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Sample records for familial creutzfeldt-jakob disease

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob Dementia: Hope Through Research Information booklet about Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and other types of dementia ...

  2. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

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    LIU Jian-rong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a degenerative central nervous system (CNS disease caused by infection of prion protein (PrP, with clinical features including short course, rapid development and 100% mortality. This article aims to discuss the pathogenesis, histopathological features, clinical manifestations, electroencephalogram (EEG findings, imaging data and treatment progress of this disease based on literature review. Cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein detection, EEG and MRI are three important methods to make an early diagnosis on patients with suspected CJD, such as elderly patients with rapidly progressive dementia (RPD and young patients with mental symptoms involving multiple systems (MS.

  3. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

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    Iwasaki, Yasushi

    2017-04-01

    This review will explore the clinical and pathological findings of the various forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Clinical findings of CJD are characterized by rapidly progressive cognitive dysfunction, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) hyperintensity, myoclonus, periodic sharp-wave complexes on electroencephalogram and akinetic mutism state. Neuropathologic findings of CJD are characterized by spongiform changes in gray matter, gliosis-particularly hypertrophic astrocytosis-neuropil rarefaction, neuron loss and prion protein (PrP) deposition. The earliest pathological symptom observed by HE staining in the cerebral cortex is spongiform change. This spongiform change begins several months before clinical onset, and is followed by gliosis. Subsequently, neuropil rarefaction appears, followed by neuron loss. Regions showing fine vacuole-type spongiform change reflect synaptic-type PrP deposition and type 1 PrP(Sc) deposition, whereas regions showing large confluent vacuole-type spongiform changes reflect perivacuolar-type PrP deposition and type 2 PrP(Sc) deposition. Hyperintensities of the cerebral gray matter observed in DWI indicate the pathology of the spongiform change in CJD. The cerebral cortical lesions with large confluent vacuoles and type 2 PrP(Sc) show higher brightness and more continuous hyperintensity on DWI than those with fine vacuoles and type 1 PrP(Sc) . CJD cases showing diffuse myelin pallor of cerebral white matter have been described as panencephalopathic-type, and this white matter pathology is mainly due to secondary degeneration caused by cerebral cortical involvement, particularly in regard to neuron loss. In conclusion, clinical and neuroimaging findings and neuropathologic observations are well matched in both typical and atypical cases in CJD. The clinical diagnosis of CJD is relatively easy for typical CJD cases such as the MM1-type. However, even in atypical cases it seems that clinical findings can be used for

  4. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

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    E.A. Croes (Esther); C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has had major impact in Europe during the last decade. In this article, we review the aetiology of vCJD and its relation with bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Further, treatment of the disease, the strategies focusing on prevention of t

  5. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of a funeral ritual) Scrapie (found in sheep) Other very rare inherited human diseases, such as ... markers that sometimes occur with the disease CT scan of the brain Electroencephalogram (EEG) MRI of the ...

  6. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to as “mad cow” disease; scrapie, which affects sheep and goats; mink encephalopathy; and feline encephalopathy. Similar ... to move and speak and enter a coma. Pneumonia and other infections often occur in these individuals ...

  7. CREUTZFELDT - JAKOB DISEASE : A CASE REPORT

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    Theophilus Premkumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by the trans - formation of an endogenous protein, PrP (prion - related protein, into an abnormal conformation, the most common of which in humans is Creutzfeldt - Jakob disease. We report t he case of a 40 year old lady who presented with rapidly progressive dementia with pyramidal, extra - pyramidal, cerebellar symptoms, myoclonus and akinetic mutism. Her EEG showed typical periodic sharp wave complexes and MRI Brain revealed DWI>FLAIR intensi ty in bilateral caudate nuclei, putamen & bilateral subcortical frontal lobes . The clinico - radiological correlation was consistent with the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt - Jakob disease.

  8. Visual art therapy in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a case study.

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    Shrestha, Rajeet; Trauger-Querry, Barbara; Loughrin, Athena; Appleby, Brian S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the diagnostic and treatment utility of visual art therapy in a case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Visual art therapy was compared longitudinally with clinical and neuroimaging data over five-month period in an autopsy-confirmed case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of MM2-cortical subtype. Art therapy sessions and content were useful in ascertaining neuropsychiatric symptoms during the course of her illness. Art therapy offered a unique emotional and cognitive outlet as illness progressed. Patients and families affected by sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may benefit from art therapy despite the rapidly progressive nature of the illness. Art therapy can also be useful for assessment of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by healthcare professionals.

  9. Radiological assessment of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

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    Tschampa, Henriette J.; Urbach, Horst [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Zerr, Inga [University of Goettingen, National Reference Center for TSE Surveillance at the Department of Neurology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare fatal neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by rapidly progressive dementia and neurological signs. There is a need for early and accurate clinical diagnosis in order to exclude any treatable disorder. Additionally, it is of public interest to differentiate the sporadic form of the disease from the variant CJD type (vCJD), which is probably transmitted from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). High signal in the striatum on T2-weighted, FLAIR and diffusion weighted (DW) MRI as well as cortical high signal in FLAIR and DW MRI are the classical findings in sCJD. The ''pulvinar sign'', defined as high signal in the pulvinar thalami that is brighter than potential additional high signal in the basal ganglia, is considered pathognomonic for vCJD. (orig.)

  10. Sleep Pathology in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

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    Kang, Peter; de Bruin, Gabriela S.; Wang, Leo H.; Ward, Beth A.; Ances, Beau M.; Lim, Miranda M.; Bucelli, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Associations between sleep and neurodegenerative diseases have become increasingly evident. This study aims to characterize the prevalence and type of sleep pathology in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a rapidly progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease. Methods: In this observational cross-sectional cohort study, we performed a retrospective analysis of sleep signs and symptoms in a consecutive group of patients with definite CJD at a tertiary care medical center (n = 28). Polysomnography was performed in 14 patients. Results: Although only 5 of 28 patients carried a premorbid sleep diagnosis, signs/symptoms of sleep pathology were present in 25 patients. Eleven reported hypersomnia whereas 13 reported insomnia. Seven had restless legs symptoms and/or periodic limb movements of sleep, and nine reported parasomnias. Of the 14 patients who underwent polysomnography, 1 did not show sleep, 9 (69%) had poorly formed or absent sleep spindles and/or K-complexes, and 10 (77%) had sleep-disordered breathing. Of the 8 patients who experienced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep during the polysomnography, 3 (38%) showed REM sleep without atonia, and 2 patients met criteria for REM sleep behavior disorder. Median total sleep time was 226 (interquartile range [IQR] = 195–282) min. Median sleep efficiency was 58.5% (IQR = 41–65.5 %). Median REM time was 0.35% (IQR = 0–7.125%). Five patients (38%) demonstrated periodic limb movements during polysomnography. One case is presented. Conclusions: Sleep pathology is common in CJD, and screening for sleep pathology is indicated in the evaluation of patients with rapidly progressive dementias. Early identification and treatment of sleep pathology may provide an intervenable target for CJD. Citation: Kang P, de Bruin GS, Wang LH, Ward BA, Ances BM, Lim MM, Bucelli RC. Sleep pathology in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):1033–1039. PMID:27250807

  11. Spreading brain lesions in a familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with V180I mutation over 4 years

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    Deguchi Kentaro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report a female patient with familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with V180I mutation (fCJD with V180I, who was serially followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and electroencephalogram (EEG for up to four years. Case presentation At 6 months after the onset, diffusion-weighted images (DWI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR of brain MRI revealed an increased signal intensity in the bilateral frontal, temporal, and parietal cerebral cortex with left dominancy except for the occipital lobe. However, her follow-up MRI at four years showed the high-signal regions spreading to the occipital cerebral cortex in DWI and FLAIR images, and bilateral frontal cerebral white matter in FLAIR images. EEG showed a progressive and general slow high-voltage rhythm from 7–8 to 3–5 c/s over four years, without evidence of periodic synchronous discharge. These findings correspond to the symptom progression even after akinetic mutism at 18 months. Conclusion We suggest that serial MRI and EEG examinations are useful for early diagnosis of fCJD with V180I and for monitoring disease progression.

  12. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Infection Control

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    Lynn Johnston

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past year, several situations have occurred in Canada in which patients who had recently undergone a surgical procedure were subsequently diagnosed with confirmed or suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. This raised concerns over contamination of surgical instruments: which instruments might have been contaminated from direct exposure to tissues; can instruments become cross-contaminated by exposure to other contaminated instruments; what assessment is necessary to determine cross-contamination; and what should be done with instruments that have been contaminated. Additionally, should there be a patient traceback in the face of potential but unproven exposure? Unfortunately, there are no easy answers to most of the above questions. Australia, the United Kingdom and the World Health Organization have developed guidelines for the infection control management of patients with CJD, as well as instruments and devices that come into contact with them and their tissues (1-3. Health Canada's draft CJD infection control guidelines, withdrawn from the Health Canada Web site until safety concerns regarding sodium hydroxide can be addressed, closely mirrored recommendations made in those documents. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for CJD are under revision. However, a recent American publication made recommendations on what procedures should be used for reprocessing items that have been in contact with the prion protein (PrP (4. These recommendations differ substantially from the draft Canadian guidelines. This article reviews current knowledge about CJD, and highlights some of the infection control concerns and controversies.

  13. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-02-03

    In this podcast, Dr. Lynne Sehulster discusses Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare neurodegenerative disease. This disease is caused by a pathological accumulation in the brain of an abnormal protein known as prions.  Created: 2/3/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 2/3/2009.

  14. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting as bulbar palsy.

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    Mittal, Manoj; Hammond, Nancy; Husmann, Kathrin; Lele, Abhijit; Pasnoor, Mamatha

    2010-11-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a degenerative neurological disorder caused by a prion protein. The diagnosis may be challenging in unusual early presentations. A bulbar symptom as the initial complaint is a rare presentation for CJD, with only a few reports so far. These patients can be misdiagnosed with motor neuron disease or the Miller Fisher variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome. We describe a 69-year-old woman with CJD who presented with bulbar symptoms at the onset.

  15. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: the value of MRI; Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Krankheit: Stellenwert der MRT

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    Urbach, H.; Tschampa, H.J.; Keller, E.; Schild, H.H. [Radiologische Klinik, Neuroradiologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Univ. Bonn (Germany); Paus, S. [Neurologische Klinik, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    To define the role of MRI in the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: 14 patients with suspected CJD were studied within 3 years. MRI findings were correlated with WHO established diagnostic criteria (clinical findings, EEG, CSF with 14-3-3 protein assay). Results: 12 patients had CJD. One patient each suffered from Hashimoto's encephalitis and ALS dementia complex, respectively. Nine of 12 CJD patients had increased signal intensity of the striatum (n = 8), pulvinar thalami (n = 5) and/or cerebellar and cerebral cortex (n = 3), respectively. Signal intensity was most pronounced on FLAIR sequences; six patients were studied with diffusion-weighted MRI and showed impaired diffusion in these areas. Both patients without CJD did not show the abovementioned signal changes (sensitivity 75%, specificity and positive predictive value 100%, respectively). Conclusion: If patients with suspected CJD are studied with FLAIR and diffusion-weighted sequences, this disorder can reliably be proven or ruled out. Typical MRI findings narrow down the differential diagnosis and should be included in the WHO diagnostic criteria. (orig.) [German] Bestimmung des Stellenwerts der MRT in der Diagnostik der Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Krankheit (CJK). Methoden: Analyse der MRTs von 14 innerhalb von drei Jahren mit Verdacht auf CJK zugewiesenen Patienten. Korrelation der MRTs mit den entsprechend den WHO-Diagnosekriterien etablierten Untersuchungsverfahren (Klinik, EEG, Liquor mit 14-3-3 Protein-Nachweis). Ergebnisse: 12 Patienten hatten eine CJK, jeweils ein Patient hatte eine Hashimoto-Enzephalitis bzw. einen ALS-Demenz-Komplex. Bei 9 der 12 CJK-Patienten fanden sich beidseits Signalerhoehungen des Striatum (n = 8), des Pulvinar thalami (n = 5) und/oder des Kleinhirn- bzw. Grosshirnkortex (n = 3). Die Signalerhoehungen waren am deutlichsten auf FLAIR-Aufnahmen erkennbar; 6 mit diffusionsgewichteter MRT untersuchte Patienten wiesen eine eingeschraenkte Diffusion dieser Areale

  16. Health professions and risk of sporadic Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease, 1965 to 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Alcalde-Cabero; J. Almazán-Isla; J-P. Brandel (Jean-Philippe); M. Breithaupt; J. Catarino; S.J. Collins (Steven); J. Haybäck; R. Höftberger (Romana); E. Kahana; G.G. Kovacs (Gabor); A. Ladogana (Anna); E. Mitrová (Eva); A. Molesworth; Y. Nakamura; M. Pocchiari (Maurizio); M. Popovic; M. Ruiz-Tovar; A. Taratuto; C. van Duin; M. Yamada; R.G. Will (Robert); I. Zerr (Inga); J. de Pedro-Cuesta (Jesús)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn 2009, a pathologist with sporadic Creutzfeldt- Jakob Disease (sCJD) was reported to the Spanish registry. This case prompted a request for information on health-related occupation in sCJD cases from countries participating in the European Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease Surveillance network

  17. Diffusion MR imaging in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

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    Burcak Cakir Pekoz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a rare dementing disease and is thought to caused by a prion. It is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia, ataxia, myoclonus, akinetic mutism and eventual death. Brain biopsy or autopsy is required for a definitive diagnosis of CJD. Diffusion-weighted imaging became an important tool for early diagnosis of CJD because of the high sensitivity. We present 59-year-old female patient diagnosed as sporadic CJD with typical MR imagings. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 880-883

  18. A novel phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

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    Giaccone, G; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Mangieri, Michela; Limido, Lucia; Capobianco, Raffaella; Suardi, Silvia; Grisoli, Marina; Binelli, Simona; Fociani, Paolo; Bugiani, Orso; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    An atypical case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is described in a 78-year-old woman homozygous for methionine at codon 129 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. The neuropathological signature was the presence of PrP immunoreactive plaque-like deposits in the cerebral cortex, striatum and thalamus. Western blot analysis showed a profile of the pathological form of PrP (PrP(Sc)) previously unrecognised in sporadic CJD, marked by the absence of diglycosylated protease resistant species. These features define a novel neuropathological and molecular CJD phenotype.

  19. Imaging and clinical characteristics of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

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    HAN Shun-chang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Five patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD presented rapidly progressive dementia which were subacute onset from 1 to 4 months. Among these cases, periodic synchronous discharge (PSD of electroencephalography (EEG was seen in 2 patients. Besides, 4 patients obtained positive results in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis for 14-3-3 protein. The cranial MRI examination showed symmetrical or asymmetrical colored-ribbon-shaped high signals in cerebral cortex or basal ganglia by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, suggesting that DWI had high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of sCJD as a preferred method in the clinical examination of sCJD.

  20. Cortical restricted diffusion as the predominant MRI finding in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

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    Talbott, Sabrina D.; Sattenberg, Ronald J.; Heidenreich, Jens O. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Louisville, Louisville (United States)), e-mail: sdtalb02@gwise.louisville.edu; Plato, Brian M (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Louisville, Louisville (United States)); Parker, John (Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Univ. of Louisville, Louisville (United States))

    2011-04-15

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disorder with MR findings predominantly limited to the grey matter of the cortex and the basal ganglia. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can produce a spectrum of MR imaging findings of the brain, most notably on DWI and FLAIR sequences. Involvement of the basal ganglia and neocortex is the most common finding, but isolated involvement of the cortex can also be seen. We describe the clinical history and MRI findings of three patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease confirmed by brain biopsy or autopsy and review the literature of imaging manifestations of this disease

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Fact Sheet for Healthcare Workers and Morticians

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    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  2. A case of pure autotopagnosia following Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

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    Tamura, Itaru; Hamada, Shinsuke; Soma, Hiroyuki; Moriwaka, Fumio; Tashiro, Kunio

    2016-12-02

    A 69-year-old male (N.A.) with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease showed pure autotopagnosia. We administered tests evaluating his ability to name his own body parts, to point to body parts (his own and examiner's), and to recognize positional relationships between his body parts by verbal questions and responses. We found impaired localization of the patient's own body parts by pointing and impaired recognition of positional relationships between his body parts. However, there was no impairment in naming his own body parts or in localizing the examiner's body parts. The results suggest a pure autotopagnosia in N.A. leading to an impairment of recognition of the spatial position of his body parts in a three-dimensional body representation within the egocentric reference frame. We were able to rule out the possibility that his pattern of performance could have been due to a disability in programming reaching movements of the arm.

  3. An unusual case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

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    Javed, Qaiser; Alam, Faouzi; Krishna, Sowmya; Jaganathan, Geetha

    2010-01-01

    A 49-year-old healthy white British female, not previously known to psychiatric services, presented with an acute onset of florid psychotic symptoms. Her symptoms included visual, auditory and tactile hallucinations as well as persecutory delusions. She was started on antipsychotic medication; however, her psychotic symptoms did not improve significantly in the first 3 months. Her blood tests were normal. Lumbar puncture was performed which was positive for protein 14-3-3. A computed tomography scan of the brain showed generalised atrophic changes. The history of early visual hallucinations, rapid cognitive decline and positive 14-3-3 result was in keeping with the Heidenhain variant of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Despite a short life expectancy as reported in literature, our patient, who was diagnosed with sCJD more than two-and-a-half years ago, is still alive. We therefore believe this is an important finding to report.

  4. Age at Death of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in subsequent family generation carrying the E200K mutation of the prion protein gene.

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    Maurizio Pocchiari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The E200K mutation of the prion protein gene (PRNP is the most frequent amino acid substitution in genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and is the only one responsible for the appearance of clustered cases in the world. In the Israel and Slovakian clusters, age of disease onset was reduced in successive generations but the absence of a clear molecular basis raised the possibility that this event was an observational bias. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible selection biases or confounding factors related to anticipation in E200K CJD patients belonging to a cluster in Southern Italy. METHODS: Clinical and demographical data of 41 parent-offspring pairs from 19 pedigrees of the Italian cluster of E200K patients were collected. Age at death of parents was compared with age at death of E200K CJD offspring. Subgroup analyses were performed for controlling possible selection biases, confounding factors, or both. RESULTS: The mean age at death/last follow-up of the parent generation was 71.4 years while that of CJD offspring was 59.3 years with an estimated anticipation of 12.1 years. When the same analysis was performed including only parents with CJD or carrying the E200K mutation (n = 26, the difference between offspring and parents increased to 14.8 years. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that early age at death occurs in offspring of families carrying the E200K PRNP mutation and that this event is not linked to observational biases. Although molecular or environmental bases for this occurrence remain unsettled, this information is important for improving the accuracy of information to give to mutated carriers.

  5. "Preclinical" MSA in definite Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

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    Rodriguez-Diehl, Roberta; Rey, Maria Jesus; Gironell, Alexandre; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Ferrer, Isidre; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Jagüe, Jordi; Nos, Carlos; Gelpi, Ellen

    2012-04-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic alpha-synucleinopathy clinically characterized by variable degrees of parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and autonomic dysfunction. The histopathological hallmark of MSA is glial cytoplasmic inclusion (GCI). It is considered to represent the earliest stage of the degenerative process in MSA and to precede neuronal degeneration. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a fatal, rapidly progressive dementia generally associated with ataxia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal symptoms and myoclonus. Definite diagnosis needs neuropathological demonstration of variable degrees of spongiform degeneration of neuropil, neuronal loss, astro- and microgliosis, and the presence of abnormal deposits of the misfolded prion protein PrP(res) . Both diseases, CJD and MSA are infrequent among neurodegenerative diseases. In the present report we describe clinical and neuropathological findings of a previously healthy 64-year-old woman who developed symptoms of classical CJD. At post mortem examination, the brain showed in addition to classical methionine/methionine PrP(res) type 1 (MM1) sCJD changes and moderate Alzheimer-type pathology, features of "preclinical" MSA with minimal histopathological changes. These were characterized by discrete amounts of alpha-synuclein immunoreacive glial cytoplasmic inclusions in the striato-nigral system, isolated intraneuronal inclusions in pigmented neurons of the substantia nigra, as well as some vermiform intranuclear inclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the coexistence of definite sCJD and "minimal changes" MSA in the same patient.

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers in Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

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    Andrea Galassi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD is the commonest form of human prion diseases, accounting for about 85% of all cases. Current criteria for intra vitam diagnosis include a distinct phenotype, periodic sharp and slow-wave complexes at electroencephalography (EEG, and a positive 14-3-3-protein assay in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. In sCJD, the disease phenotype may vary, depending upon the genotype at codon 129 of the prion protein gene (PRNP, a site of a common methionine/valine polymorphism, and two distinct conformers of the pathological prion protein. Based on the combination of these molecular determinants, six different sCJD subtypes are recognized, each with distinctive clinical and pathologic phenotypes. We analyzed CSF samples from 127 subjects with definite sCJD to assess the diagnostic value of 14-3-3 protein, total tau protein, phosphorylated181 tau, and amyloid beta (Aβ peptide 1-42, either alone or in combination. While the 14-3-3 assay and tau protein levels were the most sensitive indicators of sCJD, the highest sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value were obtained when all the above markers were combined. The latter approach also allowed a reliable differential diagnosis with other neurodegenerative dementias.

  7. Asymmetric neuroimaging in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a ruse.

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    Bavis, James; Reynolds, Patrick; Tegeler, Charles; Clark, Paige

    2003-10-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) causes diffuse neurological symptoms, but asymmetric lesions have been found on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Less often, position emission tomography (PET) scanning can also reveal asymmetric lesions in patients with CJD. Such imaging may mislead clinicians. The authors present a case of a woman with CJD who was diagnosed as having suffered a stroke because she had asymmetric T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) MRI abnormalities that were interpreted as a stroke. It was noted that the patient had clinical features consistent with CJD, including rapidly progressive dementia, myoclonus, cerebellar dysfunction, and pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs. This diagnosis was supported by periodic epileptiform discharges on the electroencephalogram (EEG) and by elevated 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid. MRI T2WI and DWI showed dramatically asymmetric abnormalities involving the left cortex. A PET study found decreased metabolism in the left cerebral and right cerebellar hemispheres. The patient's clinical, EEG, and laboratory data were all consistent with CJD, not other diseases, but the MRI and PET had atypical, asymmetric findings. This case demonstrates that CJD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with rapidly progressive neurological decline, even if they have asymmetric imaging findings.

  8. Follow-up of a pedigree of familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease%遗传性CJD一家系随访分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘峥; 叶静; 李存江; 贾建平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To detect the PRNP gene mutations in a pedigree of familial Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease and evaluate the mutation rate of PRNP gene and the phenotype of the affected members. Methods The study group consisted of 28 members of a familial dementia pedigree and 310 healthy subjects. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes of all subjects followed by in vitro amplification using polymerase chain reaction ( PCR ). The PCR products were directly sequenced by Sanger method. Result We detected missense mutations of PRNP gene in 15 family members, in which 3 were patients and 12 were healthy carriers, resulting in G114V mutation in the prion protein. A new patient demonstrated progressive dementia, myoclonus and Parkinsonism, whose cerebral MRI showed mild atrophy of left temporal lobe. EEG of the new patient indicated periodic sharp wave complexes ( PSWCs ). Conclusion Patients in this pedigree demonstrate the phenotype of CJD. The pedigree is autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance.%目的 随访一个遗传性朊蛋白病的家系,对全部家系成员进行朊蛋白基因(PRNP)突变的筛查,探讨患病者的表型和突变发生率.方法 研究对象包括28例家系成员和310例健康对照.对研究对象的PRNP基因的开放阅读框架进行PCR扩增,产物直接测序,异常者重复测序,并与对照组对比.收集新发病例的影像和神经电生理资料.结果 共发现15例G114V基因突变者,其中3例发病,12例为携带者.1例新发病的患者表现为进行性痴呆、肌阵挛、帕金森综合征,头颅MRI示左侧颞叶轻度萎缩,脑电图有典型的周期性放电.结论 本家系为常染色体显性遗传的家族性CJD,新发病例的出现进一步明确了这一表型诊断,部分携带者不发病提示存在不完全外显.

  9. A patient with a 'typical presentation' of Wernicke encephalopathy was found to have sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, K; van Bruchem-Visser, R L

    2017-06-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) has a significant degree of clinical heterogeneity that is especially found in the features at onset. Here we present a patient with the sporadic form of CJD mimicking Wernicke encephalopathy. We first treated him with a high dose of thiamine; however, the vitamin B1 levels proved to be normal, which ruled out Wernicke encephalopathy. Meanwhile, his clinical condition progressively worsened and he developed a rapidly progressive cognitive disorder, mutism and myoclonus of the muscles. At this point, the diagnosis of CJD was most likely. The patient died two months after the first symptoms. Autopsy showed prion-protein depositions in several regions. Genetic analysis was negative for familial CJD. Those findings confirmed the diagnosis of 'sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease'. CJD presents in a wide range of sequences and clinical symptoms. Therefore, recognition in the early stage can be difficult.

  10. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Analysis of Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Balushi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a rare, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease that almost always results in death in under a year from onset of symptoms. Here, we report four cases of CJD with different clinical presentations diagnosed at our institution over two-year period. Cases: The first patient is an 82-year-old woman who presented with depression, cognitive decline and word-finding difficulty over 4 weeks. The patient deteriorated neurologically to akinetic mutism and death within 6 weeks of presentation. The second patient is a 54-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis who presented with confusion, ataxia and multiple falls over 4 weeks. She was treated initially for hepatic encephalopathy, but continued to progress to mutism, startle myoclonus and obtundation. Death occurred within 4 weeks of presentation. The third patient is a 58-year-old woman who presented with an 8-week history of confusion, urinary incontinence, Parkinsonism, ataxia and myoclonus. Death occurred within 2 months from presentation. The fourth patient is a 67-year-old man who presented with a 6-week history of headache, blurred vision, ataxia and personality change and progressed to confusion, myoclonus, akinetic mutism and obtundation. Death occurred within 3 weeks from presentation. Conclusion: These 4 cases highlight the varied possible clinical presentations of CJD and demonstrate the importance of considering CJD in patients with atypical presentations of rapidly progressive cognitive decline. To diagnose CJD, brain biopsy remains the gold standard. However, the presence of CSF protein 14-3-3, typical MRI findings and suggestive EEG abnormalities all support the diagnosis.

  11. Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome with the P102L pathogenic mutation presenting as familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Robert; Fiala, Jindřich; Holada, Karel; Matějčková, Milada; Nováková, Jana; Ampapa, Radek; Koukolík, František; Matěj, Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by a mutation in the prion gene, usually manifesting as progressive ataxia with late cognitive decline. A 44-year-old woman with a positive family history developed early personality and behavior changes, followed by paresthesias and ataxia, later associated with memory problems, pyramidal signs, anosognosia and very late myoclonus, spasticity, and severe dysexecutive impairment. Magnetic resonance showed caudate, mesio-frontal, and insular hyper-intensities, electroencephalography revealed generalized triphasic periodic complexes. A pathogenic P102L mutation in the prion gene was detected. Our case differed from classical Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome by rapid progression, severe dementia, abnormal electroencephalography and magnetic resonance findings, which were highly suggestive of familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  12. CSF Neurofilament Proteins Levels are Elevated in Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, Jeroen J. J.; van Everbroeck, Bart; Abdo, W. Farid; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Verbeek, Marcel M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of neurofilament light (NFL) and heavy chain (NFHp35), total tau (t-tau), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to detect disease specific profiles in sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and Alzheimer's disease

  13. CSF neurofilament proteins levels are elevated in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, J.J.J. van; Everbroeck, B. van; Abdo, W.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of neurofilament light (NFL) and heavy chain (NFHp35), total tau (t-tau), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to detect disease specific profiles in sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and Alzheimer's disease

  14. CSF Neurofilament Proteins Levels are Elevated in Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, Jeroen J. J.; van Everbroeck, Bart; Abdo, W. Farid; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Verbeek, Marcel M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of neurofilament light (NFL) and heavy chain (NFHp35), total tau (t-tau), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to detect disease specific profiles in sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and Alzheimer's disease (A

  15. Differentiation of prions from L-type BSE versus sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicot, Simon; Bencsik, Anna; Morignat, Eric; Mestre-Francés, Nadine; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Baron, Thierry

    2012-12-01

    We compared transmission characteristics for prions from L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy and MM2-cortical sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the Syrian golden hamster and an ovine prion protein-transgenic mouse line and isolated distinct prion strains. Our findings suggest the absence of a causal relationship between these diseases, but further investigation is warranted.

  16. Detection of type 1 prion protein in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yull, H.M.; Ritchie, D.L.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Bruce, M.E.; Ironside, J.W.; Head, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular typing of the abnormal form of the prion protein (PrPSc) has come to be regarded as a powerful tool in the investigation of the prion diseases. All evidence thus far presented indicates a single PrPSc molecular type in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (termed type 2B), presumably resultin

  17. A Case of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Presenting as Conversion Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegya-Raman, Nikhil; Aziz, Rehan; Schneider, Daniel; Tobia, Anthony; Leitch, Megan; Nwobi, Onyi

    2017-01-01

    Background. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare disorder of the central nervous system. Its initial diagnosis may be obscured by its variable presentation. This case report illustrates the complexity of diagnosing this disease early in the clinical course, especially when the initial symptoms may be psychiatric. It offers a brief review of the literature and reinforces a role for consultation psychiatry services. Methods. PUBMED/MEDLINE was searched using the terms "Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease", "psychiatric symptoms", "conversion disorder", "somatic symptom disorder", "functional movement disorder", and "functional neurologic disorder". Case. The patient was a 64-year-old woman with no prior psychiatric history who was initially diagnosed with conversion disorder and unspecified anxiety disorder but soon thereafter was discovered to have Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Discussion. This case highlights the central role of psychiatric symptoms in early presentations of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Still, few other cases in the literature report functional neurological symptoms as an initial sign. The consultation psychiatrist must remain alert to changing clinical symptoms, especially with uncharacteristic disease presentations.

  18. Prions in the urine of patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Fabio; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Notari, Silvio; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Catania, Marcella; Park, Kyung-Won; Maderna, Emanuela; Suardi, Silvia; Haïk, Stéphane; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Ironside, James; Knight, Richard; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Soto, Claudio

    2014-08-07

    Prions, the infectious agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, consist mainly of the misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)). The unique mechanism of transmission and the appearance of a variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, which has been linked to consumption of prion-contaminated cattle meat, have raised concerns about public health. Evidence suggests that variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions circulate in body fluids from people in whom the disease is silently incubating. To investigate whether PrP(Sc) can be detected in the urine of patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, we used the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique to amplify minute quantities of PrP(Sc), enabling highly sensitive detection of the protein. We analyzed urine samples from several patients with various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (variant and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and genetic forms of prion disease), patients with other degenerative or nondegenerative neurologic disorders, and healthy persons. PrP(Sc) was detectable only in the urine of patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and had the typical electrophoretic profile associated with this disease. PrP(Sc) was detected in 13 of 14 urine samples obtained from patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in none of the 224 urine samples obtained from patients with other neurologic diseases and from healthy controls, resulting in an estimated sensitivity of 92.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66.1 to 99.8) and a specificity of 100.0% (95% CI, 98.4 to 100.0). The PrP(Sc) concentration in urine calculated by means of quantitative PMCA was estimated at 1×10(-16) g per milliliter, or 3×10(-21) mol per milliliter, which extrapolates to approximately 40 to 100 oligomeric particles of PrP(Sc) per milliliter of urine. Urine samples obtained from patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease contained minute quantities of PrP(Sc). (Funded by the

  19. Risk factors for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a reanalysis of case-control studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P.W.M. Wientjens (Dorothee); Z. Davanipour; K. Kondo; W.B. Matthews; R.G. Will (Robert); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractTo review the evidence for risk factors of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we pooled and reanalyzed the raw data of three case-control studies. The pooled data set comprised 178 patients and 333 control subjects. The strength of association between CJD and putative risk factors was asse

  20. Influence of timing on CSF tests value for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Sanchez-Juan (Pascual); R. Sánchez-Valle (Raquel); A. Green (Alison); A. Ladogana (Anna); N. Cuadrado-Corrales (Natividad); E. Mitrová (Eva); K. Stoeck (Katharina); T. Sklaviadis (Theodoros); J. Kulczycki (Jerzy); K. Hess; A. Krasnianski (Anna); M. Equestre; D. Slivarichová; A. Saiz (Albert Abe); M. Calero (Miguel); M. Pocchiari (Maurizio); R.S.G. Knight (Richard); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); I. Zerr (Inga)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The analysis of markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is useful in the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). However, the time at which the study of these markers is most sensitive remains controversal. Objective: To assess the influence of time of sampli

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease 38 years after diagnostic use of human growth hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Croes (Esther); G. Roks (Gerwin); G.H. Jansen; P.C. Nijssen; C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractA 47 year old man is described who developed pathology proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) 38 years after receiving a low dose of human derived growth hormone (hGH) as part of a diagnostic procedure. The patient presented with a cerebellar syndrome, which is compatible with iatrogenic

  2. Determination of neuronal antibodies in suspected and definite Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Grau-Rivera (Oriol); R. Sánchez-Valle (Raquel); A. Saiz (Albert Abe); J.L. Molinuevo (José Luis); R. Bernabé (Reyes); E. Munteis (Elvira); F. Pujadas (Francesc); A. Salvador (Antoni); J. Saura (Júlia); A. Ugarte (Antonio); M.J. Titulaer (Maarten); J. Dalmau (Josep); F. Graus (Francesc)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIMPORTANCE: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and autoimmune encephalitis with antibodies against neuronal surface antigens (NSA-abs) may present with similar clinical features. Establishing the correct diagnosis has practical implications in the management of care for these patients.

  3. A genome wide association study links glutamate receptor pathway to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Sanchez-Juan (Pascual); M.T. Bishop (Matthew); G.G. Kovacs (Gabor); M. Calero (Miguel); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); A. Ladogana (Anna); A. Boyd (Alison); V. Lewis (Victoria); C. Ponto (Claudia); Calero, O. (Olga); A. Poleggi (Anna); A. Carracedo (Angel); S. van der Lee (Sven); T. Ströbel (Thomas); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Haik; O. Combarros (Onofre); J. Berciano (José); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.J. Collins (Steven); H. Budka (Herbert); J-P. Brandel (Jean-Philippe); J.-L. Laplanche (Jean-Louis); M. Pocchiari (Maurizio); I. Zerr (Inga); R. Knight (Richard); R.G. Will (Robert); C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a

  4. A genome wide association study links glutamate receptor pathway to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Sanchez-Juan (Pascual); M.T. Bishop (Matthew); G.G. Kovacs (Gabor); M. Calero (Miguel); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); A. Ladogana (Anna); A. Boyd (Alison); V. Lewis (Victoria); C. Ponto (Claudia); Calero, O. (Olga); A. Poleggi (Anna); A. Carracedo (Angel); S. van der Lee (Sven); T. Ströbel (Thomas); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Haik; O. Combarros (Onofre); J. Berciano (José); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.J. Collins (Steven); H. Budka (Herbert); J-P. Brandel (Jean-Philippe); J.-L. Laplanche (Jean-Louis); M. Pocchiari (Maurizio); I. Zerr (Inga); R. Knight (Richard); R.G. Will (Robert); C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinat

  5. Unusual Phenotype of the Brownell-Oppenheimer Variant of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dronacharya Lamichhane

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare, transmissible, neurodegenerative disease caused by conformationally changed abnormal prion protein. Most patients present with cognitive impairment, myoclonus, ataxia, visual impairment alone or in combination. Patients who present with ataxia only at the onset are said to have Brownell-Oppenheimer variant of the disease. However, here we present a case where visual symptoms preceded the clinical presentation and hallucinations accompanied the ataxia at the onset of the disease.

  6. Preliminary risk analysis applied to the transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, E; Schlatter, J

    2011-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) is a degenerative disease of the central nervous system. As yet, there is no human screening test and no effective treatment. This disease is invariably fatal. General preventive measures are therefore essential. The objective of this study is to analyze and address on a prioritized basis the risks relating to the transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease during surgical operations by means of a preliminary risk analysis (PRA). The PRA produces 63 scenarios with maximum risk relating to operational and legal dangers. The study recommends a number of courses of action, such as training and internal controls, in order to reduce the risks identified. A procedure has been drawn up and assessed for each action. This PRA makes it possible to target and significantly reduce the potential dangers for transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease through the use of medical instruments.

  7. Unsuccessful intraventricular pentosan polysulphate treatment of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, I R; Knight, R S G; Will, R G

    2006-06-01

    Pentosan polysulphate, delivered by chronic intraventricular infusion, has been proposed as a potential therapy for human prion disease. The first treated patient is still alive several years after treatment started. Here we describe in detail a case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in which this treatment was started at a relatively early stage but had no definite clinical benefit. The patient died from disease progression 16 months after diagnosis and 5 months after pentosan polysulphate treatment was commenced.

  8. Involvement of the endosomal-lysosomal system correlates with regional pathology in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Gábor G; Gelpi, Ellen; Ströbel, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The endosomal-lysosomal system (ELS) has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine how experimental observations can be translated to human neuropathology and whether alterations of the ELS relate to neuropathologic changes....... Combined with stereologic techniques, we examined components of the ELS in human sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brains. We immunostained for the early endosomal marker Rab5 and lysosomal enzymes cathepsin D and B. We determined neuron-specific changes in their expression and correlated......-immunoreactive lysosomes. The intraneuronal distribution of cathepsin D and B diverges between Purkinje cells and frontal cortical neurons in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brains. We demonstrated focal intra- and perineuronal colocalization of cathepsin D and PrP. Our results indicate that effects in the ELS...

  9. A Case Report of Probable Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: How to Approach Early Diagnosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Bowei; Morales Mangual, Carlos; Mahmud, Iftekhar; Tongo, Nosakhare D; Mararenko, Larisa; Kay, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a rare and fatal spongiform encephalopathy characterized by rapidly progressive dementia and myoclonus. The rarity of this disease and varied initial symptoms make the early diagnosis fairly challenging. Here, we present?a case initially admitted for confusion and bizarre behaviors. She had acute deterioration of mental status, akinetic mutism, and myoclonus jerks four weeks later. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was positive for protein 14-3-3....

  10. Atypical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a rare but important cause of rapidly progressive dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefer, Marguerite S; Tangarorang, Glendo L; Kuchel, George A; Menkes, Daniel L

    2011-09-01

    We report an atypical presentation of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a 74-year-old woman that illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing this rare, but important, cause of rapidly progressive dementia. Despite well-established criteria, this diagnosis is often missed or substantially delayed (Table 1). In this case, a precipitous cognitive decline associated with a urinary tract infection initiallysuggested delirium. Although atypical CJD was considered as a cause when symptoms persisted, a definitive diagnosis was established postmortem when the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prion protein 14-3-3 tested positive. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of rapidly progressive dementia as Connecticut accounts for approximately three of the more than 200 cases diagnosed nationally.

  11. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease with Mixed Transcortical Aphasia: Insights into Echolalia

    OpenAIRE

    S. E. McPherson; J. D. Kuratani; Cummings, J L.; J. Shih; Mischel, P. S.; Vinters, H V

    1994-01-01

    Aphasia is a common manifestation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and investigation of the linguistic disorders of CJD patients may provide insights into the neurobiological mechanisms of language and aphasia. We report an autopsy-confirmed case of CJD in which the presenting symptom was change in language abilities. The patient ultimately evidenced mixed transcortical aphasia (MTA) with echolalia. Disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits with environmental dependency accounts for the s...

  12. Efficient transmission and characterization of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease strains in bank voles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romolo Nonno

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of prions between species is limited by the "species barrier," which hampers a full characterization of human prion strains in the mouse model. We report that the efficiency of primary transmission of prions from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients to a wild rodent species, the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus, is comparable to that reported in transgenic mice carrying human prion protein, in spite of a low prion protein-sequence homology between man and vole. Voles infected with sporadic and genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease isolates show strain-specific patterns of spongiform degeneration and pathological prion protein-deposition, and accumulate protease-resistant prion protein with biochemical properties similar to the human counterpart. Adaptation of genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease isolates to voles shows little or no evidence of a transmission barrier, in contrast to the striking barriers observed during transmission of mouse, hamster, and sheep prions to voles. Our results imply that in voles there is no clear relationship between the degree of homology of the prion protein of the donor and recipient species and susceptibility, consistent with the view that the prion strain gives a major contribution to the species barrier. The vole is therefore a valuable model to study human prion diversity and, being susceptible to a range of animal prions, represents a unique tool for comparing isolates from different species.

  13. Efficient transmission and characterization of creutzfeldt-jakob disease strains in bank voles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of prions between species is limited by the "species barrier," which hampers a full characterization of human prion strains in the mouse model. We report that the efficiency of primary transmission of prions from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients to a wild rodent species, the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus, is comparable to that reported in transgenic mice carrying human prion protein, in spite of a low prion protein-sequence homology between man and vole. Voles infected with sporadic and genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease isolates show strain-specific patterns of spongiform degeneration and pathological prion protein-deposition, and accumulate protease-resistant prion protein with biochemical properties similar to the human counterpart. Adaptation of genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease isolates to voles shows little or no evidence of a transmission barrier, in contrast to the striking barriers observed during transmission of mouse, hamster, and sheep prions to voles. Our results imply that in voles there is no clear relationship between the degree of homology of the prion protein of the donor and recipient species and susceptibility, consistent with the view that the prion strain gives a major contribution to the species barrier. The vole is therefore a valuable model to study human prion diversity and, being susceptible to a range of animal prions, represents a unique tool for comparing isolates from different species.

  14. Symptomatic aggravation after corticosteroid pulse therapy in definite sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with the feature of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae-Won; Park, So Young; Park, Young Ho; Kim, Jung E; Kim, SangYun

    2014-09-08

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Hashimoto's encephalopathy often show similar clinical presentation. Among Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease mimics, Hashimoto's encephalopathy is particularly important as it is treatable with corticosteroids. Thus, in cases of middle-aged woman diagnosed with probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and who exhibit high titers of antithyroid antibodies, corticosteroid pulse therapy is typically performed with expectations of near complete recovery from Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Herein, we provide the first case report that exhibited a negative effect of corticosteroid pulse therapy for a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with features of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. We report a case of 59-year-old Asian woman with blurred vision, dysarthria, myoclonus, and rapidly progressive dementia. Cerebrospinal fluid showed 14-3-3 protein positive. Electroencephalogram showed periodic sharp waves (1.5 Hz) at the bilateral frontal or occipital areas. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensities at the bilateral cerebral cortex, caudate nucleus, and putamen. The patient was diagnosed with probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, serum analysis showed a high titer of antithyroid antibodies. We started corticosteroid pulse therapy with subsequent aggravation of seizure activity including generalized myoclonus, epilepsia parialis continua, and ballistic dyskinesia, which was effectively treated with clonazepam. We provide evidence of a case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease that exhibited clinical deterioration after corticosteroid therapy. Although histopathological confirmation with brain biopsy is not easily available in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients, selective initiation of corticosteroid pulse therapy should be considered in cases of uncertain diagnosis for differentiation with Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  15. A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: diagnostic dilemmas of a rapidly fatal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza M. Baig

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal disorder of the central nervous system. It occurs worldwide with an incidence of 0.5-1 new case per million population per year. No specific treatment is available and management is limited to supportive care. Autopsy or biopsy provides a definitive diagnosis. Because of the transmissible nature of the disease and hesitancy of patients/family members to give consent for biopsy, numerous challenges in confirming the clinical diagnosis are faced by healthcare professionals. We report a case of 66-year-old male who was hospitalized due to hip fracture following a fall. Acute mental status changes followed the surgical fixation of hip fracture which triggered neurologic work up. This finally revealed suspicion and confirmation of CJD. Patient had progressive cognitive decline with akinetic mutism during further hospital stay and was later discharged home with hospice. Shorter thereafter he died at home. This case demonstrates the importance of keeping an open mind towards possibility of CJD when faced with esoteric neurologic presentations. Also this case provides insight into challenges in quarantine and sterilization of surgical instruments when these patients go through major surgeries.

  16. Codon 219 polymorphism of PRNP in healthy caucasians and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petraroli, R.; Pocchiari, M. [Instituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    1996-04-01

    A number of point and insert mutations of the PrP gene (PRNP) have been linked to familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS). Moreover, the methionine/valine homozygosity at the polymorphic codon 129 of PRNP may cause a predisposition to sporadic and iatrogenic CJD or may control the age at onset of familial cases carrying either the 144-bp insertion or codon 178, codon 198, and codon 210 pathogenic mutations in PRNP. In addition, the association of methionine or valine at codon 129 and the point mutation at codon 178 on the same allele seem to play an important role in determining either fatal familial insomnia or CJD. However, it is noteworthy that a relationship between codon 129 polymorphism and accelerated pathogenesis (early age at onset or shorter duration of the disease) has not been seen in familial CJD patients with codon 200 mutation or in GSS patients with codon 102 mutation, arguing that other, as yet unidentified, gene products or environmental factors, or both, may influence the clinical expression of these diseases. 17 refs.

  17. Analyses of the similarity and difference of global gene expression profiles in cortex regions of three neurodegenerative diseases: sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chan; Liu, Di; Xiang, Wei; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Sun, Qing-Lan; Gao, Chen; Xu, Yin; Wang, Hui; Fan, Xue-Yu; Meng, Ge; Li, Wei; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Neurodegenerative disease is a general designation for the disorders that are progressive loss of structure or function and final death of neurons, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, prion diseases, etc. In this study, we comparatively analyzed 21 individual microarray data sets of the cortex tissues from 11 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), 3 fatal familial insomnia (FFI), 3 Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 4 normal controls. After normalization, a collection of 730 differently expressed sets (DESets) were obtained by comparison of the data of three diseases with their original controls. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed a background-related distribution within the groups of FFI, AD, and normal control, but two apparently different subgroups within the group of sCJD were observed. Review of the clinical materials of 11 sCJD patients identified the difference in brain PrP(Sc) deposits between two subgroups. Hierarchical cluster analysis illustrated the relatively independent clusters of normal controls, FFIs, six sCJD cases (subgroup 1) with more PrP(Sc) deposits, respectively, while an overlapped cluster of five cases of sCJD2 (subgroup 2) with less PrP(Sc) deposits and AD patients. Despite of the presence of special gene expressions, many common features were found among those neurodegenerative diseases. The most commonly changed biological processes (BPs) were signal transduction, synaptic transmission, and neuropeptide signaling pathway. The most commonly changed pathways were MAPK signaling pathway, Parkinson's disease, and oxidative phosphorylation. Our data here provide the similarity and difference in global gene expressions among the patients with sCJD, FFI, and AD, which may help to understand the common mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. The diagnostic efficiency of biomarkers in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease compared to Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, J.M.; Heegaard, N.H.; Falkenhorst, G.

    2009-01-01

    ) together with the prion protein gene genotype to discriminate patients with sCJD (n=21) from neurological controls (n=164) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients (n=49). Low p-tau/t-tau ratio was the best single marker for sCJD with 90% specificity against neurological controls at 86% sensitivity whilst NSE......Laboratory markers have a prominent place among the diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Here we investigate the capability of protein 14-3-3, total-tau (t-tau), threonin-181-phosphorylated tau (p-tau), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF...

  19. Subtype and regional-specific neuroinflammation in sporadic creutzfeldt-jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Franc; López-González, Irene; Thüne, Katrin; Carmona, Margarita; Zafar, Saima; Andréoletti, Olivier; Zerr, Inga; Ferrer, Isidre

    2014-01-01

    The present study identifies deregulated cytokines and mediators of the immune response in the frontal cortex and cerebellum of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) MM1 and VV2 subtypes compared to age-matched controls. Deregulated genes include pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors, colony stimulating factors, cathepsins, members of the complement system, and members of the integrin and CTL/CTLD family with particular regional and sCJD subtype patterns. Analysis of cytokines and mediators at protein level shows expression of selected molecules and receptors in neurons, in astrocytes, and/or in microglia, thus suggesting interactions between neurons and glial cells, mainly microglia, in the neuroinflammatory response in sCJD. Similar inflammatory responses have been shown in the tg340 sCJD MM1 mice, revealing a progressive deregulation of inflammatory mediators with disease progression. Yet, inflammatory molecules involved are subjected to species differences in humans and mice. Moreover, inflammatory-related cell signaling pathways NFκB/IKK and JAK/STAT are activated in sCJD and sCJD MM1 mice. Together, the present observations show a self-sustained complex inflammatory and inflammatory-related responses occurring already at early clinical stages in animal model and dramatically progressing at advanced stages of sCJD. Considering this scenario, measures tailored to modulate (activate or inhibit) specific molecules could be therapeutic options in CJD.

  20. [Delayed diagnosis in a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a psychiatric hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, S; Mestdagh, I; de Grave, C; Pals, P

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old female teacher of dance was referred to the diagnostic unit of our psychiatric hospital with symptoms of anxiety and depression. The clinical image was suggestive of organic pathology, but this could not be determined with certainty until a late stage. We discuss the course of the patient's illness. Her symptoms appeared to be psychiatric and closely resembled those of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We comment on some of the signs that could have led to an earlier diagnosis and we discuss the tools that are needed.

  1. Development of Dose-Response Models of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Infection in Nonhuman Primates for Assessing the Risk of Transfusion-Transmitted Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Luisa; Anderson, Steven A.; Asher, David M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Estimates for the risk of transmitting variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) via blood transfusion have relied largely on data from rodent experiments, but the relationship between dose (amount of infected blood) and response (vCJD infection) has never been well quantified. The goal of this study was to develop a dose-response model based on nonhuman primate data to better estimate the likelihood of transfusion-transmitted vCJD (TTvCJD) in humans. Our model used dose-response data from nonhuman primates inoculated intracerebrally (i.c.) with brain tissues of patients with sporadic and familial CJD. We analyzed the data statistically by using a beta-Poisson dose-response model. We further adjusted model parameters to account for the differences in infectivity between blood and brain tissue and in transmission efficiency between intravenous (i.v.) and i.c. routes to estimate dose-dependent TTvCJD infection. The model estimates a mean infection rate of 76% among recipients who receive one unit of whole blood collected from an infected donor near the end of the incubation period. The nonhuman primate model provides estimates that are more consistent with those derived from a risk analysis of transfused nonleukoreduced red blood cells in the United Kingdom than prior estimates based on rodent models. IMPORTANCE TTvCJD was recently identified as one of three emerging infectious diseases posing the greatest immediate threat to the safety of the blood supply. Cases of TTvCJD were reported in recipients of nonleukoreduced red blood cells and coagulation factor VIII manufactured from blood of United Kingdom donors. As the quantity of abnormal prions (the causative agent of TTvCJD) varies significantly in different blood components and products, it is necessary to quantify the dose-response relationship for a wide range of doses for the vCJD agent in transfused blood and plasma derivatives. In this paper, we suggest the first mechanistic dose-response model for

  2. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease With Unilateral Symptoms in the Setting of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Kyle C; Stahl, Christine M; Zhang, Pengfei; Liang, John W; Marcuse, Lara V; Lublin, Fred

    2017-07-01

    Although it is not rare for magnetic resonance imaging findings in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to be asymmetric, unilateral clinical syndromes are uncommonly reported and may confound diagnosis. In addition, neurological paraneoplastic syndromes are not common in renal cell carcinoma, though there are cases reported, often without an offending antibody isolated. A 66-year-old man was admitted with 1 month of left-sided numbness and "loss of control" of the left arm. Examination revealed action-induced irregular jerking movements of the left arm. Mental status testing was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging brain revealed patchy areas of restricted diffusion along the cerebral cortices. Screening computed tomographic scans revealed innumerable lung nodules compatible with metastases, as well as a renal mass consistent with renal cell carcinoma. Lumbar puncture was performed and cerebrospinal fluid was sent for paraneoplastic autoantibody evaluation and protein 14-3-3. Over the next week the patient developed dystonic posturing of the left arm, left leg jerking movements, a right arm action tremor, and cognitive impairment. Paraneoplastic autoantibodies were negative. Protein 14-3-3 was elevated and brain biopsy revealed spongiform encephalopathy with positive immunoblotting. The patient died about 2 months from symptom onset. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can present with entirely unilateral myoclonus and numbness, without specific complaints of cognitive impairment. Not every difficult or unclear neurological syndrome in a patient with metastatic cancer is a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  3. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Japan: an epidemiological study done in a select prefecture between 1976 and 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, J; Ishihara, O; Higuchi, S

    1989-01-01

    An epidemiological study was performed with respect to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a designated area in Japan. The subjects were observed in a small rural prefecture where the population generally remains within a limited radius throughout their lives. The patients' life-styles in each area were investigated in detail. Nine cases appeared in 11 years; 6 were definitive and 3 probable. They were all of the subacute type; there were no noteworthy sexual differences, age of onset, course and/or past histories. Three of the nine cases came from two families; the relationship between familial and isolated cases was examined. Revealed facts and time-space clustering were investigated statistically, but no indication of natural transmission was observable.

  4. Polymorphisms in the prion protein gene and in the doppel gene increase susceptibility for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Croes (Esther); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); A.M. Bertoli Avella (Aida); T.A.M. Rademaker (Tessa); J. Vergeer-Drop (Jeannette); B. Dermaut (Bart); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); D.P.W.M. Wientjens (Dorothee); A. Hofman (Albert); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prion protein gene (PRNP) plays a central role in the origin of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), but there is growing interest in other polymorphisms that may be involved in CJD. Polymorphisms upstream of PRNP that may modulate the prion protein production as well as polymorphisms in

  5. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in France and the United Kingdom: Evidence for the Same Agent Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandel, J.P.; Heath, C.A.; Head, M.W.; Levavasseur, E.; Knight, R.; Laplanche, J.L.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Ironside, J.W.; Hauw, J.J.; Mackenzie, J.; Alperovitch, A.; Will, R.G.; Haik, S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the United Kingdom in 1996. Since then, the majority of cases have been observed in the United Kingdom where there was a major epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. France was the second country affected. To address th

  6. Nosocomial transmission of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: results from a risk-based assessment of surgical interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Rábano, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Evidence of surgical transmission of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) remains debatable in part due to misclassification of exposure levels. In a registry-based case-control study, the authors applied a risk-based classification of surgical interventions to determine the association betw...

  7. The diagnostic efficiency of biomarkers in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease compared to Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Justyna Maria Czarna; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg; Falkenhorst, Gerhard;

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory markers have a prominent place among the diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Here we investigate the capability of protein 14-3-3, total-tau (t-tau), threonin-181-phosphorylated tau (p-tau), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF......) together with the prion protein gene genotype to discriminate patients with sCJD (n=21) from neurological controls (n=164) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients (n=49). Low p-tau/t-tau ratio was the best single marker for sCJD with 90% specificity against neurological controls at 86% sensitivity whilst NSE...... with the presence of 14-3-3 protein in CSF gave the best test specificity of 96% at 84% sensitivity. We conclude that the combination of more than one CSF marker for neurodegeneration can improve the diagnostic test accuracy for sCJD against neurological controls including patients with other dementias....

