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Sample records for familial central diabetes

  1. Risk factors for diabetes, but not for cardiovascular disease, are associated with family history of Type 2 diabetes in subjects from central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Brambila, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    Independent of obesity, family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (FHT2DM) is another important risk factor for developing diabetes. To establish the association among FHT2DM, risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in subjects from central Mexico. Clinical and biochemical studies were performed in 383 first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes and 270 subjects unrelated to patients with type 2 diabetes-all subjects were from the city of Puebla in central Mexico. Logistic regressions were used to assess the association between FHT2DM and metabolic parameters. Cardiovascular risk was classified by dyslipidemia and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS). FHT2DM was associated with risk factors for diabetes, such as increased fasting insulin levels (OR = 1.731, 95% CI = 1.041-2.877), decreased insulin sensitivity (OR = 1.951, 95% CI = 1.236-3.080) and pre-diabetes (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.14-2.33). FHT2DH was not associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as dyslipidemia (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.70-1.79) and FRS (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.40-1.36) when adjusted for gender, age, smoking and obesity. Diabetic risk factors, but not cardiovascular disease risk factors, are associated with a positive family history of diabetes in subjects from central Mexico, independent of the presence of obesity.

  2. Identification of genetic mutations in patients with familial central diabetes insipidus

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco, Ângela Sofia Fernandes Alves

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is associated with defects that involve the secretion and the action of hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) resulting in the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine. The most common defect that results in disease development is the deficient secretion of the hormone AVP and the disease is referred to as central or neurohypophyseal DI. The AVP hormone is synthesized in magnocellular neurons, that originate in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of th...

  3. Idiopathic central diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Mary; Balachandran, Venu; Menon, Sooraj

    2011-10-01

    Idiopathic central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a rare disorder characterized clinically by polyuria and polydipsia, and an abnormal urinary concentration without any identified etiology. We report a case of central diabetes insipidus in a 60-year-old lady in the absence of secondary causes like trauma, infection, and infiltrative disorders of brain.

  4. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistgaard, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is characterized by severe low-solute polyuria and polydipisa. The disease is caused by a deficient neurosecretion of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). The hormone is normally synthesized by the magnocellular neurons...... as one sporadic case of early-onset diabetes insipidus. Genetic testing of the sporadic case of diabetes insipidus revealed a highly unusual mosaicism for a variation in the gene encoding the AVP receptor (AVPR2). This mosaicism had resulted in a partial phenotype and initial diagnostic difficulties...

  5. [Central diabetes insipidus: diagnostic difficulties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoussi, N; Aissa, K; Fitouri, Z; Hajji, M; Makni, S; Bellagha, I; Ben Becher, S

    2008-06-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is rare in children. Characteristic features include polyuria and polydipsia due to arginine vasopressin deficiency. The differential diagnosis of polyuric states may be difficult. Etiologic diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus may be an equally difficult task. To specify the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus and to point out features of the etiologic work-up and of long-term follow-up of children with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. A retrospective study of 12 children admitted with a polyuria/polydipsia syndrome to the pediatric - consultation and emergency unit of the children's hospital of Tunis between 1988 and 2005. Children with acquired nephrogenic central diabetes insipidus were excluded. Fourteen-hour fluid restriction test and/or desmopressin test were used without plasma vasopressin measurement. Eight patients were classified as having central diabetes insipidus, which was severe in seven children and partial in one girl. One patient was classified as having primary polydipsia. The diagnosis remains unclear in three patients. The etiological work-up in eight patients with central diabetes insipidus enabled the identification of Langerhan's-cell histiocytosis in two patients and neurosurgical trauma in one. The cause was considered idiopathic in five patients. The median follow-up of the five patients with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus was five years two months plus or minus six years seven months (range five months, 14.5 years). During this follow-up, neither brain magnetic resonance imaging scans findings nor anterior pituitary function have changed. Fluid restriction and desmopressin tests did not enable an accurate distinction between partial diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia. Regular surveillance is warranted in patients with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus to identify potential etiologies.

  6. Family diabetes matters: a view from the other side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D; Cene, Crystal W; Corsino, Leonor; Thomas, Chelsea; Svetkey, Laura P

    2013-03-01

    Typically, chronic disease self-management happens in a family context, and for African American adults living with diabetes, family seems to matter in self-management processes. Many qualitative studies describe family diabetes interactions from the perspective of adults living with diabetes, but we have not heard from family members. To explore patient and family perspectives on family interactions around diabetes. Qualitative study using focus group methodology. PARTICIPANTS & APPROACH: We conducted eight audiotaped focus groups among African Americans (four with patients with diabetes and four with family members not diagnosed with diabetes), with a focus on topics of family communication, conflict, and support. The digital files were transcribed verbatim, coded, and analyzed using qualitative data analysis software. Directed content analysis and grounded theory approaches guided the interpretation of code summaries. Focus groups included 67 participants (81 % female, mean age 64 years). Family members primarily included spouses, siblings, and adult children/grandchildren. For patients with diabetes, central issues included shifting family roles to accommodate diabetes and conflicts stemming from family advice-giving. Family members described discomfort with the perceived need to police or "stand over" the diabetic family member, not wanting to "throw diabetes in their [relative's] face," perceiving their communications as unhelpful, and confusion about their role in diabetes care. These concepts generated an emergent theme of "family diabetes silence." Diabetes silence, role adjustments, and conflict appear to be important aspects to address in family-centered diabetes self-management interventions. Contextual data gathered through formative research can inform such family-centered intervention development.

  7. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R.; Pandey, Tarun; Badawi, Mona H.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  8. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  9. Transient central diabetes insipidus following ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI following ischemic infarction of the brain has been described as a rare presentation. Posterior pituitary ischemia has also been postulated as a possible cause of idiopathic CDI. We encountered a young male with bilateral extensive ischemic infarction sustained at high altitude, who had transient polyuria due to central diabetes insipidus, requiring desmopressin therapy. DI completely resolved during the course of his neurological recovery.

  10. Central Diabetes Insipidus, Central Hypothyroidism, Renal Tubular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    readmitted to the hospital because of jaundice and failure to thrive, for which he was investigated and diagnosed to have central congenital hypothyroidism. Shortly thereafter, he was admitted to our institute with a history of vomiting, decreased oral intake, polyuria, and dehydration having lasted 5 days. He was investigated ...

  11. [The child from families with type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasikowa, Renata; Suchańska, Dorota; Suchańska, Danuta; Basiak, Aleksander; Noczyńska, Anna; Stasińska, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes type 1 is observed in individuals with a genetic predisposition to the disease. Observed is a 3-5 fold risk for congenital defects, therefore diabetes type 1 is one of the highest known teratogenic risk factor. The main factor responsible for the development of congenital defects is hyperglycemia. Observed are congenital defects of the central nervous system, the bones, urinary and digestive tract. Characteristic is macrosomia. Observed are hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, polycythemia, hyperbilirubinemia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, respiratory disturbances. Children from families with diabetes type 1 are at high risk for the development of the disease in the newborn period, additional diseases. They must be in permanent medical control.

  12. Association between central diabetes insipidus and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palumbo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Central diabetes insipidus is a rare disease of the hypothalamus and neurohypophysis. It is very unusually found in the adult with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is manifested by a polydipsic polyuric syndrome, which must be distinguished from the poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the similarity of both entities and the unusual nature of their coexistence, their suspicion is difficult. The case of a 72-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus with poor insulin control (fasting hyperglycemia greater than 180 mg/dl who had a long-standing polyuric syndrome is here presented. Hypernatremia and plasma osmolality elevated together with a low urinary osmolality led to the suspicion of diabetes insipidus, which was subsequently confirmed by the dehydration test and the administration of desmopressin sc. With 61% increase in the calculated urinary osmolarity one hour post desmopressin s.c., diabetes insipidus of central type was diagnosed. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance showed a bright spot with normal neurohypophysis, contributing to the diagnosis of the idiopathic form.

  13. [Association between central diabetes insipidus and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Claudia; Nicolaci, Nora; La Manna, Andrés A; Branek, Natalia; Pissano, María N

    2018-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is a rare disease of the hypothalamus and neurohypophysis. It is very unusually found in the adult with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is manifested by a polydipsic polyuric syndrome, which must be distinguished from the poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the similarity of both entities and the unusual nature of their coexistence, their suspicion is difficult. The case of a 72-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus with poor insulin control (fasting hyperglycemia greater than 180 mg/dl) who had a long-standing polyuric syndrome is here presented. Hypernatremia and plasma osmolality elevated together with a low urinary osmolality led to the suspicion of diabetes insipidus, which was subsequently confirmed by the dehydration test and the administration of desmopressin sc. With 61% increase in the calculated urinary osmolarity one hour post desmopressin s.c., diabetes insipidus of central type was diagnosed. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance showed a bright spot with normal neurohypophysis, contributing to the diagnosis of the idiopathic form.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of central diabetes insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Aleksandrovna Pigarova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes insipidus represents a serious disease that dramatically interferes with the everyday life of patients due to the need to constantly replenish of fluid lost in the urine, which comes amid shortage of synthesis, secretion or action of pituitary hormone vasopressin. The main difficulty is the differential diagnosis of types of diabetes insipidus in patients with the syndrome of polydipsia-polyuria as the correct differential diagnosis of these forms predetermine the safety and efficacy of further treatment. This lecture presents the current concepts of etiology, diagnosis and treatment of central diabetes insipidus (CDI. We give the comparative characteristics of various preparations of desmopressin for the treatment of the central form of the disease. We also consider the features of the management of selected patient populations with CDI: during pregnancy and lactation, pathology of the thirst sensation, after traumatic brain injury and neurosurgery.

  15. Family Health History and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... she is at an increased risk for developing diabetes for the rest of her life. Additionally, her child is at an increased risk for becoming obese ... to lower this risk for both mother and child. The U.S. Department of Health and ... National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is jointly sponsored by the ...

  16. Family First? The Costs and Benefits of Family Centrality for Adolescents with High-Conflict Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Cynthia X; Fuligni, Andrew J; Gonzales, Nancy; Telzer, Eva H

    2018-02-01

    Youth who do not identify with or value their families (i.e., low family centrality) are considered to be at risk for maladjustment. However, the current study investigated whether low family centrality may be adaptive in negative family contexts (i.e., high family conflict) because youth's self-worth should be less tied to the quality of their family relationships. Multilevel models using daily diaries and latent variable interactions using longitudinal questionnaires indicated that, among a sample of 428 Mexican American adolescents (49.8% male, M age  = 15.02 years), lower family centrality was generally detrimental to youth's well-being. However, for youth in adverse family environments, low family centrality ceased to function as a risk factor. The present findings suggest that family centrality values play a more nuanced role in youth well-being than previously believed, such that low family centrality may be an adaptive response to significant family challenges.

  17. Central obesity is important but not essential component of the metabolic syndrome for predicting diabetes mellitus in a hypertensive family-based cohort. Results from the Stanford Asia-pacific program for hypertension and insulin resistance (SAPPHIRe) Taiwan follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Te; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Hwu, Chii-Min; He, Chih-Tsueng; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Lin, Yu-Chun; Assimes, Themistocles; Curb, J David; Sheu, Wayne H-H

    2012-04-26

    Metabolic abnormalities have a cumulative effect on development of diabetes, but only central obesity has been defined as the essential criterion of metabolic syndrome (MetS) by the International Diabetes Federation. We hypothesized that central obesity contributes to a higher risk of new-onset diabetes than other metabolic abnormalities in the hypertensive families. Non-diabetic Chinese were enrolled and MetS components were assessed to establish baseline data in a hypertensive family-based cohort study. Based on medical records and glucose tolerance test (OGTT), the cumulative incidence of diabetes was analyzed in this five-year study by Cox regression models. Contribution of central obesity to development of new-onset diabetes was assessed in subjects with the same number of positive MetS components. Among the total of 595 subjects who completed the assessment, 125 (21.0%) developed diabetes. Incidence of diabetes increased in direct proportion to the number of positive MetS components (P ≪ 0.001). Although subjects with central obesity had a higher incidence of diabetes than those without (55.7 vs. 30.0 events/1000 person-years, P ≪ 0.001), the difference became non-significant after adjusting of the number of positive MetS components (hazard ratio = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.45-1.13). Furthermore, in all participants with three positive MetS components, there was no difference in the incidence of diabetes between subjects with and without central obesity (hazard ratio = 1.04, 95%CI: 0.50-2.16). In Chinese hypertensive families, the incidence of diabetes in subjects without central obesity was similar to that in subjects with central obesity when they also had the same number of positive MetS components. We suggest that central obesity is very important, but not the essential component of the metabolic syndrome for predicting of new-onset diabetes. ( NCT00260910, ClinicalTrials.gov).

  18. [Germinoma responsible for central diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakoto, N; Strivay, M

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 20-year-old woman who presented with sudden onset of polydipsia and polyuria. A diagnosis of diabetes insipidus was confirmed and the MRI showed a pituitary stalk enlargement. The patient was treated with Minirin. Two years later, she developed a panhypopituitarism. The MRI showed an intrasellar mass with an enlargement of the pituitary gland. A biopsy confirmed a germinoma. The patient was treated with radiotherapy with a partial response as only a part of the mass disappeared. This case highlights the importance of the clinical and radiological follow-up of central diabetes insipidus, especially when it is of unknown origin. The differential diagnosis will be reviewed.

  19. [Central diabetes insipidus: diagnosis and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballan, B Köhler; Hernandez, A; Rodriguez, E Gonzalez; Meyer, P

    2012-11-14

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is caused by deficient secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) due to different conditions that can affect the hypothalamic neurons. It results in an inability to retain normal quantities of free water, which leads to polyuria, including at night, and polydipsia. In adults, it is mostly due to the "idiopathic" form or present after pituitary surgery or a traumatic brain injury. In rare cases, an underlying systemic disease is found. The diagnosis of CDI is based on the water deprivation test. Pituitary MRI and specific clinical and biological work-up are recommended to precise etiology. Treatment of choice is desmopressin, a synthetic analogue of the endogenous ADH hormone. A multidisciplinary team generally provides management and monitoring of CDI.

  20. Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkı Yılmaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pituitary gland and infundibulum can be involved in a variety of medical conditions, including infiltrative diseases, fungal infections, tuberculosis, and primary and metastatic tumors. Metastases to the pituitary gland are absolutely rare, and they are generally secondary to pulmonary carcinoma in men and breast carcinoma in women. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The posterior lobe involvement may explain why patients with pituitary metastases frequently present with diabetes insipidus. We are presenting a case report of a 78-year-old male patient who had metastatic prostate with sudden onset of polyuria and persistent thirst. He had no electrolyte imbalance except mild hypernatremia. The MRI scan of the brain yielded a suspicious area in pituitary gland. A pituitary stalk metastasis was found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of pituitary. Water deprivation test was compatible with DI. A clinical response to nasal vasopressin was achieved and laboratory results revealed central diabetes insipidus. As a result, the intrasellar and suprasellar masses decreased in size, and urinary output accordingly decreased.

  1. Transient Central Diabetes Insipidus and Marked Hypernatremia following Cardiorespiratory Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar H. Koubar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central Diabetes Insipidus is often an overlooked complication of cardiopulmonary arrest and anoxic brain injury. We report a case of transient Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI following cardiopulmonary arrest. It developed 4 days after the arrest resulting in polyuria and marked hypernatremia of 199 mM. The latter was exacerbated by replacing the hypotonic urine by isotonic saline.

  2. Familial Brugada syndrome uncovered by hyperkalaemic diabetic ketoacidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Pieter G.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; DeVries, J. Hans; Tan, Hanno L.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of diabetic ketoacidosis with concomitant hyperkalaemia that uncovered a typical Brugada syndrome electrocardiogram (ECG). Further provocation testing in the patient and his son confirmed familial Brugada syndrome. Diabetic ketoacidosis with hyperkalaemia may uncover an

  3. Understanding type 2 diabetes: including the family member's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological and social factors and diabetes outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes and their family members. METHODS: A total of 153 patients with type 2 diabetes were assessed at a diabetes outpatient clinic and postal questionnaires were sent to nominated family members. The measures examined were diabetes knowledge, social support, well-being, and illness perceptions. RESULTS: When compared with those with diabetes, family members reported lower positive well-being and lower levels of satisfaction with support. They also perceived diabetes as a more cyclical illness, which was controlled more by treatment than by the individual. Family members also reported that the person with diabetes was more emotionally distressed and knew more about diabetes than the patient had actually reported himself or herself. There were no differences between the family members of those in good or poor glycaemic control. CONCLUSIONS: This study reinforces the importance of understanding social context and illness beliefs in diabetes management. It also highlights the potential for including family members in discussions and education about diabetes management.

  4. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: four families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Amit; Waters, Karen; Suresh, Sadasivam; Nair, Rashmi

    2011-12-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare condition that usually presents soon after birth and is potentially life-shortening if not treated. The defining abnormality is hypoventilation during sleep which requires life-long treatment with artificial ventilation. This syndrome may also be associated with generalised dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system and a sub-group with associated Hirschsprung's disease. The genetic basis of CCHS has been identified as mutations in the PHOX2B gene. We present four families, three with autosomal dominant inheritance and familial clustering, and one with a de novo mutation resulting in CCHS. We demonstrate that nasal mask ventilation from birth can provide adequate treatment and improved quality of life for these children. Phenotypic variability in expression of disease is seen in families with the same mutations in PHOX2B gene. The psychosocial costs of the disease and the unrecognised 'morbidity barter' that is part of current management needs to be factored into in all stages of management from childhood to adolescence to adulthood.

  5. Hypertension, obesity and central obesity in diabetics and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    comEthiopia; 2Addis Ababa University, Medical faculty, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia ... Diabetes mellitus coexists at a greater frequency with hypertension, obesity, central obesity, dyslipedemia and ... Chi square test and student t –test were used for.

  6. One too many diabetes: the combination of hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state and central diabetes insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana Burmazovic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The combination of hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state and central diabetes insipidus is unusual and poses unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for clinicians. In a patient with diabetes mellitus presenting with polyuria and polydipsia, poor glycaemic control is usually the first aetiology that is considered, and achieving glycaemic control remains the first course of action. However, severe hypernatraemia, hyperglycaemia and discordance between urine-specific gravity and urine osmolality suggest concurrent symptomatic diabetes insipidus. We report a rare case of concurrent manifestation of hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state and central diabetes insipidus in a patient with a history of craniopharyngioma.

  7. Familial history of diabetes and clinical characteristics in Greek subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia; Sotiropoulos, Alexios; Skliros, Eystathios; Kardara, Marina; Kokolaki, Anthi; Apostolou, Ourania; Pappas, Stavros

    2009-04-27

    A lot of studies have showed an excess maternal transmission of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The aim, therefore, of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of familial history of T2D in Greek patients, and to evaluate its potential effect on the patient's metabolic control and the presence of diabetic complications. A total of 1,473 T2D patients were recruited. Those with diabetic mothers, diabetic fathers, diabetic relatives other than parents and no known diabetic relatives, were considered separately. The prevalence of diabetes in the mother, the father and relatives other than parents, was 27.7, 11.0 and 10.7%, respectively. Patients with paternal diabetes had a higher prevalence of hypertension (64.8 vs. 57.1%, P = 0.05) and lower LDL-cholesterol levels (115.12 +/- 39.76 vs. 127.13 +/- 46.53 mg/dl, P = 0.006) than patients with diabetes in the mother. Patients with familial diabetes were significantly younger (P Greek diabetic patients. However, no different influence was found between maternal and paternal diabetes on the clinical characteristics of diabetic patients except for LDL-cholesterol levels and presence of hypertension. The presence of a family history of diabetes resulted to an early onset of the disease to the offspring.

  8. Central diabetes insipidus: a previously unreported side effect of temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faje, Alexander T; Nachtigall, Lisa; Wexler, Deborah; Miller, Karen K; Klibanski, Anne; Makimura, Hideo

    2013-10-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is an alkylating agent primarily used to treat tumors of the central nervous system. We describe 2 patients with apparent TMZ-induced central diabetes insipidus. Using our institution's Research Patient Database Registry, we identified 3 additional potential cases of TMZ-induced diabetes insipidus among a group of 1545 patients treated with TMZ. A 53-year-old male with an oligoastrocytoma and a 38-year-old male with an oligodendroglioma each developed symptoms of polydipsia and polyuria approximately 2 months after the initiation of TMZ. Laboratory analyses demonstrated hypernatremia and urinary concentrating defects, consistent with the presence of diabetes insipidus, and the patients were successfully treated with desmopressin acetate. Desmopressin acetate was withdrawn after the discontinuation of TMZ, and diabetes insipidus did not recur. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary and hypothalamus was unremarkable apart from the absence of a posterior pituitary bright spot in both of the cases. Anterior pituitary function tests were normal in both cases. Using the Research Patient Database Registry database, we identified the 2 index cases and 3 additional potential cases of diabetes insipidus for an estimated prevalence of 0.3% (5 cases of diabetes insipidus per 1545 patients prescribed TMZ). Central diabetes insipidus is a rare but reversible side effect of treatment with TMZ.

  9. Geriatric Family Support and Diabetic Type-2 Glycemic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Heidari

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: As the most part of geriatric (65 years and older diabetic care is given at home, family support has an important role in their blood sugar level control care. This study aimed to assess the relationship between family support and blood sugar level control in such elderly suffering type-2 diabetes. Methods & Materials: Via descriptive-correlative study, one hundred fifty geriatric patients with type-2 diabetes, who referred to Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism in Iran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Samplings based on nonrandomized and convenience. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: demographic data glucose-labeled hemoglobin (HbA1C and received-perceived family support by applying the standard questionnaire of "Diabetes Social Support-Family Version" format. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 15 by using Chi-square and Pierson Tests. Results: Results showed a significant relationship between family support and glycemic control (r=-0.56, P<0.0001. Also there were significant relationships between family support, gender and marital status (P<0.0001. There were also significant relationships between glycemic control and marital status (P=0.02, financial status (P=0.04 and educational level (P=0.05. Conclusion: Findings of this research added further evidence about the impact of family support on the health of older adults with diabetes. These findings suggest using family centered nursing interventions and collaboration of family members in care of the elderly with type-2 diabetes.

  10. Diabetes care provider perceptions on family challenges of pediatric type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric healthcare providers' perspectives on barriers to diabetes self-management among youth with type 1 diabetes and strategies to overcome them were explored qualitatively. Family conflict about diabetes care was viewed as a common problem, addressable by behavioral interventions to improve co...

  11. Involvement of family members in life with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabowski, Dan; Andersen, Tue Helms; Varming, Annemarie

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Family involvement plays a key role in diabetes management. Problems and challenges related to type 2-diabetes often affect the whole family, and relatives are at increased risk of developing diabetes themselves. We highlight these issues in our objectives: (1) to uncover specific...... family problems associated with mutual involvement in life with type 2-diabetes and (2) to analytically look at ways of approaching these problems in healthcare settings. METHODS: Qualitative data were gathered in participatory problem assessment workshops. The data were analysed in three rounds using...... radical hermeneutics. RESULTS: Problems were categorized in six domains: knowledge, communication, support, everyday life, roles and worries. The final cross-analysis focusing on the link between family identity and healthcare authenticity provided information on how the six domains can be approached...

  12. ocial representation of family support for diabetic patients in users of a family medicine unit in Chalco, State of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Rodríguez Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The goal of this study is to compare and interpret the meaning of family support for diabetic patients and their families using social representations according to a structural approach of Abric’s theory. METHODS The study was carried out in a Family Medicine Center of the Chalco Municipality in Mexico State. The population studied comprised ten diabetic patient-family pairs. The first part of the study was a simple word association test that aimed to find terms or statements related to the concept of “family support”, as well as its frequency of appearance and range of association. Once the terms or statements were obtained, they were categorized according to their “support” capabilities. A semi-structured interview for each category was conducted as well as a graphic analysis of Friedman’s meanings. The discourse of diabetic patients was compared to that of the families in order to find similarities and differences. RESULTS Evocation of terms was done in the first part of the study, and it was found that the emotional domain was central to the discourse. However, in the second part of the study, when categorization and analysis of discourse is performed, there are differences in the centrality of terms and statements. The family tends to center in the active domain, whereas the patient centers in the emotional domain. CONCLUSIONS This study brings up the emotional needs of the patient as essential components of support efforts. This promotes reflection about changing strategies in the design of public healthcare programs in that they may include family support from the viewpoint of otherness.

