds in Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V (CMTI-V), a potato I family member. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of Arg(50) and Arg(52) to the binding-loop flexibility and stability by determining changes in structure, dynamics, and proteolytic stability as a consequence of individually mutating them into an alanine. We have compared chemical shift assignments of main-chain hydrogens and nitrogens, and (1)H-(1)H interresidue nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) for the two mutants with those of the wild-type protein. We have also measured NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and (15)N-(1)H NOE enhancements for all backbone and side-chain NH groups and calculated the model-free parameters for R50A-rCMTI-V and R52A-rCMTI-V. The three-dimensional structures and backbone dynamics of the protein scaffold region remain very similar for both mutants, relative to the wild-type protein. The flexibility of the binding loop is increased in both R50A- and R52A-rCMTI-V. In R52A-rCMTI-V, the mean generalized order parameter () of the P(6)-P(1) residues of the binding loop (39-44) decreases to 0.68 +/- 0.02 from 0.76 +/- 0.04 observed for the wild-type protein. However, in R50A-rCMTI-V, the flexibility of the whole binding loop increases, especially that of the P(1)'-P(3)' residues (45-47), whose value drops dramatically to 0.35 +/- 0.03 from 0.68 +/- 0.03 determined for rCMTI-V. More strikingly, S(2) values of side-chain N epsilon Hs reveal that, in the R50A mutant, removal of the R50 hydrogen bond results in the loss of the R52 hydrogen bond too, whereas in R52A, the R50 hydrogen bond remains unaffected. Kinetic data on trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond (P(1)-P(1)') suggest that the activation free energy barrier of the reaction at 25 degrees C is reduced by 2.1 kcal

  14. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  15. Competitive protein binding assay

    Kaneko, Toshio; Oka, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of cyclic GMP (cGMP) by competitive protein binding assay was described and discussed. The principle of binding assay was represented briefly. Procedures of our method by binding protein consisted of preparation of cGMP binding protein, selection of 3 H-cyclic GMP on market, and measurement procedures. In our method, binding protein was isolated from the chrysalis of silk worm. This method was discussed from the points of incubation medium, specificity of binding protein, the separation of bound cGMP from free cGMP, and treatment of tissue from which cGMP was extracted. cGMP existing in the tissue was only one tenth or one scores of cGMP, and in addition, cGMP competed with cGMP in binding with binding protein. Therefore, Murad's technique was applied to the isolation of cGMP. This method provided the measurement with sufficient accuracy; the contamination by cAMP was within several per cent. (Kanao, N.)

  16. Serum levels of mannan-binding lectin in chickens prior to and during experimental infection with avian infectious bronchitis virus

    Juul-Madsen, H.R.; Munch, M.; Handberg, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a glycoprotein and a member of the C-type lectin super family, the collectin family, and the acute phase protein family. The MBL exerts its function by directly binding to microbial surfaces through its carbohydrate recognition domains, followed by direct opsonizati...

  17. The ACBP gene family in Rhodnius prolixus

    Majerowicz, David; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K; Castro, Rodolfo S C

    2016-01-01

    The acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBP) constitute a family of conserved proteins that bind acyl-CoA with high affinity and protect it from hydrolysis. Thus, ACBPs may have essential roles in basal cellular lipid metabolism. The genome of the insect Rhodnius prolixus encodes five ACBP genes similar...

  18. The prenyl-binding protein PrBP/δ: a chaperone participating in intracellular trafficking.

    Zhang, Houbin; Constantine, Ryan; Frederick, Jeanne M; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2012-12-15

    Expressed ubiquitously, PrBP/δ functions as chaperone/co-factor in the transport of a subset of prenylated proteins. PrBP/δ features an immunoglobulin-like β-sandwich fold for lipid binding, and interacts with diverse partners. PrBP/δ binds both C-terminal C15 and C20 prenyl side chains of phototransduction polypeptides and small GTP-binding (G) proteins of the Ras superfamily. PrBP/δ also interacts with the small GTPases, ARL2 and ARL3, which act as release factors (GDFs) for prenylated cargo. Targeted deletion of the mouse Pde6d gene encoding PrBP/δ resulted in impeded trafficking to the outer segments of GRK1 and cone PDE6 which are predicted to be farnesylated and geranylgeranylated, respectively. Rod and cone transducin trafficking was largely unaffected. These trafficking defects produce progressive cone-rod dystrophy in the Pde6d(-/-) mouse. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals binding residues for the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines

    Garry Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The surface glycoprotein (SU, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV must bind to a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4, to invade CD4+ cells. Plasmodium vivax uses the Duffy Binding Protein (DBP to bind the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and invade reticulocytes. Results Variable loop 3 (V3 of HIV-1 SU and domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax DBP share a sequence similarity. The site of amino acid sequence similarity was necessary, but not sufficient, for DARC binding and contained a consensus heparin binding site essential for DARC binding. Both HIV-1 and P. vivax can be blocked from binding to their chemokine receptors by the chemokine, RANTES and its analog AOP-RANTES. Site directed mutagenesis of the heparin binding motif in members of the DBP family, the P. knowlesi alpha, beta and gamma proteins abrogated their binding to erythrocytes. Positively charged residues within domain 1 are required for binding of P. vivax and P. knowlesi erythrocyte binding proteins. Conclusion A heparin binding site motif in members of the DBP family may form part of a conserved erythrocyte receptor binding pocket.

  20. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  1. Evolution of Metal(Loid) Binding Sites in Transcriptional Regulators

    Ordonez, E.; Thiyagarajan, S.; Cook, J.D.; Stemmler, T.L.; Gil, J.A.; Mateos, L.M.; Rosen, B.P.

    2009-05-22

    Expression of the genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of small metalloregulatory proteins respond to transition metals, heavy metals, and metalloids, including As(III), Sb(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). These homodimeric repressors bind to DNA in the absence of inducing metal(loid) ion and dissociate from the DNA when inducer is bound. The regulatory sites are often three- or four-coordinate metal binding sites composed of cysteine thiolates. Surprisingly, in two different As(III)-responsive regulators, the metalloid binding sites were in different locations in the repressor, and the Cd(II) binding sites were in two different locations in two Cd(II)-responsive regulators. We hypothesize that ArsR/SmtB repressors have a common backbone structure, that of a winged helix DNA-binding protein, but have considerable plasticity in the location of inducer binding sites. Here we show that an As(III)-responsive member of the family, CgArsR1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, binds As(III) to a cysteine triad composed of Cys{sup 15}, Cys{sup 16}, and Cys{sup 55}. This binding site is clearly unrelated to the binding sites of other characterized ArsR/SmtB family members. This is consistent with our hypothesis that metal(loid) binding sites in DNA binding proteins evolve convergently in response to persistent environmental pressures.

  2. Structural elucidation of transmembrane domain zero (TMD0) of EcdL: A multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) family of ATP-binding cassette transporter protein revealed by atomistic simulation.

    Bera, Krishnendu; Rani, Priyanka; Kishor, Gaurav; Agarwal, Shikha; Kumar, Antresh; Singh, Durg Vijay

    2017-09-20

    ATP-Binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an extensive role in the translocation of diverse sets of biologically important molecules across membrane. EchnocandinB (antifungal) and EcdL protein of Aspergillus rugulosus are encoded by the same cluster of genes. Co-expression of EcdL and echinocandinB reflects tightly linked biological functions. EcdL belongs to Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) subfamily of ABC transporters with an extra transmembrane domain zero (TMD0). Complete structure of MRP subfamily comprising of TMD0 domain, at atomic resolution is not known. We hypothesized that the transportation of echonocandinB is mediated via EcdL protein. Henceforth, it is pertinent to know the topological arrangement of TMD0, with other domains of protein and its possible role in transportation of echinocandinB. Absence of effective template for TMD0 domain lead us to model by I-TASSER, further structure has been refined by multiple template modelling using homologous templates of remaining domains (TMD1, NBD1, TMD2, NBD2). The modelled structure has been validated for packing, folding and stereochemical properties. MD simulation for 0.1 μs has been carried out in the biphasic environment for refinement of modelled protein. Non-redundant structures have been excavated by clustering of MD trajectory. The structural alignment of modelled structure has shown Z-score -37.9; 31.6, 31.5 with RMSD; 2.4, 4.2, 4.8 with ABC transporters; PDB ID 4F4C, 4M1 M, 4M2T, respectively, reflecting the correctness of structure. EchinocandinB has been docked to the modelled as well as to the clustered structures, which reveals interaction of echinocandinB with TMD0 and other TM helices in the translocation path build of TMDs.

  3. Familial gigantism

    W.W. de Herder (Wouter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractFamilial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  4. Familial gigantism

    Wouter W. de Herder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  5. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Send Us Your Feedback ... As Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin TeBG Formal Name Sex Hormone Binding Globulin This article was last reviewed ...

  6. A novel family of katanin-like 2 protein isoforms (KATNAL2), interacting with nucleotide-binding proteins Nubp1 and Nubp2, are key regulators of different MT-based processes in mammalian cells.

    Ververis, Antonis; Christodoulou, Andri; Christoforou, Maria; Kamilari, Christina; Lederer, Carsten W; Santama, Niovi

    2016-01-01

    Katanins are microtubule (MT)-severing AAA proteins with high phylogenetic conservation throughout the eukaryotes. They have been functionally implicated in processes requiring MT remodeling, such as spindle assembly in mitosis and meiosis, assembly/disassembly of flagella and cilia and neuronal morphogenesis. Here, we uncover a novel family of katanin-like 2 proteins (KATNAL2) in mouse, consisting of five alternatively spliced isoforms encoded by the Katnal2 genomic locus. We further demonstrate that in vivo these isoforms are able to interact with themselves, with each other and moreover directly and independently with MRP/MinD-type P-loop NTPases Nubp1 and Nubp2, which are integral components of centrioles, negative regulators of ciliogenesis and implicated in centriole duplication in mammalian cells. We find KATNAL2 localized on interphase MTs, centrioles, mitotic spindle, midbody and the axoneme and basal body of sensory cilia in cultured murine cells. shRNAi of Katnal2 results in inefficient cytokinesis and severe phenotypes of enlarged cells and nuclei, increased numbers of centrioles and the manifestation of aberrant multipolar mitotic spindles, mitotic defects, chromosome bridges, multinuclearity, increased MT acetylation and an altered cell cycle pattern. Silencing or stable overexpression of KATNAL2 isoforms drastically reduces ciliogenesis. In conclusion, KATNAL2s are multitasking enzymes involved in the same cell type in critically important processes affecting cytokinesis, MT dynamics, and ciliogenesis and are also implicated in cell cycle progression.

  7. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong (Toronto); (Penn)

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  8. Family Issues

    ... es Autismo? Family Issues Home / Living with Autism / Family Issues Stress Siblings A child’s autism diagnosis affects every member of the family in different ways. Parents/caregivers must now place their ... may put stress on their marriage, other children, work, finances, and ...

  9. Jamaican families.

    Miner, Dianne Cooney

    2003-01-01

    The study of the family in the Caribbean originated with European scholars who assumed the universality of the patriarchal nuclear family and the primacy of this structure to the healthy functioning of society. Matrifocal Caribbean families thus were seen as chaotic and disorganized and inadequate to perform the essential tasks of the social system. This article provides a more current discussion of the Jamaican family. It argues that its structure is the result of the agency and adaptation of its members and not the root cause of the increasing marginalization of peoples in the developing world. The article focuses on families living in poverty and how the family structure supports essential family functions, adaptations, and survival.