  8. A case cluster of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease linked to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthart, Michael B; Geschwind, Michael D; Qureshi, Shireen; Phielipp, Nicolas; Demarsh, Alex; Abrams, Joseph Y; Belay, Ermias; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Jansen, Gerard H; Lang, Anthony E; Schonberger, Lawrence B

    2016-10-01

    As of mid-2016, 231 cases of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease-the human form of a prion disease of cattle, bovine spongiform encephalopathy-have been reported from 12 countries. With few exceptions, the affected individuals had histories of extended residence in the UK or other Western European countries during the period (1980-96) of maximum global risk for human exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. However, the possibility remains that other geographic foci of human infection exist, identification of which may help to foreshadow the future of the epidemic. We report results of a quantitative analysis of country-specific relative risks of infection for three individuals diagnosed with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the USA and Canada. All were born and raised in Saudi Arabia, but had histories of residence and travel in other countries. To calculate country-specific relative probabilities of infection, we aligned each patient's life history with published estimates of probability distributions of incubation period and age at infection parameters from a UK cohort of 171 variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease cases. The distributions were then partitioned into probability density fractions according to time intervals of the patient's residence and travel history, and the density fractions were combined by country. This calculation was performed for incubation period alone, age at infection alone, and jointly for incubation and age at infection. Country-specific fractions were normalized either to the total density between the individual's dates of birth and symptom onset ('lifetime'), or to that between 1980 and 1996, for a total of six combinations of parameter and interval. The country-specific relative probability of infection for Saudi Arabia clearly ranked highest under each of the six combinations of parameter × interval for Patients 1 and 2, with values ranging from 0.572 to 0.998, respectively, for Patient 2 (age at infection × lifetime) and

  9. Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: An autopsy study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kher Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are rare, progressive and fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by long incubation period and short clinical course. We present a rare case of Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, occurring in a 55-year-old lady presenting with dementia, cortical blindness, and myoclonic jerks. She succumbed to the disease within 8 weeks of onset of symptoms. MRI revealed hyperintense signals on T2WI and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images in basal ganglia and fronto-temporal and parietal cortex, sparing thalamus, striate cortex and globus pallidum. Abundant abnormal prion protein deposits (PrP sc were detected in caudate, putamen, thalamus, cingulate and striate cortex, in comparison to frontal and parietal cortex while no deposits were found in globus pallidum. MRI changes did not correlate with degree of spongy change, gliosis or prion protein deposition. The cause for abnormal signal changes in MRI and FLAIR images remains unclear.

  10. MRI of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Imaging features and recommended MRI protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.A.; Sellar, R.J.; Zeidler, M.; Colchester, A.C.F.; Knight, R.; Will, R.G

    2001-09-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a rare, progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific histopathological features. Of the four subtypes of CJD described, the commonest is sporadic CJD (sCJD). More recently, a new clinically distinct form of the disease affecting younger patients, known as variant CJD (vCJD), has been identified, and this has been causally linked to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in cattle. Characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been identified in several forms of CJD; sCJD may be associated with high signal changes in the putamen and caudate head and vCJD is usually associated with hyperintensity of the pulvinar (posterior nuclei) of the thalamus. These appearances and other imaging features are described in this article. Using appropriate clinical and radiological criteria and tailored imaging protocols, MRI plays an important part in the in vivodiagnosis of this disease. Collie, D.A. et al. (2001)

  11. Updated clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenberg, K.; Summers, D. M.; Romero, C.; Taratuto, A.; Heinemann, U.; Breithaupt, M.; Varges, D.; Meissner, B.; Ladogana, A.; Schuur, M.; Haik, S.; Collins, S. J.; Jansen, Gerard H.; Stokin, G. B.; Pimentel, J.; Hewer, E.; Collie, D.; Smith, P.; Roberts, H.; Brandel, J. P.; van Duijn, C.; Pocchiari, M.; Begue, C.; Cras, P.; Will, R. G.; Sanchez-Juan, P.

    2009-01-01

    Several molecular subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease have been identified and electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have been reported to support clinical diagnosis but with variable utility according to subtype. In recent years, a series of publications have demonstrated a potentially important role for magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-mortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Magnetic resonance imaging signal alterations correlate with distinct sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease molecular subtypes and thus might contribute to the earlier identification of the whole spectrum of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease cases. This multi-centre international study aimed to provide a rationale for the amendment of the clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging were recruited from 12 countries. Patients referred as ‘suspected sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease’ but with an alternative diagnosis after thorough follow up, were analysed as controls. All magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed for signal changes according to a standard protocol encompassing seven cortical regions, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were evaluated in 436 sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease patients and 141 controls. The pattern of high signal intensity with the best sensitivity and specificity in the differential diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease was identified. The optimum diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnosis of rapid progressive dementia was obtained when either at least two cortical regions (temporal, parietal or occipital) or both caudate nucleus and putamen displayed a high signal in fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging magnetic resonance imaging. Based on our analyses, magnetic

  12. Unique inflammatory RNA profiles of microglia in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christopher A.; Manuelidis, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) have shown that myeloid cells in the periphery as well as derivative microglial cells in the brain are infectious. Microglia can show an activated phenotype before prion protein (PrP) pathology is detectable in brain, and isolated infectious microglia contain very little PrP. To find whether a set of inflammatory genes are significantly induced or suppressed with infection, we analyzed RNA from isolated microglia with relevant cDNA arrays, and identified 30 transcripts not previously examined in any transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. This CJD expression profile contrasted with that of uninfected microglia exposed to prototypic inflammatory stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide and IFN-, as well as PrP amyloid. These findings underscore inflammatory pathways evoked by the infectious agent in brain. Transcript profiles unique for CJD microglia and other myeloid cells provide opportunities for more sensitive preclinical diagnoses of infectious and noninfectious neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: A great masquerade in neurology, a rare case report from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaprakash Varadan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a rare, fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by an infectious protein called prion and is characterized by spongiform changes, neuronal loss, reactive astrocytic proliferation, and accumulation of pathologic cellular protein. Clinical presentation of CJD is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia, neurologic symptoms and visual impairment, and the development of akinetic mutism, which can mimic many neurological conditions. The diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, electroencephalogram, and typical cerebrospinal fluid and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings. Literature on the incidence and prevalence of CJD is lacking in South India. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with progressive dementia and typical neurologic symptoms, myoclonic jerks, and MRI findings of CJD. This case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion to diagnose CJD.

  14. A Case Report of Probable Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: How to Approach Early Diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bowei; Morales Mangual, Carlos; Mahmud, Iftekhar; Tongo, Nosakhare D; Mararenko, Larisa; Kay, Arthur

    2017-05-30

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a rare and fatal spongiform encephalopathy characterized by rapidly progressive dementia and myoclonus. The rarity of this disease and varied initial symptoms make the early diagnosis fairly challenging. Here, we present a case initially admitted for confusion and bizarre behaviors. She had acute deterioration of mental status, akinetic mutism, and myoclonus jerks four weeks later. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was positive for protein 14-3-3. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintensities in the bilateral cortex, basal ganglia, and thalami in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Electroencephalogram (EEG) showed bihemispheric periodic lateralizing epileptiform discharges. The probable diagnosis of sCJD was reached based on the clinical features, characteristic findings in her MRI, the EEG, and a positive 14-3-3 CSF assay. The literature was also reviewed for early diagnosis of sCJD.

  15. The First Report of a Patient with Probable Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Özbabalık Adapınar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD was first reported in the UK in 1996. Here, we report the first Turkish case of vCJD. A 47-year-old man, who has never lived outside of Turkey and had had no transfusion, was admitted to the University Hospital with speech disorder, cognitive decline and ataxia following depression, irritability, and personality change. The immunoassay of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid was negative. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed high-signal lesions involving the bilateral caudate and lentiform nucleus on T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging. The patient developed akinetic mutism 10 months after disease onset. The clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings were compatible with the vCJD cases reported since 1996 and met the World Health Organization’s case definition for probable vCJD.

  16. Iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease following human growth hormone therapy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caboclo Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 41-year-old man with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD acquired after the use of growth hormone (GH obtained from a number of pituitary glands sourced from autopsy material. The incubation period of the disease (from the midpoint of treatment to the onset of clinical symptoms was rather long (28 years. Besides the remarkable cerebellar and mental signs, the patient exhibited sleep disturbance (excessive somnolence from the onset of the symptoms, with striking alteration of the sleep architecture documented by polysomnography. 14-3-3 protein was detected in the CSF, and MRI revealed increased signal intensity bilaterally in the striatum, being most evident in diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI sequences. This is the second case of iatrogenic CJD associated with the use of GH reported in Brazil.

  17. Prion-Seeding Activity Is widely Distributed in Tissues of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanae Takatsuki, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by abnormally folded prion proteins in the central nervous system. These proteins can be detected using the quaking-induced conversion assay. Compared with other bioassays, this assay is extremely sensitive and was used in the present study to determine prion distribution in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients at autopsy. Although infectivity of the sporadic form is thought to be restricted within the central nervous system, results showed that prion-seeding activities reach 106/g from a 50% seeding dose in non-neuronal tissues, suggesting that prion-seeding activity exists in non-neural organs, and we suggested that non-neural tissues of 106/g SD50 did not exist the infectivity.

  18. Atypical Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Evolution after Electroconvulsive Therapy for Catatonic Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iria Grande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case report of an 80-year-old woman who presented with symptomatology compatible with an episode of major depression with catatonia. After psychiatric admission, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT was applied, but symptoms progressed with cognitive impairment, bradykinesia, widespread stiffness, postural tremor, and gait disturbance. After compatible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, diffusion changes, and electroencephalogram (EEG findings the case was reoriented to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. The genetic study found a methionine/valine heterozygosity at codon 129 of the prion protein gene PrPSc. On followup, a significant clinical recovery turned out. For this reason, EEG and MRI were repeated and confirmed the findings. The patient subsequently demonstrated progressive clinical deterioration and died 21 months later. The diagnosis was verified postmortem by neuropathology. The vCJD subtype MV2 is indeed characterized by early and prominent psychiatric symptoms and a prolonged disease duration however no frank clinical recovery has before been reported.

  19. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease with Mixed Transcortical Aphasia: Insights into Echolalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. McPherson

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Aphasia is a common manifestation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, and investigation of the linguistic disorders of CJD patients may provide insights into the neurobiological mechanisms of language and aphasia. We report an autopsy-confirmed case of CJD in which the presenting symptom was change in language abilities. The patient ultimately evidenced mixed transcortical aphasia (MTA with echolalia. Disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits with environmental dependency accounts for the symptoms in MTA, including intact repetition and echolalia. Observation in this patient and a review of the literature suggest that frontal-subcortical circuit dysfunction may contribute to the syndrome of echolalia. This hypothesis offers an alternative explanation to “isolation” of the speech area as the cause of MTA.

  20. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Ireland: epidemiological aspects 1980-2002.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horan, Gail

    2012-02-03

    Surveillance for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) has been carried out in the Republic of Ireland since 1980. Initial surveillance was passive and based on consented autopsy confirmation of CJD in patients in whom there was a high index of clinical suspicion. Since 1999, an active surveillance programme involving formal notification of all suspect CJD cases has been in place. The annual mortality rate has increased from 0.34 cases\\/million in 1980 to 1.27 cases\\/million in 2001. In all, 29 cases have been pathologically confirmed: 1 had variant CJD (vCJD), 1 had iatrogenic human growth hormone-induced CJD and 1 had fatal insomnia. Sporadic CJD (sCJD) accounted for the remainder. This paper details the change in incidence over 22 years as the surveillance programme in Ireland got under way; the increased incidence is attributed to better case ascertainment, as has occurred in other countries where active surveillance programmes have been established.

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with mixed transcortical aphasia: insights into echolalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, S E; Kuratani, J D; Cummings, J L; Shih, J; Mischel, P S; Vinters, H V

    1994-01-01

    Aphasia is a common manifestation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and investigation of the linguistic disorders of CJD patients may provide insights into the neurobiological mechanisms of language and aphasia. We report an autopsy-confirmed case of CJD in which the presenting symptom was change in language abilities. The patient ultimately evidenced mixed transcortical aphasia (MTA) with echolalia. Disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits with environmental dependency accounts for the symptoms in MTA, including intact repetition and echolalia. Observation in this patient and a review of the literature suggest that frontal-subcortical circuit dysfunction may contribute to the syndrome of echolalia. This hypothesis offers an alternative explanation to "isolation" of the speech area as the cause of MTA.

  2. The Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and concomitant tau pathology: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehler, Edvard; Pipka, Michael; Meleková, Alena; Mandysová, Petra; Johanidesová, Silvie; Matěj, Radoslav; Rusina, Robert

    2017-02-10

    The Heidenhain form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare CJD variant with predominantly visual symptoms in the early stages. Clinical manifestations of metamorphopsia, hemianopia and Balint's syndrome correlate with the involvement of the posterior cortical regions. A 71-year old healthy and very active man was admitted because of impaired visual acuity, hemianopia, and gait disturbance progressing over one week. MRI found typical cortical hyperintensities in the occipital regions while rhythm slowing and sharp waves were seen in the occipital regions on EEG. Protein 14-3-3 was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid. Postmortem neuropathology revealed typical histopathological changes consistent with CJD. Moreover, we found deposits of phosphorylated tau protein in the limbic regions that met the criteria for primary age-related tauopathy (PART); representing an additional and interesting finding in our case.

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic abnormalities in sporadic and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, H.G.; Coley, S.C.; Wilkinson, I.D.; Griffiths, P.D

    2003-02-01

    AIM: To study the proton MR spectroscopic findings in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) (sporadic and variant). MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging and proton MR spectra were acquired in two patients with sporadic CJD (biopsy proven) and one patient with variant CJD. RESULTS: The two patients with sporadic CJD demonstrated MR signal change within the basal ganglia and thalami and reduced N-acetylaspartate (NAA):creatine ratios. The patient with variant CJD showed characteristic signal change within the pulvinar of the thalami and a markedly reduced N-acetylaspartate:creatine ratio. CONCLUSION: All three patients with CJD demonstrated evidence of reduced N-acetylaspartate: creatine ratios on MR spectroscopy. These changes imply that neuronal loss and/or dysfunction is a consistent finding in established CJD. Pandya H. G., et al (2003) Clinical Radiology58, 148--153.

  4. A genome wide association study links glutamate receptor pathway to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Bishop, Matthew T; Kovacs, Gabor G; Calero, Miguel; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Ladogana, Anna; Boyd, Alison; Lewis, Victoria; Ponto, Claudia; Calero, Olga; Poleggi, Anna; Carracedo, Ángel; van der Lee, Sven J; Ströbel, Thomas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Haïk, Stéphane; Combarros, Onofre; Berciano, José; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Collins, Steven J; Budka, Herbert; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Laplanche, Jean Louis; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Zerr, Inga; Knight, Richard S G; Will, Robert G; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2014-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinational consortium. From the initial GWA analysis we selected 23 SNPs for further genotyping in 1109 sCJD cases from seven different countries. Five SNPs were significantly associated with sCJD after correction for multiple testing. Subsequently these five SNPs were genotyped in 2264 controls. The pooled analysis, including 1543 sCJD cases and 4203 controls, yielded two genome wide significant results: rs6107516 (p-value=7.62x10-9) a variant tagging the prion protein gene (PRNP); and rs6951643 (p-value=1.66x10-8) tagging the Glutamate Receptor Metabotropic 8 gene (GRM8). Next we analysed the data stratifying by country of origin combining samples from the pooled analysis with genotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and imputed genotypes from the Rotterdam Study (Total n=12967). The meta-analysis of the results showed that rs6107516 (p-value=3.00x10-8) and rs6951643 (p-value=3.91x10-5) remained as the two most significantly associated SNPs. Rs6951643 is located in an intronic region of GRM8, a gene that was additionally tagged by a cluster of 12 SNPs within our top100 ranked results. GRM8 encodes for mGluR8, a protein which belongs to the metabotropic glutamate receptor family, recently shown to be involved in the transduction of cellular signals triggered by the prion protein. Pathway enrichment analyses performed with both Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and ALIGATOR postulates glutamate receptor signalling as one of the main pathways associated with sCJD. In summary, we have detected GRM8 as a novel, non-PRNP, genome-wide significant marker associated with heightened disease risk, providing additional evidence supporting a role of glutamate receptors in sCJD pathogenesis.

  5. A genome wide association study links glutamate receptor pathway to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease risk.

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    Pascual Sanchez-Juan

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-wide association (GWA study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinational consortium. From the initial GWA analysis we selected 23 SNPs for further genotyping in 1109 sCJD cases from seven different countries. Five SNPs were significantly associated with sCJD after correction for multiple testing. Subsequently these five SNPs were genotyped in 2264 controls. The pooled analysis, including 1543 sCJD cases and 4203 controls, yielded two genome wide significant results: rs6107516 (p-value=7.62x10-9 a variant tagging the prion protein gene (PRNP; and rs6951643 (p-value=1.66x10-8 tagging the Glutamate Receptor Metabotropic 8 gene (GRM8. Next we analysed the data stratifying by country of origin combining samples from the pooled analysis with genotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and imputed genotypes from the Rotterdam Study (Total n=12967. The meta-analysis of the results showed that rs6107516 (p-value=3.00x10-8 and rs6951643 (p-value=3.91x10-5 remained as the two most significantly associated SNPs. Rs6951643 is located in an intronic region of GRM8, a gene that was additionally tagged by a cluster of 12 SNPs within our top100 ranked results. GRM8 encodes for mGluR8, a protein which belongs to the metabotropic glutamate receptor family, recently shown to be involved in the transduction of cellular signals triggered by the prion protein. Pathway enrichment analyses performed with both Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and ALIGATOR postulates glutamate receptor signalling as one of the main pathways associated with sCJD. In summary, we have detected GRM8 as a novel, non-PRNP, genome-wide significant marker associated with heightened disease risk, providing additional evidence supporting a role of glutamate receptors in sCJD pathogenesis.

  6. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease masked by head trauma and features of Wilson's disease.

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    Scontrini, Alessandra; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Fiorelli, Marco; Tiple, Dorina; Colaizzo, Elisa; Ladogana, Anna; Parchi, Piero; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder typically characterized by progressive dementia associated with myoclonus, cerebellar and other focal neurological signs. Electroencephalogram, brain MRI and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses are helpful diagnostic tools, but diagnosis in patients with atypical presenting neurological signs is often difficult to make. A 55-year-old woman developed disorientation, drowsiness and focal motor signs after a traumatic brain injury due to an accidental fall. In two weeks, her symptoms worsened in spite of a brain MRI showed an improvement of traumatic lesions, but the presence of bilateral hyperintensity in the basal nuclei was suggestive of a metabolic or prion encephalopathy. The high 24-h urinary copper level and reduction of ceruloplasmin initially supported the diagnosis of Wilson's disease, but the absence of Kayser-Fleischer rings, and the positivity of 14-3-3 protein test and elevated tau concentrations in the CSF oriented toward a diagnosis of CJD. She died 5 months after the onset, and the postmortem examination of the brain revealed immunochemical features of CJD. This case exemplifies the difficulty of a timely diagnosis when rapid progressive dementia is masked by concomitant factors (i.e., head trauma) and neurological signs are associated with unclear laboratory findings.

  7. "Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with non sterile phlebotomy (case report "

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    Ghorbani A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (C-JD is a rare disorder characterized with rapidly progressive mental decline, myoclonic jerk and finally death. The transmissible pathogen for this disease is a proteinaceous infectious particle termed prion. The prion protein is encoded by a gene (designated as PRNP on the short arm chromosome 20.This disorder is diagnosed based on clinical findings, course of disease, EEG, MRI and confirmed with brain biopsy. Case report: A 56- year- old woman presented with confusion, disorientation, hyper somnolence, psychiatric problems such as hallucination, progressive mental deterioration and myoclonic jerks. She had history of several times phlebotomy with traditional and non sterile methods in two past years. She had no past history of other disease. Her illness was diagnosed based on clinical findings, course of her illness, typical MRI, EEG and rule out other dementing disease. She died after one month. Conclusion: in any patients with psychiatric disorders, rapidly progressive mental deterioration and myoclonic jerks C-JD should be considered as an important diagnosis. Treatable dementing disease should be considered and ruled out at first. The significance of phlebotomy in C-JD has yet to be determined.

  8. A common BACE1 polymorphism is a risk factor for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

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    Olga Calero

    Full Text Available The β site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 is the rate-limiting β-secretase enzyme in the amyloidogenic processing of APP and Aβ formation, and therefore it has a prominent role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Recent evidence suggests that the prion protein (PrP interacts directly with BACE1 regulating its β-secretase activity. Moreover, PrP has been proposed as the cellular receptor involved in the impairment of synaptic plasticity and toxicity caused by Aβ oligomers. Provided that common pathophysiologic mechanisms are shared by Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD diseases, we investigated for the first time to the best of our knowledge a possible association of a common synonymous BACE1 polymorphism (rs638405 with sporadic CJD (sCJD. Our results indicate that BACE1 C-allele is associated with an increased risk for developing sCJD, mainly in PRNP M129M homozygous subjects with early onset. These results extend the very short list of genes (other than PRNP involved in the development of human prion diseases; and support the notion that similar to AD, in sCJD several loci may contribute with modest overall effects to disease risk. These findings underscore the interplay in both pathologies of APP, Aβ oligomers, ApoE, PrP and BACE1, and suggest that aging and perhaps vascular risk factors may modulate disease pathologies in part through these key players.

  9. Neuronal phosphorylated RNA-dependent protein kinase in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Paquet, Claire

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and their relationship to accumulated prion protein (PrP) are unclear. A recent cell culture study showed that intracytoplasmic PrP may induce phosphorylated RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR(p))-mediated cell stress. The double-stranded RNA protein kinase PKR is a proapoptotic and stress kinase that accumulates in degenerating neurons in Alzheimer disease. To determine whether neuronal apoptosis in human CJD is associated with activation of the PKR(p) signaling pathway, we assessed in situ end labeling and immunocytochemistry for PrP, glial fibrillary acidic protein, CD68, activated caspase 3, and phosphorylated PKR (Thr451) in samples of frontal, occipital, and temporal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum from 6 patients with sporadic CJD and 5 controls. Neuronal immunostaining for activated PKR was found in all CJD cases. The most staining was in nuclei and, in contrast to findings in Alzheimer disease, cytoplasmic labeling was not detected. Both the number and distribution of PKR(p)-positive neurons correlated closely with the extent of neuronal apoptosis, spongiosis, astrocytosis, and microglial activation and with the phenotype and disease severity. There was no correlation with the type, topography, or amount of extracellular PrP deposits. These findings suggest that neuronal apoptosis in human CJD may result from PKR(p)-mediated cell stress and are consistent with recent studies supporting a pathogenic role for intracellular or transmembrane PrP.

  10. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Report of 10 neuropathologically-verified cases in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taratuto, A L; Piccardo, P; Leiguarda, R; Granillo, R; Monti, A; Scarlatti, A; Leits, A; Morasso, C; Marquez Vigo, C; Vila, J

    1989-01-01

    We describe 10 neuropathologically verified patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who died in Argentina between 1980 and 1987. Two of the ten cases were Chilean by birth. Another case visited Chile several times. Two cases (one Argentinian and one Chilean) regularly consumed sheep brain. Ages ranged from 42 to 63 years and the male to female ratio was 7:3. Disease duration ranged from 3.5 to 24 months. Prodromal symptoms presented as behavioral changes in 5 patients, lasting from one year to several weeks, and as neurological impairment in the other 5. Patients developed pyramidal, extrapyramidal and cerebellar disturbances, as well as movement disorders and progressive dementia. Visual alterations were found in 5 cases and periodic EEG activity in 7. Unequivocal cortical spongiform changes, together with varying degrees of neuronal depletion and astroglial hyperplasia were constant findings. No white matter involvement was apparent either from CT brain scans or on histopathological study of biopsied and autopsied material. Increasing awareness of this disease as well as possibilities of transmission is necessary in order to provide better information on its true incidence in Argentina.

  11. Cathepsin D SNP associated with increased risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

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    Sanchez-Juan Pascual

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD originally resulted from the consumption of foodstuffs contaminated by bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE material, with 163 confirmed cases in the UK to date. Many thousands are likely to have been exposed to dietary infection and so it is important (for surveillance, epidemic modelling, public health and understanding pathogenesis to identify genetic factors that may affect individual susceptibility to infection. This study looked at a polymorphism in the cathepsin D gene (refSNP ID: rs17571 previously examined in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods Blood samples taken from 110 vCJD patients were tested for the C-T base change, and genotype data were compared with published frequencies for a control population using multiple logistic regression. Results There was a significant excess of the cathepsin D polymorphism TT genotype in the vCJD cohort compared to controls. The TT genotype was found to have a 9.75 fold increase in risk of vCJD compared to the CT genotype and a 10.92 fold increase compared to the CC genotype. Conclusion This mutation event has been observed to alter the protease activity of the cathepsin D protein and has been linked to an increase in amyloid beta plaque formation in AD. vCJD neuropathology is characterised by the presence of amyloid plaques, formed from the prion protein, and therefore alterations in the amyloid processing activity of cathepsin D may affect the neuropathogenesis of this disease.

  12. Three sporadic cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in China and their clinical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingbang; Li, Na; Liu, Aifen; Ma, Lin; Shan, Peiyan; Jiang, Wenjing; Zhang, Qun

    2017-09-01

    The present study described the characteristics of three cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in China and analyzed their clinical presentations. The clinical information of the three cases was collected and analyzed. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens of the patients were collected for detection of the prion protein (PRNP) gene and 14-3-3 protein levels. Dynamic changes of electroencephalograms (EEGs) and brain magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were also observed. All the three cases were sporadic CJD cases. They presented with symptoms including hyposthenia, progressive memory loss, truncal and limb ataxia, dysarthria, lowered vision acuity, bucking, language disorders, myoclonia and akinetic mutism state. One of the three cases was associated with a prolonged duration of >6 years. The EEG of two cases showed slow biphasic waves. The diffusion-weighted MRI sequence revealed abnormal hyperintensity and bilateral ribboning in the cortex. Two patients tested positive for the 14-3-3 protein in the CSF. All patients were of methionine homozygosity at codon 129 in the gene encoding PRNP protein and one patient had a mutation. The CJD cases showed differences in terms of symptoms and disease duration. Subacute onset was common and with attentive nursing and supportive treatments, one of the patients had a prolonged survival time of >6 years.

  13. Cerebroventricular infusion of pentosan polysulphate in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, N V; Morrow, J; Doh-ura, K; Dealler, S; O'Hare, S; Farling, P; Duddy, M; Rainov, N G

    2005-06-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy believed to be caused by the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent, an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(sc)). At present there is no specific or effective treatment available for any form of CJD. Pentosan polysulphate (PPS), a large polyglycoside molecule with weak heparin-like activity, has been shown to prolong the incubation period of the intracerebral infection when administered to the cerebral ventricles in a rodent scrapie model. PPS also prevents the production of further PrP(sc) in cell culture models. These properties of PPS prompted its cerebroventricular administration in a young man with vCJD. Long-term continuous infusion of PPS at a dose of 11 microg/kg/day for 18 months did not cause drug-related side effects. Follow-up CT scans demonstrated progressive brain atrophy during PPS administration. Further basic and clinical research is needed in order to address the issue of efficacy of PPS in vCJD and in other prion diseases.

  14. Constant Transmission Properties of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in 5 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diack, Abigail B.; Ritchie, Diane; Bishop, Matthew; Pinion, Victoria; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Haik, Stephane; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Van Duijn, Cornelia; Belay, Ermias D.; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Schonberger, Lawrence B.; Piccardo, Pedro; Will, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has been reported in 12 countries. We hypothesized that a common strain of agent is responsible for all vCJD cases, regardless of geographic origin. To test this hypothesis, we inoculated strain-typing panels of wild-type mice with brain material from human vCJD case-patients from France, the Netherlands, Italy, and the United States. Mice were assessed for clinical disease, neuropathologic changes, and glycoform profile; results were compared with those for 2 reference vCJD cases from the United Kingdom. Transmission to mice occurred from each sample tested, and data were similar between non-UK and UK cases, with the exception of the ranking of mean clinical incubation times of mouse lines. These findings support the hypothesis that a single strain of infectious agent is responsible for all vCJD infections. However, differences in incubation times require further subpassage in mice to establish any true differences in strain properties between cases. PMID:23017202

  15. Regulation of human cerebrospinal fluid malate dehydrogenase 1 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Llorens, Franc; Pracht, Alexander; Thom, Tobias; Correia, Ângela; Zafar, Saima; Ferrer, Isidre; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable diagnostic biomarkers in differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is an ongoing topic. A previous two-dimensional proteomic study on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed an elevated level of an enzyme, mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1), in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients. Here, we could demonstrate the expression of MDH1 in neurons as well as in the neuropil. Its levels are lower in sCJD brains than in control brains. An examination of CSF-MDH1 in sCJD patients by ELISA revealed a significant elevation of CSF-MDH1 levels in sCJD patients (independently from the PRNP codon 129 MV genotype or the prion protein scrapie (PrPSc) type) in comparison to controls. In combination with total tau (tau), CSF-MDH1 detection exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for sCJD diagnosis with a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 95.6%. A correlation study of MDH1 level in CSF with other neurodegenerative marker proteins revealed a significant positive correlation between MDH1 concentration with tau, 14-3-3 and neuron specific enolase level. In conclusion, our study indicated the potential of MDH1 in combination with tau as an additional biomarker in sCJD improving diagnostic accuracy of tau markedly. PMID:27852982

  16. Cathepsin D (C224T) polymorphism in sporadic and genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Ströbel, Thomas; Schuur, Maaike; Poleggi, Anna; Nocentini, Sara; Giannattasio, Claudia; Belay, Girma; Bishop, Matthew; Capellari, Sabina; Parchi, Piero; Gelpi, Ellen; Gal, Aniko; Bakos, Agnes; Molnar, Maria J; Heinemann, Uta; Zerr, Inga; Knight, Richard S G; Mitrova, Eva; van Duijn, Cornelia; Budka, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of cathepsin D immunoreactive lysosomes correlates with tissue pathology in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) brains. The C-to-T transition within exon 2 of the cathepsin D (CTSD) gene is associated with altered enzymatic activity. Possession of the TT genotype is a risk factor for variant CJD. To verify the association between the CTSD position 224T allele and the risk for and survival in sporadic and genetic CJD, we genotyped 540 sporadic, 101 genetic CJD, and 723 control individuals. Genotype data and duration of illness were compared using multiple logistic regression and Kruskal-Wallis test. Multivariate survival analysis was performed using Cox's regression model. The distribution of CTSD position 224 alleles was approximately the same in all groups. We observed a trend for shorter survival in sporadic CJD patients harboring the T allele at position 224 of the CTSD gene in particular in sporadic CJD patients with the prion protein gene position 129 MM genotype. We conclude that the CTSD position 224 polymorphism alone is not a significant risk or disease-modifying factor in sporadic or genetic CJD.

  17. Catatonia as Presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: a Case Report

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    Inês Silva Fernandes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Catatonia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome, classically related to schizophrenia,  but  more  often  associated  with other psychiatric, neurological and/or metabolic causes. Case Report: A 61-year-old man was admitted  in  the  Psychiatric  Department  with catatonia of unknown etiology. He was submitted to a detailed investigation including electroencephalogram that revealed triphasic periodic activity and cranial magnetic resonance imaging that revealed brain cortical and subcortical atrophy of frontal and medial  temporal  predominance.  The  patient was  then  transferred  to  the  Neurology  Department.  An increase  of  14.3.3  protein  in the cerebrospinal fluid, was detected and a presumptive diagnosis of spongiform encephalopathy was made. The clinical picture worsened with plurisegmental myoclonus, episodes of ocular deviation and dystonia. The patient died after 5 weeks. Anatomopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Conclusions: This case report reflects the difficulty in the differential diagnosis of diseases with neuropsychiatric symptoms, particularly of catatonia, and the importance of coordination and multidisciplinary synergy in medicine.

  18. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a case of suspected chronic heavy metal poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M; Schulz-Schaeffer, W; Kretzschmar, H; Theuerkauf, I; Gerling, I; Windl, O; Meissner, C

    2001-05-01

    We describe a patient who died of suspected heavy metal poisoning after a nine-month history of rapidly worsening dementia. Autopsy at a forensic-pathological institute established the postmortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) based on demonstration of the proteinase-resistant prion protein (PrPsSc) in Western-Blot on native brain tissue. Microscopic examination of the macroscopically largely inconspicuous brain revealed marked spongiform changes in the gray matter--mainly affecting the cerebral cortex, nucleus caudatus, and putamen--with confluent vacuoles. Patchy or perivacuolar deposits of PrPSc were found as well as granular PrPsc deposits. The cerebellum contained focal PrPsc deposits. There was an astrogliosis in the white matter and a proliferation of microglia in the gray matter with a simultaneous clear reduction in neuronal elements. The differential diagnosis is discussed, as is the potential risk to those performing autopsy on forensic cases with a clinical picture of rapidly progressing dementia, especially in cases where a prion disease is not initially suspected.

  19. [A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with arm levitation as an initial symptom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogawa, Kenji; Ninomiya, Satoko; Okuda, Shinya; Matsumoto, Yushi; Tomita, Hitomi; Okamoto, Kensho; Okuda, Bungo

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old, right handed man, developed insidiously with levitation and clumsiness of the right upper limb. His right arm tended to levitate spontaneously, when he was examined. He could put the elevated arm down on command, while the arm resumed to antigravity posture when his attention was diverted. His right arm also exhibited unwilled elevation when performing complex finger movements on the right side. He had a feeling of strangeness of the elevated limb, especially with the eyes closed. In addition to asymmetric limb-kinetic apraxia, combined sensations such as stereognosis were disturbed on the right side. Brain MRI showed high signal lesions predominantly in the left cerebral cortices and basal ganglia. SPECT with (123)I-IMP revealed asymmetric hypoperfusion, predominantly in the left medial frontal and parietal regions. Two months after the onset, levitation of the arm gradually disappeared, with the development of rapidly progressive dementia, frontal signs, dystonia and generalized myoclonus. The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) was made based on the clinical features and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. The early manifestation of the patient mimicked corticobasal degeneration which presents with arm levitation or alien hand syndrome. It is suggested that CJD can represent involuntary movements with higher brain dysfunction resembling corticobasal degeneration at the early stage of the illness. Although the underlying mechanism of arm levitation is still unknown, frontal disinhibition and parietal cortical sensory disturbance may contribute to the development of involuntary arm levitation in our patient.

  20. Creutzfeldt-jakob, Parkinson, lewy body dementia and Alzheimer diseases: from diagnosis to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupiereux, Ingrid; Zorzi, Willy; Quadrio, Isabelle; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Kovacs, Gabor G; Heinen, Ernst; Elmoualij, Benaïssa

    2009-03-01

    Depositions of proteins in form of amyloid and non-amyloid plaques are common pathogenic signs of more than 20 degenerative diseases affecting the central nervous system or a variety of peripheral tissues. Among the neuropathological conditions, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and the prion diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), present ambiguities as regarding their differential diagnosis. At present, their diagnosis must be confirmed by post-mortem examination of the brain. Currently the ante-mortem diagnosis is still based on the integration of multiple data (clinical, paraclinical and biological analyses) because no unique marker exists for such diseases. The detection of specific biomarkers would be useful to develop a differential diagnostic, distinguishing not only different neurodegenerative diseases but also the disease from the non-pathological effects of aging. Several neurodegenerative biomarkers are present at very low levels during the early stages of the disease development and their ultra-low detection is needed for early diagnosis, which should permit more effective therapeutic interventions, before the disease concerned can progress to a stage where considerable damage to the brain has already occurred. In the case of prion diseases, there are concerns regarding not only patient care, but the wider community too, with regard to the risk of transmission of prions, especially during blood transfusion, for which, four cases of variant CJD infection associated with transfusion of non-leukocyte-depleted blood components have been confirmed. Therefore the development of techniques with high sensitivity and specificity represent the major challenge in the field of the protein misfolding diseases. In this paper we review the current analytical and/or biochemical diagnostic technologies used mainly in prion, but also in Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and emphasizing work on the protein detection as a surrogates and specific biomarker in the body

  1. Genetic and Transcriptomic Profiles of Inflammation in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Alzheimer, Parkinson, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Tauopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López González, Irene; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Llorens, Franc; Ferrer, Isidre

    2016-02-04

    Polymorphisms in certain inflammatory-related genes have been identified as putative differential risk factors of neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates, such as sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) and sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD). Gene expression studies of cytokines and mediators of the immune response have been made in post-mortem human brain samples in AD, sPD, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2, Pick's disease (PiD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration linked to mutation P301L in MAPT Frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau (FTLD-tau). The studies have disclosed variable gene regulation which is: (1) disease-dependent in the frontal cortex area 8 in AD, sPD, sCJD MM1 and VV2, PiD, PSP and FTLD-tau; (2) region-dependent as seen when comparing the entorhinal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and frontal cortex area 8 (FC) in AD; the substantia nigra, putamen, FC, and angular gyrus in PD, as well as the FC and cerebellum in sCJD; (3) genotype-dependent as seen considering sCJD MM1 and VV2; and (4) stage-dependent as seen in AD at different stages of disease progression. These observations show that regulation of inflammation is much more complicated and diverse than currently understood, and that new therapeutic approaches must be designed in order to selectively act on specific targets in particular diseases and at different time points of disease progression.

  2. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease : report of 10 cases from North India.

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    Mehndiratta M

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is increasingly being reported over the last three decades as a result of heightened awareness of the disease. Various studies have reported annual incidence of 0.5-1.5 cases of CJD per million of general population. In India, the disease is still under reported. Over the period spanning from 1968-1997, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS, Bangalore recorded 69 cases of CJD from different parts of India in the CJD registry. This paper describes the clinical experience with cases of CJD managed at the Department of Neurology, G.B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi from 1990-1998. In this series, the mean age of the patients was 53.80 (+/- 7.32 years and there were 5 females and 5 males. Myoclonus was present in all the cases and abnormal behaviour with or without other features was the presenting complaint in 7 of the 10 patients, while one patient of CJD had cerebellar ataxia as the presenting feature. One patient with occipital variant of CJD presented with acute onset cortical blindness and myoclonic jerks. One of the patients had acute psychosis precipitated by emotional stress at the onset. Extrapyramidal features were noted in 7 of the 10 patients before death. The mean duration of symptoms from the onset of disease to death was 6.6 (+/- 6.11 months. Classical EEG changes were observed in all the patients, except in one possible case of occipital variant of CJD, where we did not have access to EEG record. Brain biopsy could be undertaken in 3 patients, and in 2 patients the features of subacute spongiform encephalopathy (SSE were noted.

  3. Detection of prions in blood from patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Marambio, Luis; Pritzkow, Sandra; Moda, Fabio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Ironside, James W; Schulz, Paul E; Soto, Claudio

    2016-12-21

    Human prion diseases are infectious and invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases. They include sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the most common form, and variant CJD (vCJD), which is caused by interspecies transmission of prions from cattle infected by bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Development of a biochemical assay for the sensitive, specific, early, and noninvasive detection of prions (PrP(Sc)) in the blood of patients affected by prion disease is a top medical priority to increase the safety of the blood supply. vCJD has already been transmitted from human to human by blood transfusion, and the number of asymptomatic carriers of vCJD in the U.K. alone is estimated to be 1 in 2000 people. We used the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique to analyze blood samples from 14 cases of vCJD and 153 controls, including patients affected by sCJD and other neurodegenerative or neurological disorders as well as healthy subjects. Our results showed that PrP(Sc) could be detected with 100% sensitivity and specificity in blood samples from vCJD patients. Detection was possible in any of the blood fractions analyzed and could be done with as little as a few microliters of sample volume. The PrP(Sc) concentration in blood was estimated to be ~0.5 pg/ml. Our findings suggest that PMCA may be useful for premortem noninvasive diagnosis of vCJD and to identify prion contamination of the blood supply. Further studies are needed to fully validate the technology. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Bioassay studies support the potential for iatrogenic transmission of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease through dental procedures.

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    Elizabeth Kirby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence is required to quantify the potential risks of transmission of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob (vCJD through dental procedures. Studies, using animal models relevant to vCJD, were performed to address two questions. Firstly, whether oral tissues could become infectious following dietary exposure to BSE? Secondly, would a vCJD-contaminated dental instrument be able to transmit disease to another patient? METHODS: BSE-301V was used as a clinically relevant model for vCJD. VM-mice were challenged by injection of infected brain homogenate into the small intestine (Q1 or by five minute contact between a deliberately-contaminated dental file and the gingival margin (Q2. Ten tissues were collected from groups of challenged mice at three or four weekly intervals, respectively. Each tissue was pooled, homogenised and bioassayed in indicator mice. FINDINGS: Challenge via the small intestine gave a transmission rate of 100% (mean incubation 157±17 days. Infectivity was found in both dental pulp and the gingival margin within 3 weeks of challenge and was observed in all tissues tested within the oral cavity before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Following exposure to deliberately contaminated dental files, 97% of mice developed clinical disease (mean incubation 234±33 days. INTERPRETATION: Infectivity was higher than expected, in a wider range of oral tissues, than was allowed for in previous risk assessments. Disease was transmitted following transient exposure of the gingiva to a contaminated dental file. These observations provide evidence that dental procedures could be a route of cross-infection for vCJD and support the enforcement of single-use for certain dental instruments.

  5. Genetic cross-interaction between APOE and PRNP in sporadic Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases.

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    Olga Calero

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD represent two distinct clinical entities belonging to a wider group, generically named as conformational disorders that share common pathophysiologic mechanisms. It is well-established that the APOE ε4 allele and homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 in the PRNP gene are the major genetic risk factors for AD and human prion diseases, respectively. However, the roles of PRNP in AD, and APOE in CJD are controversial. In this work, we investigated for the first time, APOE and PRNP genotypes simultaneously in 474 AD and 175 sporadic CJD (sCJD patients compared to a common control population of 335 subjects. Differences in genotype distribution between patients and control subjects were studied by logistic regression analysis using age and gender as covariates. The effect size of risk association and synergy factors were calculated using the logistic odds ratio estimates. Our data confirmed that the presence of APOE ε4 allele is associated with a higher risk of developing AD, while homozygosity at PRNP gene constitutes a risk for sCJD. Opposite, we found no association for PRNP with AD, nor for APOE with sCJD. Interestingly, when AD and sCJD patients were stratified according to their respective main risk genes (APOE for AD, and PRNP for sCJD, we found statistically significant associations for the other gene in those strata at higher previous risk. Synergy factor analysis showed a synergistic age-dependent interaction between APOE and PRNP in both AD (SF = 3.59, p = 0.027, and sCJD (SF = 7.26, p = 0.005. We propose that this statistical epistasis can partially explain divergent data from different association studies. Moreover, these results suggest that the genetic interaction between APOE and PRNP may have a biological correlate that is indicative of shared neurodegenerative pathways involved in AD and sCJD.

  6. Brain Dopamine Transporter Binding and Glucose Metabolism in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-Like Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

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    Eero Rissanen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD who developed initial symptoms mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP. Before the development of typical CJD symptoms, functional imaging supported a diagnosis of PSP when [123I]-FP-CIT-SPECT showed a defect in striatal dopamine transporter binding, while [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET showed cortical hypometabolism suggestive of Lewy body dementia. However, the postmortem neuropathological examination was indicative of CJD only, without tau protein or Lewy body findings. This case demonstrates that CJD should be taken into account in rapidly progressing atypical cases of parkinsonism, even when functional imaging supports a diagnosis of a movement disorder.

  7. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with focal findings: caveats to current diagnostic criteria

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    Edward C. Mader

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The clinical diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is largely based on the 1998 World Health Organization diagnostic criteria. Unfortunately, rigid compliance with these criteria may result in failure to recognize sporadic CJD (sCJD, especially early in its course when focal findings predominate and traditional red flags are not yet present. A 61-year-old man presented with a 3-week history of epilepsia partialis continua (jerking of the left upper extremity and a 2-week history of forgetfulness and left hemiparesis; left hemisensory neglect was also detected on admission. Repeated brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed areas of restricted diffusion in the cerebral cortex, initially on the right but later spreading to the left. Electroencephalography (EEG on hospital days 7, 10, and 14 showed right-sided periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. On day 20, the EEG showed periodic sharp wave complexes leading to a diagnosis of probable sCJD and subsequently to definite sCJD with brain biopsy. Neurological decline was relatively fast with generalized myoclonus and akinetic mutism developing within 7 weeks from the onset of illness. CJD was not immediately recognized because of the patient’s focal/lateralized manifestations. Focal/lateralized clinical, EEG, and MRI findings are not uncommon in sCJD and EEG/MRI results may not be diagnostic in the early stages of sCJD. Familiarity with these caveats and with the most current criteria for diagnosing probable sCJD (University of California San Francisco 2007, MRI-CJD Consortium 2009 will enhance the ability to recognize sCJD and implement early safety measures.

  8. Isolated language impairment as the primary presentation of sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tawil, S; Chohan, G; Mackenzie, J; Rowe, A; Weller, B; Will, R G; Knight, R

    2017-03-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (sCJD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that typically presents as a rapidly progressive encephalopathy associated with various neurological features, culminating in akinetic mutism and death. Atypical cases, presenting with an isolated focal may cause diagnostic confusion. We described a series of patients with sCJD presenting with isolated language impairment. We report a patient with sCJD referred to the NCJDRSU, who presented with isolated language impairment and subsequently identified all cases of sporadic CJD on the NCJDRSU database (covering the years 1990-2012) with an isolated language impairment presentation. Nineteen patients (11 females) with sCJD (1.19% of all patients) had an isolated language disorder of at least 2 weeks duration as the first neurological symptom pattern. Mean age at onset was 68.28 years. No specific pattern of language affection was seen in these patients. Further progression usually affected more than one neurological domain, with all patients eventually developing cognitive decline and myoclonic jerks. The median duration of illness was 4 months. CSF 14.3.3 was positive and S100b level was elevated in all patients in whom it was performed. EEG and MRI showed typical features of sCJD in six patients each. Most patients showed MM genotype of PRNP codon 129. This study highlights the fact that isolated aphasia can be the first neurological symptom approximately in 1% of patients with sCJD. The diagnosis is usually made with appearance of other clinical features and investigation results, but in a small minority, these may not be apparent for relatively long periods. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Myoclonus in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: polygraphic and video-electroencephalography assessment of 109 patients.

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    Binelli, Simona; Agazzi, Pamela; Canafoglia, Laura; Scaioli, Vidmer; Panzica, Ferruccio; Visani, Elisa; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Giaccone, Giorgio; Bizzi, Alberto; Bugiani, Orso; Avanzini, Guiliano; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Franceschetti, Silvana

    2010-12-15

    We used electroencephalography (EEG)-polygraphic recordings to classify myoclonus in 109 patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) on the basis of its electromyography (EMG) pattern, time course, distribution, and EEG correlates. We recorded myoclonic jerks in 55 patients (50.4%), and we classified them as periodic myoclonus in 28, rhythmic in 13, and irregular in 20 (6 patients showed two types of myoclonus). Myoclonus occurred as a prominently negative event (interrupting the EMG discharge) in 10. Periodic sharp-wave complexes (PSWCs) were present in all but one patient with myoclonic jerks but were time-locked with EMG-bursts only in case of periodic myoclonus. Jerk-locked back averaging revealed a variable EEG-EMG transfer-time commonly exceeding that characterizing cortical myoclonus. Myoclonus was frequently associated with Met/Met polymorphism at codon 129 of the prion protein gene, but it was also observed in association with Met/Val or Val/Val polymorphisms provided that the EEG showed the presence of the PSWC pattern. The presence of enlarged somatosensory evoked potentials significantly correlated with the myoclonic presentation, as did MR signal hyperintensity involving the cortical mantle. Our observations on the basis of standard polygraphic criteria suggest that CJD associates with a remarkable variety of myoclonic jerks, and therefore different brain structures are probably involved as generators. The significant association between the presence of all myoclonus types with PSWCs suggests that hyperexcitable corticosubcortical loops are always required to generate (or allow) both myoclonus and the EEG complexes, either they are time locked or not.

  10. Doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob: a propósito de um caso com comprometimento medular Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: case report with spinal cord involvement

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    Marlos Fábio Alves de Azevedo

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (DCJ é a encefalopatia espongiforme subaguda transmissível mais frequente nos seres humanos. Aproximadamente 85% dos casos pertencem à forma esporádica da doença. Os outros 15% consistem na forma genética e iatrogênica. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente com a forma esporádica da doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob, com comprometimento medular e apresentação clínica caracterizada por síndrome demencial e cerebelar, miofasciculação com arreflexia difusa e crises convulsivas do tipo tônico-clônico generalizada. É rara a associação das duas últimas manifestações clínicas. O caso foi considerado como provável DCJ até confirmação por autópsia e imunohistoquímica. Concluímos que se deve sempre pensar na DCJ em pacientes que apresentam demência rapidamente progressiva e, na ausência de sinais piramidais ou extrapiramidais, pensar em acometimento periférico e/ou medular.Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is the most common subacute transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Approximately 85% of the cases are sporadic. The remaining 15% consist of genetic and iatrogenic forms. We report a sporadic form of CJD with spinal cord involvement and a clinical manifestation characterized by dementia and cerebellar syndrome, myofasciculation with absent reflexes and seizures. The two last manifestations are rare. The clinical hypothesis was probable CJD which was confirmed with autopsy and immunohistochemistry. We conclude that CJD should always be suspected when rapidly progressive dementia occurs and the absence of pyramidal or extrapyramidal signs suggest a spinal cord and/or peripheral nerve involvement.

  11. Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru, and fatal familial insomnia. Treatment There is no cure for GSS, nor are ... include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru, and fatal familial insomnia. Treatment There is no cure for GSS, nor are ...

  12. Chinese specific characteristics of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a retrospective analysis of 57 cases.

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    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD is a fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative disorder. However, no studies have reported Chinese specific characteristics of sCJD. We aimed to identify differences in sCJD between Chinese patients and patients from other countries. METHODS: The data from 57 Chinese sCJD patients were retrospectively analyzed, including demographic data, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, electroencephalograms (EEGs, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI scans, positron emission tomography (PET scans, and pathological results. RESULT: The disease was pathologically confirmed in 11 patients. 39 cases were diagnosed as probable sCJD, and 7 were possible. Of the total cases, 33 were male, and 24 were female. The onset age ranged from 36 to 75 years (mean: 55.5, median: 57. Disease onset before the age of 60 occurred in 57.9% of patients. The disease duration from onset to death ranged 5-22 months (mean: 11.6, median: 11, and 51.9% of patients died 7 to 12 months after disease onset. The majority of patients presented with sub-acute onset with progressive dementia. 3 of the 9 patients who took 14-3-3 protein analysis had positive results (33.3%. The sensitivity of EEG was 79.6% (43/54. For DWI and PET examinations, the sensitivities were 94% (47/50 and 94.1% (16/17, respectively. In seven patients who did not show typical hyper-intensities on the first DWI examination, abnormalities of hypo-metabolism in the cerebral cortex were clearly detected by PET. In 13 out of the 17 patients, PET detected extra abnormal regions in addition to the hyper-intense areas observed in DWI. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to indicate that Chinese sCJD patients have a much earlier onset age and a longer disease duration than other populations, which is most likely related to racial differences. The longer disease duration may also be a probable characteristic of Asian populations. PET had high sensitivity for the

  13. Co-existence of scrapie prion protein types 1 and 2 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: its effect on the phenotype and prion-type characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cali, I.; Castellani, R.; Alshekhlee, A.; Cohen, Y.; Blevins, J.; Yuan, J.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Parchi, P.; Safar, J.G.; Zou, W.Q.; Gambetti, P.

    2009-01-01

    Five phenotypically distinct subtypes have been identified in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), based on the methionine/valine polymorphic genotype of codon 129 of the prion protein (PrP) gene and the presence of either one of the two protease K-resistant scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) types

  14. Incidence and spectrum of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease variants with mixed phenotype and co-occurrence of PrPSc types: an updated classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parchi, P.; Strammiello, R.; Notari, S.; Giese, A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Ladogana, A.; Zerr, I.; Roncaroli, F.; Cras, P.; Ghetti, B.; Pocchiari, M.; Kretzschmar, H.; Capellari, S.

    2009-01-01

    Six subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with distinctive clinico-pathological features have been identified largely based on two types of the abnormal prion protein, PrPSc, and the methionine (M)/valine (V) polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein. The existence of affected subjects sho

  15. New variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob (vCJD disease and other human prion diseases under epidemiological surveillance in Brazil

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    Vera Lúcia Gattás

    Full Text Available Abstract To increase the timeliness of detection of human cases of the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD and to reduce the risk of transmission, the Brazilian Ministry of Health has established and standardized rules and control measures. These include the definition of criteria for suspect cases, reporting, monitoring, and control measures for illness prevention and transmission. Guidelines to be used by the team of health care staff were published and distributed to health workers. A detailed proposal for a simplified system of surveillance for prion diseases was developed and mandatory reporting introduced. Additional effort is necessary to increase vCJD case detection, thus making it necessary to establish a partnership with health care services for best identification of suspected cases and dissemination of information to all involved in the service dealing with vCJD investigation.

  16. Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob por RMI: alteración cortical como signo temprano de la enfermedad Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by MRI: Cortical alteration as early sign disease

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    María Fernanda Markarian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió por RMI un paciente de 59 años con diagnóstico probable de Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob desde el inicio de sus síntomas. El paciente comienza con un cuadro de leve deterioro cognitivo. En una primera resonancia en secuencias FLAIR se visualiza hiperintensidad cortical a predomino de hemisferio izquierdo, no observándose en FSE T 2. Se hace más significativa en nueva resonancia en FLAIR y Difusión, con aparición de hiperintensidad en cabeza de ambos caudados y rápido deterioro cognitivo, alteraciones visuales, aparición de signos piramidales y extrapiramidales, convulsiones y mioclonias y mutismo. Con la acentuación de las alteraciones corticales -y en los ganglios de la base en una tercera resonancia-, el paciente trasforma su ECG de ritmo lento a un ritmo de punta-onda bifásico y trifásico. A 3 meses de la primera resonancia, nuevas imágenes muestran atrofia e importante hiperintensidad cortical y en ganglios de la base. En conclusión, las secuencias FLAIR y Difusión serían más sensibles que las secuencias T2 en la detección del aumento de intensidad de señal en la corteza cerebral, siendo un indicio diagnóstico temprano de la enfermedad de Creutzfeld-Jakob.A 59-year-old man with probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was studied from early symptoms. The patients manifested mild cognitive impairment. The first magnetic resonance showed hiperintense signal cortical abnormalities in FLAIR sequence predominantly in left hemisphere, FSE T2 no showed abnormalities. In other resonance those abnormities were more significative and appeared head of the caudate nucleus abnormalities in FLAIR and Diffusion-weighted, the patients began with rapidly progressing impairment, visual disturbance, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, seizures, myoclonus and mutism. The third resonance revealed cortical and basal ganglia high signal intensity abnormalities and the patient transformed slowing EEG to biphasic and triphasic sharp

  17. Long term survival in a patient with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease treated with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A; Baker, I; Stacey, R; Wimalaratna, S

    2007-07-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a neurodegenerative disease that principally affects young people and has a median duration of illness of 13 (range 6-39) months. vCJD is incurable and there are currently no treatments that conclusively slow the rate of disease progression. However, recent animal studies and isolated case reports have suggested that treatment with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate (PPS) may be beneficial in the treatment of patients with vCJD. We report a case of a 22-year-old male with vCJD treated 19 months after the onset of clinical symptoms with continuous intraventricular PPS (32 microg/kg/day) over a period of 31 months. Treatment with PPS appeared to be safe and well tolerated and was associated with prolonged survival (51 months) when compared to natural history studies. However, PPS treatment did not appear to arrest the progression of the disease.