  13. [Social representation of family support for diabetic patients in users of a family medicine unit in Chalco, State of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alejandra; Camacho, Esteban Jaime; Escoto, María Del Consuelo; Contreras, Georgina; Casas, Donovan

    2014-08-27

    The goal of this study is to compare and interpret the meaning of family support for diabetic patients and their families using social representations according to a structural approach of Abric's theory. The study was carried out in a Family Medicine Center of the Chalco Municipality in Mexico State. The population studied comprised ten diabetic patient-family pairs. The first part of the study was a simple word association test that aimed to find terms or statements related to the concept of "family support", as well as its frequency of appearance and range of association. Once the terms or statements were obtained, they were categorized according to their "support" capabilities. A semi-structured interview for each category was conducted as well as a graphic analysis of Friedman's meanings. The discourse of diabetic patients was compared to that of the families in order to find similarities and differences. Evocation of terms was done in the first part of the study, and it was found that the emotional domain was central to the discourse. However, in the second part of the study, when categorization and analysis of discourse is performed, there are differences in the centrality of terms and statements. The family tends to center in the active domain, whereas the patient centers in the emotional domain. This study brings up the emotional needs of the patient as essential components of support efforts. This promotes reflection about changing strategies in the design of public healthcare programs in that they may include family support from the viewpoint of otherness.

  14. Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by a mutation in the arginine-vasopressin II gene in four generations of a Korean family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myo-Jing Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a rare form of central diabetes insipidus that is caused by mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII gene. It is characterized by persistent polydipsia and polyuria induced by deficient or absent secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP. Here we report a case of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in four generations of a Korean family, caused by heterozygous missense mutation in exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene (c.286G>T. This is the first report of such a case in Korea.

  15. Diabetes in South and Central America: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschner, Pablo; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Aguirre, Loreto; Franco, Laercio; Gagliardino, Juan Jose; de Lapertosa, Sylvia Gorban; Seclen, Segundo; Vinocour, Mary

    2014-02-01

    The estimated population of the South and Central America (SACA) Region is 467.6 million and 64% is in the age range of 20-79 years but the population pyramid and age distribution are changing. The average prevalence of diabetes in the Region is 8.0% and is expected to reach 9.8% by the year 2035. Prevalence is much lower in rural settings than in urban and the differences attributed to lifestyle changes may be a target for intervention. The indigenous population is a particularly vulnerable group needing special attention. On average, 24% of the adult cases with diabetes are undiagnosed but in some countries this is still as high as 50%. Health expenditure due to diabetes in the Region is around 9% of the global total. Inadequate glycemic control, defined as HbA1c >7%, is a strong predictor of chronic complications which increase resource use in the Region and less than half of the patients enrolled in diabetes care programmes are at target. Fifty percent or more of the adult population is overweight/obese and around one third of the adult population has metabolic syndrome using regional cutoffs for waist circumference. The number of people with IGT is almost equal to those with diabetes presenting an additional challenge for prevention. Children with type 1 diabetes represent only 0.2% of the total population with diabetes but the incidence may be increasing. In many places they have limited access to insulin, and even when available, it is not used appropriately. The available epidemiological data provide the background to act in developing national diabetes programmes which integrate diabetes care with cardiovascular prevention and promote diabetes prevention as well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Familial history of diabetes and clinical characteristics in Greek subjects with type 2 diabetes

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    Apostolou Ourania

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A lot of studies have showed an excess maternal transmission of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The aim, therefore, of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of familial history of T2D in Greek patients, and to evaluate its potential effect on the patient's metabolic control and the presence of diabetic complications. Methods A total of 1,473 T2D patients were recruited. Those with diabetic mothers, diabetic fathers, diabetic relatives other than parents and no known diabetic relatives, were considered separately. Results The prevalence of diabetes in the mother, the father and relatives other than parents, was 27.7, 11.0 and 10.7%, respectively. Patients with paternal diabetes had a higher prevalence of hypertension (64.8 vs. 57.1%, P = 0.05 and lower LDL-cholesterol levels (115.12 ± 39.76 vs. 127.13 ± 46.53 mg/dl, P = 0.006 than patients with diabetes in the mother. Patients with familial diabetes were significantly younger (P 2, P = 0.08, higher prevalence of dyslipidemia (49.8 vs. 44.6%, P = 0.06 and retinopathy (17.9 vs. 14.5%, P = 0.08 compared with patients with no diabetic relatives. No difference in the degree of metabolic control and the prevalence of chronic complications were observed. Conclusion The present study showed an excess maternal transmission of T2D in a sample of Greek diabetic patients. However, no different influence was found between maternal and paternal diabetes on the clinical characteristics of diabetic patients except for LDL-cholesterol levels and presence of hypertension. The presence of a family history of diabetes resulted to an early onset of the disease to the offspring.

  17. One too many diabetes: the combination of hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state and central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmazovic, Snezana; Henzen, Christoph; Brander, Lukas; Cioccari, Luca

    2018-01-01

    The combination of hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state and central diabetes insipidus is unusual and poses unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for clinicians. In a patient with diabetes mellitus presenting with polyuria and polydipsia, poor glycaemic control is usually the first aetiology that is considered, and achieving glycaemic control remains the first course of action. However, severe hypernatraemia, hyperglycaemia and discordance between urine-specific gravity and urine osmolality suggest concurrent symptomatic diabetes insipidus. We report a rare case of concurrent manifestation of hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state and central diabetes insipidus in a patient with a history of craniopharyngioma. In patients with diabetes mellitus presenting with polyuria and polydipsia, poor glycaemic control is usually the first aetiology to be considered.However, a history of craniopharyngioma, severe hypernatraemia, hyperglycaemia and discordance between urine-specific gravity and osmolality provide evidence of concurrent diabetes insipidus.Therefore, if a patient with diabetes mellitus presents with severe hypernatraemia, hyperglycaemia, a low or low normal urinary-specific gravity and worsening polyuria despite correction of hyperglycaemia, concurrent diabetes insipidus should be sought.

  18. Current perspective on the pathogenesis of central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardello, Stefano; Malattia, Clara; Scagnelli, Paola; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2005-07-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a heterogeneous condition characterised by polyuria and polydipsia caused by a lack of secretion of vasopressin, its physiological suppression following excessive water intake, or kidney resistance to its action. The clinical and laboratory diagnosis is confirmed by standard tests, but recent advances in molecular biology and imaging techniques have shed new light on the pathophysiology of this disease. In many patients, central diabetes insipidus is caused by a germinoma or craniopharyngioma; Langerhans' cell histiocytosis and sarcoidosis of the central nervous system; local inflammatory, autoimmune or vascular diseases; trauma from surgery or accident; and, rarely, genetic defects in vasopressin biosynthesis inherited as autosomal dominant or X-linked recessive traits. Thirty to fifty percent of cases are considered idiopathic. Tumour-associated central diabetes insipidus is uncommon in children younger than 5 years old. Biopsy of enlarged pituitary stalk should be reserved for patients with hypothalamic-pituitary mass and progressive thickening of the pituitary stalk since spontaneous recovery may occur. Molecular biology in selected patients may identify those with apparently idiopathic diabetes insipidus carrying the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene mutation.

  19. Schizophrenia: management and family burden | Sebit | Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schizophrenia: management and family burden. MB Sebit. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/cajm.v53i9-12.62618 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  20. Familial forms of diabetes insipidus: clinical and molecular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babey, Muriel; Kopp, Peter; Robertson, Gary L

    2011-07-05

    Over the past two decades, the genetic and molecular basis of familial forms of diabetes insipidus has been elucidated. Diabetes insipidus is a clinical syndrome characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine (polyuria) and increased fluid intake (polydipsia). The most common type of diabetes insipidus is caused by lack of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (vasopressin), which is produced in the hypothalamus and secreted by the neurohypophysis. This type of diabetes insipidus is referred to here as neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. The syndrome can also result from resistance to the antidiuretic effects of vasopressin on the kidney, either at the level of the vasopressin 2 receptor or the aquaporin 2 water channel (which mediates the re-absorption of water from urine), and is referred to as renal or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Differentiation between these two types of diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia can be difficult owing to the existence of partial as well as complete forms of vasopressin deficiency or resistance. Seven different familial forms of diabetes insipidus are known to exist. The clinical presentation, genetic basis and cellular mechanisms responsible for them vary considerably. This information has led to improved methods of differential diagnosis and could provide the basis of new forms of therapy.

  1. Early-Onset Central Diabetes Insipidus due to Compound Heterozygosity for AVP Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdet, Karine; Vallette, Sophie; Deladoëy, Johnny; Van Vliet, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Genetic cases of isolated central diabetes insipidus are rare, are mostly due to dominant AVP mutations and have a delayed onset of symptoms. Only 3 consanguineous pedigrees with a recessive form have been published. A boy with a negative family history presented polyuria and failure to thrive in the first months of life and was diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a normal posterior pituitary signal. A molecular genetic analysis of the AVP gene showed that he had inherited a previously reported mutation from his Lebanese father and a novel A>G transition in the splice acceptor site of intron 1 (IVS1-2A>G) from his French-Canadian mother. Replacement therapy resulted in the immediate disappearance of symptoms and in weight gain. The early polyuria in recessive central diabetes insipidus contrasts with the delayed presentation in patients with monoallelic AVP mutations. This diagnosis needs to be considered in infants with very early onset of polyuria-polydipsia and no brain malformation, even if there is no consanguinity and regardless of whether the posterior pituitary is visible or not on imaging. In addition to informing family counseling, making a molecular diagnosis eliminates the need for repeated imaging studies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Common familial risk factors for schizophrenia and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2016-05-01

    The co-occurrence of type 2 diabetes and psychosis is an important form of medical comorbidity within individuals, but no large-scale study has evaluated comorbidity within families. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence for familial comorbidity between type 2 diabetes and psychosis. Data were analysed from an observational study of a nationally representative sample of 1642 people with psychosis who were in contact with psychiatric services at the time of survey (The 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis). Participants were aged 18-64 years and met World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnostic criteria for a psychotic disorder (857 with schizophrenia, 319 with bipolar disorder with psychotic features, 293 with schizoaffective disorder, 81 with depressive psychosis and 92 with delusional disorder or other non-organic psychoses). Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between a family history of diabetes and a family history of schizophrenia. A positive family history of diabetes was associated with a positive family history of schizophrenia in those with a psychotic disorder (odds ratio = 1.35, p = 0.01, adjusted for age and gender). The association was different in those with an affective versus non-affective psychosis (odds ratio = 0.613, p = 0.019, adjusted for age and gender) and was significant only in those with a non-affective psychosis, specifically schizophrenia (odds ratio = 1.58, p = 0.005, adjusted for age and sex). Adjustment for demographic factors in those with schizophrenia slightly strengthened the association (odds ratio = 1.74, p = 0.001, adjusted for age, gender, diagnosis, ethnicity, education, employment, income and marital status). Elevated risk for type 2 diabetes in people with schizophrenia is not simply a consequence of antipsychotic medication; type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia share familial risk factors. © The Royal Australian and New

  3. [Family dynamics and chronic illness: children with diabetes in the context of their families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirlach-Bartosik, S; Schubert, M T; Freilinger, M; Schober, E

    2005-01-01

    The present study is based on the assumption of an interaction between family functioning and chronic illness. Using a systemic approach, the intra-familial situation of families with a diabetes-affected child is examined. 44 families were evaluated using a family diagnostic instrument ("Familienbögen") and compared with 31 control families with a healthy child. Furthermore, the study looked at the influence of the level of family functioning on glycemic control, as measured by HbA1c values, and vice versa. Families with a child affected by diabetes showed significantly more dysfunctional domains and higher discrepancies of the ratings in the family diagnostic instrument (p familial dynamics, it may, at the same time, offer opportunities for an improvement of family relationships. However, if physiological parameters deteriorate in the child (poor glycemic control), family problems seem to become less important. Success in the treatment of diabetes patients should therefore not only be measured by the quality of glycemic control, but also by considering psychological factors and aspects of family dynamics.

  4. Prevention of Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes directed at the family context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund Nielsen, K; Grunnet, L Groth; Maindal, H Terkildsen

    2018-01-01

    In this review, we aim to summarize knowledge about gestational diabetes (GDM) after delivery; with special focus on the potential of preventing Type 2 diabetes in a family context. The review expands on the key messages from a symposium held in Copenhagen in May 2017 and highlights avenues...... and implemented in real-world settings. Although interlinked and interacting, barriers to maintaining a healthy lifestyle post-partum can be grouped into those pertaining to diabetes beliefs, the family context and the healthcare system. Health literacy level and perceptions of health and disease risk may modify...

  5. Cerebral Malaria: An Unusual Cause of Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resmi Premji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central diabetes insipidus is an uncommon feature of malaria. A previously healthy 72-year-old man presented with fever, rigors, and altered mental status after a recent trip to Liberia, a country known for endemic falciparum malaria. Investigations confirmed plasmodium falciparum parasitemia. Within one week after admission, the serum sodium rose to 166 mEq/L and the urine output increased to 7 liters/day. Other labs were notable for a high serum osmolality, low urine osmolality, and low urine specific gravity. The hypernatremia did not respond to hypotonic fluids. Diabetes insipidus was suspected and parenteral desmopressin was started with a prompt decrease in urinary output and improvement in mental status. Additional testing showed normal anterior pituitary hormones. The desmopressin was eventually tapered off with complete resolution of symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus occurred likely as a result of obstruction of the neurohypophyseal microvasculature. Other endocrinopathies that have been reported with malaria include hyponatremia, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, hyper-, and hypoglycemia, but none manifested in our patient. Though diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of malaria, clinicians need to be aware of this manifestation, as failure to do so may lead to fatality particularly if the patient is dehydrated.

  6. Confirmation of novel type 1 diabetes risk loci in families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, J D; Howson, J M M; Smyth, D

    2012-01-01

    Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we......, the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC), aimed to exclude the possibility that any of the 18 loci were false-positives due to population stratification by significantly increasing the statistical power of our family study....

  7. Mother-father informant discrepancies regarding diabetes management: associations with diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Erica D; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan M; Rohan, Jennifer M; Pulgaron, Elizabeth R; Drotar, Dennis

    2012-09-01

    To examine the relationship of mother-father informant discrepancies regarding diabetes management to diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control. One hundred thirty-six mothers and fathers of youth with Type 1 diabetes reported on the youth's diabetes management, diabetes-specific family conflict, and amount of paternal involvement in diabetes care. Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was used to measure glycemic control. As hypothesized, mother-father discrepancies regarding diabetes management were positively associated with frequency of diabetes-specific family conflict. Contrary to hypotheses, mother-father discrepancies regarding diabetes management predicted poorer glycemic control for youth with less involved fathers only. Results highlight the importance of caregivers being consistent about pediatric illness management and support the idea that informant discrepancies represent an important window into the functioning of the family system. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Intensive multifactorial treatment modifies the effect of family history of diabetes on glycaemic control in people with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliraqi, G M; Vistisen, D; Lauritzen, T

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether intensive multifactorial treatment can reverse the predisposed adverse phenotype of people with Type 2 diabetes who have a family history of diabetes. Methods Data from the randomized controlled trial ADDITION-Denmark were used. A total of 1441 newly diagnosed patients...... pressure, lipids and HbA1c) after 5 years of follow-up in participants with and without a family history of diabetes. An interaction term between family history of diabetes and treatment group was included in the models to test for a modifying effect of the intervention. All analyses were adjusted for age...... with diabetes (598 with family history of diabetes) were randomized to intensive treatment or routine care. Family history of diabetes was defined as having one parent and/or sibling with diabetes. Linear mixed-effects models were used to assess the changes in risk factors (BMI, waist circumference, blood...

  9. Diabete insípido central em um cão Central diabetes insipidus in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudete Schmidt

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se um caso de diabete insípido central em um cão, fêmea, nove anos de idade, sem raça definida, com história de poliúria e polidipsia há 18 meses. Com o exame físico, nenhuma alteração sistêmica foi elucidada. Já nos exames laboratoriais complementares, observou-se policitemia e hiperproteinemia, e a densidade específica da urina (1002 encontrava-se abaixo do limiar fisiológico. O animal foi submetido à privação hídrica e se mostrou incapaz de concentrar a urina durante as sete horas observadas, tempo que levou para apresentar 5% de desidratação. Após isso, foi administrado acetato de desmopressina e, 5 horas após, a densidade estava em 1028, confirmando o diabete insípido de origem central. O animal recebeu terapia à base de acetato de desmopressina, apresentando melhora do quadro clínico.A case of central diabetes insipidus in a nine-year-old female dog is described. The dog presented intermitent polyuria and polydipsia in the past 18 months. In the clinical exam, complete blood count, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, BUN, creatinine, glucose and calcium dosages were normal. However, the specific urine gravity was low and presented the value 1002. The dog was unable to concentrate the urine during the seven hours of water deprivation test and presented 5% of dehydratation. The administration of desmopressin acetate elevated the specific urine gravity to 1028 five hours after the beginning of the treatment, confirming the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus of central origin.

  10. Diabetes Mellitus Coding Training for Family Practice Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urse, Geraldine N

    2015-07-01

    Although physicians regularly use numeric coding systems such as the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) to describe patient encounters, coding errors are common. One of the most complicated diagnoses to code is diabetes mellitus. The ICD-9-CM currently has 39 separate codes for diabetes mellitus; this number will be expanded to more than 50 with the introduction of ICD-10-CM in October 2015. To assess the effect of a 1-hour focused presentation on ICD-9-CM codes on diabetes mellitus coding. A 1-hour focused lecture on the correct use of diabetes mellitus codes for patient visits was presented to family practice residents at Doctors Hospital Family Practice in Columbus, Ohio. To assess resident knowledge of the topic, a pretest and posttest were given to residents before and after the lecture, respectively. Medical records of all patients with diabetes mellitus who were cared for at the hospital 6 weeks before and 6 weeks after the lecture were reviewed and compared for the use of diabetes mellitus ICD-9 codes. Eighteen residents attended the lecture and completed the pretest and posttest. The mean (SD) percentage of correct answers was 72.8% (17.1%) for the pretest and 84.4% (14.6%) for the posttest, for an improvement of 11.6 percentage points (P≤.035). The percentage of total available codes used did not substantially change from before to after the lecture, but the use of the generic ICD-9-CM code for diabetes mellitus type II controlled (250.00) declined (58 of 176 [33%] to 102 of 393 [26%]) and the use of other codes increased, indicating a greater variety in codes used after the focused lecture. After a focused lecture on diabetes mellitus coding, resident coding knowledge improved. Review of medical record data did not reveal an overall change in the number of diabetic codes used after the lecture but did reveal a greater variety in the codes used.

  11. Assessing diabetes support in adolescents: factor structure of the Modified Diabetes Social Support Questionnaire (M-DSSQ-Family)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, J.A.; Koot, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the underlying factor structure of diabetes specific support using a modified diabetes family social support questionnaire, the M-DSSQ-Family, in one half of a sample of adolescents with type 1 diabetes, confirm it in the second half, test invariance in factor structure

  12. "It is not possible for me to have diabetes"-community perceptions on diabetes and its risk factors in Rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujilestari, Cahya Utamie; Ng, Nawi; Hakimi, Mohammad; Eriksson, Malin

    2014-06-12

    Accumulating evidence suggests that negative perceptions towards diabetes can limit the management and prevention of the disease. The negative perceptions towards diabetes are prevalent in many different settings, especially among rural communities. Few qualitative studies have been performed to understand how the community views diabetes and its associated risk factors. This study aimed to explore general community perceptions of diabetes and its risk factors in rural Indonesia. A total of 68 participants were recruited to 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) comprised of different age groups and sexes. The FGDs were conducted in six villages in rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia, from 2011 to 2012. All FGDs were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative content analysis was performed to describe and analyse how the rural community perceived diabetes and its risk factors. Diabetes was perceived as a visible and scary sugar disease, and the affected individuals themselves were blamed for getting the disease. Recognised as 'sugar' or 'sweet-pee' disease with terrifying effects, diabetes was believed to be a disease with no cure. The participants seemed to have an unrealistic optimism with regards to the diabetes risk factors. They believed that diabetes would not affect them, only others, and that having family members with diabetes was necessary for one to develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that rural communities have negative perceptions about diabetes and at the same time individuals have unrealistic optimism about their own risk factors. Understanding how such communities perceive diabetes and its risk factors is important for planning prevention strategies. Health messages need to be tailored to health-related behaviours and the local culture's concepts of diseases and risk factors.

  13. Late onset of familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus in monozygotic twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmarova, M; Nagyova, G; Janko, V; Pribilincova, Z; Virgova, D; Ilencikova, D; Kovacs, L

    2013-10-01

    Autosomal dominant familial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is a rare disease characterized by polydipsia and polyuria due to deficiency of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). We report the first Slovak family with the disease. Noteworthy is the concordantly belated debut of the disease symptoms in two monozygotic twin proband girls in the age of 17 years. Because of inconclusive results of water deprivation test consistent with partial diabetes insipidus (DI), missing "bright spot" of posterior pituitary gland in T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and family occurrence of polyuria and polydipsia on anamnestic evaluation. Molecular genetic testing of the AVP gene was proceeded, because of the inconclusive results of water deprivation test consistent with partial diabetes insipidus, missing "bright spot" of posterior pituitary gland in T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and family occurrence of polyuria and polydipsia on anamnestic evaluation. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous g.279G>A substitution that predicts a p.Ala19Thr substitution in the signal peptide of the AVP prohormone. The wide intrafamiliar variations (3 to 17 years) in disease onset together with the concordantly delayed debut of polyuria in two monozygotic twin girls suggest that individual differences in genetic influences family environmental factors may modify the penetrance of the mutation of the AVP gene. The present paper supports the notion that molecular genetic evaluation should be performed in all patients with familial occurrence of DI regardless of the clinical results.

  14. [Association between type 2 diabetes and physical activity in individuals with family history of diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Fanny; Díaz-Martínez, Ximena; Garrido-Méndez, Álex; Leiva, Ana María; Martínez, María Adela; Salas, Carlos; Poblete-Valderrama, Felipe; Celis-Morales, Carlos

    To investigate whether the association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and family history of diabetes is modified by the levels of physical activity in the Chilean population. In this study were included 5129 participants from the cross-sectional 2009-2010 National Health Survey. Physical activity level was assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire and family history of T2D, through self-reporting. The association between diabetes, family history of diabetes and physical activity was determined using logistic regression. The odds of developing T2D in people with family history of this pathology is high, independent of their levels of physical activity and adiposity. Both men and women with family history of T2D have a higher probability of developing T2D. The odds ratio for having T2D was 5,49 (95%CI: 3,85-7,84; p <0,0001) in women, and 8,16 (95%CI: 4,96-13,4; p <0,0001) in men with family history of T2D and low levels of physical activity in comparison to those with high levels of physical activity and without a family history. Given the elevated risk of developing T2D presented by individuals with a family history of this pathology, and the effect of physical activity in reducing such risk, people with family history of diabetes may need higher levels of physical activity to attenuate their susceptibility to T2D. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The multi-faceted outcomes of conjunct diabetes and cardiovascular familial history in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Michel P; Ahn, Sylvie A; Rousseau, Michel F

    2012-01-01

    Familial history of early-onset CHD (EOCHD) is a major risk factor for CHD. Familial diabetes history (FDH) impacts β-cell function. Some transmissible, accretional gradient of CHD risk may exist when diabetes and EOCHD familial histories combine. We investigated whether the impact of such combination is neutral, additive, or potentiating in T2DM descendants, as regards cardiometabolic phenotype, glucose homeostasis and micro-/macroangiopathies. Cross-sectional retrospective cohort study of 796 T2DM divided according to presence (Diab[+]) or absence (Diab[-]) of 1st-degree diabetes familial history and/or EOCHD (CVD(+) and (-)). Four subgroups: (i) [Diab(-)CVD(-)] (n=355); (ii) [Diab(+)CVD(-)] (n=338); (iii) [Diab(-)CVD(+)] (n=47); and (iv) [Diab(+)CVD(+)] (n=56). No interaction on subgroup distribution between presence of both familial histories, the combination of which translated into additive detrimental outcomes and higher rates of fat mass, sarcopenia, (hs)CRP and retinopathy. FDH(+) had lower insulinemia, insulin secretion, hyperbolic product, and accelerated hyperbolic product loss. An EOCHD family history affected neither insulin secretion nor sensitivity. There were significant differences regarding macroangiopathy/CAD, more prevalent in [Diab(-)CVD(+)] and [Diab(+)CVD(+)]. Among CVD(+), the highest macroangiopathy prevalence was observed in [Diab(-)CVD(+)], who had 66% macroangiopathy, and 57% CAD, rates higher (absolute-relative) by 23%-53% (overall) and 21%-58% (CAD) than [Diab(+)CVD(+)], who inherited the direst cardiometabolic familial history (p 0.0288 and 0.0310). A parental history for diabetes markedly affects residual insulin secretion and secretory loss rate in T2DM offspring without worsening insulin resistance. It paradoxically translated into lower macroangiopathy with concurrent familial EOCHD. Conjunct diabetes and CV familial histories generate multi-faceted vascular outcomes in offspring, including lesser macroangiopathy/CAD. Copyright

  16. Profound hyper natremia due to central diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaqar, A.; Javaid, K.H.; Parveen, R.; Sadaf, R.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare endocrine disorder in paediatric patients. Polyuria is a cardinal manifestation that is extremely difficult to recognize in diapered infants. Careful urine quantification is the key to diagnosis in appropriate clinical setting. We report a case of a 4 months old infant presenting with an acute life threatening event following an episode of vomiting and decreased oral intake. She had profound hyper natremia which persisted after stabilization. Polyuria unrecognized by the mother was revealed by 24-hour urine output measurement. A diagnosis of diabetes insipidus was made after appropriate laboratory investigations including serum and urine osmolality. The central nature of the disease was confirmed by neuroimaging which showed holoprosencephaly. (author)

  17. Partial central diabetes insipidus in patient with common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías, Marta Cano; Matei, Ana Maria; Gonzalez Albarran, Olga; Perez Lopez, Gilberto

    2012-07-03

    Approximately 20% of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have any autoimmune disease, as concurrent as prior to diagnosis, even during follow-up. In recent years, cases of CVID associated to endocrine autoimmune diseases have been reported. To our knowledge, no cases of CVID with diabetes insipidus has been reported previously. The authors present the case of a 37-year-old male, diagnosed of CVID, who had thirst, polyuria and nocturia for several years. After a water deprivation test and a complete resolution of patient's symptoms with vasopressin (DDAVP) treatment, diagnosis of partial central diabetes insipidus was finally made. Patients diagnosed of CVID could develop water misbalance due to posterior hypophysis autoimmune disorder. A high index of clinical suspicion, an early diagnosis and treatment of these disease could avoid future complications and improve the quality of life of these patients.