  10. Two Differential Binding Mechanisms of FG-Nucleoporins and Nuclear Transport Receptors

    Piau Siong Tan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Phenylalanine-glycine-rich nucleoporins (FG-Nups are intrinsically disordered proteins, constituting the selective barrier of the nuclear pore complex (NPC. Previous studies showed that nuclear transport receptors (NTRs were found to interact with FG-Nups by forming an “archetypal-fuzzy” complex through the rapid formation and breakage of interactions with many individual FG motifs. Here, we use single-molecule studies combined with atomistic simulations to show that, in sharp contrast, FG-Nup214 undergoes a coupled reconfiguration-binding mechanism when interacting with the export receptor CRM1. Association and dissociation rate constants are more than an order of magnitude lower than in the archetypal-fuzzy complex between FG-Nup153 and NTRs. Unexpectedly, this behavior appears not to be encoded selectively into CRM1 but rather into the FG-Nup214 sequence. The same distinct binding mechanisms are unperturbed in O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine-modified FG-Nups. Our results have implications for differential roles of distinctly spatially distributed FG-Nup⋅NTR interactions in the cell. : Archetypal-fuzzy complexes found in most FG-Nucleoporin⋅nuclear transport receptor complexes allow fast yet specific nuclear transport. Tan et al. show that FG-Nup214, located at the periphery of the nuclear pore complex, binds to CRM1⋅RanGTP via a coupled reconfiguration-binding mechanism, which can enable different functionalities e.g., cargo release. Keywords: intrinsically disordered protein, glycosylation, FG-Nup, nuclear transport receptors, binding mechanism, single-molecule FRET, molecular dynamics simulations

  11. High-throughput screening identifies small molecules that bind to the RAS:SOS:RAS complex and perturb RAS signaling.

    Burns, Michael C; Howes, Jennifer E; Sun, Qi; Little, Andrew J; Camper, DeMarco V; Abbott, Jason R; Phan, Jason; Lee, Taekyu; Waterson, Alex G; Rossanese, Olivia W; Fesik, Stephen W

    2018-05-01

    K-RAS is mutated in approximately 30% of human cancers, resulting in increased RAS signaling and tumor growth. Thus, RAS is a highly validated therapeutic target, especially in tumors of the pancreas, lung and colon. Although directly targeting RAS has proven to be challenging, it may be possible to target other proteins involved in RAS signaling, such as the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS). We have previously reported on the discovery of small molecules that bind to SOS1, activate SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange on RAS, and paradoxically inhibit ERK phosphorylation (Burns et al., PNAS, 2014). Here, we describe the discovery of additional, structurally diverse small molecules that also bind to SOS1 in the same pocket and elicit similar biological effects. We tested >160,000 compounds in a fluorescence-based assay to assess their effects on SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange. X-Ray structures revealed that these small molecules bind to the CDC25 domain of SOS1. Compounds that elicited high levels of nucleotide exchange activity in vitro increased RAS-GTP levels in cells, and inhibited phospho ERK levels at higher treatment concentrations. The identification of structurally diverse SOS1 binding ligands may assist in the discovery of new molecules designed to target RAS-driven tumors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. CARBOHYDRATE-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS WHICH BIND TO CARBOHYDRATE BINDING RECEPTORS

    1995-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases.......Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases....

  13. Family Polymorphism

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    safety and flexibility at the level of multi-object systems. We are granted the flexibility of using different families of kinds of objects, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. This paper highlights the inability of traditional polymorphism to handle multiple objects, and presents family...... polymorphism as a way to overcome this problem. Family polymorphism has been implemented in the programming language gbeta, a generalized version of Beta, and the source code of this implementation is available under GPL....

  14. Family literacy

    Sehested, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    I Projekt familielæsning, der er et samarbejde mellem Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning og Hillerød Bibliotek, arbejder vi med at få kontakt til de familier, som biblioteket ellers aldrig ser som brugere og dermed også de børn, der vokser op i familier, for hvem bøger og oplæsningssituationer ikk...... er en selvfølgelig del af barndommen. Det, vi vil undersøge og ønsker at være med til at udvikle hos disse familier, er det, man kan kalde family literacy....

  15. Community families

    Jensen, Lotte Groth; Lou, Stina; Aagaard, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    : Qualitative interviews with members of volunteer families. Discussion: The families were motivated by helping a vulnerable person and to engaging in a rewarding relationship. However, the families often doubted their personal judgment and relied on mental health workers to act as safety net. Conclusion......Background: Social interventions targeted at people with severe mental illness (SMI) often include volunteers. Volunteers' perspectives are important for these interventions to work. The present paper investigates the experiences of volunteer families who befriend a person with SMI. Material...

  16. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium BipA Exhibits Two Distinct Ribosome Binding Modes

    deLivron, M.; Robinson, V

    2008-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions to influence numerous cellular processes in bacteria. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, BipA has been implicated in controlling bacterial motility, modulating attachment and effacement processes, and upregulating the expression of virulence genes and is also responsible for avoidance of host defense mechanisms. In addition, BipA is thought to be involved in bacterial stress responses, such as those associated with virulence, temperature, and symbiosis. Thus, BipA is necessary for securing bacterial survival and successful invasion of the host. Steady-state kinetic analysis and pelleting assays were used to assess the GTPase and ribosome-binding properties of S. enterica BipA. Under normal bacterial growth, BipA associates with the ribosome in the GTP-bound state. However, using sucrose density gradients, we demonstrate that the association of BipA and the ribosome is altered under stress conditions in bacteria similar to those experienced during virulence. The data show that this differential binding is brought about by the presence of ppGpp, an alarmone that signals the onset of stress-related events in bacteria.

  17. DNA Mismatch Binding and Antiproliferative Activity of Rhodium Metalloinsertors

    Ernst, Russell J.; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2009-01-01

    Deficiencies in mismatch repair (MMR) are associated with carcinogenesis. Rhodium metalloinsertors bind to DNA base mismatches with high specificity and inhibit cellular proliferation preferentially in MMR-deficient cells versus MMR-proficient cells. A family of chrysenequinone diimine complexes of rhodium with varying ancillary ligands that serve as DNA metalloinsertors has been synthesized, and both DNA mismatch binding affinities and antiproliferative activities against the human colorectal carcinoma cell lines HCT116N and HCT116O, an isogenic model system for MMR deficiency, have been determined. DNA photocleavage experiments reveal that all complexes bind to the mismatch sites with high specificities; DNA binding affinities to oligonucleotides containing single base CA and CC mismatches, obtained through photocleavage titration or competition, vary from 104 to 108 M−1 for the series of complexes. Significantly, binding affinities are found to be inversely related to ancillary ligand size and directly related to differential inhibition of the HCT116 cell lines. The observed trend in binding affinity is consistent with the metalloinsertion mode where the complex binds from the minor groove with ejection of mismatched base pairs. The correlation between binding affinity and targeting of the MMR-deficient cell line suggests that rhodium metalloinsertors exert their selective biological effects on MMR-deficient cells through mismatch binding in vivo. PMID:19175313

  18. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2005-01-01

    The family of NAC (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC2) transcription factors has been implicated in a wide range of plant processes, but knowledge on the DNA-binding properties of the family is limited. Using a reiterative selection procedure on random oligonucleotides, we have identified consensus binding sites....... Furthermore, NAC protein binding to the CaMV 35S promoter was shown to depend on sequences similar to the consensus of the selected oligonucleotides. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that NAC proteins bind DNA as homo- or heterodimers and that dimerization is necessary for stable DNA binding....... The ability of NAC proteins to dimerize and to bind DNAwas analysed by structure-based mutagenesis. This identified two salt bridge-forming residues essential for NAC protein dimerization. Alteration of basic residues in a loop region containing several highly conserved residues abolished DNA binding. Thus...

  19. Lil3 dimerization and chlorophyll binding in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Mork-Jansson, Astrid Elisabeth; Gargano, Daniela; Kmiec, Karol; Furnes, Clemens; Shevela, Dmitriy; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas

    2015-10-07

    The two-helix light harvesting like (Lil) protein Lil3 belongs to the family of chlorophyll binding light harvesting proteins of photosynthetic membranes. A function in tetrapyrrol synthesis and stabilization of geranylgeraniol reductase has been shown. Lil proteins contain the chlorophyll a/b-binding motif; however, binding of chlorophyll has not been demonstrated. We find that Lil3.2 from Arabidopsis thaliana forms heterodimers with Lil3.1 and binds chlorophyll. Lil3.2 heterodimerization (25±7.8 nM) is favored relative to homodimerization (431±59 nM). Interaction of Lil3.2 with chlorophyll a (231±49 nM) suggests that heterodimerization precedes binding of chlorophyll in Arabidopsis thaliana. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The decorin sequence SYIRIADTNIT binds collagen type I

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Aspberg, Anders; Oldberg, Ake

    2007-01-01

    Decorin belongs to the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan family, interacts with fibrillar collagens, and regulates the assembly, structure, and biomechanical properties of connective tissues. The decorin-collagen type I-binding region is located in leucine-rich repeats 5-6. Site......-directed mutagenesis of this 54-residue-long collagen-binding sequence identifies Arg-207 and Asp-210 in leucine-rich repeat 6 as crucial for the binding to collagen. The synthetic peptide SYIRIADTNIT, which includes Arg-207 and Asp-210, inhibits the binding of full-length recombinant decorin to collagen in vitro....... These collagen-binding amino acids are exposed on the exterior of the beta-sheet-loop structure of the leucine-rich repeat. This resembles the location of interacting residues in other leucine-rich repeat proteins....

  1. This is My Family

    Yeğen, Hale Nur; Çetin, Merve

    2017-01-01

    Me and my family, Families poem, Mother-Father, Brother-Sister, Grandparents, Uncle-Aunt, Cousin, Family, Family handgame, My family tree, Activities (Three In a Family), Digital Games, A family poem, Quiz

  2. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  3. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Binding and Bulgarian

    Schürcks-Grozeva, Lilia Lubomirova

    2003-01-01

    In haar proefschrift analyseert Lilia Schürcks de anaforische verschijnselen in de Bulgaarse taal. Het gaat dan om wederkerende aspecten, uitgedrukt bij woorden als ‘zich’ en ‘elkaar’. De situatie in het Bulgaars blijkt moeilijk in te passen in de klassieke Binding Theory van Noam Chomsky. Bron: RUG

  5. Family problems

    Goldman, T.

    1984-01-01

    Even Grand Unified Theories may not explain the repetitive pattern of fermions in the Standard Model. The abysmal absence of dynamical information about these ''families'' is emphasized. The evidence that family quantum numbers exist, and are not conserved, is reviewed. It is argued that rare kaon decays may be the best means to obtain more information on this important question

  6. Family problems

    Goldman, T.

    1984-01-01

    Even Grand Unified Theories may not explain the repetitive pattern of fermions in the Standard Model. The abysmal absence of dynamical information about these families is emphasized. The evidence that family quantum numbers exist, and are not conserved, is reviewed. It is argued that rare kaon decays may be the best means to obtain more information on this important question

  7. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    ... and Tests A physical exam may show fatty skin growths called xanthomas and cholesterol deposits in the eye (corneal arcus). The health care provider will ask questions about your personal and family medical history. There may be: A strong family history of ...

  8. FAMILY PYRGOTIDAE.

    Mello, Ramon Luciano; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker

    2016-06-14

    Pyrgotidae is a family of endoparasitics flies of beetles with worldwide distribution. The Neotropical fauna is composed by 59 valid species names disposed in 13 genera. The occurrence of Pyrgota longipes Hendel is the first record of the family in Colombia.

  9. The Ties That Bind

    Gloyn, Liz; Crewe, Vicky; King, Laura; Woodham, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Using an interdisciplinary research methodology across three archaeological and historical case studies, this article explores “family archives.” Four themes illustrate how objects held in family archives, curation practices, and intergenerational narratives reinforce a family’s sense of itself: people–object interactions, gender, socialization and identity formation, and the “life course.” These themes provide a framework for professional archivists to assist communities and individuals working with their own family archives. We argue that the family archive, broadly defined, encourages a more egalitarian approach to history. We suggest a multiperiod analysis draws attention to historical forms of knowledge and meaning-making practices over time. PMID:29593371

  10. Evidence that Na+/H+ exchanger 1 is an ATP-binding protein.

    Shimada-Shimizu, Naoko; Hisamitsu, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomoe Y; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2013-03-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) 1 is a member of the solute carrier superfamily, which regulates intracellular ionic homeostasis. NHE1 is known to require cellular ATP for its activity, despite there being no requirement for energy input from ATP hydrolysis. In this study, we investigated whether NHE1 is an ATP-binding protein. We designed a baculovirus vector carrying both epitope-tagged NHE1 and its cytosolic subunit CHP1, and expressed the functional NHE1-CHP1 complex on the surface of Sf9 insect cells. Using the purified complex protein consisting of NHE1 and CHP1 from Sf9 cells, we examined a photoaffinity labeling reaction with 8-azido-ATP-biotin. UV irradiation promoted the incorporation of 8-azido-ATP into NHE1, but not into CHP1, with an apparent Kd of 29.1 µM in the presence of Mg(2+). The nonlabeled nucleotides ATP, GTP, TTP and CTP all inhibited this crosslinking. However, ATP had the strongest inhibitory effect, with an apparent inhibition constant (IC50) for ATP of 2.2 mM, close to the ATP concentration giving the half-maximal activation of NHE1 activity. Importantly, crosslinking was more strongly inhibited by ATP than by ADP, suggesting that ATP is dissociated from NHE1 upon ATP hydrolysis. Limited proteolysis with thrombin and deletion mutant analysis revealed that the 8-azido-ATP-binding site is within the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of NHE1. Equilibrium dialysis with NHE1-derived peptides provided evidence that ATP directly binds to the proximal cytoplasmic region (Gly542-Pro598), which is critical for ATP-dependent regulation of NHE1. These findings suggest that NHE1 is an ATP-binding transporter. Thus, ATP may serve as a direct activator of NHE1. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  11. Characterization of the PB2 Cap Binding Domain Accelerates Inhibitor Design

    Amanda E. Constantinides

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray crystallographic structural determinations of the PB2 cap binding domain (PB2cap have improved the conformational characterization of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase machinery (PA, PB2, and PB1 of the influenza virus. Geometrically, the catalytic PB1 subunit resembles the palm of a human hand. PA lies near the thumb region, and PB2 lies near the finger region. PB2 binds the cap moiety in the pre-mRNA of the host cell, while the endonuclease of PA cleaves the pre-mRNA 10–13 nucleotides downstream. The truncated RNA piece performs as a primer for PB1 to synthesize the viral mRNA. Precisely targeting PB2cap with a small molecule inhibitor will halt viral proliferation via interference of the cap-snatching activity. Wild-type and mutant PB2cap from A/California/07/2009 H1N1 were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by nickel affinity and size exclusion chromatography, crystallized, and subjected to X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystal of mutant PB2cap liganded with m7GTP was prepared by co-crystallization. Structures were solved by the molecular replacement method, refined, and deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Structural determination and comparative analyses of these structures revealed the functions of Glu361, Lys376, His357, Phe404, Phe323, Lys339, His432, Asn429, Gln406, and Met401 in PB2cap, and the dissociation of the influenza A PB2cap C-terminal subdomain (residues 446–479 upon ligand binding. Understanding the role of these residues will aid in the ultimate development of a small-molecule inhibitor that binds both Influenza A and B virus PB2cap.