  18. Bitemporal hypometabolism in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease measured by positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)-2-fluorodeoxyglucose

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    Friedland, R.P.; Prusiner, S.B.; Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Davis, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    It is well established that Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is caused by a slow infectious agent similar to the scrapie prion. However, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a 54-year-old man with autopsy confirmed CJD using (18F)-2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the Donner 280-crystal tomograph. Temporal lobe hypometabolism with hemispheric asymmetry was observed. These findings are similar to those previously obtained in PET-FDG studies of patients with clinically defined Alzheimer disease (AD). The similarities in the regional metabolic alterations between CJD and AD provide additional evidence for the possibility that AD may be caused by a slow infectious prion.

  19. Clinical analysis of early-stage misdiagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease%克雅病早期误诊临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰贤; 梁颖茵; 姚晓黎

    2011-01-01

    目的 提高散发性克雅病临床诊断水平,降低其误诊率.方法 回顾性分析11例克雅病患者临床表现及早期误诊情况.结果 11例克雅病患者早期误诊为阿尔茨海默病4例,病毒性脑炎3例,脑梗死2例,路易体痴呆2例,脑脊液14-3-3蛋白阳性6例.结论 克雅病的早期临床表现极不典型,较易误诊;多次复查脑电图、磁共振弥散加权成像、脑脊液14-3-3蛋白是诊断本病的重要手段.%Objective To improve the clinical practical diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and decrease the probability of misdiagnosis.Methods Clinical manifestations of 11 cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease misdiagnosed in the early stage were reviewed.Results Eleven cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease were misdiagnosed as Alzheimer' s disease (4 cases), viral encephalitis (3 cases),cerebral infarction (2 cases) and dementia with Lewy bodies (2 cases) in the early stage.Cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein was positive in 6 cases.Conclusions The clinical manifestations of Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease in the early stage are atypical and tend to be misdiagnosed;repetitive EEG,diffusion weighted imaging and cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein are essential to diagnosis.

  20. Doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob forma Heidenhain: relato de caso com achados de ressonância magnética e DWI Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Heidenhain variant: case report with MRI (DWI findings

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    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD é uma forma de demência pré-senil de rápida evolução, geralmente fatal em um ano. Casos autóctones no Brasil têm sido raramente descritos assim como achados de ressonância magnética. Mulher, natural de Ponta Grossa PR, branca , 54 anos , foi admitida no serviço em outubro de 2001 com quadro de amaurose bilateral cortical progressiva desde há 1 mês do internamento. Nunca viajou ao exterior e foi somente submetida a uma cirurgia de redução do estômago, para obesidade. História familial sem relato de casos semelhantes. Logo após o internamento a paciente desenvolveu quadro de disfasia mista, hemiparesia flácida direita, com movimentos coreoatetóticos e crises parciais motoras. Paciente evoluiu com quadro demencial progressivo; atualmente, acamada, torporosa, dependente de alimentação enteral, recebendo mepacrina, fenitoína e clorpromazina , estabilizando o quadro até final de maio de 2002. Exames laboratoriais negativos ou normais. Pesquisa de proteína 14-3-3 no líquor foi positiva; enolase-neurônio-específica no líquor foi normal. Estudo genético do gen PRNP não revelou mutação descrita anteriormente. EEG (23/10/2001 revelou intensa atividade irritativa hemisfério cerebral esquerdo. Estudo de ressonância magnética revelou áreas de hipersinal em T2 e FLAIR em regiões temporal esquerda e bioccipital; gânglios da base normal. Imagens de DWI mostraram hipersinal nas mesmas áreas.Outro EEG (15/03/2002 revelou padrão periódico de ondas trifásicas sugestivos de CJD. A paciente fez uso de mepacrina associado a clorpromazina com aparente estabilização do quadro, até seu óbito por complicações infecciosas pulmonares em abril de 2003.Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a presenile dementia characterized by rapidly progressive mental deterioration, myoclonic jerking, and other less common neurological signs. Few autoctonous cases have been described in Brazil. A 54-year

  1. Racial and ethnic differences in individuals with sporadic Creutzfeldt-jakob disease in the United States of America.

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    Brian S Appleby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about racial and ethnic differences in individuals with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. The authors sought to examine potential clinical, diagnostic, genetic, and neuropathological differences in sCJD patients of different races/ethnicities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective study of 116 definite and probable sCJD cases from Johns Hopkins and the Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare Systems was conducted that examined differences in demographic, clinical, diagnostic, genetic, and neuropathological characteristics among racial/ethnic groups. Age at disease onset differed among racial/ethnic groups. Non-Hispanic Whites had a significantly older age at disease onset compared to the other groups (65 vs. 60, p = 0.036. Non-Whites were accurately diagnosed more rapidly than Whites (p = 0.008 and non-Hispanic Whites were more likely to have normal appearing basal ganglia on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI compared to minorities (p = 0.02. Whites were also more likely to undergo post-mortem evaluation compared to non-Whites (p = 0.02. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Racial/ethnic groups affected by sCJD demonstrated differences in age at disease onset, time to correct diagnosis, clinical presentation, and diagnostic test results. Whites were more likely to undergo autopsy compared to non-Whites. These results have implications in regards to case ascertainment, diagnosis, and surveillance of sCJD and possibly other human prion diseases.

  2. Does Poor Dental Health Have a Role in the Emergence of Variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease in the United Kingdom?

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    Robert Burnie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Variant creutzfeldt jakob disease (vCJD is the hu-man neurological disease known to be caused by the same proteinaceous infectious agent (“prion” that causes Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or "Mad Cow Disease". Two un-usual and unexplained characteristics of the vCJD epidemic are its geographical distribution within the UK (about twice as frequent in Scotland and Northern England and its median age of onset of 26 years that has remained unchanged over the fifteen years of the epidemic.The hypothesis: Infection via the dental route as a consequence of poor dental health, most probably the presence of untreated decay may account for the geographical distribution of vCJD in the UK and offer an explanation for the constant median age of onset of the dis-ease by representing a fixed stage in development.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Analysis of existing data indicates that vCJD incidence by region and an index of dental health by region are positively correlated (r=0.737, p= 0.015. The hypothesis that infection via the dental route may explain the constant median age of onset and geographical distribution of vCJD could be investigated further with a case control study based on individual dental records and by further animal experiments to confirm the biological plausibility of this route.

  3. MM2-thalamic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: neuropathological, biochemical and transmission studies identify a distinctive prion strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Fabio; Suardi, Silvia; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Indaco, Antonio; Limido, Lucia; Vimercati, Chiara; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Langeveld, Jan; Terruzzi, Alessandro; Brambilla, Antonio; Zerbi, Pietro; Fociani, Paolo; Bishop, Matthew T; Will, Robert G; Manson, Jean C; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-09-01

    In Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), molecular typing based on the size of the protease resistant core of the disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc) ) and the M/V polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene correlates with the clinico-pathologic subtypes. Approximately 95% of the sporadic 129MM CJD patients are characterized by cerebral deposition of type 1 PrP(Sc) and correspond to the classic clinical CJD phenotype. The rare 129MM CJD patients with type 2 PrP(Sc) are further subdivided in a cortical and a thalamic form also indicated as sporadic fatal insomnia. We observed two young patients with MM2-thalamic CJD. Main neuropathological features were diffuse, synaptic PrP immunoreactivity in the cerebral cortex and severe neuronal loss and gliosis in the thalamus and olivary nucleus. Western blot analysis showed the presence of type 2A PrP(Sc) . Challenge of transgenic mice expressing 129MM human PrP showed that MM2-thalamic sporadic CJD (sCJD) was able to transmit the disease, at variance with MM2-cortical sCJD. The affected mice showed deposition of type 2A PrP(Sc) , a scenario that is unprecedented in this mouse line. These data indicate that MM2-thalamic sCJD is caused by a prion strain distinct from the other sCJD subtypes including the MM2-cortical form. © 2012 The Authors; Brain Pathology © 2012 International Society of Neuropathology.

  4. Stereotypic Movements in Case of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Possible Role of Anti-NMDA Receptor Antibodies

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    Michelle Molina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD and anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis (NMDAE can both produce a rapidly progressive dementia with resulting state of catatonia or akinetic mutism. Both are associated with movement disorders. In published case series, myoclonus appears to be the most frequent movement disorder in sCJD, while stereotypic, synchronized, one-cycle-per-second movements such as arm or leg elevation, jaw opening, grimacing, head turning, and eye deviation are seen in NMDAE. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman with rapidly worsening cognitive disturbance leading to a nearly catatonic state interrupted by stereotypic movements. sCJD was diagnosed via periodic sharp wave complexes on EEG as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF 14-3-3 and tau protein elevation. Characteristic movement disorder of NMDAE was present in absence of ovarian mass or CSF pleiocytosis. Given prior case reports of presence of anti-NMDA receptor antibodies in sCJD, we propose that the movement disorder in this case was caused by anti-NMDA receptor antibodies whose formation was secondary to neuronal damage from prion disease. It is important to consider sCJD even in cases that have some clinical features suggestive of NMDAE.

  5. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: the extent of microglia activation is dependent on the biochemical type of PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puoti, Gianfranco; Giaccone, Giorgio; Mangieri, Michela; Limido, Lucia; Fociani, Paolo; Zerbi, Pietro; Suardi, Silvia; Rossi, Giacomina; Iussich, Selina; Capobianco, Raffaella; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Marcon, Gabriella; Cotrufo, Roberto; Filippini, Graziella; Bugiani, Orso; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2005-10-01

    In prion-related encephalopathies, microglial activation occurs early and is dependent on accumulation of disease-specific forms of the prion protein (PrPSc) and may play a role in nerve cell death. Previously, we found that different types of PrPSc (i.e. type 1 and type 2) coexisted in approximately 25% of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD); and a close relationship was detected between PrPSc type, the pattern of PrP immunoreactivity, and extent of spongiform degeneration. To investigate whether microglial reaction is related to the biochemical type and deposition pattern of PrPSc, we carried out a neuropathologic and biochemical study on 26 patients with sporadic CJD, including all possible genotypes at codon 129 of the prion protein gene. By quantitative analysis, we demonstrated that strong microglial activation was associated with type 1 PrPSc and diffuse PrP immunoreactivity, whereas type 2 PrPSc and focal PrP deposits were accompanied by mild microglia reaction. These findings support the view that the phenotypic heterogeneity of sporadic CJD is largely determined by the physicochemical properties of distinct PrPSc conformers.

  6. Bitemporal hypometabolism in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease measured by positron emission tomography with (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Prusiner, S.B.; Jagust, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    It is well established that Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is caused by a slow infectious agent similar to the scrapie prion. However, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a 54 year old male subject with autopsy confirmed CJD using (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the Donner 280-crystal tomograph. An x-ray computed tomographic study of the brain performed 4 days prior to PET was normal. In the PET study the frontal to temporal cortex difference of activity densities was 30% on the left and 12% on the right, reflecting temporal hypometabolism. The left-right temporal cortex difference of activity density was 25%, documenting marked hemispheric asymmetry. These findings are similar to those previously obtained in PET-FDG studies of patients with clinically defined Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and are distinctly different from PET-FDG finding in patients with other dementing illnesses or in healthy aged subjects. Recent work has demonstrated extensive biological similarities between CJD, scrapie and AD. The similarities in the regional metabolic alterations between CJD and AD provide additional evidence for the hypothesis that AD is caused by a slow infectious (prion-like) pathogen.

  7. Panencephalopathic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with distinct pattern of prion protein deposition in a patient with D178N mutation and homozygosity for valine at codon 129 of the prion protein Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Gabriella; Indaco, Antonio; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Suardi, Silvia; Finato, Nicoletta; Moretti, Valentino; Micoli, Sandro; Fociani, Paolo; Zerbi, Pietro; Pincherle, Alessandro; Redaelli, Veronica; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Giorgio

    2014-03-01

    Prion diseases include sporadic, acquired and genetic forms linked to mutations of the prion protein (PrP) gene (PRNP). In subjects carrying the D178N PRNP mutation, distinct phenotypes can be observed, depending on the methionine/valine codon 129 polymorphism. We present here a 53-year-old woman with D178N mutation in the PRNP gene and homozygosity for valine at codon 129. The disease started at age 47 with memory deficits, progressive cognitive impairment and ataxia. The clinical picture slowly worsened to a state of akinetic mutism in about 2 years and the disease course was 6 years. The neuropathologic examination demonstrated severe diffuse cerebral atrophy with neuronal loss, spongiosis and marked myelin loss and tissue rarefaction in the hemispheric white matter, configuring panencephalopathic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. PrP deposition was present in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum with diffuse synaptic-type pattern of immunoreactivity and clusters of countless, small PrP deposits, particularly evident in the lower cortical layers, in the striatum and in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. Western blot analysis showed the presence of type 1 PrP(Sc) (Parchi classification). These findings underline the clear-cut distinction between the neuropathological features of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with D178N PRNP mutation and those of fatal familial insomnia.

  8. Diffusion-Weighted MRI in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Focus on the Cerebral Cortex and Chronologic Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, In Ho [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, In Kyu [Eulji University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, See Sung [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate high cortical signal intensity and chronologic changes for diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We retrospectively analyzed the DWI results of 16 patients with probable CJD (according to WHO criteria) and evaluated the distribution, extent and bilaterality of the lesions in the cortex, basal ganglia and thalamus. We also reviewed the chronologic changes of the lesions by evaluating the followup MR examination results in 8 of 16 patients. Cortical abnormalities were present in 15 (94%) of 16 patients. Isolated cortical involvement was present in 6 patients (40%), while the combined involvement of the cortex and basal ganglia was present in 9 patients (60%). The distribution of the lesions was bilateral in 12 patients and predominantly on the right side in 8 patients. Upon follow-up MR imaging, the cortical lesions showed progress in terms of extent and signal intensity. Basal ganglia abnormalities were present in 9 of 15 patients. Moreover, 4 of 6 patients who had no abnormal signal intensity in the basal ganglia on the initial MR imaging results, showed abnormally high signal intensity upon follow-up MR imaging. The characteristically high cortical signal intensities on DWI in an elderly patient with rapidly progressive dementia should point to the diagnosis of early phase CJD and might be useful for the differential diagnosis.

  9. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Prion Pathology in Medulla Oblongata—Possible Routes of Infection and Host Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Iacono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, the most frequent human prion disorder, is characterized by remarkable phenotypic variability, which is influenced by the conformation of the pathologic prion protein and the methionine/valine polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene. While the etiology of sCJD remains unknown, it has been hypothesized that environmental exposure to prions might occur through conjunctival/mucosal contact, oral ingestion, inhalation, or simultaneous involvement of the olfactory and enteric systems. We studied 21 subjects with definite sCJD to assess neuropathological involvement of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and other medullary nuclei and to evaluate possible associations with codon 129 genotype and prion protein conformation. The present data show that prion protein deposition was detected in medullary nuclei of distinct sCJD subtypes, either valine homozygous or heterozygous at codon 129. These findings suggest that an “environmental exposure” might occur, supporting the hypothesis that external sources of contamination could contribute to sCJD in susceptible hosts. Furthermore, these novel data could shed the light on possible causes of sCJD through a “triple match” hypothesis that identify environmental exposure, host genotype, and direct exposure of specific anatomical regions as possible pathogenetic factors.

  10. [Perioperative considerations for performing a brain biopsy on a patient with subtype VV2 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Domínguez, R; Rubio-Romero, R; González-González, G; Jiménez, I

    2015-04-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most common transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. It is an infectious, progressive, degenerative neurological disorder, with a presumably long incubation period, but a rapid fatal course. CJD is transmitted by a proteinaceous infectious agent, or «prion». Because the prions are difficult to eradicate and are resistant to the currently used sterilization methods, special precautions must be taken with all surgical instruments. It is recommended the single-use equipment, destruction of contaminated equipment, decontamination of reusable instruments, use of protective clothing, and storing and quarantining surgical instruments. The single-use equipment and some tissues and body fluids from the patient with CJD are highly infectious and must be incinerated. We report a case of a patient who had undergone brain biopsy for suspected of CJD, being confirmed to have sporadic CJD. Specific preventive measures were taken to reduce the risk of transmission to healthcare workers. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: correlation with clinical course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheolkyu [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Chang, YoungHee; Kim, SangYun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a fatal disease with variable clinical courses. The presence or absence of basal ganglia (BG) involvement has been reported to be associated with clinical course. We investigated the association of clinical course of sCJD with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) as well as BG involvement at early stage. DWI and single voxel proton MRS were performed in 14 patients with sCJD during the initial diagnostic workup. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and metabolites were measured in medial occipitoparietal cortices where large hyperintense DWI lesions were found in all patients. The presence or absence of BG involvement, ADC, N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) ratios, and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios were correlated with disease duration (i.e., the time from the symptom onset to death). The disease duration ranged from 2 to 31 months (median, 16). Hyperintense DWI lesions were observed bilaterally in both cortices and basal ganglia in eight patients and in cortices alone in six patients. Patients with BG involvement had shorter disease duration (median, 6.8 versus 20.5; p = 0.039) than those without and lower NAA/Cr ratios (median, 1.41 versus 2.03; p = 0.001). ADC and Cho/Cr ratios were not significantly different between the patients with BG involvement and those without. By multiple regression analysis, NAA/Cr ratios had the greatest correlation with the disease duration (p = 0.029). The disease duration of sCJD was variable. NAA/Cr ratios of the affected brain at the early stage of sCJD can be used as a useful parameter in predicting the clinical course. (orig.)

  12. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol Moe Lee

    Full Text Available Inherited prion diseases (IPDs, including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD, account for 10-15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP. The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs, such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid real-time quaking-induced conversion is a robust and reliable test for sporadic creutzfeldt-jakob disease: An international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Lynne I; Poleggi, Anna; Poggiolini, Ilaria; Suardi, Silvia; Grznarova, Katarina; Shi, Song; de Vil, Bart; Sarros, Shannon; Satoh, Katsuya; Cheng, Keding; Cramm, Maria; Fairfoul, Graham; Schmitz, Matthias; Zerr, Inga; Cras, Patrick; Equestre, Michele; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Knox, David; Collins, Steven; Haïk, Stéphane; Parchi, Piero; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Green, Alison

    2016-07-01

    Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) has been proposed as a sensitive diagnostic test for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; however, before this assay can be introduced into clinical practice, its reliability and reproducibility need to be demonstrated. Two international ring trials were undertaken in which a set of 25 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analyzed by a total of 11 different centers using a range of recombinant prion protein substrates and instrumentation. The results show almost complete concordance between the centers and demonstrate that RT-QuIC is a suitably reliable and robust technique for clinical practice. Ann Neurol 2016;80:160-165.

  14. Consumption of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) contaminated beef and the risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chu-Chih; Wang, Yin-Han; Wu, Kuen-Yuh

    2013-11-01

    To date, the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) risk assessments that have been performed have primarily focused on predicting future vCJD cases in the United Kingdom, which underwent a bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic between 1980 and 1996. Surveillance of potential BSE cases was also used to assess vCJD risk, especially in other BSE-prevalent EU countries. However, little is known about the vCJD risk for uninfected individuals who accidentally consume BSE-contaminated meat products in or imported from a country with prevalent BSE. In this article, taking into account the biological mechanism of abnormal prion PrP(res) aggregation in the brain, the probability of exposure, and the expected amount of ingested infectivity, we establish a stochastic mean exponential growth model of lifetime exposure through dietary intake. Given the findings that BSE agents behave similarly in humans and macaques, we obtained parameter estimates from experimental macaque data. We then estimated the accumulation of abnormal prions to assess lifetime risk of developing clinical signs of vCJD. Based on the observed number of vCJD cases and the estimated number of exposed individuals during the BSE epidemic period from 1980 to 1996 in the United Kingdom, an exposure threshold hypothesis is proposed. Given the age-specific risk of infection, the hypothesis explains the observations very well from an extreme-value distribution fitting of the estimated BSE infectivity exposure. The current BSE statistics in the United Kingdom are provided as an example.

  15. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Heidenhain variant: case report with MRI (DWI) findings; Doenca de Creutzfeldt-Jakob forma Heidenhain: relato de caso com achados de ressonancia magnetica e DWI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, Walter Oleschko; Bordignon, Kelly C.; Milano, Jeronimo B.; Ramina, Ricardo [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: warruda@speednet.com.br

    2004-06-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a pre senile dementia characterized by rapidly progressive mental deterioration, myoclonic jerking, and other less common neurological signs. Few accentuates cases have been described in Brazil. A 54-year-old white woman, was admitted in our service with a month history of progressive, bilateral cortical blindness. After admission, she developed right partial motor seizures (right facial, upper and lower limbs), she became progressively aphasic (mixed aphasia). Seizures were controlled with phenytoine, but she developed choreoathetotic movements on her right dimidium, with partial control after introduction of chlorpromazine 25 mg q/d. She could no longer stand up or walk due to severe ataxia. The first EEG (October, 2001) showed left hemisphere severe seizure activity (status epilepticus partial is). She was delivered home with enteral nutrition, phenytoine, chlorpromazine and mepacrine 100 mg q d. The following laboratory tests were negative or normal: blood series, platelets, ESR, kidney and liver function, copper, ceruloplasmin, Vedril, HIV, HTLV-1, lactate, and cerebral Dsa (performed in other service). A spinal tap with normal opening pressure was perform and CSFR examination was normal. CSFR 14-3-3 protein was positive, CSF specific neuronal enolase 7.5 ng/ml(normal). Genetic study of PRNP gene did not disclosed any known mutation. A MRI (October, 2001) showed areas of hyperintense signal (T 2 and FLAIR) without Gd-enhancement on T1, in the left temporal lobe and in both occipital lobes; basal ganglia have a normal appearance. DWI imaging showed bright areas at the same sites. An EEG (March, 2002) disclosed a periodical sharp triphasic waves pattern, suggestive of CJD. A second MRI (April, 2002) showed mild generalized atrophy, no ventricular dilatation, and the hyperintense sites disappeared. She remained clinically stable and under use of chlorpromazine and mepacrine until she died due to pulmonary complications on April

  16. Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob por RMI: alteración cortical como signo temprano de la enfermedad Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by MRI: Cortical alteration as early sign disease

    OpenAIRE

    María Fernanda Markarian; Adriana Ojeda; Ana María Uriarte

    2008-01-01

    Se estudió por RMI un paciente de 59 años con diagnóstico probable de Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob desde el inicio de sus síntomas. El paciente comienza con un cuadro de leve deterioro cognitivo. En una primera resonancia en secuencias FLAIR se visualiza hiperintensidad cortical a predomino de hemisferio izquierdo, no observándose en FSE T 2. Se hace más significativa en nueva resonancia en FLAIR y Difusión, con aparición de hiperintensidad en cabeza de ambos caudados y rápido deterioro co...

  17. Characterization of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions in prion protein-humanized mice carrying distinct codon 129 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ironside, James W; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2013-07-26

    To date, all clinical variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) patients are homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129M/M) of the prion protein (PrP) gene. However, the appearance of asymptomatic secondary vCJD infection in individuals with a PRNP codon 129 genotype other than M/M and transmission studies using animal models have raised the concern that all humans might be susceptible to vCJD prions, especially via secondary infection. To reevaluate this possibility and to analyze in detail the transmission properties of vCJD prions to transgenic animals carrying distinct codon 129 genotype, we performed intracerebral inoculation of vCJD prions to humanized knock-in mice carrying all possible codon 129 genotypes (129M/M, 129M/V, or 129V/V). All humanized knock-in mouse lines were susceptible to vCJD infection, although the attack rate gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The amount of PrP deposition including florid/amyloid plaques in the brain also gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The biochemical properties of protease-resistant abnormal PrP in the brain and transmissibility of these humanized mouse-passaged vCJD prions upon subpassage into knock-in mice expressing bovine PrP were not affected by the codon 129 genotype. These results indicate that individuals with the 129V/V genotype may be more susceptible to secondary vCJD infection than expected and may lack the neuropathological characteristics observed in vCJD patients with the 129M/M genotype. Besides the molecular typing of protease-resistant PrP in the brain, transmission studies using knock-in mice carrying bovine PrP may aid the differential diagnosis of secondary vCJD infection, especially in individuals with the 129V/V genotype.

  18. An experiential learning model applied to nurses working with patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Rolande; Guimond, Pierrette

    2010-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (C/D) is a rare neurological disease, transmissible, incurable and always fatal affecting humans, as well as animals. In the 1980s, the "mad cow disease" (MCD) epidemic in the United Kingdom popularized prion diseases worldwide. However, this contributed to the proliferation of disinformation, causing confusion between C/D and MCD in the public, as well as in some health care providers. The purpose of this article is to describe the process utilized to develop, implement, and evaluate a workshop on CJD for nurses and other health care providers. Kolb's experiential teaching/learning model was used as a framework for this workshop. A workbook was developed to complement the participants' learning. Fifteen health care providers from the Alzheimer Society of Canada's Dementia Network agreed to participate in this educational project. The results indicated that the participants had limited knowledge about C/D. They felt ill prepared and uncomfortable in providing quality care to this patient population. The workshop generated new insights and knowledge about the disease and the needs of the patients and their families. Participants exchanged ideas for tailored interventions. An experiential teaching/learning model is a highly effective approach to increase knowledge and skills, as well as fostering reflective practice.

  19. Alien hand and leg as the presenting feature of probable sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: A rare presentation of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banshi Lal Kumawat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD can have varied clinical presentation depending upon the genotype at codon 129. The common presenting clinical features of sCJD are rapid onset cognitive impairment, ataxia, psychosis and visual signs (field defects, distortion, cortical blindness. Alien limb sign was first described in patients with corpus callosal tumors and later with other neurodegenerative conditions like corticobasal degeneration. Alien hand complaints as the presenting feature of sCJD has been described in literature, but simultaneous alien hand and leg has been rarely described as presenting feature of sCJD. We describe here a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive left alien hand and leg as the sole clinical manifestation of probable sCJD.

  20. Alien hand and leg as the presenting feature of probable sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: A rare presentation of a rare disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumawat, Banshi Lal; Sharma, Chandra Mohan; Nath, Kunal; Acharya, Mihir; Khandelwal, Dinesh; Jain, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) can have varied clinical presentation depending upon the genotype at codon 129. The common presenting clinical features of sCJD are rapid onset cognitive impairment, ataxia, psychosis and visual signs (field defects, distortion, cortical blindness). Alien limb sign was first described in patients with corpus callosal tumors and later with other neurodegenerative conditions like corticobasal degeneration. Alien hand complaints as the presenting feature of sCJD has been described in literature, but simultaneous alien hand and leg has been rarely described as presenting feature of sCJD. We describe here a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive left alien hand and leg as the sole clinical manifestation of probable sCJD. PMID:25745324

  1. Subtype and regional-specific neuroinflammation in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc eLlorens

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study identifies deregulated cytokines and mediators of the immune response in the frontal cortex and cerebellum of sCJD MM1 and VV2 subtypes compared to age-matched controls. Deregulated genes include pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors, colony stimulating factors, cathepsins, members of the complement system, and members of the integrin and CTL/CTLD family with particular regional and sCJD subtype patterns. Analysis of cytokines and mediators at protein level shows expression of selected molecules and receptors in neurons and/or in astrocytes and/or in microglia thus suggesting interactions between neurons and glial cells, mainly microglia, in the neuroinflammatory response in sCJD. Similar inflammatory responses have been shown in the tg340 sCJD MM1 mice, revealing a progressive deregulation of inflammatory mediators with disease progression. Yet inflammatory molecules involved are subjected to species differences in humans and mice. Moreover, inflammatory-related cell signalling pathways NFκB/IKK and JAK/STAT are activated in sCJD and sCJD MM1 mice. Together, the present observations show a self-sustained complex inflammatory and inflammatory-related responses occurring already at early clinical stages in animal model and dramatically progressing at advanced stages of sCJD. Considering this scenario, measures tailored to modulate (activate or inhibit specific molecules could be therapeutic options in CJD.

  2. Genetic and Transcriptomic Profiles of Inflammation in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Alzheimer, Parkinson, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Tauopathies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    López González, Irene; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Llorens, Franc; Ferrer, Isidre

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in certain inflammatory-related genes have been identified as putative differential risk factors of neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates, such as sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD...

  3. Unusual resistance to ionizing radiation of the viruses of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Latarjet, R

    1978-01-01

    The titers of several preparations of kuru. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, and scrapie viruses were reduced by only 1/10th or less by high doses of gamma radiation of 50 kGy and by only 1/10th-1/1000th or less for 200 kGy. This unusual radiation resistance of the two human viruses further links them with the scrapie virus and suggests that the genetic information of all three viruses is considerably smaller than that of any other known viruses of mammals. PMID:104301

  4. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

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    ... newsletter Stay up-to-date on the latest advances in Alzheimer's and dementia treatments, care and research. Subscribe now ... up-to-date on the latest news and advances in Alzheimer's treatments, care and research. Get tips for living ...

  5. Doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob forma Heidenhain: relato de caso com achados de ressonância magnética e DWI Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Heidenhain variant: case report with MRI (DWI) findings

    OpenAIRE

    Walter Oleschko Arruda; Kelly C. Bordignon; Jerônimo B. Milano; Ricardo Ramina

    2004-01-01

    A doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) é uma forma de demência pré-senil de rápida evolução, geralmente fatal em um ano. Casos autóctones no Brasil têm sido raramente descritos assim como achados de ressonância magnética. Mulher, natural de Ponta Grossa PR, branca , 54 anos , foi admitida no serviço em outubro de 2001 com quadro de amaurose bilateral cortical progressiva desde há 1 mês do internamento. Nunca viajou ao exterior e foi somente submetida a uma cirurgia de redução do estômago, para o...

  6. 中国2010年克-雅病监测病例特征分析%Surveillance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in China,2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈操; 石琦; 周伟; 张宝云; 高晨; 田婵; 韩俊; 董小平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand the incidence, epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in China. Methods The analysis was conducted on the clinical and epidemiological data of suspected CJD cases collected through the surveillance in China in 2010. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples were taken from the patients to detect PrPSc in brain tissue and 14-3-3 protein in CSF by using Western blot assay and analyze the polymorphism of 129 amino acid and mutation of PRNP gene extracted from blood samples by using PCR and sequencing assay. Results Totally 1 laboratory confirmed cases, 46 clinical diagnosed and 25 suspected cases of CJD, 3 fatal familial insomnia cases (FFI) and 5 genetic CJD cases were detected, including 1 R208H, 1 P102L and 3 T188K mutation cases No seasonal, geographic and population clustering of the disease were observed. The mean age of clinical diagnosed patients was 62 years old, the male to female ratio was 1. 30:1, the mean age of suspected patients was 57 years old, the male to female ratio was 2. 14: 1. Rapidly progressive dementia was the mostly common symptom, occurring firstly in 54. 93% of the CJD patients. More typical clinical manifestations were presented in clinical diagnosed patients than in suspected patients. Conclusion CJD occurred sporadically in China in 2010, which was demonstrated by the time, geographic, population, gender and age distributions of the cases.%目的 了解中国(未包括香港、澳门和台湾地区,下同)克-雅病(Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease,CJD)的发病情况、流行病学及临床特征.方法 对2010年中国CJD监测网络获得的可疑CJD病例的临床及流行病学资料进行分析,收集患者脑脊液及血液样品,利用Western blot方法检测脑组织中PrPSc蛋白及脑脊液中14 -3 -3蛋白,提取全血基因组DNA并利用PCR及测序方法对PRNP基因进行129位多态性及基因突变的分析.结果 共发现散发型CJD确定诊断病例1

  7. Doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob: considerações clínicas, eletrencefalográficas e anatomopatológicas a propósito de uma caso Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a case report with clinical, electroencephalographic and neuropathological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Luiz Sanvito

    1971-03-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso da doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob cujo diagnóstico foi comprovado mediante estudo anátomo-patológico. São analisadas as diversas formas clínicas da doença e particular ênfase é dada aos aspectos eletrencefalográficos. No que respeita aos aspectos neuropatológicos é ressaltada a importância, para o diagnóstico, da presença de degeneração neuronal ao lado de hipertrofia da astroglia; o estado espongioso pode ocorrer em elevado número de casos. O paciente do presente registro, do sexo masculino, apresentou aos 52 anos de idade um quadro rapidamente evolutivo, caracterizado por instabilidade à marcha, mutismo, mioclonias generalizadas e coma vigil, vindo a falecer 5 meses após o início da doença. O estudo anátomo-patológico evidenciou lesões difusas nas regiões corticais, sub-corticais, no tronco do encéfalo e na medula espinhal, caracterizadas por degeneração neuronal, hipertrofia da astroglia e presença do estado espongioso.A case of peculiar form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease — the subacute disseminated encephalo-myelopathy one — is reported. The diagnosis was ascertained by necroscopic study. The clinical and electroencephalographic aspects are analysed. The patient here concerned, a man aged fifty two, during the clinical course of the disease showed stupor, decorticate posture, myoclonic jerks, epileptic seizures, muscular wasting in the left leg, exaggerated tendon reflexes in the face, tendon reflexes not elicitable in the legs. The electroencephalographic findings, during the downhill course of the disease, showed a pattern of irregularly depressed background rhythm with the periodic synchronous high voltage wave. The post-mortem findings revealed mild atrophy of the brain and the histological study revealed neuronal degeneration, astroglial hypertrophies and status spongiosus. The microscopic examination showed that the areas most affected were the frontal and occipital lobes, the basal

  8. Protease-sensitive conformers in broad spectrum of distinct PrPSc structures in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are indicator of progression rate.

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    Chae Kim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The origin, range, and structure of prions causing the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, are largely unknown. To investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for the broad phenotypic variability of sCJD, we analyzed the conformational characteristics of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant fractions of the pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc using novel conformational methods derived from a conformation-dependent immunoassay (CDI. In 46 brains of patients homozygous for polymorphisms in the PRNP gene and exhibiting either Type 1 or Type 2 western blot pattern of the PrP(Sc, we identified an extensive array of PrP(Sc structures that differ in protease sensitivity, display of critical domains, and conformational stability. Surprisingly, in sCJD cases homozygous for methionine or valine at codon 129 of the PRNP gene, the concentration and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc correlated with progression rate of the disease. These data indicate that sCJD brains exhibit a wide spectrum of PrP(Sc structural states, and accordingly argue for a broad spectrum of prion strains coding for different phenotypes. The link between disease duration, levels, and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc suggests that these conformers play an important role in the pathogenesis of sCJD.

  9. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease-Human Manifestation of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy%新型克-雅氏病是人的牛海绵状脑病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方元

    2001-01-01

    本文在概述人朊病毒的基础上,重点阐述新型克-雅氏病与早先已知的各种人朊病毒病的区别和它是由牛海绵状脑病朊病毒引起的证据,并对牛海绵状脑病并非源于痒病而是原于牛散发性朊病毒病、影响新型克-雅氏病流行规模的主要因素和该病的主要预防措施等问题进行了讨论。%Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a new disease firstly described in April, 1996 in the United Kingdom. On the basis of a brief account of human prion diseases, this paper elucidates the differences between vCJD and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and presents the evidence conforming that vCJD is caused by the BSE agent. In addition, the origin of BSE (it was not derived from scrapie), some important factors determining epidemic scale of vCJD and key preventive measures of vCJD are discussed.

  10. Human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and sheep scrapie PrP(res) detection using seeded conversion of recombinant prion protein.

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    Orrú, Christina D; Wilham, Jason M; Hughson, Andrew G; Raymond, Lynne D; McNally, Kristin L; Bossers, Alex; Ligios, Ciriaco; Caughey, Byron

    2009-08-01

    The pathological isoform of the prion protein (PrP(res)) can serve as a marker for prion diseases, but more practical tests are needed for preclinical diagnosis and sensitive detection of many prion infections. Previously we showed that the quaking-induced conversion (QuIC) assay can detect sub-femtogram levels of PrP(res) in scrapie-infected hamster brain tissue and distinguish cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) samples from normal and scrapie-infected hamsters. We now report the adaptation of the QuIC reaction to prion diseases of medical and agricultural interest: human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and sheep scrapie. PrP(res)-positive and -negative brain homogenates from humans and sheep were discriminated within 1-2 days with a sensitivity of 10-100 fg PrP(res). More importantly, in as little as 22 h we were able to distinguish CSF samples from scrapie-infected and uninfected sheep. These results suggest the presence of prions in CSF from scrapie-infected sheep. This new method enables the relatively rapid and sensitive detection of human CJD and sheep scrapie PrP(res) and may facilitate the development of practical preclinical diagnostic and high-throughput interference tests.

  11. An autopsy case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with a prion protein gene codon 180 mutation presenting with pathological laughing and an exaggerated startle reaction.

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    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Akagi, Akio; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-07-13

    A 78-year-old Japanese woman presented with slow progressive disorientation and memory disturbances. Pathological laughing was observed at an early disease stage and continued for several months. Around the same time, the patient began to exhibit an exaggerated startle reaction and mild myoclonus. The pathological laughing and startle reaction disappeared before the patient reached an akinetic mutism state approximately 16 months after symptom onset. MRI showed extensive hyperintensity of the cerebral cortex and striatum on diffusion-weighted images, and swelling in the cerebral cortex on T2-weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery images. A prion protein (PrP) gene analysis revealed a V180I mutation with methionine homozygosity at codon 129. Neuropathological examination showed extensive spongiform changes with characteristic various-sized and non-confluent (VaSNoC) vacuoles in the cerebral neocortex and striatum. Gliosis and hypertrophic astrocytosis were generally mild in character. Neurons were relatively preserved in number. We believe that pathological laughing and an exaggerated startle reaction are possible pathognomonic findings of V180I genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Based on the pathological findings of the present case, the presence of the VaSNoC-type spongiform changes with relative preservation of the neurons in the cerebral cortex and a lack of apparent brainstem involvement are associated at least in part with the pathological laughing and startle reaction. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  12. Deep Learning Representation from Electroencephalography of Early-Stage Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Features for Differentiation from Rapidly Progressive Dementia.

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    Morabito, Francesco Carlo; Campolo, Maurizio; Mammone, Nadia; Versaci, Mario; Franceschetti, Silvana; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Sofia, Vito; Fatuzzo, Daniela; Gambardella, Antonio; Labate, Angelo; Mumoli, Laura; Tripodi, Giovanbattista Gaspare; Gasparini, Sara; Cianci, Vittoria; Sueri, Chiara; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Aguglia, Umberto

    2017-03-01

    A novel technique of quantitative EEG for differentiating patients with early-stage Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) from other forms of rapidly progressive dementia (RPD) is proposed. The discrimination is based on the extraction of suitable features from the time-frequency representation of the EEG signals through continuous wavelet transform (CWT). An average measure of complexity of the EEG signal obtained by permutation entropy (PE) is also included. The dimensionality of the feature space is reduced through a multilayer processing system based on the recently emerged deep learning (DL) concept. The DL processor includes a stacked auto-encoder, trained by unsupervised learning techniques, and a classifier whose parameters are determined in a supervised way by associating the known category labels to the reduced vector of high-level features generated by the previous processing blocks. The supervised learning step is carried out by using either support vector machines (SVM) or multilayer neural networks (MLP-NN). A subset of EEG from patients suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and healthy controls (HC) is considered for differentiating CJD patients. When fine-tuning the parameters of the global processing system by a supervised learning procedure, the proposed system is able to achieve an average accuracy of 89%, an average sensitivity of 92%, and an average specificity of 89% in differentiating CJD from RPD. Similar results are obtained for CJD versus AD and CJD versus HC.

  13. A patient with progressive cognitive decline and periodic abnormal waves in EEG: PLEDs of neurosyphilis or PSDs of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease?

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    Lv, Yudan; Chu, Fengna; Meng, Hongmei; Wang, Zan; Cui, Li

    2014-07-01

    We report one Chinese patient with neurosyphilis exhibiting periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) in the electroencephalogram (EEG). The patient (male, 59 years old) manifested with progressive cognitive decline and abnormal behavior. After several days, he gradually lost contact with others, and fell into a coma. EEG revealed periodic abnormal waves, predominantly located in the right anterior frontal region. The serum and cerebrospinal fluid Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test and Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay were positive. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed focal atrophy in the right frontal and temporal region. Diffusion-weighted MRI showed "lace sign" in cortex, which could be seen as an early and special feature in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). To differentiate "PLEDs of neurosyphilis on EEG" from "periodic synchronous discharges (PSD) of CJD on EEG," we treated this patient with diazepam 20 mg intravenously. After 10 minutes, periodic abnormal waves on EEG disappeared, with improved mental status, which confirmed the diagnosis of PLEDs of neurosyphilis. Then, after the treatment with penicillin, the patient improved and returned to work.

  14. Polymorphisms at codons 56 and 174 of the prion-like protein gene (PRND) are not associated with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

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    Jeong, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Nam-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2005-01-01

    Association between sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and the prion-like protein gene (PRND) has been reported in the German population. To investigate whether the PRND polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk for developing sporadic CJD in the Korean population, we compared the genotype and allele frequencies of PRND polymorphisms in 110 sporadic CJD patients with those in 102 healthy Koreans. Two polymorphisms (P56L, T174 M) in Koreans were found in the open reading frame (ORF) of PRND. One heterozygote of P56L was observed in normal controls but not in sporadic CJD patients. A strong significant difference of PRND genotype frequency at codon 174 was found between the normal Korean population and various European populations. In contrast to results in the German population, our study did not show a significant difference in PRND genotype or allele frequency at codon 174 between sporadic CJD and normal controls. This was the first genetic association study of the ORF of PRND in an Asian CJD population.

  15. CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP are lower in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease but not Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Patrick Oeckl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyclic nucleotides cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP are important second messengers and are potential biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigated by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP of 82 patients and evaluated their diagnostic potency as biomarkers. For comparison with a well-accepted biomarker, we measured tau concentrations in CSF of CJD and control patients. CJD patients (n = 15 had lower cAMP (-70% and cGMP (-55% concentrations in CSF compared with controls (n = 11. There was no difference in PD, PD dementia (PDD and ALS cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses confirmed cAMP and cGMP as valuable diagnostic markers for CJD indicated by the area under the curve (AUC of 0.86 (cAMP and 0.85 (cGMP. We calculated a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64% for cAMP and a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 100% for cGMP. The combination of both nucleotides increased the sensitivity to 80% and specificity to 91% for the term cAMPxcGMP (AUC 0.92 and to 93% and 100% for the ratio tau/cAMP (AUC 0.99. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the CSF determination of cAMP and cGMP may easily be included in the diagnosis of CJD and could be helpful in monitoring disease progression as well as in therapy control.

  16. The first report of RPSA polymorphisms, also called 37/67 kDa LRP/LR gene, in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD

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    Jeong Byung-Hoon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although polymorphisms of PRNP, the gene encoding prion protein, are known as a determinant affecting prion disease susceptibility, other genes also influence prion incubation time. This finding offers the opportunity to identify other genetic or environmental factor (s modulating susceptibility to prion disease. Ribosomal protein SA (RPSA, also called 37 kDa laminin receptor precursor (LRP/67 kDa laminin receptor (LR, acts as a receptor for laminin, viruses and prion proteins. The binding/internalization of prion protein is dependent for LRP/LR. Methods To identify other susceptibility genes involved in prion disease, we performed genetic analysis of RPSA. For this case-control study, we included 180 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD patients and 189 healthy Koreans. We investigated genotype and allele frequencies of polymorphism on RPSA by direct sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis. Results We observed four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, including -8T>C (rs1803893 in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR of exon 2, 134-32C>T (rs3772138 in the intron, 519G>A (rs2269350 in the intron and 793+58C>T (rs2723 in the intron on the RPSA. The 519G>A (at codon 173 is located in the direct PrP binding site. The genotypes and allele frequencies of the RPSA polymorphisms showed no significant differences between the controls and sporadic CJD patients. Conclusion These results suggest that these RPSA polymorphisms have no direct influence on the susceptibility to sporadic CJD. This was the first genetic association study of the polymorphisms of RPSA gene with sporadic CJD.

  17. Comparison of the neuropathological characteristics of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in mice.

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    Brown, D A; Bruce, M E; Fraser, J R

    2003-06-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) belong to a group of diseases called the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Transmission studies in inbred mice (strain typing) provided overwhelming evidence that vCJD arose from BSE. In this study, we compare the patterns of neuropathology in a panel of three inbred mouse strains (RIII, C57BL and VM) and one cross (C57BL x VM) infected with either vCJD or BSE. For each mouse strain, patterns of abnormal prion protein (PrPres) deposition, astrocytosis and vacuolation were similar in the vCJD- and BSE-challenged mice. Prion protein (PrP)-positive plaques were prominent in the VM and C57BL x VM mice in addition to diffuse PrPres accumulation, whereas only diffuse PrPres labelling was observed in the RIII and C57BL mice. The hippocampus was targeted in all mouse strains, as was the cochlear nucleus in the medulla, both showing consistent severe vacuolation and heavy PrPres deposition. Although the targeting of PrPres was similar in the BSE- and vCJD-infected brains, the amount and intensity of PrPres observed in the brains treated with formic acid during fixation was reduced considerably. The distribution of astrocytosis was similar to the targeting of PrPres deposition in the brain, although some differences were observed in the hippocampi of mice challenged with vCJD. We conclude that there are no significant differences in the targeting of neuropathological changes observed in the BSE- and vCJD-infected mice, consistent with the previous evidence of a link between BSE and vCJD.

  18. Study on clinical features in general paresis of insane, HIV-associated dementia and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease behaved as dementia

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    LIU Wen-yan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical features of general paresis of insane (GPI, HIV-associated dementia (HAD and Creutzfeldt -Jakob disease (CJD. Methods The clinical features, laboratory examination, electroencephalography (EEG, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, treatment and prognosis of 19 patients (GPI, n = 8; HAD, n = 6; CJD, n = 5 were analyzed retrospectively. Results The cases of three groups had cognitive impairment. At the same time, multiple systems (pyramidal system, extrapyramidal system and cerebellar and multiple cranial nerves were involved. In GPI patients, the results of rapid plasma regain circle card test (RPR and treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA were all positive in 8 cases, venereal disease research laboratory tests (VDRL of CSF were positive in 4 cases, and Head MRI showed encephalatrophy in 6 cases. In HAD patients, serologic tests for HIV of all cases were positive, the average protein of CSF was increased significantly and Pandy's test was positive in 2 cases, Head MRI were characterized with multiple space occupying lesions or diffuse abnormal density image. In CJD patients, CSF 14-3-3 protein showed positive in 4 patients, EEG showed diffuse slow waves in 5 case, in which 1 case showed typical periodic triphasic wave, Head MRI in 3 sporadic CJD patients (sCJD showed swelling like changes in sulus of cortex area and 1 varaint CJD (vCJD patient showed hockey like change in thalamencephalon. Conclusion The clinical characteristics of dementia caused by GPI, HAD or CJD are varied, and the diagnosis mainly depends on clinical features, positive findings in serum, CSF, EEG and MRI detections.

  19. Is brain copper deficiency in Alzheimer's, Lewy body, and Creutzfeldt Jakob diseases the common key for a free radical mechanism and oxidative stress-induced damage?

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    Deloncle, Roger; Guillard, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's (AD), Lewy body (LBD), and Creutzfeldt Jakob (CJD) diseases, similar pathological hallmarks have been described, one of which is brain deposition of abnormal protease-resistant proteins. For these pathologies, copper bound to proteins is able to protect against free radicals by reduction from cupric Cu++ to cupreous Cu+. We have previously demonstrated in bovine brain homogenate that free radicals produce proteinase K-resistant prion after manganese is substituted for copper. Since low brain copper levels have been described in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, in substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease, and in various brain regions in AD, LBD, and CJD, a mechanism has been proposed that may underlie the neurodegenerative processes that occur when copper protection against free radicals is impaired. In peptide sequences, the alpha acid proton near the peptide bond is highly mobile and can be pulled out by free radicals. It will produce a trivalent α-carbon radical and induce a free radical chain process that will generate a D-amino acid configuration in the peptide sequence. Since only L-amino acids are physiologically present in mammalian (human) proteins, it may be supposed that only physiological L-peptides can be recycled by physiological enzymes such as proteases. If a D-amino acid is found in the peptide sequence subsequent to deficient copper protection against free radicals, it will not be recognized and might alter the proteasome L-amino acid recycling from brain peptides. In the brain, there will result an accumulation of abnormal protease-resistant proteins such as those observed in AD, LBD, and CJD.

  20. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Abnormal Prion Protein on Steel Surfaces by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification: Application to Prion Decontamination Studies.

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    Maxime Belondrade

    Full Text Available The prevalence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD in the population remains uncertain, although it has been estimated that 1 in 2000 people in the United Kingdom are positive for abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE by a recent survey of archived appendix tissues. The prominent lymphotropism of vCJD prions raises the possibility that some surgical procedures may be at risk of iatrogenic vCJD transmission in healthcare facilities. It is therefore vital that decontamination procedures applied to medical devices before their reprocessing are thoroughly validated. A current limitation is the lack of a rapid model permissive to human prions. Here, we developed a prion detection assay based on protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA technology combined with stainless-steel wire surfaces as carriers of prions (Surf-PMCA. This assay allowed the specific detection of minute quantities (10-8 brain dilution of either human vCJD or ovine scrapie PrPTSE adsorbed onto a single steel wire, within a two week timeframe. Using Surf-PMCA we evaluated the performance of several reference and commercially available prion-specific decontamination procedures. Surprisingly, we found the efficiency of several marketed reagents to remove human vCJD PrPTSE was lower than expected. Overall, our results demonstrate that Surf-PMCA can be used as a rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of human vCJD PrPTSE adsorbed onto a metallic surface, therefore facilitating the development and validation of decontamination procedures against human prions.

  1. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Abnormal Prion Protein on Steel Surfaces by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification: Application to Prion Decontamination Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belondrade, Maxime; Nicot, Simon; Béringue, Vincent; Coste, Joliette; Lehmann, Sylvain; Bougard, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in the population remains uncertain, although it has been estimated that 1 in 2000 people in the United Kingdom are positive for abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) by a recent survey of archived appendix tissues. The prominent lymphotropism of vCJD prions raises the possibility that some surgical procedures may be at risk of iatrogenic vCJD transmission in healthcare facilities. It is therefore vital that decontamination procedures applied to medical devices before their reprocessing are thoroughly validated. A current limitation is the lack of a rapid model permissive to human prions. Here, we developed a prion detection assay based on protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technology combined with stainless-steel wire surfaces as carriers of prions (Surf-PMCA). This assay allowed the specific detection of minute quantities (10-8 brain dilution) of either human vCJD or ovine scrapie PrPTSE adsorbed onto a single steel wire, within a two week timeframe. Using Surf-PMCA we evaluated the performance of several reference and commercially available prion-specific decontamination procedures. Surprisingly, we found the efficiency of several marketed reagents to remove human vCJD PrPTSE was lower than expected. Overall, our results demonstrate that Surf-PMCA can be used as a rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of human vCJD PrPTSE adsorbed onto a metallic surface, therefore facilitating the development and validation of decontamination procedures against human prions.

  2. An autopsy-verified case of FTLD-TDP type A with upper motor neuron-predominant motor neuron disease mimicking MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

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    Hayashi, Yuichi; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Takekoshi, Akira; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Asano, Takahiko; Mimuro, Maya; Kimura, Akio; Satoh, Katsuya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Here we report an autopsy-verified case of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)-transactivation responsive region (TAR) DNA binding protein (TDP) type A with upper motor neuron-predominant motor neuron disease mimicking MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). A 69-year-old woman presented with an 11-month history of progressive dementia, irritability, insomnia, and gait disturbance without a family history of dementia or prion disease. Neurological examination revealed severe dementia, frontal signs, and exaggerated bilateral tendon reflexes. Periodic sharp-wave complexes were not observed on the electroencephalogram. Brain diffusion MRI did not reveal abnormal changes. An easy Z score (eZIS) analysis for (99m)Tc-ECD-single photon emission computed tomography ((99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT) revealed a bilateral decrease in thalamic regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). PRNP gene analysis demonstrated methionine homozygosity at codon 129 without mutation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed normal levels of both 14-3-3 and total tau proteins. Conversely, prion protein was slowly amplified in the CSF by a real-time quaking-induced conversion assay. Her symptoms deteriorated to a state of akinetic mutism, and she died of sudden cardiac arrest, one year after symptom onset.  Despite the SPECT results supporting a clinical diagnosis of MM2-thalamic-type sCJD, a postmortem assessment revealed that this was a case of FTLD-TDP type A, and excluded prion disease. Thus, this case indicates that whereas a bilateral decreasing thalamic rCBF detected by (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT can be useful for diagnosing MM2-thalamic-type sCJD, it is not sufficiently specific. Postmortem diagnosis remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of this condition.