  18. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a novel mutation in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Fost, M.; van Trotsenburg, A. S. P.; van Santen, H. M.; Endert, E.; van den Elzen, C.; Kamsteeg, E. J.; Swaab, D. F.; Fliers, E.

    2011-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal (central) diabetes insipidus (DI) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene. The majority of cases is inherited in an autosomal dominant way. In this study, we present the clinical features of a mother and her son with autosomal

  19. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a novel mutation in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fost, M. de; Trotsenburg, A.S. van; Santen, H.M. van; Endert, E.; Elzen, C. van den; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Swaab, D.F.; Fliers, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Familial neurohypophyseal (central) diabetes insipidus (DI) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene. The majority of cases is inherited in an autosomal dominant way. In this study, we present the clinical features of a mother and her son with

  20. Family-nurse co-construction of meaning: a central phenomenon of family caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiers, Sonja J; Tomlinson, Patricia S

    2003-06-01

    situation. Caring enacted by nurses in participation with families holds abundant potential for enhancing the family health experience and honor the ethic of caring as central to nursing.

  1. [Diabetic foot risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a family medicine unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Godínez, S A; Zonana-Nacach, A; Anzaldo-Campos, M C; Muñoz-Martínez, J A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) seen in a Family Medicine Unit. The study included type II DM patients with a disease duration ≥ 5 years seen in a Family Medicine Unit, Tijuana, Mexico, during September-December 2011. Neuropathy was assessed with the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom questionnaire, and pressure sensation using a 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. A patient had a high risk of diabetic foot if there was sensitivity loss, foot deformities, and non-palpable pedal pulses. We studied 205 patients with an average (± SD) age and DM duration of 59 ± 10 years and 10.7 ± 6.7 years, respectively. Ninety one patients (44%) had a high risk of developing diabetic foot, and it was associated with; an education of less than 6 years (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1-1-4.1), DM disease duration ≥ 10 years (OR 5.1; 95%CI: 2.8-9.4), female gender (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.6), monthly familiar income diabetic neuropathy, since they have a high risk of diabetic foot. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. The association of age, gender, ethnicity, family history, obesity and hypertension with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B Shivananda; Sobrian, Arianne; Latiff, Khalif; Pope, Danielle; Rampersad, Akash; Lourenço, Kodi; Samuel, Nichole

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of risk factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, family history, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and hypertension, on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Trinidadian population. A cross-sectional case control study comprised 146 non-diabetics and 147 type 2 diabetics ≥18 years of age, from North Central, South West and Eastern regions of Trinidad. Cross-tabulations revealed a significant difference between type 2-diabetes and age at pdiabetes and family history, ethnicity, waist circumference and hypertension at pdiabetics and type 2 diabetics being, 130.62 (±2.124) and 141.35 (±2.312), respectively. No significant difference was observed between type 2 diabetes and gender and BMI. Age was the most significant risk factor of type 2 diabetes. Therefore it can be concluded that family history, ethnicity, waist circumference and hypertension are more significant risk factors of this disease than BMI and gender in the Trinidadian population. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MR imaging of central diabetes insipidus: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Kim, Chang Jin; Hong, Sung Kwan [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Dong Gyu [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) can be the outcome of a number of diseases that affect the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal axis. The causes of the condition can be classified as traumatic, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Traumatic causes include postoperative sella or transection of the pituitary stalk, while infectious or inflammatory causes include meningitis, lymphocytic hypophysitis, and granulomatous inflammations such as sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. Various neoplastic conditions such as germinoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, metastasis, leukemic infiltration, lymphoma, teratoma, pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, Rathke cleft cyst, hypothalamic glioma, and meningioma are also causes of central DI. In affected patients, careful analysis of these MR imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations can allow a more specific diagnosis, which is essential for treatment.

  4. MR imaging of central diabetes insipidus: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Kim, Chang Jin; Hong, Sung Kwan; Na, Dong Gyu

    2001-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) can be the outcome of a number of diseases that affect the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal axis. The causes of the condition can be classified as traumatic, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Traumatic causes include postoperative sella or transection of the pituitary stalk, while infectious or inflammatory causes include meningitis, lymphocytic hypophysitis, and granulomatous inflammations such as sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. Various neoplastic conditions such as germinoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, metastasis, leukemic infiltration, lymphoma, teratoma, pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, Rathke cleft cyst, hypothalamic glioma, and meningioma are also causes of central DI. In affected patients, careful analysis of these MR imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations can allow a more specific diagnosis, which is essential for treatment

  5. [Etiological diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus: about 41 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, Fatma; Chihaoui, Melika; Yazidi, Meriem; Slimane, Hedia

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of polyuria-polydipsia syndrome with hypotonic urine requires careful diagnostic strategy. This study aims to evaluate diagnostic modalities for central diabetes insipidus. We conducted a retrospective study of 41 cases with central diabetes insipidus (CDI). Data were collected at the Department of Endocrinology, University Hospital La Rabta, Tunis, from 1990 to 2013. We identified the circumstances for detecting CDI, the abnormalities in anterior pituitary assessment and pituitary imaging. CDI occurred in the postoperative period in 20 patients. The average urine 24-hour volume was significantly higher in patients with CDI outside a surgical setting. Water deprivation test was successful in all patients who benefited from it. Outside of neurosurgery, infiltration causes were found in 6 patients and tumor causes were found in 6 patients. CDI was associated with empty sella turcica in 1 case and idiopathic sella turcica in 3 patients. Hypothalamic-pituitary magnetic resonance imaging and anterior pituitary balance sheet are systematic outside pituitary surgery setting and obvious primary polydipsia.

  6. Substantial proportion of MODY among multiplex families participating in a Type 1 diabetes prediction programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzelkova, L; Dusatkova, P; Cinek, O; Sumnik, Z; Pruhova, S; Hradsky, O; Vcelakova, J; Lebl, J; Kolouskova, S

    2016-12-01

    Patients with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) might be over-represented in families with histories of Type 1 diabetes. Our aim was to re-evaluate families participating in the Czech T1D Prediction Programme (PREDIA.CZ) with at least two members affected with diabetes to assess the proportion of MODY among these families and determine its most significant clinical predictors. Of the 557 families followed up by the PREDIA.CZ, 53 (9.5%) had two or more family members with diabetes. One proband with diabetes from these families was chosen for direct sequencing of the GCK, HNF1A, HNF4A and INS genes. Non-parametric tests and a linear logistic regression model were used to evaluate differences between MODY and non-MODY families. MODY was genetically diagnosed in 24 of the 53 families with multiple occurrences of diabetes (45%). Mutations were detected most frequently in GCK (58%), followed by HNF1A (38%) and INS (4%). MODY families were more likely to have a parent with diabetes and had a higher proportion of females with diabetes than non-MODY families. Higher age (P MODY families already presenting with diabetes. A prediction programme for Type 1 diabetes would provide a useful new source of patients with MODY most likely to benefit from an accurate diagnosis. This identification has implications for patient treatment and disease prognosis. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  7. Diabetes, child care, and performance of family functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kobos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Parents caring for a child with diabetes may experience a burden on both a practical and an emotional level. Aim of the research : Analysis of the correlations between the care burden level and the perceived influence of type 1 diabetes in children on the performance of family functions. Material and methods : The study included 112 caregivers of children with diabetes. The following inclusion criteria were taken into account: full family, direct caregiver of the child, the child’s age 3–16 years, disease duration of at least 6 months, and no chronic diseases in siblings. The study material was collected using an interview questionnaire and the Caregiver Burden Scale. Correlation analysis was performed using the Spearman correlation coefficient. The significance level was defined as p = 0.05. Results : A higher burden level of a caregiver in the individual subscales of the CB Scale was associated with a significant decrease in the intensity of performance of the cultural and social function as well as consumption function, the increased amount of time spent with a sick child, and an increase in parental disagreements. The overall burden level differentiated the performance of the religious function. An increase in the burden level on the overall effort subscale was accompanied by lower interest in sex and less frequent sexual intercourse. The higher level of caregiver burden occurs in families where permanent job income has fallen. The differences were shown in the performance of control-socialisation function due to the sense of burden on the environment subscale. Conclusions : The burden level of a caregiver is important in the perceived influence of the child’s illness on the functioning of the family. Stimulating a caregiver in dealing with the problems that are the consequence of the disease, as well as activating and preparing other family members to participate in the care of a sick child, and financial support may

  8. Diabetes education for children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Robert; Jetha, Mary; Dryden, Donna M; Hooten, Nicola; Liang, Yuanyuan; Durec, Tamara; Sumamo, Elizabeth; Spooner, Carol; Milne, Andrea; O'Gorman, Kate; Klassen, Terry P

    2008-04-01

    To determine the effectiveness of diabetes education on metabolic control, diabetes-related hospitalizations, complications, and knowledge, quality of life and other psychosocial outcomes for children with type 1 diabetes and their families. A systematic and comprehensive literature review was conducted in 21 electronic databases of medical and health education literature to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies evaluating the effectiveness of diabetes education. Study selection, quality assessment, and data extraction were conducted independently by several investigators in duplicate. A descriptive analysis is presented. From 12,756 citations, 80 studies were identified and included in the review (53 RCTs or CCTs, 27 observational studies). The methodological quality of studies was generally low. Most studies (35/52) that examined the effect of educational interventions on HbA1c found no evidence of increased effectiveness of the interventions over the education provided as part of standard care. Successful interventions were heterogeneous and included cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, skills training and general diabetes education. Most studies reported a positive effect on health service utilization (i.e., reduced use), although less than half were statistically significant. There was no clear evidence that educational interventions had an effect on short-term complications. The effect of educational interventions on diabetes knowledge was unclear with 12/30 studies reporting a significant improvement. Interventions which had varying effects on knowledge scores included diabetes camp, general diabetes education, and cognitive behavioral therapy. In the area of self management/regimen adherence, 10/21 studies reported improving this outcome significantly. Successful interventions included general diabetes education and cognitive behavioral therapy. Educational interventions were successful in improving various

  9. 24-hour central aortic systolic pressure and 24-hour central pulse pressure are related to diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Simone; Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Hansen, Tine Willum

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive measurements of 24 hour ambulatory central aortic systolic pressure (24 h-CASP) and central pulse pressure (24 h-CPP) are now feasible. We evaluate the relationship between 24 h central blood pressure and diabetes-related complications in patients with type 1 diabetes.......68) and 3.72 (1.85-7.47) and autonomic dysfunction: 3.25 (1.65-6.41), 1.64 (1.12-2.39) and 2.89 (1.54-5.42). CONCLUSIONS: 24 h-CASP and 24 h-CPP was higher in patients vs. controls and increased with diabetic complications independently of covariates. Furthermore, 24 h-CASP was stronger associated....... METHODS: The study was cross-sectional, including 715 subjects: 86 controls (C), 69 patients with short diabetes duration (diabetes (≥ 10 years) and normoalbuminuria (LN), 163...

  10. Neurosarcoidosis-associated central diabetes insipidus masked by adrenal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non, Lemuel; Brito, Daniel; Anastasopoulou, Catherine

    2015-01-22

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is an infrequent complication of neurosarcoidosis (NS). Its presentation may be masked by adrenal insufficiency (AI) and uncovered by subsequent steroid replacement. A 45-year-old woman with a history of NS presented 2 weeks after abrupt cessation of prednisone with nausea, vomiting, decreased oral intake and confusion. She was diagnosed with secondary AI and intravenous hydrocortisone was promptly begun. Over the next few days, however, the patient developed severe thirst and polyuria exceeding 6 L of urine per day, accompanied by hypernatraemia and hypo-osmolar urine. She was presumed to have CDI due to NS, and intranasal desmopressin was administered. This eventually normalised her urine output and serum sodium. The patient was discharged improved on intranasal desmopressin and oral prednisone. AI may mask the manifestation of CDI because low serum cortisol impairs renal-free water clearance. Steroid replacement reverses this process and unmasks an underlying CDI. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Central diabetes insipidus following cardiopulmonary arrest in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Tara; Daly, Meredith; Davidson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    To describe a clinical case of transient central diabetes insipidus (CDI) occurring post cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) in a dog. An 8-week-old dog presented for intensive care after successful resuscitation following CPA. The patient exhibited neurologic deficits at initial presentation and over the following days developed marked polyuria, isosthenuria, and low urine osmolality. Treatment with synthetic vasopressin resulted in a reduction in urine output, increase in urine specific gravity (>50%), and increase in urine osmolality, suggesting a diagnosis of partial CDI. Clinical signs resolved over the following weeks and treatment was discontinued. CPA has been described as a cause of ischemic injury to the pituitary gland resulting in CDI in people. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a dog developing transient partial CDI following CPA and successful resuscitation. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  12. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pamungkas, Rian Adi; Chamroonsawasdi, Kanittha; Vatanasomboon, Paranee

    2017-01-01

    The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM) care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME) that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose moni...

  13. Anti-PD-L1 Treatment Induced Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Tella, Sri Harsha; Del Rivero, Jaydira; Kommalapati, Anuhya; Ebenuwa, Ifechukwude; Gulley, James; Strauss, Julius; Brownell, Isaac

    2018-02-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), anti-programmed cell death protein ligand 1 (PD-L1), and anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (anti-CTLA4) monoclonal antibodies, have been widely used in cancer treatment. They are known to cause immune-related adverse events (irAEs), which resemble autoimmune diseases. Anterior pituitary hypophysitis with secondary hypopituitarism is a frequently reported irAE, especially in patients receiving anti-CTLA4 treatment. In contrast, posterior pituitary involvement, such as central diabetes insipidus (DI), is relatively rare and is unreported in patients undergoing PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. We describe a case of a 73-year-old man with Merkel cell carcinoma who received the anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody avelumab and achieved partial response. The patient developed nocturia, polydipsia, and polyuria 3 months after starting avelumab. Further laboratory testing revealed central DI. Avelumab was held and he received desmopressin for the management of central DI. Within 6 weeks after discontinuation of avelumab, the patient's symptoms resolved and he was eventually taken off desmopressin. The patient remained off avelumab and there were no signs or symptoms of DI 2 months after the discontinuation of desmopressin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of central DI associated with anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy. The patient's endocrinopathy was successfully managed by holding treatment with the immune checkpoint inhibitor. This case highlights the importance of early screening and appropriate management of hormonal irAEs in subjects undergoing treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors to minimize morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  14. [Family physician attitudes towards insulinization in type II diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Rodríguez, M I; Sánchez-Morales, M C; Aceña-Gutiérrez, M T; Carrasco-Flores, J; Villarín-Castro, A

    2014-04-01

    To determine the attitudes of Toledo Health Area family physicians about starting insulinization in type 2 diabetic patients. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. A self-completed questionnaire was given to 353 family physicians of the Toledo Health Area, asking about socio-demographic and occupational data, and including the Spanish version of the Diabetes Attitude Scale (DAS-3sp) questionnaire to evaluate attitudes and motivations related to diabetes. A total of 66 responses were received, of which 50.8% were from females. Mean age (±standard deviation) was 49.97±7.40. Results of the different DAS-3sp subscales (values from 1 to 5) were: S1 (need for special training): 4.52±0.38; S2 (seriousness of type2 diabetes): 4.18±0.42; S3 (value of tight control): 4.15±0.39; S4 (psychosocial impact of diabetes): 3.79±0.48; and S5 (need for patient autonomy): 3.72±0.55. No statistically significant differences were obtained with the four first subscales with sex, specialized training, being a resident tutor, type of contract or clinical setting. There were statistically significant differences in S5 compared with sex (3.90±0,60 in men vs 3.54±0.45 in women; t=2.701; P=.009) and with being a resident tutor (3.99±0.58 vs 3.64±0.52 in non-tutors; t=2.188; P=.033). The attitudes regarding starting insulin treatment in type2 diabetic patients are positives among Toledo Health Area family physicians, specially in the clinical aspects, but they are lower in the psychosocial impact and patient autonomy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Family communication as strategy in diabetes prevention: an observational study in families with Dutch and Surinamese South-Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, Suzanne C M; Cornel, Martina C; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, Petronella H L M; Snoek, Frank J

    2012-04-01

    To explore the possibility of utilizing family communication as a diabetes prevention strategy, specifically targeting high-risk families with South-Asian ancestry in The Netherlands. In a cross-sectional study, type 2 diabetes patients from Dutch (n=311) and Surinamese South-Asian (n=157) origin filled in a questionnaire assessing socio-demographic characteristics, beliefs and concerns about familial diabetes risk, primary prevention, and diabetes-related family communication. Discussing diabetes is regarded acceptable in most families. Especially Surinamese South-Asian patients (68%) seemed motivated to convey risk messages to their relatives; they reported a higher risk perception and expressed more concern than Dutch patients. While 40% in both groups thought relatives are able to prevent developing diabetes, 46% in Dutch and 33% in Surinamese South-Asian patients were unsure. Promoting family communication appears a feasible strategy in diabetes prevention in high-risk (Surinamese South-Asian) families. Health care providers should address patients' concern and emphasize opportunities for prevention. Findings favor training of clinicians in utilizing a family approach as prevention strategy. Patients (particularly Surinamese South-Asians) are in need of professional help in the process of family risk disclosure. (Online) Educational tools should be made available at which patients can refer their relatives. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of diabetes-related family stress on glycemic control in young patients with type 1 diabetes: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouli, Elina; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Stefanaki, Charikleia; Darviri, Christina; Chrousos, George P

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the way that family stress influences glycemic control among patients with diabetes who are younger than 18 years of age. PubMed and Scopus were searched for relevant studies published since 1990 using the following key words: diabetes type 1, glycemic control, family stress, family conflict, and family function. In total, 1478 papers were identified in the initial search. The final review included 6 cohort studies, 3 cross-sectional studies, and 1 qualitative review in which family stress was assessed using specific diabetes-related conflict measurement instruments, and glycemic control was evaluated by glycosylated hemoglobin measurement. In most studies family stress was negatively correlated with patients' glycemic control. Family function was strongly related to patients' glycemic control, while family conflict was adversely associated with glycemic control. Families of low socioeconomic status, those of adolescents with diabetes, and those of single parents were more prone to diabetes-related stress and thus more susceptible to worse glycemic control. Therapeutic psychological interventions and educational programs can help alleviate family diabetes-related stress and will likely improve glycemic control.

  17. Central Adrenal Insufficiency and Diabetes Insipidus Misdiagnosed as Severe Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Hiroi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 68 year-old Japanese man, who had been suffering from immobilization and disuse syndrome, was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of polyuria with polyposia, hyponatremia and low blood pressure. His plasma osmolality was greater than that of his urine. His endocrinological examination revealed low levels of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and cortisol, and a normal response of ACTH to the corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH challenge. Plasma ACTH did not increase with insulin loading. A low plasma vasopressin (AVP level and no response of AVP to a 5% saline administration were observed. We diagnosed central adrenal insufficiency with central diabetes insipidus. Six months after starting administration of hydrocortisone and 1-deamino-8D-arginine vasopressin, his psychological symptoms had improved, and 1.5 years after starting treatment, he was able to walk. In conclusion, it is not particularly rare for adrenal insufficiency to be misdiagnosed as depression. However, a correct early diagnosis is necessary, because, if adrenal insufficiency is not definitively diagnosed, the patient's quality of life diminishes markedly.

  18. Clinical characteristics of central diabetes insipidus in Taiwanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Yao; Tung, Yi-Ching; Lee, Cheng-Ting; Liu, Hon-Man; Peng, Shinn-Forng; Wu, Mu-Zon; Kuo, Meng-Fai; Tsai, Wen-Yu

    2013-10-01

    Data on the clinical features of children with central diabetes insipidus (CDI) are lacking in Taiwan. This study investigated the clinical manifestations and etiology of CDI in Taiwanese children. From 1983 to 2012, 62 children with permanent diabetes insipidus were enrolled in the study. They were diagnosed at the Department of Pediatrics of National Taiwan University Hospital. Their medical records were thoroughly reviewed and their clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory data, and etiologies were analyzed. The patients' median age at diagnosis was 10 years and the median interval between initial manifestations and diagnosis was 0.5 years. The most common symptoms and signs were polyuria, polydipsia, nocturia, and growth retardation. Most patients had low urine osmolality and elevated plasma osmolality on diagnosis. Absence of a posterior pituitary hyperintense signal and thickening of the pituitary stalk were common findings on magnetic resonance imaging. Approximately 80% of the patients had anterior pituitary hormone deficiency and all patients had growth hormone deficiency. Approximately 60% of patients had intracranial lesions, the most common causes of which were germ cell tumor and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Two patients were initially believed to have idiopathic CDI but intracranial lesions were detected during the follow-up period. Because a delayed diagnosis of CDI is common in Taiwanese children, a high index of suspicion is important. The underlying etiology of CDI in children may not initially be obvious. Long-term surveillance is therefore necessary, especially for the early detection of evolving treatable intracranial lesions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Depression Amplifies the Influence of Central Obesity on 10-Year Incidence of Diabetes: Findings from MIDUS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera K Tsenkova

    Full Text Available Central obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes but many obese individuals never develop diabetes, suggesting the presence of important effect modifiers. Depression has emerged as a key risk factor for poor glycemic control, but to our knowledge, no previous work has investigated whether depression amplifies the effect of central obesity on glucoregulation.We used a national sample of adults without prevalent diabetes (MIDUS; N = 919 to test for synergy between central obesity and depression in the development of diabetes 10 years later. We found that depression amplified the association of waist-to-hip ratio (WHR with incident diabetes adjusted for age, race, gender, education, physical activity, and sleep problems (p = 0.01 for test of interaction. The relative risk for incident diabetes per every 0.1 increment in WHR was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.31; 2.33 in those without depression and 3.78 in those with depression (95% CI: 2.14; 6.66.These results confirm the role of depression as a robust risk factor for the development of diabetes and for the first time, demonstrate a synergy between depression and central obesity. Identifying and addressing depression could prove to be an effective approach to preventing diabetes in at risk individuals. Ultimately, elucidating the interplay among risk factors from different domains will be key to understanding multifactorial diseases such as diabetes and informing theory-based, patient-centered interventions aimed at reducing diabetes risk.