  12. B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, binds Vitamin D3; conservation of binding among albuminoid molecules

    Farzaneh, N.K.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Hearing, V.J.; Gersten, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, is a member of the serum albumin protein family. Other members of this family include serum albumin (SMA), a-fetoprotein (AFP), vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and C700. The primary structure and biochemical functions of B700, as well as its in vivo metabolic fate are largely unknown. The authors examined the functional characteristics of MSA, AFP, and DBP, and for their ability to specifically bind [ 3 H]-1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D 3 . Scatchard analysis revealed a single binding site for B700 with a Kd of 51,000 M and a Bmax of 4.51 x 10 -7 . There is no significant difference between the Kd and Bmax values among the albuminoid proteins. However, differences in the binding sites could be distinguished by competition of the 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 with other steroids. 2nM of vitamin D 3 , vitamin D 2 , or estrogen competed for the specific binding of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 by B700 but not by DBP. The MSA binding site for 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D 3 more closely resembles that of DBP than B700. These data indicate that the binding function of the albuminoid proteins has been conserved in the B700 melanoma antigen

  13. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  14. How Y-Family DNA polymerase IV is more accurate than Dpo4 at dCTP insertion opposite an N2-dG adduct of benzo[a]pyrene.

    Sholder, Gabriel; Creech, Amanda; Loechler, Edward L

    2015-11-01

    To bypass DNA damage, cells have Y-Family DNA polymerases (DNAPs). One Y-Family-class includes DNAP κ and DNAP IV, which accurately insert dCTP opposite N(2)-dG adducts, including from the carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BP). Another class includes DNAP η and DNAP V, which insert accurately opposite UV-damage, but inaccurately opposite BP-N(2)-dG. To investigate structural differences between Y-Family-classes, regions are swapped between DNAP IV (a κ/IV-class-member) and Dpo4 (a η/V-class-member); the kinetic consequences are evaluated via primer-extension studies with a BP-N(2)-dG-containing template. Four key structural elements are revealed. (1) Y-Family DNAPs have discreet non-covalent contacts between their little finger-domain (LF-Domain) and their catalytic core-domain (CC-Domain), which we call "non-covalent bridges" (NCBs). Arg37 and Arg38 in DNAP IV's CC-Domain near the active site form a non-covalent bridge (AS-NCB) by interacting with Glu251 and Asp252, respectively, in DNAP IV's LF-Domain. Without these interactions dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions increase. DNAP IV's AS-NCB suppresses misinsertions better than Dpo4's equivalent AS-NCB. (2) DNAP IV also suppresses dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions via a second non-covalent bridge, which is ∼8Å from the active site (Distal-NCB). Dpo4 has no Distal-NCB, rendering it inferior at dATP/dGTP/dTTP suppression. (3) dCTP insertion is facilitated by the larger minor groove opening near the active site in DNAP IV versus Dpo4, which is sensible given that Watson/Crick-like [dCTP:BP-N(2)-dG] pairing requires the BP-moiety to be in the minor groove. (4) Compared to Dpo4, DNAP IV has a smaller major groove opening, which suppresses dGTP misinsertion, implying BP-N(2)-dG bulk in the major groove during Hoogsteen syn-adduct-dG:dGTP pairing. In summary, DNAP IV has a large minor groove opening to enhance dCTP insertion, a plugged major groove opening to suppress dGTP misinsertion, and two non-covalent bridges (near and distal

  15. Family matters

    Kieffer-Kristensen, Rikke; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2013-01-01

    brain injury participated. Family and brain injury characteristics were reported by the ill and healthy parents. Children self-reported post-traumatic stress symptoms (PSS) using the Child Impact of Events revised (CRIES). Emotional and behavioural problems among the children were also identified...... by the parents using the Achenbach’s Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). RESULTS: The family stress variables relating to the healthy spouse in all six comparisons were significant (p... scores for the children. For the adjusted associations, we again found the family stress variables in the healthy spouse to be related to the risk of emotional and behavioral problems in the children. CONCLUSIONS: The present results suggest that in ABI families, the children’s emotional functioning...

  16. Small Families

    ... children of larger families. The financial costs of maintaining a household are lower. It is easier for ... separated from you, hindering the development of new relationships with peers. In fact, you may have that ...

  17. Familial hypercholesterolaemia

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a monogenic disorder of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism. It is characterised .... Figure 2: Cumulative prevalence of physical signs in adult FH patients at the. GSH Lipid .... microvascular trauma.

  18. Family Life

    ... family members to do your laundry, walk the dog, or update others on your progress. You may ... parenting while living with cancer . The importance of communication As demonstrated above, good communication is important in ...

  19. Familial dysautonomia

    ... condition. FD occurs most often in people of Eastern European Jewish ancestry (Ashkenazi Jews). It is caused ... also be used for prenatal diagnosis. People of Eastern European Jewish background and families with a history ...

  20. Cation Binding to Xanthorhodopsin: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Magnetic Studies.

    Smolensky Koganov, Elena; Leitus, Gregory; Rozin, Rinat; Weiner, Lev; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai

    2017-05-04

    Xanthorhodopsin (xR) is a member of the retinal protein family and acts as a proton pump in the cell membranes of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Salinibacter ruber. In addition to the retinal chromophore, xR contains a carotenoid, which acts as a light-harvesting antenna as it transfers 40% of the quanta it absorbs to the retinal. Our previous studies have shown that the CD and absorption spectra of xR are dramatically affected due to the protonation of two different residues. It is still unclear whether xR can bind cations. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy used in the present study revealed that xR can bind divalent cations, such as Mn 2+ and Ca 2+ , to deionized xR (DI-xR). We also demonstrate that xR can bind 1 equiv of Mn 2+ to a high-affinity binding site followed by binding of ∼40 equiv in cooperative manner and ∼100 equiv of Mn 2+ that are weakly bound. SQUID magnetic studies suggest that the high cooperative binding of Mn 2+ cations to xR is due to the formation of Mn 2+ clusters. Our data demonstrate that Ca 2+ cations bind to DI-xR with a lower affinity than Mn 2+ , supporting the assumption that binding of Mn 2+ occurs through cluster formation, because Ca 2+ cations cannot form clusters in contrast to Mn 2+ .

  1. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of Nostoc sp. C139A variant of the heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) domain.

    Alexandropoulos, Ioannis I; Argyriou, Aikaterini I; Marousis, Kostas D; Topouzis, Stavros; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2016-10-01

    The H-NOX (Heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding) domain is conserved across eukaryotes and bacteria. In human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) the H-NOX domain functions as a sensor for the gaseous signaling agent nitric oxide (NO). sGC contains the heme-binding H-NOX domain at its N-terminus, which regulates the catalytic site contained within the C-terminal end of the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of GTP (guanosine 5'-triphosphate) to GMP (guanylyl monophosphate). Here, we present the backbone and side-chain assignments of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances of the 183-residue H-NOX domain from Nostoc sp. through solution NMR.

  2. The mealtimes that bind?

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    . The au pair is expected to live as part of a host family, who in turn should offer a protective space for the young foreigner. Nevertheless, au pairs and hosts often find this challenging. Focusing on mealtimes, this article examines how culturally diverse practices of family relations influence au pairs......Since 2000, more than 17,000 young Filipinas have received temporary residence in Denmark as au pairs. Officially, au pair placement is a cultural exchange program; however, it is also a domestic work arrangement where au pairs conduct domestic labor in return for food, lodging and allowance...... in different ways. This adds to the ambiguous positions au pairs are offered as they are to involve themselves in gendered tasks that ‘makes the family’, while they also are expected to liberate themselves from the host family sociality. Based on ethnographic fieldwork among au pairs and hosts in Denmark...

  3. Analysis of calcium-induced conformational changes in calcium-binding allergens and quantitative determination of their IgE binding properties.

    Parody, Nuria; Fuertes, Miguel Angel; Alonso, Carlos; Pico de Coaña, Yago

    2013-01-01

    The polcalcin family is one of the most epidemiologically relevant families of calcium-binding allergens. Polcalcins are potent plant allergens that contain one or several EF-hand motifs and their allergenicity is primarily associated with the Ca(2+)-bound form of the protein. Conformation, stability, as well as IgE recognition of calcium-binding allergens greatly depend on the presence of protein-bound calcium ions. We describe a protocol that uses three techniques (SDS-PAGE, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and ELISA) to describe the effects that calcium has on the structural changes in an allergen and its IgE binding properties.

  4. Hierarchy of ADAM12 binding to integrins in tumor cells

    Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Fröhlich, Camilla; Nielsen, Christian Kamp

    2005-01-01

    ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a family of cell surface proteins with protease and cell-binding activities. Using different forms and fragments of ADAM12 as substrates in cell adhesion and spreading assays, we demonstrated that alpha9beta1 integrin is the main receptor for ADA...

  5. The netrin protein family.

    Rajasekharan, Sathyanath; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2009-01-01

    The name netrin is derived from the Sanskrit Netr, meaning 'guide'. Netrins are a family of extracellular proteins that direct cell and axon migration during embryogenesis. Three secreted netrins (netrins 1, 3 and 4), and two glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane proteins, netrins G1 and G2, have been identified in mammals. The secreted netrins are bifunctional, acting as attractants for some cell types and repellents for others. Receptors for the secreted netrins include the Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) family, the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM), and the UNC-5 homolog family: Unc5A, B, C and D in mammals. Netrin Gs do not appear to interact with these receptors, but regulate synaptic interactions between neurons by binding to the transmembrane netrin G ligands NGL1 and 2. The chemotropic function of secreted netrins has been best characterized with regard to axon guidance during the development of the nervous system. Extending axons are tipped by a flattened, membranous structure called the growth cone. Multiple extracellular guidance cues direct axonal growth cones to their ultimate targets where synapses form. Such cues can be locally derived (short-range), or can be secreted diffusible cues that allow target cells to signal axons from a distance (long-range). The secreted netrins function as short-range and long-range guidance cues in different circumstances. In addition to directing cell migration, functional roles for netrins have been identified in the regulation of cell adhesion, the maturation of cell morphology, cell survival and tumorigenesis.

  6. Family welfare.

    Sinha, N K

    1992-01-01

    Between 1901-1921, India gained 12.9 million people because mortality remained high. The death rate fell between 1921-1951, but birth rates remained the same. Therefore 110 million people were added--2 times the population increase between 1891-1921. Between 1951-1981, the population increased to 324 million. Socioeconomic development was responsible for most of the downward trend in the birth rate during the 20th century. Even though large families were the norm in early India, religious leaders encouraged small family size. The 1st government family planning clinics in the world opened in Mysore and Bangalore in 1930. Right before Independence, the Bhore Committee made recommendations to reduce population growth such as increasing the age of marriage for girls. Since 1951 there has been a change in measures and policies geared towards population growth with each of the 7 5-Year Plans because policy makers applied what they learned from each previous plan. The 1st 5-Year Plan emphasized the need to understand what factors contribute to population growth. It also integrated family planning services into health services of hospitals and health centers. The government was over zealous in its implementation of the sterilization program (2nd 5-Year Plan, 1956-1961), however, which hurt family planning programs for many years. As of early 1992, sterilization, especially tubectomy, remained the most popular family planning method, however. The 7th 5-Year Plan changed its target of reaching a Net Reproductive Rate of 1 by 2001 to 2006-2011. It set a goal of 100% immunization coverage by 1990 but it did not occur. In 1986, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare planned to make free contraceptives available in urban and rural areas and to involve voluntary organizations. The government needs to instill measures to increase women's status, women's literacy, and age of marriage as well as to eliminate poverty, ensure old age security, and ensure child survival and

  7. Two unique ligand-binding clamps of Rhizopus oryzae starch binding domain for helical structure disruption of amylose.

    Ting-Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21 members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs.