  3. Asymmetric cortical high signal on diffusion weighted-MRI in a case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease Hipersinal cortical assimétrico na ressonância magnética na imagem em difusão em caso de doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob

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    Ricardo Nitrini

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available High signal in the cerebral cortex and/or basal ganglia on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI has been described as a good diagnostic marker for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. We report a case of sCJD with atypical clinical evolution and unusual DW-MRI findings. A 53-year-old man was seen with a 2-year history of a rapidly progressive dementia and cerebellar ataxia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis, including the test for 14-3-3 protein, was normal. EEG did not show periodic activity. However, DW-MRI showed gyriform hyperintensity involving practically the entire cortical ribbon of the left hemisphere, whilst being limited to the posterior cingulate gyrus in the right hemisphere. DNA analysis showed no mutations or insertions in the prion protein gene, and homozigozity for methionine in codon 129. A subsequent brain biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of CJD. Thus, high signal on DW-MRI may be limited to the cerebral cortex and may present a very asymmetric distribution in sCJD.Hipersinal no cortex cerebral e/ou nos gânglios da base observado com a técnica de difusão da ressonância magnética (RM-DIF tem sido descrito como bom marcador diagnóstico da doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob esporádica (DCJe. Relatamos caso de DCJe com evolução clínica atípica e achados incomuns na RM-DIF. Homem de 53 anos foi examinado com história de dois anos de demência rapidamente progressiva e ataxia cerebelar. Exame do líquido cefalorraqueano, incluindo pesquisa da proteína 14-3-3, foi normal; EEG não revelou atividade periódica; RM-DIF mostrou hiperintensidade nos giros que afetava quase inteiramente o manto cortical do hemisfério cerebral esquerdo e que no hemisfério direito se limitava à parte posterior do giro cíngulo. Análise do DNA revelou ausência de mutação ou de inserção no gene da proteína priônica e a presença de homozigose para metionina no códon 129. Biópsia cerebral confirmou o diagnóstico de DCJ

  4. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a clinico-neuropathological analysis of nine definite cases Doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob do tipo esporádico: análise clínico-neuropatológica de nove casos da forma definida

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    CARLOS M. DE CASTRO COSTA

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors have analyzed clinico-neuropathologically nine cases of the definite sporadic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. All cases were female, with mean age of 62.7 years. Eighty-nine percent of the patients exhibited prodromal and initial psychiatric symptoms; definite signs of dementia, and myoclonus were present in 100% of cases. The EEG was abnormal in all cases and pseudoperiodic paroxysms were present in 56% of the patients. Their evolution time ranged from 3 to 19 months. Neuropathologically, brain and cerebellar atrophy, spongiosis, astrocytosis and neuronal loss were present in 100% of the patients. In 5 (56% of these 9 cases, prion protein (PrP amyloid plaques were detected in the cerebellum, by optical- and electronmicroscopy. There was a positive correlation between the number of plaques and the evolution time. The authors outline the similarities of their cases in the elderly with the new variant of CJD described in young people.Os autores analisaram, do ponto de vista clínico e neuropatológico, nove casos da forma esporádica definida da doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (DCJ. Todos eles eram mulheres, com idade média de 62,7 anos. Oitenta e nove por cento dos pacientes exibiram sintomas psiquiátricos prodrômicos e iniciais; sinais típicos de demência e mioclonias estavam presentes em 100% deles. O EEG foi anormal em todos os casos e apresentou paroxismos pseudoperiódicos em 56% dos pacientes. O tempo de evolução da doença variou de 3 a 19 meses. Do ponto de vista neuropatológico, atrofia cerebral e cerebelar, espongiose, astrocitose e perda neuronal estavam presentes em 100% dos pacientes. Em 5 (56% dos 9 casos, foi evidenciada, por microscopia óptica e eletrônica, a presença de placas amilóides de proteína prion (PrP no cerebelo. Havia correlação positiva entre o número de placas e o tempo de evolução da doença. Os autores salientam as semelhanças desses seus casos de pacientes idosos com a nova

  5. Red-backed vole brain promotes highly efficient in vitro amplification of abnormal prion protein from macaque and human brains infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

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    Nemecek, Julie; Nag, Nabanita; Carlson, Christina M.; Schneider, Jay R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Asher, David M.; Gregori, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrPTSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrPTSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA). Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV), a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrPTSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrPTSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype) was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrPTSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrPTSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrPTSE was more permissive than human PrPTSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrPTSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrPTSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10-12 of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrPTSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect PrPTSE in v

  6. Red-backed vole brain promotes highly efficient in vitro amplification of abnormal prion protein from macaque and human brains infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Nemecek

    Full Text Available Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrP(TSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrP(TSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA. Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV, a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrP(TSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N. We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrP(TSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrP(TSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrP(TSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrP(TSE was more permissive than human PrP(TSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrP(TSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrP(TSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10⁻¹² of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrP(TSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect Pr

  7. MM1-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with 1-month total disease duration and early pathologic indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Kato, Hiroko; Ando, Tetsuo; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-10-01

    A 62-year-old man presented with abnormal behavior and cognitive impairment. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) obtained on MRI showed extensive hyperintense regions in the cerebral cortex and striatum. Myoclonus was recognized, and the patient died 1 month after the onset; his condition did not reach the akinetic mutism state. The brain weighed 1300 g and showed no apparent atrophy. Extensive spongiform changes were observed in the cerebral neocortex, striatum, thalamus and cerebellar cortex, but gliosis was mild or absent. Neuropil rarefaction and neuron loss were not apparent. Mild proliferation of anti- GFAP-positive astrocytes was observed in the cerebral cortex, but unaffected regions were noted. Regions without spongiform changes and GFAP-positive astrocytes included the hippocampal formation and subiculum. PrP immunostaining showed extensive diffuse synaptic-type PrP deposition in the gray matter, including the hippocampal region, but it was also mild. PrP gene analysis revealed no mutation with methionine homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129. Western blot analysis of proteinase K-resistant PrP indicated type 1 PrP(Sc) . The clinicopathological findings of the present case confirm several hypotheses: (i) the earliest pathologic evidence observed by HE staining in CJD are spongiform changes; (ii) DWI hyperintense regions indicate these spongiform changes; and (iii) regions without spongiform changes, gliosis and proliferation of GFAP-positive astrocytes, but with PrP deposition, exist in the early disease stage. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  8. R3-R4 deletion in the PRNP gene is associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervenakova, L.; Brown, P.; Nagle, J. [and others

    1994-09-01

    There are conflicting reports on the association of deletions in the PRNP gene on chromosome 20 with CJD, a rapidly progressive fatal spongiform encephalopathy. We accumulated data suggesting that a deletion of R3-R4 type (parts of the third and fourth repeats are deleted from the area of four repeating 24 bp sequences in the 5{prime} region of the gene) is causing CJD. Screening of 129 unaffected control individuals demonstrated presence of a deletion of R2 type in four (1.55% of the studied chromosomes), but none of them had the R3-R4 type. Of 181 screened patients with spongiform encephalopathies, two had a deletion of R3-R4 type with no other mutations in the coding sequence. Both patients had a classical rapidly progressive dementing disease and diffuse spongiform degeneration, and both cases were apparently sporadic. The same R3-R4 type of deletion was detected in three additional neuropathologically confirmed spongiform encephalopathy patients, of which two had other known pathogenic mutations in the PRNP gene: at codon 178 on the methionine allele exhibiting the phenotype of fatal familial insomnia, and codon 200 causing CJD with severe dementia; the third was a patient with iatrogenic CJD who developed the disease after treatment with growth hormone extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. In all cases the deletion coincided with a variant sequence at position 129 coding for methionine.

  9. RARB and STMN2 polymorphisms are not associated with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in the Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Hae-Jung; Lee, Kyung-Hee; Carp, Richard I; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the prion protein gene (PRNP) can affect the susceptibility of humans to prion diseases. Recently, aside from PRNP, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of two candidate genes for susceptibility to human prion diseases have been identified by human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in the British population. One SNP of retinoic acid receptor beta (RARB), which is correlated with prion disease incubation time in mice, was associated with human prion diseases such as variant and iatrogenic CJD in the British population. The other SNP of the gene that encodes SCG10 (STMN2), which is related to clinical onset of sporadic CJD, was also associated with variant CJD and kuru. In order to investigate whether two polymorphisms located in upstream of RARB and STMN2 are associated with sporadic CJD in the Korean population, we compared genotype and allele frequencies of these polymorphisms in 217 sporadic CJD patients and 216 healthy Koreans. The genotype distribution and allele frequencies in upstream of the RARB and STMN2 polymorphisms were not significantly different between healthy controls and Korean sporadic CJD patients. This finding indicates that the two SNPs are not correlated with genetic susceptibility to sporadic CJD in the Korean population. This is the first genetic association study of RARB and STMN2 with sporadic CJD in an Asian population.

  10. Description and analysis of 12 years of surveillance for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Denmark, 1997 to 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gubbels, S; Bacci, S; Laursen, H;

    2012-01-01

    Prospective surveillance of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) was initiated in Denmark in 1997, following the observation of variant CJD in the United Kingdom. Demographic, clinical and diagnostic information was collected for each patient with clinical suspicion of CJD. Here we describe the method...

  11. [A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob in the Mexican north-east and review of current concepts on prion disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, A L; Sagastegui-Rodríguez, J A; Canales-Ibarra, C; Farías-García, R

    2001-01-01

    The case reported here is that of a 50-year-old man from Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico, who during the previous 15 months developed a demential syndrome and myoclonia. The brain biopsy led to establish a diagnosis of spongiform encephalopathy. The EEG showed periodic sharp wave complexes over the right hemisphere. A review on about prion diseases is included.

  12. Generalized cerebral atrophy seen on MRI in a naturally exposed animal model for creutzfeldt-jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasanu Constantin A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic resonance imaging has been used in the diagnosis of human prion diseases such as sCJD and vCJD, but patients are scanned only when clinical signs appear, often at the late stage of disease. This study attempts to answer the questions "Could MRI detect prion diseases before clinical symptoms appear?, and if so, with what confidence?" Methods Scrapie, the prion disease of sheep, was chosen for the study because sheep can fit into a human sized MRI scanner (and there were no large animal MRI scanners at the time of this study, and because the USDA had, at the time of the study, a sizeable sample of scrapie exposed sheep, which we were able to use for this purpose. 111 genetically susceptible sheep that were naturally exposed to scrapie were used in this study. Results Our MRI findings revealed no clear, consistent hyperintense or hypointense signal changes in the brain on either clinically affected or asymptomatic positive animals on any sequence. However, in all 37 PrPSc positive sheep (28 asymptomatic and 9 symptomatic, there was a greater ventricle to cerebrum area ratio on MRI compared to 74 PrPSc negative sheep from the scrapie exposed flock and 6 control sheep from certified scrapie free flocks as defined by immunohistochemistry (IHC. Conclusions Our findings indicate that MRI imaging can detect diffuse cerebral atrophy in asymptomatic and symptomatic sheep infected with scrapie. Nine of these 37 positive sheep, including 2 one-year old animals, were PrPSc positive only in lymph tissues but PrPSc negative in the brain. This suggests either 1 that the cerebral atrophy/neuronal loss is not directly related to the accumulation of PrPSc within the brain or 2 that the amount of PrPSc in the brain is below the detectable limits of the utilized immunohistochemistry assay. The significance of these findings remains to be confirmed in human subjects with CJD.

  13. Creutzfeldt-Jakob病43例患者的临床分析%The clinical features of 43 patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘静; 王玉平; 王红星; 李莉萍; 刘爱华; 叶静; 杨延辉

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical features of 43 patients with clinically possible or probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) to provide references for the early clinical evaluation and diagnosis of CJD. Method All patients who were diagnosed with “suspected CJD” and hospitalized in our hospital between January 2013 to January 2016 were collected, and their clinical features and laboratory data were analyzed retrospectively. Results In general, the onset of CJD occurred at about 60 years old, with a mean course of disease of 5.70±5.08 months(median:four months). The first symptoms are changeable, mainly presenting with rapidly progressive dementia. In addition, typical clinical manifestations included 6 types: rapidly progressivedementia, damage in the locomotor system(fibrae pyramidales, extrapyramidal and cerebellar symptoms), myoclonus, akinetic mutism, sleep and vision disorders.Conclusion The early diagnosis of CJD should pay attention to its clinical features, and highly alarming and periodic review should be given to the patient with 2 typical features or above manifestations to avoid misdiagnosis, although 14-3-3 protein, EEG and MRI show atypical findings.%目的:分析43例临床可能或很可能克雅氏病(CJD)患者的临床特征,为CJD早期诊断提供一些参考。方法搜集2013年1月至2016年1月以“可疑CJD”诊断在首都医科大学宣武医院住院的患者,对其临床特点及实验室资料进行分析。结果 CJD通常在60岁左右发病,平均病程5.70±5.08个月;首发症状多变,以迅速进展性痴呆为主。典型临床表现有6种:迅速进展的痴呆、运动系统损害(锥体束、锥体外系及小脑症状)、肌阵挛、无动性缄默、睡眠障碍和视力障碍。结论 CJD的早期诊断应重视其临床特征,当一个患者具有典型特征中的两项或以上表现时,即使14-3-3蛋白、脑电图(EEG)、磁共振(MRI)均不典型,也要高度警惕CJD

  14. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease versus anti-LGI1 limbic encephalitis in a patient with progressive cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms, involuntary facio-brachio-crural movement, and an abnormal electroencephalogram: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Li Sun, Jie Cao, Chang Liu, Yudan LvDepartment of Neurology, The First Hospital of JiLin University, ChangChun, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is often challenging in elderly individuals, not only because of its variable clinical features but also because of nonspecific changes on the electroencephalogram (EEG in the early stages of the disease. Here we report on a patient who presented with progressive cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms, involuntary facio-brachio-crural movement, and an abnormal EEG. We provide a detailed analysis and differential diagnosis between anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1 limbic encephalitis versus CJD, in the hope of providing a new understanding of CJD. A 65-year-old Chinese man presented with slowly progressive cognitive decline with psychiatric symptoms. On admission, he presented with facial grimacing and brief left upper limb dystonic posturing lasting 1–2 seconds, with hyponatremia that was difficult to rectify. Neurological examination showed increased muscle tension in the left limb but without pathological reflexes. His early EEG showed focal periodic wave complexes. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a suspected “lace sign” in the occipital cortex. His cerebrospinal fluid was negative for LGI1 antibodies and positive for 14-3-3 brain protein. Therefore, we made a presumptive diagnosis of CJD. At the following visit, a second EEG showed paroxysmal sharp wave complexes, but the patient had a poor prognosis. Atypical facio-brachio-crural movement and nonspecific EEG changes may occasionally be found in patients with CJD or anti-LGI1 encephalitis. Clinicians should not be dissuaded from a diagnosis of CJD where the EEG does not show paroxysmal sharp wave complexes in the early stages but abnormal facio-brachio-crural movement is present.Keywords: abnormal facio-brachio-crural movement, hyponatremia, Creutzfeldt-Jakob

  15. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease a case report, with special attention to the electroencephalogram in this disorder and to its possible relationships to kuru, scrapie and «mad cow disease»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Chapman

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 58-year-old Brazillian cattle rancher and businessman is presented. The EEG was normal, which is consistent with the fact that it was made during the first half of his illness; in a later stage suppression of normal rhythms by slow moderate voltage waves would be expected. The resemblances of kuru, scrapie and "mad cow disease» to C-J disease are discussed. In each of these 4 illnesses the patient or affected animal (scrapie and «mad cow disease" (a has a widespread spongiform encephalopathy and consequent dementia, myoclonic epilepsy and cerebellar and corticospinal symptoms, (b Each illness is caused by a virus (or virus-like organism called a PrP or prion which is unusually resistant to heat and entirely resistant to ultraviolet light and x-rays, (c This causative agent can be transmitted to other mammals by intracerebral injection or, in the proved cases of 3 of them, by the oral route. Unresolved questions about C-J disease include the following: Are C-J disease, kuru, scrapie and "mad cow disease" essentially similar illnesses caused by the same virus or by subtle variants of it? What is the incubation period of C-J disease, and does its virus exist for long periods of time in some asymptomatic persons, some of whom may never become neurologically ill? How does this virus enter the bodies of most persons with C-J disease, and why does the clinical disease characteristically occur only in middle age?

  16. Brain in human nutrition and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease risk (vCJD): detection of brain in retail liver sausages using cholesterol and neuron specific enolase (NSE) as markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücker, E; Horlacher, S; Eigenbrodt, E

    2001-08-01

    No information is available about the consumption of brain via meat products. With respect to the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the presumed food-borne transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to humans, a preliminary survey for brain and/or spinal cord (tissues of the central nervous system, CNS) was conducted. We applied a previously developed integrated procedure using cholesterol and neuron specific enolase (NSE) as markers. Quantification of cholesterol had to be backed up by NSE immunochemistry in order to account for low specificity and relatively high variances. Out of 126 high-quality finely graded liver sausages, five samples (4 %) showed positive NSE immunoresponses. In four of these samples a transgression of the normal maximum cholesterol content was obtained. The identification of such a considerable number of CNS-positive sausages indicates that brain consumption is not as rare as previously assumed. Overall, the present integrated method could be successfully applied for the detection of CNS in heat-treated meat products. Its routine application in official food control would deter illegal practice and thus help to control transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

  17. Dynamic change of MRI in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (report of 1 case)%Creutzfeldt-Jakob病的MRI动态改变(附1例报告)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄承芳; 姜丹; 金红花; 张智燕; 杨卫; 吴银侠

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨Creutzfeldt-Jakob病( CJD)的MRI动态改变。方法回顾性分析1例CJD患者的临床资料。结果本例患者以进行性痴呆为特征,伴有共济失调、肌阵挛,发病3个月后达晚期。 DWI示早期双侧额、颞、顶、枕叶皮质、海马异常稍高信号,颞叶明显;随疾病进展脑皮质及海马异常信号变强,范围变大;晚期随着脑萎缩出现,脑皮质及海马异常高信号逐渐消失。患者因反复肺部感染死亡。结论散发型CJD患者DWI表现为早期病灶高信号,最常见于大脑皮质。%Objective To investigate the dynamic change of MRI in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease ( CJD ) . Methods The clinical data of 1 sporadic CJD patient were analyzed retrospectively.Results The clinical features were progressive dementia, accompanied with ataxia and myoclonus in this case, and she reached terminal stage at 3 months after the onset of the disease.DWI showed the mildly hyperintensities in both side of cortex of frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital lobe and hippocampus, and especially of temporal lobe. With the progressive exacerbation of disease, the hyperintensities in cortex and hippocampus became higher and gradually distributed wider region.Late as brain atrophy, DWI displayed abnormally hyperintensities gradually decreased in both side cortexes of cerebra and hippocampus.The patient was died of pulmonary infection.Conclusion The DWI of sporadic CJD shows hyperintensities in the early stage, mostly in cerebral cortex.

  18. Decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral thalami and medulla oblongata determined by an easy Z-score (eZIS) analysis of (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT images in a case of MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Asano, Takahiko; Hatano, Taku; Tatsumi, Shinsui; Satoh, Katsuya; Kimura, Akio; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2015-11-15

    We report a case of autopsy-verified MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) in a 46-year-old patient with a 16-month history of abnormal behavior, progressive dementia, insomnia, and speech disturbances without family history. Neurological examination revealed progressive dementia, frontal signs, insomnia, speech disturbance, gait disturbance and bilaterally exaggerated tendon reflexes. Both brain MRI and cerebrospinal fluid examinations, including 14-3-3 protein, yielded normal results. An easy Z-score (eZIS) analysis for (99m)Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer-single photon emission computed tomography ((99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT) revealed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral thalami and medulla oblongata. PRNP gene analysis revealed methionine homozygosity at codon 129 without mutation. Neuropathological examinations revealed severe neuronal loss, gliosis, and hypertrophic astrocytosis in the medial thalamus and inferior olivary nucleus. A slight depletion of Purkinje cells was observed. PrP immunostaining showed no obvious PrP deposits in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, or brainstem; however, mild synaptic-type PrP deposits with some smaller plaque-like structures were only partially observed in the localized region of the frontal lobe with the spongiform change. Western blot analyses of protease-resistant PrP showed a type 2 pattern. In conclusion, eZIS analysis of (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT images is useful for detecting both thalamic and medullary lesions. This is the first case of medullary lesions detected in a live patient with MM2-thalamic-type sCJD using SPECT.

  19. An autopsied case of MM1 + MM2-cortical with thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with hyperintensities on diffusion-weighted MRI before clinical onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-02-01

    + MM2-cortical with thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), which suggests a broader spectrum of sCJD clinicopathological findings. © 2016 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  20. Human Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and sheep scrapie PrP (res) detection using seeded conversion of recombinant prion protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orrú, C.D.; Wilham, J.M.; Hughson, A.G.; Raymond, L.D.; McNally, K.L.; Bossers, A.; Ligios, C.; Caughey, B.

    2009-01-01

    The pathological isoform of the prion protein (PrPres) can serve as a marker for prion diseases, but more practical tests are needed for preclinical diagnosis and sensitive detection of many prion infections. Previously we showed that the quaking-induced conversion (QuIC) assay can detect sub-femtog

  1. Clinical findings of a probable case of MM2-cortical-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with antibodies to anti-N-terminus of α-enolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Yamada, Megumi; Kimura, Akio; Asano, Takahiko; Satoh, Katsuya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoneda, Maokoto; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2017-10-02

    We report the case of a 76-year-old woman presenting with 47-month history of progressive dementia and cortical blindness with no family history. Antibodies against thyroid glands and the N-terminus of α-enolase (NAE) were detected in her serum. Neurological examination revealed progressive dementia, frontal signs, visual disturbance, and exaggerated bilateral tendon reflexes in both legs. Diffusion MRI showed cortical hyper-intensities in the bilateral occipital and parietal, and the left frontal and temporal cortices. (99m)Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer-single photon emission computed tomography indicated decreased regional cerebral blood flow throughout the bilateral parietal lobes and partially in the left frontal and temporal lobes. PRNP gene analysis showed no mutations with methionine homozygosity at codon 129 in peripheral blood. Cerebrospinal fluid examination, including 14-3-3 and total tau protein detection, revealed normal levels; however, prion proteins were amplified by the real-time quaking-induced conversion method. Hashimoto's encephalopathy was excluded on the basis of unresponsiveness to corticosteroids. The symptoms progressed slowly. Periodic sharp-wave complexes were observed on electroencephalogram 36 months after the onset of symptoms; the patient reached a state of akinetic mutism at 47 months. This was a probable case of MM2-cortical-type sCJD with anti-NAE antibodies based on the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria for sCJD, genetic information, and the slowly progressive course. However, this case did not meet with the probable WHO diagnostic criteria until 3 years after symptom onset, highlighting the difficulty of diagnosing a living case of the MM2-type of sCJD. Therefore, establishment of clinical diagnostic criteria for MM2-type of sCJD is required.

  2. Hashimoto's encephalopathy mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Angela C; Baehring, Joachim M

    2017-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare, imprecisely defined autoimmune neurologic syndrome associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis that normally responds to corticosteroids. Here, we describe the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with subacute cognitive decline and ataxia. Neoplastic, paraneoplastic, infectious, and metabolic etiologies were ruled out. Anti-TPO antibody level was markedly elevated at 966U/mL. After one month of 60mg/day of oral prednisone, she felt back to baseline and her Montreal Cognitive Assessment dramatically improved. Physicians should strongly consider this uncommon diagnosis in patients with rapid cognitive decline and no other clear etiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob: Reporte de dos casos.

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Brevis C.; Eduardo López A.; Catherine Navarrete G.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: La enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (ECJ) es una enfermedad priónica neurodegenerativa que afecta el Sistema Nervioso Central (SNC), invariablemente mortal. Clasificada en esporádica, familiar e iatrogénica, se manifiesta por cuadro demencial subagudo, síntomas motores, visuales, y mioclonías. Presenta electroencefalograma (EEG) con actividad espicular pseudoperiódica; resonancia agnética (RM) con hiperintesidad de núcleos estriados y áreas de corteza cerebral; y líquido céfalo r...

  4. Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob: Reporte de dos casos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Brevis C.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: La enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (ECJ es una enfermedad priónica neurodegenerativa que afecta el Sistema Nervioso Central (SNC, invariablemente mortal. Clasificada en esporádica, familiar e iatrogénica, se manifiesta por cuadro demencial subagudo, síntomas motores, visuales, y mioclonías. Presenta electroencefalograma (EEG con actividad espicular pseudoperiódica; resonancia agnética (RM con hiperintesidad de núcleos estriados y áreas de corteza cerebral; y líquido céfalo raquídeo (LCR con aumento de proteína 14-3-3. Finalmente, un estudio histopatológico del cerebro establece la encefalopatía espongiforme. PRESENTACIÓN DEL CASO: Se exponen dos casos de ECJ. Ambas mujeres, 44 y 67 años, con alteración de la marcha, deterioro cognitivo y mioclonías, cuadro rápidamente progresivo hasta la dependencia absoluta. EEG en ambos casos compatible con ECJ, además de imágenes que revelan hiperintensidad en núcleos estriados y/o zonas de la corteza. Ambas cursaron con infecciones durante su hospitalización y se les realizó gastrostomía por presentar trastorno deglutorio severo. DISCUSIÓN: El diagnóstico de ECJ se sospecha con la clínica, y se fundamenta con hallazgos característicos en RM, EEG y análisis de LCR. Ante la sospecha de la forma familiar se sugiere estudio genético, sin embargo, en el Hospital Clínico Herminda Martin (HCHM no se realiza. Al ser una enfermedad invariablemente mortal y sin tratamiento, dificulta la decisión entre realización de estudios e intervenciones, contra el manejo expectante.

  5. Coexistence of mixed phenotype Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Lewy body disease and argyrophilic grain disease plus histological features of possible Alzheimer's disease: a multi-protein disorder in an autopsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vega, Iván; Ruiz-Ojeda, Javier; Juste, Ramon A; Geijo, Maria; Zarranz, Juan Jose; Sánchez Menoyo, Jose Luis; Vicente-Etxenausia, Ikerne; Mediavilla-García, Jennifer; Guerra-Merino, Isabel

    2015-02-01

    We report hereby an autopsy case of sporadic mixed phenotype CJD without hereditary burden and a long-term clinical course. An 80-year old man was diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment 27 months before death, caused by bronchopneumonia and severe respiratory impairment. During this time, the patient developed gradual mental deterioration, some sleeping problems and myoclonus. Other clinical manifestations were progressive gait problems, language deterioration, presence of primitive reflexes and irritability. In keeping with those symptoms, a rapidly evolving dementia was clinically suspected. Cerebrospinal fluid test for 14-3-3 protein was negative. However, an abnormal EEG and MRI at end-stage of disease were finally consistent with CJD. Post-mortem examination revealed a massive cortical neuronal loss with associated reactive astrocytosis, also evident in the white matter. Diffuse spongiform changes involving some basal ganglia, especially medial thalamus, some troncoencephalic nuclei, mainly inferior olivary nucleus and the molecular layer of the cerebellum were seen. Immunorreactive deposits for anti-prion protein antibody were present at different areas of the CNS. Additionally, Lewy bodies were observed at the brainstem and amygdala. Furthermore, argirophilic grains together with oligodendroglial coiled bodies and pre-tangle inclusions in the neurons from the limbic system containing hyperphosphorylated 4R tau were noted. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of CJD combined with Lewy body disease and argirophilic grain disease. Furthermore, we believe this case is an extremely rare combination of MM2-cortical-type and MM2-thalamic-type sporadic CJD (sCJD), which explains the broad spectrum of MM2-type sCJD findings and symptoms. Moreover, histological features of possible Alzheimer's disease were also reported.

  6. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging - a new instrument in the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jacob's disease; Diffusjonsvektet magnetisk resonanstomografi - nytt i diagnostikken av Creutzfeldt-Jakobs sykdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romi, Fredrik; Smivoll, Alf Inge; Moerk, Sverre; Tysnes, Ole-Bjoern

    2000-07-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jacob's disease (CID) is characterised by rapidly progressive dementia, ataxia, myoclonus and several other neurological deficits. It generally affects older adults and occurs in sporadic, genetic and iatrogenic forms. Death occurs usually within one year after onset of the disease. The diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, neuro physiological and radiological findings and confirmed by post mortal histopathology. During the last two years several cases of CID have been reported with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MR) abnormalities represented by increased signal intensity indicating reduced diffusion in basal ganglia and/or cortex cerebric. These abnormalities seem to be characteristic of CID. We report a case of CID in a 54 year old woman who developed vertigo, nystagmus, ataxia, myoclonus and dementia over a period of eight months. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed increased signal intensity in corpus striatum and gyrus conguli. The diagnosis was post mortally confirmed with histopathology. (Author) 7 figs., 15 refs.

  7. Presymptomatic detection or exclusion of prion protein gene defects in families with inherited prion diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The identification of defects in the prion protein (PrP) gene in families with inherited Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or Gerstmann-Straussler syndrome allows presymptomatic diagnosis or exclusion of these disorders in subjects at risk. After counseling, PrP gene analysis was performed in three such individuals: two from families with a 144-bp insert and one with a point mutation at codon 102 in the PrP gene. The presence of a PrP gene defect was confirmed in one and excluded in two. Despite the ...

  8. Binswanger's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  9. Batten Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  10. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  11. Krabbe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  12. Doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob: registro de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Aris Kouyoumdjian

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado um caso da doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (DCJ com estudo neuropatológico. O paciente, de 76 anos de idade e do sexo masculino, apresentou quadro de demência rapidamente progressiva associada a ataxia, afasia, mioclonias e síndrome motora piramidal com evolução de aproximadamente 4 meses até o óbito. Havia antecedente de trauma ocular à direita causado por substância química de origem vegetal há cerca de 12 a 18 meses. O eletrencefalograma revelou lentificação difusa do traçado. Os achados neuropatológicos foram característicos. O encontro de partícula proteinácea infectante no "scrapie", descrita como "prion" ou PrP27-30 cujo antissoro reagiu com proteínas do cérebro de pacientes com DCJ abriu nova perspectiva na conceituação do agente etiológico, descrito anteriormente como vírus não convencional. A descrição de alguns casos de DCJ em jovens que faziam uso de hormônio de crescimento preparado de hipófises de cadáveres é preocupante em termos de aparecimento de novos casos.

  13. Enfermedad de creutzfeldt-jakob en el Perú: reporte de once casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Torres-Ramírez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (ECJ es una enfermedad neurológica fatal producida por la isoforma patológica de la proteína priónica humana. Se reporta las características clínicas de seis casos de la forma esporádica de ECJ con diagnóstico definitivo por histopatología, y cinco casos con diagnóstico probable, en pacientes atendidos en el Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas del Perú. La edad de inicio en los casos definitivos fue de 55,8 años y, en los probables, de 59,6 años, con predominio del sexo masculino. El tiempo de enfermedad fue de 8,8 meses. Se encontró un EEG típico en 50% de los casos definitivos y 80% de los probables. La proteína 14-3-3 en líquido cefalorraquídeo fue positiva en un caso probable y los hallazgos típicos en resonancia magnética se observaron en dos casos probables. Todos los casos cursaron con una evolución clínica típica de la enfermedad, y se considera el primer reporte de ECJ en el Perú

  14. Enfermedad de creutzfeldt-jakob en el Perú: reporte de once casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Torres-Ramírez

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (ECJ es una enfermedad neurológica fatal producida por la isoforma patológica de la proteína priónica humana. Se reporta las características clínicas de seis casos de la forma esporádica de ECJ con diagnóstico definitivo por histopatología, y cinco casos con diagnóstico probable, en pacientes atendidos en el Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas del Perú. La edad de inicio en los casos definitivos fue de 55,8 años y, en los probables, de 59,6 años, con predominio del sexo masculino. El tiempo de enfermedad fue de 8,8 meses. Se encontró un EEG típico en 50% de los casos definitivos y 80% de los probables. La proteína 14-3-3 en líquido cefalorraquídeo fue positiva en un caso probable y los hallazgos típicos en resonancia magnética se observaron en dos casos probables. Todos los casos cursaron con una evolución clínica típica de la enfermedad, y se considera el primer reporte de ECJ en el Perú

  15. Diversidad sindromatica de la enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob: correlato neurofisiologico e histopatologico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ferrer D

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available Se estudian dos casos de enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob comprobados por examen necrópsico. Uno de ellos presentaba típicas descargas hipersincrónicas, periódicas en el electroencefalograma; el otro caso no mostraba estas descargas epileptiformes y evolucionó con una lentitud difusa progresiva. La espongiosis, gliosis y pérdida neuronal fué intensa en la corteza del caso con espigas y muy moderada en el caso sin espigas. El compromiso subcortical era similar en ambos casos. Se postula que la diferente expresión topográfica de su histopatología explicaria tambien la diferencia en el comportamiento de los potenciales evocados somatosensoriales y el diferente modelo electroencefalográfico del sueno penthotálico. La independencia de las descargas epileptiformes en cada hemisferio se prueba con el test de Wada. Se discute el origen de las espigas y su periodicidad. Se postula teóricamente que el predominio de las lesiones de las capas II a IV privaria a las células piramidales remanentes, de influencias inhibitorias, lo que explicaria la génesis de las espigas.

  16. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  17. Infantile Refsum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  18. Prion diseases of the brain; Prionenerkrankung des Gehirns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Kira; Urbach, Horst [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Neuroradiologie

    2015-09-15

    The prion diseases of the brain, especially Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, are rare fatal neurodegenerative disorders. A definitive CJD diagnosis is currently only possible by a brain biopsy or post mortem autopsy. The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is based on clinical signs, pathognomonic EEG, on typical MRI findings and the examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. Using the MRI the diagnosis Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can be confirmed or excluded with high certainty. The MRI examination should contain diffusion-weighted and FLAIR imaging sequences. This review article provides an overview of the prion diseases of the brain with the corresponding imaging findings.

  19. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (Prion Diseases)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  20. Human prion disease with a G114V mutation and epidemiological studies in a Chinese family: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Jing

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are a group of neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals. Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, in which mutations in the PRNP gene predispose to disease by causing the expression of abnormal PrP protein, include familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome and fatal familial insomnia. Case presentation A 47-year-old Han-Chinese woman was hospitalized with a 2-year history of progressive dementia, tiredness, lethargy and mild difficulty in falling asleep. On neurological examination, there was severe apathy, spontaneous myoclonus of the lower limbs, generalized hyperreflexia and bilateral Babinski signs. A missense mutation (T to G was identified at the position of nt 341 in one PRNP allele, leading to a change from glycine (Gly to valine (Val at codon 114. PK-resistant PrPSc was detected in brain tissues by Western blotting and immunohistochemical assays. Information on pedigree was collected notably by interviews with family members. A further four suspected patients in five consecutive generations of the family have been identified. One of them was hospitalized for progressive memory impairment at the age of 32. On examination, he had impairment of memory, calculation and comprehension, mild ataxia of the limbs, tremor and a left Babinski sign. He is still alive. Conclusion This family with G114V inherited prion disease is the first to be described in China and represents the second family worldwide in which this mutation has been identified. Three other suspected cases have been retrospectively identified in this family, and a further case with suggestive clinical manifestations has been shown by gene sequencing to have the causal mutation.

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease with Mixed Transcortical Aphasia: Insights into Echolalia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S. E. McPherson; J. D. Kuratani; J. L. Cummings; J. Shih; P. S. Mischel; H. V. Vinters

    1994-01-01

    .... The patient ultimately evidenced mixed transcortical aphasia (MTA) with echolalia. Disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits with environmental dependency accounts for the symptoms in MTA, including intact repetition and echolalia...

  2. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with mixed transcortical aphasia: insights into echolalia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McPherson, S E; Kuratani, J D; Cummings, J L; Shih, J; Mischel, P S; Vinters, H V

    1994-01-01

    .... The patient ultimately evidenced mixed transcortical aphasia (MTA) with echolalia. Disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits with environmental dependency accounts for the symptoms in MTA, including intact repetition and echolalia...

  3. 医源性Creutzfeldt-Jakob病%Introgenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林世和

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1999年7月19~21日在世界卫生组织官员Maura Ricketts的组织领导下,奥地利著名神经病学家Herbert Budka、英国Martin Zeidler、MR Bradley教授等专程来到北京,由中国卫生部和世界卫生组织联合举办,中国预防医学科学院具体承办的Creutzfeldt-Jakob病(CJD)监测讲习班,旨在我国尽快成立国家CJD监测中心,同世界发达国家与世界卫生组织取得紧密联系,共同努力尽快发现CJD的危险因素与致病因子,为减少和预防CJD的发生与扩延做出自己的贡献.会议期间吉林大学第一医院CJD课题组报告了国人CJD的临床、病理、免疫组化、基因检测、14-3-3蛋白和动物传递的研究.董小平研究员报告了人朊病毒病的实验室研究,郭玉璞教授对CJD的病理改变做了补充发言.

  4. Cleanability of dental instruments--implications of residual protein and risks from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J T; Dickinson, J; Sutton, J M; Raven, N D H; Marsh, P D

    2007-10-13

    Cleaning of dental instruments is the first line of control in reducing the adherent bioburden. The threat of vCJD and the difficulty in removing prion protein has provided a new challenge for cleaning surgical and dental instruments. Prion proteins are also more resistant to many disinfection and sterilisation techniques. A number of different methods are currently available in primary care for cleaning instruments including manual washing, ultrasonic cleaners and washer disinfectors. Manual cleaning of dental instruments is time-consuming, introduces operator error and the risk of puncture wounds, is not reproducible and does not completely remove debris from instruments. Ultrasonic baths are significantly more effective than hand cleaning alone and are currently used by the majority of dental surgeries (often as an adjunct to manual cleaning). Automated washer-disinfectors appear to provide a validated, reliable and reproducible procedure for disinfection and sterilisation of dental instruments to ensure both the safety of patients and dental staff. Dental instruments that are difficult to clean are frequently contaminated with tissue debris after routine reprocessing and cannot be excluded as a potential transmission risk for infectious agents, including prions. The transmission of vCJD via dentistry is considered to be low risk, however, the Department of Health (DoH) has recently advised dentists to ensure that endodontic reamers and files are treated as single-use as a precautionary basis in order to further reduce any risk of vCJD transmission.

  5. Doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob forma Heidenhain: relato de caso com achados de ressonância magnética e DWI

    OpenAIRE

    Arruda Walter Oleschko; Bordignon Kelly C.; Milano Jerônimo B.; Ramina Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    A doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) é uma forma de demência pré-senil de rápida evolução, geralmente fatal em um ano. Casos autóctones no Brasil têm sido raramente descritos assim como achados de ressonância magnética. Mulher, natural de Ponta Grossa PR, branca , 54 anos , foi admitida no serviço em outubro de 2001 com quadro de amaurose bilateral cortical progressiva desde há 1 mês do internamento. Nunca viajou ao exterior e foi somente submetida a uma cirurgia de redução do estômago, para o...

  6. Localization of disease-related PrP in Danish patients with different subtypes of prion disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrom, A.L.; Heegaard, P.M.; Dyrbye, H.

    2009-01-01

    blot (PET-blot), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB) were combined to study the morphology and localization of disease related PrP in Danish patients with different subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, familiar Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann......-Straussler-Scheinker disease. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: There was a good morphological and anatomical concordance between what was found with PET-blot and IHC in all patients. In some specific cases, the PET-blot was superior to IHC in sensitivity. To our knowledge, this is the first report where PET-blot analysis is applied...

  7. Localization of disease-related PrP in Danish patients with different subtypes of prion disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, A. L.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Dyrbye, H.;

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The transmissible spongiform encephalopaties are characterized by vacuolization, neuronal loss, gliosis and deposition of a misfilded and Proteinase K resistant isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system. Methods, materials and patients: Paraffin-embedded tissue...... blot (PET-blot), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB) were combined to stydy the morphology and localization of disease related PrP in Danish patients with different subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, familiar Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gertsmann...

  8. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  9. Transgenic fatal familial insomnia mice indicate prion infectivity-independent mechanisms of pathogenesis and phenotypic expression of disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihssane Bouybayoune

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatal familial insomnia (FFI and a genetic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD178 are clinically different prion disorders linked to the D178N prion protein (PrP mutation. The disease phenotype is determined by the 129 M/V polymorphism on the mutant allele, which is thought to influence D178N PrP misfolding, leading to the formation of distinctive prion strains with specific neurotoxic properties. However, the mechanism by which misfolded variants of mutant PrP cause different diseases is not known. We generated transgenic (Tg mice expressing the mouse PrP homolog of the FFI mutation. These mice synthesize a misfolded form of mutant PrP in their brains and develop a neurological illness with severe sleep disruption, highly reminiscent of FFI and different from that of analogously generated Tg(CJD mice modeling CJD178. No prion infectivity was detectable in Tg(FFI and Tg(CJD brains by bioassay or protein misfolding cyclic amplification, indicating that mutant PrP has disease-encoding properties that do not depend on its ability to propagate its misfolded conformation. Tg(FFI and Tg(CJD neurons have different patterns of intracellular PrP accumulation associated with distinct morphological abnormalities of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, suggesting that mutation-specific alterations of secretory transport may contribute to the disease phenotype.

  10. Transgenic fatal familial insomnia mice indicate prion infectivity-independent mechanisms of pathogenesis and phenotypic expression of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouybayoune, Ihssane; Mantovani, Susanna; Del Gallo, Federico; Bertani, Ilaria; Restelli, Elena; Comerio, Liliana; Tapella, Laura; Baracchi, Francesca; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Mangieri, Michela; Bisighini, Cinzia; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Paladini, Alessandra; Balducci, Claudia; Micotti, Edoardo; Forloni, Gianluigi; Castilla, Joaquín; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Imeri, Luca; Chiesa, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and a genetic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD178) are clinically different prion disorders linked to the D178N prion protein (PrP) mutation. The disease phenotype is determined by the 129 M/V polymorphism on the mutant allele, which is thought to influence D178N PrP misfolding, leading to the formation of distinctive prion strains with specific neurotoxic properties. However, the mechanism by which misfolded variants of mutant PrP cause different diseases is not known. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the mouse PrP homolog of the FFI mutation. These mice synthesize a misfolded form of mutant PrP in their brains and develop a neurological illness with severe sleep disruption, highly reminiscent of FFI and different from that of analogously generated Tg(CJD) mice modeling CJD178. No prion infectivity was detectable in Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) brains by bioassay or protein misfolding cyclic amplification, indicating that mutant PrP has disease-encoding properties that do not depend on its ability to propagate its misfolded conformation. Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) neurons have different patterns of intracellular PrP accumulation associated with distinct morphological abnormalities of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, suggesting that mutation-specific alterations of secretory transport may contribute to the disease phenotype.

  11. MM2-Thalamic Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease: Neuropathological, Biochemical and Transmission Studies Identify a Distinctive Prion Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moda, F.; Suardi, S.; Fede, Di G.; Indaco, A.; Limido, L.; Vimercati, C.; Ruggerone, M.; Campagnani, I.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Terruzzi, A.; Brambilla, A.; Zerbi, P.; Fociani, P.; Bishop, T.; Will, G.W.; Manson, J.C.; Giaccone, G.; Tagliavini, F.

    2012-01-01

    In CreutzfeldtJakob disease (CJD), molecular typing based on the size of the protease resistant core of the disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) and the M/V polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene correlates with the clinico-pathologic subtypes. Approximately 95% of the sporadic 129MM CJD pat

  12. MM2-Thalamic Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease: Neuropathological, Biochemical and Transmission Studies Identify a Distinctive Prion Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moda, F.; Suardi, S.; Fede, Di G.; Indaco, A.; Limido, L.; Vimercati, C.; Ruggerone, M.; Campagnani, I.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Terruzzi, A.; Brambilla, A.; Zerbi, P.; Fociani, P.; Bishop, T.; Will, G.W.; Manson, J.C.; Giaccone, G.; Tagliavini, F.

    2012-01-01

    In CreutzfeldtJakob disease (CJD), molecular typing based on the size of the protease resistant core of the disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) and the M/V polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene correlates with the clinico-pathologic subtypes. Approximately 95% of the sporadic 129MM CJD

  13. Metabolic patterns in prion diseases: an FDG PET voxel-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, Elena; Dominguez-Prado, Ines; Jesus Ribelles, Maria; Arbizu, Javier [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Pamplona (Spain); Riverol, Mario; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Rosario Luquin, Maria; Castro, Purificacion de [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Neurology Department, Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Clinical diagnosis of human prion diseases can be challenging since symptoms are common to other disorders associated with rapidly progressive dementia. In this context, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) might be a useful complementary tool. The aim of this study was to determine the metabolic pattern in human prion diseases, particularly sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). We retrospectively studied 17 patients with a definitive, probable or possible prion disease who underwent FDG PET in our institution. Of these patients, 12 were diagnosed as sCJD (9 definitive, 2 probable and 1 possible), 1 was diagnosed as definitive vCJD and 4 were diagnosed as definitive FFI. The hypometabolic pattern of each individual and comparisons across the groups of subjects (control subjects, sCJD and FFI) were evaluated using a voxel-based analysis. The sCJD group exhibited a pattern of hypometabolism that affected both subcortical (bilateral caudate, thalamus) and cortical (frontal cortex) structures, while the FFI group only presented a slight hypometabolism in the thalamus. Individual analysis demonstrated a considerable variability of metabolic patterns among patients, with the thalamus and basal ganglia the most frequently affected areas, combined in some cases with frontal and temporal hypometabolism. Patients with a prion disease exhibit a characteristic pattern of brain metabolism presentation in FDG PET imaging. Consequently, in patients with rapidly progressive cognitive impairment, the detection of these patterns in the FDG PET study could orient the diagnosis to a prion disease. (orig.)

  14. Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of BSE and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human PrP

    Science.gov (United States)

    The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle TSEs can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several new TSEs in shee...

  15. Prionic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q-C Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 – and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI. Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases.

  16. Localization of disease-related PrP in Danish patients with different subtypes of prion disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, A. L.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Dyrbye, H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The transmissible spongiform encephalopaties are characterized by vacuolization, neuronal loss, gliosis and deposition of a misfilded and Proteinase K resistant isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system. Methods, materials and patients: Paraffin-embedded tissue...... blot (PET-blot), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB) were combined to stydy the morphology and localization of disease related PrP in Danish patients with different subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, familiar Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gertsmann......-Sträussler-Scheinker disease. Results and conclusion: There was a good morphological and anatomical concordance between what was found with PET-blot and IHC in all patients. In some specific cases, the PET-blot was superior to IHC in sensitivity. to our knowledge, this is the first report where PET-blot analysis is applied...

  17. Estudo retrospectivo da doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob diagnosticada no norte de Portugal entre 1993-2002: características demográficas, clínicas e neuropatológicas

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    Silva Ana Martins

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO E OBJETIVO: Descrição das características demográficas, clinicas e neuropatológicas de 11 doentes com doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (DCJ. MÉTODO: Revisão clínica e neuropatológica de doentes com DCJ diagnosticados entre 1993 e 2002 em hospitais do Norte de Portugal. RESULTADOS: Foram identificados 11 doentes (4 do sexo feminino; idade média de início dos sintomas, 64 anos; média de duração da doença, 8 meses. Todos apresentaram síndrome demencial progressiva associada a mioclonias, sendo a síndrome cerebelar a forma de apresentação inicial em quatro deles. O estudo neuropatológico revelou sempre espongiose e gliose reativa associada a perda neuronal. O estudo imunocitoquímico para proteína priônica (PrP foi positivo nos oito casos em que foi executado. CONCLUSÃO: O grupo de doentes descritos constitui uma série clinica representativa da heterogeneidade de fenótipos possíveis da DCJ esporádica. O estudo neuropatológico é ainda indispensável para o diagnóstico definitivo da doença.

  18. [From the Scrapie syndrome of sheep and goat to the mad cow disease - the history of the discovery of prion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Weng, Yi

    2009-05-01

    Since the discovery of Scrapie Syndrome in sheep and goats in 1730, there emerged a series of diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc. In the research of kuru disease, the American scientist D. Carlteton Gajdusek found a new virus without the characteristic of DNA and RNA, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology in 1976. Since then another American scientist, Stanley B. Prusiner, found a new virus-prion, taking protein as the genetic medium, which was awarded the Nobel prize in physiology and medicine in 1997. The discovery of prion is a great landmark in the research of life science, which laid a theoretical foundation for people to conquer a series of diseases such as Scrapie syndrome in sheep and goats, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc.

  19. Infectious prion diseases in humans: cannibalism, iatrogenicity and zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïk, Stéphane; Brandel, Jean-Philippe

    2014-08-01

    In contrast with other neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, human prion diseases include infectious forms (also called transmitted forms) such as kuru, iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The transmissible agent is thought to be solely composed of the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the host-encoded prion protein that accumulated in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Compared to its normal counterpart, PrP(Sc) is β-sheet enriched and aggregated and its propagation is based on an autocatalytic conversion process. Increasing evidence supports the view that conformational variations of PrP(Sc) encoded the biological properties of the various prion strains that have been isolated by transmission studies in experimental models. Infectious forms of human prion diseases played a pivotal role in the emergence of the prion concept and in the characterization of the very unconventional properties of prions. They provide a unique model to understand how prion strains are selected and propagate in humans. Here, we review and discuss how genetic factors interplay with strain properties and route of transmission to influence disease susceptibility, incubation period and phenotypic expression in the light of the kuru epidemics due to ritual endocannibalism, the various series iatrogenic diseases secondary to extractive growth hormone treatment or dura mater graft and the epidemics of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease linked to dietary exposure to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

  20. [Human prion diseases in the Czech Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Z; Rusina, R; Marešová, M; Matěj, R

    2015-09-01

    Human prion diseases are a group of very rare diseases with a unique pathogenesis and, due to an inauspicious prognosis and unavailability of therapy, with fatal consequences. The etiopathogenetic background is the presence of pathologically misfolded prion protein, highly resistant to denaturation, the aggregation and presence of which in the brain tissue causes irreversible neuronal damage. The most frequent prion disease in humans is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) which occurs in sporadic, hereditary/familial, or acquired/infectious/iatrogenic forms. A new form of CJD, variant CJD, is considered to be linked to dietary exposure to beef products from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and to infection via blood transfusion. The clinical picture of these diseases is characterized by a rapidly progressing dementia, cerebellar and extrapyramidal symptoms, and rather specific MRI, EEG, and CSF findings. Clinically, the diagnosis is described as possible or probable prion disease and needs to be confirmed by neuropathological or immunological investigation of the brain tissue. Epidemiological data from the Czech Republic spanning the last decade are presented.

  1. Glycoform-selective prion formation in sporadic and familial forms of prion disease.

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    Xiangzhu Xiao

    Full Text Available The four glycoforms of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C variably glycosylated at the two N-linked glycosylation sites are converted into their pathological forms (PrP(Sc in most cases of sporadic prion diseases. However, a prominent molecular characteristic of PrP(Sc in the recently identified variably protease-sensitive prionopathy (VPSPr is the absence of a diglycosylated form, also notable in familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD, which is linked to mutations in PrP either from Val to Ile at residue 180 (fCJD(V180I or from Thr to Ala at residue 183 (fCJD(T183A. Here we report that fCJD(V180I, but not fCJD(T183A, exhibits a proteinase K (PK-resistant PrP (PrP(res that is markedly similar to that observed in VPSPr, which exhibits a five-step ladder-like electrophoretic profile, a molecular hallmark of VPSPr. Remarkably, the absence of the diglycosylated PrP(res species in both fCJD(V180I and VPSPr is likewise attributable to the absence of PrP(res glycosylated at the first N-linked glycosylation site at residue 181, as in fCJD(T183A. In contrast to fCJD(T183A, both VPSPr and fCJD(V180I exhibit glycosylation at residue 181 on di- and monoglycosylated (mono181 PrP prior to PK-treatment. Furthermore, PrP(V180I with a typical glycoform profile from cultured cells generates detectable PrP(res that also contains the diglycosylated PrP in addition to mono- and unglycosylated forms upon PK-treatment. Taken together, our current in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that sporadic VPSPr and familial CJD(V180I share a unique glycoform-selective prion formation pathway in which the conversion of diglycosylated and mono181 PrP(C to PrP(Sc is inhibited, probably by a dominant-negative effect, or by other co-factors.

  2. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... similar to those of other disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the disorder is ... similar to those of other disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the disorder is ...

  3. Prion disease resembling frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17

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    Nitrini Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical features of a familial prion disease with those of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17. BACKGROUND: Prion diseases are not usually considered in the differential diagnosis of FTDP-17, since familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, the most common inherited prion disease, often manifests as a rapidly progressive dementia. Conversely, FTDP-17 usually has an insidious onset in the fifth decade, with abnormal behavior and parkinsonian features. METHOD: We present the clinical features of 12 patients from a family with CJD associated with a point mutation at codon 183 of the prion protein gene. RESULTS: The mean age at onset was 44.0 ± 3.7; the duration of the symptoms until death ranged from two to nine years. Behavioral disturbances were the predominant presenting symptoms. Nine patients were first seen by psychiatrists. Eight patients manifested parkinsonian signs. CONCLUSION: These clinical features bear a considerable resemblance to those described in FTDP-17.

  4. Gastrostomy in patients with prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Kawai, Yoshinari; Hoshino, Ken-Ichiro; Kawabata, Yuko; Mimuro, Maya; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-05-04

    Patients with prion diseases can live for long periods of time in a state of akinetic mutism given appropriate management of their symptoms. To study symptom support in these cases, we performed gastrostomies on 3 patients with V180I genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) who had become akinetic and mute, and compared them to 14 other similar patients being fed by tube. In the 3 gastrostomy cases, there were no direct complications due to the gastrostomy or tube feeding, nor were there episodes of discontinuation of tube feeding or initiation of continuous drip infusion due to severe complications. Antibiotics were administered for mild infections, a complication of CJD, with 0.2% and 8.8% of the total time after gastrostomy being used for intravenous or transluminal administration, respectively. We compared the present patient series with that of our previous report statistically, and found that patients undergoing gastrostomy required significantly fewer discontinuations of tube feeding than those who did not. No significant difference in antibiotic administration was found between groups, however. It is our conclusion that gastrostomy should be allowed for symptom support in akinetic patients with prion disease, but adequate informed consent must be provided to the patient's family.

  5. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Collinge, J. [University College London, MRC Prion Unit, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  6. [Patient with Creutzfeld-Jakob disease - a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Klimczuk, Joanna; Rolewska, Agnieszka; Galbarczyk, Dariusz

    2017-02-20

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare syndrome of central nervous system caused by infectious protein called prion. There are four types of CJD: sporadic (sCJD), familial (fCJD), jatrogenic (jCJD) and variant (vCJD). The most frequent symptoms are rapidly progressing dementia, mioclonias, akinetic mutism and signs of cerebellum dysfunction. In sCJD, MRI often shows high signal intensity in the putamen and caudate nucleus on T2-weighted images while in vCJD pulvinar sign is often observed. 70% patients with CJD often has characteristic generalized periodic sharp wave pattern in electroencephalography. In case of 90% patients with CJD 14-3-3 protein is present in cerebrospinal fluid. Neuropathological studies play an important role in disease diagnosis. CJD incidence is 0.5-1 on 1000000 people but some cases can be undiagnosed. Presented study is a description of woman with sCJD confirmed with histopathological study. Since childhood patient had psychotic symptoms and behavior disturbances. Patient wasn't diagnosed due to this symptoms. Few months before admission to hospital her condition was getting worse. Symptoms of cerebellum, pyramidal and extrapyramidal system occurred. In cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein was detected. In EEG and MRI changes specific for sCJD was observed. After three months patient died.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol-glycan-phospholipase D is involved in neurodegeneration in prion disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Kwang Jin

    Full Text Available PrPSc is formed from a normal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored prion protein (PrPC by a posttranslational modification. Most GPI-anchored proteins have been shown to be cleaved by GPI phospholipases. Recently, GPI-phospholipase D (GPI-PLD was shown to be a strictly specific enzyme for GPI anchors. To investigate the involvement of GPI-PLD in the processes of neurodegeneration in prion diseases, we examined the mRNA and protein expression levels of GPI-PLD in the brains of a prion animal model (scrapie, and in both the brains and cerebrospinal fluids (CSF of sporadic and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD patients. We found that compared with controls, the expression of GPI-PLD was dramatically down-regulated in the brains of scrapie-infected mice, especially in the caveolin-enriched membrane fractions. Interestingly, the observed decrease in GPI-PLD expression levels began at the same time that PrPSc began to accumulate in the infected brains and this decrease was also observed in both the brain and CSF of CJD patients; however, no differences in expression were observed in either the brains or CSF specimens from Alzheimer's disease patients. Taken together, these results suggest that the down-regulation of GPI-PLD protein may be involved in prion propagation in the brains of prion diseases.

  8. The epsilon isoform of 14-3-3 protein is a component of the prion protein amyloid deposits of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Giaccone, Giorgio; Limido, Lucia; Mangieri, Michela; Suardi, Silvia; Puoti, Gianfranco; Morbin, Michela; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Ghetti, Bernardino; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2007-02-01

    The 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved, ubiquitous molecules involved in a variety of biologic events, such as transduction pathway modulation, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. Seven isoforms have been identified that are abundant in the brain, preferentially localized in neurons. Remarkable increases in 14-3-3 are seen in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and it has been found in pathologic inclusions of several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, the zeta isoform has been detected in prion protein (PrP) amyloid deposits of CJD patients. To further investigate the cerebral distribution of 14-3-3 in prion-related encephalopathies, we carried out an immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis of brain tissue from patients with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and sporadic, familial and acquired forms of CJD, using specific antibodies against the seven 14-3-3 isoforms. The study showed a strong immunoreactivity of PrP amyloid plaques of GSS patients for the 14-3-3 epsilon isoform, but not for the other isoforms. The epsilon isoform of 14-3-3 was not found in PrP deposits of CJD. These results indicate that the epsilon isoform of 14-3-3 is a component of PrP amyloid deposits of GSS and suggest that this is the sole 14-3-3 isoform specifically involved in the neuropathologic changes associated with this disorder.