  20. Family history of diabetes and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Asemi, Zatollah; Lankarani, Kamran B; Tabrizi, Reza; Maharlouei, Najmeh; Naghibzadeh-Tahami, Ahmad; Yousefzadeh, Gholamreza; Sadeghi, Reza; Khatibi, Seyed Reza; Afshari, Mahdi; Khodadost, Mahmoud; Akbari, Maryam

    2017-11-01

    Gestational diabetes is the most prevalent metabolic disorder being firstly diagnosed during pregnancy. The relationship between the family history of diabetes and the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been investigated in several primary studies with a number of contradictions in the results. Hence, the purpose of the present study is to determine the relationship between the GDM and the family history of diabetes using the meta-analysis method. All published papers in main national and international databases were systematically searched with some specific keywords to find the related studies between 2000 and 2016. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) in analysis for each study using a random-effect and Mantel-Haenzel method. We also determined heterogeneity among these 33 articles and their publication bias. We entered 33 relevant studies of 2516 articles into the meta-analysis process including 2697 women with family history of diabetes mellitus as well as 29134 women without. Of them, 954 and 4372 subjects developed GDM respectively. Combining the results of the primary studies using the meta-analysis method, the overall odds ratio of family history for developing GDM was estimated as of 3.46 (95% CI: 2.80-4.27). This meta-analysis study revealed that the family history of diabetes is an important risk factor for the gestational diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Corneal endothelial morphology and central thickness in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr-Paulsen, Allan; Singh, Amardeep; Jeppesen, Helene

    2014-01-01

    size was based on a power calculation (power = 0.90; p = 0.05). The diabetic patients had on average more than four HbA1c tests performed (mean 4.1; range 2-14) with intervals of at least 3 months as a reflection of the long-term glycaemic status. The controls had no diabetes confirmed by two causal......PURPOSE: To investigate corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in type II diabetic and non-diabetic patients and to relate potential differences to the glycaemic status. METHODS: A prospective clinical study including 107 patients with type II diabetes and 128 non-diabetic patients. Sample...... blood tests. The endothelial cell density, the variation in endothelial cell size (CV), the percentage of hexagonal cells, and the central corneal thickness (CCT) were recorded. RESULTS: Type II diabetic subjects did not differ from the non-diabetic control subjects with regards to endothelial cell...

  2. Central pontine myelinolysis secondary to hypokalaemic nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, C

    2010-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) has been described in alcoholic patients and in the aftermath of rapid correction of chronic hyponatraemia. We describe a case of CPM occurring secondary to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (DI), which developed as a consequence of severe hypokalaemia. A 63-year-old man with alcohol dependence was admitted to hospital with severe pulmonary sepsis and type 1 respiratory failure. On admission, he had euvolaemic hyponatraemia of 127 mmol\\/L, consistent with a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secondary to his pneumonia. Following admission, his plasma potassium dropped from 3.2 to a nadir of 2.3 mmol\\/L. Mineralocorticoid excess, ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone production and other causes of hypokalaemia were excluded. The hypokalaemia provoked significant hypotonic polyuria and a slow rise in plasma sodium to 161 mmol\\/L over several days. Plasma glucose, calcium and creatinine were normal. The polyuria did not respond to desmopressin, and subsequent correction of his polyuria and hypernatraemia after normalization of plasma potassium confirmed the diagnosis of nephrogenic DI due to hypokalaemia. The patient remained obtunded, and the clinical suspicion of osmotic demyelination was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging. The patient remained comatose and passed away 10 days later. This is the first reported case of nephrogenic DI resulting in the development of CPM, despite a relatively slow rise in plasma sodium of less than 12 mmol\\/L\\/24 h. Coexisting alcohol abuse, hypoxaemia and hypokalaemia may have contributed significantly to the development of CPM in this patient.

  3. Are family factors universally related to metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, F.J.; Skinner, T.C.; Beaufort, C.E. de

    2008-01-01

    -parent disagreement on responsibility for diabetes care practices (F = 8.46; d.f. = 2; P gender or insulin treatment regimen......Aims To assess the importance of family factors in determining metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes in 19 countries. Methods Adolescents with Type 1 diabetes aged 11-18 years, from 21 paediatric diabetes care centres, in 19 countries, and their parents were invited to participate...... a questionnaire. Family demographic factors that were associated with metabolic outcomes included: parents living together (t = 4.1; P 2; d.f. = 3; P diabetes care (r = 0.11; P

  4. Cultural and family challenges to managing type 2 diabetes in immigrant Chinese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesla, Catherine A; Chun, Kevin M; Kwan, Christine M L

    2009-10-01

    Although Asians demonstrate elevated levels of type 2 diabetes, little attention has been directed to their unique cultural beliefs and practices regarding diabetes. We describe cultural and family challenges to illness management in foreign-born Chinese American patients with type 2 diabetes and their spouses. This was an interpretive comparative interview study with 20 foreign-born Chinese American couples (n = 40) living with type 2 diabetes. Multiple (six to seven) semistructured interviews with each couple in individual, group, and couple settings elicited beliefs about diabetes and narratives of care within the family and community. Interpretive narrative and thematic analysis were completed. A separate respondent group of 19 patients and spouses who met the inclusion criteria reviewed and confirmed the themes developed from the initial couples. Cultural and family challenges to diabetes management within foreign-born Chinese American families included how 1) diabetes symptoms challenged family harmony, 2) dietary prescriptions challenged food beliefs and practices, and 3) disease management requirements challenged established family role responsibilities. Culturally nuanced care with immigrant Chinese Americans requires attentiveness to the social context of disease management. Patients' and families' disease management decisions are seldom made independent of their concerns for family well-being, family face, and the reciprocal responsibilities required by varied family roles. Framing disease recommendations to include cultural concerns for balance and significant food rituals are warranted.

  5. Polyuria with the Concurrent manifestation of Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) & Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Jae-Ha; Yi, Joo-Hark; Han, Sang-Woong; Kim, Ho-Jung

    2012-12-01

    We report a rare case of the concurrent manifestation of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A 56 year-old man was diagnosed as a type 2 DM on the basis of hyperglycemia with polyuria and polydipsia at a local clinic two months ago and started an oral hypoglycemic medication, but resulted in no symptomatic improvement at all. Upon admission to the university hospital, the patient's initial fasting blood sugar level was 140 mg/dL, and he showed polydipsic and polyuric conditions more than 8 L urine/day. Despite the hyperglycemia controlled with metformin and diet, his symptoms persisted. Further investigations including water deprivation test confirmed the coexisting CDI of unknown origin, and the patient's symptoms including an intense thirst were markedly improved by desmopressin nasal spray (10 µg/day). The possibility of a common origin of CDI and type 2 DM is raised in a review of the few relevant adult cases in the literature.

  6. [Emotional distress and quality of life in people with diabetes and their families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beléndez Vázquez, Marina; Lorente Armendáriz, Iñaki; Maderuelo Labrador, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The daily experience of living with diabetes can adversely affect the quality of life of people with diabetes and their families. We present the results for Spain of the DAWN2 study related to quality of life and wellbeing of patients and their families. The DAWN2 study is an observational, cross-sectional study. In the present study, we used the Spanish sample of patients (N=502) and their relatives (N=123). A total of 13.9% of patients were at risk of possible depression while 50.0% of people with diabetes and 45.5% of family members reported a high level of diabetes-related emotional stress. People with diabetes experience high levels of stress and the psychosocial impact of diabetes also affects family members. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Bouncing forward: families living with a type I diabetic child | Brown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Despite the multitude of challenges that families living with a child with diabetes face, they have been found to adapt to such an extent that diabetes is viewed as a manageable condition. This study was concerned with the factors that enable these families to adapt. The internationally acclaimed Resiliency Model of Stress, ...

  8. Central diabetes insipidus in an African Grey parrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Simon R; Wood, Catherine; de Matos, Ricardo; Ledbetter, Eric C; Morrisey, James K

    2010-08-15

    A 5.5-year-old sexually intact female African Grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) was evaluated for a 1-year history of pronounced polyuria and polydipsia. The bird also had a 1-month history of signs of mild depression and mydriasis. Physical examination revealed a thin body condition and incomplete bilateral mydriasis. Other examination findings as well as CBC and screening radiography results were unremarkable. Plasma biochemical analysis revealed mild hypernatremia. The bird had a 3.3% loss in body weight over 170 minutes during a water deprivation test, and urine osmolality remained low. After IM administration of 0.9 microg of desmopressin, the rate of weight loss decreased substantially and urine osmolality increased 300% over the following 200 minutes. Initial attempts to treat the bird with orally administered desmopressin failed to correct the polydipsia and polyuria. Ultimately, IM administration of 24 microg of desmopressin/kg (10.9 microg/lb) every 12 hours yielded a noticeable reduction in water consumption and urine production over a 6- to 8-hour period. Eight months later, the bird was returned for a recheck examination, at which time it was in good health and continued to respond to the medication. Despite continued response to the medication, right-sided internal ophthalmoparesis was detected 16 months after the initial diagnosis. To the authors' knowledge, central diabetes insipidus in birds has not been reported. The condition should be considered in birds with clinical signs of disease similar to those in mammals. Long-term IM administration of desmopressin may be a viable treatment option.

  9. Mechanisms underlying progressive polyuria in familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, H; Oiso, Y

    2010-07-01

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI), an autosomal dominant disorder, is mostly caused by mutations in the gene of neurophysin II (NPII), the carrier protein of arginine vasopressin (AVP). The analyses of knock-in mice expressing a mutant NPII that causes FNDI in humans demonstrated that polyuria progressed substantially in the absence of loss of AVP neurones. Morphological analyses revealed that inclusion bodies were present in the AVP neurones in the supraoptic nucleus and that the size and numbers of inclusion bodies gradually increased in parallel with the increases in urine volume. Electron microscopic analyses showed that aggregates existed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of AVP neurones. These data suggest that cell death is not the primary cause of polyuria in FNDI, and that the aggregate formation in the ER is likely to be related to the pathogenesis of the progressive polyuria.

  10. Causes of visual disability among Central Africans with diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) remains a common and one of the major causes of blindness in the developed and western societies. The same situation is shown in emerging economic areas (5,6). In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) however, the issues of visual disability due to diabetes mellitus (DM) are overshadowed ...

  11. Causes of visual disability among Central Africans with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvitu Muaka, M; Longo-Mbenza, B

    2012-06-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) remains a common and one of the major causes of blindness in the developed and western societies. The same situation is shown in emerging economic areas (5,6). In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) however, the issues of visual disability due to diabetes mellitus (DM) are overshadowed by the presence of the prevalent and common nutritional deficiency diseases and eye infections This clinic-based study was conducted to determine whether diabetic retinopathy is independently related to visual disability in black patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) from Kinshasa, Congo. A total of 299 urban patients with DM and low income including 108 cases of visual disability and matched for time admission and DM type to 191 controls, were assessed. Demographic, clinical, and ophthalmic data were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Age ≥60 years, female sex, presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), proliferative DR, shorter DM duration, glaucoma, macular oedema, diabetic nephropathy were the univariate risk factors of visual disability. Using logistic regression model, visual disability was significantly associated with female sex and diabetic retinopathy. The risk of visual disability is 4 times higher in patients with diabetic retinopathy and 2 times higher in females with DM. Therefore, to prevent further increase of visual disability, the Congolese Ministry of Health should prioritize the eye care in patients with DM.

  12. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus among adults in rural north central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is one of the noncommunicable diseases and a public health problem facing the world. This chronic disease is expected to rise due to rapid population growth, urbanization, aging, obesity and physical inactivity. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus ...

  13. Hepatitis C as a risk factor for diabetes type 2: lack of evidence in a hospital in central-west Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luce Marina Freires Corrêa da Costa

    Full Text Available In order to assess the importance of HCV infection as a possible risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus, a case-control study was conducted, comparing the prevalence of HCV infection among diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetic outpatients attending to a University Hospital in Central-West Brazil were evaluated between April and October 2005. A control group composed by patients from the same institution was matched by gender and age. Candidates to control group were included only if fasting glucose measures were under 100 mg/dL. Diabetics and controls had blood samples taken in order to test for antibodies against HCV (anti-HCV by enzyme-immunoassay. Polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot were performed to confirm the anti-HCV status. Each group included 206 participants. Despite of the groups were in general comparable. The diabetics had a greater body mass average and smaller family income. The prevalence of confirmed anti-HCV in the diabetic group was of 1.4%, which was similar to the controls (1%. Finding statistical difference may have been hampered by the low frequency of HCV infection in both groups. It was not possible to demonstrate a role of HCV as an etiologic factor in type 2 diabetes, since HCV infected patients represented a small portion of the overall diabetes cases. This finding does not allow to recommend regular screening for HCV infection in type 2 diabetics in this region.

  14. "El Miedo y El Hambre": Understanding the Familial, Social, and Educational Realities of Undocumented Latino Families in North Central Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viramontez Anguiano, Ruben P.; Lopez, Anayeli

    2012-01-01

    This study explored how different ecological factors, within and outside the family, affected the educational success of the children of undocumented families. The sample consisted of 63 immigrant Latino parents (40 families) who resided in North Central Indiana. This study utilized an ethnographic research design. Findings demonstrated that…

  15. Prevalence of a positive family history of type 2 diabetes in women with polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R

    1999-12-01

    The known association between insulin resistance and polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) has been studied by determination of the prevalence of a positive family history of diabetes in a consecutive series of oligomenorrheic women with polycystic ovaries and eumenorrheic women with normal ovaries who served as controls. A significantly greater proportion of the families of the patients with PCOD had at least one member affected by type 2 diabetes (39.1% of the PCOD group and 7.6% of the controls; p PCOD had an increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes within their families. Paternal and maternal family members affected were in similar proportions, there being no evidence of preferential transmission through the female line in this study. The increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the families of women with polycystic ovaries is further evidence for the association between PCOD and insulin resistance, and provides a possible explanation for the familial nature of the ovarian disorder.

  16. Manifestation of Central Diabetes Insipidus in a Patient with Thyroid Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Akiko; Ocho, Kazuki; Oka, Kosuke; Yasuda, Miho; Hasegawa, Kou; Iwamuro, Masaya; Obika, Mikako; Rai, Kammei; Otsuka, Fumio

    2018-02-28

    We herein report a case of central diabetes insipidus complicated with thyroid storm. A middle-aged woman who was receiving treatment for Graves' disease suddenly complained of polydipsia, polyuria and general fatigue. Laboratory tests showed hyperthyroidism, hypernatremia, hypoosmolar urine and a decreased plasma vasopressin level. The occurrence of central diabetes insipidus with hyperthyroidism was revealed on the basis of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging, a water deprivation test and a desmopressin test. The clinical co-existence of diabetes insipidus and hyperthyroidism is very rare; however, the complication should be considered when hypernatremia and/or dehydration progress in patients with Graves's disease as a common autoimmune-related etiology.

  17. Disentangling the roles of parental monitoring and family conflict in adolescents' management of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Holmes, Clarissa S; Chen, Rusan; Maher, Kathryn; Robinson, Elizabeth; Streisand, Randi

    2013-04-01

    Less parental monitoring of adolescents' diabetes self-care and more family conflict are each associated with poorer diabetes outcomes. However, little is known about how these two family factors relate with one another in the context of self-care and glycemic control. Diabetes self-care was evaluated as a mediator of the associations among parental monitoring, family conflict, and glycemic control in early adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Adolescent-parent dyads (n = 257) reported on the frequency of parental monitoring, family conflict, and diabetes self-care. Hemoglobin A1c was abstracted from medical charts. Structural equation modeling was used for mediation analysis. A mediation model linking parental involvement and family conflict with A1c through diabetes self-care fit the data well. Monitoring and conflict were inversely correlated (β = -0.23, p Conflict also was positively associated with higher A1c (β = 0.31, p conflict and less parental monitoring are risk factors for poorer glycemic control, and diabetes self-care is one mediator linking these variables. Interventions to promote parental monitoring of diabetes management during early adolescence may benefit from emphasizing strategies to prevent or reduce family conflict. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  18. Evidence for diffuse central retinal edema in vivo in diabetic male Sprague Dawley rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Berkowitz

    Full Text Available Investigations into the mechanism of diffuse retinal edema in diabetic subjects have been limited by a lack of animal models and techniques that co-localized retinal thickness and hydration in vivo. In this study we test the hypothesis that a previously reported supernormal central retinal thickness on MRI measured in experimental diabetic retinopathy in vivo represents a persistent and diffuse edema.In diabetic and age-matched control rats, and in rats experiencing dilutional hyponatremia (as a positive edema control, whole central retinal thickness, intraretinal water content and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC, 'water mobility' were measured in vivo using quantitative MRI methods. Glycated hemoglobin and retinal thickness ex vivo (histology were also measured in control and diabetic groups. In the dilutional hyponatremia model, central retinal thickness and water content were supernormal by quantitative MRI, and intraretinal water mobility profiles changed in a manner consistent with intracellular edema. Groups of diabetic (2, 3, 4, 6, and 9 mo of diabetes, and age-matched controls were then investigated with MRI and all diabetic rats showed supernormal whole central retinal thickness. In a separate study in 4 mo diabetic rats (and controls, MRI retinal thickness and water content metrics were significantly greater than normal, and ADC was subnormal in the outer retina; the increase in retinal thickness was not detected histologically on sections of fixed and dehydrated retinas from these rats.Diabetic male Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate a persistent and diffuse retinal edema in vivo, providing, for the first time, an important model for investigating its pathogenesis and treatment. These studies also validate MRI as a powerful approach for investigating mechanisms of diabetic retinal edema in future experimental and clinical investigations.

  19. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome accompanied by panhypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hee Jung; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Min; Yoon, Na-Ra; Kim, Choon-Mee

    2018-03-05

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) was detected in a patient with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) who had been molecularly and serologically diagnosed with Hantaan virus infection. We recommend that clinicians differentiate central DI in HFRS patients with a persistent diuretic phase even when pituitary MRI findings are normal.

  20. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian Adi Pamungkas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose monitoring, diet and exercise changes, health outcomes including psychological well-being and self-efficacy, and physiological markers including body mass index, level of blood pressure, cholesterol level and glycemic control. Three databases, PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus were reviewed for relevant articles. The search terms were “type 2 diabetes,” “self-management,” “diabetes self-management education (DSME,” “family support,” “social support,” and “uncontrolled glycaemia.” Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI guidelines were used to determine which studies to include in the review. Details of the family support components of DSME intervention and the impacts of these interventions had on improving the health outcomes patients with uncontrolled glycaemia patients. A total of 22 intervention studies were identified. These studies involved different DSME strategies, different components of family support provided, and different health outcomes to be measured among T2D patients. Overall, family support had a positive impact on healthy diet, increased perceived support, higher self-efficacy, improved psychological well-being and better glycemic control. This systematic review found evidence that DSME with family support improved self-management behaviors and health outcomes among uncontrolled glycaemia T2D patients. The findings suggest DSME models that include family engagement can be a useful direction for improving diabetes care.

  1. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamungkas, Rian Adi; Chamroonsawasdi, Kanittha; Vatanasomboon, Paranee

    2017-09-15

    The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM) care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME) that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose monitoring, diet and exercise changes, health outcomes including psychological well-being and self-efficacy, and physiological markers including body mass index, level of blood pressure, cholesterol level and glycemic control. Three databases, PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus were reviewed for relevant articles. The search terms were "type 2 diabetes," "self-management," "diabetes self-management education (DSME)," "family support," "social support," and "uncontrolled glycaemia." Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) guidelines were used to determine which studies to include in the review. Details of the family support components of DSME intervention and the impacts of these interventions had on improving the health outcomes patients with uncontrolled glycaemia patients. A total of 22 intervention studies were identified. These studies involved different DSME strategies, different components of family support provided, and different health outcomes to be measured among T2D patients. Overall, family support had a positive impact on healthy diet, increased perceived support, higher self-efficacy, improved psychological well-being and better glycemic control. This systematic review found evidence that DSME with family support improved self-management behaviors and health outcomes among uncontrolled glycaemia T2D patients. The findings suggest DSME models that include family engagement can be a useful direction for improving diabetes care.

  2. Lost in translation - the role of family in interventions among adults with diabetes; a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torenholt, Rikke; Schwennesen, Nete; Willaing, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Aims Family interventions are increasingly recognized as important in the care of people with diabetes. The aim of this study was to synthesize the existing literature on family interventions among adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and to determine the degree to which they were family centred....... Methods The literature search was carried out in four databases (Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO and ERIC). Two reviewers independently screened the search results. Only English-language articles about interventions on education, care and/or support of adult individuals with diabetes involving the participation...... of both the individual with diabetes and at least one family member were included. Results From an initial 1480 citations, 10 reports were included. The intervention studies varied considerably in terms of design and population. The family dimension generally represented a modest part of the interventions...

  3. Searching for the Kinkeepers: Historian Gender, Age, and Type 2 Diabetes Family History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordimaina, Alicia M.; Sheldon, Jane P.; Kiedrowski, Lesli A.; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Kinkeepers facilitate family communication and may be key to family medical history collection and dissemination. Middle-aged women are frequently kinkeepers. Using type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as a model, we explored whether the predicted gender and age effects of kinkeeping can be extended to family medical historians. Through a U.S. telephone survey,…

  4. Migrant adults with diabetes in France: Influence of family migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chambre

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: We may fear that migrants share an increased risk of uncontrolled diabetes. Individual migration could be a risk factor of uncontrolled diabetes. Knowing the migration history of migrant patients is fundamental to understand some barriers of care.

  5. Family Food Choices: A Guide to Weight and Diabetes Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indian Health Service (PHS/HSA), Rockville, MD.

    Written for American Indians who have diabetes, this folder explains diabetes and outlines a weight control program and diet. The folder discusses the five things diabetics can do to help control their disease: lose weight, watch the amount and kind of fat eaten, eat more food with fiber, avoid sugar, and avoid alcohol. Charts for foods containing…

  6. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus associated with a signal peptide mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLeod, J.F.; Gaskill, M.B.; Bradley, G.S.; Robertson, G.L. (Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)); Kovacs, L. (Comenius Univ. Medical School, Bratislava (Slovakia)); Rittig, S. (Univ. of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark))

    1993-09-01

    The authors studied the pathophysiology, natural history, and genetic basis of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) in a caucasian kindred. Twelve members had polyuria and a deficiency of plasma vasopressin (AVP), which progressed in severity over time. Another had normal urine volumes and plasma AVP when first tested at age 3 yr, but developed severe FNDI a year later. For unknown reasons, one man had a normal urine volume despite severe AVP deficiency and a history of polyuria in the past. When the AVP-neurophysin-II gene was amplified and sequenced, exon 2/3 was normal, but 7 of 12 clones of exon 1 contained a base substitution (G[yields]A) predicting a substitution of threonine for alanine at the -1 position of the signal peptide. Restriction analysis found the mutation in all 14 affected members, but in none of the 41 controls of 19 adult members with normal urine volumes and plasma or urinary AVP (lod score = 5.7). The mutation was also found in 2 infants in whom AVP was normal when tested at 6 and 9 months of age. We hypothesize that a mutation in exon 1 of the AVP-neurophysin-II gene caused FNDI in this kindred by making an abnormally processed precursor that gradually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Mice deficient for ERAD machinery component Sel1L develop central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Daniel G; Lussier, Yoann

    2017-10-02

    Deficiency of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) underlies diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of dilute urine and persistent thirst. In this issue of the JCI, Shi et al. report that Sel1L-Hrd1 ER-associated degradation (ERAD) is responsible for the clearance of misfolded pro-arginine vasopressin (proAVP) in the ER. Additionally, mice with Sel1L deficiency, either globally or specifically within AVP-expressing neurons, developed central diabetes insipidus. The results of this study demonstrate a role for ERAD in neuroendocrine cells and serve as a clinical example of the effect of misfolded ER proteins retrotranslocated through the membrane into the cytosol, where they are polyubiquitinated, extracted from the ER membrane, and degraded by the proteasome. Moreover, proAVP misfolding in hereditary central diabetes insipidus likely shares common physiopathological mechanisms with proinsulin misfolding in hereditary diabetes mellitus of youth.

  8. Causes of visual disability among Central Africans with diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    I read with great interest the article by Mvitu and. Longo-Mbenza that appeared in a recent issue of. African Heath Sciences.¹ In that paper, the authors were interested in determining whether diabetes is an independent and significant determinant of visual disability. I commend them for performing this study. However a ...