  8. Expression and regulation of prostaglandin transporters, ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 1 and 9, and solute carrier organic anion transporter family, member 2A1 and 5A1 in the uterine endometrium during the estrous cycle and pregnancy in pigs

    Hwanhee Jang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective Prostaglandins (PGs function in various reproductive processes, including luteolysis, maternal pregnancy recognition, conceptus development, and parturition. Our earlier study has shown that PG transporters ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 4 (ABCC4 and solute carrier organic anion transporter family, member 2A1 (SLCO2A1 are expressed in the uterine endometrium in pigs. Since several other PG transporters such as ABCC1, ABCC9, SLCO4C1, and SLCO5A1 are known to be present in the uterine endometrium, this study investigated the expression of these PG transporters in the porcine uterine endometrium and placenta. Methods Uterine endometrial tissues were obtained from gilts on day (D 12 and D15 of the estrous cycle and days 12, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 114 of pregnancy. Results ABCC1, ABCC9, SLCO4C1, and SLCO5A1 mRNAs were expressed in the uterine endometrium, and levels of expression changed during the estrous cycle and pregnancy. Expression of ABCC1 and ABCC9 mRNAs was localized mainly to luminal and glandular epithelial cells in the uterine endometrium, and chorionic epithelial cells during pregnancy. Conceptuses during early pregnancy and chorioallantoic tissues from mid to late pregnancy also expressed these PG transporters. Estradiol-17β increased the expression of ABCC1 and SLCO5A1, but not ABCC9 and SLCO4C1 mRNAs and increasing doses of interleukin-1β induced the expression of ABCC9, SLCO4C1, and SLCO5A1 mRNAs in endometrial explant tissues. Conclusion These data showed that several PG transporters such as ABCC1, ABCC9, SLCO4C1, and SLCO5A1 were expressed at the maternal-conceptus interface, suggesting that these PG transporters may play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy by regulating PG transport in the uterine endometrium and placenta in pigs.

  9. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    Tanley, Simon W. M. [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Diederichs, Kay [University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Levy, Colin [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Schreurs, Antoine M. M. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  10. Raman spectroscopy in comparative investigations of mechanisms of binding of three molecular probes - fluorescein, eosin, and erythrosin - to human serum albumin

    Vlasova, I. M.; Saletsky, A. M.

    2008-11-01

    The comparative analysis of binding of three molecular fluorescent probes (fluorescein, eosin, and erythrosin), belonging to one homologous family, to human serum albumin (HSA) is made by Raman spectroscopy method. The binding of all three probes to binding Center I of HSA is registered. The character of binding of initial probe of the given homologous family - fluorescein - to protein differs from character of binding of its halogen-derivatives (eosin and erythrosin) to protein. The differences in binding of these three probes to HSA are determined by value of electronegativity of atoms of lateral radicals in structural formulas of probes and, therefore, by value of pK of their ionized groups.

  11. Optical Binding of Nanowires

    Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Zemánek, Pavel; Marago, O.M.; Jones, P.H.; Hanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3485-3492 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) CNR-16-12 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical binding nanowires * Brownian motion * self-organization * non-equilibrium thermodynamics * non-equilibrium steady state * spin-orbit coupling * emergent phenomena Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  12. Familial macrocephaly

    Tatsuno, Masaru; Hayashi, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko

    1984-01-01

    We reported 63 macrocephalic children with special emphasis on 16 cases with familial macrocephaly. Of the 16 children with familial macrocephaly, 13 were boys. Foureen parents (13 fathers and 1 mother) had head sizes above 98th percentile. Three of 5 brothers and 5 of 8 sisters also had large heads. The head circumference at birth was known for 14 of the children and it was above the 98th percentile in 7 patients. Subsequent evaluations have shown the head size of these children to be following a normal growth curve. Some of the children were hypotonic as infants, but their development was generally normal. CT scans usually clearly distinguished these children from those with hydorocephalus. The familial macrocephalic children had ventricular measurements which were within the normal range, but absolute measurements of the ventricular size may be misleading, because the CT appearance was of mildly dilated ventricles in half of them. (author)

  13. Family Structure and Family Processes in Mexican American Families

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2011-01-01

    Despite increases in single-parent families among Mexican Americans (MA), few studies have examined the association of family structure and family adjustment. Utilizing a diverse sample of 738 Mexican American families (21.7% single parent), the current study examined differences across family structure on early adolescent outcomes, family functioning, and parent-child relationship variables. Results revealed that early adolescents in single parent families reported greater school misconduct,...

  14. Human TFDP3, a novel DP protein, inhibits DNA binding and transactivation by E2F

    Qiao, Huan; Di Stefano, Luisa; Tian, Chan

    2006-01-01

    The two known DP proteins, TFDP1 and -2, bind E2Fs to form heterodimers essential for high affinity DNA binding and efficient transcriptional activation/repression. Here we report the identification of a new member of the DP family, human TFDP3. Despite the high degree of sequence similarity, TFD...

  15. Surface binding sites in carbohydrate active enzymes: An emerging picture of structural and functional diversity

    Svensson, Birte; Cockburn, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    is not universal and is in fact rare among some families of enzymes. In some cases an alternative to possessing a CBM is for the enzyme to bind to the substrate at a site on the catalytic domain, but away from the active site. Such a site is termed a surface (or secondary) binding site (SBS). SBSs have been...

  16. Super families

    Amato, N.; Maldonado, R.H.C.

    1989-01-01

    The study on phenomena in the super high energy region, Σ E j > 1000 TeV revealed events that present a big dark spot in central region with high concentration of energy and particles, called halo. Six super families with halo were analysed by Brazil-Japan Cooperation of Cosmic Rays. For each family the lateral distribution of energy density was constructed and R c Σ E (R c ) was estimated. For studying primary composition, the energy correlation with particles released separately in hadrons and gamma rays was analysed. (M.C.K.)

  17. Crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of the cap-binding domain of influenza A virus H1N1 polymerase subunit PB2

    Liu, Yong; Meng, Geng; Luo, Ming; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Substrate-free cap-binding domain of influenza A virus H1N1 polymerase subunit PB2 has been crystallized to show the structural details and clarify whether obvious conformational changes exist between the substrate-free and substrate-bound cap-binding domain. PB2 is one of the subunits of the influenza virus heterotrimeric polymerase. By its cap-binding domain (PB2 cap ), PB2 captures the 5′ cap of the host pre-mRNA to generate a capped 5′ oligonucleotide primer for virus transcription. The crystal structure of influenza A virus H3N2 PB2 cap with bound cap analogue m 7 GTP has been reported previously. To show the substrate-free structural details of PB2 cap and clarify whether obvious conformational changes exist between the substrate-free and substrate-bound cap-binding domain, we have successfully obtained the crystal of substrate-free H1N1 PB2 cap . The crystal of H1N1 PB2 cap diffracted to a high resolution of 1.32 Å. The crystal symmetry belongs to space group P1 with unit-cell parameters a = 29.49, b = 37.04, c = 38.33 Å, α = 71.10, β = 69.84, γ = 75.85°. There is one molecule in the asymmetric unit

  18. IGF binding proteins.

    Bach, Leon A

    2017-12-18

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1-6 bind IGFs but not insulin with high affinity. They were initially identified as serum carriers and passive inhibitors of IGF actions. However, subsequent studies showed that, although IGFBPs inhibit IGF actions in many circumstances, they may also potentiate these actions. IGFBPs are widely expressed in most tissues, and they are flexible endocrine and autocrine/paracrine regulators of IGF activity, which is essential for this important physiological system. More recently, individual IGFBPs have been shown to have IGF-independent actions. Mechanisms underlying these actions include (i) interaction with non-IGF proteins in compartments including the extracellular space and matrix, the cell surface and intracellularly; (ii) interaction with and modulation of other growth factor pathways including EGF, TGF- and VEGF; and (iii) direct or indirect transcriptional effects following nuclear entry of IGFBPs. Through these IGF-dependent and IGF-independent actions, IGFBPs modulate essential cellular processes including proliferation, survival, migration, senescence, autophagy and angiogenesis. They have been implicated in a range of disorders including malignant, metabolic, neurological and immune diseases. A more complete understanding of their cellular roles may lead to the development of novel IGFBP-based therapeutic opportunities.

  19. Molecular Evolution of the Oxygen-Binding Hemerythrin Domain.

    Claudia Alvarez-Carreño

    Full Text Available The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis during Precambrian times entailed the diversification of strategies minimizing reactive oxygen species-associated damage. Four families of oxygen-carrier proteins (hemoglobin, hemerythrin and the two non-homologous families of arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanins are known to have evolved independently the capacity to bind oxygen reversibly, providing cells with strategies to cope with the evolutionary pressure of oxygen accumulation. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin was first studied in marine invertebrates but further research has made it clear that it is present in the three domains of life, strongly suggesting that its origin predated the emergence of eukaryotes.Oxygen-binding hemerythrins are a monophyletic sub-group of the hemerythrin/HHE (histidine, histidine, glutamic acid cation-binding domain. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologs were unambiguously identified in 367/2236 bacterial, 21/150 archaeal and 4/135 eukaryotic genomes. Overall, oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues were found in the same proportion as single-domain and as long protein sequences. The associated functions of protein domains in long hemerythrin sequences can be classified in three major groups: signal transduction, phosphorelay response regulation, and protein binding. This suggests that in many organisms the reversible oxygen-binding capacity was incorporated in signaling pathways. A maximum-likelihood tree of oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues revealed a complex evolutionary history in which lateral gene transfer, duplications and gene losses appear to have played an important role.Hemerythrin is an ancient protein domain with a complex evolutionary history. The distinctive iron-binding coordination site of oxygen-binding hemerythrins evolved first in prokaryotes, very likely prior to the divergence of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and spread into many bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic species. The later evolution of the

  20. Family Violence.

    Emery, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers have begun to recognize the extent and severity of family violence, particularly its effects on children. But there is much disagreement about the definition of violence, its development, the consequences for victims, and the most effective avenues for intervention. Advances recommendations for further research.…

  1. Family arizing

    Croes, M.J.G.; Feijs, L.M.G.; Chen, L.; Djajadingrat, T.; Feijs, L.M.G.; Hu, J.; Kufin, S.H.M.; Rampino, L.; Rodriguez, E.; Steffen, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this demo we show the two main components of the Family Arizing system which allows parents to stay in contact with their child and, in cases of distress, provide the child with a remote comforting hug. The two components to be shown are the active necklace and the active snuggle.

  2. Family Genericity

    Ernst, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Type abstraction in object-oriented languages embody two techniques, each with its own strenghts and weaknesses. The first technique is extension, yielding abstraction mechanisms with good support for gradual specification. The prime example is inheritance. The second technique is functional abst...... the result as family genericity. The presented language design has been implemented....

  3. FAMILY ASILIDAE.

    Wolff, Marta; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker

    2016-06-14

    Asilidae is one of the largest Diptera families with more than 7,000 recognized species worldwide. All their species are predators on arthropods, mainly insects. This catalogue presents 71 species distributed in 26 genera, ten tribes or generic groups and four subfamilies. For each species we present the available geographical information and relevant references.

  4. Family Hypnotherapy.

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  5. Familial hypercholesterolaemia

    Versmissen, Jorie; Vongpromek, Ranitha; Yahya, Reyhana

    2016-01-01

    cholesterol efflux capacity between male familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) patients with and without CHD relative to their non-FH brothers, and examined HDL constituents including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its carrier apolipoprotein M (apoM). RESULTS: Seven FH patients were asymptomatic and six had...... in asymptomatic FH patients may play a role in their apparent protection from premature CHD....

  6. [Family violence].

    Manoudi, F; Chagh, R; Es-soussi, M; Asri, F; Tazi, I

    2013-09-01

    Family violence is a serious public health problem, the scale of which is seriously increasing in Morocco. Although it has existed for a long time, we ignore the real characteristics of this plague in our country; our work consisted in an epidemiological approach of family violence in Marrakech during 2006. After elaborating a questionnaire, which allows the study of the demographic and social profile of the families, the study of violence exercised in the family and the evaluation of the depression in the women, we led an inquiry amongst 265 women. Analysis of the results obtained has allowed us to underline the following characteristics: 16.6% of the women in our sample had been physically beaten; the young age is a risk factor; the age range most affected by violence is in women between the ages of 30 and 40 and which represent 39% of the battered women; domestic violence touches all the social, economic and cultural classes: in our study, 63% of the women having undergone violence were housewives, 25% were managers and 3% senior executives; family problems were the most important cause of violence in our study, representing 32.32%. Requests for money was the cause in 11.3% of the cases, and imposed sexual relations were found in 6.8% of the cases; alcoholism is an aggravating factor of family violence; 27.3% of the spouses who assaulted their wives were drunk; 52% of the assaulted women were victims of violence in childhood and 36% had been witness to their father's violence; in 63.6% of the cases of violence, the children were witnesses, and in 25% of the cases the children were victims of violence at the same time as their mothers; 50% of the women victims of violence did not react, while 38.6% left home, and 9.1 filed for divorce. Thirty-two percent of the assaulted woman had been traumatised by the aggression; the association of depression and violence was very high, 343% of the battered women in our study suffered from severe depression. This work

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of allosamidin binding to the human chitotriosidase

    Eide, Kristine Bistrup; Lundmark, Silje Thoresen [Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Sakuda, Shohei [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113 (Japan); Sørlie, Morten, E-mail: morten.sorlie@umb.no [Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway)

    2013-08-10

    Highlights: • Large differences in thermodynamic signatures for family 18 chitinase inhibition. • Allosamidin binds tight to HCHT. • Binding driven by enthalpy change and desolvation. - Abstract: Human chitotriosidase (HCHT) is one of two active family 18 chitinases produced by humans, the other being acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase). The enzyme is thought to be part of the innate human defense mechanism against fungal parasites. Recently, it has been shown that levels of HCHT bioactivity and protein are significantly increased in the circulation and lungs of systemic sclerosis patients and for this reason is a suggested therapeutic target. For this reason, we have undertaken a detailed thermodynamic investigation using isothermal titration calorimetry of the binding interaction of HCHT with the well-known family 18 chitinase inhibitor allosamidin. The binding is shown to be strong (K{sub d} = 0.20 ± 0.03 μM and ΔG{sub r}° = −38.9 ± 0.4 kJ/mol) and driven by favorable changes in enthalpy (ΔH{sub r}° = −50.2 ± 1.2 kJ/mol) and solvation entropy (−TΔS{sub solv}° = −41.8 ± 4.4 kJ/mol). It is accompanied with a large penalty in conformational entropy change (−TΔS{sub conf}° = 43.1 ± 4.2 kJ/mol)

  8. FAMILY BOMBYLIIDAE.

    Lamas, Carlos José Einicker; Evenhuis, Neal L

    2016-06-14

    Bombyliidae is one of the largest Diptera families with more than 4,500 recognized species worldwide. Their species vary from robust to thin, and may be small to large (2-20mm) and looks like bees or wasps. They also present great variation in color. Adults can often be seen either resting and sunning themselves on trails, rocks or twigs or feeding on flowering plants as they are nectar feeders. All reared bee flies are predators or parasitoids of arthropods. The Colombian fauna of bombyliids comprises at the moment 22 species, and 12 genera, of which, six are endemic species. Nonetheless, this number may be much higher, as Colombia is a megadiverse country and there are not many specimens of this family deposited in collections all over the world.