  9. Investigating the role of rare coding variability in Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP) in late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Celeste; Guerreiro, Rita; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K.; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Niblock, Michael; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Adnan, Jihad; Killick, Richard; Brown, Kristelle S.; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Bras, Jose; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F.; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    The overlapping clinical and neuropathologic features between late-onset apparently sporadic Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), and other neurodegenerative dementias (frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) raise the question of whether shared genetic risk factors may explain the similar phenotype among these disparate disorders. To investigate this intriguing hypothesis, we analyzed rare coding variability in 6 Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP), in 141 LOAD patients and 179 elderly controls, neuropathologically proven, from the UK. In our cohort, 14 LOAD cases (10%) and 11 controls (6%) carry at least 1 rare variant in the genes studied. We report a novel variant in PSEN1 (p.I168T) and a rare variant in PSEN2 (p.A237V), absent in controls and both likely pathogenic. Our findings support previous studies, suggesting that (1) rare coding variability in PSEN1 and PSEN2 may influence the susceptibility for LOAD and (2) GRN, MAPT, and PRNP are not major contributors to LOAD. Thus, genetic screening is pivotal for the clinical differential diagnosis of these neurodegenerative dementias. PMID:25104557

  10. Iron: the Redox-active center of oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Rudy J; Moreira, Paula I; Liu, Gang; Dobson, Jon; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2007-10-01

    Although iron is essential in maintaining the function of the central nervous system, it is a potent source of reactive oxygen species. Excessive iron accumulation occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, raising the possibility that oxidative stress is intimately involved in the neurodegenerative process. AD in particular is associated with accumulation of numerous markers of oxidative stress; moreover, oxidative stress has been shown to precede hallmark neuropathological lesions early in the disease process, and such lesions, once present, further accumulate iron, among other markers of oxidative stress. In this review, we discuss the role of iron in the progression of AD.

  11. Creutzfeldt-Jacob’s Disease Presenting with Psychiatric Symptomsand Severe Itching

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    Emine Rabia Koç

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal prion-like proteins in the central nervous system. Clinical features, electroencephalography, brain magnetic resonance imaging and protein 14.3.3 is useful in diagnosis. Protein 14.3.3 may be negative in the early or late stages of the disease. Presentation with psychiatric symptoms and itching is not typical in the beginning of the disease In this paper, we present a patient who was first accepted to the pschiatry ward because of his psychiatric symtpoms and had severe itching, resistant to antihistaminic drugs.

  12. Genetic Characterization of Movement Disorders and Dementias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Ataxia; Dystonia; Parkinson's Disease; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Corticobasal Degeneration; Multiple System Atrophy; Alzheimer's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Parkinson Disease-Dementia; Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian Atrophy; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Fatal Familial Insomnia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Krabbe's Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C; Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

  13. A novel form of human disease with a protease-sensitive prion protein and heterozygosity methionine/valine at codon 129: Case report

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    Bilbao Miren J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD is a rare neurodegenerative disorder in humans included in the group of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies or prion diseases. The vast majority of sCJD cases are molecularly classified according to the abnormal prion protein (PrPSc conformations along with polymorphism of codon 129 of the PRNP gene. Recently, a novel human disease, termed "protease-sensitive prionopathy", has been described. This disease shows a distinct clinical and neuropathological phenotype and it is associated to an abnormal prion protein more sensitive to protease digestion. Case presentation We report the case of a 75-year-old-man who developed a clinical course and presented pathologic lesions compatible with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and biochemical findings reminiscent of "protease-sensitive prionopathy". Neuropathological examinations revealed spongiform change mainly affecting the cerebral cortex, putamen/globus pallidus and thalamus, accompanied by mild astrocytosis and microgliosis, with slight involvement of the cerebellum. Confluent vacuoles were absent. Diffuse synaptic PrP deposits in these regions were largely removed following proteinase treatment. PrP deposition, as revealed with 3F4 and 1E4 antibodies, was markedly sensitive to pre-treatment with proteinase K. Molecular analysis of PrPSc showed an abnormal prion protein more sensitive to proteinase K digestion, with a five-band pattern of 28, 24, 21, 19, and 16 kDa, and three aglycosylated isoforms of 19, 16 and 6 kDa. This PrPSc was estimated to be 80% susceptible to digestion while the pathogenic prion protein associated with classical forms of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease were only 2% (type VV2 and 23% (type MM1 susceptible. No mutations in the PRNP gene were found and genotype for codon 129 was heterozygous methionine/valine. Conclusions A novel form of human disease with abnormal prion protein sensitive to protease and

  14. [Prion diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz, J J

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are one of the paradigms of modern neurological nosology founded on molecular grounds. Their incidence is low, however the public health challenges derived from their transmissibility, especially due to the appearance of a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) confers them a preferential place among health care authority concerns. The evolution of data from the European surveillance systems suggests a generalized underdiagnosis of prion diseases and casts doubts about their ability to detect a possible second wave of atypical vCJD, especially if their clinical-pathological characteristics change. Recent data also challenge the feasibility of a subclassification of prion diseases according to their genetic-molecular features

  15. The Features of Genetic Prion Diseases Based on Chinese Surveillance Program.

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    Qi Shi

    Full Text Available To identify the features of Chinese genetic prion diseases.Suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD cases that were reported under CJD surveillance were diagnosed and subtyped using the diagnostic criteria issued by the WHO. The general information concerning the patient, their clinical, MRI and EEG data, and the results of CSF 14-3-3 and PRNP sequencing were carefully collected from the database of the national CJD surveillance program and analyzed using the SPSS 11.5 statistical software program.Since 2006, 69 patients were diagnosed with genetic prion diseases and as having 15 different mutations. The median age of the 69 patients at disease onset was 53.5 years, varying from 19 to 80 years. The majority of patients displaying clinical symptoms were in the 50-59 years of age. FFI, T188K gCJD and E200K were the three most common subtypes. The disease appeared in the family histories of 43.48% of the patients. The clinical manifestations varied considerably among the various diseases. Patients who carried mutations in the N-terminus displayed a younger age of onset, were CSF 14-3-3 negative, had a family history of the condition, and experienced a longer duration of the condition. The clinical courses of T188K were significantly shorter than those of FFI and E200K gCJD, while the symptoms in the FFI group appeared at a younger age and for a longer duration. Moreover, the time intervals between the initial neurologist visit to the final diagnosis were similar among patients with FFI, T188K gCJD, E200K gCJD and other diseases.The features of Chinese genetic prion diseases are different from those seen in Europe and other Asian countries.

  16. Prions in Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy: An Update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, W.Q.; Gambetti, P.; Xiao, X.; Yuan, J.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Pirisinu, L.

    2013-01-01

    Human prion diseases, including sporadic, familial, and acquired forms such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), are caused by prions in which an abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) derived from its normal cellular isoform (PrPC) is the only known component. The recently-identified variably protease-sensi

  17. The human prion diseases. A review with special emphasis on new variant CJD and comments on surveillance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, C

    2012-02-03

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases represent a new group of diseases with unique clinical and neuropathological features, the transmission of which is both genetic and infectious. The responsible agent is unconventional and appears to be largely composed of a glycoprotein, the prion protein PrP. This is normally present on different cells. In prion diseases, it becomes converted to the pathogenic form PrPres which is resistant to proteinase and accumulates within the brain and this process is accompanied by the development of spongiform change, gliosis and neuronal loss. The human prion diseases include Kuru a progressive cerebellar degeneration with late dementia affecting Fore tribes in New-Guinea, now almost extinct, regarded as being related to cannibalism. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is the more frequent human prion disease. Its incidence is approximately one case per million per year. Four variants are now recognized: sporadic, familial, iatrogenic and the new variant. The latter represents a distinct clinico-pathological entity. It is now widely accepted that it is due to the same agent responsible for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in cattle. Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease is a very rare inherited disorder due to a number of different mutations in the PRP gene, characterized by abundant deposits of plaque PrPres in the cerebral grey matter. Fatal familial insomnia is another inherited disorder due to a mutation at codon 178 of the PRP gene associated with methionine on codon 129 of the mutant allele. The main neuropathological change is neuronal loss in the thalamus with little or no spongiosis and usually no PrPres deposition. Following the emergence of new variant CJD in 1996, surveillance of all forms of prion diseases has been now been actively introduced in many European nations in order to determine the true incidence and geographic distribution of these rare disorders in humans.

  18. Olfactory Receptors in Non-Chemosensory Organs: The Nervous System in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Isidro; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Carmona, Margarita; Carro, Eva; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Grison, Alice; Gustincich, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) and down-stream functional signaling molecules adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), olfactory G protein α subunit (Gαolf), OR transporters receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 (RTP1 and RTP2), receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are expressed in neurons of the human and murine central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies have shown that these receptors react to external stimuli and therefore are equipped to be functional. However, ORs are not directly related to the detection of odors. Several molecules delivered from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, neighboring local neurons and glial cells, distant cells through the extracellular space, and the cells’ own self-regulating internal homeostasis can be postulated as possible ligands. Moreover, a single neuron outside the olfactory epithelium expresses more than one receptor, and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be different in olfactory epithelia and brain neurons. OR gene expression is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2 with disease-, region- and subtype-specific patterns. Altered gene expression is also observed in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia with a major but not total influence of chlorpromazine treatment. Preliminary parallel observations have also shown the presence of taste receptors (TASRs), mainly of the bitter taste family, in the mammalian brain, whose function is not related to taste. TASRs in brain are also abnormally regulated in neurodegenerative diseases. These seminal observations point to the need for further studies on ORs and TASRs chemoreceptors in the mammalian brain. PMID:27458372

  19. Investigation of prion protein gene in 10 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients: a new novel mutation of prion protein gene%散发性Creutzfeldt-Jakob病患者10例prion基因研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    南善姬; 赵节绪; 林世和; 江新梅; 宋晓南

    2006-01-01

    目的 检测10例Creutzfeldt-Jakob病(CJD)患者prion基因(PRNP)外显子突变情况.方法 抽取患者外周静脉血,提取DNA,PCR法扩增PRNP外显子后直接测序,并用限制性内切酶Nsp Ⅰ检测PRNP 129位点密码子基因型.结果 2例肯定CJD患者中,1例PRNP检测未见异常,另1例PRNP第729碱基G被C取代(729G→C),使编码prion第211个氨基酸的密码子GAG变成了GAC,翻译后第211个氨基酸由谷氨酸变为天冬氨酸(E211D).8例很可能CJD患者中,2例PRNP第751碱基G被A取代(751G→A),使编码prion第219个氨基酸的密码子GAG变成了AAG,翻译后第219个氨基酸由谷氨酸变为赖氨酸(E219K).10例CJD患者PRNP 129位点密码子基因型都是甲硫氨酸纯合型.结论 1例肯定CJD患者的prion基因外显子存在一种新的点突变E211D,这很可能是导致遗传prion病发生的原因.2例很可能CJD患者的prion基因突变E219K,与M129V同属于基因多态性,而不是致病原因.prion基因检测有助于prion病的诊断.

  20. Remarkable reduction of MAP2 in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents and human prion disease possibly correlated with the increase of calpain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Guo

    Full Text Available Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2 belongs to the family of heat stable MAPs, which takes part in neuronal morphogenesis, maintenance of cellular architecture and internal organization, cell division and cellular processes. To obtain insight into the possible alteration and the role of MAP2 in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, the MAP2 levels in the brain tissues of agent 263K-infected hamsters and human prion diseases were evaluated. Western blots and IHC revealed that at the terminal stages of the diseases, MAP2 levels in the brain tissues of scrapie infected hamsters, a patient with genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (G114V gCJD and a patient with fatal familial insomnia (FFI were almost undetectable. The decline of MAP2 was closely related with prolonged incubation time. Exposure of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cell line to cytotoxic PrP106-126 peptide significantly down-regulated the cellular MAP2 level and remarkably disrupted the microtubule structure, but did not alter the level of tubulin. Moreover, the levels of calpain, which mediated the degradation of a broad of cytoskeletal proteins, were significantly increased in both PrP106-126 treated SK-N-SH cells and brain tissues of 263K prion-infected hamsters. Our data indicate that the decline of MAP2 is a common phenomenon in TSEs, which seems to occur at an early stage of incubation period. Markedly increased calpain level might contribute to the reduction of MAP2.

  1. Molecular Pathology of Human Prion Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative conditions in humans and animals. In this review, we summarize the molecular background of phenotypic variability, relation of prion protein (PrP to other proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, and pathogenesis of neuronal vulnerability. PrP exists in different forms that may be present in both diseased and non-diseased brain, however, abundant disease-associated PrP together with tissue pathology characterizes prion diseases and associates with transmissibility. Prion diseases have different etiological background with distinct pathogenesis and phenotype. Mutations of the prion protein gene are associated with genetic forms. The codon 129 polymorphism in combination with the Western blot pattern of PrP after proteinase K digestion serves as a basis for molecular subtyping of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Tissue damage may result from several parallel, interacting or subsequent pathways that involve cellular systems associated with synapses, protein processing, oxidative stress, autophagy, and apoptosis.

  2. Patología del sueño en las enfermedades priónicas Sleep disorders in prion diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ayuso

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades priónicas son un grupo de encefalopatías con cambios neurodegenerativos causados por una proteína alterada denominada prión cuyo dato característico es la transmisibilidad. Ocurren la mayoría de las veces de forma esporádica aunque un grupo de ellas son familiares asociadas a mutaciones en el gen de la proteína priónica. El polimorfismo genético parece determinar las diferentes variantes familiares. Una de las más enigmáticas e inhabituales es el Insomnio Letal Familiar (ILF, trastorno hereditario caracterizado por pérdida del sueño fisiológico con estupor onírico, hiperactividad autonómica y motora, y anomalías motoras. La polisomnografía de esta entidad refleja la incapacidad para producir un patrón fisiológico del sueño NREM y REM, así como de las fluctuaciones circadianas hormonales y vegetativas; la transición de vigilia a sueño está marcadamente alterada con desaparición precoz de los husos de sueño. La hipótesis del origen de estos trastornos es la pérdida neuronal talámica, especialmente en los núcleos anterior y dorsomedial, descrita en la neuropatología de estos pacientes; además la PET revela hipofunción de núcleos talámicos, centros responsables del control vigilia-sueño. En la enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob las alteraciones de sueño-vigilia no se han considerado características, no obstante, se han encontrado frecuentes alteraciones en los registros electroencefalográficos de sueño. Además de la neurodegeneración talámica puede haber mecanismos etiopatogénicos comunes en las enfermedades priónicas en relación con la función biológica de la proteína priónica.Prion diseases are a group of encephalopathies with neurodegenerative changes caused by an altered protein named prion whose characteristic datum is transmissibility. In most cases they occur in a sporadic form although a group of them are familial associated with mutations in the gene of the prion protein

  3. Highly Sensitive, Quantitative Cell-Based Assay for Prions Adsorbed to Solid Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Julie Ann Edgeworth; Graham S. Jackson; Anthony R. Clarke; Charles Weissmann; John Collinge

    2009-01-01

    Prions are comprised principally of aggregates of a misfolded host protein and cause fatal transmissible neurodegenerative disorders of humans and animals, such as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease...

  4. [Doctor Francoise Cathala and history of prions diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, L; Hauw, J-J

    2015-12-01

    Doctor Françoise Cathala Pagesy, MD, MS, born on July 7, 1921 in Paris, passed away peacefully at home on November 5, 2012. Unconventional, passionate and enthusiastic neurologist and virologist, she devoted her life to research on latent and slow viral infections, specializing mainly on unconventional transmissible agents or prions. As a research member of Inserm (French Institute for Medical Research), she soon joined the team of Carlton Gajdusek (the NINCDS - National Institute of Nervous Central System and Stroke - of NIH), who first demonstrated the transmissibility of kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to monkeys. When she came back to Paris, where she was followed by one of NIH members, Paul Brown, she joined the Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées (Army Health Research Center), in Percy-Clamart, where she found the experimental design and the attentive help needed for her research, which appeared heretical to many French virologists, including some authorities. A large number of research programs were set up with numerous collaborations involving CEA (Center for Atomic Energy) and other institutions in Paris and Marseilles on epidemiology, results of tissue inoculation, electrophysiology and neuropathology of human and animal prions diseases, and resistance of the infectious agent. International symposia were set up, where met, in the Val-de-Grâce hospital in Paris, the research community on "slow viral diseases". Stanley Prusiner introduced the concept - then badly accepted and still in evolution - of prion, a protein only infectious agent. Before retiring from Inserm, Françoise Cathala predicted and was involved in some of the huge sanitary crises in France. These were, first, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease from contaminated growth hormone extracted from cadavers, which led parents to instigate legal procedure - a quite unusual practice in France. The second was Mad cow disease in the United Kingdom then in France, followed by new variant

  5. Study on the characteristics of patients with Creutzfeld-Jakob disease in Shaanxi Province, 2006-2010%2006-2010年陕西省克雅氏病监测病例特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 董建华; 史伟; 李慎; 魏菁; 郑媛; 王敬军; 余鹏博

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in Shaanxi Province.Methods Clinical and epidemical data on 42 suspected CJD patients from clinical hospitals in Shaanxi from 2006 to 2010 was analyzed.42 blood samples,41 cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) specimens and 1 brain tissue from these patients were collected.Western blot assay was used to detect PrPsc in brain tissue and 14-3-3 protein in CSF.PCR and sequencing were used for analyzing the polymorphism of 129 amino acids and mutation of PRNP gene.Results A total number of 18 probable and three possible sporadic CJD patients,two familial CJD cases were identified.No geographic-or occupational-related events were observed among these cases.The mean age of onset was 55.9 years old,the fender ratio was 1.25 ∶ 1.Rapid progressive dementia was the main symptom,presenting in 34.78 percent of the CJD patients.Conclusions This report indicates that the main type of CJD in Shaanxi Province is sporadic CJD with its distinctive characteristics including geography distribution,occupation,gender ratio and the average of onset.Follow-up visits to probable and possible CJD patients may contribute to a proper diagnosis.%目的 了解陕西省克雅氏病(Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease,CJD)的发病情况、临床表现及流行病学特征.方法 对2006-2010年陕西省临床医院报告的42例可疑CJD病例的临床及流行病学资料进行分析,收集了42份血液标本、41份脑脊液及1份脑组织样品,利用免疫印迹(western blot,WB)方法检测脑组织的异常折叠朊蛋白(prion protein scrapie,PrPsc)和脑脊液的14-3-3蛋白,提取全血基因组DNA并利用聚合酶链式反应(polymerase chain reaction,PCR)及测序方法对血液中朊蛋白(Prion protein,PRNP或PrP)基因进行129位多态性及基因突变分析.结果 共发现散发型CJD临床诊断病例18例,疑似诊断病例3例,家族型CJD 2例.病例的地理分布和职业无明显

  6. Quantitative EEG parameters correlate with the progression of human prion diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Tim; Lowe, Jessica; Porter, Marie-Claire; Kenny, Joanna; Thompson, Andrew; Rudge, Peter; Collinge, John; Mead, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background Prion diseases are universally fatal and often rapidly progressive neurodegenerative diseases. EEG has long been used in the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; however, the characteristic waveforms do not occur in all types of prion diseases. Here, we re-evaluate the utility of EEG by focusing on the development of biomarkers. We test whether abnormal quantitative EEG parameters can be used to measure disease progression in prion diseases or predict disease onset in healthy individuals at risk of disease. Methods In the National Prion Monitoring Cohort study, we did quantitative encephalography on 301 occasions in 29 healthy controls and 67 patients with prion disease. The patients had either inherited prion disease or sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We computed the main background frequency, the α and θ power and the α/θ power ratio, then averaged these within 5 electrode groups. These measurements were then compared among participant groups and correlated with functional and cognitive scores cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Results We found lower main background frequency, α power and α/θ power ratio and higher θ power in patients compared to control participants. The main background frequency, the power in the α band and the α/θ power ratio also differed in a consistent way among the patient groups. Moreover, the main background frequency and the α/θ power ratio correlated significantly with functional and cognitive scores. Longitudinally, change in these parameters also showed significant correlation with the change in clinical and cognitive scores. Conclusions Our findings support the use of quantitative EEG to follow the progression of prion disease, with potential to help evaluate the treatment effects in future clinical-trials. PMID:27413165

  7. Human prion diseases in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Holman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prion diseases are a family of rare, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders that affect humans and animals. The most common form of human prion disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, occurs worldwide. Variant CJD (vCJD, a recently emerged human prion disease, is a zoonotic foodborne disorder that occurs almost exclusively in countries with outbreaks of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This study describes the occurrence and epidemiology of CJD and vCJD in the United States. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis of CJD and vCJD deaths using death certificates of US residents for 1979-2006, and those identified through other surveillance mechanisms during 1996-2008. Since CJD is invariably fatal and illness duration is usually less than one year, the CJD incidence is estimated as the death rate. During 1979 through 2006, an estimated 6,917 deaths with CJD as a cause of death were reported in the United States, an annual average of approximately 247 deaths (range 172-304 deaths. The average annual age-adjusted incidence for CJD was 0.97 per 1,000,000 persons. Most (61.8% of the CJD deaths occurred among persons >or=65 years of age for an average annual incidence of 4.8 per 1,000,000 persons in this population. Most deaths were among whites (94.6%; the age-adjusted incidence for whites was 2.7 times higher than that for blacks (1.04 and 0.40, respectively. Three patients who died since 2004 were reported with vCJD; epidemiologic evidence indicated that their infection was acquired outside of the United States. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Surveillance continues to show an annual CJD incidence rate of about 1 case per 1,000,000 persons and marked differences in CJD rates by age and race in the United States. Ongoing surveillance remains important for monitoring the stability of the CJD incidence rates, and detecting occurrences of vCJD and possibly other novel prion diseases in the United States.

  8. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-06-05

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation.

  9. Familial Pompe Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tecellioglu, Mehmet; Kamisli, Ozden

    2015-01-01

    .... We present a family with Pompe disease consisting of the asymptomatic mother and two siblings who presented with muscle weakness and respiratory failure and who had been followed-up with a diagnosis...

  10. Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rona; Plinston, Chris; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Suardi, Silvia; Ruggerone, Margherita; Moda, Fabio; Graziano, Silvia; Sbriccoli, Marco; Cardone, Franco; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Ingrosso, Loredana; Baron, Thierry; Richt, Juergen; Andreoletti, Olivier; Simmons, Marion; Lockey, Richard; Manson, Jean C; Barron, Rona M

    2012-07-01

    The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several novel TSEs in sheep, cattle and deer have been described and the risk posed to humans by these agents is currently unknown. In this study, we inoculated two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and H-type BSE), a chronic wasting disease (CWD) isolate and seven isolates of atypical scrapie into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP). Upon challenge with these ruminant TSEs, gene-targeted Tg mice expressing human PrP did not show any signs of disease pathology. These data strongly suggest the presence of a substantial transmission barrier between these recently identified ruminant TSEs and humans.

  11. Neprilysin-Like Activity Correlates with CSF-Tau and Phospho-Tau in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Katrine Christa Nordskov; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Holmetoft, Ulla Bachmann

    2013-01-01

    the level and enzyme activity of NEP in serum and CSF, using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay, respectively, in patients with AD, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and depression. Results were correlated...... with the levels of CSF AD biomarkers Aβ42, hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau), and total tau (t-tau). In serum, we found no differences in NEP-like activity or concentration between the groups and there were no correlations between NEP and AD biomarkers. In CSF, no influence of age or gender on NEP levels or enzyme...... activity was seen. However, NEP concentration was lower and the specific activity was higher in FTD compared to AD. Aβ42 levels in CSF did not correlate with NEP concentration or activity in the AD, CJD, or depression groups, but NEP-like activity and Aβ42 levels correlated significantly in the FTD group...

  12. 75 FR 9902 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... reports include: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Cyclospora, Dengue, Hantavirus, Kawasaki Syndrome... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a list of...

  13. Familial Fahr disease in a Turkish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotan, Dilcan; Aygul, Recep

    2009-01-01

    Fahr syndrome refers to a rare syndrome characterized by symmetrical and bilateral intracranial calcification. We present a 42-year-old woman with Fahr disease, but lacking extrapyramidal symptoms or a metabolic disorder. Her neurological examination was normal. Computed tomographic scans demonstrated symmetrical calcification over the basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. No underlying cause for the bilateral calcification was found. When screening other family members, we detected Fahr syndrome in her two daughters and three brothers, revealing that the disease was an autosomal dominant trait. Fahr disease may be clinically asymptomatic, but have pronounced positive brain imaging findings. Computed tomographic scanning remains the most effective screening tool for adult relatives.

  14. Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  15. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome (KTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  16. Locked-In Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  17. Meralgia Paresthetica

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  18. Striatonigral Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  19. Syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  20. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  1. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  2. Foot Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  3. Central Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  4. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  5. Tarlov Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  6. Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  7. Todd's Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  8. Symmetrical corticobasal syndrome caused by a novel c.314dup progranulin mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); H. Seelaar (Harro); W.Z. Chiu (Wang Zheng); I. de Koning (Inge); R. van Minkelen (Rick); M.C. Baker (Matthew); A.J.M. Rozemuller (Annemieke); R. Rademakers (Rosa); J.C. van Swieten (John)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCorticobasal syndrome (CBS) is characterised by asymmetrical parkinsonism and cognitive impairment. The underlying pathology varies between corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, Alzheimer's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration

  9. The expanding universe of prion diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C Watts

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Prions cause fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative disease. These etiological infectious agents are formed in greater part from a misfolded cell-surface protein called PrP(C. Several mammalian species are affected by the diseases, and in the case of "mad cow disease" (BSE the agent has a tropism for humans, with negative consequences for agribusiness and public health. Unfortunately, the known universe of prion diseases is expanding. At least four novel prion diseases--including human diseases variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD and sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI, bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE, and Nor98 of sheep--have been identified in the last ten years, and chronic wasting disease (CWD of North American deer (Odocoileus Specis and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni is undergoing a dramatic spread across North America. While amplification (BSE and dissemination (CWD, commercial sourcing of cervids from the wild and movement of farmed elk can be attributed to human activity, the origins of emergent prion diseases cannot always be laid at the door of humankind. Instead, the continued appearance of new outbreaks in the form of "sporadic" disease may be an inevitable outcome in a situation where the replicating pathogen is host-encoded.

  10. The expanding universe of prion diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Prions cause fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative disease. These etiological infectious agents are formed in greater part from a misfolded cell-surface protein called PrP(C. Several mammalian species are affected by the diseases, and in the case of "mad cow disease" (BSE the agent has a tropism for humans, with negative consequences for agribusiness and public health. Unfortunately, the known universe of prion diseases is expanding. At least four novel prion diseases-including human diseases variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD and sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI, bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE, and Nor98 of sheep-have been identified in the last ten years, and chronic wasting disease (CWD of North American deer (Odocoileus Specis and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni is undergoing a dramatic spread across North America. While amplification (BSE and dissemination (CWD, commercial sourcing of cervids from the wild and movement of farmed elk can be attributed to human activity, the origins of emergent prion diseases cannot always be laid at the door of humankind. Instead, the continued appearance of new outbreaks in the form of "sporadic" disease may be an inevitable outcome in a situation where the replicating pathogen is host-encoded.

  11. Information for People Treated with Human Growth Hormone (Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHPP): Information for People Treated with Pituitary Human Growth Hormone (Summary) How did Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) occur in people treated with pituitary human growth hormone (hGH)? From 1963 to 1985, the National Hormone ...

  12. Familial Behcet′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Neeraj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few reports of Behηet′s disease from India. Familial aggregation of Behηet′s disease has been reported with restricted geographical distribution. We report here familial Behcet′s disease from India in two brothers aged 30 and 32 years. Both patients had recurrent oral and genital ulcers for approximately five years. They also had arthralgias on and off along with fever. Pathergy test was positive in both cases. Their younger brother and a sister had recurrent oral aphthous ulcers.

  13. Prions: a model of conformational disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinet, F

    2014-04-01

    The discovery that a protein could mimic viral and bacterial pathogens around 1980 by Stanley Prusiner was unexpected. Evidence shows now that Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and related disorders are caused by prions. Prions and, for example neurodegeneratives diseases, arise from the same general disease mechanism. In each, there is abnormal unfolding and then aggregation of proteins. The protein conformational changes associated with the pathogenesis of protein misfolding disorders produce β sheet rich oligomers that are partially resistant to proteolysis and have a high tendency to form amyloid-like aggregates. It is important to distinguish between prions and amyloids: prions need not to polymerize into amyloid fibrils and can undergo self-propagation as oligomers. The prion diseases are characterized by the conformational conversion of PrP(c) to PrP(sc), the fundamental even underlying prion diseases. Despite the obvious differences between prions and conventional infectious microorganisms, prions fulfill the Koch's postulates. Meaningful treatments are likely to require cocktails of drugs that interfere with the conversion of precursor into prions and enhance the clearance of prions; such an approach may find application in the more common degenerative diseases.

  14. Prion疾病%Prion disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范学工

    1999-01-01

    @@ 人和动物的慢性中枢神经系统退行性疾病,如羊瘙痒症(scapie)、人克雅病(Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease,CJD)和库鲁病(kuru)的病因一直不明,美国加州大学旧金山医学院的Prusiner教授经过近20年的研究,在1982年提出了Prion是CJD的病原因子假说,指出这是一种不同于细菌、病毒、真菌和寄生虫等病原微生物的新的致病蛋白质因子,并构建了prion-词[1].由Prion所引起的疾病称为Prion病(Prion Diseases).目前认为,Prion是所有传染性海绵状脑病(transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,TSE)的病原因子.

  15. Understanding Family Interaction Patterns in Families With Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Patricia; Blair, Kate; Jost, Ellen; Schaffer, Molly; Thurner, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the dynamic changes that occur in family interaction patterns when Alzheimer's disease is present. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 participants who have a family member with the disease. Using modified analytic induction, guided by the dimensions of the Family Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (FIRO) Model, participants shared how Alzheimer's disease affected family structure, control dynamics, and intimacy among family members. Findings demonstrate that (a) families reorganize and restructure based on geographic proximity and shifting roles, act out of filial responsibility, and strive to preserve shared meanings and rituals; (b) decision making increases around care of the person with Alzheimer's disease and shifts to the primary caregiver or other family members based on their abilities; and (c) expressions of intimacy intensify while personality is preserved in the person with the disease. The Family FIRO model can inform practitioners using family-centered care with families with Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Epigenetic Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael H; Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Steliou, Kosta; Pinkert, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research In this review, we discuss epigenetic-driven methods for treating neurodegenerative disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, focusing on carnitinoid antioxidant-histone deacetylase inhibitors that show an ability to reinvigorate synaptic plasticity and protect against neuromotor decline in vivo. Aging remains a major risk factor in patients who progress to dementia, a clinical syndrome typified by decreased mental capacity, including impairments in memory, language skills, and executive function. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction are viewed as determinants in the aging process that may afford therapeutic targets for a host of disease conditions, the brain being primary in such thinking. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a core feature in the pathophysiology of both Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and rare mitochondrial diseases. The potential of new therapies in this area extends to glaucoma and other ophthalmic disorders, migraine, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, systemic exertion intolerance disease, and chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. An emerging and hopefully more promising approach to addressing these hard-to-treat diseases leverages their sensitivity to activation of master regulators of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes, antioxidant response elements, and mitophagy. Drug Dev Res 77 : 109-123, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [New findings on the diagnosis and therapy of prion diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begić, Lejla; Mulaomerović, Adaleta; Berbić, Selma; Zigić, Zlata

    2002-01-01

    Spongiform encephalopathies are the fatal diseases, that affect the brain tissue of mammals. They are caused by a conformational changed prion protein. There is no adequate diagnostic test for in vivo identification of prion protein. Disease can be diagnosed only by clinical sings and EEG in new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Post mortem, histopathological examination of brain tissue reveals spongiform changes and immunohistochemistry detects disease-related prion protein. Appropriate diagnostic in vivo tests are not developed yet; therefore extensive researches are ongoing aimed to introduce such methods. This review describes a few promising experimental methods, which may develop into diagnostic tests in the future: detection of prions in urine samples, PMCA (protein misfolding cyclic amplification), DATAS (differential analysis of transcripts with alternative splicing), SELEX (in vitro selection), detection of prions in tonsils and detection of copper and manganese dysbalance in tissues. Current therapy strategy is based on testing of some known drugs (quinacrine, chlorpromazine), and antioxidant and antibody treatments. The detection of NSE (neuron-specific enolase) and cholesterol in meat products reveals the presence of brain and spinal cord tissue. The spreading of spongiform encephalopathies can be diminished by utilising the adequate in vivo diagnostic tests, effective therapy strategy and preventive steps.

  18. Small-Molecule Theranostic Probes: A Promising Future in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Aulić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative illnesses, which include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and scrapie, chronic wasting disease, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in animals. They are caused by unconventional infectious agents consisting primarily of misfolded, aggregated, β-sheet-rich isoforms, denoted prions, of the physiological cellular prion protein (PrPC. Many lines of evidence suggest that prions (PrPSc act both as a template for this conversion and as a neurotoxic agent causing neuronal dysfunction and cell death. As such, PrPSc may be considered as both a neuropathological hallmark of the disease and a therapeutic target. Several diagnostic imaging probes have been developed to monitor cerebral amyloid lesions in patients with neurodegenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and prion disease. Examples of these probes are Congo red, thioflavin T, and their derivatives. We synthesized a series of styryl derivatives, denoted theranostics, and studied their therapeutic and/or diagnostic potentials. Here we review the salient traits of these small molecules that are able to detect and modulate aggregated forms of several proteins involved in protein misfolding diseases. We then highlight the importance of further studies for their practical implications in therapy and diagnostics.

  19. Structural properties of Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease amyloid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmona, Mario; Morbin, Michela; Massignan, Tania; Colombo, Laura; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Capobianco, Raffaella; Diomede, Luisa; Thaler, Florian; Mollica, Luca; Musco, Giovanna; Kourie, Joseph J; Bugiani, Orso; Sharma, Deepak; Inouye, Hideyo; Kirschner, Daniel A; Forloni, Gianluigi; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2003-11-28

    Prion protein (PrP) amyloid formation is a central feature of genetic and acquired forms of prion disease such as Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The major component of GSS amyloid is a PrP fragment spanning residues approximately 82-146. To investigate the determinants of the physicochemical properties of this fragment, we synthesized PrP-(82-146) and variants thereof, including entirely and partially scrambled peptides. PrP-(82-146) readily formed aggregates that were partially resistant to protease digestion. Peptide assemblies consisted of 9.8-nm-diameter fibrils having a parallel cross-beta-structure. Second derivative of infrared spectra indicated that PrP-(82-146) aggregates are primarily composed of beta-sheet (54%) and turn (24%) which is consistent with their amyloid-like properties. The peptide induced a remarkable increase in plasma membrane microviscosity of primary neurons. Modification of the amino acid sequence 106-126 caused a striking increase in aggregation rate, with formation of large amount of protease-resistant amorphous material and relatively few amyloid fibrils. Alteration of the 127-146 region had even more profound effects, with the inability to generate amyloid fibrils. These data indicate that the intrinsic properties of PrP-(82-146) are dependent upon the integrity of the C-terminal region and account for the massive deposition of PrP amyloid in GSS.

  20. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture 2001. Animal origins of human infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R A

    2001-06-29

    Since time immemorial animals have been a major source of human infectious disease. Certain infections like rabies are recognized as zoonoses caused in each case by direct animal-to-human transmission. Others like measles became independently sustained with the human population so that the causative virus has diverged from its animal progenitor. Recent examples of direct zoonoses are variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease arising from bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and the H5N1 avian influenza outbreak in Hong Kong. Epidemics of recent animal origin are the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic, and acquired immune deficiency syndrome caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Some retroviruses jump into and out of the chromosomal DNA of the host germline, so that they oscillate between being inherited Mendelian traits or infectious agents in different species. Will new procedures like animal-to-human transplants unleash further infections? Do microbes become more virulent upon cross-species transfer? Are animal microbes a threat as biological weapons? Will the vast reservoir of immunodeficient hosts due to the HIV pandemic provide conditions permissive for sporadic zoonoses to take off as human-to-human transmissible diseases? Do human infections now pose a threat to endangered primates? These questions are addressed in this lecture.

  1. Isoprostanes and Neuroprostanes as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Miller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating data shows that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative disorders. The literature data indicate that in vivo or postmortem cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue levels of F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs especially F4-neuroprotanes (F4-NPs are significantly increased in some neurodegenerative diseases: multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Central nervous system is the most metabolically active organ of the body characterized by high requirement for oxygen and relatively low antioxidative activity, what makes neurons and glia highly susceptible to destruction by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and neurodegeneration. The discovery of F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as markers of lipid peroxidation caused by the free radicals has opened up new areas of investigation regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the relationship between F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as biomarkers of oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases. We summarize the knowledge of these novel biomarkers of oxidative stress and the advantages of monitoring their formation to better define the involvement of oxidative stress in neurological diseases.

  2. 从羊瘙痒症到疯牛病——朊病毒发现史%From the Scrapie Syndrome of sheep and goats to the mad cow disease-the history of the discovery of prion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锐; 翁屹

    2009-01-01

    从1730年人们发现羊瘙痒症开始,克-雅氏症、库鲁病、疯牛病等一系列疾病随之出现.在库鲁病的研究中,美国科学家盖达塞克发现其病原体不具有DNA或RNA特性,并因此获得了1976年的诺贝尔生理学医学奖.其后,另一位美国科学家普鲁塞纳在进一步研究中,发现了以蛋白质为遗传媒介的新型病毒--朊病毒,并因此获得了1997年诺贝尔生理学医学奖.朊病毒的发现是生命科学研究中的重大事件,为人类战胜羊瘙痒症、克-雅氏症、库鲁病和疯牛病等一系列疾病奠定了理论基础.%Since the discovery of Scrapie Syndrome in sheep and goats in 1730, there emerged a series of diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc. In the research of kuru disease, the American scientist D. Carlteton Gajdusek found a new virus without the characteristic of DNA and RNA, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology in 1976. Since then another American sci-entist, Stanley B. Prusiner, found a new virus-prion, taking protein as the genetic medium, which was awar-ded the Nobel prize in physiology and medicine in 1997. The discovery of prion is a great landmark in the re-search of life science, which laid a theoretical foundation for people to conquer n series of diseases such as Scrapie syndrome in sheep and goats, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc.

  3. Role of zinc and copper ions in the pathogenetic mechanisms of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmashook, E V; Isaev, N K; Genrikhs, E E; Amelkina, G A; Khaspekov, L G; Skrebitsky, V G; Illarioshkin, S N

    2014-05-01

    Disbalance of zinc (Zn2+) and copper (Cu2+) ions in the central nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous neurodegenerative disorders such as multisystem atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Wilson-Konovalov disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Among these, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most frequent age-related neurodegenerative pathologies with disorders in Zn2+ and Cu2+ homeostasis playing a pivotal role in the mechanisms of pathogenesis. In this review we generalized and systematized current literature data concerning this problem. The interactions of Zn2+ and Cu2+ with amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-amyloid (Abeta), tau-protein, metallothioneins, and GSK3β are considered, as well as the role of these interactions in the generation of free radicals in AD and PD. Analysis of the literature suggests that the main factors of AD and PD pathogenesis (oxidative stress, structural disorders and aggregation of proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy deficiency) that initiate a cascade of events resulting finally in the dysfunction of neuronal networks are mediated by the disbalance of Zn2+ and Cu2+.

  4. Familial epidemic of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilović, V; Vrbanec-Megla, L; Payerl-Pal, M; Puntarić, D; Baklaić, Z

    1998-03-01

    Two closely related boys from the same house hold (Home 1), aged two and three, were affected with fulminant meningococcal sepsis known as Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Neisseria meningitidis serogorup B was isolated from their blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The two-year-old boy died one day after the onset of the disease. Epidemiological examination of contacts and pharyngeal swabs were performed in 14 persons from the household, all of them relatives of the affected children, as well as in a number of other contacts. Chemoprophylaxis with cotrimoxazole was simultaneously administered to all contacts. Family histories revealed that two contacts from the household where the patients did not live (Home 2) were inadvertently omitted. Subsequent examinations, following a report of another contagious disease (salmonelosis), revealed that these two persons were Neisseria meningitidis carriers, together with another one in the same household. The carriers most probably caused the infection of a third, five-year-old boy, the deceased boy's brother (Home 1) who also developed fulminant meningococcal sepsis. The failure to take the appropriate prophylaxis led to a prolonged carrier state in the carrier from the second household. Repeated pharyngeal swab sampling revealed two more carriers from both households that had previously been negative. Control of the epidemic was achieved after 5 weeks by repeated and controlled chemoprophylaxis with ciprofloxacin, and by repeated epidemiological examinations, disinfection, and daily health surveillance by the Sanitary Inspectorate. This extremely rare instance of a familial epidemic with three infected persons emphasizes the need for consistent chemoprophylaxis in meningococcal disease contacts.

  5. Therapy in prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forloni, Gianluigi; Artuso, Vladimiro; Roiter, Ignazio; Morbin, Michela; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, knowledge of the neurobiology of prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) has significantly advanced, but a successful therapy to stop or delay the progression of these disorders remains one of the most challenging goals of biomedical research. Several obstacles to this achievement are in common with other neurodegenerative disorders: difficulties to move from experimental level to clinical stage; appropriate timing of intervention; correct set up of clinical trial. Also in terms of molecular bases of disease, TSE and the other neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and Huntington diseases, share a central pathogenic role of soluble small aggregates, named oligomers, considered the culprit of neuronal dysfunction: accordingly, these disorders could by termed oligomeropathies. However, the rapid progression of TSE, together with their clinical and molecular heterogeneity, make the therapeutic approach particularly problematic. The main target of the antiprion strategy has been the pathological form of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) termed PrP(Sc), invariably associated with the diseases. Several compounds have been found to affect PrP(Sc) formation or enhance its clearance in in vitro models, and prolong survival in experimental animals. However, few of them such as quinacrine and pentosan polysulfate have reached the clinical evaluation; more recently, we have conducted a clinical trial with doxycycline in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease without satisfactory results. In experimental conditions, active and passive immunization with antibodies against PrP and mucosal vaccination have shown to protect from peripheral infection. Other studies have proposed new potentially effective molecules targeting PrP oligomers. Furthermore, the possibility to interfere with PrP(C) to PrP(Sc) conversion by an active control of PrP(C) is another interesting approach

  6. Novel strain properties distinguishing sporadic prion diseases sharing prion protein genotype and prion type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cracco, Laura; Notari, Silvio; Cali, Ignazio; Sy, Man-Sun; Chen, Shu G.; Cohen, Mark L.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Appleby, Brian S.; Zou, Wen-Quan; Caughey, Byron; Safar, Jiri G.; Gambetti, Pierluigi

    2017-01-01

    In most human sporadic prion diseases the phenotype is consistently associated with specific pairings of the genotype at codon 129 of the prion protein gene and conformational properties of the scrapie PrP (PrPSc) grossly identified types 1 and 2. This association suggests that the 129 genotype favours the selection of a distinct strain that in turn determines the phenotype. However, this mechanism cannot play a role in the phenotype determination of sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI) and a subtype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) identified as sCJDMM2, which share 129 MM genotype and PrPSc type 2 but are associated with quite distinct phenotypes. Our detailed comparative study of the PrPSc conformers has revealed major differences between the two diseases, which preferentially involve the PrPSc component that is sensitive to digestion with proteases (senPrPSc) and to a lesser extent the resistant component (resPrPSc). We conclude that these variations are consistent with two distinct strains in sFI and sCJDMM2, and that the rarer sFI is the result of a variant strain selection pathway that might be favoured by a different brain site of initial PrPSc formation in the two diseases. PMID:28091514

  7. Mad Cows and CJD A Physicist's View of Prion Brain Diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston

    1997-01-01

    The research of Carleton Gajdusek on a stone-age tribe in Papua New Guinea, who suffered from a mysterious disease, kuru, spread by cannibalism, is described and short extracts from his films will be shown. Some deaths from kuru are still occuring after 45 years. This disease is believed to be caused by an entirely new mechanism, not a virus or bacteria, but by a small molecule known as a prion that occurs naturally in many living forms. The Prion Only hypothesis of Stan Prusiner is discussed critically. It has been calculated that 900,000 cows in Britain had the Mad Cow disease, BSE, but most were slaughtered before symptoms were recognised. This epidemic started with 10 cases in the first year, and finally 160,000 were officially classified as having BSE; it is now slowly dying out. The human epidemic, caused by a new version of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, nvCJD, affects mainly young people, has just begun with 10 cases in the first year. The average incubation time may be about 14 years then death follows i...

  8. Increased oxidation, glycoxidation, and lipoxidation of brain proteins in prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Reinald; Naudí, Alba; Gavín, Rosalina; Pastrana, Miguel A; Sajnani, Gustavo; Ilieva, Ekaterina V; Del Río, José Antonio; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Ferrer, Isidre; Requena, Jesús R

    2008-10-15

    The basic molecular underpinnings of the pathological changes that unfold in prion disease remain elusive. A key role of increased oxidative stress has been hypothesized. Given the transient nature of most intermediate molecules implicated, increased oxidative stress is better assessed by quantitating the damage it causes to macromolecules. We used mass spectrometry-based methods to measure specific products of protein oxidation, glycoxidation, and lipoxidation in brains from patients suffering from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Syrian hamsters affected by scrapie. In both cases, increased amounts of glutamic and aminoadipic semialdehydes, products of metal-catalyzed oxidation, malondialdehydelysine (a product of lipoxidation), N-epsilon-carboxyethyllysine (a product of glycoxidation), and N-epsilon-carboxymethyllysine (generated by lipoxidation and glycoxidation) were measured. PrP(Sc), the infectious isoform of the prion protein that accumulates in prion disease, was itself shown to be a target of increased oxidative modification. These changes were accompanied by alterations in fatty acid composition and increased phosphorylation of ERK(1/2) and p38, protein kinases known to respond to increased flows of ROS. These data support an important role of oxidative damage in the pathology of prion disease.

  9. Atypical sporadic CJD-MM phenotype with white matter kuru plaques associated with intranuclear inclusion body and argyrophilic grain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, Anna S; Trummert, Anita; Unterberger, Ursula; Ströbel, Thomas; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2015-08-01

    We describe an atypical neuropathological phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 76-year-old man. The clinical symptoms were characterized by progressive dementia, gait ataxia, rigidity and urinary incontinence. The disease duration was 6 weeks. MRI did not show prominent atrophy or hyperintensities in cortical areas, striatum or thalamus. Biomarker examination of the cerebrospinal fluid deviated from that seen in pure Alzheimer's disease. Triphasic waves in the EEG were detected only later in the disease course, while 14-3-3 assay was positive. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity (MM) at codon 129. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes corresponding to the MM type 1 cases. However, a striking feature was the presence of abundant kuru-type plaques in the white matter. This rare morphology was associated with neuropathological signs of intranuclear inclusion body disease and advanced stage of argyrophilic grain disease. These alterations did not show correlation with each other, thus seemed to develop independently. This case further highlights the complexity of neuropathological alterations in the ageing brain.

  10. Prion病与睡眠障碍%Prion diseases and sleep disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹淑琴; 郭彩凤; 王玉平; 贾建平

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases (PrD) are a group of encephalopathies with neurodegenerative changes caused by prion protein (PrP) whose characteristic datum is transmissibility.In most cases they occur in a sporadic form although a group of them are familial associated with mutations in PrP gene.Phenotypic variability of fatal familial insomnia (FFI) versus familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease178 (fCJD178) seems to determine the different methionine-valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PrP gene.Sleep disorders is one of the important clinical features for the diagnosis and definition of PrD.FFI,a hereditary disorder characterized by loss of physiological sleep with oneiric stupor,autonomic and motor hyperactivity.The polysomnography (PSG) shows disappearance of the physiological pattern of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep,as well as sleep spindles and K-complexes were absent.The hypothesis of the origin of these disorders is thalamic neuronal loss,especially in the anterior and dorsomedial nuclei,described in the neuropathology of these patients; besides,PET reveals hypofunction of thalamic nuclei,centres responsible for controlling wake-sleep.In CJD the wake-sleep disorders is not considered characteristic; nonetheless,frequent alterations have been found in the electroencephalographic registers of sleep.Besides thalamic neurodegeneration,there could be common etiopathogenic mechanisms in PrD in relation to the biological function of PrP.%Prion病是由传染性朊蛋白侵袭中枢神经系统引起的致死性神经变性脑病,睡眠障碍在Prion病中十分常见,也是其诊断特征之一.其中致死性家族性失眠症表现为严重的生理睡眠缺失及特殊梦幻状态、自主神经功能失调和过度运动;多导睡眠图早期睡眠纺锤波和K复合波消失,无法产生快速眼动和非快速眼动睡眠生理循环.除PET扫描呈现丘脑低代谢,神经病理学观察可见丘脑神经元大量缺失,尤其是丘脑

  11. Sod1 deficiency reduces incubation time in mouse models of prion disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Akhtar

    Full Text Available Prion infections, causing neurodegenerative conditions such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep and BSE in cattle are characterised by prolonged and variable incubation periods that are faithfully reproduced in mouse models. Incubation time is partly determined by genetic factors including polymorphisms in the prion protein gene. Quantitative trait loci studies in mice and human genome-wide association studies have confirmed that multiple genes are involved. Candidate gene approaches have also been used and identified App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 as affecting incubation times. In this study we looked for an association between App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 representative SNPs and prion disease incubation time in the Northport heterogeneous stock of mice inoculated with the Chandler/RML prion strain. No association was seen with App, however, significant associations were seen with Il1-r1 (P = 0.02 and Sod1 (P<0.0001 suggesting that polymorphisms at these loci contribute to the natural variation observed in incubation time. Furthermore, following challenge with Chandler/RML, ME7 and MRC2 prion strains, Sod1 deficient mice showed highly significant reductions in incubation time of 20, 13 and 24%, respectively. No differences were detected in Sod1 expression or activity. Our data confirm the protective role of endogenous Sod1 in prion disease.

  12. Computational Studies of the Structural Stability of Rabbit Prion Protein Compared to Human and Mouse Prion Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    Prion diseases are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. The neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Str$\\ddot{a}$ussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle belong to prion diseases. By now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. Dogs, rabbits and horses were reported to be resistant to prion diseases. By the end of year 2010 all the NMR structures of dog, rabbit and horse prion proteins (X-ray for rabbits too) had been finished to release into protein data bank. Thus, at this moment it is very worth studying the NMR and X-ray molecular structures of horse, dog and rabbit prion proteins to obtain insights into their immunity prion diseases. The author found that dog and horse prion proteins have sta...

  13. Extracellular vesicles--Their role in the packaging and spread of misfolded proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Bradley M; Hill, Andrew F

    2015-04-01

    Many cell types, including neurons, are known to release small membranous vesicles known as exosomes. In addition to their protein content these vesicles have recently been shown to contain messenger RNA (mRNA) and micro RNA (miRNA) species. Roles for these vesicles include cell-cell signalling, removal of unwanted proteins, and transfer of pathogens (including prion-like misfolded proteins) between cells, such as infectious prions. Prions are the infectious particles that are responsible for transmissible neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) of humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Exosomes are also involved in processing the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). As exosomes can be isolated from circulating fluids such as serum, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), they provide a potential source of biomarkers for neurological conditions. Here, we review the roles these vesicles play in neurodegenerative disease and highlight their potential in diagnosing these disorders through analysis of their RNA content.

  14. Codon 129 polymorphism of prion protein gene in is not a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerusa Smid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of prion protein and amyloid-b oligomers has been demonstrated recently. Homozygosity at prion protein gene (PRNP codon 129 is associated with higher risk for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. This polymorphism has been addressed as a possible risk factor in Alzheimer disease (AD. Objective To describe the association between codon 129 polymorphisms and AD. Methods We investigated the association of codon 129 polymorphism of PRNP in 99 AD patients and 111 controls, and the association between this polymorphism and cognitive performance. Other polymorphisms of PRNP and additive effect of apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE were evaluated. Results Codon 129 genotype distribution in AD 45.5% methionine (MM, 42.2% methionine valine (MV, 12.1% valine (VV; and 39.6% MM, 50.5% MV, 9.9% VV among controls (p>0.05. There were no differences of cognitive performance concerning codon 129. Stratification according to ApoE genotype did not reveal difference between groups. Conclusion Codon 129 polymorphism is not a risk factor for AD in Brazilian patients.

  15. Fabry Disease in Families With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adalsteinsdottir, Berglind; Palsson, Runolfur; Desnick, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The screening of Icelandic patients clinically diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulted in identification of 8 individuals from 2 families with X-linked Fabry disease (FD) caused by GLA(α-galactosidase A gene) mutations encoding p.D322E (family A) or p.I232T (family B...

  16. Prion Disease Induces Alzheimer Disease-Like Neuropathologic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousseyn, Thomas; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Sánchez, Henry; Gheyara, Ania; Oehler, Abby; Geschwind, Michael; DeArmond, Bernadette; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the brains of 266 patients with prion diseases (PrionD) and found that 46 (17%) had Alzheimer disease (AD)-like changes. To explore potential mechanistic links between PrionD and AD, we exposed human brain aggregates (Hu BrnAggs) to brain homogenate from a patient with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and found that the neurons in the Hu BrnAggs produced many β-amyloid (β42) inclusions, whereas uninfected, control-exposed Hu BrnAggs did not. Western blots of 20-pooled CJD-infected BrnAggs verified higher Aβ42 levels than controls. We next examined the CA1 region of the hippocampus from 14 patients with PrionD and found that 5 patients had low levels of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc), many Aβ42 intraneuronal inclusions, low APOE-4, and no significant nerve cell loss. Seven patients had high levels of PrPSc, low Aβ42, high APOE-4 and 40% nerve cell loss, suggesting that APOE-4 and PrPSc together cause neuron loss in PrionD. There were also increased levels of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (Hτ) and Hτ-positive neuropil threads and neuron bodies in both PrionD and AD groups. The brains of 6 age-matched control patients without dementia did not contain Aβ42 deposits; however, there were rare Hτ-positive threads in 5 controls and 2 controls had a few Hτ-positive nerve cell bodies. We conclude that PrionD may trigger biochemical changes similar to AD and suggest that PrionD are diseases of PrPSc, Aβ42, APOE-4 and abnormal tau. PMID:26226132

  17. Distinct transmissibility features of TSE sources derived from ruminant prion diseases by the oral route in a transgenic mouse model (TgOvPrP4 overexpressing the ovine prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Noël Arsac

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases associated with a misfolded form of host-encoded prion protein (PrP. Some of them, such as classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle (BSE, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME, kuru and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, are acquired by the oral route exposure to infected tissues. We investigated the possible transmission by the oral route of a panel of strains derived from ruminant prion diseases in a transgenic mouse model (TgOvPrP4 overexpressing the ovine prion protein (A136R154Q171 under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter. Sources derived from Nor98, CH1641 or 87V scrapie sources, as well as sources derived from L-type BSE or cattle-passaged TME, failed to transmit by the oral route, whereas those derived from classical BSE and classical scrapie were successfully transmitted. Apart from a possible effect of passage history of the TSE agent in the inocula, this implied the occurrence of subtle molecular changes in the protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres following oral transmission that can raises concerns about our ability to correctly identify sheep that might be orally infected by the BSE agent in the field. Our results provide proof of principle that transgenic mouse models can be used to examine the transmissibility of TSE agents by the oral route, providing novel insights regarding the pathogenesis of prion diseases.