  9. Association Between Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besseling, Joost; Kastelein, John J. P.; Defesche, Joep C.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Hovingh, G. Kees

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Familial hypercholesterolemia is characterized by impaired uptake of cholesterol in peripheral tissues, including the liver and the pancreas. In contrast, statins increase the cellular cholesterol uptake and are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We hypothesize

  10. Generalized status epilepticus associated with massive pulmonary aspiration and transient central diabetes insipidus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVALHO MAURICIO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus causes significant morbidity and mortality. A case of generalized status epilepticus followed by massive pulmonary aspiration, acute respiratory failure and transient central diabetes insipidus is presented. Seizures were promptly controlled, but the patient required mechanical ventilation and correction of polyuria with desmopressin acetate. During hospitalization mental status improved, diabetes insipidus spontaneously remitted and he was discharged without neurologic sequelae. The clinical and pathophysiological features of this case are discussed.

  11. Diabetic retinopathy in a remote Indigenous primary healthcare population: a Central Australian diabetic retinopathy screening study in the Telehealth Eye and Associated Medical Services Network project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazionis, L; Jenkins, A; Keech, A; Ryan, C; Brown, A; Boffa, J; Bursell, S

    2018-05-01

    To determine diabetic retinopathy prevalence and severity among remote Indigenous Australians. A cross-sectional diabetic retinopathy screening study of Indigenous adults with Type 2 diabetes was conducted by locally trained non-ophthalmic retinal imagers in a remote Aboriginal community-controlled primary healthcare clinic in Central Australia and certified non-ophthalmic graders in a retinal grading centre in Melbourne, Australia. The main outcome measure was prevalence of any diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Among 301 participants (33% male), gradable image rates were 78.7% (n = 237) for diabetic retinopathy and 83.1% (n = 250) for diabetic macular oedema, and 77.7% (n = 234) were gradable for both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. For the gradable subset, the median (range) age was 48 (19-86) years and known diabetes duration 9.0 (0-24) years. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 47% (n = 110) and for diabetic macular oedema it was 14.4% (n = 36). In the fully gradable imaging studies, sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy prevalence was 16.2% (n = 38): 14.1% (n = 33) for clinically significant macular oedema, 1.3% (n = 3) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 0.9% (n = 2) for both. Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy had been treated in 78% of detected cases. A novel telemedicine diabetic retinopathy screening service detected a higher prevalence of 'any' diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in a remote primary care setting than reported in earlier surveys among Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Whether the observed high prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was attributable to greater detection, increasing diabetic retinopathy prevalence, local factors, or a combination of these requires further investigation and, potentially, specific primary care guidelines for diabetic retinopathy management in remote Australia. Clinical Trials registration number: Australia and

  12. Quality of life in the patients with central diabetes insipidus assessed by Nagasaki Diabetes Insipidus Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Aya; Ando, Takao; Akazawa, Satoru; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Sagara, Ikuko; Horie, Ichiro; Imaizumi, Misa; Usa, Toshiro; Yanagisawa, Robert T; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is characterized by polyuria and polydipsia due to a deficiency of vasopressin. Currently, the treatment goal for CDI is improvement of quality of life (QOL) by desmopressin (DDAVP) without developing hyponatremia. However, there is no reliable measure for QOL in CDI patients. We evaluate our original questionnaire for QOL, consisting of 12 questions focusing on polyuria, polydipsia, and DDAVP treatment, in CDI patients who underwent a switch from nasal spray to oral disintegrating tablets of DDAVP. Twenty-five CDI patients under nasal DDAVP treatment, six with newly developed CDI, and 18 healthy individuals without known polyuric/polydipsic disorders as control subjects were enrolled. QOL scores were determined by our questionnaire at the enrollment and 3 months after the start of oral DDAVP treatment and were examined by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Eleven questions detected improvement in QOL. The sum of the QOL scores of the eleven questions increased from 29.2 ± 5.6 under nasal to 36.8 ± 4.5 under oral DDAVP (p < 0.001). There were no clinically relevant changes in serum levels of Na. After eliminating two questions about DDAVP treatment, the sum of QOL scores was 15.3 ± 6.5 in untreated CDI patients, 24.4 ± 5.2 in those with nasal treatment, 28.9 ± 4.9 in those with oral DDAVP, and 29.5 ± 3.6 in healthy controls. The difference among groups was significant (p < 0.05 in Steel-Dwass test) except between patients treated with oral DDAVP and healthy controls. Our questionnaire can be used to accurately assess QOL in CDI patients.

  13. Anterior Hypopituitarism is Rare and Autoimmune Disease is Common in Adults with Idiopathic Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Central diabetes insipidus is a rare clinical condition with a heterogenous aetiology. Up to 40% of cases are classified as idiopathic, though many of these are thought to have an autoimmune basis. Published data has suggested that anterior hypopituitarism is common in childhood onset idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We aimed to assess the incidence of anterior hypopituitarism in a cohort of adult patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Design and Patients: We performed a retrospective review of the databases of two pituitary investigation units. This identified 39 patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. All had undergone MRI scanning and dynamic pituitary testing (either insulin tolerance testing or GHRH\\/arginine and short synacthen testing) to assess anterior pituitary function. Results: One patient had partial growth hormone deficiency; no other anterior pituitary hormonal deficits were found. 33% had at least one autoimmune disease in addition to central diabetes insipidus. Conclusions: Our data suggest that anterior hypopituitarism is rare in adult idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Routine screening of these patients for anterior hypopituitarism may not therefore be indicated. The significant prevalence of autoimmune disease in this cohort supports the hypothesis that idiopathic diabetes insipidus may have an autoimmune aetiology.

  14. Knowledge, Attitude, and Perception of Barriers for Eye Care among Diabetic Persons Registered at Employee Health Department of a Tertiary Eye Hospital of Central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Abeer; Al-Hassan, Arif; Chauhan, Deepti; Al-Futais, Muneera; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the level of knowledge, attitudes, and barriers to diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening among diabetic healthcare staff at a tertiary eye hospital in central Saudi Arabia. Methods: This was a descriptive survey using a closed-ended questionnaire. A. 5-grade. Likert scale was used for responses to each question. Data were collected on patient demographics and the status of diabetes. Survey responses related to knowledge, attitude, and barriers were grouped. Results: The study sample was comprised of 45 diabetics employed at the hospital. The mean age was 49 ± 11 years and 33 diabetics were males. One-third of the study population was referred to the eye clinic for DR screening. DR screening was performed in 25% of diabetics over the previous year. Twenty-nine (64%; 95% confidence intervals: 50–78) participants had excellent knowledge of eyecare for diabetic complications. Thirteen percent of participants had a positive attitude toward periodic eye checkups. Travel distance to an eyecare unit, no referral from family physicians for annual eye checkups and the lack of availability of gender-specific eyecare professionals were the main perceived barriers. Conclusion: Annual DR screening needs to be promoted to primary healthcare providers and diabetic patients. Barriers should be addressed to improve the uptake of DR screening. PMID:26957842

  15. Knowledge, Attitude, and Perception of Barriers for Eye Care among Diabetic Persons Registered at Employee Health Department of a Tertiary Eye Hospital of Central Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Abeer; Al-Hassan, Arif; Chauhan, Deepti; Al-Futais, Muneera; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the level of knowledge, attitudes, and barriers to diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening among diabetic healthcare staff at a tertiary eye hospital in central Saudi Arabia. This was a descriptive survey using a closed-ended questionnaire. A. 5-grade. Likert scale was used for responses to each question. Data were collected on patient demographics and the status of diabetes. Survey responses related to knowledge, attitude, and barriers were grouped. The study sample was comprised of 45 diabetics employed at the hospital. The mean age was 49 ± 11 years and 33 diabetics were males. One-third of the study population was referred to the eye clinic for DR screening. DR screening was performed in 25% of diabetics over the previous year. Twenty-nine (64%; 95% confidence intervals: 50-78) participants had excellent knowledge of eyecare for diabetic complications. Thirteen percent of participants had a positive attitude toward periodic eye checkups. Travel distance to an eyecare unit, no referral from family physicians for annual eye checkups and the lack of availability of gender-specific eyecare professionals were the main perceived barriers. Annual DR screening needs to be promoted to primary healthcare providers and diabetic patients. Barriers should be addressed to improve the uptake of DR screening.

  16. The relationship between family social support and quality of life in diabetic female patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mousavi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Life quality of diabetic patients is always affected by psychosocial problems, physical disorders, and life style changes. It seems that the perceived social support could intervene in improving the life quality of these patients. The present study was carried out aiming to examine the relation between family social support and life quality of female patients with diabetes. This was a cross-sectional study. The statistical population included 173 diabetic females who were randomly selected from patients referred to Kermanshah diabetes research center. Data were collected using life quality questionnaire (Short Form-36 as well as perceived social support scale. The data analysis indicated that there is a significant correlation between family support and life quality of patients. Furthermore, concerning the components of life quality, there is a significant correlation between family social support and physical performance, physical limitation, tiredness, emotional health, social performance, pain, and general health of patients. However, no significant relation was found between family support and limitation of patients. Results showed that there is a direct relation between family support and the life quality in females with diabetes. Hence, it can be concluded that giving the family support to the female diabetic patients can increase their quality of life.

  17. Sex and genetic effects on upper and lower body fat and associations with diabetes in multigenerational families of African heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic-Gacic, Iva; Wang, Xiaojing; Kammerer, Candace M; Bunker, Clareann H; Patrick, Alan L; Wheeler, Victor W; Kuller, Lewis H; Evans, Rhobert W; Zmuda, Joseph M

    2008-06-01

    Very few studies have comprehensively defined the genetic and environmental influences on body fat storage in the arms and legs and their association with diabetes, especially in families of African heritage. We analyzed body fat distribution by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (percentage total fat, percentage trunk fat, percentage arm fat, and percentage leg fat) and fasting serum glucose in 471 individuals (mean age, 43 years) from 8 multigenerational Afro-Caribbean families (mean family size = 51; 3535 relative pairs). Diabetes was inversely associated with percentage leg fat (P = .009) and, to some extent, positively associated with percentage arm fat independent of age, sex, and body size (P = .08), but not with anthropometric or dual-energy x-ray absorptiometric measures of total and central adiposity. Furthermore, percentage leg fat was inversely, whereas percentage arm fat was positively, associated with body mass index, waist circumference, and serum glucose (P Genetic correlation (rho(G)) between arm and leg fat was -0.61 (P genetic influences. This study provides new evidence for a strong genetic and sex contribution to upper and lower body fat, with relatively little covariation between these traits due to shared genes. Our findings also suggest that, in this population, leg fat is associated with diabetes independent of overall adiposity.

  18. How Much Time Do Families Spend on the Health Care of Children with Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jane E; Nugent, Colleen N; Russell, Louise B

    2016-09-01

    Family time caring for children with diabetes is an overlooked component of the overall burden of the condition. We document and analyze risk factors for time family members spend providing health care at home and arranging/coordinating health care for children with diabetes. Data for 755 diabetic children and 16,161 non-diabetic children whose chronic conditions required only prescription (Rx) medication were from the 2009-2010 United States National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN). We used generalized ordered logistic regressions to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of time burden by diabetes, insulin use, and stability of the child's health care needs, controlling for health and socioeconomic status. Nearly one-quarter of diabetic children had family members who spent 11+ h/week providing health care at home, and 8% spent 11+ h/week arranging/coordinating care, compared with 3.3% and 1.9%, respectively, of non-diabetic Rx-only children. Time providing care at home for insulin-using children was concentrated in the higher time categories: AORs for insulin-using diabetic compared to non-diabetic Rx-only children were 4.4 for 1+ h/week compared with less pronounced for non-insulin-using children. AORs for arranging/coordinating care did not vary by time contrast: AOR = 4.2 for insulin-using, 3.0 for non-insulin-using children. Health care providers, school personnel, and policymakers need to work with family members to improve care coordination and identify other ways to reduce family time burdens caring for children with diabetes.

  19. Does Perceived Family Support has a Relation with Depression and Anxiety in an Iranian Diabetic Sample?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behshid Garrusi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering psycho-social aspects of diabetes such as family support ,depression and anxiety ,may have a pivotal role in improvement of health status of the patients. In Iran (IR, as other parts of the worldprevalence of diabetes and its burden are increasing therefore these issues must be seriously considered.Aims: The aim of this study was identify the contributing factors that could be promote quality of life in diabetes. For this reason , relationship between perceived family support and psychiatric comorbidities (depression and anxiety in Iranian diabetic population sample was studied.Methodology: In this cross-sectional study which was conducted in South-east Iran, 386 diabetic patients were assessed. The assessment instruments were Diabetes Specific Family Support (DSFS, Hospital Anxiety–Depression Scale( HADS, and demographic variables. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as statistical significance.Results: About 52% of the participants were female. The mean (SD age was 50.77 (10.24 years. The mean score of supportive behaviors,in females waslower than males. There was no relationship between the mean scores of depression and anxiety with gender. Duration of diabetes, educational level and socio-economic level had significant relationship with depression. The relation between subscales of family behaviors (supportive and non supportive and psychological comorbidities (depression, anxiety were significant (P<0.05.Conclusion: The survey results emphasized the important role of family support in Iranian diabetic patients. Families should be encouraged to provide a supportive environment for the diabetic patients that could be due quality of life promotion.

  20. Family PArtners in Lifestyle Support (PALS): Family-Based Weight Loss for African American Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D.; Holder-Cooper, Judith C.; Gizlice, Ziya; Davis, Gwendolyn; Steele, Sonia P.; Keyserling, Thomas C.; Kumanyika, Shiriki K.; Brantley, Phillip J.; Svetkey, Laura P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a family-centered behavioral weight loss intervention for African American adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods In this randomized trial, dyads consisting of African American adult with overweight or obesity and type 2 diabetes (index participant) paired with a family partner with overweight or obesity, but not diagnosed with diabetes, were assigned in a 2:1 ratio to a 20-week special intervention (SI) or delayed intervention (DI) control group. The primary outcome was weight loss among index participants at 20 weeks follow-up. Results One hundred-eight participants (54 dyads – 36 (SI) and 18 (DI) dyads) were enrolled: 81% females; mean age, 51 years; mean weight,103 kg; and mean BMI, 37 kg/m2. At post-intervention, 96 participants (89%) returned for follow-up measures. Among index participants, mean difference in weight loss between groups was −5.0 kg, pfamily interactions, and dietary, physical activity, and diabetes self-care behaviors. SI family partners also had significant weight loss (−3.9 kg (SI) vs. −1.0 kg (DI) p=0.02). Conclusions A family-centered, behavioral weight loss intervention led to clinically significant short-term weight loss among family dyads. PMID:27911049

  1. Supportive and non-supportive interactions in families with a type 2 diabetes patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennich, Birgitte B; Røder, Michael E; Overgaard, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    changes and diabetes self-management. The purpose of this integrative review was to summarise and assess published studies on the intra-family perspective of supportive and non-supportive interactions in families with a type 2 diabetes patient. METHODS: Included in the review were published qualitative......BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes and its management affect the patient and the close family potentially causing either psychological distress or increased sense of responsibility and collaboration in these families. Interactions between patient and family play an important role in maintaining lifestyle...... of reference lists. Quality assessment, data extraction and analysis were undertaken on all included studies. RESULTS: We identified five eligible research papers. Employing content analysis three categories describing interactions were refined: Impact of practical action, impact of emotional involvement...

  2. The Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND): design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowler, William C; Coresh, Josef; Elston, Robert C; Freedman, Barry I; Iyengar, Sudha K; Kimmel, Paul L; Olson, Jane M; Plaetke, Rosemarie; Sedor, John R; Seldin, Michael F

    2005-01-01

    The Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND) is a multicenter study designed to identify genetic determinants of diabetic nephropathy. It is conducted in eight U.S. clinical centers and a coordinating center, and with four ethnic groups (European Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, and American Indians). Two strategies are used to localize susceptibility genes: a family-based linkage study and a case-control study using mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD). In the family-based study, probands with diabetic nephropathy are recruited with their parents and selected siblings. Linkage analyses will be conducted to identify chromosomal regions containing genes that influence the development of diabetic nephropathy or related quantitative traits such as serum creatinine concentration, urinary albumin excretion, and plasma glucose concentrations. Regions showing evidence of linkage will be examined further with both genetic linkage and association studies to identify genes that influence diabetic nephropathy or related traits. Two types of MALD studies are being done. One is a case-control study of unrelated individuals of Mexican American heritage in which both cases and controls have diabetes, but only the case has nephropathy. The other is a case-control study of African American patients with nephropathy (cases) and their spouses (controls) unaffected by diabetes and nephropathy; offspring are genotyped when available to provide haplotype data. Identification of genes that influence susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy will lead to a better understanding of how nephropathy develops. This should eventually lead to improved treatment and prevention.

  3. Importance of family/social support and impact on adherence to diabetic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller TA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tricia A Miller, M Robin DiMatteoDepartment of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, USAAbstract: Diabetes mellitus affects 24 million individuals in the US. In order to manage their diabetes successfully, patients must adhere to treatment regimens that include dietary restrictions, physical activity goals, and self-monitoring of glucose levels. Numerous factors affect patients' ability to adhere properly, eg, self-efficacy, treatment expectations, health beliefs, and lack of social support. Consequently, diabetes management can be quite complex, requiring lifelong commitment and drastic changes to the patient's lifestyle. Empirical studies have shown positive and significant relationships between social support and treatment adherence among patients with diabetes. Social support from family provides patients with practical help and can buffer the stresses of living with illness. However, the exact mechanism by which social support affects patient adherence is not yet completely understood. Further research is needed to address how the differences in types of support, such as functional or emotional support, are linked to outcomes for patients. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is known of the impact of social and family support on treatment adherence in patients with diabetes and to explore the current methods and interventions used to facilitate family support for diabetic patients.Keywords: patient adherence, patient compliance, diabetes management, support, family, social

  4. Evaluation of an Ongoing Diabetes Group Medical Visit in a Family Medicine Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Amy T; Delgado, David J; Jackson, Joseph D; Crawford, Albert G; Jabbour, Serge; Lieberthal, Robert D; Diaz, Victor; LaNoue, Marianna

    2018-01-01

    Group medical visits (GMVs), which combine 1-on-1 clinical consultations and group self-management education, have emerged as a promising vehicle for supporting type 2 diabetes management in primary care. However, few evaluations exist of ongoing diabetes GMVs embedded in medical practices. This study used a quasi-experimental design to evaluate diabetes GMV at a large family medicine practice. We examined program attendance and attrition, used propensity score matching to create a matched comparison group, and compared participants and the matched group on clinical, process of care, and utilization outcomes. GMV participants (n = 230) attended an average of 1 session. Participants did not differ significantly from the matched comparison group (n = 230) on clinical, process of care or utilization outcomes. The diabetes GMV was not associated with improvements in outcomes. Further studies should examine diabetes GMV implementation challenges to enhance their effectiveness in everyday practice. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  5. Evidence-based behavioral interventions to promote diabetes management in children, adolescents, and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Powell, Priscilla W; Anderson, Barbara J

    2016-10-01

    As members of multidisciplinary diabetes care teams, psychologists are well-suited to support self-management among youth with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and their families. Psychological and behavioral interventions can promote adherence to the complex and demanding diabetes care regimen, with the goals of promoting high quality of life, achieving optimal glycemic control, and ultimately preventing disease-related complications. This article reviews well-researched contemporary behavioral interventions to promote optimal diabetes family- and self-management and health outcomes in youth with T1D, in the context of key behavioral theories. The article summarizes the evidence base for established diabetes skills training programs, family interventions, and multisystemic interventions, and introduces emerging evidence for technology and mobile health interventions and health care delivery system interventions. Next steps in behavioral T1D intervention research include tailoring interventions to meet individuals' and families' unique needs and strengths, and systematically evaluating cost-effectiveness to advocate for dissemination of well-developed interventions. Although in its infancy, this article reviews observational and intervention research for youth with T2D and their families and discusses lessons for future research with this population. Interventions for youth with T2D will need to incorporate family members, consider cultural and family issues related to health behaviors, and take into account competing priorities for resources. As psychologists and behavioral scientists, we must advocate for the integration of behavioral health into routine pediatric diabetes care in order to effectively promote meaningful change in the behavioral and medical well-being of youth and families living with T1D and T2D. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Randomized trial of a diabetes self-management education and family teamwork intervention in adolescents with Type1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, H. R.; Wadham, C.; Hassler-Hurst, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of a family-centred group education programme, in adolescents with Type1 diabetes. Methods Three hundred and five adolescents with Type1 diabetes; age 13.1±1.9years, diabetes duration 5.6±3.3years, BMI 20.9±3.7kg/m 2, HbA 1c 78±6mmol/mol (9.3±1.9%) were randomly...... attendance of group education sessions delivered in routine clinics was a major challenge. More personalized educational approaches may be required to support and motivate families who are struggling to integrate the demands of intensive insulin regimens into their daily lives....

  7. The role of hypoglycemia in the burden of living with diabetes among adults with diabetes and family members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, François

    2018-01-01

    -severe hypoglycemia in the past year (OR = 2.45, 1.25-4.83), self-reported severe hypoglycemia in the past year (OR = 1.91, 1.02-3.58), and being very worried about hypoglycemia at least occasionally (OR = 3.64, 2.18-6.10). For family members, the odds of experiencing living with diabetes as a burden was increased......, 412 Dutch adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and 86 family members completed questions about the burden of living with diabetes, the frequency of hypoglycemia, worries about these events, and several demographic and clinical factors. Analyses included hierarchical logistic regression. RESULTS...

  8. Influence of uncomplicated phacoemulsification on central macular thickness in diabetic patients: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Liu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of uncomplicated phacoemulsification on central macular thickness (CMT and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA in both diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy (DR and diabetic patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR.Potential prospective observational studies were searched through PubMed and EMBASE. Standardized mean difference (SMD and 95% confidence interval (CI for changes in CMT and BCVA were evaluated at postoperative 1, 3 and 6 months. The pooled effect estimates were calculated in the use of a random-effects model.A total of 10 studies involving 190 eyes of diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy and 143 eyes of diabetic patients with NPDR were identified. CMT values demonstrated a statistically significant increase after uncomplicated phacoemulsification at 1 month (SMD, -0.814; 95%CI, -1.230 to -0.399, 3 months (SMD, -0.565; 95%CI, -0.927 to -0.202 and 6 months (SMD, -0.458; 95%CI, -0.739 to -0.177 in diabetic patients with NPDR. There was no statistical difference in CMT values at postoperative 1 month (SMD, -1.206; 95%CI, -2.433 to 0.021and no statistically significant increase in CMT values at postoperative3 months (SMD, -0.535; 95%CI, -1.252 to 0.182 and 6 months (SMD, -1.181; 95%CI, -2.625 to 0.263 in diabetic patients without DR.BCVA was significantly increased at postoperative 1 month (SMD, 1.149; 95%CI, 0.251 to 2.047; and SMD,1.349; 95%CI, 0.264 to 2.434, respectively and 6 months (SMD, 1.295; 95%CI, 0.494 to 2.096; and SMD, 2.146; 95%CI, 0.172 to 4.120, respectively in both diabetic patients without DR and diabetic patients with NPDR. Sensitivity analysis showed that the results were relatively stable and reliable.Uncomplicated phacoemulsification in diabetic patients with mild to moderate NPDR seemed to influence significantly the subclinical thickening of the macular zones at postoperative 1, 3 and 6 months compared with diabetic patients without DR

  9. Association of inflammatory markers with physical activity, family history and other diabetic complications in patients of diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, A.; Rashif, A.; Waheed, P.; Ishaq, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the association of inflammatory markers with physical activity, family history and other complications among patients of diabetic retinopathy. Study Design: Cross sectional comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology (AFIO) and Military Hospital Laboratories, Rawalpindi from Jan 2016 to Jun 2016. Material and Methods: A total of 90 diagnosed patients of diabetic retinopathy of ages 40-70 years were enrolled from Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology, Rawalpindi. Their inflammatory markers (ESR and CRP) were assessed and their levels were compared with their physical activity, family history and other complications of diabetes already developed in them. These were then compared with those of 90 normal healthy controls enrolled from general population using independent student's t test and one way Anova test for scale variables and Chi square test for nominal variables. Results: Both patients and controls were age and gender matched with mean age of 60 +- 8.9 years in patients and 59 +- 13.02 years in controls. Among 90 patients enrolled 51(56.7 percent) were males and 39 (43.3) were females. And among 90 controls 49 (54.4 percent) were males and 41(45.6 percent) were females. An inverse association was observed between inflammatory markers and physical activity with ap-value of 0.001. On the contrary a strong positive association was observed between inflammatory markers and family history and complications of diabetes with a p-value 0.001. Conclusion: There is an inverse association of inflammatory markers with physical activity and a direct association of these with family history and complications of diabetes among patients of diabetic retinopathy. (author)

  10. Familial diabetes is associated with reduced risk of cancer in diabetic patients: a possible role for metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, Lev M; Boyarkina, Marina P; Teslenko, Svetlana Yu

    2012-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is a risk factor of a number of malignancies. Therefore, it is important to identify factors linking DM2 and cancer within family units and how current treatment regimens influence the development of cancer in DM2 patients. The present case-controlled study was designed to assess DM2 prevalence among parents or siblings of (a) cancer patients who did not have diabetes (n = 77; age 59.3 ± 1.3 years) or (b) had overt (n = 197; 63.7 ± 0.6 years) or latent (n = 25; 61.5 ± 1.5 years) DM2 and (c) of female DM2 patients without cancer (n = 172; 61.7 ± 0.6 years). In the families of cancer-free DM2 women, DM2 was found to be significantly more frequent (30.8 ± 3.5%) than in families of cancer patients without diabetes (in all patients: 6.5 ± 2.8%; in female patients: 5.0 ± 3.4%). More importantly, DM2 in families of cancer-free DM2 women was more frequent than in the families of DM2 patients having mammary (9.5 ± 4.5%), endometrial (6.3 ± 4.1%) or any other cancer (in all: 15.2 ± 2.6%; in women: 12.9 ± 2.8%). Additionally, DM2 patients without cancer, who had parents or siblings with DM2, received biguanide metformin versus sulfonylurea derivatives more often than those with breast or endometrial cancer, either with or without family history of DM2. Our data indicate that familial DM2 may have a protective effect for some cancer types and that the type of anti-diabetes therapy may be a factor of influence in the associations observed.