  9. A unique bivalent binding and inhibition mechanism by the yatapoxvirus interleukin 18 binding protein.

    Brian Krumm

    Full Text Available Interleukin 18 (IL18 is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation as well as host defense against microbes. Mammals encode a soluble inhibitor of IL18 termed IL18 binding protein (IL18BP that modulates IL18 activity through a negative feedback mechanism. Many poxviruses encode homologous IL18BPs, which contribute to virulence. Previous structural and functional studies on IL18 and IL18BPs revealed an essential binding hot spot involving a lysine on IL18 and two aromatic residues on IL18BPs. The aromatic residues are conserved among the very diverse mammalian and poxviruses IL18BPs with the notable exception of yatapoxvirus IL18BPs, which lack a critical phenylalanine residue. To understand the mechanism by which yatapoxvirus IL18BPs neutralize IL18, we solved the crystal structure of the Yaba-Like Disease Virus (YLDV IL18BP and IL18 complex at 1.75 Å resolution. YLDV-IL18BP forms a disulfide bonded homo-dimer engaging IL18 in a 2∶2 stoichiometry, in contrast to the 1∶1 complex of ectromelia virus (ECTV IL18BP and IL18. Disruption of the dimer interface resulted in a functional monomer, however with a 3-fold decrease in binding affinity. The overall architecture of the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 complex is similar to that observed in the ECTV-IL18BP:IL18 complex, despite lacking the critical lysine-phenylalanine interaction. Through structural and mutagenesis studies, contact residues that are unique to the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 binding interface were identified, including Q67, P116 of YLDV-IL18BP and Y1, S105 and D110 of IL18. Overall, our studies show that YLDV-IL18BP is unique among the diverse family of mammalian and poxvirus IL-18BPs in that it uses a bivalent binding mode and a unique set of interacting residues for binding IL18. However, despite this extensive divergence, YLDV-IL18BP binds to the same surface of IL18 used by other IL18BPs, suggesting that all IL18BPs use a conserved inhibitory mechanism by blocking a putative receptor-binding

  10. The cAMP-activated GTP exchange factor, Epac1 Upregulates Plasma Membrane and Nuclear Akt Kinase Activities in 8-CPT-2-O-Me-cAMP-Stimulated Macrophages: Gene silencing of the cAMP-activated GTP exchange Epac1 prevents 8-CPT-2-O-Me-cAMP activation of Akt activity in macrophages*

    Misra, Uma K.; Kaczowka, Steven; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    2008-01-01

    cAMP regulates a wide range of processes through its downstream effectors including PKA, and the family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Depending on the cell type, cAMP inhibits or stimulates growth and proliferation in a PKA-dependent or independent manner. PKA-independent effects are mediated by PI 3-kinases-Akt signaling and EPAC1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) activation. Recently, we reported PKA-independent activation of the protein kinase Akt as well co-immunopre...

  11. Pictorial binding: endeavor to classify

    Zinchenko S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the classification of bindings of the 1-19th centuries with a unique and untypical book binding decoration technique (encaustic, tempera and oil paintings. Analysis of design features, materials and techniques of art decoration made it possible to identify them as a separate type - pictorial bindings and divide them into four groups. The first group consists of Coptic bindings, decorated with icon-painting images in encaustic technique. The second group is made up of leather Western bindings of the 13-14th centuries, which have the decoration and technique of ornamentation close to iconography. The third group involves parchment bindings, ornamentation technique of which is closer to the miniature. The last group comprises bindings of East Slavic origin of the 15-19th centuries, decorated with icon-painting pictures made in the technique of tempera or oil painting. The proposed classification requires further basic research as several specific kinds of bindings have not yet been investigated

  12. Family roles as family functioning regulators

    STEPANYAN ARMINE

    2015-01-01

    The author examines the problems of formation and functioning of family roles. Having social roots, family roles appear on individual level by performing the social function of the formation of family as a social institute.

  13. Global analysis of small molecule binding to related protein targets.

    Felix A Kruger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the integration of pharmacological data and homology information for a large scale analysis of small molecule binding to related targets. Differences in small molecule binding have been assessed for curated pairs of human to rat orthologs and also for recently diverged human paralogs. Our analysis shows that in general, small molecule binding is conserved for pairs of human to rat orthologs. Using statistical tests, we identified a small number of cases where small molecule binding is different between human and rat, some of which had previously been reported in the literature. Knowledge of species specific pharmacology can be advantageous for drug discovery, where rats are frequently used as a model system. For human paralogs, we demonstrate a global correlation between sequence identity and the binding of small molecules with equivalent affinity. Our findings provide an initial general model relating small molecule binding and sequence divergence, containing the foundations for a general model to anticipate and predict within-target-family selectivity.

  14. The Role of Family in Family Firms

    Marianne Bertrand; Antoinette Schoar

    2006-01-01

    History is replete with examples of spectacular ascents of family businesses. Yet there are also numerous accounts of family businesses brought down by bitter feuds among family members, disappointed expectations between generations, and tragic sagas of later generations unable to manage their wealth. A large fraction of businesses throughout the world are organized around families. Why are family firms so prevalent? What are the implications of family control for the governance, financing an...

  15. Phylogenomic analyses and molecular signatures for the class Halobacteria and its two major clades: a proposal for division of the class Halobacteria into an emended order Halobacteriales and two new orders, Haloferacales ord. nov. and Natrialbales ord. nov., containing the novel families Haloferacaceae fam. nov. and Natrialbaceae fam. nov.

    Gupta, Radhey S; Naushad, Sohail; Baker, Sheridan

    2015-03-01

    The Halobacteria constitute one of the largest groups within the Archaea. The hierarchical relationship among members of this large class, which comprises a single order and a single family, has proven difficult to determine based upon 16S rRNA gene trees and morphological and physiological characteristics. This work reports detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic studies on >100 halobacterial (haloarchaeal) genomes containing representatives from 30 genera to investigate their evolutionary relationships. In phylogenetic trees reconstructed on the basis of 32 conserved proteins, using both neighbour-joining and maximum-likelihood methods, two major clades (clades A and B) encompassing nearly two-thirds of the sequenced haloarchaeal species were strongly supported. Clades grouping the same species/genera were also supported by the 16S rRNA gene trees and trees for several individual highly conserved proteins (RpoC, EF-Tu, UvrD, GyrA, EF-2/EF-G). In parallel, our comparative analyses of protein sequences from haloarchaeal genomes have identified numerous discrete molecular markers in the form of conserved signature indels (CSI) in protein sequences and conserved signature proteins (CSPs) that are found uniquely in specific groups of haloarchaea. Thirteen CSIs in proteins involved in diverse functions and 68 CSPs that are uniquely present in all or most genome-sequenced haloarchaea provide novel molecular means for distinguishing members of the class Halobacteria from all other prokaryotes. The members of clade A are distinguished from all other haloarchaea by the unique shared presence of two CSIs in the ribose operon protein and small GTP-binding protein and eight CSPs that are found specifically in members of this clade. Likewise, four CSIs in different proteins and five other CSPs are present uniquely in members of clade B and distinguish them from all other haloarchaea. Based upon their specific clustering in phylogenetic trees for different gene

  16. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is inhibited...

  17. Lipid-binding proteins modulate ligand-dependent trans-activation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and localize to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm

    Helledie, T; Antonius, M; Sorensen, R V

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are activated by a variety of fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Many of these compounds bind avidly to members of a family of small lipid-binding proteins, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Fatty...

  18. TAF(II)170 interacts with the concave surface of TATA-binding protein to inhibit its DNA binding activity.

    Pereira, L A; van der Knaap, J A; van den Boom, V; van den Heuvel, F A; Timmers, H T

    2001-11-01

    The human RNA polymerase II transcription factor B-TFIID consists of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the TBP-associated factor (TAF) TAF(II)170 and can rapidly redistribute over promoter DNA. Here we report the identification of human TBP-binding regions in human TAF(II)170. We have defined the TBP interaction domain of TAF(II)170 within three amino-terminal regions: residues 2 to 137, 290 to 381, and 380 to 460. Each region contains a pair of Huntington-elongation-A subunit-Tor repeats and exhibits species-specific interactions with TBP family members. Remarkably, the altered-specificity TBP mutant (TBP(AS)) containing a triple mutation in the concave surface is defective for binding the TAF(II)170 amino-terminal region of residues 1 to 504. Furthermore, within this region the TAF(II)170 residues 290 to 381 can inhibit the interaction between Drosophila TAF(II)230 (residues 2 to 81) and TBP through competition for the concave surface of TBP. Biochemical analyses of TBP binding to the TATA box indicated that TAF(II)170 region 290-381 inhibits TBP-DNA complex formation. Importantly, the TBP(AS) mutant is less sensitive to TAF(II)170 inhibition. Collectively, our results support a mechanism in which TAF(II)170 induces high-mobility DNA binding by TBP through reversible interactions with its concave DNA binding surface.

  19. Comparison of the ligand binding properties of two homologous rat apocellular retinol-binding proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Levin, M S; Locke, B; Yang, N C; Li, E; Gordon, J I

    1988-11-25

    Cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) and cellular retinol-binding protein II (CRBP II) are 132-residue cytosolic proteins which have 56% amino acid sequence identity and bind all-trans-retinol as their endogenous ligand. They belong to a family of cytoplasmic proteins which have evolved to bind distinct hydrophobic ligands. Their patterns of tissue-specific and developmental regulation are distinct. We have compared the ligand binding properties of rat apo-CRBP and apo-CRBP II that have been expressed in Escherichia coli. Several observations indicate that the E. coli-derived apoproteins are structurally similar to the native rat proteins: they co-migrate on isoelectric focusing gels; and when complexed with all-trans-retinol, their absorption and excitation/emission spectra are nearly identical to those of the authentic rat holoproteins. Comparative lifetime and acrylamide quenching studies suggest that there are differences in the conformations of apo-CRBP and apo-CRBP II. The interaction of E. coli-derived apo-CRBP and apo-CRBP II with a variety of retinoids was analyzed using spectroscopic techniques. Both apoproteins formed high affinity complexes with all-trans-retinol (K'd approximately 10 nM). In direct binding assays, all-trans-retinal bound to both apoproteins (K'd approximately 50 nM for CRBP; K'd approximately 90 nM for CRBP II). However, all-trans-retinal could displace all-trans-retinol bound to CRBP II but not to CRBP. These observations suggests that there is a specific yet distinct interaction between these two proteins and all-trans-retinal. Apo-CRBP and apo-CRBP II did not demonstrate significant binding to either retinoic acid or methyl retinoate, an uncharged derivative of all-trans-retinoic acid. This indicates that the carboxymethyl group of methyl retinoate cannot be sterically accommodated in their binding pockets and that failure to bind retinoic acid probably is not simply due to the negative charge of its C-15 carboxylate group

  20. [3]tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for [ 3 ]tetrahydrotrazodone ([ 3 ] THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of [ 3 ]THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, [ 3 ] THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that [ 3 ]THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors

  1. Roles within the Family

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Text Size Email Print Share Roles Within the Family Page Content Article Body Families are not democracies. ...