  18. Familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Munkholm, P; Langholz, E

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We assessed the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in Copenhagen County, where there has been a long-term interest in the epidemiology of such disorders. In 1987 we interviewed 662 patients in whom inflammatory bowel disease had been diagnosed before 1979...... or Crohn's disease) among second-degree relatives was increased; the prevalence of the other disease was not increased. CONCLUSIONS: The 10-fold increase in the familial risk of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease strongly suggests that these disorders have a genetic cause....... with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease had a 10-fold increase in the risk of having the same disease as the patients, after standardization for age and sex. The risk of having the other of the two diseases was also increased, but less so, and the increase in the risk of having Crohn's disease...

  19. Human prion diseases: surgical lessons learned from iatrogenic prion transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonda, David J; Manjila, Sunil; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Khan, Fahd; Miller, Benjamin R; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Puoti, Gianfranco; Cohen, Mark L; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Cali, Ignazio

    2016-07-01

    The human prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, have captivated our imaginations since their discovery in the Fore linguistic group in Papua New Guinea in the 1950s. The mysterious and poorly understood "infectious protein" has become somewhat of a household name in many regions across the globe. From bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly identified as mad cow disease, to endocannibalism, media outlets have capitalized on these devastatingly fatal neurological conditions. Interestingly, since their discovery, there have been more than 492 incidents of iatrogenic transmission of prion diseases, largely resulting from prion-contaminated growth hormone and dura mater grafts. Although fewer than 9 cases of probable iatrogenic neurosurgical cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) have been reported worldwide, the likelihood of some missed cases and the potential for prion transmission by neurosurgery create considerable concern. Laboratory studies indicate that standard decontamination and sterilization procedures may be insufficient to completely remove infectivity from prion-contaminated instruments. In this unfortunate event, the instruments may transmit the prion disease to others. Much caution therefore should be taken in the absence of strong evidence against the presence of a prion disease in a neurosurgical patient. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) have devised risk assessment and decontamination protocols for the prevention of iatrogenic transmission of the prion diseases, incidents of possible exposure to prions have unfortunately occurred in the United States. In this article, the authors outline the historical discoveries that led from kuru to the identification and isolation of the pathological prion proteins in addition to providing a brief description of human prion diseases and iatrogenic forms of CJD, a brief history of prion disease nosocomial transmission

  20. Family History of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O D Rymar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was estimate the clinical characteristics of Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT in first@degree relatives of persons in families with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD. Patients: Eighty one patients with AITD of 40 families, mean age (+/@s.d. 41.9 ± 1.8; range 18-73 years. In 10 families (25% AITD traced among siblings, whose average age was 33.6 ± 3.5 years, 29 families (72.5% - of two generations (parent@ descendant 57.4 ± 1.6 and 32.2 ± 1.5 years, p = 0.001, respectively. In one family (2.5% the disease was traced in both parents and their offspring. Results. Among patients with a positive family history for AITD is dominated by a pair of parent - descendant with a diagnosis of hypothyroidism (55%. Preliminary evidence of genetic anticipation in GD and HT. Patients with a family history of AITD ill of GD and HT to 50 years (84%, half - up to 30 years (47%. In familial forms of GD, a decrease in compensated patients for two generations. Among parents and descendant with hypothyroidism, there is a low percentage of persons over the medical euthyroidism (42%.

  1. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD.Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia.Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families.Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%.Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis.

  2. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD. Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia. Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families. Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%. Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:173-6.

  3. Less protease-resistant PrP in a patient with sporadic CJD treated with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, T; Tsuboi, Y; Obi, T; Doh-ura, K; Murayama, S; Kitamoto, T; Yamada, T; Mizoguchi, K

    2010-02-01

    Treatment with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate (PPS) might be beneficial in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We report a 68-year-old woman with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who received continuous intraventricular PPS infusion (1-120 microg/kg/day) for 17 months starting 10 months after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment with PPS was well tolerated but was associated with a minor, transient intraventricular hemorrhage and a non-progressive collection of subdural fluid. The patient's overall survival time was well above the mean time expected for the illness but still within the normal range. Post-mortem examination revealed that the level of abnormal protease-resistant prion protein in the brain was markedly decreased compared with levels in brains without PPS treatment. These findings suggest that intraventricular PPS infusion might modify the accumulation of abnormal prion proteins in the brains of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  4. Expression of human S100 protein and preparation of specific antiserum for S100 and establishment of a quantitative measurement for S100 protein in CSF specimens of patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease%人S100蛋白的表达及其抗血清的制备和脑脊液中S100含量测定方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福萍; 张瑾; 周伟; 董小平; 洪涛

    2002-01-01

    目的建立定量检测脑脊液(CSF)及血清中S100蛋白的方法,探讨S100蛋白的检测在辅助诊断克-雅病(CJD)中的应用.方法利用脑cDNA文库,经PCR获得了S100基因并克隆至原核表达载体pGEX-2T上,在大肠埃希菌中表达了谷胱甘肽-S-转移酶(GST)-S100融合蛋白;融合蛋白经亲和纯化后,免疫家兔,制备抗体;抗体经纯化后,用生物素(BNHS)标记,建立了可定量检测S100蛋白的生物素-亲和素系统ELISA方法,并初步用于临床脑脊液的检测中.结果所表达的GST-S100蛋白相对分子质量约为35 000,以其为抗原制备的S100特异性抗血清具有良好的免疫反应性.建立了定量检测脑脊液中S100蛋白的双抗体夹心ELISA方法,对3例"可能性的CJD"患者(14-3-3蛋白阳性)和15例无痴呆症状患者脑脊液进行检测,结果显示,3例CJD患者脑脊液S100含量均超过2.900 μg/L,而在无痴呆症状患者组中14例患者脑脊液S100含量都低于0.180 μg/L.对正常人和CJD患者血清进行检测,显示S100蛋白含量个体间差异很大.结论所建立的方法可用于脑脊液中S100蛋白的检测,进一步扩大标本量有助于明确脑脊液中S100蛋白的检测在辅助诊断CJD中的价值.

  5. Familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottone, Mario; Marrone, Ciro; Casà, Angelo; Oliva, Lorenzo; Orlando, Ambrogio; Calabrese, Emma; Martorana, Giuseppe; Pagliaro, Luigi

    2003-09-01

    The authors have previously reported a possible increased risk of the familial occurrence of Crohn's disease in patients with celiac disease. The aim of the current study was to evaluate in a case-control study the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease. One hundred eleven consecutive patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease were interviewed to ascertain whether IBD was present in first-degree relatives. The number of relatives, their ages, and possible IBD status were collected in a questionnaire. When a diagnosis of familial IBD was reported, the diagnosis was checked in the hospital records. Two hundred twenty-two controls matched for age and sex (111 from the general population and 111 from orthopedic wards) were also interviewed regarding the possible occurrence of IBD in first-degree relatives. The chi2 test was used to evaluate the difference in proportion of familial occurrence of IBD among individuals with celiac disease and controls. Among 600 first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease, 10 cases of IBD were identified among first-degree relatives (7 cases of ulcerative colitis and 3 cases of Crohn's disease), whereas only 1 case of IBD was identified among the 1,196 first-degree relatives of control patients (p case-control study shows that there is a significantly increased prevalence of familial ulcerative colitis in patients with celiac disease. There was no significant increase in the prevalence of Crohn's disease in patients with celiac disease. The possible role of this association is discussed.

  6. Family physician perspectives on primary immunodeficiency diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan eOrange

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with a PID. Selective immunoglobulin A (IgA, deficiency (21%, and chronic granulomatous disease (11% were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P<.0001. Use of intravenously administered Ig, and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P<.0001. Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4% vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P<.0001. Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with a PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care.

  7. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Frederik Trier; Andersen, Vibeke; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD....... METHODS: The study encompassed the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (N=8,295,773; 200 million person-years). From national registries, we obtained information on diagnosis date of IBD (N=45,780) and family ties. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of IBD...... in relatives of IBD cases compared with individuals with relatives of the same type without IBD. RESULTS: The risk of CD was significantly increased in first-degree (IRR, 7.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.05-8.56), second-degree (IRR, 2.44; 95% CI, 2.01-2.96), and third-degree relatives (IRR, 1.88; 95% CI...

  8. Diseases of herbs from Apiaceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Dorota Zalewska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The largest participation in causing the disease of herbal plants have fungi. Studies on their occurrence on plants of the family Apiaceae are conducted in the Lublin region since 2001. The observations of plant healthiness are carried out directly on the plantations. Plants with symptoms of disease are studied in the laboratory. Identification of the fungi is performed based on etiological symptoms and on the base of fungal cultures isolated from plants. Among the many species of fungi obtained from diseased plants to the particularly harmful belong: Septoria carvi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioidesand C. dematium, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Passalora puncta(Cercosporidium punctum and Erysiphe umbelliferarum.

  9. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases.

  10. Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy: A New Sporadic Disease of the Prion Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wen-Quan; Puoti, Gianfranco; Xiao, Xiangzhu; Yuan, Jue; Qing, Liuting; Cali, Ignazio; Shimoji, Miyuki; Langeveld, Jan P. M.; Castellani, Rudy; Notari, Silvio; Crain, Barbara; Schmidt, Robert E.; Geschwind, Michael; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Dickson, Dennis; Honig, Lawrence; Torres, Juan Maria; Mastrianni, James; Capellari, Sabina; Giaccone, Giorgio; Belay, Ermias D.; Schonberger, Lawrence B.; Cohen, Mark; Perry, George; Kong, Qingzhong; Parchi, Piero; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Gambetti, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study is to report 2 new genotypic forms of protease-sensitive prionopathy (PSPr), a novel prion disease described in 2008, in 11 subjects all homozygous for valine at codon 129 of the prion protein (PrP) gene (129VV). The 2 new PSPr forms affect individuals who are either homozygous for methionine (129MM) or heterozygous for methionine/valine (129MV). Methods Fifteen affected subjects with 129MM, 129MV, and 129VV underwent comparative evaluation at the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center for clinical, histopathologic, immunohistochemical, genotypical, and PrP characteristics. Results Disease duration (between 22 and 45 months) was significantly different in the 129VV and 129MV subjects. Most other phenotypic features along with the PrP electrophoretic profile were similar but distinguishable in the 3 129 genotypes. A major difference laid in the sensitivity to protease digestion of the disease-associated PrP, which was high in 129VV but much lower, or altogether lacking, in 129MV and 129MM. This difference prompted the substitution of the original designation with “variably protease-sensitive prionopathy” (VPSPr). None of the subjects had mutations in the PrP gene coding region. Interpretation Because all 3 129 genotypes are involved, and are associated with distinguishable phenotypes, VPSPr becomes the second sporadic prion protein disease with this feature after Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, originally reported in 1920. However, the characteristics of the abnormal prion protein suggest that VPSPr is different from typical prion diseases, and perhaps more akin to subtypes of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease. PMID:20695009

  11. Family aggregation of cardiovascular disease mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Möller, Sören

    2017-01-01

    Background: Familial factors play an important role in the variation of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), but less is known about how they affect the risk of death from CVD. We estimated familial aggregation of CVD mortality for twins offering the maximum level of risk due to genetic...... deaths from myocardial infarct and 4855 deaths occurred from stroke, with 1092 deaths from ischaemic stroke and 1159 deaths from haemorrhagic stroke. Relative recurrence risk ratios (RRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for monozygotic and dizygotic twins were calculated. Results......: In the analyses pooling men and women, the RRR for monozygotic twins was 1.49 (95% CI 1.40-1.57) for CHD and 1.81 for any stroke (95% CI 1.54-2.09). The highest RRR was found for haemorrhagic stroke (3.53 95% CI 2.01-5.04). For dizygotic twins, the RRRs were generally lower. Conclusions: Family aggregation...

  12. Reg gene family and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Wei Zhang; Liu-Song Ding; Mao-De Lai

    2003-01-01

    Regenerating gene (Reg or REG) family, within the superfamily of C-type lectin, is mainly involved in the liver,pancreatic, gastric and intestinal cell proliferation or differentiation. Considerable attention has focused on Reg family and its structurally related molecules. Over the last 15 years, 17 members of the Reg family have been cloned and sequenced. They have been considered as members of a conserved protein family sharing structural and some functional properties being involved in injury, inflammation,diabetes and carcinogenesis. We previously identified Reg Ⅳ as a strong candidate for a gene that was highly expressed in colorectal adenoma when compared to normal mucosa based on suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH),reverse Northern blot, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR)and Northern blot. In situ hybridization results further support that overexpression of Reg Ⅳ may be an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis. We suggest that detection of Reg Ⅳ overexpression might be useful in the early diagnosis of carcinomatous transformation of adenoma.This review summarizes the roles of Reg family in diseases in the literature as well as our recent results of Reg Ⅳ in colorectal cancer. The biological properties of Reg family and its possible roles in human diseases are discussed. We particularly focus on the roles of Reg family as sensitive reactants of tissue injury, prognostic indicators of tumor survival and early biomarkers of carcinogenesis. In addition to our current understanding of Reg gene functions, we postulate that there might be relationships between Reg family and microsatellite instability, apoptosis and cancer with a poor prognosis. Investigation of the correlation between tumor Reg expression and survival rate, and analysis of the Reg gene status in human maliganancies, are required to elucidate the biologic consequences of Reg gene expression, the implications for Reg gene regulation of cell growth, tumorigenesis

  13. Tay Sachs and Related Storage Diseases: Family Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Gerald; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Based on interviews with 24 families, the article discusses family planning and the choices available to those families in which a child has previously died from Tay-Sachs or related lipid storage diseases. (IM)

  14. Tay Sachs and Related Storage Diseases: Family Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Gerald; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Based on interviews with 24 families, the article discusses family planning and the choices available to those families in which a child has previously died from Tay-Sachs or related lipid storage diseases. (IM)

  15. Exosomes: vehicles for the transfer of toxic proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayne Anthony Bellingham

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted by a number of cell types including neurons and can be isolated from conditioned cell media or bodily fluids such as urine and plasma. Exosome biogenesis involves the inward budding of endosomes to form multivesicular bodies (MVB. When fused with the plasma membrane, the MVB releases the vesicles into the extracellular environment as exosomes. Proposed functions of these vesicles include roles in cell-cell signaling, removal of unwanted proteins, and the transfer of pathogens between cells. One such pathogen which exploits this pathway is the prion, the infectious particle responsible for the transmissible neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD of humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE of cattle. Similarly, exosomes are also involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP which is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Exosomes have been shown to contain full-length APP and several distinct proteolytically cleaved products of APP, including Aβ. In addition, these fragments can be modulated using inhibitors of the proteases involved in APP cleavage. These observations provide further evidence for a novel pathway in which PrP and APP fragments are released from cells. Other proteins such as superoxide dismutase I (SOD-1 and alpha-synuclein (involved in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Parkinson’s disease respectively are also found associated with exosomes. This review will focus on the role of exosomes in neurodegenerative disorders and discuss the potential of these vesicles for the spread of neurotoxicity, therapeutics and diagnostics for these diseases.

  16. Evidence of subclinical prion disease in aged mice following exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Karen L; Mabbott, Neil A

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob (vCJD) disease in humans was almost certainly the result of consumption of food contaminated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions. Despite probable widespread exposure of the UK population to BSE-contaminated food in the 1980s, vCJD has been identified predominantly in young individuals, and there have been fewer cases of clinical disease than anticipated. The reasons for this are uncertain. Following peripheral exposure, many prions replicate within the lymphoid tissues before infecting the central nervous system. We have shown that the effects of host age on the microarchitecture of the spleen significantly impair susceptibility to mouse-adapted prions after peripheral exposure. The transmission of prions between different mammalian species is considered to be limited by the 'species barrier', which is dependent on several factors, including an intact immune system. Thus, cross-species prion transmission may be much less efficient in aged individuals. To test this hypothesis, we compared prion pathogenesis in groups of young (6-8 weeks old) and aged (600 days old) mice injected with primary BSE brain homogenate. We showed that prion pathogenesis was impaired dramatically in aged mice when compared with young animals. Whereas most young mice succumbed to clinical prion disease, all aged mice failed to develop clinical disease during their lifespans. However, the demonstration that prion accumulation was detected in the lymphoid tissues of some aged mice after injection with primary BSE brain homogenate, in the absence of clinical signs of prion disease, has important implications for human health.

  17. Detecting and quantifying prions: Mass spectrometry-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prions are novel pathogens that cause a set of rare fatal neurological diseases know as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Examples of these diseases include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, scrapie and chronic wasting disease. Prions are able to recruit a normal cellular prion protein and convert...

  18. Absence of consensus in diagnostic criteria for familial neurodegenerative diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Susan

    2012-04-01

    A small proportion of cases seen in neurodegenerative conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson\\'s disease and Alzheimer disease are familial. These familial cases are usually clinically indistinguishable from sporadic cases. Identifying familial cases is important both in terms of clinical guidance for family members and for gene discovery.

  19. A naturally occurring variant of the human prion protein completely prevents prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Emmanuel A; Smidak, Michelle; Grimshaw, Andrew; Houghton, Richard; Tomlinson, Andrew; Jeelani, Asif; Jakubcova, Tatiana; Hamdan, Shyma; Richard-Londt, Angela; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Brandner, Sebastian; Alpers, Michael; Whitfield, Jerome; Mead, Simon; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Collinge, John

    2015-06-25

    Mammalian prions, transmissible agents causing lethal neurodegenerative diseases, are composed of assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP). A novel PrP variant, G127V, was under positive evolutionary selection during the epidemic of kuru--an acquired prion disease epidemic of the Fore population in Papua New Guinea--and appeared to provide strong protection against disease in the heterozygous state. Here we have investigated the protective role of this variant and its interaction with the common, worldwide M129V PrP polymorphism. V127 was seen exclusively on a M129 PRNP allele. We demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing both variant and wild-type human PrP are completely resistant to both kuru and classical Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) prions (which are closely similar) but can be infected with variant CJD prions, a human prion strain resulting from exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions to which the Fore were not exposed. Notably, mice expressing only PrP V127 were completely resistant to all prion strains, demonstrating a different molecular mechanism to M129V, which provides its relative protection against classical CJD and kuru in the heterozygous state. Indeed, this single amino acid substitution (G→V) at a residue invariant in vertebrate evolution is as protective as deletion of the protein. Further study in transgenic mice expressing different ratios of variant and wild-type PrP indicates that not only is PrP V127 completely refractory to prion conversion but acts as a potent dose-dependent inhibitor of wild-type prion propagation.

  20. Lack of familial aggregation of Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gilberto; Louis, Elan D; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Côté, Lucien; Andrews, Howard; Harris, Juliette; Waters, Cheryl; Ford, Blair; Frucht, Steven; Fahn, Stanley; Ottman, Ruth; Marder, Karen

    2004-07-01

    To investigate the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) in first-degree relatives of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) compared with first-degree relatives of controls. Case-control study, family history method, and reconstructed cohort approach. Probands with PD without dementia and control probands, matched by age strata, sex, and ethnicity, were examined in person and enrolled without knowledge of family history of PD and other neurological disorders. Disease status in first-degree relatives of probands with PD and control probands was ascertained through a structured family history interview administered to the proband and a second informant (self-report or another informant). Cox proportional hazards models with double-censoring techniques for missing information on age of onset of AD were used to analyze the risk of AD in first-degree relatives of patients with PD compared with first-degree relatives of controls. Four hundred eighty-seven probands with PD and 409 control probands provided family history information on 4819 first-degree relatives older than 30 years (2534 relatives of probands with PD and 2285 relatives of control probands). One hundred thirteen first-degree relatives (2.3%; 61 relatives [2.4%] of patients with PD and 52 relatives [2.3%] of controls) were diagnosed with AD. The risk of AD was not increased in relatives of patients with PD compared with relatives of controls (hazard ratio, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-1.6; P =.65). Similarly, no significantly increased risk of AD was observed when comparing relatives of patients with early-onset (50 years) PD with relatives of controls. The lack of familial aggregation of PD and AD does not support the hypothesis of major shared genetic contributions to the etiology of the 2 most common neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Anesthesia experience along with familial Mediterranean fever and celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Sargın; Hale Borazan; Gülçin Hacıbeyoğlu; Şeref Otelcioğlu

    2015-01-01

    (Anesthetic management in patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac Disease) Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive transmitted disease which often seen at Mediterranean origin society and it goes by deterioration at inflammation control. Celiac disease is a proximal small intestine disease which develops gluten intolerance by autoimmune mechanism in sensitive people. Association of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease is a rare situation. In this art...

  2. Geographical BSE risk assessment and its impact on disease detection and dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Mo; Silano, Vittorio; Heim, Dagmar; Kreysa, Joachim

    2012-08-01

    Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) rapidly evolved into an issue of major public concern particularly when, in 1996, evidence was provided that this disease had crossed the species barrier and infected humans in the UK with what has become known as "variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease" (vCJD). The aim of this paper is to describe the European Geographical BSE risk assessment (GBR) that was successfully used for assessing the qualitative likelihood that BSE could be present in a country where it was not yet officially recognized. It also discusses how this can lead to risk-based and therefore preventive management of BSE at national and international levels. The basic assumption of the GBR method is that the BSE agent is initially introduced into a country's domestic cattle production system through the importation of contaminated feedstuffs or live cattle. This is referred to as an "external challenge". The ability of the system to cope with such a challenge is, in turn, referred to as its "stability": a stable system will not allow the BSE agent to propagate and amplify following its introduction, while an unstable system will. The BSE-status of a country assessed by this system was used by the European Commission as the basis for trade legislation rules for cattle and their products. The GBR was an invaluable tool in evaluating the potential global spread of BSE as it demonstrated how a disease could be transferred through international trade. This was shown to be a critical factor to address in reducing the spread and amplification of BSE throughout the world. Furthermore, GBR resulted in the implementation of additional measures and management activities both to improve surveillance and to prevent transmission within the cattle population.

  3. Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (c-BSE) is an animal prion disease that also causes variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Over the past decades, c-BSE's zoonotic potential has been the driving force in establishing extensive protective measures for animal and human health. In compl...

  4. Mass Spectrometry of Prions: Approaches to Conformational Distinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prions are the agents that cause a set of fatal neurological diseases that include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Prions are composed solely of protein. Unlike viral, bacterial, or fungal pathogens, the information necessary to propagate the infection is contained in the conformation of the prion isofor...

  5. BSE-associated prion-amyloid cardiomyopathy in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasemann, Susanne; Mearini, Giulia; Krämer, Elisabeth; Wagenführ, Katja; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Neumann, Melanie; Bodemer, Walter; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Beekes, Michael; Carrier, Lucie; Aguzzi, Adriano; Glatzel, Markus

    2013-06-01

    Prion amyloidosis occurred in the heart of 1 of 3 macaques intraperitoneally inoculated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions. This macaque had a remarkably long duration of disease and signs of cardiac distress. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, caused by transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to humans, may manifest with cardiac symptoms from prion-amyloid cardiomyopathy.

  6. Prion-Specific Antibodies Produced in Wild-Type Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Andersen, Heidi Gertz;

    2015-01-01

    method for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against peptides representing two sites of interest in the bovine prion protein (boPrP), the causative agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease (CJD) in humans, as well...

  7. Anesthesia experience along with familial Mediterranean fever and celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sargın

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available (Anesthetic management in patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac Disease Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive transmitted disease which often seen at Mediterranean origin society and it goes by deterioration at inflammation control. Celiac disease is a proximal small intestine disease which develops gluten intolerance by autoimmune mechanism in sensitive people. Association of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease is a rare situation. In this article we present our anesthesia experience on a bilateral septic arthritis case who also have Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease association.

  8. The Olig family affects central nervous system development and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Botao Tan; Jing Yu; Ying Yin; Gongwei Jia; Wei Jiang; Lehua Yu

    2014-01-01

    Neural cell differentiation and maturation is a critical step during central nervous system devel-opment. The oligodendrocyte transcription family (Olig family) is known to be an important factor in regulating neural cell differentiation. Because of this, the Olig family also affects acute and chronic central nervous system diseases, including brain injury, multiple sclerosis, and even gliomas. Improved understanding about the functions of the Olig family in central nervous system development and disease will greatly aid novel breakthroughs in central nervous system diseases. This review investigates the role of the Olig family in central nervous system develop-ment and related diseases.

  9. Protease-resistant PrP and PrP oligomers in the brain in human prion diseases after intraventricular pentosan polysulfate infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Minaki, Haruhiko; Masui, Kenta; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Doh-Ura, Katsumi; Iwaki, Toru

    2012-04-01

    Intraventricular infusion of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) as a treatment for various human prion diseases has been applied in Japan. To evaluate the influence of PPS treatment we performed pathological examination and biochemical analyses of PrP molecules in autopsied brains treated with PPS (one case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, case 1), two cases of dura mater graft-associated CJD (dCJD, cases 2 and 4), and one case of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS, case 3). Six cases of sCJD without PPS treatment were examined for comparison. Protease-resistant PrP (PrP(res) ) in the frontal lobe was evaluated by Western blotting after proteinase K digestion. Further, the degree of polymerization of PrP molecules was examined by the size-exclusion gel chromatography assay. PPS infusions were started 3-10 months after disease onset, but the treatment did not achieve any clinical improvements. Postmortem examinations of the treated cases revealed symmetrical brain lesions, including neuronal loss, spongiform change and gliosis. Noteworthy was GFAP in the cortical astrocytes reduced in all treated cases despite astrogliosis. Immunohistochemistry for PrP revealed abnormal synaptic deposits in all treated cases and further plaque-type PrP deposition in case 3 of GSS and case 4 of dCJD. Western blotting showed relatively low ratios of PrP(res) in case 2 of dCJD and case 3 of GSS, while in the treated sCJD (case 1), the ratio of PrP(res) was comparable with untreated cases. The indices of oligomeric PrP were reduced in one sCJD (case 1) and one dCJD (case 2). Although intraventricular PPS infusion might modify the accumulation of PrP oligomers in the brains of patients with prion diseases, the therapeutic effects are still uncertain.

  10. [McArdle's disease (a familial case)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, A M

    1976-01-01

    The author describes a family (48 year old mother and 15 year old son) with the muscular variant of glycogenosis-McArde's metabolic myopathy. The mother has been ill since 22 years old, the son--since 7. The disease had a slowly progressive development. The clinical picture was characterized by convulsions of the type of cramps following physical loadings on muscles of the body and extremities. Convulsions were accompanied by pain, an induration and enlargment of the muscles, muscle fatigue and increased significantly in an artifical ischemia of the extremities. A histochemical study of the muscle revealed a pathological accumulation of glycogen. The content of lactic and pyruvic acid in the blood after work in ischemic conditions did not change significantly. A study of the sugar curve in the blood with a loading with glucose and a parallel determination of insulin by a radioimmune method found hyperinsulinemia and a dysfunction of the pancreas.

  11. Inactivation of the BSE agent by the heat and pressure process for manufacturing gelatine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grobben, A.H.; Steele, P.J.; Somerville, R.A.; Taylor, D.; Schreuder, B.E.C.

    2005-01-01

    Dietary exposure to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent is the probable cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in people. The industrial manufacturing process for the production of gelatine and colloidal protein by the heat and pressure process was downscaled accurately and its capa

  12. 76 FR 38667 - Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... deferral for time spent in Saudi Arabia to reduce the risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) by blood and blood products and human cells, tissues and cellular and tissue-based products. FDA intends to... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory...

  13. Typical and atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom and subsequently in other countries. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, but the origin of BSE has not been eluci...

  14. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease)

    OpenAIRE

    Mufaddel, Amir A.; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr’s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsych...

  15. Hippocampal hyperactivation in presymptomatic familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Budson, Andrew E; Celone, Kim; Ruiz, Adriana; Newmark, Randall; Castrillón, Gabriel; Lopera, Francisco; Stern, Chantal E

    2010-12-01

    The examination of individuals who carry fully penetrant genetic alterations that result in familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) provides a unique model for studying the early presymptomatic disease stages. In AD, deficits in episodic and associative memory have been linked to structural and functional changes within the hippocampal system. This study used functional MRI (fMRI) to examine hippocampal function in a group of healthy, young, cognitively-intact presymptomatic individuals (average age 33.7 years) who carry the E280A presenilin-1 (PS1) genetic mutation for FAD. These PS1 subjects will go on to develop the first symptoms of the disease around the age of 45 years. Our objective was to examine hippocampal function years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Twenty carriers of the Alzheimer's-associated E280A PS1 mutation and 19 PS1-negative control subjects participated. Both groups were matched for age, sex, education level, and neuropsychological test performance. All participants performed a face-name associative encoding task while in a Phillips 1.5T fMRI scanner. Analysis focused on the hippocampal system. Despite identical behavioral performance, presymptomatic PS1 mutation carriers exhibited increased activation of the right anterior hippocampus during encoding of novel face-name associations compared to matched controls. Our results demonstrate that functional changes within the hippocampal memory system occur years before cognitive decline in FAD. These presymptomatic changes in hippocampal physiology in FAD suggest that hippocampal fMRI patterns during associative encoding may also provide a preclinical biomarker in sporadic AD.

  16. Chronic illness and family: impact of schizophrenia and Crohn's disease on the family quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loga, Slobodan; Sošić, Bojan; Kulenović, Alma Džubur; Svraka, Emira; Bosankić, Nina; Kučukalić, Abdulah; Cemalović, Omer; Hadžić, Alma

    2012-12-01

    Quality of life assessments are increasingly present in health research. Chronic and progressive illness of a family member unavoidably affects quality of life of a family as a whole. The goals of this study were to gain insight into the family burden of chronic disorders, especially possible differences in family quality of life (FQOL) in families that have members suffering from either schizophrenia or Crohn's disease, and families in which none of the members have chronic somatic or mental illness, as well as to pilot an instrument for this purpose. The sample consisted of 53 families with a member suffering from schizophrenia, 50 families with a member suffering from Crohn's disease, and 45 families with no identifiable chronic illnesses. An informant from each family underwent a structured face to face interview, using a questionnaire specially adapted from Family Quality of Life Survey, an instrument widely used to assess FQOL in families with members with disabilities, and which addresses nine areas of family life. In the domain of health, both groups of families with chronic illnesses believe they have significantly different conditions when compared to members of the Control group. In the Crohn's disease group, families had a great deal more of challenges in accessing healthcare services; and see themselves at a disadvantage when compared to both other groups in the domain of finances. Control group offered lowest rating in the domain of support from others. Overall measures of FQOL show significant variation among the three groups, Crohn's disease group offering lowest ratings, followed by families of mental health service users. Overall, FQOL seems to be lower in families that have members diagnosed with Crohn's disease than in families with members suffering from schizophrenia. Illness-specific studies are required, as well as instruments with stronger psychometric properties and studies of determinants of FQOL. Qualitative approach should be emphasised

  17. Family history assessment: impact on disease risk perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Catharine; Sen, Ananda; Ruffin, Mack T; Nease, Donald E; Gramling, Robert; Acheson, Louise S; O'Neill, Suzanne M; Rubinstein, Wendy S

    2012-10-01

    Family Healthware™, a tool developed by the CDC, is a self-administered web-based family history tool that assesses familial risk for six diseases (coronary heart disease; stroke; diabetes; and colon, breast, and ovarian cancers) and provides personalized prevention messages based on risk. The Family Healthware Impact Trial (FHITr) set out to examine the clinical utility of presenting personalized preventive messages tailored to family history risk for improving health behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of Family Healthware on modifying disease risk perceptions, particularly among those who initially underestimated their risk for certain diseases. A total of 3786 patients were enrolled in a cluster-randomized trial to evaluate the clinical utility of Family Healthware. Participants were recruited from 41 primary care practices among 13 states between 2005 and 2007. Perceived risk for each disease was assessed at baseline and 6-month follow-up using a single-item comparative risk question. Analyses were completed in March 2012. Compared to controls, Family Healthware increased risk perceptions among those who underestimated their risk for heart disease (15% vs 9%, prisk perceptions. Family Healthware was effective at increasing disease risk perceptions, particularly for metabolic conditions, among those who underestimated their risk. Results from this study also demonstrate the relatively resistant nature of risk perceptions. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.govNCT00164658. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. Dock protein family in brain development and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    The family of dedicator of cytokinesis (Dock), a protein family that belongs to the atypical Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rac and/or Cdc42 GTPases, plays pivotal roles in various processes of brain development. To date, 11 members of Docks have been identified in the mammalian system. Emerging evidence has suggested that members of the Dock family are associated with several neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, including Alzheimer disease and autism spectrum disorders. This review summarizes recent advances on the understanding of the roles of the Dock protein family in normal and diseased processes in the nervous system. Furthermore, interacting proteins and the molecular regulation of Docks are discussed.

  19. Exome sequencing in a family segregating for celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szperl, A M; Ricaño-Ponce, I; Li, J K; Deelen, P; Kanterakis, A; Plagnol, V; van Dijk, Freerk; Westra, H J; Trynka, G; Mulder, C. J.; Swertz, M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zheng, H C H

    Celiac disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by an unknown number of genetic factors interacting with an environmental factor. Hence, most patients are singletons and large families segregating with celiac disease are rare. We report on a three-generation family with six patients in which the

  20. Exome sequencing in a family segregating for celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szperl, A M; Ricaño-Ponce, I; Li, J K; Deelen, P; Kanterakis, A; Plagnol, V; van Dijk, Freerk; Westra, H J; Trynka, G; Mulder, C. J.; Swertz, M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zheng, H C H

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by an unknown number of genetic factors interacting with an environmental factor. Hence, most patients are singletons and large families segregating with celiac disease are rare. We report on a three-generation family with six patients in which the

  1. Von Willebrand's Disease in Two Families of Doberman Pinschers

    OpenAIRE

    Johnstone, I B; Crane, S

    1981-01-01

    The history, clinical symptoms and laboratory results in two families of Doberman pinschers with von Willebrand's disease are described. The affected animals illustrate the rather nonspecific bleeding problems that may be encountered in mild and moderate forms of this disease. In both families a bleeding diathesis was suspected when one member of the family underwent surgery with serious postoperative bleeding complications. These cases illustrate the importance of a thorough presurgical hist...

  2. A familial concurrence of schizophrenia and Gaucher's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siomos Konstantinos E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaucher's disease (GD is the most frequently encountered lysosomal storage disease. Here, we describe and discuss the observed concurrence of schizophrenia and Gaucher's disease in two siblings. Methods Presentation of a family with two siblings with Gaucher's disease. Results In a six-member family, the first son suffers from schizophrenia, while the third and fourth sons suffer from the Gaucher's disease (type 1 non-neuronopathic. The parents and the second son do not suffer from either illness. Conclusion The concurrence of schizophrenia and Gaucher's disease in the same family is an unusual phenomenon. The literature regarding this coincidence is limited, despite the fact that patients with Gaucher's disease have one or two mutated alleles, considered to be a risk factor leading to conditions such as Dementia, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia.

  3. Mutation Analysis of HTRA2 Gene in Chinese Familial Essential Tremor and Familial Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ya-Chao; Huang, Pei; Li, Qiong-Qiong; Sun, Qian; Li, Dun-Hui; Wang, Tian; Shen, Jun-Yi; Du, Juan-Juan; Cui, Shi-Shuang; Gao, Chao; Fu, Rao; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-01-01

    Background. HTRA2 has already been nominated as PARK13 which may cause Parkinson's disease, though there are still discrepancies among these results. Recently, Gulsuner et al.'s study found that HTRA2 p.G399S is responsible for hereditary essential tremor and homozygotes of this allele develop Parkinson's disease by examining a six-generation family segregating essential tremor and essential tremor coexisting with Parkinson's disease. We performed this study to validate the condition of HTRA2 gene in Chinese familial essential tremor and familial Parkinson's disease patients, especially essential tremor. Methods. We directly sequenced all eight exons, exon-intron boundaries, and part of the introns in 101 familial essential tremor patients, 105 familial Parkinson's disease patients, and 100 healthy controls. Results. No exonic variant was identified, while one exon-intron boundary variant (rs2241028) and one intron variant (rs2241027) were detected, both with no clinical significance and uncertain function. There was no difference in allele, genotype, and haplotype between groups. Conclusions. HTRA2 exonic variant might be rare among Chinese Parkinson's disease and essential tremor patients with family history, and HTRA2 may not be the cause of familial Parkinson's disease and essential tremor in China.

  4. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Jess, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    in the entire population. Individuals receiving at least 2 diagnoses of IBD during the time period (n=45,780) were identified using the Danish National Registry of Patients. Risk of IBD in family members to individuals with IBD was assessed by Poisson regression analysis. Results: The overall proportion...... of familial CD cases was 12,15 percent of total CD cases and familial UC accounted for and 8,84 percent of total UC cases from 2007-2011. Patterns of IBD risk in family members to IBD-affected individuals appear from Table 1. The risk of CD was 9-fold increased in 1. degree relatives to at least two...... of the same but also the other subtype of IBD, whereas the risk of IBD was less pronounced in third degree relatives to individuals with IBD. Table 1 Rate ratio RR (95% CI) of contracting CD in family members to an IBD affected case, as compared to having a relative of the same type without a diagnosis of IBD...

  5. Coronary Heart Disease in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Versmissen (Jorie)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractFamilial hypercholesterolemia (FH) (OMIM #143890) is an autosomal dominant disorder present in 1:500 Caucasians. FH is caused by defective low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, leading to a diminished uptake of LDL cholesterol by the liver. As a result, FH patients have high LDL chole

  6. Family and twin studies in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leena Halme; Paulina Paavola-Sakki; Ulla Turunen; Maarit Lappalainen; Martti F(a)rkkil(a); Kimmo Kontula

    2006-01-01

    Studies examining the inheritance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) within different family groups have been the basis for recent molecular advances in the genetics of IBD. The derived heritability in Crohn's disease (CD) is higher than in many other complex diseases. The risk of IBD is highest in first-degree relatives of a CD proband,but first-degree relatives of a proband suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC) and more distant relatives are also at increased risk. Disease concordance rates in IBD have been examined in multiplex families and in three large European twin studies.

  7. BEHСET'S DISEASE: ETHNOS AND FAMILIAL AGGREGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Alekberova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial aggregation (repeated cases of the disease in the families of probands is considered as an argument in favor of the genetic nature of Behсet's disease (BD. The results of a survey of 180 patients with BD in three ethnic groups indicated that there were repeated cases of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS in 54 (30% families: more commonly among Dagestanis (n =32, less commonly in Chechens (n = 12 and Russians (10. Thus, the relatives of the RAS proband should be included in a group at risk for BD.

  8. Family caregivers' views on coordination of care in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Collaboration between family caregivers and health professionals in specialised hospitals or community-based primary healthcare systems can be challenging. During the course of severe chronic disease, several health professionals might be involved at a given time, and the patient......'s illness may be unpredictable or not well understood by some of those involved in the treatment and care. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and expectations of family caregivers for persons with Huntington's disease concerning collaboration with healthcare professionals. METHODS......: To shed light on collaboration from the perspectives of family caregivers, we conducted an explorative, qualitative interview study with 15 adult participants experienced from caring for family members in all stages of Huntington's disease. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation, a cross...

  9. Phenotypical variation within 22 families with Pompe disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C.A. Wens (Stephan); C.M. Van Gelder (Carin); M.E. Kruijshaar (Michelle); J.M. de Vries (Juna); N.A.M.E. van der Beek (Nadine); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); E. Brusse (Esther)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pompe disease has a broad clinical spectrum, in which the phenotype is partially explained by the genotype. The aim of this study was to describe phenotypical variation among siblings with non-classic Pompe disease. We hypothesized that siblings and families with the same gen

  10. Wolman disease in patients with familial hemophagocytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solaf Elsayed

    2015-09-26

    Sep 26, 2015 ... b CEDI, Hoˆpital Necker Enfants Malades, Paris, France ... function, neurological dysfunction and hemophagocytic cells ... sites or in association with lymphoma, autoimmune disease, ... the age of one month with a provisional diagnosis of FHL .... is not prominent and is associated with relatively huge.

  11. [Update in family medicine: Periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Silva, M C; Diz-Iglesias, P; Seoane-Romero, J M; Quintas, V; Méndez-Brea, F; Varela-Centelles, P

    2017-03-01

    About 85-94% of the Spanish adults older than 35 experience gum problems, and about 15-30% suffer from periodontitis, being severe in up to 5-11% of them. Unlike other inflammatory conditions, periodontal disease rarely causes discomfort, or limits life or causes functional limitations until its advanced stages, when clinical signs and symptoms arise (gingival recession, pathological teeth migration, or mobility). Lack of knowledge about the disease, together with the idea that tooth loss is linked to ageing, frequently results in a late diagnosis, requiring extensive treatments with a worse prognosis. At Primary Care level, there is series of drugs have been related to periodontal disease (anticonvulsants, immunosuppressive drugs, and calcium channel blockers) as secondary effects, which vary as regards their frequency and severity depending of the amount of accumulated plaque. Stress and depression have also been reported to alter the immune response and to increase the inflammatory response as well as periodontal susceptibility. Certain systemic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, respiratory diseases, as well as low-weight pre-term birth, have also been linked to periodontitis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Interdisciplinary psychosocial care for families with inherited cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleshu, Colleen; Kasparian, Nadine A; Edwards, Katharine S; Yeates, Laura; Semsarian, Christopher; Perez, Marco; Ashley, Euan; Turner, Christian J; Knowles, Joshua W; Ingles, Jodie

    2016-10-01

    Inherited cardiovascular diseases pose unique and complex psychosocial challenges for families, including coming to terms with life-long cardiac disease, risk of sudden death, grief related to the sudden death of a loved one, activity restrictions, and inheritance risk to other family members. Psychosocial factors impact not only mental health but also physical health and cooperation with clinical recommendations. We describe an interdisciplinary approach to the care of families with inherited cardiovascular disease, in which psychological care provided by specialized cardiac genetic counselors, nurses, and psychologists is embedded within the cardiovascular care team. We report illustrative cases and the supporting literature to demonstrate common scenarios, as well as practical guidance for clinicians working in the inherited cardiovascular disease setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mirza, A; King, A.; Troakes, C.; Exley, C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer’s disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer’s disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and a...

  14. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer’s disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer’s disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to alumin...

  15. [Comments on present-day spread and epidemiology of BSE and prion diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemer, W; Kaup, F-J

    2004-02-01

    Prion diseases of animals and man are neurological diseases with amyloidal deposition of the respective proteins. As to prion disease, the cellular prion protein is in its abnormal isoform(s) an essential component of prion protein aggregates found in affected tissue. In contrast to all neurodegenerative diseases like Morbus Alzheimer or Huntington's disease, prion diseases are transmissible. Therefore, prion diseases were designated Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE). The diseases have been well known for decades. Scrapie was first described around 1750, a BSE case was reported in the 1850-ties most likely a misdiagnosis, and in 1920/1930 the human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) had been described. Transmission of CJD i. e. Kuru had been suspected in the early 1950 s and was erroneously classified as slow virus disease. The CJD transmission posed a problem to humans when transplants from CJD cases were used for treatment. Fortunately, these iatrogenic transmissions remained limited. But with the advent of BSE and appearance of variant CJD cases in the UK and some places in Europe scientists suspected that transmission from cattle to man could have happened. From animal models we know of successful transmission via several routes. Species barriers do not completely prevent transmission. Rather, transmission barriers might exist controlling individual susceptibility against prions. Modes of transmission, susceptibility to transmission, identification of receptor molecules as well as molecular mechanisms of the transmission process are being investigated with great intensity. Current knowledge leads us to assume that inapparent stages of prion infection wrongly suggest a (non-existent) species barrier. This inapparent infection precedes overt disease, and, hence, most research focuses on the development of highly sensitive assay systems for detection of minute amounts of pathological prion protein in suspected cases. Inapparence also should warn us to

  16. Familial periodontal disease in the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Octavio A; Orraca, Luis; Kensler, Terry B; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Maldonado, Elizabeth; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Substantial ongoing research continues to explore the contribution of genetics and environment to the onset, extent and severity of periodontal disease(s). Existing evidence supports that periodontal disease appears to have an increased prevalence in family units with a member having aggressive periodontitis. We have been using the nonhuman primate as a model of periodontal disease for over 25 years with these species demonstrating naturally occurring periodontal disease that increases with age. This report details our findings from evaluation of periodontal disease in skulls from 97 animals (5-31 years of age) derived from the skeletons of the rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago. Periodontal disease was evaluated by determining the distance from the base of the alveolar bone defect to the cemento-enamel junction on 1st/2nd premolars and 1st/2nd molars from all four quadrants. The results demonstrated an increasing extent and severity of periodontitis with aging across the population of animals beyond only compensatory eruption. Importantly, irrespective of age, extensive heterogeneity in disease expression was observed among the animals. Linking these variations to multi-generational matriarchal family units supported familial susceptibility of periodontitis. As the current generations of animals that are descendants from these matrilines are alive, studies can be conducted to explore an array of underlying factors that could account for susceptibility or resistance to periodontal disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genotype phenotype correlation in Wilson's disease within families-a report on four south Indian families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S Santhosh; GM Chandy; RV Shaji; CE Eapen; V Jayanthi; S Malathi; P Finny; N Thomas; M Chandy; G Kurian

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the genotype phenotype correlation inWilson's disease (WD) patients with in families.METHODS: We report four unrelated families from South India with nine members affected withWD. Phenotype was classified as per international consensus phenotypic classification of WD. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and 21 exons of ATP7B gene and flanking introns were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were screened for mutations and the aberrant products noted on screening were sequenced.RESULTS: Four separate ATP7B mutations were found in the four families. ATP7B mutations were identical amongst affected members within each family.Three families had homozygous mutations of ATP7B gene while one family had compound heterozygous mutation, of which only one mutation was identified.We noted concordance between ATP7B gene mutation and Wilson's disease phenotype amongst members within each family. The age of onset of symptoms orof detection of asymptomatic disease, baseline serum ceruloplasmin and baseline urinary copper levelswere also similar in affected members of each family.Minor differences in phenotype and baseline serumceruloplasmin level were noted in one family.CONCLUSION: We report concordance between ATP7B mutation and WD phenotype within each familywith > 1 member affected with WD. Homozygous ATP7B mutation was present in 3 of the 4 families studied. Our report supports allelic dominance as adeterminant of WD phenotype. However, in one familywith compound heterozygous mutation, there was a similar WD phenotype which suggests that there may be other factors determining the phenotype.

  18. Exploring family communication about sickle cell disease in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, J Carolyn; Hankins, Jane; Graves, Rebecca J; Robitaille, Kimberly Y; Roberts, Ruth; Cejda, Katherine; Hardy, Belinda T; Johnson, Margery; Porter, Jerlym S

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a lifelong disorder that involves progressive organ damage and requires ongoing medical attention to prevent and treat episodic acute complications. Children with SCD need ongoing monitoring and extra attention that may be stressful to family members. Communication within families can help resolve family stress and may be associated with medical follow-up and management of SCD. Focus groups were conducted with 12 African American families to explore the communication that occurred within and outside of the family from the perspectives of adolescents with SCD, siblings, and parents. Factors that influence family communication were explored. The extended family was an important social network and resource to adolescents, siblings, and parents. Family member knowledge of SCD was an important factor that influenced communication about SCD; adolescents and parents communicated more easily than siblings and also reported having more knowledge of SCD than siblings. Future research focusing on the knowledge of immediate and extended family members and their recognition of their contribution to the child with SCD is recommended.

  19. Association of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Tümgör

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever is an autosomal recessive,short, acute, self-limiting disease characterized by attacksof fever and polyserositis, which is common in countriesaround the Mediterranean. Inflammatory bowel diseaseis a term used to describe Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’sdisease that associated with chronic idiopathic inflammatory.The patient had FMF but she had been well untilapproximately 20 days before admission, when malaise,fever, abdominal pain, right knee and ankle edema developed.She was taking colchicine. The patient diagnosedas Crohn Disease by endoscopy and histopathology. Thiscase report is presented to emphasize the association oftwo diseases.Key words: Familial Mediterranean Fever, inflammatorybowel disease, Crohn’s disease, childhood

  20. Examination of Huntington's disease in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingxia; Li, Xiaogai; Wu, Sanyun; Shen, Ji; Tu, Jiancheng

    2014-02-15

    We report brain imaging and genetic diagnosis in a family from Wuhan, China, with a history of Huntington's disease. Among 17 family members across three generations, four patients (II2, II6, III5, and III9) show typical Huntington's disease, involuntary dance-like movements. Magnetic resonance imaging found lateral ventricular atrophy in three members (II2, II6, and III5). Moreover, genetic analysis identified abnormally amplified CAG sequence repeats (> 40) in two members (III5 and III9). Among borderline cases, with clinical symptoms and brain imaging features of Huntington's disease, two cases were identified (II2 and II6), but shown by mutation analysis for CAG expansions in the important transcript 15 gene, to be non-Huntington's disease. Our findings suggest that clinical diagnosis of Huntington's disease requires a combination of clinical symptoms, radiological changes, and genetic diagnosis.

  1. Examination of Huntington’s disease in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxia Yu; Xiaogai Li; Sanyun Wu; Ji Shen; Jiancheng Tu

    2014-01-01

    We report brain imaging and genetic diagnosis in a family from Wuhan, China, with a history of Huntington’s disease. Among 17 family members across three generations, four patients (II2, II6, III5, and III9) show typical Huntington’s disease, involuntary dance-like movements. Mag-netic resonance imaging found lateral ventricular atrophy in three members (II2, II6, and III5). Moreover, genetic analysis identiifed abnormally ampliifed CAG sequence repeats (>40) in two members (III5 and III9). Among borderline cases, with clinical symptoms and brain imaging features of Huntington’s disease, two cases were identiifed (II2 and II6), but shown by mutation analysis for CAG expansions in the important transcript 15 gene, to be non-Huntington’s disease. Our ifndings suggest that clinical diagnosis of Huntington’s disease requires a combination of clinical symptoms, radiological changes, and genetic diagnosis.

  2. The novel interleukin-1 cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Madelaine; Frey, Silke; Hueber, Axel J

    2017-03-01

    This review provides an update on the new interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases with focus on recent findings concerning the family members IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 and their different expression patterns. The IL-1 cytokines are known to be involved in many different inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The latest IL-1 family members, IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 have been shown to be differently regulated during course of disease. Studies of patients suffering from inflammatory diseases revealed that those cytokines are upregulated in the serum as well as in inflamed tissue. Both, epithelial cells and infiltrating peripheral mononuclear blood cells serve as source of the cytokines IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 triggering different outcomes. These results could be confirmed in different mouse models and in-vitro and ex-vivo studies. IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 are involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory diseases psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, systemic lupus erythematosus as well as Crohn's disease. Thereby IL-36 acts proinflammatory triggering further inflammatory mediators. In contrast, IL-37 and IL-38 are upregulated to counteract. Understanding the imbalance of the IL-1 family is crucial for future therapeutics.

  3. Familial prion diseases in the Basque Country (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz, Juan J; Digon, Anton; Atarés, Begoña; Arteagoitia, José M; Carrera, Nieves; Fernández-Manchola, Iñaki; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel; Fernández-Maiztegui, Covadonga; Forcadas, Isabel; Galdos, Luis; Ibáñez, Agustín; Lezcano, Elena; Martí-Massó, José F; Mendibe, María M; Urtasun, Miguel; Uterga, Juan M; Saracibar, Nieves; Velasco, Fernando; González de Galdeano, Luis

    2005-01-01

    In 1995, a surveillance system for prion diseases was set up in the Basque Country, an autonomous region in northern Spain (2.1 million inhabitants). In the period from January 1993 to December 2003, we diagnosed 21 patients with familial prion diseases prospectively and another 4 patients retrospectively. They represent 35% of all the cases referred to the epidemiological registry. Two main possible explanations for this unusual high incidence of familial prion diseases are proposed: first, comprehensive case ascertainment by public health neurologists; second, a probable cluster of the D178N mutation within families of Basque origin related to a still unconfirmed common ancestor. Further genetic and genealogical studies should resolve this issue.

  4. Familial associations of lymphoma and myeloma with autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hemminki, K; Försti, A; Sundquist, K.; Sundquist, J.; Li, X

    2017-01-01

    Many B-cell neoplasms are associated with autoimmune diseases (AIDs) but most evidence is based on a personal rather than a family history of AIDs. Here we calculated risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and multiple myeloma (MM) when family members were diagnosed with any of 44 different AIDs, or, independently, risk for AIDs when family members were diagnosed with a neoplasm. A total of 64 418 neoplasms and 531 155 AIDs were identified from Swedish nationwide health c...

  5. Phenotypic commonalities in familial and sporadic Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yasuhiko; Markopoulou, Katerina; Putzke, John D; Whaley, Nathaniel R; Farrer, Matthew J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J

    2006-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a clinically well-documented neurodegenerative disorder. However, the mechanism or mechanisms of its phenotypic expressions are still unknown. To compare phenotypes by examining demographic and clinical features of patients with familial PD and sporadic PD and with or without a family history of PD. Historical review of patients with sporadic PD in clinic-based samples and individual patients diagnosed with PD from families whose linkage to mutations or loci has been identified. Movement disorder clinic in a referral center. A total of 1277 patients with sporadic PD and 40 patients with familial PD. Clinical features, including distribution by sex, initial motor symptom, location of initial motor symptom, and frequency of asymmetric motor symptoms. Despite different etiologic backgrounds, both familial and sporadic PD exhibited several interesting commonalities, including a higher incidence in men, tremor as the initial motor symptom (predominantly involving the upper extremities), and asymmetric parkinsonism during disease course. The increased incidence of parkinsonism in men with familial PD suggests that the sex disparity is more likely the result of a protective effect against development of PD in women than of an increased risk in men that is associated with environmental factors. Phenotypic similarity among familial and sporadic PD indicates that a similar topographic distribution of the nigrostriatal lesion exists in patients with either form of PD regardless of apparent genetic influence.

  6. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer's disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer's disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and aluminium has been shown to be present in brain tissue in sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have made the first ever measurements of aluminium in brain tissue from 12 donors diagnosed with familial Alzheimer's disease. The concentrations of aluminium were extremely high, for example, there were values in excess of 10μg/g tissue dry wt. in 5 of the 12 individuals. Overall, the concentrations were higher than all previous measurements of brain aluminium except cases of known aluminium-induced encephalopathy. We have supported our quantitative analyses using a novel method of aluminium-selective fluorescence microscopy to visualise aluminium in all lobes of every brain investigated. The unique quantitative data and the stunning images of aluminium in familial Alzheimer's disease brain tissue raise the spectre of aluminium's role in this devastating disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  7. The ANKH gene and familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Patrick; Bardin, Thomas; Bianchi, Arnaud; Richette, Pascal; Loeuille, Damien

    2004-09-01

    Familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition (CPPD) disease is a chronic condition in which CPPD microcrystals deposit in the joint fluid, cartilage, and periarticular tissues. Two forms of familial CPPD disease have been identified: CCAL1 and CCAL2. The CCAL1 locus is located on the long arm of chromosome 8 and is associated with CPPD and severe osteoarthritis. The CCAL2 locus has been mapped to the short arm of chromosome 5 and identified in families from the Alsace region of France and the United Kingdom. The ANKH protein is involved in pyrophosphate metabolism and, more specifically, in pyrophosphate transport from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Numerous ANKH gene mutations cause familial CCAL2; they enhance ANKH protein activity, thereby elevating extracellular pyrophosphate levels and promoting the formation of pyrophosphate crystals, which produce the manifestations of the disease. Recent studies show that growth factors and cytokines can modify the expression of the normal ANKH protein. These results suggest a role for ANKH in sporadic CPPD disease and in CPPD associated with degenerative disease.