  11. Family history of myocardial infarction, stroke and diabetes and cardiometabolic markers in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentzen, Nina E.; Wijga, Alet H.; van Rossem, Lenie; Koppelman, Gerard H.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Bo; Gehring, Ulrike; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.; Smit, Henriette A.

    Aims/hypothesis Despite the overlap in occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes and their risk factors, family history of these diseases has not yet been investigated simultaneously in relation to cardiometabolic markers in offspring. We examined how a family history of CVD

  12. Family history of myocardial infarction, stroke and diabetes and cardiometabolic markers in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentzen, Nina E; Wijga, Alet H; van Rossem, Lenie; Koppelman, Gerard H; van Nieuwenhuizen, Bo; Gehring, Ulrike; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Smit, Henriëtte A

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Despite the overlap in occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes and their risk factors, family history of these diseases has not yet been investigated simultaneously in relation to cardiometabolic markers in offspring. We examined how a family history of CVD

  13. Relation between family history, obesity and risk for diabetes and heart disease in Pakistani children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basit, A.; Hakeem, R.; Hydrie, M.Z.; Ahmadani, M.Y.; Masood, Q.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the differences in relative risk of developing diabetes and CHD, obesity, fasting blood glucose, insulin and lipids of children having family history of diabetes or heart disease in first or second degree relatives as compared to control group. Design: Children were given a questionnaire to collect demographic data and to assess their dietary habits and family history. Anthropometric measurements and blood samples for fasting blood glucose, insulin and lipids of 8-10 years old children from 4 schools was taken. Subjects: Children having positive family history of diabetes (n=44) or heart disease (n=16) in first or second degree relatives were compared with a control group (n=39). Results: Children having positive family history for diabetes had slightly higher mean values for BMI, waist circumference, arm fat % as compared to the controls but the differences were not statistically significant. Overweight children (>85th Percentile of BMI for age) did not differ significantly in terms of various risk indicators however those who were in the uppermost tertile of arm fat % had significantly higher total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, LDL-C, LDL:HDL and Insulin levels (P<0.05 in each case). Conclusion: Diabetes and CVD risks from positive family history for the disease are probably mediated through increased body fat percentage. Thus even when information about family history of disease is lacking, arm-fat-percentage could be used as an important screening tool for determining the risk status of children. (author)

  14. How people with diabetes evaluate participation of their family in their health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliny de Lima Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To understand how individuals with diabetes evaluate the participation of their family in their health care. Methodology. This was a descriptive study with a qualitative approach involving 26 individuals in the Diabetes Association of Maringá. Participating in the study were 9 women and 17 men (age range, 38 to 83 years who had attended at least one educational meeting of the "culture circles" of the association. We used the methodological reference of Paulo Freire for implementing an educational proposal directed at persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus that overcame the limitations of conventional health education approaches. Data were collected between May and July 2011. Testimonials given in meetings were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed according to thematic structures. Results. Three thematic structures appeared: 1 Recognizing the importance of family in the care of patients with diabetes, 2 blaming the family for non-adherence to healthy practices, and 3 perceiving a secondary gain of the disease: feeling cared for by family members. Conclusion. Patients with diabetes perceive family as a source of support and stimulus for adherence and healthy practice, which enable them to control the disease. Family participation in a patient's care plan should be encouraged.

  15. Diabetic retinopathy at the Yaoundé Central Hospital in Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We carried out a cross-sectional analytical survey using data from patients who had done Fluorescein Angiography at the Yaounde Central Hospital Diabetic Retinopathy Prevention and Management Project between October 2007 and January 2010 to identify the risk factors, incidence and severity of different types of ...

  16. Central diabetes insipidus preceding acute myeloid leukemia with t(3;12)(q26;p12)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, P; Vellenga, E; Adriaanse, R; van de Loosdrecht, AA

    A 52-year-old woman presented with polyuria and polydipsia. ii diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus (DI) was made, which turned out to be the first sign of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Cytogenetic analysis revealed a balanced translocation between chromosome 3 and 12 t(3;12)(q26;p12). The

  17. Concurrent central diabetes insipidus and panhypopituitarism in a German shepherd dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, I K; Dennis, R; Herrtage, M E

    1999-06-01

    This report describes a German shepherd dog that was presented with proportionate dwarfism and coat changes typical of hypopituitarism but that was also profoundly polydipsic and polyuric. Investigations established a diagnosis of concurrent central diabetes insipidus. Treatment with desmopressin was successful in managing the polyuria and polydipsia.

  18. Normal MR appearances of the posterior pituitary in central diabetes insipidus associated with septo-optic dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abernethy, L.J.; Qunibi, M.A.; Smith, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pituitary in children with central diabetes insipidus usually shows absence of the normal high signal within the posterior gland. The high signal of the normal posterior pituitary is thought to be due to the presence of intra- cellular storage granules of vasopressin. MR imaging has been advocated as a useful investigation to aid in the distinction between central diabetes insipidus and other causes of thirst and polydipsia. We report the case of an infant with central diabetes insipidus in association with septo-optic dysplasia in whom MR imaging showed normal appearances of the posterior pituitary. The mechanism of central diabetes insipidus in this case may be related to a failure of hypothalamic function affecting osmoreception, rather than to a deficiency of vasopressin. Normal MR appearances of the pituitary do not exclude central diabetes insipidus in infants with midline cerebral malformations. (orig.). With 1 fig

  19. Normal MR appearances of the posterior pituitary in central diabetes insipidus associated with septo-optic dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, L.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Liverpool Children`s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Qunibi, M.A. [Depts. of Radiology and Child Health, Royal Liverpool Children`s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Smith, C.S. [Depts. of Radiology and Child Health, Royal Liverpool Children`s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pituitary in children with central diabetes insipidus usually shows absence of the normal high signal within the posterior gland. The high signal of the normal posterior pituitary is thought to be due to the presence of intra- cellular storage granules of vasopressin. MR imaging has been advocated as a useful investigation to aid in the distinction between central diabetes insipidus and other causes of thirst and polydipsia. We report the case of an infant with central diabetes insipidus in association with septo-optic dysplasia in whom MR imaging showed normal appearances of the posterior pituitary. The mechanism of central diabetes insipidus in this case may be related to a failure of hypothalamic function affecting osmoreception, rather than to a deficiency of vasopressin. Normal MR appearances of the pituitary do not exclude central diabetes insipidus in infants with midline cerebral malformations. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  20. Family History of Type 2 Diabetes is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Female Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticiana Costa Rodrigues

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the family history (FH of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS in a group of non-diabetic obese female subjects. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 239 female patients with obesity, regularly attending the Internal Medicine Division’s outpatient clinic (Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil. The inclusion criteria were patients with body mass index ?30 kg/m2 and absence of type 2 diabetes. The FH was considered positive if a first degree relative had a diagnosis of diabetes. Seventy-four of 239 patients evaluated (30% had a positive FH for type 2 diabetes. Patients with positive FH had higher waist/hip ratio and MetS more often than patients with negative FH. FH of type 2 diabetes was associated with MetS in this sample of non-diabetic obese female patients. Waist/hip ratio and fasting plasma glucose, markers of insulin resistance, were also associated with FH of type 2 diabetes. The simple question: “Do you have a FH of type 2 diabetes?” may help to identify the obese patients that should be better evaluated and intensively treated with the objective of preventing type 2 diabetes.

  1. AWARENESS AND KNOWLEDGE OF DIABETIC EYE DISEASE AMONG DIABETIC PATIENTS PRESENTING TO EYE OPD IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Saluja

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic eye disease can lead to permanent visual impairment or blindness if medical attention is delayed. Awareness and knowledge of diabetes-related eye complications is important for early medical presentation and maximisation of visual prognosis. The aim of the study is to study the level of awareness and knowledge of diabetic eye disease among diabetic patients presenting to eye OPD in central India. MATERIALS AND METHODS A hospital-based study was conducted on 300 diabetic patients presenting to eye OPD. A questionnaire was provided to the patients based on their awareness and knowledge of diabetic eye disease. On the basis of their response, answers were categorised into three groups for awareness (fully, partially and not aware and for knowledge (good, fair and poor knowledge. RESULTS Out of 300, the mean age of participants was 50.3 ± 12.4 years (range 20-79 years from which 123 (41% were males and 177 (59% were females. 106 (35.3% were from rural area and 194 (64.7% were from urban area. 164 (54.7% were literate and 136 (45.3% were illiterate. Maximum patients 172 (57.3% were diabetic since last 5 years with the average duration being 5.9 ± 4.1 years. Out of 300 patients, only 89 (29.7% were found to be fully aware and only 66 (22.0% had good knowledge (p<0.001. There was little knowledge of retinopathy risk factors or the need for routine eye examination. Most of the patients 152 (50.7% were not advised by their physician for screening. CONCLUSION The present study showed that there is poor awareness and knowledge among a larger portion of the sample among the illiterate patients, patients from rural area and those who were recently diagnosed diabetics. There is therefore a need for increasing awareness about diabetes in patients and physicians and providing access to retinopathy screening services to the patients.

  2. The role of family nutritional support in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Koin; Kurose, Takeshi; Kitatani, Naomi; Yabe, Daisuke; Hishizawa, Masahiro; Hyo, Takanori; Seino, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the role of family support in glycemic control by nutritional self-care behavior of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. One hundred twelve Japanese out-patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited for the study at Kansai Electric Power Hospital. Interviews were conducted and HbA1c and triglyceride levels were measured. HbA1c levels were significantly related to family nutritional support. Patients under 60 years old with family nutritional support showed significantly lower HbA1c than patients without family support (p1 week) showed similar outcomes in glycemic control. Patients who appreciate the support and follow the advice showed lower HbA1c (6.88 +/- 0.22%) than (7.43 +/- 0.23%) patients who appreciate the advice but sometimes feel emotional barriers. Family nutritional support is useful in improving metabolic outcome of diabetic patients. Self-care practice in disease management should be carefully adjusted to the family setting of type 2 diabetic patients. Emotional barriers to family support may affect the metabolic consequences, especially in the Japanese elderly.

  3. The Interactive Effect of Diabetes Family Conflict and Depression on Insulin Bolusing Behaviors for Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliszewski, Genevieve; Patton, Susana R; Midyett, L Kurt; Clements, Mark A

    2017-05-01

    Adherence to type 1 diabetes management declines as children enter adolescence. For youth, psychosocial variables including mood and interpersonal relationships play a large role in diabetes maintenance. The current study assessed the unique and interactive roles diabetes family conflict and depression have on insulin bolusing behaviors for youth ages 10-16 years. Ninety-one youth-parent dyads completed a survey assessing family conflict and depression. Mean daily blood glucose levels, mealtime insulin bolus scores ( BOLUS), and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were collected from the medical record as outcome variables. Parent-reported diabetes-related family conflict and youths' endorsed depression both significantly predicted insulin bolusing behavior, R 2 = .13, F(2, 88) = 6.66, P family conflict and youth depression played a significant role in youths' bolusing behaviors, above and beyond that which was predicted by conflict and depression separately, R 2 = .18, F change (1, 87) = 4.63, P family conflict, while there was no change in BOLUS scores among depressed youth living in families reporting less conflict. Findings underscore the importance of screening for depression and family conflict in youth experiencing or at risk for poor adherence to mealtime insulin and higher HbA1c levels.

  4. Central diabetes insipidus: clinical profile that suggests organicity in Peruvian children: Lima - Peru 2001-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Santos, Miguel Angel; Águila, Carlos Manuel Del; Rojas, Maria Isabel; Falen, Juan Manuel; Nuñez, Oswaldo; Chávez, Eliana Manuela; Espinoza, Oscar Antonio; Pinto, Paola Marianella; Calagua, Martha Rosario

    2016-12-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a heterogeneous disease caused by arginine vasopressin deficiency; its management implies a profound understanding of the pathophysiology and the clinical spectrum. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical characteristics that indicate organicity in children and adolescents with central diabetes insipidus treated at the Department of Endocrinology from The Child Health's Institute during 2001 to 2013. Cross-sectional, retrospective study. 79 cases of patients diagnosed with CDI (51 males and 28 females) from 1 month to 16 years of age were reviewed. For the descriptive analysis, measures of central tendency and dispersion were used; groups of organic and idiopathic CDI were compared using χ2-test and t-test. A p-valuediabetes insipidus were headache and visual disturbances; furthermore, anterior pituitary hormonal abnormalities suggest an underlying organic etiology.

  5. Adolescent and parent diabetes distress in type 1 diabetes: the role of self-efficacy, perceived consequences, family responsibility and adolescent-parent discrepancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, G Urquhart; Walsh, Jennifer; Queralt, Victoria; Nouwen, Arie

    2013-04-01

    To examine the association of adolescent and parent diabetes distress with perceived consequences, dietary self-efficacy, and discrepancies in diabetes family responsibility, in type 1 diabetes (T1D). 203 adolescents with T1D, aged 12-18, and their parents completed self-report questionnaires cross-sectionally. Higher HbA1c, greater perceived negative consequences of diabetes, and reduced self-efficacy predicted adolescent diabetes distress. Higher HbA1c predicted parental diabetes distress, as did diabetes family responsibility disagreements when both family members claimed responsibility, and parents' perception of reduced adolescent self-efficacy. Dietary self-efficacy and perceived negative consequences of diabetes are important factors to consider in assessing and managing adolescent diabetes distress. Perceptions of family responsibility for self-care tasks and parental confidence in adolescents' self-management have implications for parental diabetes distress. Clinical implications support long-held recommendations of taking a family-perspective of T1D care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy observation on multiple wave length laser for diabetic retinopathy and central retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Tian

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the efficacy of the multiple wave length laser in treating diabetic retinopathy combined with central retinal vein occlusion. METHODS:Totally 95 cases(100 eyeswith diabetic retinopathy combined with central retinal vein occlusion were treated by multiple wave length laser. Krypton yellow laser was used for macular edema in focal photocoagulation and diffuse photocoagulation. For peripheral retina, krypton green or krypton red laser were used. Visual acuity, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and fundus fluorescein angiography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. The patients were followed up for 12 to 48wk. In this study, change in visual acuity and macular edema were observed in both groups, and statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS:The effective rate was 61.2% in diffuse macular edema group and 86.3% in focal macular edema group. The general effective rate of later was higher than the former, while the treatment effect had significant statistical difference(PCONCLUSION: Multiple wave length laser is an effective and safe way to treat diabetic macular edema of diabetic retinopathy combined with central retinal vein occlusion,which is worth widely applying in clinical practice.

  7. Reducing health risk in family members of patients with type 2 diabetes: views of first degree relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Sullivan Bernadette

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with type 2 diabetes can have an important role in discussing health risk within families. This study aimed to establish the acceptability to first degree relatives towards their relative with type 2 diabetes intervening as health promoters in their own families, using the Health Belief Model as a theoretical framework for evaluation. Methods Cross-sectional questionnaire design. Survey questionnaire for first degree relative (sibling or child mailed to a random sample of patients with type 2 diabetes registered with an urban hospital diabetes clinic (n = 607 eligible patients. Patients were asked to pass on questionnaires to one to two first degree relatives. Results Questionnaires were returned from 257 families (42% response rate with two responses provided by 107 families (a total of 364 questionnaires. The majority (94% of first degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes would like to be informed about reducing their risk. Half (48% of respondents reported being spoken to by a relative with type 2 diabetes about their risk of diabetes. Those spoken to were more likely to see themselves at risk of diabetes, to worry about developing diabetes and to view diabetes as a serious condition. Conclusions A role for patients with type 2 diabetes in discussing health risk in their family appears to be acceptable to many relatives. Discussion of risk and interventions to reduce health risk with their relatives should be encouraged in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Reducing health risk in family members of patients with type 2 diabetes: views of first degree relatives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whitford, David L

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with type 2 diabetes can have an important role in discussing health risk within families. This study aimed to establish the acceptability to first degree relatives towards their relative with type 2 diabetes intervening as health promoters in their own families, using the Health Belief Model as a theoretical framework for evaluation. METHODS: Cross-sectional questionnaire design. Survey questionnaire for first degree relative (sibling or child) mailed to a random sample of patients with type 2 diabetes registered with an urban hospital diabetes clinic (n = 607 eligible patients). Patients were asked to pass on questionnaires to one to two first degree relatives. RESULTS: Questionnaires were returned from 257 families (42% response rate) with two responses provided by 107 families (a total of 364 questionnaires). The majority (94%) of first degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes would like to be informed about reducing their risk. Half (48%) of respondents reported being spoken to by a relative with type 2 diabetes about their risk of diabetes. Those spoken to were more likely to see themselves at risk of diabetes, to worry about developing diabetes and to view diabetes as a serious condition. CONCLUSIONS: A role for patients with type 2 diabetes in discussing health risk in their family appears to be acceptable to many relatives. Discussion of risk and interventions to reduce health risk with their relatives should be encouraged in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  9. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of foot care in patients with diabetes at central rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharati Amar Taksande

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot syndrome is one of the common and most devastating preventable complications of diabetes mellitus (DM. It is associated with morbidity and premature mortality due to long-term complications affecting foot. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes should have a comprehensive foot examination once per year. Most of the foot problems can be prevented with careful foot care. It may take effort and time to build up good foot care habits, but self-care is essential. Aim: The main aim of the study is to analyze the knowledge, attitude, and practice of foot care in patients with DM in central rural India. Methodology: This study was conducted at a rural educational hospital in central part of India over 200 patients who have Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. They were evaluated for their knowledge about foot care and footwear practices. A structured and validated questionnaire was administered to cases. Results: Around 82.9% of the patients were aware of the disease and 23.2% were aware of the complications of the DM. In 63% of the patients, foot care examination and education regarding foot complications were not suggested by their treating physicians. Annual examination of feet by the physician and self-examination were not known facts to the diabetic population. Conclusion: It is necessary to firstly develop awareness of diabetes mellitus and the related complications, one amongst which is foot care. Certain educational strategies should be established for both the consultant physician and also the common man to create awareness for effective foot care.

  10. Monostotic Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in a child with central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Eduardo Costa Studart; Quidute, Ana Rosa Pinto; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel; Gurgel, Maria Helane Costa; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Fonteles, Cristiane Sá Roriz

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans'cell histiocytosis (LCH) comprises a rare group of reticuloendothelial system disorders that can produce focal or systemic manifestations. Diabetes insipidus is considered to be an important indicator of serious underlying diseases in children, including LCH. We report the case of a young patient with monostotic LCH confined to the mandibular ramus, who was diagnosed with the disease after presenting symptoms of central diabetes insipidus and was satisfactorily treated with multi-agent chemotherapy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical, radiographic, histological and immunohistochemical findings, as well as the multidisciplinary approach of this important disease, which should receive attention by dental practitioners, especially when it occurs in children.

  11. Relationship between family meal frequency and individual dietary intake among diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhee, Divya; Mahomoodally, Fawzi

    2015-01-01

    Notoriously, the island of Mauritius has one of the highest prevalence of diabetes in the world. Management of the disease is very important and family meals are undoubtedly beneficial to patients as they promote the development of healthy eating behaviours and food choices. This study has aimed to probe into potential relationship(s) between family meal frequency and individual dietary intake among diabetic patients and to establish whether family cohesion may be a plausible mediator of this relationship. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with a random sample of 384 diabetic patients. The Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale III was used to obtain information on two general aspects of family functioning, that is, cohesiveness and adaptability. Chi-squared (χ (2)) tests, independent sample t-tests and one-way ANOVA were used to determine statistical significance. Pearson correlation was used to examine associations between family meal frequency, individual dietary intake and family cohesion. Hierarchical linear regression models were performed for the mediation analysis. Family meal frequency (breakfast, lunch and dinner) was observed to be positively associated with intake of fish, raw vegetables, dried and fresh fruits, low-fat milk, cheese, yogurt, nuts and light butter and negatively associated with intake of red meat, white rice, white bread, whole egg fried, chocolates, fried cakes, burgers, chips, and fried noodles/rice. Average mediation (52.6 %) was indicated by family cohesion for the association between family meal frequency and individual dietary intake among diabetic patients. Sobel's test further confirmed the trend towards complete mediation (z = 15.4; P relationship between family meal frequency and individual dietary intake among diabetic patients was recorded. The present study is one of the few studies that have examined family cohesion as a mediator of the relationship and to our best knowledge is the first work to

  12. Family history of type 2 diabetes and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adult Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mithun; Pal, Susil; Ghosh, Arnab

    2012-04-01

    Our objective was to test the association between familial risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in adult Asian Indians. A total of 448 adult (>30 years) individuals (257 males and 191 females) participated in the study. Familial risk of T2DM was classified into three groups viz., 1=both parents affected; 2=parent and/or siblings affected and 3=none or no family history for T2DM. Anthropometric measures, blood pressures, fasting blood glucose and metabolic profiles were studied using standard techniques. MS was defined accordingly. The prevalence of MS phenotypes was estimated and compared among the three familial risk strata. Individuals with a history of both parents affected from diabetes had significantly higher (Pfamily history of T2DM. Significant difference was also noticed between individuals with and without MS according to the family history of diabetes (Pfamily history of T2DM. Family history of T2DM had significant effect on individuals with MS as compared to their counterparts (individuals having no family history of T2DM). It therefore seems reasonable to argue that family history of T2DM could be useful as a predictive tool for early diagnosis and prevention of MS in Asian Indian population.

  13. Central Control of Heat Pump for Smart Grid Purposes Tested on Single Family Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tom S.; Andersen, Palle; Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2013-01-01

    A challenge in Denmark in the near future is to balance the electrical grid due to a large increase in the renewable energy production mainly from wind turbines. In this work a central control system using heat pumps in single family houses to help balancing the grid is investigated. The central...

  14. Use of Chlorothiazide in the Management of Central Diabetes Insipidus in Early Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Raisingani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of central diabetes insipidus in infancy is challenging. The various forms of desmopressin, oral, subcutaneous, and intranasal, have variability in the duration of action. Infants consume most of their calories as liquids which with desmopressin puts them at risk for hyponatremia and seizures. There are few cases reporting chlorothiazide as a temporizing measure for central diabetes insipidus in infancy. A male infant presented on day of life 30 with holoprosencephaly, cleft lip and palate, and poor weight gain to endocrine clinic. Biochemical tests and urine output were consistent with central diabetes insipidus. The patient required approximately 2.5 times the normal fluid intake to keep up with the urine output. Patient was started on low renal solute load formula and oral chlorothiazide. There were normalization of serum sodium, decrease in fluid intake close to 1.3 times the normal, and improved urine output. There were no episodes of hyponatremia/hypernatremia inpatient. The patient had 2 episodes of hypernatremia in the first year of life resolving with few hours of hydration. Oral chlorothiazide is a potential bridging agent for treatment of central DI along with low renal solute load formula in early infancy. It can help achieve adequate control of DI without wide serum sodium fluctuations.