  2. Protein binding of psychotropic agents

    Hassan, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Based upon fluorescence measurements, protein binding of some psychotropic agents (chlorpromazine, promethazine, and trifluoperazine) to human IgG and HSA was studied in aqueous cacodylate buffer, PH7. The interaction parameters determined from emission quenching of the proteins. The interaction parameters determined include the equilibrium constant (K), calculated from equations derived by Borazan and coworkers, the number of binding sites (n) available to the monomer molecules on a single protein molecule. The results revealed a high level of affinity, as reflected by high values of K, and the existence of specific binding sites, since a limited number of n values are obtained. 39 tabs.; 37 figs.; 83 refs

  3. Probing the structural basis of oxygen binding in a cofactor-independent dioxygenase.

    Li, Kunhua; Fielding, Elisha N; Condurso, Heather L; Bruner, Steven D

    2017-07-01

    The enzyme DpgC is included in the small family of cofactor-independent dioxygenases. The chemistry of DpgC is uncommon as the protein binds and utilizes dioxygen without the aid of a metal or organic cofactor. Previous structural and biochemical studies identified the substrate-binding mode and the components of the active site that are important in the catalytic mechanism. In addition, the results delineated a putative binding pocket and migration pathway for the co-substrate dioxygen. Here, structural biology is utilized, along with site-directed mutagenesis, to probe the assigned dioxygen-binding pocket. The key residues implicated in dioxygen trafficking were studied to probe the process of binding, activation and chemistry. The results support the proposed chemistry and provide insight into the general mechanism of dioxygen binding and activation.

  4. Family Psychology and Family Therapy in Japan.

    Kameguchi, Kenji; Murphy-Shigematsu, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan, tracing the origins of these movements, explaining how these fields were activated by the problem of school refusal, and describing an approach to family therapy that has been developed to work with families confronting this problem, as well as preventive programs of family…

  5. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families.

    Chartier, Karen G; Negroni, Lirio K; Hesselbrock, Michie N

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9-12 year old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted with each family. Parental stress, parent-child dysfunctional relations, and child behavior problems were reduced in the families receiving the intervention; family hardiness and family attachment were improved. Findings contribute to the validation of the SFP with Latinos, and can be used to inform social work practice with Puerto Rican families.

  6. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The heparin-binding site in tetranectin is located in the N-terminal region and binding does not involve the carbohydrate recognition domain.

    Lorentsen, R H; Graversen, J H; Caterer, N R; Thogersen, H C; Etzerodt, M

    2000-04-01

    Tetranectin is a homotrimeric plasma and extracellular-matrix protein that binds plasminogen and complex sulphated polysaccharides including heparin. In terms of primary and tertiary structure, tetranectin is related to the collectin family of Ca(2+)-binding C-type lectins. Tetranectin is encoded in three exons. Exon 3 encodes the carbohydrate recognition domain, which binds to kringle 4 in plasminogen at low levels of Ca(2+). Exon 2 encodes an alpha-helix, which is necessary and sufficient to govern the trimerization of tetranectin by assembling into a triple-helical coiled-coil structural element. Here we show that the heparin-binding site in tetranectin resides not in the carbohydrate recognition domain but within the N-terminal region, comprising the 16 amino acid residues encoded by exon 1. In particular, the lysine residues in the decapeptide segment KPKKIVNAKK (tetranectin residues 6-15) are shown to be of primary importance in heparin binding.

  8. Hemoglobin Rahere, a human hemoglobin variant with amino acid substitution at the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate binding site. Functional consequences of the alteration and effects of bezafibrate on the oxygen bindings.

    Sugihara, J; Imamura, T; Nagafuchi, S; Bonaventura, J; Bonaventura, C; Cashon, R

    1985-01-01

    We encountered an abnormal hemoglobin (Rahere), with a threonine residue replacing the beta 82 (EF6) lysine residue at the binding site of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, which was responsible for overt erythrocytosis in two individuals of a Japanese family. Hemoglobin Rahere shows a lower oxygen affinity on the binding of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate or chloride ions than hemoglobin A. Although a decrease in the positive charge density at the binding sites of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in hemoglobin Rahere ap...

  9. Family Matters

    Isabel de Riquer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The scene is at the court of James I of Aragon in the mid-13th c., the place is the royal palace of Barcelona or any of the crown's other possessions, and the dramatis personae include the heir to the throne, prince Peire (future king Peire the Great, and the court's most famous troubadour, Cerverí de Girona (fl. 1259-85. Author of the largest corpus of any Occitan troubadour (114 poems, Cerverì distinguishes himself by the surprises and challenges he presents to his audience: an alba (the most openly erotic genre to the Virgin Mary, the Cobla in sis lengatges (Cobla in Six Languages, the apparently nonsensical Vers estrayn. Cerverì borrows equally from the folk-inspired Galician-Portuguese poetry and from the French tradition, including the chanson de malmariée, where a young woman bemoans being sold off by her family to an old man (gilos, "Jealous" and separated from her youthful doulz amis, some even praying for the death of their husband. Both within that tradition and among Cerverì's three chansons de malmariée, the Gelosesca stands out as "especially determined" to lose her husband, using every "solution" (prayer, black magic, potion or experimenta.

  10. Ion Binding Energies Determining Functional Transport of ClC Proteins

    Yu, Tao; Guo, Xu; Zou, Xian-Wu; Sang, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-01

    The ClC-type proteins, a large family of chloride transport proteins ubiquitously expressed in biological organisms, have been extensively studied for decades. Biological function of ClC proteins can be reflected by analyzing the binding situation of Cl- ions. We investigate ion binding properties of ClC-ec1 protein with the atomic molecular dynamics simulation approach. The calculated electrostatic binding energy results indicate that Cl- at the central binding site Scen has more binding stability than the internal binding site Sint. Quantitative comparison between the latest experimental heat release data isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and our calculated results demonstrates that chloride ions prefer to bind at Scen than Sint in the wild-type ClC-ec1 structure and prefer to bind at Sext and Scen than Sint in mutant E148A/E148Q structures. Even though the chloride ions make less contribution to heat release when binding to Sint and are relatively unstable in the Cl- pathway, they are still part contributors for the Cl- functional transport. This work provides a guide rule to estimate the importance of Cl- at the binding sites and how chloride ions have influences on the function of ClC proteins.

  11. ;:::,!,lj

    The potential effect of the ... coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, drugs which have been shown to be .... The Ras family of small GTP-binding proteins act as important ... Defects in this switching mechanism give rise to disease.

  12. Clathrin-independent endocytosis: from nonexisting to an extreme degree of complexity

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Torgersen, Maria Lyngaas; Raa, Hilde Andersen

    2008-01-01

    Today it is generally accepted that there are several endocytic mechanisms, both the clathrin-dependent one and mechanisms which operate without clathrin and with different requirements when it comes to dynamin, small GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family and specific lipids. It should be noted ...... to give an overview of the complexity of the mechanisms and their regulation....

  13. Mucin- and carbohydrate-stimulated adhesion and subproteome changes of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Olesen, Sita Vaag; Prehn, Kennie

    2017-01-01

    .2-2.1 fold reduced relative abundance comprised elongation factor G, phosphoglycerate kinase, BipAEFTU family GTP-binding protein, ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase, adenylosuccinate synthetase, 30S ribosomal protein S1, and manganese-dependent inorganic pyrophosphatase. Surface proteome of cellobiose...

  14. Structural characterization of Helicobacter pylori dethiobiotin synthetase reveals differences between family members

    Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Klimecka, Maria; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Nicholls, Robert A.; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Cuff, Marianne E.; Xu, Xiaohui; Cymborowski, Marcin; Murshudov, Garib N.; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek (MCSG); (UV); (MRC)

    2012-07-11

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) is involved in the biosynthesis of biotin in bacteria, fungi, and plants. As humans lack this pathway, DTBS is a promising antimicrobial drug target. We determined structures of DTBS from Helicobacter pylori (hpDTBS) bound with cofactors and a substrate analog, and described its unique characteristics relative to other DTBS proteins. Comparison with bacterial DTBS orthologs revealed considerable structural differences in nucleotide recognition. The C-terminal region of DTBS proteins, which contains two nucleotide-recognition motifs, differs greatly among DTBS proteins from different species. The structure of hpDTBS revealed that this protein is unique and does not contain a C-terminal region containing one of the motifs. The single nucleotide-binding motif in hpDTBS is similar to its counterpart in GTPases; however, isothermal titration calorimetry binding studies showed that hpDTBS has a strong preference for ATP. The structural determinants of ATP specificity were assessed with X-ray crystallographic studies of hpDTBS-ATP and hpDTBS-GTP complexes. The unique mode of nucleotide recognition in hpDTBS makes this protein a good target for H. pylori-specific inhibitors of the biotin synthesis pathway.

  15. Dying or living?: The double bind.

    Longhofer, J

    1980-06-01

    Describing the behaviors of terminally ill patients, their families and those charged with their care has received considerable attention during the past decade. This study of comprehensive cancer treatment and research facility indicates that the prevailing theory is limited to explanation at the intra-psychic level. In her work with hundreds of terminal cases, Dr. Elizabeth Kubler-Ross found that patients typically progress through five stages: 1) denial, 2) anger, 3) bargaining, 4) depression, and 5) acceptance. She concludes that the majority of her patients die in a stage of acceptance--a state of equanimity. Recently, scholars have claimed that this five stage scheme has limited applicability and may in fact contribute to the formalization of a dying person's behavior. This preliminary report proposes that the stage theory, if it has any descriptive validity, becomes meaningful only when used to describe behaviors occurring among patients, families, and medical practitioners. A plausible explanation of these behaviors is accomplished by examination of communication patterns containing the structure of paradox or double bind. Patients are forced to perceive realities about their physical conditions not as they appear to them, but as they are defined by those in their environment. This paper explores these communication patterns in relation to the structure of social relationships and the specific contents of messages being transmitted and received.

  16. Dwarfism and impaired gut development in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-deficient mice

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Hammer, Niels A; Nielsen, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1 (IMP1) belongs to a family of RNA-binding proteins implicated in mRNA localization, turnover, and translational control. Mouse IMP1 is expressed during early development, and an increase in expression occurs around embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5). T...

  17. One-step purification of rat heart-type fatty acid-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli

    Schaap, F. G.; Specht, B.; van der Vusse, G. J.; Börchers, T.; Glatz, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is a member of a family of 14-15 kDa lipid binding proteins which are believed to enhance intracellular transport of lipids by facilitating their cytoplasmic diffusion. To obtain sufficient amounts of protein for in vitro studies, we expressed rat

  18. To bind or not to bind? Different temporal binding effects from voluntary pressing and releasing actions.

    Zhao, Ke; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Yan, Wen-Jing; Fu, Xiaolan

    2013-01-01

    Binding effect refers to the perceptual attraction between an action and an outcome leading to a subjective compression of time. Most studies investigating binding effects exclusively employ the "pressing" action without exploring other types of actions. The present study addresses this issue by introducing another action, releasing action or the voluntary lifting of the finger/wrist, to investigate the differences between voluntary pressing and releasing actions. Results reveal that releasing actions led to robust yet short-lived temporal binding effects, whereas pressing condition had steady temporal binding effects up to super-seconds. The two actions also differ in sensitivity to changes in temporal contiguity and contingency, which could be attributed to the difference in awareness of action. Extending upon current models of "willed action," our results provide insights from a temporal point of view and support the concept of a dual system consisting of predictive motor control and top-down mechanisms.

  19. Meningococcal factor H-binding protein vaccines with decreased binding to human complement factor H have enhanced immunogenicity in human factor H transgenic mice.

    Rossi, Raffaella; Granoff, Dan M; Beernink, Peter T

    2013-11-04

    Factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is a component of a meningococcal vaccine recently licensed in Europe for prevention of serogroup B disease, and a second vaccine in clinical development. The protein specifically binds human factor H (fH), which down-regulates complement activation and enhances resistance to bactericidal activity. There are conflicting data from studies in human fH transgenic mice on whether binding of human fH to fHbp vaccines decreases immunogenicity, and whether mutant fHbp vaccines with decreased fH binding have enhanced immunogenicity. fHbp can be classified into two sub-families based on sequence divergence and immunologic cross-reactivity. Previous studies of mutant fHbp vaccines with low fH binding were from sub-family B, which account for approximately 60% of serogroup B case isolates. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of two mutant sub-family A fHbp vaccines containing single substitutions, T221A or D211A, which resulted in 15- or 30-fold lower affinity for human fH, respectively, than the corresponding control wild-type fHbp vaccine. In transgenic mice with high serum concentrations of human fH, both mutant vaccines elicited significantly higher IgG titers and higher serum bactericidal antibody responses than the control fHbp vaccine that bound human fH. Thus, mutations introduced into a sub-family A fHbp antigen to decrease fH binding can increase protective antibody responses in human fH transgenic mice. Collectively the data suggest that mutant fHbp antigens with decreased fH binding will result in superior vaccines in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  1. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Zing Tsung-Yeh Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS and DNA structure (DS properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  2. Bequeathing Family Continuity.

    Spanier, Graham B.