  8. Familial occurrence of systemic mast cell activation disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard J Molderings

    Full Text Available Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD comprises disorders characterized by an enhanced release of mast cell mediators accompanied by accumulation of dysfunctional mast cells. Demonstration of familial clustering would be an important step towards defining the genetic contribution to the risk of systemic MCAD. The present study aimed to quantify familial aggregation for MCAD and to investigate the variability of clinical and molecular findings (e.g. somatic mutations in KIT among affected family members in three selected pedigrees. Our data suggest that systemic MCAD pedigrees include more systemic MCAD cases than would be expected by chance, i.e., compared with the prevalence of MCAD in the general population. The prevalence of MCAD suspected by symptom self-report in first-degree relatives of patients with MCAD amounted to approximately 46%, compared to prevalence in the general German population of about 17% (p<0.0001. In three families with a high familial loading of MCAD, the subtype of MCAD and the severity of mediator-related symptoms varied between family members. In addition, genetic alterations detected in KIT were variable, and included mutations at position 816 of the amino acid sequence. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for common familial occurrence of MCAD. Our findings observed in the three pedigrees together with recent reports in the literature suggest that, in familial cases (i.e., in the majority of MCAD, mutated disease-related operator and/or regulator genes could be responsible for the development of somatic mutations in KIT and other proteins important for the regulation of mast cell activity. Accordingly, the immunohistochemically different subtypes of MCAD (i.e. mast cell activation syndrome and systemic mastocytosis should be more accurately regarded as varying presentations of a common generic root process of mast cell dysfunction, than as distinct diseases.

  9. Implications of prion adaptation and evolution paradigm for human neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, M Enamul; Safar, Jiri G

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that number of human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, fronto-temporal dementias, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, propagate in the brain via prion-like intercellular induction of protein misfolding. Prions cause lethal neurodegenerative diseases in humans, the most prevalent being sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD); they self-replicate and spread by converting the cellular form of prion protein (PrP(C)) to a misfolded pathogenic conformer (PrP(Sc)). The extensive phenotypic heterogeneity of human prion diseases is determined by polymorphisms in the prion protein gene, and by prion strain-specific conformation of PrP(Sc). Remarkably, even though informative nucleic acid is absent, prions may undergo rapid adaptation and evolution in cloned cells and upon crossing the species barrier. In the course of our investigation of this process, we isolated distinct populations of PrP(Sc) particles that frequently co-exist in sCJD. The human prion particles replicate independently and undergo competitive selection of those with lower initial conformational stability. Exposed to mutant substrate, the winning PrP(Sc) conformers are subject to further evolution by natural selection of the subpopulation with the highest replication rate due to the lowest stability. Thus, the evolution and adaptation of human prions is enabled by a dynamic collection of distinct populations of particles, whose evolution is governed by the selection of progressively less stable, faster replicating PrP(Sc) conformers. This fundamental biological mechanism may explain the drug resistance that some prions gained after exposure to compounds targeting PrP(Sc). Whether the phenotypic heterogeneity of other neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding is determined by the spectrum of misfolded conformers (strains) remains to be established. However, the prospect that these conformers may evolve and

  10. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufaddel, Amir A.; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr’s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsychiatric features and movement disorders. Psychiatric features reported in the literature include: cognitive impairment, depression, hallucinations, delusions, manic symptoms, anxiety, schizophrenia-like psychosis, and personality change. Other clinical features include: Parkinsonism, ataxia, headache, seizures, vertigo, stroke-like events, orthostatic hypotension, tremor, dysarthria, and paresis. Fahr’s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, particularly when associated with movement disorder. The disease should be differentiated from other conditions that can cause intracranial calcification. No specific treatment is currently available. Further research is needed to bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge of the prevalence, etiology, symptoms, and treatment of Fahr’s disease. PMID:24983277

  11. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr`s disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufaddel, Amir A; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A

    2014-07-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr`s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr`s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsychiatric features and movement disorders. Psychiatric features reported in the literature include: cognitive impairment, depression, hallucinations, delusions, manic symptoms, anxiety, schizophrenia-like psychosis, and personality change. Other clinical features include: Parkinsonism, ataxia, headache, seizures, vertigo, stroke-like events, orthostatic hypotension, tremor, dysarthria, and paresis. Fahr`s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, particularly when associated with movement disorder. The disease should be differentiated from other conditions that can cause intracranial calcification. No specific treatment is currently available. Further research is needed to bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge of the prevalence, etiology, symptoms, and treatment of Fahr`s disease.

  12. Lifestyle, family history, and risk of idiopathic Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenborg, Line; Lassen, Christina F.; Ritz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Parkinson disease (PD) and smoking has been examined in several studies, but little is known about smoking in conjunction with other behaviors and a family history of PD. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we studied individual and joint associations...

  13. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, Martin C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Poell, Jos; Slot, Ruben Van 't; Meijer, Jos W. R.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Mulder, Chris J.; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Wijmenga, Cisca

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was

  14. Large C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Repeat Expansions Are Seen in Multiple Neurodegenerative Syndromes and Are More Frequent Than Expected in the UK Population

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Jon; Poulter, Mark; Hensman, Davina; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Mahoney, Colin J; Adamson, Gary; Campbell, Tracy; Uphill, James; Borg, Aaron; Fratta, Pietro; Orrell, Richard W.; Malaspina, Andrea; Rowe, James; Brown, Jeremy; Hodges, John

    2013-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Understanding the disease mechanisms and a method for clinical diagnostic genotyping have been hindered because of the difficulty in estimating the expansion size. We found 96 repeat-primed PCR expansions: 85/2,974 in six neurodegenerative diseases cohorts (FTLD, ALS, Alzheimer disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Huntington disease-like sy...

  15. Cows for fear: is BSE a threat to human health? Bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Josephson, J

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, a new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-a disease that causes lack of coordination, muscle twitching or jerking, dementia, and, eventually, death-suddenly appeared in Great Britain. It is believed that the victims contracted the disease from eating the beef of cattle stricken with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease. As of December 1997, at least 25 people in the United Kingdom and France have contracted vCJD.

  16. Familial Mediterranean fever in two Bedouin families: mutation analysis and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, J; Shinar, Y; Langevitz, P; Livneh, A; Pras, M; Buskila, D

    2000-06-05

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease prevalent among non-Ashkenazi Jews, Armenians, Arabs, and Turks. The Bedouin are nomad Arab tribes residing in desert margins of the Middle East and Arabia. FMF is quite rare in Bedouins, and here we report on two Bedouin families from southern Israel suffering from this disorder. The MEFV mutations found in the Bedouin patients M694I, V726A, and E148Q are consistent with their Arab origin. The disease severity score showed a mild to moderate severity disease in six patients. The Bedouins, leading a unique nomadic life, may prove instrumental in unraveling the role of environmental factors in the course and severity of FMF.

  17. Familial aggregation of schizophrenia-like symptoms in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuang, D; DiGiacomo, L; Lipe, H; Bird, T D

    1998-07-10

    An increased incidence of schizophrenia-like symptoms in Huntington's disease (HD) has been well-documented in the past. The reasons for this association, however, have never been explained. At the University of Washington Medical Genetics Clinic, we had the opportunity to evaluate a unique juvenile-onset HD proband who had schizophrenia-like symptoms. This patient was referred to our clinic because of new onset of somatic delusions and command auditory hallucinations early in the course of her illness. Since we had already evaluated other affected individuals in her family, we selected another family with a nonpsychotic juvenile-onset proband for comparison. Using these two families in a small case-control study, we investigated the following hypotheses which could explain the association between schizophrenia-like symptoms and HD: first, schizophrenia-like symptoms may be related to the number of CAG repeats in the HD gene; second, schizophrenia-like symptoms may segregate in certain HD families, for unknown reasons; and third, there may coincidentally be an unrelated gene for schizophrenia in certain HD families. Comparisons of clinical characteristics and the HD genotype showed that family history of schizophrenia-like symptoms segregated with the HD gene; however, age of onset of HD, size of CAG repeat, and sex of the transmitting parent were not associated with psychotic symptoms. Further genetic and neurobiological studies are necessary to investigate the potential mechanism underlying this association.

  18. Familial associations of lymphoma and myeloma with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, K; Försti, A; Sundquist, K; Sundquist, J; Li, X

    2017-01-06

    Many B-cell neoplasms are associated with autoimmune diseases (AIDs) but most evidence is based on a personal rather than a family history of AIDs. Here we calculated risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and multiple myeloma (MM) when family members were diagnosed with any of 44 different AIDs, or, independently, risk for AIDs when family members were diagnosed with a neoplasm. A total of 64 418 neoplasms and 531 155 AIDs were identified from Swedish nationwide health care records. NHL was associated with a family history of five AIDs, all increasing the risk, HL was associated with one AID increasing and three AIDs decreasing the risk while MM had no association. A family history of NHL was associated with eight, HL with seven and MM with seven different AIDs, nine increasing and 13 decreasing the risk. The present family data on B-cell neoplasms and AIDs show an approximately equal number of associations for risk increase and risk decrease, suggesting that inherited genes or gene-environment interactions may increase the risk or be protective. These results differed from published data on personal history of AID, which only report increased risks, often vastly higher and for different AIDs compared with the present data.

  19. Seeded fibrillation as molecular basis of the species barrier in human prion diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Luers

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans and animals, including scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE in cattle, chronic wasting disease (CWD in deer, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans. The hallmark of prion diseases is the conversion of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C to its pathological isoform PrP(Sc, which is accompanied by PrP fibrillation. Transmission is not restricted within one species, but can also occur between species. In some cases a species barrier can be observed that results in limited or unsuccessful transmission. The mechanism behind interspecies transmissibility or species barriers is not completely understood. To analyse this process at a molecular level, we previously established an in vitro fibrillation assay, in which recombinant PrP (recPrP as substrate can be specifically seeded by PrP(Sc as seed. Seeding with purified components, with no additional cellular components, is a direct consequence of the "prion-protein-only" hypothesis. We therefore hypothesise, that the species barrier is based on the interaction of PrP(C and PrP(Sc. Whereas in our earlier studies, the interspecies transmission in animal systems was analysed, the focus of this study lies on the transmission from animals to humans. We therefore combined seeds from species cattle, sheep and deer (BSE, scrapie, CWD with human recPrP. Homologous seeding served as a control. Our results are consistent with epidemiology, other in vitro aggregation studies, and bioassays investigating the transmission between humans, cattle, sheep, and deer. In contrast to CJD and BSE seeds, which show a seeding activity we can demonstrate a species barrier for seeds from scrapie and CWD in vitro. We could show that the seeding activity and therewith the molecular interaction of PrP as substrate and PrP(Sc as seed is sufficient to explain the phenomenon of species barriers. Therefore our data supports the hypothesis

  20. [Investigation of the clinical course and treatment of prion disease patients in the akinetic mutism state in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi

    2012-01-01

    Twelve cases (one Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (P102L; definite), one genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) (V180I; definite) and ten sporadic CJD (7 MM1-type definite, 3 probable)), who reached the akinetic mutism state, were investigated with regard to their clinical course and treatment. They were hospitalized for a total of 3,968 days in the akinetic mutism state. In the nine definite cases, the median period from the akinetic mutism state to death was 22 months (average: 27.0 ± 23.3 months, range: 3-80 months) and median total disease duration was 27 months (average: 34.2 ± 30.1 months, range: 5-102 months). In the seven definite sporadic CJD cases, the median period from akinetic mutism to death was 21 months (average: 17.0 ± 9.6 months, range 3-28 months), and median total disease duration was 24 months (average: 20.6 ± 10.0 months, range: 5-31 months). Nasal-tube feeding was performed in all cases. Symptomatic treatments such as parenteral nutrition and antibiotic drugs were administered for complications such as respitory and urinary tract infections and digestive symptoms. Patients received rehabilitation and hot spring therapy regularly until death. Gastrostomy and/or tracheotomy was not performed in any case, the patients were not intubated nor was mechanical ventilation (including non-invasive positive pressure ventilation) applied. Vasoactive drugs were not administered. Clonazepam was administered for myoclonus in four patients but not in another three when myoclonus appeared. It is unclear whether the treatment influenced the duration of myoclonus. Our observations indicate that the extended survival period among Japanese prion disease patients is likely due to the management procedures implemented for prion disease in Japan, which are usually continued after the patients reach the akinetic mutism state. We speculate that nasal-tube feeding is the crucial factor that results in the prolonged disease duration of prion disease

  1. Antithyroideaantistof hos to patienter med subakut dementiel udvikling, ataksi og myoklonus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Hansen, Klaus; Gonzalez, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus and posit......Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus...... and positive antithyroid antibodies were given oral steroids. Whereas one progressively declined and had histopathologically proven CJD, the other made a complete recovery and was diagnosed with HE. Anti-thyroid antibodies can occur in CJD, but when present in a patient with subacute dementia, ataxia...

  2. Antithyroideaantistof hos to patienter med subakut dementiel udvikling, ataksi og myoklonus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Hansen, Klaus; Gonzalez, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus and posit......Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus...... and positive antithyroid antibodies were given oral steroids. Whereas one progressively declined and had histopathologically proven CJD, the other made a complete recovery and was diagnosed with HE. Anti-thyroid antibodies can occur in CJD, but when present in a patient with subacute dementia, ataxia...

  3. Cortical sensory loss in a patient with posterior cortical atrophy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jung-Lung; Chen, Wei-Hung; Chiu, Hou-Chang

    2004-02-01

    Patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) who present with initial symptoms of higher visual function deficits eventually develop alexia, aphasia, and components of Balint's syndrome or Gerstmann's syndrome. Recently, pathological findings were reported for these patients that are generally suggestive of Alzheimer's disease even though Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) was presumed as an alternative cause of some autopsy-diagnosed PCA cases. Here, we report a case with a four-year progression of cognitive and higher visual function deterioration, and with features not described in previously reported PCA cases (i.e., a distinct sensory complaint and early frontal lobe involvement). To summarize, this case belongs to perceptual-motor syndrome of asymmetric cortical degeneration and the underlying neuropathology is more suggestive of Alzheimer's disease than of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  4. Mutations in DJ-1 are rare in familial Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, Nathan; Pauciulo, Michael W.; Elsaesser, Veronika E.; Marek, Diane K.; Halter, Cheryl A.; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Clifford W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Nichols Ph.D., William C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in DJ-1 (PARK7) are one cause of early-onset autosomal-recessive parkinsonism. We screened for DJ-1 mutations in 93 affected individuals from the 64 multiplex Parkinson disease (PD) families in our sample that had the highest family-specific multipoint LOD scores at the DJ-1 locus. In addition to sequencing all coding exons for alterations, we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to examine the genomic copy number of DJ-1 exons. A known polymorphism (R98Q) was found in five PD subjects, once as a homozygote and in the other four cases as heterozygotes. No additional missense mutations and no exon deletions or duplications were detected. Our results, in combination with those of previous studies, suggest that alterations in DJ-1 are not a common cause of familial PD. PMID:16997464

  5. [Hartnup disease (report of 2 cases in one family)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanović, D; Djukić, A; Stepanović, R; Peković, D; Vranjesević, D

    2000-01-01

    The Hartnup mutation affects the amino acid transport system of the intestine and kidney used by a large group of neutral amino acids (monoamino-monocarboxylic acids) resulting in a characteristic pattern of neutral aminoaciduria [2, 5, 6]. In this research clinical and neurological methods and a great number of laboratory tests were used. Patient 1. A 16-year-old girl, born in 1972, was a full-term newborn. Her psychomotor development was normal. She is the eldest of three children in the family. Till the age of 10 the girl was healthy, except for the mild skin disorders on uncovered parts of the body, face and hands, occurring in springtime almost every year. She had had two exacerbations of the disease. The first exacerbation lasted between the end of April and August 22, 1982. The second began in the middle of November 1987 and finished on May 31, 1988. A changeable and severe clinical feature in this girl was characterized by polymorphic, transient mainly cerebral symptoms, papilloedema with peripapillary haemorrhage and pellagra-like skin rash. At the beginning of the disease the left spastic haemiplegia with bilateral Babinski's reflex and diffuse brain oedema were observed. Signs of the upper motor neurone lesion and myoclonic jerks of limbs and face were most persistent during the first and second exacerbation of the disease. Dysinhibition phenomenon: mandibular, snout and palmomental reflexes were sometimes positive. Mental states at the time of hospitalization were changed and characterized by bradypsychic, torpid, disoriented in time and confused at the beginning of the disease. She had severe psychotic episodes during the second relapse of the disease. The symptoms and signs of the disease as well as pellagra-like skin rash resolved with nicotinamide therapy. Patient 2. A 38-year-old man; clinically healthy, with no skin lesions. A gross aminoaciduria was found in this case. However, the amino acids pattern was atypical. This new, rare disease was

  6. Single-shot echo-planar MR sequences in the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Yamakami, Norio; Hachiya, Junichi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our preliminary experience in the application of echo-planar-imaging (EPI) MR sequences for the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases and to assess the value of these sequences. We reviewed single-shot EPI MR images obtained at 1.5 T in 17 patients and compared these images with conventional or fast spin-echo (SE) or fluid attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. The clinical diagnoses for the 17 patients were meningitis (2 patients), encephalitis or meningoencephalitis (7 patients), brain abscess (5 patients), epidural empyema (2 patients) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (1 patient). We obtained EPI-T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}W) images in 8 patients, EPI-FLAIR images in 13 patients and EPI-diffusion-weighted (DW) images in 14 patients. Among the 8 patients for whom EPI-T{sub 2}W imaging was performed, EPI-T{sub 2}W imaging yielded superior results compared with SE-T{sub 2}W imaging in 3 patients as a consequence of patient motion and equal results compared with SE-T{sub 2}W imaging in 5 patients. Among the 13 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, the EPI-FLAIR images were superior to conventional FLAIR images in 3 unstable patients. In the remaining 10 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, EPI-FLAIR images were equivalent or inferior to conventional FLAIR images. In 6 patients with encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, the encephalitic lesions showed hyperintensity in EPI-DW images to a greater extent than in images obtained with the other techniques. In 3 patients, EPI-DW images also demonstrated hyperintensity for the contents of abscesses or areas of empyema that was not seen with the other imaging techniques. The value of EPI-T{sub 2}W and EPI-FLAIR imaging is limited in uncooperative patients. EPI-DW imaging was found to be of value for the evaluation of several intracranial infectious diseases. (author)

  7. Balancing needs as a family caregiver in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    support and health services to deal with challenges. Wewanted to explore coping strategies and behaviour patterns used byfamily caregivers to care for themselves, while caring for a familymember with HD. Participants were recruited from hospitals andcommunity-based healthcare. The sample represents...... experiences fromcare-giving in all stages of the disease. We conducted semi-structuredinterviews with 15 family caregivers in Norway. The transcribed materialwas analysed by use of systematic text condensation, a method for cross-case thematic analysis of qualitative data. We found that family membersused...... various coping strategies, adjusted to the stage and progression ofHD. They tried to regulate information about the disease, balancingconsiderations for protection and disclosure, within and outside thefamily. The participants made efforts to maintain a balance between theirown needs in everyday life...

  8. [Needs and expectations of Alzheimer's disease family caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amieva, H; Rullier, L; Bouisson, J; Dartigues, J-F; Dubois, O; Salamon, R

    2012-06-01

    Family members of people suffering from Alzheimer's disease play a major role in providing daily life care for their relatives. Compared to non-caregivers, they present increased risks of mortality as well as psychological and physical co-morbidity. Altered relationships between caregivers and medical staff and dissatisfaction with the quality of help provided tend to increase the risk of depression and anxiety disorders among caregivers. The present study aimed at exploring the needs and expectations of family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease who request medical assistance for their relatives. The present analysis is an ancillary study of a large multicentric controlled randomized study designed to assess the efficacy of three non-pharmacological treatments in Alzheimer's disease, in which 645 mild-to-moderate Alzheimer patients were enrolled. Needs and expectations of the caregivers were assessed with a French scale of patient expectations for medical consultation, the échelle d'attentes en matière de consultations (EAC), completed by caregivers during the inclusion visit. This scale consists in a self-administered 28-item questionnaire concerning four main needs: learning skills to improve daily life management of their relatives; information regarding the disease; improving caregivers' self-confidence; support to improve communication with their relatives. The ten items for which more than 40% of caregivers reported high or very high expectations referred to two main needs: information regarding the disease (treatment, prognosis…) and learning skills in order to improve daily life management of their relative. The predominance of such needs was observed whatever the relationship between the caregiver and the cared relative but seemed to be more pronounced in female spouses and children of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Needs and expectations of Alzheimer's disease family caregivers involve two major aspects: first, information regarding

  9. Familial mediterranean fever in an Iranian patient with behcet disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most prevalent disorder among the hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes. This disorder is characterized by fever and some painful attacks such as abdominal, chest or joint pain and potentially development of AA amyloidosis. Several vasculitis are more common in FMF than general population. There are some reports about association of FMF with Behcet Disease (BD). In this study, we describe a 27 year old patient with BD who suffered from attacks of fever, arthralgia, abdominal pain and genetic study confirmed the diagnosis of FMF. FMF should be considered in a patient with Behcet disease who is suffering from attacks of fever, arthralgia and abdominal pain.

  10. Gaucher disease in a family from Maranhão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Shizuko Parreão Oi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gaucher disease is an inborn, autosomal recessive error of the metabolism which belongs to the group of lysosomal storage disorders. Objective: This work reports on the treatment of Gaucher disease in several members of the same family from the countryside of Maranhão. Methods: This was an observational, retrospective and prospective, descriptive case study about the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy. Results: The results showed that women were more affected (80% of patients by the disease, age at diagnosis ranged from 24 to 33 years, the predominant ethnicity was mulatto (80% and all cases were classified as type 1. The diagnosis of these patients was performed by measuring the levels of glucocerebrosidase and chitotriosidase enzymes and confirmed by genotyping. All patients suffering from Gaucher disease had low glucocerebrosidase levels. Before replacement therapy, hepatosplenomegaly was the most common clinical manifestation (100% and osteopenia was seen in 80% of the cases. Regarding hematological manifestations, anemia and leukopenia were found in 40% of patients at diagnosis; however the hemoglobin and leukocyte levels were normalized after four years of therapy. Thrombocytopenia, observed in 20% of cases, was normalized after the second year of treatment. Conclusion: In these cases, despite gaps in the treatment as the family resides in the rural region of the state, the patients with Gaucher disease showed satisfactory therapeutic response over time.

  11. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  12. Isolation of prion with BSE properties from farmed goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiropoulos, John; Lockey, Richard; Sallis, Rosemary E; Terry, Linda A; Thorne, Leigh; Holder, Thomas M; Beck, Katy E; Simmons, Marion M

    2011-12-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that include variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in small ruminants, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle. Scrapie is not considered a public health risk, but BSE has been linked to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Small ruminants are susceptible to BSE, and in 2005 BSE was identified in a farmed goat in France. We confirm another BSE case in a goat in which scrapie was originally diagnosed and retrospectively identified as suspected BSE. The prion strain in this case was further characterized by mouse bioassay after extraction from formaldehyde-fixed brain tissue embedded in paraffin blocks. Our data show that BSE can infect small ruminants under natural conditions and could be misdiagnosed as scrapie. Surveillance should continue so that another outbreak of this zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy can be prevented and public health safeguarded.

  13. Families with familial combined hyperlipidemia and families enriched for coronary artery disease share genetic determinants for the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allayee, H.; Aouizerat, B.E.; Lusis, A.J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cantor, R.M.; Lanning, C.D.; Rotter, J.I. [Cedars-Sinai Research Inst., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dallinga-Thie, G.M. [University Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands). Dept. of Medicine; Krauss, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bruin, T.W.A. de [University Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands). Dept. of Medicine]|[University Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Medicine and Endocrinology

    1998-08-01

    Small, dense LDL particles consistently have been associated with hypertriglyceridemia, premature coronary artery disease (CAD), and familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH). Previously, the authors have observed linkage of LDL particle size with four separate candidate-gene loci in a study of families enriched for CAD. These loci contain the genes for manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), on chromosome 6q; for apolipoprotein AI-CIII-AIV, on chromosome 11q; for cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyl-transferase (LCAT), on chromosome 16q; and for the LDL receptor (LDLR), on chromosome 19p. The authors have now tested whether these loci also contribute to LDL particle size in families ascertained for FCH. The members of 18 families (481 individuals) were typed for genetic markers at the four loci, and linkage to LDL particle size was assessed by nonparametric sib-pair linkage analysis. The presence of small, dense LDL (pattern B) was much more frequent in the FCH probands than in the spouse controls. Evidence for linkage was observed at the MnSOD (P = .02), CETP/LCAT (P = .03), and apolipoprotein AI0CIII0AIV loci (P = .005) but not at the LDLR locus. The authors conclude that there is a genetically based association between FCH and small, dense LDL and that the genetic determinants for LDL particle size are shared, at least in part, among FCH families and the more general population at risk for CAD.

  14. Ultra-Sensitive Detection of Prion Protein in Blood Using Isothermal Amplification Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Original contains colored plates: ALL DTIC reproductions will be in black and white...disease. Presently, the Western blot or ELISA are used to test the brain stem in cattle for the presence of PrPsc after proteinase K digestion of...concern about the safety of the food supply, knowing that infected beef has been implicated as the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD

  15. Mammalian prion biology: one century of evolving concepts.

    OpenAIRE

    Aguzzi, A; Polymenidou, M

    2004-01-01

    Prions have been responsible for an entire century of tragic episodes. Fifty years ago, kuru decimated the population of Papua New Guinea. Then, iatrogenic transmission of prions caused more than 250 cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. More recently, transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to humans caused a widespread health scare. On the other hand, the biology of prions represents a fascinating and poorly understood phenomenon, which may account for more than just diseases and may...

  16. Reconstructing prions: fibril assembly from simple yeast to complex mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurdson, C B; Polymenidou, M; Aguzzi, A

    2005-01-01

    With the epizootics of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in North American cattle, BSE infections in goats, new forms of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and the spread of chronic wasting disease in North American deer and elk, one wonders whether we are gaining control over the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Although many basic scientific questions in the prion field remain hotly debated and unresolved [1], including the function of the cellular prion protein (Pr...

  17. A pediatric approach to family history of cardiovascular disease: diagnosis, risk assessment, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Erin M; Hinton, Robert B

    2014-02-01

    The medical family history is a comprehensive and dynamic record of illnesses and other pertinent health information among family members. Family history is used to facilitate diagnosis, to identify family members at risk for developing a particular disease, and increasingly to manage disease. This article reviews the application of family history to pediatric cardiovascular disease. As more is learned about the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease, the family history will play an increasingly central role in management. Improved understanding of the causes of pediatric cardiovascular disease promises the opportunity to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Family history of vascular disease and the risk of cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijmans, M.

    2015-01-01

    A positive family history of cardiovascular disease is an established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. In clinical practice, this evident relation between the presence of cardiovascular disease in families and first cardiovascular events has resulted in family history being

  19. A New Approach for Detection Improvement of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disorder through a Specific Surface Chemistry Applied onto Titration Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Debarnot

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates the enhancement of the sensitivity of the ELISA titration for recombinant human and native prion proteins, while reducing other non-specific adsorptions that could increase the background signal and lead to a low sensitivity and false positives. It is achieved thanks to the association of plasma chemistry and coating with different amphiphilic molecules bearing either ionic charges and/or long hydrocarbon chains. The treated support by 3-butenylamine hydrochloride improves the signal detection of recombinant protein, while surface modification with the 3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dien-1-diamine (geranylamine enhances the sensitivity of the native protein. Beside the surface chemistry effect, these different results are associated with protein conformation.

  20. Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob: hallazgos clínicos, electroencefalográficos, imagenológicos y de patología

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Éste artículo hace parte de: Acta Neurológica Colombianana Vol. 24 No. 3 SEPTIEMBRE 2008 La enfermedad de Creutzfeld-Jakob (ECJ) hace parte de un grupo de enfermedades transmisibles que se caracterizan por la presencia de encefalopatía espongiforme, donde también se encuentran el kuru, el síndrome Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker, y el insomnio fatal familiar. De ellas, la más común es la ECJ (representando aproximadamente el 85 por ciento de casos de encefalopatías espongiformes), con una i...

  1. Dock-family exchange factors in cell migration and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadea, Gilles; Blangy, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Dock family proteins are evolutionary conserved exchange factors for the Rho GTPases Rac and Cdc42. There are 11 Dock proteins in mammals, named Dock1 (or Dock180) to Dock11 that play different cellular functions. In particular, Dock proteins regulate actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and migration. Not surprisingly, members of the Dock family have been involved in various pathologies, including cancer and defects in the central nervous and immune systems. This review proposes an update of the recent findings regarding the function of Dock proteins, focusing on their role in the control of cell migration and invasion and the consequences in human diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Some trends of research in the domain of viral neuroinfections approached in the "Stefan S. Nicolau" Institute of Virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drăgănescu, N

    1985-01-01

    The main directions of research in the field of viral neuroinfections approached during 35 years in the Institute of Virology are briefly outlined. After some considerations on terminology and on the classification of viral encephalitides, mention is made of the studies in the domain of herpes infections, rabies, meningitis, encephalitis and slow virus infections of the central nervous system (subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, etc.).

  3. The Roles of ADAMs Family Proteinases in Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Kawaguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs are members of a new gene family of transmembrane and secreted proteins, which belong to the zinc proteinase superfamily. These molecules are involved in various biological events such as cell adhesion, cell fusion, cell migration, membrane protein shedding, and proteolysis. Growing evidence now attests to the potential involvement of ADAMs proteinases in diverse processes such as skin wound healing, inflammation, pigmentation, tumor development, cell proliferation, and metastasis. This paper focuses on the roles of ADAMs proteinases in a wide variety of skin diseases.

  4. Long-term mortality in the United States cohort of pituitary-derived growth hormone recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, James L; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Wysowski, Diane K; Brown, Paul; Durako, Stephen J; Cox, Christopher; Kong, Fanhui; Fradkin, Judith E

    2004-04-01

    Patients who received pituitary-derived growth hormone (GH) are at excess risk of mortality from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We investigated whether they were at increased risk of death from other conditions, particularly preventable conditions. A cohort (N=6107) from known US pituitary-derived GH recipients (treated 1963-1985) was studied. Deaths were identified by reports from physicians and parents and the National Death Index. Rates were compared with the expected rates for the US population standardized for race, age, and sex. There were 433 deaths versus 114 expected (relative risk [RR], 3.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4-4.2; Pderived GH recipients was almost four times the expected rate. Replacing pituitary-derived GH with recombinant GH has eliminated only the risk of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Hypoglycemia and adrenal insufficiency accounted for far more mortality than Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The large number of potentially preventable deaths in patients with adrenal insufficiency and hypoglycemia underscores the importance of early intervention when infection occurs in patients with adrenal insufficiency, and aggressive treatment of panhypopituitarism.

  5. A family living with Alzheimer's disease: The communicative challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Danielle

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease irrevocably challenges a person's capacity to communicate with others. Earlier research on these challenges focused on the language disorders associated with the condition and situated language deficit solely in the limitations of a person's cognitive and semantic impairments. This research falls short of gaining insight into the actual interactional experiences of a person with Alzheimer's and their family. Drawing on a UK data set of 70 telephone calls recorded over a two-and-a-half year period (2006-2008) between one elderly woman with Alzheimer's disease, and her daughter and son-in-law, this paper explores the role which communication (and its degeneration) plays in family relationships. Investigating these interactions, using a conversation analytic approach, reveals that there are clearly communicative difficulties, but closer inspection suggests that they arise due to the contingencies that are generated by the other's contributions in the interaction. That being so, this paper marks a departure from the traditional focus on language level analysis and the assumption that deficits are intrinsic to the individual with Alzheimer's, and instead focuses on the collaborative communicative challenges that arise in the interaction itself and which have a profound impact on people's lives and relationships.

  6. PARK1 gene mutation of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ligang Jiang; Guohua Hu; Qiuhui Chen; Ying Zhang; Xinyu Hu; Jia Fan; Lifeng Liu; Rui Guo; Yajuan Sun; Yixhi Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that PARK1 gene is associated with the autosomal dominant inheritance of Parkinson's disease.PARK1 gene contains two mutation sites, namely Ala30Pro and AIa53Thr, which are located on exons 3 and 4, respectively.However, the genetic loci of the pathogenic genes remain unclear.In this study, blood samples were collected from 11 members of a family with high prevalence of Parkinson's disease, including four affected cases, five suspected cases,and two non-affected cases.Point mutation screening of common mutation sites on PARK1 gene exon 4 was conducted using PCR, to determine the genetic loci of the causative gene for Parkinson's disease.Gene identification and sequencing results showed that a T base deletion mutation was observed in the PARK1 gene exon 4 of all 11 collected samples.It was confirmed that the PARKf gene exon 4 gene mutation is an important pathogenic mutation for Parkinson's disease.

  7. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pereira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c. Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Objective: This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD, such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. Methods: The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations, mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. Results: The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049. Conclusion: Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients.

  8. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Carolina [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miname, Marcio [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Makdisse, Marcia [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kalil, Roberto Filho [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Raul D., E-mail: rdsf@cardiol.br [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients.

  9. Neurochemistry changes associated with mutations in familial Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, M M; Tan, E K

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the progressive loss of dopamine neurons and the accumulation of Lewy bodies and neurites. The exact role of genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of PD has frequently been debated. The association of MPTP (methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6- tetrahydropyridine) and toxins (such as rotenone) with parkinsonism highlights the potential etiologic role of environmental toxins in disease causation. The recent discoveries of monogenic (such as α-synuclein, Parkin, UCHL1, PINK1, DJ-1, LRRK2) forms of PD have provided considerable insights into its pathophysiology. Parkin, an ubiquitin protein ligase assists in the degradation of toxic substrates via the ubiquitin proteasome system. It can also mediate a nondegradative form of ubiquitination. PINK1 and LRRK2 are possibly involved in the phosphorylation of substrates important for various cellular functions. Some toxins could interact with α-synuclein, an endogenous protein that is implicated in pathology of PD. Increasing in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that deficits in mitochondrial function, oxidative and nitrosative stress, the accumulation of aberrant or misfolded proteins, and ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction underpin the pathogenesis of sporadic and familial forms of PD. Elucidation of the functions of the proteins encoded by the diseasecausing genes will provide an opportunity for identification of specific pathways that could be targeted in neurotherapeutics.

  10. A model for intra-familial distribution of an infectious disease (Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Feitosa

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available A probabilistic model for intra-familial distribution of infectous disease is proposed and applied to the prevalence of positive serology for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Northeastern Brazilian sample. This double with one tail excess model fits satisfactorily to the data and its interpretation says that around 51% of these 982 families are free of infection risk; among those that are at risk, 3% have a high risk (0.66, probably due to high domestic infestation of the vector bug; while 97% show a small risk (0.11, probably due to accidental, non-domestic transmission.

  11. A Unifying Hypothesis for Familial and Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole J. Proctor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterised by the aggregation of two quite different proteins, namely, amyloid-beta (Aβ, which forms extracellular plaques, and tau, the main component of cytoplasmic neurofibrillary tangles. The amyloid hypothesis proposes that Aβ plaques precede tangle formation but there is still much controversy concerning the order of events and the linkage between Aβ and tau alterations is still unknown. Mathematical modelling has become an essential tool for generating and evaluating hypotheses involving complex systems. We have therefore used this approach to discover the most probable pathway linking Aβ and tau. The model supports a complex pathway linking Aβ and tau via GSK3β, p53, and oxidative stress. Importantly, the pathway contains a cycle with multiple points of entry. It is this property of the pathway which enables the model to be consistent with both the amyloid hypothesis for familial AD and a more complex pathway for sporadic forms.

  12. Ancestral origins of the prion protein gene D178N mutation in the Basque Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Ana B; Barreau, Christian; Coupry, Isabelle; Yagüe, Jordi; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Galdós-Alcelay, Luis; Ibáñez, Agustín; Digón, Antón; Fernández-Manchola, Ignacio; Goizet, Cyril; Castro, Azucena; Cuevas, Nerea; Alvarez-Alvarez, Maite; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Arveiler, Benoît; Zarranz, Juan J

    2005-06-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD) are familial prion diseases with autosomal dominant inheritance of the D178N mutation. FFI has been reported in at least 27 pedigrees around the world. Twelve apparently unrelated FFI and fCJD pedigrees with the characteristic D178N mutation have been reported in the Prion Diseases Registry of the Basque Country since 1993. The high incidence of familial prion diseases in this region may reflect a unique ancestral origin of the chromosome carrying this mutation. In order to investigate this putative founder effect, we developed "happy typing", a new approach to the happy mapping method, which consists of the physical isolation of large haploid genomic DNA fragments and their analysis by the Polymerase Chain Reaction in order to perform haplotypic analysis instead of pedigree analysis. Six novel microsatellite markers, located in a 150-kb genomic segment flanking the PRNP gene were characterized for typing haploid DNA fragments of 285 kb in size. A common haplotype was found in patients from the Basque region, strongly suggesting a founder effect. We propose that "happy typing" constitutes an efficient method for determining disease-associated haplotypes, since the analysis of a single affected individual per pedigree should provide sufficient evidence.

  13. Maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA variants in familial Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer Ronald F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial function is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD and may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD, but the causes of mitochondrial impairment in PD are unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recapitulated in cell lines expressing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA from PD patients, implicating mtDNA variants or mutations, though the role of mtDNA variants or mutations in PD risk remains unclear. We investigated the potential contribution of mtDNA variants or mutations to the risk of PD. Methods We examined the possibility of a maternal inheritance bias as well as the association between mitochondrial haplogroups and maternal inheritance and disease risk in a case-control study of 168 multiplex PD families in which the proband and one parent were diagnosed with PD. 2-tailed Fisher Exact Tests and McNemar's tests were used to compare allele frequencies, and a t-test to compare ages of onset. Results The frequency of affected mothers of the proband with PD (83/167, 49.4% was not significantly different from the frequency of affected females of the proband generation (115/259, 44.4% (Odds Ratio 1.22; 95%CI 0.83 - 1.81. After correcting for multiple tests, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of mitochondrial haplogroups or of the 10398G complex I gene polymorphism in PD patients compared to controls, and no significant associations with age of onset of PD. Mitochondrial haplogroup and 10398G polymorphism frequencies were similar in probands having an affected father as compared to probands having an affected mother. Conclusions These data fail to demonstrate a bias towards maternal inheritance in familial PD. Consistent with this, we find no association of common haplogroup-defining mtDNA variants or for the 10398G variant with the risk of PD. However, these data do not exclude a role for mtDNA variants in other populations, and it remains possible that other inherited mitochondrial DNA variants, or somatic m

  14. Clinical Polymorphism of Stargardt Disease in a Large Consanguineous Tunisian Family; Implications for Nosology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila El Matri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the polymorphic expression of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family with clinical intra- and interfamilial variation of the condition. Methods: Twelve subjects from two related families with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease were enrolled. A detailed clinical examination including visual acuity and visual field measurement, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, electroretinography (ERG and color vision testing was performed for all subjects. Results: The youngest child from family A manifested typical Stargardt disease while her two brothers presented with Stargardt disease-fundus flavimaculatus (STGD-FFM and her two sisters demonstrated a peculiar phenotype overlapping Stargardt disease and cone-rod dystrophy; their phenotypic manifestation corresponded well with ERG groups I, II and III, respectively. This uncommon occurrence of an age-related decline in ERG amplitude and worsening of fundus changes is suggestive of a grading pattern in Stargardt disease. Their two cousins in family B, displayed the STGD-FFM phenotype. Despite clinically similar STGD-FFM patterns in both families, age of onset and progression of the phenotype in family B differed from family A. Conclusion: This is the first report on phenotypic variation of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family. Regarding phenotype and severity of visual symptoms, family A demonstrated Stargardt disease at various stages of progression. In addition, STGDFFM appeared to be an independent clinical entity in family B. These findings imply that further parameters are required to classify Stargardt′s disease.

  15. A family study of the biochemical defects in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soothill, J F; Blainey, J D; Neale, F C; Fischer-Williams, M; Melnick, S C

    1961-05-01

    Estimations of serum copper, serum ceruloplasmin (immunochemical), and urinary amino-acids excretion (quantitative and chromatographic) in 44 healthy relatives of patients with Wilson's disease (39 from one family) are reported. Each technique revealed some abnormal individuals. Good agreement was obtained between the serum copper and serum ceruloplasmin estimations and between the quantitative and chromatographic estimations of amino-acid excretion. Some individuals were abnormal to one or other of the pairs of tests only. These results cast doubt on the hypothesis that the symptoms of Wilson's disease are secondary to a quantitative (or qualitative) abnormality of ceruloplasmin. They also suggest that the mode of inheritance of the biochemical defects may be more complicated than that of a simple recessive mutant gene. Two of the relatives (one pregnant and one immediately post-partum) had a high serum copper level, as is expected in pregnancy, but normal serum ceruloplasmin. This suggests that the mechanism of control of the serum ceruloplasmin concentration may, normally, depend on the serum copper concentration.

  16. Hippocampal Hyperactivation in Presymptomatic Familial Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Budson, Andrew E.; Celone, Kim; Ruiz, Adriana; Newmark, Randall; Castrillón, Gabriel; Lopera, Francisco; Stern, Chantal E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The examination of individuals who carry fully penetrant genetic alterations that result in familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) provides a unique model for studying the early presymptomatic disease stages. In AD, deficits in episodic and associative memory have been linked to structural and functional changes within the hippocampal system. This study used functional MRI (fMRI) to examine hippocampal function in a group of healthy, young, cognitively-intact presymptomatic individuals (average age 33.7 years) who carry the E280A presenilin-1 (PS1) genetic mutation for FAD. These PS1 subjects will go on to develop the first symptoms of the disease around the age of 45 years. Our objective was to examine hippocampal function years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Methods Twenty carriers of the Alzheimer’s-associated E280A PS1 mutation and 19 PS1-negative control subjects participated. Both groups were matched for age, sex, education level, and neuropsychological test performance. All participants performed a face-name associative encoding task while in a Philips 1.5T fMRI scanner. Analysis focused on the hippocampal system. Results Despite identical behavioral performance, presymptomatic PS1 mutation carriers exhibited increased activation of the right anterior hippocampus during encoding of novel face-name associations compared to matched controls. Interpretation Our results demonstrate that functional changes within the hippocampal memory system occur years before cognitive decline in FAD. These presymptomatic changes in hippocampal physiology in FAD suggest that hippocampal fMRI patterns during associative encoding may also provide a preclinical biomarker in sporadic AD. PMID:21194156

  17. A survey and a molecular dynamics study on the (central) hydrophobic region of prion proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases are invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and animals. Unlike most other amyloid forming neurodegenerative diseases, these can be highly infectious. Prion diseases occur in a variety of species. They include the fatal human neurodegenerative diseases Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI), Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), Kuru, the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or 'mad-cow' disease) in cattle, the chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and elk, and scrapie in sheep and goats, etc. Transmission across the species barrier to humans, especially in the case of BSE in Europe, CWD in North America, and variant CJDs (vCJDs) in young people of UK, is a major public health concern. Fortunately, scientists reported that the (central) hydrophobic region of prion proteins (PrP) controls the formation of diseased prions. This article gives a detailed survey on PrP hydrophobic region and does molecular dynamics studies of human PrP(110-136...

  18. A consanguineous family with Hirschsprung disease, microcephaly, and mental retardation (Goldberg-Shprintzen syndrome)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks, AS; Breuning, MH; Osinga, J; Van der Smagt, JJ; Catsman, CE; Buys, CHCM; Meijers, C; Hofstra, RMW

    1999-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease, mental retardation, microcephaly, and specific craniofacial dysmorphism were observed in three children from a large, consanguineous, Moroccan family. A fourth child showed similar clinical features, with the exception of Hirschsprung disease. The association of these abnormali

  19. Adjustment for misclassification in studies of familial aggregation of disease using routine register data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the misclassification that occurs when relying solely on routine register data in family studies of disease clustering. A register study of familial aggregation of schizophrenia is used as an example. The familial aggregation is studied using a regression model for the disease...... in the child including the disease status of the parents as a risk factor. If all the information is found in the routine registers then the disease status of the parents is only known from the time when the register started and if this information is used unquestioningly the parents who have had the disease...

  20. The TET Family of Proteins: Functions and Roles in Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adelene Y.Tan; James L.Manley

    2009-01-01

    Translocated in liposarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma and TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15 constitute an interesting and important family of proteins known as the TET proteins. The proteins function in several aspects of cell growth control, including multiple different steps in gene expression, and they are also found mutated in a number of specific diseases. For example, all contain domains for binding nucleic acids and have been shown to function in both RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription and premRNA splicing, possibly connecting these two processes. Chromosomal translocations in human sarcomas result in a fusion of the amino terminus of these proteins, which contains a transcription activation domain, to the DNA-binding domain of a transcription factor. Although the fusion proteins have been characterized in a clinical environment, the function of the cognate full-length protein in normal cells is a more recent topic of study. The first part of this review will describe the TET proteins, followed by detailed descriptions of their multiple roles in cells. The final sections will examine changes that occur in gene regulation in cells expressing the fusion proteins. The clinical implications and treatment of sarcomas will not be addressed but have recently been reviewed.

  1. Family Health History Communication Networks of Older Adults: Importance of Social Relationships and Disease Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication ("have shared" and "intend to share…

  2. Family history of premature death and risk of early onset cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Oyen, Nina;

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a family history of premature death, cardiovascular death in particular, on the risk of early cardiovascular disease.......The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a family history of premature death, cardiovascular death in particular, on the risk of early cardiovascular disease....

  3. INFLUENCE OF A POSITIVE FAMILY HISTORY AND ASSOCIATED ALLERGIC DISEASES ON THE NATURAL COURSE OF ASTHMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROORDA, RJ; GERRITSEN, J; VANAALDEREN, WMC; KNOL, K

    1992-01-01

    The outcome of childhood asthma was studied in a cohort of 406 asthmatic children, with emphasis on the influence of family history for allergic disease, as well as the influence of associated allergic diseases on prognosis. Sixty-two per cent had a positive family history for atopy. In young adulth

  4. Molecular dynamics studies on 3D structures of the hydrophobic region PrP(109-136)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiapu Zhang; Yuanli Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases,traditionally referred to as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species,manifesting as scrapie in sheep,bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'madcow' disease) in cattle,and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease,Gerstmann-Strussler-Scheinker syndrome,fatal familial insomnia (FFI),and Kulu in humans,etc.These neurodegenerative diseases are caused by the conversion from a soluble normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) into insoluble abnormally folded infectious prions (prpSc).The hydrophobic region PrP(109-136) controls the formation of diseased prions:the normal PrP(113-120) AGAAAAGA palindrome is an inhibitor/blocker of prion diseases and the highly conserved glycine-xxx-glycine motif PrP(119-131) can inhibit the formation of infectious prion proteins in cells.This article gives detailed reviews on the PrP(109-136) region and presents the studies of its three-dimensional structures and structural dynamics.

  5. Family Aggregation of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1-Associated Diseases: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carolina; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Verdonck, Kristien

    2016-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that produces a persistent infection. Two transmission routes (from mother to child and via sexual intercourse) favor familial clustering of HTLV-1. It is yet unknown why most HTLV-1 carriers remain asymptomatic while about 10% of them develop complications. HTLV-1 associated diseases were originally described as sporadic entities, but familial presentations have been reported. To explore what is known about family aggregation of HTLV-1-associated diseases we undertook a systematic review. We aimed at answering whether, when, and where family aggregation of HTLV-1-associated diseases was reported, which relatives were affected and which hypotheses were proposed to explain aggregation. We searched MEDLINE, abstract books of HTLV conferences and reference lists of selected papers. Search terms used referred to HTLV-1 infection, and HTLV-1-associated diseases, and family studies. HTLV-1-associated diseases considered are adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), HTLV-1-associated uveitis, and infective dermatitis. Seventy-four records reported HTLV-1-associated diseases in more than one member of the same family and were included. Most reports came from HTLV-1-endemic countries, mainly Japan (n = 30) and Brazil (n = 10). These reports described a total of 270 families in which more than one relative had HTLV-1-associated diseases. In most families, different family members suffered from the same disease (n = 223). The diseases most frequently reported were ATLL (115 families) and HAM/TSP (102 families). Most families (n = 144) included two to four affected individuals. The proportion of ATLL patients with family history of ATLL ranged from 2 to 26%. The proportion of HAM/TSP patients with family history of HAM/TSP ranged from 1 to 48%. The predominant cluster types for ATLL were clusters of siblings and parent-child pairs and for HAM/TSP, an affected

  6. Familial associations of Alzheimer disease and essential tremor with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, S; Bordelon, Y; Bronstein, J; Ritz, B

    2010-06-01

    We constructed a cohort of first-degree relatives of participants in a population-based case-control study of Parkinson disease (PD) and compared the occurrence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and essential tremor (ET) in relatives of PD cases and controls. We relied on proband interviews to assess family history in 372 probands with incident PD confirmed by a movement disorder specialist and 404 controls from three rural California counties. Overall, for the 2980 first-degree relatives of PD cases, the risk of AD was not increased compared with the 2981 relatives of controls. But relatives of younger onset PD cases (familial susceptibility to AD amongst first-degree relatives of younger onset PD cases.

  7. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and familial Mediterranean fever: Are they related?

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkis Cihat; Caglar Erkan; Ugurlu Serdal; Cetinkaya Emel; Tekin Nilüfer; Arslan Mubeccel; Özdemir Sebati; Tuncer Murat

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a periodic febrile disease characterized by acute recurrent episodes of serositis. Liver disease is not considered a part of the spectrum of clinical manifestations of FMF. Objective. The purpose of this study was to characterize the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) that could be associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Methods. Clinical findings and treatment information of the patients with FMF were obtained from o...

  8. Collection of family health history for assessment of chronic disease risk in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Karen P; Christianson, Carol A; Hahn, Susan E; Dave, Gaurav; Evans, Leslie R; Blanton, Susan H; Hauser, Elizabeth; Agbaje, Astrid; Orlando, Lori A; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Henrich, Vincent C

    2013-01-01

    Family health history can predict a patient's risk for common complex diseases. This project assessed the completeness of family health history data in medical charts and evaluated the utility of these data for performing risk assessments in primary care. Family health history data were collected and analyzed to determine the presence of quality indicators that are necessary for effective and accurate assessment of disease risk. More than 99% of the 390 paper charts analyzed contained information about family health history, which was usually scattered throughout the chart. Information on the health of the patient's parents was collected more often than information on the health of other relatives. Key information that was often not collected included age of disease onset, affected side of the family, and second-degree relatives affected. Less than 4% of patient charts included family health histories that were informative enough to accurately assess risk for common complex diseases. Limitations of this study include the small number of charts reviewed per provider, the fact that the sample consisted of primary care providers in a single geographic location, and the inability to assess ethnicity, consanguinity, and other indicators of the informativeness of family health history. The family health histories collected in primary care are usually not complete enough to assess the patient's risk for common complex diseases. This situation could be improved with use of tools that analyze the family health history information collected and provide risk-stratified decision support recommendations for primary care.

  9. Type 2 Gaucher's disease in a Malian family

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report here the case of an 8 month old child, fourth in a family of four children, who presents the neuropathic form of the ... neurologic symptoms, three clinical varieties ... an acute brainstem dysfunction or ... diarrhea and constipation.

  10. Family History of Alzheimer's Disease and Cortical Thickness in Patients With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganske, Steffi; Haussmann, Robert; Gruschwitz, Antonia; Werner, Annett; Osterrath, Antje; Baumgaertel, Johanna; Lange, Jan; Donix, Katharina L; Linn, Jennifer; Donix, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A first-degree family history of Alzheimer's disease reflects genetic risks for the neurodegenerative disorder. Recent imaging data suggest localized effects of genetic risks on brain structure in healthy people. It is unknown whether this association can also be found in patients who already have dementia. Our aim was to investigate whether family history risk modulates regional medial temporal lobe cortical thickness in patients with Alzheimer's disease. We performed high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and cortical unfolding data analysis on 54 patients and 53 nondemented individuals. A first-degree family history of Alzheimer's disease was associated with left hemispheric cortical thinning in the subiculum among patients and controls. The contribution of Alzheimer's disease family history to regional brain anatomy changes independent of cognitive impairment may reflect genetic risks that modulate onset and clinical course of the disease.

  11. [Corticobasal syndrome: recent advances and future directions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Ikuko

    2012-04-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder described by Rebeiz et al. It is characterized by progressive, asymmetric, cortical (eg, apraxia, alien limb phenomena, cortical sensory loss, and myoclonus), and extrapyramidal (eg, rigidity, bradykinesia, dystonia, and tremor) dysfunction. However, CBD has many clinical phenotypes, and the features used for predicting CBD have low sensitivity. Therefore, the term corticobasal syndrome (CBS) has been used to characterize such clinical features, whereas the term CBD is used to refer to the pathological disorder. The most frequent causes of CBS are CBD, followed by Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology (sporadic and familial), Pick's disease, Lewy body disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with fused in sarcoma-positive inclusions, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and progranulin (GRN) genes. The topography of neurodegeneration dictates the clinical syndrome not according to the underlying pathology. Researchers have attempted to develop fluid biomarkers or imaging analysis for diagnosing CBS. The aim of this review was to highlight recent advances in CBS diagnosis and discuss future directions.

  12. [Aphasia, prosopagnosia and mania: a case diagnosed with right temporal variant semantic dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Çetin; Kesebir, Sermin; Meteris, Handan; Ülker, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic disorders can produce "secondary" mania, and clinicians must distinguish secondary mania from bipolar disorders (BD). Patients with new and late onset mania require an evaluation that includes a thorough history, a neurologic examination, neuroimaging, and other selected tests. Neurologic causes of mania include strokes in the right basotemporal or inferofrontal region, strokes or tumors in the perihypothalamic region, Huntington's disease and other movement disorders, multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases, head trauma, infections such as neurosyphilis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The term Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) is suggested for neurodegenerative diseases characterized by focal degeneration such as Primer Progressive Aphasia (PPA), Frontal Lobe Dementia, PPA- Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and Corticobasal Degeneration. In this article, we report a frontotemporal dementia (FTD) case that referred with manic symptoms. The female patient was 46 years old, married, graduated from primary school, and had been admitted with complaints of hyperactivity, excessive talking, and decreased sleep for one week. She presented first with complaints that began three years ago that included the inability to remember names, recognize faces, use household appliances, and follow rules. She had also been repeating the same words and behaviors. Prosopagnosia, aphasia, and a positive family history of ALS were discussed with related index in our case.