  15. Identification of a Novel Deletion in AVP-NPII Gene in a Patient with Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Ferhat; Acar, Ceren; Saglar, Emel; Erdem, Beril; Karaduman, Tugce; Yonem, Arif; Cagiltay, Eylem; Ay, Seyit Ahmet; Mergen, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) is caused by a deficiency of antidiuretic hormone and characterized by polyuria, polydipsia and inability to concentrate urine. Our objective was to present the results of the molecular analyses of AVP-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene in a large familial neurohypophyseal (central) DI pedigree. A male patient and his family members were analyzed and the prospective clinical data were collected. The proband applied to hospital for eligibility to be a recruit in Armed Forces. The patient had severe polyuria (20 L/day), polydipsia (20.5 L/day), fatique, and deep thirstiness. CDI was confirmed with the water deprivation-desmopressin test according to an increase in urine osmolality from 162 mOsm/kg to 432 mOsm/kg after desmopressin acetate injection. To evaluate the coding regions of AVP-NPII gene, polymerase chain reactions were performed and amplified regions were submitted to direct sequence analysis. We detected a heterozygous three base pair deletion at codon 69-70 (207_209delGGC) in exon 2, which lead to a deletion of the amino acid alanine. A three-dimensional protein structure prediction was shown for the deleted AVP-NPII and compared with the wild type. The three base pair deletion may yield an abnormal AVP precursor in neurophysin moiety, but further functional analyses are needed to understand the function of the deleted protein. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  16. Screening for diabetes mellitus in a Nigerian family practice population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease with a rising prevalence worldwide. Most of the increase in prevalence is projected to be in the developing countries. As it is recognised that the onset of the disease and its complications predate the symptoms, it is expedient that screening procedures are ...

  17. Permanent Central Diabetes Insipidus as a Complication of S. pneumoniae Meningitis in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statz, Hannah; Hsu, Benson S

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare but recognized complication of meningitis. The occurrence of diabetes insidipus has been previously attributed to Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) in a handful of patients and only once within the pediatric subpopulation. We present the clinical course of a previously healthy 2-year, 8-month-old male child ultimately diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus (CDI) secondary to S. pneumoniae meningitis. Permanent CDI following S. pneumoniae meningitis is unique to our case and has not been previously described. Following the case presentation, we describe the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CDI. The mechanism proposed for this clinical outcome is cerebral herniation for a sufficient duration and subsequent ischemia leading to the development of permanent CDI. Providers should be aware of CDI resulting from S. pneumoniae meningitis as prompt diagnosis and management may decrease the risk of permanent hypothalamo-pituitary axis damage. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  18. Analysis of central corneal thickness in different degrees of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Hua

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study central corneal thickness(CCTand correlation in different degrees of diabetic retinopathy(DR.METHODS: A total of 65 cases(130 eyeswith different degrees of DR and 35 normal cases(70 eyesas the age-and gender-matched control group were examined by corneal endothelial microscope, to measure CCT and statistics RESULTS: Compared to control group, there were no significant difference of CCT both mild and medium nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRgroups(P>0.05. While the CCT of severe NPDR group and proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDRgroup were thicker than control group, and the differences were statistically significant(PPPr=0.173, PCONCLUSION: The CCT increases with severity of DR. Taking care of protecting corneal endothelium is very important in the time of therapeutic measure, especially intraocular operation, to decrease complication.

  19. Family physicians clinical aptitude for the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Guadalajara, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Pivaral, C E; Gutiérrez Roman, E A; Gonzalez Pérez, G; Gonzalez Reyes, F; Valadez Toscano, F; Gutiérrez Ruvalcaba, C; Rios Riebeling, C D

    2008-02-01

    There are 180,000 new Diabetes Mellitus cases in Mexico each year (1). This chronic, complex and multifactor disease requires an adequate nutritional management plan to be prescribed by family physicians. They should be trained to identify the potential difficulties in the patient's dietary schedule and orientate their management from an integrative point of view. The purpose of this study was to detect and measure family physician's clinical aptitudes for the nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes, in a representative family physician's sample from five Family Medicine Units of the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. A structured and validated instrument was applied to 117 physicians from a total of 450 in Guadalajara, Jalisco. The main study variable was clinical aptitude for nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes. Aptitude levels were defined by an ordinal scale and related to the other variables using the median, Mann-Whitney's U test and Kruskal Wallis (KW) test. Global results showed a median of 30 points that relates to a low and a very low aptitude level for the 72% of physicians without statistical significance (KW: p>0.05) with the rest of variables. These results reflect family physician's difficulties to orientate the nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes, as well as the lack of work environments that facilitate case reflection and formative educational strategies.

  20. Adolescence and changing family relations in the Central Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, R G

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports on a ten-year longitudinal study of adolescent development and socialization conducted in the Copper Inuit community of Holman. This research has documented how demographic, social, and economic changes have dramatically altered the patterning and sequencing of traditional Inuit life stages, thus giving rise to a prolonged adolescent life stage which was non-existent in the precontact period. At the same time, Inuit family relations have undergone drastic changes as a result of population increase, population concentration, access to government housing, introduction of formal schooling, and the availability of social subsides. Today, the Copper Inuit family has lost its focus as the primary agent of socialization and learning, and many young Inuit now spend most of their time within the context of a greatly expanded peer group which has gradually acquired the values and aspirations of the southern adolescent sub-culture. This paper will discuss the impact of these changing attitudes upon parent-child relations as well as the social adjustment problems experienced by young Inuit as they strive to find a place in the North's changing social landscape.

  1. Central Diabetes Insipidus Linked to Rathke's Cleft Cyst, Polyuria in a 17-year-old Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Yeon; Lee, Seung Jin; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2017-09-01

    A 17-year-old girl presented with polyuria (7 L/day) and polydipsia for one year. Initial urine osmolality was 113mOsm/kg H 2 O. Following 6 h of fluid restriction, serum plasma osmolality reached 300mOsm/kg H 2 O, whereas urine osmolality was 108mOsm/kg H 2 O. Urine osmolality was increased by 427% from 108 to 557mOsm/kg after vasopressin challenge. The patient was diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus, possibly derived from the atypical occupation of a Rathke's cleft cyst at the pituitary stalk following magnetic resonance imaging with enhancement. She was discharged with desmopressin nasal spray (10 µg); urine output was maintained at 2-3 L/day, and urine osmolality was >300 mOsm/kg. Additional pituitary image studies and evaluation of hypopituitarism should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with central diabetes insipidus.

  2. Gestational diabetes and central pontine myelinolysis with quadriplegia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Wen; Su, Mei-Tsz; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Chang, Chia-Ming

    2010-07-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) has been reported in women with severe hyperemesis gravidarum-induced hyponatremia followed by rapid correction. Gestational diabetes with adipsia complicated by acute hypernatremia resulting in CPM has never been reported. Here is a case of a disabled female who presented with polydipsia, polyuria, seizures, fetal death in utero, hyperglycemia, and hyper-osmolar hypernatremia on her 31st gestational week. The dead fetus was delivered and the patient's plasma glucose and sodium were later stabilized. When the patient developed quadriplegia and respiratory failure 5 days later, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed central pontine and extra-pontine myelinolysis. Gestational diabetes complicated by hyper-osmolar crisis may cause fetal death and severe neurologic sequela. Early recognition and delivery of the fetus and placenta may improve the electrolyte and fluid imbalance.

  3. Drugs for the treatment of central diabetes insipidus: historical background and modern opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dar'ya S. Mikhaylova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Central diabetes insipidus is a severe disease with disturbance of arginine vasopressin secretion, which leads to excretion of large amounts of hypotonic urine. The polyuria-polydipsia syndrome is essential as a clinical presentation and high impact condition. Desmopressin, a synthetic analog of arginine vasopressin, is used to compensate a water-electrolyte balance is available in forms of tablets and intranasal spray. Free drug choice is obligated for proper treatment.

  4. Expectations of family circles/guardians of diabetics within the scope of education in diabetes – in the light of nationwide research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Abramczyk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A family is a significant asset, which may support a diabetic in his efforts and strengthen his concern for health. Properly prepared families/guardians may protect the patient from many medical mistakes and also help ensure suitable conditions for treatment and satisfactory care. Recommendations required in the process of diabetes treatment are better complied with if the needs, expectations as well as previous experience of both patients and supporting family members are respected in the planned care. The aim of the work: The paper presents the expectations of family circles/guardians of diabetes patients within the scope of education in diabetes and their conditions. Material and methods: To meet the objective , research was carried out by the author of this work on 1366 family patients with diabetes from 61 randomly chosen national primary health service units, within the scope of NCSR grant no 6P05D02320. The research was conducted on the basis of: guided nursing interviews, relative assessment of fitness and independence of the patients, anonymous questionnaire completed by the patients, anonymous questionnaire completed by families/guardians and analysis of medical records. Results: Results of the research show that: most families are open to increase their level of competence and expect education on diabetes. Openness to education shown by families/guardians of diabetics is determined by many factors. Conclusions: Education of families/guardians of diabetics may lead to lower demand for professional care, reduced costs of care as well as increased satisfaction with this care and effects of diabetics treatment.

  5. Fenugreek, A Potent Hypoglycaemic Herb Can Cause Central Hypothyroidism Via Leptin - A Threat To Diabetes Phytotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Jayjeet; Chakraborty, Pratip; Mitra, Analava; Sarkar, Nirmal Kumar; Sarkar, Supriti

    2017-07-01

    Fenugreek ( Trigonella foenum graecum) , a medicinal herb with potent antihyperglycaemic and hypoglycaemic effects, is used to treat diabetes. This study is aimed to explore the interaction of fenugreek seed extract (FSE) and HPT (hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid) axis in context of leptin secretion which have important role in normal and type-1 diabetic subjects. FSE (confirmed to contain trigonelline, diosgenin, 4 hydroxyisoleucine) was gavaged (0.25 gm/kg body weight/day) to normal and alloxan-induced type-1 diabetic rats for 4 weeks. Expression of hypothalamic prepro-TRH (Thyrotropin releasing hormone) mRNA, serum levels of TRH, TSH (Thyroid stimulating hormone), fT 3 , fT 4 , insulin, leptin, glucose; thyroperoxidase activity and growth of thyroid gland, food intake, adiposity index were also studied FSE significantly down regulated prepro-TRH mRNA expression; decreased serum TRH, TSH, fT 3 , fT 4 levels, and regressed thyroid gland in FSE-fed normal and diabetic rats than those observed in normal diet-fed control and diabetic rats. FSE decreased (psecretion, increased food intake and body weight in all FSE-fed rats. FSE improved insulin secretion, decreased glucose level but impaired HPT axis in diabetic rats, indicating insulin-independent central hypothyroidism. Results suggested that the dominant signal to hypothalamus suppressing HPT axis is the fall in leptin level which i resulted from decreased adiposity index following FSE feeding. Fenugreek simultaneously having hypoglycaemic and hypothyroidal actions raises questions whether it can be safely used to treat diabetes and/or hyperthyroidism as was suggested by many workers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Newly developed central diabetes insipidus following kidney transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K M; Kim, S M; Lee, J; Lee, S Y; Kwon, S K; Kim, H-Y

    2013-09-01

    Polyuria after kidney transplantation is a common, usually self-limiting disorder. However, persistent polyuria can cause not only patient discomfort, including polyuria and polydipsia, but also volume depletion that can produce allograft dysfunction. Herein, we have report a case of central diabetes insipidus newly diagnosed after kidney transplantation. A 45-year-old woman with end-stage kidney disease underwent deceased donor kidney transplantation. Two months after the transplantation, she was admitted for persistent polyuria, polydipsia, and nocturia with urine output of more than 4 L/d. Urine osmolarity was 100 mOsm/kg, which implied that the polyuria was due to water rather than solute diuresis. A water deprivation test was compatible with central diabetes insipidus; desmopressin treatment resulted in immediate symptomatic relief. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated diffuse thickening of the pituitary stalk, which was considered to be nonspecific finding. MRI 12 months later showed no change in the pituitary stalk, although the patient has been in good health without polyuria or polydipsia on desmopressin treatment. The possibility of central diabetes insipidus should be considered in patients presenting with persistent polyuria after kidney transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Congenital toxoplasmosis presenting as central diabetes insipidus in an infant: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Sarar; Osman, Abdaldafae; Al Jurayyan, Nasir A; Al Nemri, Abdulrahman; Salih, Mustafa A M

    2014-03-28

    Congenital toxoplasmosis has a wide range of presentation at birth varying from severe neurological features such as hydrocephalus and chorioretinitis to a well appearing baby, who may develop complications late in infancy. While neuroendocrine abnormalities associated with congenital toxoplasmosis are uncommon, isolated central diabetes insipidus is extremely rare. Here, we report on a female infant who presented with fever, convulsions, and polyuria. Examination revealed weight and length below the 3rd centile along with signs of severe dehydration. Fundal examination showed bilateral chorioretinitis. This infant developed hypernatremia together with increased serum osmolality and decreased both urine osmolality and specific gravity consistent with central diabetes insipidus. Serology for toxoplasma specific immunoglobulin M was high for both the mother and the baby and polymerase chain reaction for toxoplasma deoxyribonucleic acid was positive in the infant confirming congenital toxoplasmosis. Brain computerized tomography scans demonstrated ventriculomegaly associated with cerebral and cortical calcifications. Fluid and electrolyte abnormalities responded to nasal vasopressin therapy. This report highlights central diabetes inspidus as a rare presentation of congenital toxoplasmosis.

  8. Two novel mutations in seven Czech and Slovak kindreds with familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus-benefit of genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrčková, Gabriela; Jankó, Viktor; Kytnarová, Jitka; Čižmárová, Michaela; Tesařová, Markéta; Košťálová, Ľudmila; Virgová, Daniela; Dallos, Tomáš; Hána, Václav; Lebl, Jan; Zeman, Jiří; Kovács, László

    2016-09-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is a rare hereditary disorder with unknown prevalence characterized by arginine-vasopressin hormone (AVP) deficiency resulting in polyuria and polydipsia from early childhood. We report the clinical manifestation and genetic test results in seven unrelated kindreds of Czech or Slovak origin with FNDI phenotype. The age of the sign outset ranged from 2 to 17 years with remarkable interfamilial and intrafamilial variability. Inconclusive result of the fluid deprivation test in three children aged 7 and 17 years old might cause misdiagnosis; however, the AVP gene analysis confirmed the FNDI. The seven families segregated together five different mutations, two of them were novel (c.164C > A, c.298G > C). In addition, DNA analysis proved mutation carrier status in one asymptomatic 1-year-old infant. The present study together with previously published data identified 38 individuals with FNDI in the studied population of 16 million which predicts a disease prevalence of 1:450,000 for the Central European region. The paper underscores that diagnostic water deprivation test may be inconclusive in polyuric children with partial diabetes insipidus and points to the clinical importance and feasibility of molecular genetic testing for AVP gene mutations in the proband and her/his first degree relatives. • At least 70 different mutations were reported to date in about 100 families with neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI), and new mutations appear sporadically. What is New: • Two novel mutations of the AVP gene are reported • The importance of molecular testing in children with polyuria and inconclusive water deprivation test is emphasized.

  9. Network and social support in family care of children with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennafort, Viviane Peixoto Dos Santos; Queiroz, Maria Veraci Oliveira; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Guedes, Maria Vilani Cavalcante

    2016-01-01

    to understand the influence of network and social support in the care of a child with type 1 diabetes. qualitative study, with assumptions of ethnonursing, conducted in a reference service specialized in the treatment of diabetes, in 2014, in the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceará, Brazil. Twenty-six members of the family and their respective school children participated in the study. The process of collection and analysis followed the observation-participation-reflection model. the analytical categories showed that the social network in the care of children with diabetes helped sharing of information and experiences, moments of relaxation and aid in the acquisition of supplies for treatment, with positive repercussions in the family context, generating well-being and confidence in the care of children with diabetes. the cultural care provided by nurses strengthens the network and social support because it encourages autonomy in the promotion of the quality of life of children with type 1 diabetes and their families.

  10. Families with children with diabetes: implications of parent stress for parent and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Vicki S; Becker, Dorothy; Escobar, Oscar; Siminerio, Linda

    2012-05-01

    To examine the relation of parent stress to parent mental health and child mental and physical health. We interviewed children with type 1 diabetes (n = 132; mean age 12 years) annually for 5 years and had one parent complete a questionnaire at each assessment. Parents completed measures of general life stress, stress related to caring for a child with diabetes, benefit finding, and mental health. Child outcomes were depressive symptoms, self-care behavior, and glycemic control. Multilevel modeling was used to examine concurrent and longitudinal relations. Greater parent general stress and greater parent diabetes-specific stress were associated with poorer parent mental health. Overall, greater parent general stress was associated with poorer child outcomes, whereas greater parent diabetes-specific stress was associated with better child outcomes. Families with high levels of general life stress should be identified as they are at risk for both poor parent and child health outcomes.

  11. Elevated liver enzymes in women with a family history of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Masatoshi; Miyoshi, Yuji; Kobayashi, Yasuki

    2008-03-01

    Both elevated liver enzymes and a family history of diabetes mellitus (FHDM) are independent risk factors for type 2 diabetes. This study evaluates the epidemiological association between elevated liver enzymes and FHDM. Subjects included 3512 women workers without diabetes, hepatitis, a smoking habit, or a history of alcohol intake. Blood samples and personal data were collected from all subjects. Subjects with FHDM had a higher mean body mass index (BMI: 23.9kg/m(2) vs. 23.4kg/m(2); p=0.003). Laboratory testing also revealed higher mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG: 5.67mmol/L vs. 5.22mmol/L; penzymes were associated with FHDM. In particular, elevated GGT was related to FHDM, independent of the other variables. Elevated liver enzymes, probably due to fat deposition in the liver, may play a role in increasing the risk of diabetes in individuals with FHDM.

  12. Data collection of patients with diabetes in family medicine: a study in north-eastern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaona, Alberto; Del Zotti, Franco; Girotto, Sandro; Marafetti, Claudio; Rigon, Giulio; Marcon, Alessandro

    2017-08-16

    Studies on data collection and quality of care in Italian family medicine are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the completeness of data collection of patients with diabetes in a large sample of family physicians in the province of Verona, Veneto region, a benchmark for the Italian National Health System. We extracted the data on all the patients with diabetes from the electronic health records of 270 family physicians in 2006 and 2009. We reported the percentage of patients with data recorded for 12 indicators of performance derived from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence diabetes guidelines. Secondarily, we assessed quality of care using the Q-score (the lower the score, the greater the risk of cardiovascular events). Patients with diabetes were 18,507 in 2006 and 20,744 in 2009, and the percentage of patients registered as having diabetes was 4.9% and 5.4% of the total population, respectively (p Data collection improved for all the indicators between 2006 and 2009 but the performance was still low at the end of the study period: patients with no data recorded were 42% in 2006 and 32% in 2009, while patients with data recorded for ≥5 indicators were 9% in 2006 and 17% in 2009. The Q-score improved (mean ± SD, 20.7 ± 3.0 in 2006 vs 21.3 ± 3.6 in 2009, p data collection and quality of care for patients with diabetes during the study period. Nonetheless, data collection was still unsatisfactory in comparison with international benchmarks in 2009. Structural interventions in the organization of family medicine, which have not been implemented since the study period, should be prioritised in Italy.

  13. Impaired Fasting Glucose in Omani Adults with no Family History of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan Al-Sinani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG among Omani adults with no family history (FH of diabetes and to investigate the factors behind the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D, while excluding a FH of diabetes. Methods: A total of 1,182 Omani adults, aged ≥40 years, visited the Family Medicine & Community Health Clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman, on days other than the Diabetes Clinic days, from July 2010 to July 2011. The subjects were interviewed and asked if they had T2D or a FH of T2D. Results: Only 191 (16% reported no personal history of T2D or FH of the disease. Of these, anthropometric and biochemical data was complete in 159 subjects. Of these a total of 42 (26% had IFG according to the American Diabetes Association criteria. Body mass index, fasting insulin, haemoglobin A1C and blood pressure (BP, were significantly higher among individuals with IFG (P <0.01, P <0.05, P <0.01 and P <0.01, respectively. In addition, fasting insulin, BP and serum lipid profile were correlated with obesity indices (P <0.05. Obesity indices were strongly associated with the risk of IFG among Omanis, with waist circumference being the strongest predictor. Conclusion: Despite claiming no FH of diabetes, a large number of Omani adults in this study had a high risk of developing diabetes. This is possibly due to environmental factors and endogamy. The high prevalence of obesity combined with genetically susceptible individuals is a warning that diabetes could be a future epidemic in Oman.

  14. Type III Bartter-like syndrome in an infant boy with Gitelman syndrome and autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnara, Milena; Gaudino, Rossella; Tedeschi, Silvana; Syrèn, Marie-Louise; Perrotta, Silverio; Maines, Evelina; Zaffanello, Marco

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of an infant boy with polyuria and a familial history of central diabetes insipidus. Laboratory blood tests disclosed hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperreninemia, and hyperaldosteronism. Plasma magnesium concentration was slightly low. Urine analysis showed hypercalciuria, hyposthenuria, and high excretion of potassium. Such findings oriented toward type III Bartter syndrome (BSIII). Direct sequencing of the CLCNKB gene revealed no disease-causing mutations. The water deprivation test was positive. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lack of posterior pituitary hyperintensity. Finally, direct sequencing of the AVP-NPII gene showed a point mutation (c.1884G>A) in a heterozygous state, confirming an autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI). This condition did not explain the patient's phenotype; thus, we investigated for Gitelman syndrome (GS). A direct sequencing of the SLC12A3 gene showed c.269A>C and c.1205C>A new mutations. In conclusion, the patient had a genetic combination of GS and adFNDI with a BSIII-like phenotype.

  15. Neurophysiological changes in the central and peripheral nervous system of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Course of development and effects of insulin treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Biessels, G.J.; Cristino, N.A.; Rutten, G.J.; Hamers, F.P.; Erkelens, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus can affect both the peripheral and the central nervous system. However, central deficits are documented less well than peripheral deficits. We therefore compared the course of development of neurophysiological changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems in

  16. A case of transient central diabetes insipidus after aorto-coronary bypass operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung-Hoon; Cho, Jang-Hee; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Lim, Jeong-Hoon; Jin, Mi-Kyung; Kwon, Owen; Hong, Kyung-Deuk; Choi, Ji-Young; Yoon, Se-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Gun-Jik; Park, Sun-Hee

    2012-09-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is characterized by excessive urination and thirst. This disease results from inadequate output of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) from the pituitary gland or the absence of the normal response to ADH in the kidney. We present a case of transient central DI in a patient who underwent a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). A 44-yr-old male underwent a CABG operation. An hour after the operation, the patient developed polyuria and was diagnosed with central DI. The patient responded to desmopressin and completely recovered five days after surgery. It is probable that transient cerebral ischemia resulted in the dysfunction of osmotic receptors in the hypothalamus or hypothalamus-pituitary axis during CPB. It is also possible that cardiac standstill altered the left atrial non-osmotic receptor function and suppressed ADH release. Therefore, we suggest that central DI is a possible cause of polyuria after CPB.

  17. A novel AVP gene mutation in a Turkish family with neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, M; Tiryakioglu, N O; Karaman, O; Coskunpinar, E; Yildiz, R S; Turgut, S; Tiryakioglu, D; Toprak, H; Tasan, E

    2016-03-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is a rare, autosomal dominant, inherited disorder which is characterized by severe polydipsia and polyuria generally presenting in early childhood. In the present study, we aimed to analyze the AVP gene in a Turkish family with FNDI. Four patients with neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus and ten healthy members of the family were studied. Diabetes insipidus was diagnosed by the water deprivation test in affected family members. Mutation analysis was performed by sequencing the whole coding region of AVP-NPII gene using DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples. Urine osmolality was low (C in all patients. c.-3A>C mutation in 5'UTR of AVP gene in this family might lead to the truncation of signal peptide, aggregation of AVP in the cytoplasm instead of targeting in the endoplasmic reticulum, thereby could disrupt AVP secretion without causing neuronal cytotoxicity, which might explain the presence of bright spot. The predicted effect of this mutation should be investigated by further in vitro molecular studies.