    1989-01-01

    Notes that many children who experience abuse, family disruption, or poverty reach adulthood with a strong commitment to family life. Questions whether changes in American families are indicators of pathology, deterioration, and instability; and asks how dysfunctional families transmit commitment to the concept of family to succeeding generations.…

  3. The Reconstituted Family

    Talbot, Yves

    1981-01-01

    The reconstituted or step-family is becoming more prevalent. The physician who cares for families should be acquainted with the different aspects of such family structure and family functioning. This will enable professionals to better understand and assist their patients, by anticipating the different stresses related to the new family formation, and supporting their adaptation.

  4. Functional Elements on SIRPα IgV domain Mediate Cell Surface Binding to CD47

    Liu, Yuan; Tong, Qiao; Zhou, Yubin; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Yang, Jenny J.; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Chen, Yi-Tien; Ha, Binh; Chen, Celia X-J.; Zen, Ke

    2006-01-01

    SIRPα and SIRPβ1, the two major isoforms of the signal regulatory protein (SIRP) family, are co-expressed in human leukocytes but mediate distinct extracellular binding interactions and divergent cell signaling responses. Previous studies have demonstrated that binding of SIRPα with CD47, another important cell surface molecule, through the extracellular IgV domain regulates important leukocyte functions including macrophage recognition, leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. Although SIRPβ1 ...

  5. Evolution of function in the "two dinucleotide binding domains" flavoproteins.

    Sunil Ojha

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural and biochemical constraints force some segments of proteins to evolve more slowly than others, often allowing identification of conserved structural or sequence motifs that can be associated with substrate binding properties, chemical mechanisms, and molecular functions. We have assessed the functional and structural constraints imposed by cofactors on the evolution of new functions in a superfamily of flavoproteins characterized by two-dinucleotide binding domains, the "two dinucleotide binding domains" flavoproteins (tDBDF superfamily. Although these enzymes catalyze many different types of oxidation/reduction reactions, each is initiated by a stereospecific hydride transfer reaction between two cofactors, a pyridine nucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD. Sequence and structural analysis of more than 1,600 members of the superfamily reveals new members and identifies details of the evolutionary connections among them. Our analysis shows that in all of the highly divergent families within the superfamily, these cofactors adopt a conserved configuration optimal for stereospecific hydride transfer that is stabilized by specific interactions with amino acids from several motifs distributed among both dinucleotide binding domains. The conservation of cofactor configuration in the active site restricts the pyridine nucleotide to interact with FAD from the re-side, limiting the flow of electrons from the re-side to the si-side. This directionality of electron flow constrains interactions with the different partner proteins of different families to occur on the same face of the cofactor binding domains. As a result, superimposing the structures of tDBDFs aligns not only these interacting proteins, but also their constituent electron acceptors, including heme and iron-sulfur clusters. Thus, not only are specific aspects of the cofactor-directed chemical mechanism conserved across the superfamily, the constraints they impose are

  6. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Mans, Ben J. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort 0110 (South Africa); Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F., E-mail: jandersen@niaid.nih.gov [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  7. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W.; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity

  8. Binding energies of cluster ions

    Parajuli, R.; Matt, S.; Scheier, P.; Echt, O.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    The binding energy of charged clusters may be measured by analyzing the kinetic energy released in the metastable decay of mass selected parent ions. Using finite heat bath theory to determine the binding energies of argon, neon, krypton, oxygen and nitrogen from their respective average kinetic energy released were carried out. A high-resolution double focussing two-sector mass spectrometer of reversed Nier-Johnson type geometry was used. MIKE ( mass-analysed ion kinetic energy) were measured to investigate decay reactions of mass-selected ions. For the inert gases neon (Ne n + ), argon (Ar n + ) and krypton (Kr n + ), it is found that the binding energies initially decrease with increasing size n and then level off at a value above the enthalpy of vaporization of the condensed phase. Oxygen cluster ions shown a characteristic dependence on cluster size (U-shape) indicating a change in the metastable fragmentation mechanism when going from the dimer to the decamer ion. (nevyjel)

  9. Metal binding by food components

    Tang, Ning

    for zinc binding by the investigated amino acids, peptides and proteins. The thiol group or imidazole group containing amino acids, peptides and proteins which exhibited strong zinc binding ability were further selected for interacting with zinc salts in relation to zinc absorption. The interactions...... between the above selected food components and zinc citrate or zinc phytate will lead to the enhanced solubility of zinc citrate or zinc phytate. The main driving force for this observed solubility enhancement is the complex formation between zinc and investigated food components as revealed by isothermal...... titration calorimetry and quantum mechanical calculations. This is due to the zinc binding affinity of the relatively softer ligands (investigated food components) will become much stronger than citrate or phytate when they present together in aqueous solution. This mechanism indicates these food components...

  10. Binding of [3H]MSX-2 (3-(3-hydroxypropyl)-7-methyl-8-(m-methoxystyryl)-1-propargylxanthine) to rat striatal membranes--a new, selective antagonist radioligand for A(2A) adenosine receptors.

    Müller, C E; Maurinsh, J; Sauer, R

    2000-01-01

    The present study describes the preparation and binding properties of a new, potent, and selective A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist radioligand, [3H]3-(3-hydroxypropyl)-7-methyl-8-(m-methoxystyryl)-1-propargy lxanth ine ([3H]MSX-2). [3H]MSX-2 binding to rat striatal membranes was saturable and reversible. Saturation experiments showed that [3H]MSX-2 labeled a single class of binding sites with high affinity (K(d)=8.0 nM) and limited capacity (B(max)=1.16 fmol.mg(-1) of protein). The presence of 100 microM GTP, or 10 mM magnesium chloride, respectively, had no effect on [3H]MSX-2 binding. AR agonists competed with the binding of 1 nM [3H]MSX-2 with the following order of potency: 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA)>2-[4-(carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxami doaden osine (CGS-21680)>2-chloroadenosine (2-CADO)>N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). AR antagonists showed the following order of potency: 8-(m-bromostyryl)-3, 7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (BS-DMPX)>1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX)>(R)-5, 6-dimethyl-7-(1-phenylethyl)-2-(4-pyridyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2, 3-d]pyrimidine-4-amine (SH-128)>3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX)>caffeine. The K(i) values for antagonists were in accordance with data from binding studies with the agonist radioligand [3H]CGS21680, while agonist affinities were 3-7-fold lower. [3H]MSX-2 is a highly selective A(2A) AR antagonist radioligand exhibiting a selectivity of at least two orders of magnitude versus all other AR subtypes. The new radioligand shows high specific radioactivity (85 Ci/mmol, 3150 GBq/mmol) and acceptable nonspecific binding at rat striatal membranes of 20-30%, at 1 nM.

  11. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  12. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Gillard, Mike, E-mail: m.n.gillard@leeds.ac.uk; Harland, Derek, E-mail: d.g.harland@leeds.ac.uk; Speight, Martin, E-mail: speight@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2015-06-15

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  13. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Gillard, Mike; Harland, Derek; Speight, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values

  14. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Mike Gillard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  15. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... more members within the same family have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) or any other form of Idiopathic Interstitial ...

  16. Family Activities for Fitness

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  17. Normal Functioning Family

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  18. Improving Family Communications

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Improving Family Communications Page Content Article Body How can I ...

  19. Mutations in Human Tubulin Proximal to the Kinesin-Binding Site Alter Dynamic Instability at Microtubule Plus- and Minus-Ends

    Ti, Shih-Chieh; Pamula, Melissa C.; Howes, Stuart C.; Duellberg, Christian; Cade, Nicholas I.; Kleiner, Ralph E.; Forth, Scott; Surrey, Thomas; Nogales, Eva; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2016-04-01

    The assembly of microtubule-based cellular structures depends on regulated tubulin polymerization and directional transport. In this research, we have purified and characterized tubulin heterodimers that have human β-tubulin isotype III (TUBB3), as well as heterodimers with one of two β-tubulin mutations (D417H or R262H). Both point mutations are proximal to the kinesin-binding site and have been linked to an ocular motility disorder in humans. Compared to wild-type, microtubules with these mutations have decreased catastrophe frequencies and increased average lifetimes of plus- and minus-end-stabilizing caps. Importantly, the D417H mutation does not alter microtubule lattice structure or Mal3 binding to growing filaments. Instead, this mutation reduces the affinity of tubulin for TOG domains and colchicine, suggesting that the distribution of tubulin heterodimer conformations is changed. Together, our findings reveal how residues on the surface of microtubules, distal from the GTP-hydrolysis site and inter-subunit contacts, can alter polymerization dynamics at the plus- and minus-ends of microtubules.

  20. The nuclear localization of low risk HPV11 E7 protein mediated by its zinc binding domain is independent of nuclear import receptors

    Piccioli, Zachary; McKee, Courtney H.; Leszczynski, Anna; Onder, Zeynep; Hannah, Erin C.; Mamoor, Shahan; Crosby, Lauren; Moroianu, Junona

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 protein using 1) transfection assays in HeLa cells with EGFP fusion plasmids containing 11E7 and its domains and 2) nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells with GST fusion proteins containing 11E7 and its domains. The EGFP-11E7 and EGFP-11cE7 39-98 localized mostly to the nucleus. The GST-11E7 and GST-11cE7 39-98 were imported into the nuclei in the presence of either Ran-GDP or RanG19V-GTP mutant and in the absence of nuclear import receptors. This suggests that 11E7 enters the nucleus via a Ran-dependent pathway, independent of nuclear import receptors, mediated by a nuclear localization signal located in its C-terminal domain (cNLS). This cNLS contains the zinc binding domain consisting of two copies of Cys-X-X-Cys motif. Mutagenesis of Cys residues in these motifs changed the localization of the EGFP-11cE7/-11E7 mutants to cytoplasmic, suggesting that the zinc binding domain is essential for nuclear localization of 11E7.

  1. The pancreatic zymogen granule membrane protein, GP2, binds Escherichia coli type 1 Fimbriae

    Lowe Anson W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GP2 is the major membrane protein present in the pancreatic zymogen granule, and is cleaved and released into the pancreatic duct along with exocrine secretions. The function of GP2 is unknown. GP2's amino acid sequence is most similar to that of uromodulin, which is secreted by the kidney. Recent studies have demonstrated uromodulin binding to bacterial Type 1 fimbria. The fimbriae serve as adhesins to host receptors. The present study examines whether GP2 also shares similar binding properties to bacteria with Type 1 fimbria. Commensal and pathogenic bacteria, including E. coli and Salmonella, express type 1 fimbria. Methods An in vitro binding assay was used to assay the binding of recombinant GP2 to defined strains of E. coli that differ in their expression of Type 1 fimbria or its subunit protein, FimH. Studies were also performed to determine whether GP2 binding is dependent on the presence of mannose residues, which is a known determinant for FimH binding. Results GP2 binds E. coli that express Type 1 fimbria. Binding is dependent on GP2 glycosylation, and specifically the presence of mannose residues. Conclusion GP2 binds to Type 1 fimbria, a bacterial adhesin that is commonly expressed by members of the Enterobacteriacae family.

  2. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2)

    Marr, Eric; Tardie, Mark; Carty, Maynard; Brown Phillips, Tracy; Wang, Ing-Kae; Soeller, Walt; Qiu, Xiayang; Karam, George

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) with a bound palmitate is reported at 1.5 Å resolution. Human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) belongs to a family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins involved in the transport and storage of lipids. Here, the crystal structure of human aP2 with a bound palmitate is described at 1.5 Å resolution. Unlike the known crystal structure of murine aP2 in complex with palmitate, this structure shows that the fatty acid is in a folded conformation and that the loop containing Phe57 acts as a lid to regulate ligand binding by excluding solvent exposure to the central binding cavity

  3. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Thongjuea, Supat; Kwon, Andrew T

    2009-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database...... to an active research community. As binding models are refined by newer data, the JASPAR database now uses versioning of matrices: in this release, 12% of the older models were updated to improved versions. Classification of TF families has been improved by adopting a new DNA-binding domain nomenclature...

  4. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, O N; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  5. Prediction of vitamin interacting residues in a vitamin binding protein using evolutionary information.