  13. Alpha-synuclein in familial Alzheimer disease: epitope mapping parallels dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, C F; Schmidt, M L; Lee, V M; Trojanowski, J Q

    2001-11-01

    Alpha-synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies (LBs) in Parkinson disease and dementia with LBs and of glial cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy. However, epitope mapping for alpha-synuclein is distinctive in different neurodegenerative diseases. The reasons for this are poorly understood but may reflect fundamental differences in disease mechanisms. To investigate the alpha-synuclein epitope mapping properties of LBs in familial Alzheimer disease. We compared LBs in familial Alzheimer disease with those in synucleinopathies by probing 6 brains of persons with familial Alzheimer disease using a panel of antibodies to epitopes spanning the alpha-synuclein protein. Results were compared with data from brains of persons with Parkinson disease, dementia with LBs, and multiple system atrophy. The brains of persons with familial Alzheimer disease showed consistent staining of LBs with all antibodies, similar to Parkinson disease and dementia with LBs but different from alpha-synuclein aggregates that occurred in multiple system atrophy. These data suggest that the epitope profiles of alpha-synuclein in LBs are similar, regardless of whether the biological trigger is related to synuclein or a different genetic pathway. These findings support the hypothesis that the mechanism of alpha-synuclein aggregation is the same within cell types but distinctive between cell types.

  14. Emerging models for mobilizing family support for chronic disease management: a structured review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Piette, John D

    2010-03-01

    We identify recent models for programmes aiming to increase effective family support for chronic illness management and self-care among adult patients without significant physical or cognitive disabilities. We then summarize evidence regarding the efficacy for each model identified. Structured review of studies published in medical and psychology databases from 1990 to the present, reference review, general Web searches and conversations with family intervention experts. Review was limited to studies on conditions that require ongoing self-management, such as diabetes, chronic heart disease and rheumatologic disease. Programmes with three separate foci were identified: (1) Programmes that guide family members in setting goals for supporting patient self-care behaviours have led to improved implementation of family support roles, but have mixed success improving patient outcomes. (2) Programmes that train family in supportive communication techniques, such as prompting patient coping techniques or use of autonomy supportive statements, have successfully improved patient symptom management and health behaviours. (3) Programmes that give families tools and infrastructure to assist in monitoring clinical symptoms and medications are being conducted, with no evidence to date on their impact on patient outcomes. The next generation of programmes to improve family support for chronic disease management incorporate a variety of strategies. Future research can define optimal clinical situations for family support programmes, the most effective combinations of support strategies, and how best to integrate family support programmes into comprehensive models of chronic disease care.

  15. Familial Alzheimer's disease: genetic analysis related to disease heterogeneity, Down syndrome and human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapiro, M B; Rapoport, S I

    1989-01-01

    Etiologically heterogeneous subgroups of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) exist and need to be distinguished so as to better identify genetic causes of familial cases. Furthermore, the presence of AD neuropathology in Down syndrome (trisomy 21) subjects older than 35 years suggests that AD in some cases is caused by dysregulation of expression of genes on chromosome 21. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in life, and the distribution of AD neuropathology in the post-mortem brain, indicate that AD involves the association neocortices and subcortical regions with which they evolved during evolution of the human brain. Accordingly, understanding the molecular basis of this evolution should elucidate the genetic basis of AD, whereas knowing the genetics of AD should be informative about the genomic changes which promoted brain evolution.

  16. Converging approaches to understanding early onset familial Alzheimer disease: A First Nation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Laura Y; Beattie, B Lynn; Dwosh, Emily; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In 2007, a novel pathogenic genetic mutation associated with early onset familial Alzheimer disease was identified in a large First Nation family living in communities across British Columbia, Canada. Building on a community-based participatory study with members of the Nation, we sought to explore the impact and interplay of medicalization with the Nation’s knowledge and approaches to wellness in relation to early onset familial Alzheimer disease. Methods: We performed a secondary content analysis of focus group discussions and interviews with 48 members of the Nation between 2012 and 2013. The analysis focused specifically on geneticization, medicalization, and traditional knowledge of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, as these themes were prominent in the primary analysis. Results: We found that while biomedical explanations of disease permeate the knowledge and understanding of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, traditional concepts about wellness are upheld simultaneously. Conclusion: The analysis brings the theoretical framework of “two-eyed seeing” to the case of early onset familial Alzheimer disease for which the contributions of different ways of knowing are embraced, and in which traditional and western ways complement each other on the path of maintaining wellness in the face of progressive neurologic disease. PMID:27092264

  17. Family history of Alzheimer’s disease limits improvement in cognitive function after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Alosco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Bariatric surgery can reverse cognitive impairments associated with obesity. However, such benefits may be attenuated in individuals with a predisposing risk for cognitive impairment such as family history of Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: In all, 94 bariatric surgery participants completed a computerized cognitive test battery before and 12 weeks after surgery. Family history of Alzheimer’s disease was obtained through self-report. Results: In the overall sample, cognitive function improved in memory and attention/executive function 12 weeks post-surgery. Repeated measures showed similar rates of improvements in attention/executive function between patients with and without a family history of Alzheimer’s disease. In contrast, only individuals without a family history of Alzheimer’s disease exhibited post-operative improvements in memory. A family history of Alzheimer’s disease was associated with greater post-surgery rates of cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Family history of Alzheimer’s disease may limit post-surgery cognitive benefits. Future studies should examine whether weight loss can modify the course of cognitive decline in patients at-risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

  18. Researches Regarding the Testing of Bee Family Resistance to Bee Brood Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Pătruică; Eliza Căuia; Eliza Simiz; Adrian Siceanu; Marian Bura; Ionut Bănăţean Dunea; Marioara Nicula; Cristian Fiştea

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we tested the resistance of bee families to young bee diseases. The researches were carried out in two apiaries from Timişoara and Comoraste, Caras-Severin County. The biological material was consisted of 10 bee families belonging to the species Apis mellifica carpatica, distributed in two experimental variants of 5 families, with almost equal power. During this experiment, we assessed the degree of cleaning and removing of the young bees that died of freezing. Successive to the...

  19. Clinical Decision Support for Vascular Disease in Community Family Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavjee, K; Holbrook, AM; Lau, E; Esporlas-Jewer, I; Troyan, S

    2006-01-01

    The COMPETE III Vascular Disease Tracker (C3VT) is a personalized, Web-based, clinical decision support tool that provides patients and physicians access to a patient’s 16 individual vascular risk markers, specific advice for each marker and links to best practices in vascular disease management. It utilizes the chronic care model1 so that physicians can better manage patients with chronic diseases. Over 1100 patients have been enrolled into the COMPETE III study to date.

  20. Risk factors in familial forms of celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease has been reported in up to 2% of some European populations. A similar risk has been identified in the America and Australia where immigration of Eu-ropeans has occurred. Moreover, an increasing number of celiac disease patients are being identified in many Asian countries, including China and India. Finally, celiac disease has also been detected in Asian immigrants and their descendants to other countries, such as Canada. Within these so-called "general" celiac populations, however, there are...

  1. GVHD (Graft-Versus-Host Disease): A Guide for Patients and Families After Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease): A guide for patients and families after stem cell transplant The immune system is the body's tool ... and attacking them. When you receive a donor's stem cells (the “graft”), the stem cells recreate the donor's ...

  2. Lyme Disease: Knowledge and Practices of Family Practitioners in Southern Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Ferrouillet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Public health authorities in Quebec have responded to the progressive emergence of Lyme disease (LD with surveillance activities and education for family physicians (FPs who are key actors in both vigilance and case management.

  3. Airway wall thickening and emphysema show independent familial aggregation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Bipen D; Coxson, Harvey O; Pillai, Sreekumar G

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: It is unclear whether airway wall thickening and emphysema make independent contributions to airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and whether these phenotypes cluster within families. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether airway wall thickening and emphysema (1...

  4. Online information as support to the families of children and adolescents with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Verônica de Azevedo; Lima, Vanessa Ferreira de; Carvalho, Ana Karoline da Silva; Weissheimer, Gisele; Soares, Larissa Gramazio

    2017-04-20

    To describe the use of online information as support to families of children and adolescents with chronic disease. This is an integrative review conducted in August 2015, with an online search in the following databases: PubMed, Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature, and Science Direct. Twelve studies were selected from the 293 studies found in the databases. After analysis, the following two categories emerged: Potentialities of the use of online information by families of children and adolescents with chronic disease, and Weaknesses of the use of online information by families of children and adolescents with chronic disease. The internet offers a wide range of information that helps families manage the care of children and adolescents with chronic diseases, but it also has characteristics that need to be analysed.

  5. Experiences of Supporting People with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease in Aged Care and Family Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling-Jenkins, Rachel; Torr, Jennifer; Iacono, Teresa; Bigby, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Research addressing the experiences of families of adults with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease in seeking diagnosis and gaining support is limited. The aim of this study was to gain a greater understanding of these processes by exploring the experiences of families and carers in supporting people with Down syndrome and…

  6. Family Stigma and Caregiver Burden in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Perla; Mittelman, Mary S.; Goldstein, Dovrat; Heinik, Jeremia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The stigma experienced by the family members of an individual with a stigmatized illness is defined by 3 dimensions: caregiver stigma, lay public stigma, and structural stigma. Research in the area of mental illness suggests that caregivers' perception of stigma is associated with increased burden. However, the effect of stigma on…

  7. Family Stigma and Caregiver Burden in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Perla; Mittelman, Mary S.; Goldstein, Dovrat; Heinik, Jeremia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The stigma experienced by the family members of an individual with a stigmatized illness is defined by 3 dimensions: caregiver stigma, lay public stigma, and structural stigma. Research in the area of mental illness suggests that caregivers' perception of stigma is associated with increased burden. However, the effect of stigma on…

  8. Towards Genetic Prediction of Coronary Heart Disease in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B. van der Net (Jeroen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractFamilial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disorder of lipid metabolism caused by mutations in the gene coding for the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. The LDL receptor is a transmembrane protein that regulates plasma cholesterol levels by uptake of LDL particles

  9. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease) in a Turkish family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, F

    1996-12-01

    A 31-year-old Turkish patient and some family members suffered from multiple hyperplastic oral mucosal papules. Intralesional papilloma virus was not found but the patient had elevated levels of CD8 lymphocytes in his peripheral blood. We diagnosed focal epithelial hyperplasia of Heck.

  10. [Chronic disease, the chronic patient and his family. Psychosocial impact of diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, L

    1992-07-01

    Concerning a revision about the mutual influence between the diabetes, the diabetic and his family, the author reviews the literature about the psychosocial area of the Family Physician content's work. It is also confirmed the high prevalency of the chronic disease and the importance of the family ecosystem, not only as support but also as problem to the bearing person of such type of disease. Studies of chronic disease indicate that family dysfunction is associated with poor health outcomes. The areas which more and better have been studied in this scope are reviewed. Thus, having as backdrop the diabetes management, the family's diabetic influence in general is reviewed, as well as the parental attitudes, the family organization and the family life events. Finally, the health care team role is reviewed and particulary the role of the family physician in the management of this type of patients. It is pointed out, as example of the Family Medicine specific contribution, the improving cooperation with medical treatment from the diabetic.

  11. Familial Mediterranean fever in which Crohn’s disease was suspected: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Satohiro; Urayoshi, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial Mediterranean fever is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease, mainly characterized by periodic fever and serositis. The level of awareness about familial Mediterranean fever is far from sufficient, and it is assumed that there may be many patients with this disease who are under observation without an accurate diagnosis. Case presentation A 30-year-old Japanese man presented to us with a few years’ history of recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain and diarrhea. He oft...

  12. Skin diseases in family medicine: prevalence and health care use.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, E.W.M.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Weel, C. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Duller, P.; Valk, P.G.M. van der; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Bor, J.H.J.; Schers, H.J.; Evers, A.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Ongoing care for patients with skin diseases can be optimized by understanding the incidence and population prevalence of various skin diseases and the patient-related factors related to the use of primary, specialty, and alternative health care for these conditions. We examined the recent

  13. Instruments measuring the disease-specific quality of life of family carers of people with neurodegenerative diseases: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Thomas E; Farina, Nicolas; Brown, Anna; Daley, Stephanie; Bowling, Ann; Basset, Thurstine; Livingston, Gill; Knapp, Martin; Murray, Joanna; Banerjee, Sube

    2017-01-01

    Objective Neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia, have a profound impact on those with the conditions and their family carers. Consequently, the accurate measurement of family carers' quality of life (QOL) is important. Generic measures may miss key elements of the impact of these conditions, so using disease-specific instruments has been advocated. This systematic review aimed to identify and examine the psychometric properties of disease-specific outcome measures of QOL of family carers of people with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease and other dementias; Huntington's disease; Parkinson's disease; multiple sclerosis; and motor neuron disease). Design Systematic review. Methods Instruments were identified using 5 electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Scopus and the International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)) and lateral search techniques. Only studies which reported the development and/or validation of a disease-specific measure for adult family carers, and which were written in English, were eligible for inclusion. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) checklist. The psychometric properties of each instrument were examined. Results 676 articles were identified. Following screening and lateral searches, a total of 8 articles were included; these reported 7 disease-specific carer QOL measures. Limited evidence was available for the psychometric properties of the 7 instruments. Psychometric analyses were mainly focused on internal consistency, reliability and construct validity. None of the measures assessed either criterion validity or responsiveness to change. Conclusions There are very few measures of carer QOL that are specific to particular neurodegenerative diseases. The findings of this review emphasise the importance of developing and validating psychometrically robust disease

  14. Evaluating the contribution of genetics and familial shared environment to common disease using the UK Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, María; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Canela-Xandri, Oriol; Rawlik, Konrad; Haley, Chris S; Tenesa, Albert

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have detected many loci underlying susceptibility to disease, but most of the genetic factors that contribute to disease susceptibility remain unknown. Here we provide evidence that part of the 'missing heritability' can be explained by an overestimation of heritability. We estimated the heritability of 12 complex human diseases using family history of disease in 1,555,906 individuals of white ancestry from the UK Biobank. Estimates using simple family-based statistical models were inflated on average by ∼47% when compared with those from structural equation modeling (SEM), which specifically accounted for shared familial environmental factors. In addition, heritabilities estimated using SNP data explained an average of 44.2% of the simple family-based estimates across diseases and an average of 57.3% of the SEM-estimated heritabilities, accounting for almost all of the SEM heritability for hypertension. Our results show that both genetics and familial environment make substantial contributions to familial clustering of disease.

  15. Cardiovascular disease mortality in patients with genetically verified familial hypercholesterolemia in Norway during 1992-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundal, Liv; Igland, Jannicke; Ose, Leiv; Holven, Kirsten B; Veierød, Marit B; Leren, Trond P; Retterstøl, Kjetil

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with familial hypercholesterolemia have increased cardiovascular disease mortality but the magnitude of the increased risk is uncertain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate all causes of death and place and manner of deaths in a large sample of genotyped familial hypercholesterolemia patients. Design, methods and results In this registry study data on 5518 patients with genotyped familial hypercholesterolemia were linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry during 1992-2013. Standardized mortality ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. There were in total 189 deaths. Cardiovascular disease was the most common cause of death (42.3%). Mean age at cardiovascular disease death was 64.5 years (range 33-91). Cardiovascular disease mortality including all cardiovascular disease deaths mentioning any place on the death certificate was significantly higher in familial hypercholesterolemia patients compared to the general Norwegian population under 70 years of age. Standardized mortality ratio (95% CI) was highest in the 20-39 years age group; 4.12 (1.85-9.18) decreasing to 0.77 (0.50-1.19) for those over 80 years. For total cardiovascular disease deaths occurring out of hospital, standardized mortality ratio was 12.35 (5.14-29.70) for those aged 20-39 years. Conclusion Familial hypercholesterolemia patients under 70 years of age have significantly higher cardiovascular disease mortality compared to the general Norwegian population. For those aged 20-39 years the risk of cardiovascular disease deaths occurring out of hospital was increased 12-fold. In spite of genotyped familial hypercholesterolemia and premature cardiovascular disease deaths, the majority of all death certificates did not include familial hypercholesterolemia among any of the contributing causes of death.

  16. Development of Aortic Valve Disease in Familial Hypercholesterolemic Swine: Implications for Elucidating Disease Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Ana M; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Meudt, Jennifer J; Krueger, Christian G; Hacker, Timothy A; Rahko, Peter S; Reed, Jess D; Masters, Kristyn S

    2015-10-27

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a prevalent hereditary disease associated with increased atherosclerosis and calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). However, in both FH and non-FH individuals, the role of hypercholesterolemia in the development of CAVD is poorly understood. This study used Rapacz FH (RFH) swine, an established model of human FH, to investigate the role of hypercholesterolemia alone in the initiation and progression of CAVD. The valves of RFH swine have not previously been examined. Aortic valve leaflets were isolated from wild-type (0.25- and 1-year-old) and RFH (0.25-, 1-, 2-, and 3-year-old) swine. Adult RFH animals exhibited numerous hallmarks of early CAVD. Significant leaflet thickening was found in adult RFH swine, accompanied by extensive extracellular matrix remodeling, including proteoglycan enrichment, collagen disorganization, and elastin fragmentation. Increased lipid oxidation and infiltration of macrophages were also evident in adult RFH swine. Intracardiac echocardiography revealed mild aortic valve sclerosis in some of the adult RFH animals, but unimpaired valve function. Microarray analysis of valves from adult versus juvenile RFH animals revealed significant upregulation of inflammation-related genes, as well as several commonalities with atherosclerosis and overlap with human CAVD. Adult RFH swine exhibited several hallmarks of early human CAVD, suggesting potential for these animals to help elucidate CAVD etiology in both FH and non-FH individuals. The development of advanced atherosclerotic lesions, but only early-stage CAVD, in RFH swine supports the hypothesis of an initial shared disease process, with additional stimulation necessary for further progression of CAVD. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  17. Co-existence of classic familial lecithin-cholesterol acyl transferase deficiency and fish eye disease in the same family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H S Mahapatra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a family with a rare genetic disorder arising out of mutation in the gene that encodes for the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT. The proband presented with nephrotic syndrome, hemolytic anemia, cloudy cornea, and dyslipidemia. Kidney biopsy showed certain characteristic features to suggest LCAT deficiency, and the enzyme activity in the serum was undetectable. Mother and younger sister showed corneal opacity and dyslipidemia but no renal or hematological involvement. These two members had a milder manifestation of the disease called fish eye disease. This case is presented to emphasize the importance of taking family history and doing a good clinical examination in patients with nephrotic syndrome and carefully analyze the lipid fractions in these subset of patients.

  18. Disease evolution and outcomes in familial AML with germline CEBPA mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tawana, Kiran; Wang, Jun; Renneville, Aline

    2015-01-01

    therapies were observed, with prolonged median survival after relapse (8 years) and long-term overall survival (10-year overall survival, 67%). Our data reveal that familial CEBPA-mutated AML exhibits a unique model of disease progression, associated with favorable long-term outcomes.......In-depth molecular investigation of familial leukemia has been limited by the rarity of recognized cases. This study examines the genetic events initiating leukemia and details the clinical progression of disease across multiple families harboring germ-line CEBPA mutations. Clinical data were...

  19. Generalized Vitiligo Associated Autoimmune Diseases in Japanese Patients Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Narita

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Among Japanese vitiligo patients, there is a subgroup with strong evidence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo, but also to autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune disorders.

  20. Maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA variants in familial Parkinson's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simon, David K; Pankratz, Nathan; Kissell, Diane K; Pauciulo, Michael W; Halter, Cheryl A; Rudolph, Alice; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; Nichols, William C; Foroud, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    .... We examined the possibility of a maternal inheritance bias as well as the association between mitochondrial haplogroups and maternal inheritance and disease risk in a case-control study of 168...

  1. The eye in systemic disease | Lenake | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The eye is a unique organ which is often involved in systemic disease. ... virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome, syphilis, some dermatological conditions and the ocular side-effects of certain drugs, are discussed in this article.

  2. Familial aggregation in inflammatory bowel disease: Is it genes or environment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiago Nunes; Gionata Fiorino; Silvio Danese; Miquel Sans

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develops in genetically susceptible individuals due to the influence of environmental factors, leading to an abnormal recognition of microbiota antigens by the innate immune system which triggers an exaggerated immune response and subsequent bowel tissue damage. IBD has been more frequently found in families, an observation that could be due to either genetic, environmental or both types of factors present in these families. In addition to expanding our knowledge on IBD pathogenesis, defining the specific contribution to familial IBD of each one of these factors might have also clinical usefulness. We review the available evidence on familial IBD pathogenesis.

  3. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus in a five-generation Chinese family with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yueqing; Liang, Jingyao; Yu, Shengyuan

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) in population studies, but no case has been reported in a large HD family. We report a case of a five-generation Chinese family who is afflicted by both HD and DM. The prevalence of DM in HD of this family was high (72.7%). The diagnosis of HD in 11 family members was confirmed by the genetic test of the proband who had 42 CAG repeats. Furthermore, the proband's daughter had abnormal locus at G3460T in MT-ND1 among mtDNA genome. Our case report suggests a genetic link between HD and DM.

  4. Polygenic risk score is associated with increased disease risk in 52 Finnish breast cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranen, Taru A; Mavaddat, Nasim; Khan, Sofia; Fagerholm, Rainer; Pelttari, Liisa; Lee, Andrew; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Easton, Douglas F; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-08-01

    The risk of developing breast cancer is increased in women with family history of breast cancer and particularly in families with multiple cases of breast or ovarian cancer. Nevertheless, many women with a positive family history never develop the disease. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) based on the risk effects of multiple common genetic variants have been proposed for individual risk assessment on a population level. We investigate the applicability of the PRS for risk prediction within breast cancer families. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and a PRS based on 75 common genetic variants in 52 Finnish breast cancer families including 427 genotyped women and pedigree information on ~4000 additional individuals by comparing the affected to healthy family members, as well as in a case-control dataset comprising 1272 healthy population controls and 1681 breast cancer cases with information on family history. Family structure was summarized using the BOADICEA risk prediction model. The PRS was associated with increased disease risk in women with family history of breast cancer as well as in women within the breast cancer families. The odds ratio (OR) for breast cancer within the family dataset was 1.55 [95 % CI 1.26-1.91] per unit increase in the PRS, similar to OR in unselected breast cancer cases of the case-control dataset (1.49 [1.38-1.62]). High PRS-values were informative for risk prediction in breast cancer families, whereas for the low PRS-categories the results were inconclusive. The PRS is informative in women with family history of breast cancer and should be incorporated within pedigree-based clinical risk assessment.

  5. Study designs for identification of rare disease variants in complex diseases: the utility of family-based designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Ottman, Ruth

    2011-11-01

    The recent progress in sequencing technologies makes possible large-scale medical sequencing efforts to assess the importance of rare variants in complex diseases. The results of such efforts depend heavily on the use of efficient study designs and analytical methods. We introduce here a unified framework for association testing of rare variants in family-based designs or designs based on unselected affected individuals. This framework allows us to quantify the enrichment in rare disease variants in families containing multiple affected individuals and to investigate the optimal design of studies aiming to identify rare disease variants in complex traits. We show that for many complex diseases with small values for the overall sibling recurrence risk ratio, such as Alzheimer's disease and most cancers, sequencing affected individuals with a positive family history of the disease can be extremely advantageous for identifying rare disease variants. In contrast, for complex diseases with large values of the sibling recurrence risk ratio, sequencing unselected affected individuals may be preferable.

  6. Using family history information to promote healthy lifestyles and prevent diseases; a discussion of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Paula W

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A family history, reflecting genetic susceptibility as well as shared environmental and behavioral factors, is an important risk factor for common chronic multifactorial diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes and many cancers. Discussion The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the evidence for the use of family history as a tool for primary prevention of common chronic diseases, in particular for tailored interventions aimed at promoting healthy lifestyles. The following questions are addressed: (1 What is the value of family history information as a determinant of personal disease risk?; (2How can family history information be used to motivate at-risk individuals to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles in order to prevent disease?; and (3 What additional studies are needed to assess the potential value of family history information as a tool to promote a healthy lifestyle? Summary In addition to risk assessment, family history information can be used to personalize health messages, which are potentially more effective in promoting healthy lifestyles than standardized health messages. More research is needed on the evidence for the effectiveness of such a tool.

  7. The impact of patients' chronic disease on family quality of life: an experience from 26 specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golics CJ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Catherine Jane Golics,1 Mohammad Khurshid Azam Basra,2 M Sam Salek,1 Andrew Yule Finlay2 1Centre for Socioeconomic Research, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Dermatology and Wound Healing, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK Background: Previous studies have assessed family quality of life in individual disease areas and specialties. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of disease on family members of patients over a wide range of specialties and identify key impact areas. This information is essential in order to reveal the extent of this impact and to allow strategies to be developed to support the family members of patients with chronic disease. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 133 family members of mostly chronically ill patients from 26 medical specialties. Family members were invited to discuss all areas of their lives that had been affected by having an unwell relative. Thematic analysis was carried out using NVivo9® software. Results: Most family members were female (61%, the partner or spouse of the patient (56%, or the parent (22%. Their mean age was 56.1 years (range: 21–85 years and the mean duration of the patient's disease was 8.9 years (range: 1 month to 60 years. Ten key themes of family quality of life were identified from interviews. The median number of themes reported by family members was six (range: 1–10. The key themes included: emotional impact (mentioned by 92% of subjects, daily activities (91%, family relationships (69%, sleep and health (67%, holidays (62%, involvement in medical care and support given to family members (61%, work and study (52%, financial impact (51%, social life (37%, and time planning (14%. Relationships between the themes were identified. Conclusion: This large scale multi-specialty study has demonstrated the significant, yet similar, impact that illness can have on the quality of life of

  8. Using family history information to promote healthy lifestyles and prevent diseases; A discussion of the evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Claassen (Liesbeth); L. Henneman (Lidewij); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); M. Wijdenes-Pijl (Miranda); N. Qureshi (Nadeem); F.M. Walter (Fiona); P.W. Yoon (Paula); D.R.M. Timmermans (Danielle)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. A family history, reflecting genetic susceptibility as well as shared environmental and behavioral factors, is an important risk factor for common chronic multifactorial diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes and many cancers. Discussion. The purpose of the

  9. Familial Alzheimer's disease-associated presenilin-1 alters cerebellar activity and calcium homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Hagel, Christian; Korwitz, Anne; Vinueza-Veloz, Maria Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Schonewille, Martijn; Zhou, Haibo; Velazquez-Perez, Luis; Rodriguez-Labrada, Roberto; Villegas, Andres; Ferrer, Isidro; Lopera, Francisco; Langer, Thomas; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Glatzel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) is characterized by autosomal dominant heritability and early disease onset. Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin-1 (PS1) are found in approximately 80% of cases of FAD, with some of these patients presenting cerebellar damage with amyloid plaques and ataxia w

  10. Using family history information to promote healthy lifestyles and prevent diseases; A discussion of the evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Claassen (Liesbeth); L. Henneman (Lidewij); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); M. Wijdenes-Pijl (Miranda); N. Qureshi (Nadeem); F.M. Walter (Fiona); P.W. Yoon (Paula); D.R.M. Timmermans (Danielle)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. A family history, reflecting genetic susceptibility as well as shared environmental and behavioral factors, is an important risk factor for common chronic multifactorial diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes and many cancers. Discussion. The purpose of the

  11. Familial Analysis of Seropositivity to Trypanosoma cruzi and of Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Grecco, Roseane L.; Balarin, Marly A. S.; Correia, Dalmo; Prata, Aluízio; Rodrigues, Virmondes

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out in Água Comprida, MG, Brazil, a region previously endemic to Chagas disease whose vectorial transmission was interrupted around 20 year ago. A total of 998 individuals were examined for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Seropositivity was observed in 255 subjects (25.5%), and 743 subjects were negative. Forty-one families with 5–80 individuals with similar environmental conditions were selected for familial analysis. In 15 families, seropositivity to T. cruzi was observed in > 50% of individuals. The segregation analysis confirmed family aggregation for the seropositivity to the T. cruzi. Heart commitment was the major clinical form observed, and in six families, > 50% of the individuals display cardiopathy that may be attributed to T. cruzi infection. Our results support the hypothesis that there is a family aggregation for the seropositivity but without the effect of one major gene. PMID:20064994

  12. 朊病毒播散机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙可; 沈宇清

    2011-01-01

    传染性海绵状脑病(Transmissible spongiformencephalopathies,TSE)是一类致死性中枢神经系统的慢性退化性疾病,它包括了疯牛病( Mad cow disease,MCD)即牛海绵状脑病(Bovine spongiformencephalopathy,BSE)、羊瘙痒病(Scrapie)、克雅病(Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease,CJD)、GSS综合征(Gersrmann-Straussler-Scheikerg disease, GSS)和致死性睡眠综合症(Fatal familial insomnia,FFI)等。TSE的共同特征是出现认知和运动功能的严重衰退,直至死亡。其病理特征表现为脑组织的海绵体化、空泡化,星形胶质细胞增生以及致病蛋白的积累等,最终结果一般都是死亡[1]。

  13. Caregiver roles in families affected by Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2013-01-01

    and the hierarchical order between spouses, partners, and parents and children. The relationship between spouses and partners changed during the course of the disease. A reciprocal relationship was difficult to maintain, as the role as carer overshadowed other roles. Children of an affected parent could compensate...

  14. Genetic lipid disorders, Familial Dysbetalipoproteinemia and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopal, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a large worldwide medical burden, with yearly increasing morbidity and mortality. An important risk factor for CVD are high cholesterol levels, with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as the main focus of research up to now. The introduction of

  15. Mutations in GBA are associated with familial Parkinson disease susceptibility and age at onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, W C; Pankratz, N; Marek, D K; Pauciulo, M W; Elsaesser, V E; Halter, C A; Rudolph, A; Wojcieszek, J; Pfeiffer, R F; Foroud, T

    2009-01-27

    To characterize sequence variation within the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene in a select subset of our sample of patients with familial Parkinson disease (PD) and then to test in our full sample whether these sequence variants increased the risk for PD and were associated with an earlier onset of disease. We performed a comprehensive study of all GBA exons in one patient with PD from each of 96 PD families, selected based on the family-specific lod scores at the GBA locus. Identified GBA variants were subsequently screened in all 1325 PD cases from 566 multiplex PD families and in 359 controls. Nine different GBA variants, five previously reported, were identified in 21 of the 96 PD cases sequenced. Screening for these variants in the full sample identified 161 variant carriers (12.2%) in 99 different PD families. An unbiased estimate of the frequency of the five previously reported GBA variants in the familial PD sample was 12.6% and in the control sample was 5.3% (odds ratio 2.6; 95% confidence interval 1.5-4.4). Presence of a GBA variant was associated with an earlier age at onset (p = 0.0001). On average, those patients carrying a GBA variant had onset with PD 6.04 years earlier than those without a GBA variant. This study suggests that GBA is a susceptibility gene for familial Parkinson disease (PD) and patients with GBA variants have an earlier age at onset than patients with PD without GBA variants.

  16. Anakinra prevents symptoms of familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome and Raynaud's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metyas, Samy K; Hoffman, Hal M

    2006-10-01

    Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is a rare, hereditary disorder characterized by cold-induced inflammation. We describe the successful longterm treatment of a patient with FCAS with anakinra, an interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra). The remarkable response of FCAS and associated Raynaud's disease in this patient suggests that IL-1 is an important mediator of these inflammatory diseases. Our report supports increasing evidence that anakinra plays an important role in the treatment of select chronic inflammatory diseases.

  17. The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with familial mediterranean Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işikay, Sedat; Işikay, Nurgül; Kocamaz, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever and celiac disease are both related to auto-inflammation and/or auto-immunity and they share some common clinical features such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating and flatulence. Objectives We aimed to determine the association of these two diseases, if present. Totally 112 patients diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 cases as healthy control were included in the study. All participants were examined for the evidence of celiac disease, with serum tissue transglutaminase IgA levels (tTG IgA). Totally 144 cases, 112 with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 healthy control cases were included in the study. tTG IgA positivity was determined in three cases with Familial Mediterranean Fever and in one case in control group. In that aspect there was no significant difference regarding the tTG IgA positivity between groups (P=0.81). Duodenum biopsy was performed to the tTG IgA positive cases and revealed Marsh Type 3b in two Familial Mediterranean Fever cases and Marsh Type 3c in the other one while the biopsy results were of the only tTG IgA positive case in control group was Marsh Type 3b. In HLA evaluation of the celiac cases; HLA DQ2 was present in two celiac cases of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group and in the only celiac case of the control group while HLA DQ8 was present in one celiac case of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group. We did not determine an association of Familial Mediterranean Fever with celiac disease. Larger studies with subgroup analysis are warranted to determine the relationship of these two diseases.

  18. THE PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE AMONG PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL MEDITERRANEAN FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Familial Mediterranean Fever and celiac disease are both related to auto-inflammation and/or auto-immunity and they share some common clinical features such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating and flatulence. Objectives We aimed to determine the association of these two diseases, if present. Methods Totally 112 patients diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 cases as healthy control were included in the study. All participants were examined for the evidence of celiac disease, with serum tissue transglutaminase IgA levels (tTG IgA. Results Totally 144 cases, 112 with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 healthy control cases were included in the study. tTG IgA positivity was determined in three cases with Familial Mediterranean Fever and in one case in control group. In that aspect there was no significant difference regarding the tTG IgA positivity between groups (P=0.81. Duodenum biopsy was performed to the tTG IgA positive cases and revealed Marsh Type 3b in two Familial Mediterranean Fever cases and Marsh Type 3c in the other one while the biopsy results were of the only tTG IgA positive case in control group was Marsh Type 3b. In HLA evaluation of the celiac cases; HLA DQ2 was present in two celiac cases of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group and in the only celiac case of the control group while HLA DQ8 was present in one celiac case of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group. Conclusions We did not determine an association of Familial Mediterranean Fever with celiac disease. Larger studies with subgroup analysis are warranted to determine the relationship of these two diseases.

  19. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Borgermans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  20. Relevance of chronic lyme disease to family medicine as a complex multidimensional chronic disease construct: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgermans, Liesbeth; Goderis, Geert; Vandevoorde, Jan; Devroey, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  1. Characteristics of familial aggregation in early-onset Alzheimer`s disease: Evidence of subgroups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campion, D. [INSERM, Paris (France); Martinez, M.; Babron, M.C. [and others

    1995-06-19

    Characteristics of familial aggregation of Alzheimer`s Disease were studied in 92 families ascertained through a clinically diagnosed proband with an onset below age 60 years. In each family data were systematically collected on the sibships of the proband, of his father, and of his mother. A total of 926 relatives were included and 81% of the living relatives (i.e., 251 individuals) were directly examined. The estimated cumulative risk among first degree relatives was equal to 35% by age 89 years (95% confidence interval 22 to 47%). This result does not support the hypothesis that an autosomal dominant gene, fully penetrant by age 90 years, is segregating within all these pedigrees. Despite the fact that all probands were selected for an onset before age 60 years it was shown that two types of families could be delineated with respect to age at onset among affected relatives: all secondary cases with an onset below age 60 years were contributed by a particular group of families (type 1 families), whereas all secondary cases with an onset after age 60 years were contributed by another group of families (type 2 families). Although genetic interpretation of these findings is not straightforward, they support the hypothesis of etiologic heterogeneity in the determinism of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA variants in familial Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer Ronald F; Rudolph Alice; Halter Cheryl A; Pauciulo Michael W; Kissell Diane K; Pankratz Nathan; Simon David K; Nichols William C; Foroud Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondrial function is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD) and may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD, but the causes of mitochondrial impairment in PD are unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recapitulated in cell lines expressing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from PD patients, implicating mtDNA variants or mutations, though the role of mtDNA variants or mutations in PD risk remains unclear. We investigated the potential contribution of mtDNA variants or mutations to t...

  3. Knowledge of family physicians on common dermatological diseases and their diagnosis and management trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Özyurt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: In clinical practice, dermatology specialists usually encounter misdiagnosis and inappropriate management approaches of other specialists for several dermatological diseases. This study aims to investigate the knowledge, diagnosis and management trends of family physicians in primary care on common dermatological diseases and their opinions about dermatology education. Materials and Methods: A multicenter study was conducted in six cities in Turkey including a total of 302 family physicians in primary care using an 82-item questionnaire through in-person interview. The questionnaire aimed at identifying demographic characteristics of family physicians, knowledge on common dermatological diseases, and their diagnosis and management trends. Results: Out of 1414 family physicians, 302 (21.53% subjects, who could be contacted and those accepted to respond the questionnaire, were included. 57.6% of participants reported that there was not a microscope, while 94.4% reported that potassium hydroxide solution was not available in their clinics. A higher rate of family physicians mentioned experience difficulties in the management of psoriasis and acne rosacea. The rate of family physicians, who assumed that hepatobiliary disorders and other visceral conditions play a role in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and acne vulgaris and those who did not state an opinion about this issue, was high. Incorrect management trends for bacterial skin diseases and nail diseases were observed with higher rates. Conclusion: It is recommended that knowledge should be reinforced through both undergraduate and continuous medical education and, skills of family physicians on the management of dermatological diseases should be improved.

  4. Familial hyperhomocysteinemia, age and peripheral vascular diseases - an Italian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Michelini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia is a widely recognized, although not yet entirely understood, risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Particularly, the complex relationships between age, hyperhomocysteinemia, predisposing genetic factors and peripheral vascular diseases have not been fully evaluated. Our contribution to this issue is a retrospective analysis of a large series of patients with peripheral arterial, venous and lymphatic disease, and of their blood relatives, with special reference to homocysteine plasma levels, age and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms. Serum homocysteine was measured in 477 patients (286 males, 191 females, age range 19-78 years with various vascular clinical conditions: postphlebitic syndrome (46 recurrent venous ulcers (78, arterial diseases (101 primary lymphoedema (87, secondary lymphoedema (161 and outlet thoracic syndrome (4, and in 50 normal controls. A MTHFR study for polymorphisms was carried on in the subjects with homocysteine values exceeding 15 mol/L. Serum homocysteine determination and MTHFR polymorphism studies were performed also in 1430 healthy blood related relatives (mainly siblings, descendents and sibling descendents of the subjects with hyperhomocysteinemia and MTHFR polymorphisms. We found MTHFR polymorphisms in 20% of controls and in 69.3%, 69.5% and 53.8% of hyperhomocysteinemic subjects with arterial diseases, postphlebitic syndrome and venous ulcers, respectively. As expected, the percentage of hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with secondary lymphoedema and with thoracic outlet syndrome did not show significant differences compared to the control group. A MTHFR polymorphism was found in 116 out of the 214 hyperhomocysteinemic patients, i.e., in the 54% of the overall patient population with hyperhomocysteinemia (214 patients. Interestingly 750 (52% out of the 1430 blood relatives of the 116 patients with hyperhomocysteinemia and MTHFR polymorphisms showed at least one

  5. Family history and disease outcomes in patients with Crohn's disease: A comparison between China and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Qi; Hu, Jun; Al Kazzi, Elie S; Akhuemonkhan, Eboselume; Zhi, Min; Gao, Xiang; de Paula Pessoa, Raquel Holand; Ghazaleh, Sami; Cornelius, Tuhina; Sabunwala, Suhel Abbas; Ghadermarzi, Shadi; Tripathi, Kartikeya; Lazarev, Mark; Hu, Pin-Jin; Hutfless, Susan

    2016-11-06

    To investigate the differences in family history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and clinical outcomes among individuals with Crohn's disease (CD) residing in China and the United States. We performed a survey-based cross-sectional study of participants with CD recruited from China and the United States. We compared the prevalence of IBD family history and history of ileal involvement, CD-related surgeries and IBD medications in China and the United States, adjusting for potential confounders. We recruited 49 participants from China and 145 from the United States. The prevalence of family history of IBD was significantly lower in China compared with the United States (China: 4.1%, United States: 39.3%). The three most commonly affected types of relatives were cousin, sibling, and parent in the United States compared with child and sibling in China. Ileal involvement (China: 63.3%, United States: 63.5%) and surgery for CD (China: 51.0%, United States: 49.7%) were nearly equivalent in the two countries. The lower prevalence of familial clustering of IBD in China may suggest that the etiology of CD is less attributed to genetic background or a family-shared environment compared with the United States. Despite the potential difference in etiology, surgery and ileal involvement were similar in the two countries. Examining the changes in family history during the continuing rise in IBD may provide further insight into the etiology of CD.

  6. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New therapeutic targets in major diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balasundaram Padmanabhan; Shruti Mathur; Manjula Ramu; Shailesh Tripathi

    2016-06-01

    The bromodomains and extra-terminal domain (BET) family proteins recognize acetylated chromatin through their bromodomains (BDs) and helps in regulating gene expression. BDs are chromatin ‘readers’; by interacting with acetylated lysines on the histone tails, they recruit chromatin-regulating proteins on the promoter region to regulate gene expression and repression. Extensive efforts have been employed by the scientific communities worldwide, to identify and develop potential inhibitors of BET family BDs to regulate protein expression by inhibiting acetylated histone (H3/H4) interactions. Several small molecule inhibitors have been reported, which not only have high affinity, but also have high specificity to BET BDs. These developments make BET family proteins to be an important therapeutic targets, for major diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, obesity and inflammation. Here, we review and discuss the structural biology of BET family BDs and their applications in major diseases.

  7. Genetic Analyses of a Three Generation Family Segregating Hirschsprung Disease and Iris Heterochromia

    OpenAIRE

    Long Cui; Emily Hoi-Man Wong; Guo Cheng; Manoel Firmato de Almeida; Man-Ting So; Pak-Chung Sham; Stacey S Cherny; Paul Kwong-Hang Tam; Maria-Mercè Garcia-Barceló

    2013-01-01

    We present the genetic analyses conducted on a three-generation family (14 individuals) with three members affected with isolated-Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) and one with HSCR and heterochromia iridum (syndromic-HSCR), a phenotype reminiscent of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (WS4). WS4 is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, eyes and/or hair, sensorineural deafness and HSCR. None of the members had sensorineural deafness. The family was screened for copy number variations (CNVs)...

  8. Hospital Admissions, Biological Therapy, and Surgery in Familial and Sporadic Cases of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Andersson, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    -related hospitalization, biological treatment, and surgery in familial versus sporadic cases of IBD. RESULTS: A total of 27,886 IBD cases, including 1006 IBD-relative pairs, were followed-up for up to 16 years, totaling 164,979 person-years. We observed no difference in risk of hospital admissions between familial...... and sporadic cases of IBD. However, patients with familial CD had significantly higher risk of major surgery than sporadic CD cases after 2 years of disease duration (hazard ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.07). Also, sensitivity analysis suggested a slightly reduced time from diagnosis to first...... tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor treatment among familial CD and UC cases as compared with sporadic cases. CONCLUSION: We found only minor differences in surgery rates and tumor necrosis factor exposure, between familial and sporadic cases of IBD. These findings may represent purely social rather than...

  9. Parental consanguinity and family history of coronary artery disease strongly predict early stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youhanna, Sonia; Platt, Daniel E; Rebeiz, Abdallah; Lauridsen, Michael; Deeb, Mary E; Nasrallah, Antoine; Alam, Samir; Puzantian, Houry; Kabbani, Samer; Ghoul, Melanie; Zreik, Tony G; el Bayeh, Hamid; Abchee, Antoine; Zalloua, Pierre

    2010-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multifactorial disease with acquired and inherited components. We investigated the roles of family history and consanguinity on CAD risk and age at diagnosis in 4284 patients. The compounded impact of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking, and BMI, which are known CAD risk factors, on CAD risk and age at diagnosis was also explored. CAD was determined by cardiac catheterization. Logistic regression and stratification were performed to determine the impact of family history and consanguinity on risk and onset of CAD, controlling for diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking, and BMI. Family history of CAD and gender significantly increased the risk for young age at diagnosis of CAD (p<0.001). Consanguinity did not promote risk of CAD (p=0.38), but did affect age of disease diagnosis (p<0.001). The mean age at disease diagnosis was lowest, 54.8 years, when both family history of CAD and consanguinity were considered as unique risk factors for CAD, compared to 62.8 years for the no-risk-factor patient category (p<0.001). Family history of CAD and smoking are strongly associated with young age at diagnosis. Furthermore, parental consanguinity in the presence of family history lowers the age of disease diagnosis significantly for CAD, emphasizing the role of strong genetic and cultural CAD modifiers. These findings highlight the increased role of genetic determinants of CAD in some population subgroups, and suggest that populations and family structure influence genetic heterogeneity between patients with CAD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE (ADPKD IN A LARGE IRANIAN FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Farhud

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Study of a family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases (ADPKD in five generations, including 96 healthy and 47 affected individuals, has been carried out in Tehran. Investigation on individuals, including final diagnoses by clinical findings, sonography, radiography and laboratory results, have Lead to the completion of genealogical chart of the family. The affected individuals have reached a stage of the disease with confirmed occurrence of renal damages. Uncertain diagnoses, unconfirmed statements of the family members about probable presence of the disease in some other members, and also the death of some members by other reasons were not possible to be registered in the chart. Up to now the chart has been the largest and the most complete in Iran, compared with the ones reported in the available literature.

  11. Prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia: The role of PCSK9 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećin, Ivan; Hartgers, Merel L; Hovingh, G Kees; Dent, Ricardo; Reiner, Željko

    2017-09-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterised by elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and consequently an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Familial hypercholesterolaemia is relatively common, but is often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Cardiologists are likely to encounter many individuals with familial hypercholesterolaemia; however, patients presenting with premature ASCVD are rarely screened for familial hypercholesterolaemia and fasting lipid levels are infrequently documented. Given that individuals with familial hypercholesterolaemia and ASCVD are at a particularly high risk of subsequent cardiac events, this is a missed opportunity for preventive therapy. Furthermore, because there is a 50% chance that first-degree relatives of individuals with familial hypercholesterolaemia will also be affected by the disorder, the underdiagnosis of familial hypercholesterolaemia among patients with ASCVD is a barrier to cascade screening and the prevention of ASCVD in affected relatives. Targeted screening of patients with ASCVD is an effective strategy to identify new familial hypercholesterolaemia index cases. Statins are the standard treatment for individuals with familial hypercholesterolaemia; however, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets are not achieved in a large proportion of patients despite treatment. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors have been shown to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels considerably in individuals with familial hypercholesterolaemia who are concurrently receiving the maximal tolerated statin dose. The clinical benefit of PCSK9 inhibitors must, however, also be considered in terms of their cost-effectiveness. Increased awareness of familial hypercholesterolaemia is required among healthcare professionals, particularly cardiologists and primary care physicians, in order to start early preventive

  12. Cystic disease, family history of breast cancer, and use of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, D V; Elinson, L; Morgan, R W

    1981-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies show a lower frequency of fibrocystic breast disease among users of oral contraceptives than among women who have never used them. Family history of breast cancer appears to be more common among benign breast disease patients than among their controls. To determine the use of oral contraceptives and the presence of family history of breast cancer, information was obtained from 211 cystic cases and their matched controls from the metropolitan Toronto area. Cystic cases compared to controls had a higher proportion of women with a family history of breast cancer (21% vs 15%). For both a positive and negative family history of breast cancer, as well as for all women combined, the mean duration of oral contraceptive use was lower for cystic cases than for controls. The odds ratio for oral contraceptive use according to family history of breast cancer for cystic cases and controls was 0.42 and 0.81 respectively. The possibility that a woman is more protected against benign breast disease by using oral contraceptives if she has a family history of breast cancer deserves more attention in future investigations on the long-term effects of birth control pills.

  13. The impact of Juvenile Huntington's Disease on the family: the case of a rare childhood condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Helen M; Eatough, Virginia; Smith, Jonathan A; Stanley, Cath A; Glendinning, Neil W; Quarrell, Oliver W J

    2008-01-01

    There has been little research into the impact of Juvenile Huntington's Disease (JHD) on the family, and the issues facing this group are poorly understood. The study reported here is part of larger project that aimed to address this. Ten semi-structured interviews with the main carer were carried out, and were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). This article reports three themes arising from the study relating to the psychosocial impact of JHD on the family: (1) dealing with something so different; (2) lack of understanding (3) isolation. This information is useful in developing appropriate services for families affected by JHD, as well as being of relevance to other childhood conditions.

  14. Familial Mediterranean fever in which Crohn's disease was suspected: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Satohiro; Urayoshi, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Yukio

    2014-09-27

    Familial Mediterranean fever is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease, mainly characterized by periodic fever and serositis. The level of awareness about familial Mediterranean fever is far from sufficient, and it is assumed that there may be many patients with this disease who are under observation without an accurate diagnosis. A 30-year-old Japanese man presented to us with a few years' history of recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain and diarrhea. He often visited a hospital when the attacks occurred; however, acute enteritis was diagnosed each time, and the symptoms resolved spontaneously within a few days. When he noticed a shortening of the interval between the attacks, he visited the hospital again. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy performed at this hospital revealed no significant abnormal findings. He was then referred to our hospital under the suspicion of a small intestinal disease. Abdominal computed tomography revealed wall thickening and increased density of the mesenteric adipose tissue in the jejunum, which led us to suspect Crohn's disease. Oral double-balloon enteroscopy was performed; because this revealed only mild mucosal edema in the jejunum, Crohn's disease was considered to be highly improbable. Based on the patient's clinical course, we suspected familial Mediterranean fever. As the Livneh criteria for familial Mediterranean fever were satisfied, the patient was started on oral colchicine for the purpose of diagnostic treatment. A definitive diagnosis of familial Mediterranean fever was then made based on the detection of a mutation of the Mediterranean fever gene. A marked reduction in the frequency of attacks was observed in response to colchicine treatment. Although Crohn's disease may be considered first in the differential diagnosis of young patients presenting with periodic fever, abdominal pain and diarrhea, the possibility of familial Mediterranean fever should also be borne in mind.

  15. Comorbidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in family practice: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Olmos Luis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is frequent and often coexists with other diseases. The aim of this study was to quantify the prevalence of COPD and related chronic comorbidity among patients aged over 40 years visiting family practices in an area of Madrid. Methods An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in a health area of the Madrid Autonomous Region (Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid. The practice population totalled 198,670 persons attended by 129 Family Physicians (FPs, and the study population was made up of persons over the age of 40 years drawn from this practice population. Patients were deemed to have COPD if this diagnosis appeared on their clinical histories. Prevalence of COPD; prevalence of a further 25 chronic diseases in patients with COPD; and standardised prevalence ratios, were calculated. Results Prevalence of COPD in family medicine was 3.2% (95% CI 3.0–3.3 overall, 5.3% among men and 1.4% among women; 90% of patients presented with comorbidity, with a mean of 4 ± 2.04 chronic diseases per patient, with the most prevalent related diseases being arterial hypertension (52%, disorders of lipid metabolism (34%, obesity (25%, diabetes (20% and arrhythmia (15%. After controlling for age and sex, the observed prevalence of the following ten chronic diseases was higher than expected: heart failure; chronic liver disease; asthma; generalised artherosclerosis; osteoporosis; ischaemic heart disease; thyroid disease; anxiety/depression; arrhythmia; and obesity. Conclusions Patients with COPD, who are frequent in family practice, have a complex profile and pose a clinical and organisational challenge to FPs.

  16. Correlation of gastroesophageal reflux disease with positive family history and headache in Shiraz city, Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saberi-Firoozi Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To analyze the potential correlation of a positive family history of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD and the history of headaches as a risk factor for and complication of the disease. Materials and Methods: Three thousand and six hundred subjects were selected by cluster random sampling from all seven districts of Shiraz city, who were invited for interview. In five months, 1956 subjects participated in this study. A questionnaire organized into three sections of demographic, signs and symptoms of GERD, headache and family history of GERD was completed for each patient. Social and demographic variables were also recorded. Results: The presence of GERD symptoms (72% had a significant correlation with a positive family history of the disease ( P = 0.000. Patients showed a variable frequency of headache, ranging from once daily (16.7%, three to five times a week (5.6%, once-twice a week (26.7%, once to three times a month (15.0% and less than once a month (8.3%. There was a significant correlation between the headaches and the GERD symptoms ( P = 0.000. Conclusion: A positive family history of GERD can be considered as a risk factor for the disease and the presence of headache at the time of diagnosis as a complication of this disease. Therefore, in the management of GERD, attention should be given to these factors.

  17. Germline mutation screening and predictive testing in families with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauch, H.; Glavac, D.; Pausch, F. [Univ. of Munich (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal inheritable disease that predisposes gene carriers to develop tumors in the eyes, central nervous system, kidney, adrenal gland, pancreas and epididymis. VHL type 1 is without phenochromocytoma (P); VHL type 2 is with P. Screening for germline mutations and preclinical diagnosis in families with VHL disease has become feasible since the VHL gene was isolated. We applied Southern blotting and hybridization with g7cDNA to detect rearrangements, PCR-SSCP and sequencing to detect missense, nonsense and splice mutations, and primer-specified restriction map modification to detect a P-specific missense mutation. In 48 apparently unrelated VHL families mainly from Germany, we identified 20/48 (42%) VHL mutations: 7 (14.5%) rearrangements, 9/48 (19%) missense mutations affecting nt505, 1/48 (2%) splice site mutation, 2/48 (4%) other missense mutations, and 1/48 (2%) nonsense mutation. The predominance of the nt505 mutation in 9 German families with VHL type 2 suggests that this genotype expresses the VHL/P disease pattern. Predictive testing for VHL gene carriers in families with specific mutations identified 7 asymptomatic gene carriers. VHL manifestations have been confirmed by clinical examination in two individuals. Early molecular diagnosis may result in a successful management of VHL disease and prolong survival of VHL patients.

  18. Alcoholic patients' response to their disease: perspective of patients and family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Salvador Lima-Rodríguez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to know the perspective of alcoholic patients and their families about the behavioral characteristics of the disease, identifying the issues to modify the addictive behavior and seek rehabilitation. Method: ethnographic research using interpretative anthropology, via participant observation and a detailed interview with alcoholic patients and their families, members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA and Alanon in Spain. Results: development of disease behavior in alcoholism is complex due to the issues of interpreting the consumption model as a disease sign. Patients often remain long periods in the pre-contemplation stage, delaying the search for assistance, which often arrives without them accepting the role of patient. This constrains the recovery and is related to the social thought on alcoholism and self-stigma on alcoholics and their families, leading them to deny the disease, condition of the patient, and help. The efforts of self-help groups and the involvement of health professionals is essential for recovery. Conclusion: understanding how disease behavior develops, and the change process of addictive behavior, it may be useful for patients, families and health professionals, enabling them to act in a specific way at each stage.

  19. A New PKD1 Mutation Discovered in a Chinese Family with Autosomal Polycystic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhendi Wang; Yang Wang; Jing Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims: Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by massive kidney enlargement and progressive chronic kidney disease, is due to abnormal proliferation of renal tubular epithelium. ADPKD is known to be caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Methods: In the present study, the mutation analysis of PKD genes was performed in a new Chinese family with ADPKD using Long-Range (LR) PCR sequencing and targeted next-generation s...

  20. Relationship of age of onset and family history in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Matthew J; Hac, Nicholas E; Yan, Guofen; Harrison, Madaline B; Wooten, G Frederick

    2015-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether age of onset of Parkinson disease (PD) is associated with differences in PD risk and PD age of onset in parents and siblings. Clinical and detailed family history data were available for 1,114 PD probands. Proband age of onset was not associated with differences in PD prevalence or PD age of onset in parents. Proband age of PD onset disease. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.