    Panwar, Bharat; Gupta, Sudheer; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2013-02-07

    The vitamins are important cofactors in various enzymatic-reactions. In past, many inhibitors have been designed against vitamin binding pockets in order to inhibit vitamin-protein interactions. Thus, it is important to identify vitamin interacting residues in a protein. It is possible to detect vitamin-binding pockets on a protein, if its tertiary structure is known. Unfortunately tertiary structures of limited proteins are available. Therefore, it is important to develop in-silico models for predicting vitamin interacting residues in protein from its primary structure. In this study, first we compared protein-interacting residues of vitamins with other ligands using Two Sample Logo (TSL). It was observed that ATP, GTP, NAD, FAD and mannose preferred {G,R,K,S,H}, {G,K,T,S,D,N}, {T,G,Y}, {G,Y,W} and {Y,D,W,N,E} residues respectively, whereas vitamins preferred {Y,F,S,W,T,G,H} residues for the interaction with proteins. Furthermore, compositional information of preferred and non-preferred residues along with patterns-specificity was also observed within different vitamin-classes. Vitamins A, B and B6 preferred {F,I,W,Y,L,V}, {S,Y,G,T,H,W,N,E} and {S,T,G,H,Y,N} interacting residues respectively. It suggested that protein-binding patterns of vitamins are different from other ligands, and motivated us to develop separate predictor for vitamins and their sub-classes. The four different prediction modules, (i) vitamin interacting residues (VIRs), (ii) vitamin-A interacting residues (VAIRs), (iii) vitamin-B interacting residues (VBIRs) and (iv) pyridoxal-5-phosphate (vitamin B6) interacting residues (PLPIRs) have been developed. We applied various classifiers of SVM, BayesNet, NaiveBayes, ComplementNaiveBayes, NaiveBayesMultinomial, RandomForest and IBk etc., as machine learning techniques, using binary and Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) features of protein sequences. Finally, we selected best performing SVM modules and obtained highest MCC of 0.53, 0.48, 0.61, 0

  6. Nitric Oxide Binds to and Modulates the Activity of a Pollen Specific Arabidopsis Diacylglycerol Kinase

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in plants. In the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, NO causes re-orientation of the growing tube and this response is mediated by 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, in plants, NO-sensors have remained somewhat elusive. Here, the findings of an NO-binding candidate, Arabidopsis thaliana DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE 4 (ATDGK4; AT5G57690) is presented. In addition to the annotated diacylglycerol kinase domain, this molecule also harbors a predicted heme-NO/oxygen (H-NOX) binding site and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain which have been identified based on the alignment of functionally conserved amino acid residues across species. A 3D model of the molecule was constructed, and from which the locations of the kinase catalytic center, the ATP-binding site, the GC and H-NOX domains were estimated. Docking of ATP to the kinase catalytic center was also modeled. The recombinant ATDGK4 demonstrated kinase activity in vitro, catalyzing the ATP-dependent conversion of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity was inhibited by the mammalian DAG kinase inhibitor R59949 and importantly also by the NO donors diethylamine NONOate (DEA NONOate) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Recombinant ATDGK4 also has GC activity in vitro, catalyzing the conversion of guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) to cGMP. The catalytic domains of ATDGK4 kinase and GC may be independently regulated since the kinase but not the GC, was inhibited by NO while Ca2+ only stimulates the GC. It is likely that the DAG kinase product, PA, causes the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores and Ca2+ in turn activates the GC domain of ATDGK4 through a feedback mechanism. Analysis of publicly available microarray data has revealed that ATDGK4 is highly expressed in the pollen. Here, the pollen tubes of mis-expressing atdgk4 recorded slower growth rates than the wild-type (Col-0) and importantly, they showed altered

  7. Families and family therapy in Hong Kong.

    Tse, Samson; Ng, Roger M K; Tonsing, Kareen N; Ran, Maosheng

    2012-04-01

    Family therapy views humans not as separate entities, but as embedded in a network of relationships, highlighting the reciprocal influences of one's behaviours on one another. This article gives an overview of family demographics and the implementation of family therapy in Hong Kong. We start with a review of the family demographics in Hong Kong and brief notes on families in mainland China. Demographics show that the landscape has changed markedly in the past decade, with more cross-border marriages, an increased divorce rate, and an ageing overall population - all of which could mean that there is increasing demand for professional family therapy interventions. However, only a limited number of professionals are practising the systems-based approach in Hong Kong. Some possible reasons as to why family therapy is not well disseminated and practised are discussed. These reasons include a lack of mental health policy to support family therapy, a lack of systematic family therapy training, and a shortage of skilled professionals. Furthermore, challenges in applying the western model in Chinese culture are also outlined. We conclude that more future research is warranted to investigate how family therapy can be adapted for Chinese families.

  8. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. When is protein binding important?

    Heuberger, Jules; Schmidt, Stephan; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is an ode to a classic citation by Benet and Hoener (2002. Clin Pharm Ther 71(3):115-121). The now classic paper had a huge impact on drug development and the way the issue of protein binding is perceived and interpreted. Although the authors very clearly pointed out the limitations and underlying assumptions for their delineations, these are too often overlooked and the classic paper's message is misinterpreted by broadening to cases that were not intended. Some members of the scientific community concluded from the paper that protein binding is not important. This was clearly not intended by the authors, as they finished their paper with a paragraph entitled: "When is protein binding important?" Misinterpretation of the underlying assumptions in the classic work can result in major pitfalls in drug development. Therefore, we revisit the topic of protein binding with the intention of clarifying when clinically relevant changes should be considered during drug development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Definition of the G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane bundle binding pocket and calculation of receptor similarities for drug design

    Gloriam, David Erik Immanuel; Foord, Steven M; Blaney, Frank E

    2009-01-01

    currently available crystal structures. This was used to characterize pharmacological relationships of Family A/Rhodopsin family GPCRs, minimizing evolutionary influence from parts of the receptor that do not generally affect ligand binding. The resultant dendogram tended to group receptors according...

  11. Family doctors' involvement with families in Estonia

    Lember Margus

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family doctors should care for individuals in the context of their family. Family has a powerful influence on health and illness and family interventions have been shown to improve health outcomes for a variety of health problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the Estonian family doctors' (FD attitudes to the patients' family-related issues in their work: to explore the degree of FDs involvement in family matters, their preparedness for management of family-related issues and their self-assessment of the ability to manage different family-related problems. Methods A random sample (n = 236 of all FDs in Estonia was investigated using a postal questionnaire. Altogether 151 FDs responded to the questionnaire (response rate 64%, while five of them were excluded as they did not actually work as FDs. Results Of the respondents, 90% thought that in managing the health problems of patients FDs should communicate and cooperate with family members. Although most of the family doctors agreed that modifying of the health damaging risk factors (smoking, alcohol and drug abuse of their patients and families is their task, one third of them felt that dealing with these problems is ineffective, or perceived themselves as poorly prepared or having too little time for such activities. Of the respondents, 58% (n = 83 were of the opinion that they could modify also relationship problems. Conclusions Estonian family doctors are favourably disposed to involvement in family-related problems, however, they need some additional training, especially in the field of relationship management.

  12. Flow-cytometric determination of high-density-lipoprotein binding sites on human leukocytes

    Schmitz, G.; Wulf, G.; Bruening, T.A.; Assmann, G.

    1987-01-01

    In this method, leukocytes were isolated from 6 mL of EDTA-blood by density-gradient centrifugation and subsequently incubated with rhodamine isothiocyanate (RITC)-conjugated high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The receptor-bound conjugate particles were determined by fluorescent flow cytometry and compared with 125 I-labeled HDL binding data for the same cells. Human granulocytes express the highest number of HDL binding sites (9.4 x 10(4)/cell), followed by monocytes (7.3 x 10(4)/cell) and lymphocytes (4.0 x 10(4)/cell). Compared with conventional analysis of binding of 125 I-labeled HDL in tissue-culture dishes, the present determination revealed significantly lower values for nonspecific binding. In competition studies, the conjugate competes for the same binding sites as 125 I-labeled HDL. With the use of tetranitromethane-treated HDL3, which fails to compete for the HDL receptor sites while nonspecific binding is not affected, we could clearly distinguish between 37 degrees C surface binding and specific 37 degrees C uptake of RITC-HDL3, confirming that the HDL receptor leads bound HDL particles into an intracellular pathway rather than acting as a docking type of receptor. Patients with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia showed a significantly higher number of HDL binding sites in the granulocyte population but normal in lymphocytes and monocytes, indicating increased uptake of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins. In patients with familial hypercholesterolemia, HDL binding was increased in all three cell types, indicating increased cholesterol uptake and increased cholesterol synthesis. The present method allows rapid determination of HDL binding sites in leukocytes from patients with various forms of hyper- and dyslipoproteinemias

  13. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14, a novel insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 binding partner

    Wu, Chen; Yao, Guangyin; Zou, Minji; Chen, Guangyu; Wang, Min; Liu, Jingqian; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Donggang

    2007-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is known to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in IGF-dependent and IGF-independent manners, but the mechanism underlying IGF-independent effects is not yet clear. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, IGFBP-3 was used as the bait to screen a human fetal liver cDNA library for it interactors that may potentially mediate IGFBP-3-regulated functions. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GalNAc-T14), a member of the GalNAc-Tases family, was identified as a novel IGFBP-3 binding partner. This interaction involved the ricin-type beta-trefoil domain of GalNAc-T14. The interaction between IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14 was reconfirmed in vitro and in vivo, using GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and mammalian two-hybrid assays. Our findings may provide new clues for further study on the mechanism behind the IGF-independent effects of IGFBP-3 promoting apoptosis. The role of GalNAc-T14 as an intracellular mediator of the effects of IGFBP-3 need to be verified in future studies

  14. Binding of ADAM12, a marker of skeletal muscle regeneration, to the muscle-specific actin-binding protein, alpha -actinin-2, is required for myoblast fusion

    Galliano, M F; Huet, C; Frygelius, J

    2000-01-01

    ADAM12 belongs to the transmembrane metalloprotease ADAM ("a disintegrin and metalloprotease") family. ADAM12 has been implicated in muscle cell differentiation and fusion, but its precise function remains unknown. Here, we show that ADAM12 is dramatically up-regulated in regenerated, newly formed...... of differentiation. Using the yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that the muscle-specific alpha-actinin-2 strongly binds to the cytoplasmic tail of ADAM12. In vitro binding assays with GST fusion proteins confirmed the specific interaction. The major binding site for alpha-actinin-2 was mapped to a short sequence...... in a dominant negative fashion by inhibiting fusion of C2C12 cells, whereas expression of a cytosolic ADAM12 lacking the major alpha-actinin-2 binding site had no effect on cell fusion. Our results suggest that interaction of ADAM12 with alpha-actinin-2 is important for ADAM12 function....

  15. Structural and binding studies of SAP-1 protein with heparin.

    Yadav, Vikash K; Mandal, Rahul S; Puniya, Bhanwar L; Kumar, Rahul; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-03-01

    SAP-1 is a low molecular weight cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) which belongs to type-2 cystatins family. SAP-1 protein purified from human seminal plasma (HuSP) has been shown to inhibit cysteine and serine proteases and exhibit interesting biological properties, including high temperature and pH stability. Heparin is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan (with varied chain length) which interacts with a number of proteins and regulates multiple steps in different biological processes. As an anticoagulant, heparin enhances inhibition of thrombin by the serpin antithrombin III. Therefore, we have employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to improve our understanding of the binding interaction between heparin and SAP-1 (protease inhibitor). SPR data suggest that SAP-1 binds to heparin with a significant affinity (KD = 158 nm). SPR solution competition studies using heparin oligosaccharides showed that the binding of SAP-1 to heparin is dependent on chain length. Large oligosaccharides show strong binding affinity for SAP-1. Further to get insight into the structural aspect of interactions between SAP-1 and heparin, we used modelled structure of the SAP-1 and docked with heparin and heparin-derived polysaccharides. The results suggest that a positively charged residue lysine plays important role in these interactions. Such information should improve our understanding of how heparin, present in the reproductive tract, regulates cystatins activity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Identification of critical residues in loop E in the 5-HT3ASR binding site

    Muthalagi Mani

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT3R is a member of a superfamily of ligand gated ion channels. All members of this family share a large degree of sequence homology and presumably significant structural similarity. A large number of studies have explored the structure-function relationships of members of this family, particularly the nicotinic and GABA receptors. This information can be utilized to gain additional insights into specific structural and functional features of other receptors in this family. Results Thirteen amino acids in the mouse 5-HT3ASR that correspond to the putative E binding loop of the nicotinic α7 receptor were chosen for mutagenesis. Due to the presence of a highly conserved glycine in this region, it has been suggested that this binding loop is comprised of a hairpin turn and may form a portion of the ligand-binding site in this ion channel family. Mutation of the conserved glycine (G147 to alanine eliminated binding of the 5-HT3R antagonist [3H]granisetron. Three tyrosine residues (Y140, Y142 and Y152 also significantly altered the binding of 5-HT3R ligands. Mutations in neighboring residues had little or no effect on binding of these ligands to the 5-HT3ASR. Conclusion Our data supports a role for the putative E-loop region of the 5-HT3R in the binding of 5-HT, mCPBG, d-tc and lerisetron. 5-HT and mCPBG interact with Y142, d-tc with Y140 and lerisetron with both Y142 and Y152. Our data also provides support for the hypothesis that this region of the receptor is present in a loop structure.

  17. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Competitiveness of Family Businesses

    M.A.A.M. Leenders (Mark); E. Waarts (Eric)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study is to systematically examine the advantages and disadvantages of different types of family businesses. We distinguish four different types of family businesses based on their family and business orientation: (1) House of Business, (2) Family Money Machine, (3)

  19. Families in Transition .

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  20. Pure γ-families

    Dunaevskii, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    The subject of this work are pure gamma families consisting of the gamma quanta produced in the early stages of cosmic cascades. The criteria of selecting these families from the all measured families are presented. The characteristics of these families are given and some conclusions about the mechanism of the nuclear-electromagnetic cascades are extracted. (S.B.)