  18. Significance of family and peer support for metabolic control of type 1 diabetes in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Dušanka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to explore the significance of family and peer support for metabolic control of Type 1 diabetes in adolescents. Metabolic control refers to maintenance of acceptable blood glucose level thus diminishing risk for chronic complications. It involves regular insulin shots, measuring blood glucose and keeping diary, as the daily based self-control. Regular visits to endocrinologist and screening for chronic complications are compulsory. The sample comprised 79 adolescents age 10-17 years with diagnose of Type 1 diabetes and properly treated at the institute. The sample was divided in two groups - with good (N=40 and poor (N=39 metabolic control. A criterium for good metabolic control was glycosilated hemoglobin less than 7,6%. Social support was measured by Social Support Scale consisting of two parts - the first for estimation of registered family support (based upon modified Perceived Social Support Family Scale and the second for estimation of registered friends' support (modified Perceived Social Support Friend Scale. Adolescents with good metabolic control referred statistically more significant social support in the family, unlike the group with poor metabolic control. Considering peer social support, there was no statistically significant difference. Positive family history for diabetes also appeared to be directly linked to good metabolic control.

  19. Impaired glucose homeostasis in non-diabetic Greek hypertensives with diabetes family history. Effect of the obesity status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssoulis, Gregory P; Liakos, Charalampos I; Karpanou, Eva A; Triantafyllou, Athanasios I; Michaelides, Andreas P; Tzamou, Vanessa E; Markou, Maria I; Stefanadis, Christodoulos I

    2013-01-01

    Arterial hypertension (AH) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are established cardiovascular risk factors. Impaired glucose homeostasis (IGH; impaired fasting glucose or/and impaired glucose tolerance) or pre-diabetes, obesity, and DM family history identify individuals at risk for type 2 DM in whom preventive interventions are necessary. The aim of this study was to determine the glycemic profile in non-diabetic Greek adult hypertensive men and women according to DM family history and the obesity status. Diabetes family history, obesity markers (waist-to-hip ratio, WHR; body mass index, BMI), glycemic parameters (fasting and 2-hour post-load plasma glucose, if necessary; glycated hemoglobin, HbA1c; fasting insulin), insulin resistance indices (homeostasis model assessment, HOMA; quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, QUICKI; Bennett; McAuley), and IGH prevalence were determined in a large cohort of 11,540 Greek hypertensives referred to our institutions. Positive DM family history was associated with elevated fasting glucose (98.6 ± 13.1 vs 96.5 ± 12.3 mg/dL), HbA1c (5.58% ± 0.49% vs 5.50% ± 0.46%), fasting insulin (9.74 ± 4.20 vs 9.21 ± 3.63 μU/mL) and HOMA (2.43 ± 1.19 vs 2.24 ± 1.01) values, lower QUICKI (0.342 ± 0.025 vs 0.345 ± 0.023), Bennett (0.285 ± 0.081 vs 0.292 ± 0.078) and McAuley (6.73 ± 3.43 vs 6.95 ± 3.44) values, and higher IGH prevalence (45.3% vs 38.7%); P history was significant (P history present with higher IGH prevalence and worse glycemic indices levels compared with those with negative family history, especially in the higher WHR/BMI subgroups. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of adiposity and lifestyle in the relationship between family history of diabetes and 20-year incidence of type 2 diabetes in US women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Riet, E.; Dekker, J.M.; Sun, Q.; Nijpels, G.; Hu, F.B.; van Dam, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To evaluate to what extent the association between family history of diabetes and risk of type 2 diabetes can be explained by excess adiposity and lifestyle risk factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We analyzed data from 73,227 women who participated in the Nurses' Health Study cohort.

  1. A genome-wide scan in families with maturity-onset diabetes of the young

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frayling, Timothy M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Chevre, Jean Claude

    2003-01-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a heterogeneous single gene disorder characterized by non-insulin-dependent diabetes, an early onset and autosomal dominant inheritance. Mutations in six genes have been shown to cause MODY. Approximately 15-20% of families fitting MODY criteria do...... not have mutations in any of the known genes. These families provide a rich resource for the identification of new MODY genes. This will potentially enable further dissection of clinical heterogeneity and bring new insights into mechanisms of beta-cell dysfunction. To facilitate the identification of novel...... MODY loci, we combined the results from three genome-wide scans on a total of 23 families fitting MODY criteria. We used both a strict parametric model of inheritance with heterogeneity and a model-free analysis. We did not identify any single novel locus but provided putative evidence for linkage...

  2. Educating families from ethnic minorities in type 1 diabetes-experiences from a Danish intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Olsen, Birthe; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    focusing on immigrant families with children with type 1 diabetes is described. The intervention included the development of adapted educational material and guidelines, and a subsequent re-education of children, adolescents and parents from 37 families. The study demonstrated that it was possible......Ethnic minorities may constitute vulnerable groups within Western health care systems as their ability to master severe chronic diseases could be affected by barriers such as different culture and health/illness beliefs, communication problems and limited educational background. An intervention...... to improve health outcome. During the study, the knowledge of diabetes increased, but with considerable differences between the families. HbA(1c) also decreased significantly during the intervention, but increased during follow-up. The paper discusses possible explanations and suggestions for optimising...

  3. MAFA missense mutation causes familial insulinomatosis and diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacovazzo, D. (Donato); Flanagan, S.E. (Sarah E.); Walker, E. (Emily); Quezado, R. (Rosana); De Sousa Barros, F.A. (Fernando Antonio); Caswell, R. (Richard); Johnson, M.B. (Matthew B.); Wakeling, M. (Matthew); Brändle, M. (Michael); Guo, M. (Min); Dang, M.N. (Mary N.); Gabrovska, P. (Plamena); B. Niederle (Bruno); E. Christ (Emanuel); Jenni, S. (Stefan); Sipos, B. (Bence); Nieser, M. (Maike); A. Frilling (Andrea); Dhatariya, K. (Ketan); P. Chanson (Philippe); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); Konukiewitz, B. (Björn); Klöppel, G. (Günter); Stein, R. (Roland); M. Korbonits; S. Ellard (Sian)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThe β-cell–enriched MAFA transcription factor plays a central role in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while also demonstrating oncogenic transformation potential in vitro. No disease-causing MAFA variants have been previously described. We investigated a large pedigree

  4. Early central diabetes insipidus: An ominous sign in post-cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Minjung Kathy; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Tae Rim; Yoon, Hee; Hwang, Sung Yeon; Cha, Won Chul; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Keun Jeong; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) after cardiac arrest is not well described. Thus, we aim to study the occurrences, outcomes, and risk factors of CDI of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We retrospectively analyzed post-OHCA patients treated at a single center. Central diabetes insipidus was retrospectively defined by diagnostic criteria. One-month cerebral performance category (CPC) scores were collected for outcomes. Of the 169 patients evaluated, 36 patients (21.3%) were diagnosed with CDI. All CDI patients had a poor neurologic outcome of either CPC 4 (13.9%) or CPC 5 (86.1%), and CDI was strongly associated with mortality. Age (odds ratio [OR], 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-0.99), respiratory arrest (OR, 6.62; 95% CI, 1.23-35.44), asphyxia (OR, 9.26; 95% CI, 2.17-34.61), and gray to white matter ratio on brain computed tomogram (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95) were associated with the development of CDI. The onset of CDI was earlier (P diabetes insipidus patients with death or brain death had earlier occurrence of CDI and more maximum urine output. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. INCIDENCE OF CENTRAL DIABETES INSIPIDUS IN CHILDREN PRESENTING WITH POLYDIPSIA AND POLYURIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nadine G; Nabhan, Zeina M; Eugster, Erica A

    2016-12-01

    Polydipsia and polyuria are common reasons for referral to the Pediatric Endocrine clinic. In the absence of hyperglycemia, diabetes insipidus (DI) should be considered. The objectives of the study were to determine the prevalence of central DI (CDI) in a group of children presenting for evaluation of polydipsia and polyuria, and to determine if predictive features were present in patients in whom the diagnosis of DI was made. The study was a retrospective chart review of children presenting to the endocrine clinic with complaints of polydipsia and polyuria over a 5-year period. The charts of 41 patients (mean age 4.9 ± 3.7 years, 28 males) were reviewed. CDI was diagnosed in 8 (20%) children based on abnormal water deprivation test (WDT) results. All but one patient had abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, the most common being pituitary stalk thickening. Children with DI were older (7.86 ± 4.40 vs. 4.18 ± 3.20 years, P = .01) and had a higher propensity for cold beverages intake and unusual water-seeking behaviors compared to those without DI. Baseline WDT also revealed higher serum sodium (Na) and osmolality. The incidence of CDI in children presenting with polydipsia and polyuria is low. Factors associated with higher likelihood of pathology include older age, propensity for cold beverage intake, and higher baseline serum Na and osmolality on a WDT. BMI = body mass index CDI = central diabetes insipidus DI = diabetes insipidus Na = sodium WDT = water deprivation test.

  6. Family Density and SES Related to Diabetes Management and Glycemic Control in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavale, Laura J; Weaver, Patrick; Chen, Rusan; Streisand, Randi; Holmes, Clarissa S

    2015-06-01

    Youth with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) from single-parent families have poorer glycemic control; a finding confounded with socioeconomic status (SES). Family density (FD), or youth:adult ratio, may better characterize family risk status. Structural equation modeling assessed the relation of single-parent status, SES, and FD to parenting stress, diabetes-related conflict, parental monitoring, adherence, and glycemic control using cross-sectional parent and youth data (n = 257). Single-parent status exhibited similar relations as SES and was removed. Lower FD was associated with better glycemic control (β = -.29, p = .014) via less conflict (β = .17, p = .038) and greater adherence (β = -.54, p single-parent status were indistinguishable from those of SES. FD provides distinct information related to adolescent glycemic control. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. SELF - EFFICACY, PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS, FAMILY SUPPORT, AND EATING BEHAVIOR ON TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusuma Wijaya Ridi Putra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the leading causes of death and it is caused by genetics, nutrition, and unhealthy behaviors. Therefore, changes in lifestyle associated with eating behaviors in diabetes mellitus patients greatly impact on their quality of life. There are many factors related with changes in lifestyle of diabetes mellitus patients, especially eating behaviors. Purpose: This study aims to examine the relationships between self-efficacy, psychological stress, family support, and eating behaviors among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients in Sidoarjo, Indonesia. Method: A total of 117 T2DM patients from the Sidoarjo Community Health Center were included in the analysis. Using SPSS IBM 21.0 program, Pearson product moment correlation was performed to analyze data. Results: The findings showed that self-efficacy and family support had positive relationship with eating behaviors (r = .692, p < .001; r = .683, p < .001, respectively. Psychological stress had negative relationship with eating behaviors (r = -.327, p < .001. Conclusion: Self-efficacy, family support, and psychological stress had relationship with eating behaviors. Nurses should pay attention to the factors to make T2DM patients into a long-term commitment toward healthy eating behaviors.

  8. Importance of telemedicine in diabetes care: Relationshipsbetween family physicians and ophthalmologists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the worldwide leadingcause of legal blindness. In 2010, 1.9% of diabetesmellitus (DM) patients were legally blind and 10.2%had visual impairment. The control of DM parameters(glycemia, arterial tension and lipids) is the goldstandard for preventing DR complications, although,unfortunately, DR still appeared in a 25% to 35% ofpatients. The stages of severe vision threading DR,include proliferative DR (6.96%) and diabetic macularedema (6.81%). This review aims to update ourknowledge on DR screening using telemedicine, thedifferent techniques, the problems, and the inclusion ofdifferent professionals such as family physicians in careprograms.

  9. Family businesses and their anchorages in Central European society in the 19th century

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlavačka, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2016), s. 1-22 ISSN 1210-6860 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19640S Institutional support: RVO:67985963 Keywords : Family Business * Central Europe * 19th century Subject RIV: AB - History

  10. The development of academic family medicine in central and eastern Europe since 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krztoń-Królewiecka, Anna; Švab, Igor; Oleszczyk, Marek; Seifert, Bohumil; Smithson, W Henry; Windak, Adam

    2013-03-19

    Since the early 1990s former communist countries have been reforming their health care systems, emphasizing the key role of primary care and recognizing family medicine as a specialty and an academic discipline. This study assesses the level of academic development of the discipline characterised by education and research in central and eastern European (CEE) countries. A key informants study, using a questionnaire developed on the basis of a systematic literature review and panel discussions, conducted in 11 central and eastern European countries and Russia. Family medicine in CEE countries is now formally recognized as a medical specialty and successfully introduced into medical training at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Almost all universities have FM/GP departments, but only a few of them are led by general practitioners. The specialist training programmes in all countries except Russia fulfil the recommendations of the European Parliament. Structured support for research in FM/GP is not always available. However specific scientific organisations function in almost all countries except Russia. Scientific conferences are regularly organised in all the countries, but peer-reviewed journals are published in only half of them. Family medicine has a relatively strong position in medical education in central and eastern Europe, but research in family practice is less developed. Although the position of the discipline at the universities is not very strong, most of the CEE countries can serve as an example of successful academic development for countries southern Europe, where family medicine is still not fully recognised.

  11. Central diabetes insipidus: an unusual complication in a child with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and monosomy 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapolchai, Pacharapan; Ha, Shau-Yin; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung; Lukito, Johannes B; Wan, Thomas S K; So, Chi-Chiu; Chiang, Alan Kwok-Shing

    2013-03-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) is well-documented as a presenting feature of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in adults. However, DI is unusual in pediatric patients with myeloid malignancies. We report here this rare complication in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1 who developed juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and monosomy 7. Our case and previously reported cases of DI arising as a complication in myeloid malignancies demonstrate a close association with deletion of chromosome 7. The clinical characteristics and outcomes of these uncommon cases in children are reviewed and discussed.

  12. Swan ganz catheter for diagnosis of transient central diabetes insipidus after mitral valve replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, I.; Sinha, L.M.; Younus, A.

    2012-01-01

    Transient Diabetes Insipidus (DI) occurring in a patient undergoing open heart surgery is a rare occurrence. In this case report, we are presenting a 30 years old female patient with past history of stroke who underwent redo mitral valve replacement developed polyuria. The diagnosis of hypovolemia was made with the help of swan ganz catheter. The patient responded to desmopressin and completely recovered seven days after surgery. It is possible that transient cerebral ischemia given her history of Stroke resulted in the dysfunction of osmotic receptors in the hypothalamus or hypothalamus - pituitary axis during Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB). Therefore, we concluded that central DI is a probable cause of polyuria after CPB. (author)

  13. Central Diabetes Insipidus and Cisplatin-Induced Renal Salt Wasting Syndrome: A Challenging Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, Gerard; Hansford, Jordan R; Duke, Trevor

    2016-05-01

    We describe a 2-year-old female with a suprasellar primitive neuroectodermal tumor and central diabetes insipidus (DI) who developed polyuria with natriuresis and subsequent hyponatremia 36 hr after cisplatin administration. The marked urinary losses of sodium in combination with a negative sodium balance led to the diagnosis of cisplatin-induced renal salt wasting syndrome (RSWS). The subsequent clinical management is very challenging. Four weeks later she was discharged from ICU without neurological sequela. The combination of cisplatin-induced RSWS with DI can be confusing and needs careful clinical assessment as inaccurate diagnosis and management can result in increased neurological injury. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Diabetes mellitus juvenil: a experiência de familiares de adolescentes e pré-adolescentes Juvenile diabetes: the family's experience with diabetic adolescents and pre-adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Basso de Brito

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de investigar a experiência de cuidar de adolescentes e pré-adolescentes portadores de diabetes tipo I, na perspectiva dos seus familiares. Foi utilizada a abordagem fenomenológica, modalidade de pesquisa qualitativa que se propõe a compreender os significados das experiências vividas. Foram entrevistados dez pais (9 mães e 1 pai em hospital de ensino do interior paulista. A experiência de cuidar do filho com diabetes emerge das convergências das descrições dos participantes, sendo descrita em três temas principais: o universo da doença; relação com as pessoas; reflexão sobre a experiência vivida. Os participantes descrevem suas dificuldades e estratégias para manterem a família unida e ainda oferecer suporte aos filhos. Eles acreditam que têm que aceitar e enfrentar os desafios, além de estimularem os filhos para sua segurança e qualidade de vida. Os dados mostraram a necessidade de um suporte profissional, além de um espaço para a discussão de temas tanto para as crianças com diabetes como para seus familiares.This study aimed at investigating the experience of taking care of adolescents and pre-adolescents with type 1 diabetes from the standpoint of their family members. A phenomenological approach, i.e. a type of qualitative analysis aimed at understanding the meaning of life experiences, was used. Ten parents (9 mothers and 1 father were interviewed at a teaching hospital in the interior of São Paulo state. The experience of taking care of a child with diabetes emerged from the converging points reported under 3 main themes: the universe of the disease; personal relationships; reflections on the experience. The participants described their difficulties and the strategies they use for keeping the family together besides providing support to the children. They believe they have to accept and face the challenges, besides motivating their children in order to ensure their

  15. Identification of a SIRT1 mutation in a family with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biason-Lauber, Anna; Böni-Schnetzler, Marianne; Hubbard, Basil P

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by autoimmune-mediated β cell destruction leading to insulin deficiency. The histone deacetylase SIRT1 plays an essential role in modulating several age-related diseases. Here we describe a family carrying a mutation in the SIRT1 gene, in which all five affected members...... developed an autoimmune disorder: four developed type 1 diabetes, and one developed ulcerative colitis. Initially, a 26-year-old man was diagnosed with the typical features of type 1 diabetes, including lean body mass, autoantibodies, T cell reactivity to β cell antigens, and a rapid dependence on insulin....... Direct and exome sequencing identified the presence of a T-to-C exchange in exon 1 of SIRT1, corresponding to a leucine-to-proline mutation at residue 107. Expression of SIRT1-L107P in insulin-producing cells resulted in overproduction of nitric oxide, cytokines, and chemokines. These observations...

  16. Factors associated with glycemic control in people with diabetes at the Family Health Strategy in Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fonseca Lima

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Identifying factors associated with glycemic control in people with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM registered in the Family Health Strategy (FHS in Pernambuco, Brazil. METHOD Associations between glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin A lower or equal to 7% presented by people with DM and variables related to sociodemographic conditions, lifestyle, characteristics of diabetes, treatment and follow-up of patients by health services were investigated by multiple regression. RESULTS More than 65% of the participants presented inadequate glycemic control, especially those with lower age, longer illness duration, more annual contacts with FHS and complex therapeutic regimen. People with DM without referrals to specialists presented greater glycemic control. Associations with education level and obesity did not remain significant in the multivariate model. CONCLUSION The evolution of diabetes hinders adequate control, however, attention to younger people with DM and referrals to specialists are factors that can improve glycemic control.

  17. Diabetes self-care: lessons from research on the family and broader contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barbara J

    2003-04-01

    The foundation of diabetes management is the self-care behavior of the patient. All of the systems within which the person with diabetes interacts, as well as the media and broader social and cultural values, affect this self-care behavior. In this article I focus on recent research that has examined the link between relationships in the patient's intimate network (i.e., family and close friends) and in the patient's exchange network (i.e., patient-provider relationship, Internet support). The goal of this review is to identify relational targets associated with self-care behaviors that are potentially modifiable within the diabetes medical care setting. Evidence-based suggestions are made for points of intervention entry, and areas for future research are explored.

  18. Family clustering of secondary chronic kidney disease with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Fernando Antonio; Ciambelli, Giuliano Serafino; Bertoco, André Luz; Jurado, Marcelo Mai; Siqueira, Guilherme Vasconcelos; Bernardo, Eder Augusto; Pavan, Maria Valeria; Gianini, Reinaldo José

    2015-02-01

    In Brazil hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus are responsible for 60% of cases of end-stage renal disease in renal replacement therapy. In the United States studies have identified family clustering of chronic kidney disease, predominantly in African-Americans. A single Brazilian study observed family clustering among patients with chronic kidney disease when compared with hospitalized patients with normal renal function. This article aims to assess whether there is family clustering of chronic kidney disease in relatives of individuals in renal replacement therapy caused by hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus. A case-control study with 336 patients in renal replacement therapy with diabetes mellitus or hypertension for at least 5 years (cases) and a control matched sample group of individuals with hypertension or diabetes mellitus and normal renal function (n = 389). Individuals in renal replacement therapy (cases) had a ratio of 2.35 (95% CI 1.42-3.89, p hypertension or diabetes mellitus).

  19. The Relationship Between Perceived Family Climate and Glycemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Adolescent Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eray, Şafak; Uçar, Halit Necmi; Çetinkaya, Fatma; Eren, Erdal; Vural, Pınar

    2017-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disease which ranks third in children under age 16 years. Expressed emotion (EE) is a term that indicates a specific family climate including lack of emotional support (LES), irritability, and emotional over-involvement. It is known that the family environment is highly important for glycemic control in diabetic adolescents. In this study, the relationship between perceived EE and glycemic control in adolescents diagnosed with T1DM not accompanied by psychopathology were investigated. The study included 49 adolescents with T1DM and 50 adolescents as a control group. Adolescents with psychopathology and intellectual disability were excluded from the study. Perceived EE was measured by the Shortened Level of Expressed Emotion Scale (SLEES) and blood sugar regulation was assessed by HbA1c levels. The adolescents with T1DM showed a significant difference in perceived EE (p=0.020) and LES (p=0.014) when compared with the control group. When diabetic adolescents were compared among themselves, the diabetic adolescents with poor glycemic control perceived greater EE (p=0.033) and less emotional support (p=0.049). In regression analyses, the predictive power of mother's educational level, the employment status of mothers and the subscale "LES" of SLEES combined to explain HbA1c level was determined to be 37.8%. The strong relationship between perceived EE and glycemic control showed us that perceived EE can hinder treatment compliance without causing psychopathology. For this reason, it is recommended that not only patients with psychopathology, but all diabetic adolescents receive psychosocial support and family interventions.

  20. Selection of desmopressin preparations for the treatment of central diabetes insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Biryukova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Central diabetes insipidus (CDI is a severe pathology of the hypothalamic-pituitary system, based on a deficit of antidiuretic hormone (ADH. The disease is a life threating condition for patients without adequate replacement therapy by various preparations of arginine vasopressin. This review presents the current concepts on etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic proсedures, and treatment of CDI. The article gives comparative pharmacological characteristics of various desmopressin forms for the treatment of the central form of disease. When choosing a therapy for the treatment of CDI, the article highlights the long-term high efficiency and safety of the original sublingual form of desmopressin (Mininin Melt, which is confirmed by real clinical practice and clinical trials, including the comparison with other forms of desmopressin.

  1. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdenes-Pijl, Miranda; Dondorp, Wybo J; Timmermans, Danielle Rm; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2011-07-05

    This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3) and without (n = 1) a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2), and diabetes patients (n = 2). All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment (DNA test or obtaining family history) and also differ from

  2. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Methods Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3 and without (n = 1 a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2, and diabetes patients (n = 2. All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Results Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. Conclusion The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment

  3. The influence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on local postural muscle and central sensory feedback balance control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Toosizadeh

    Full Text Available Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN. Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing. DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2 and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2 with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, P<0.01, which suggests a compromised local-control balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, P<0.02, which suggests an adaptation mechanism to reduce the overall body sway in DPN patients. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were observed between central-control rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, P<0.05 and the history of diabetes (rPearson = 0.58-071, P<0.05. Results suggest that in the lack of sensory feedback cueing, DPN participants were highly unstable compared to controls. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation

  4. Contribution of family social support to the metabolic control of people with diabetes mellitus: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Lilian Cristiane; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; Gomides, Danielle Dos Santos; Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Foss, Milton César; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-08-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial aimed to evaluate the contribution of family social support to the clinical/metabolic control of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that requires continuous care in order for individuals to reach glycemic control, the primordial goal of treatment. Family social support is essential to the development of care skills and their maintenance. However, there are few studies that investigate the contribution of family social support to diabetes control. The study was developed between June 2011 and May 2013, and included 164 people who were randomized using simple randomization. The intervention group differed from the control group in that it included a family caregiver, who was recognized by the patient as a source of social support. The educational interventions received by people with diabetes mellitus were used as the basis of the education provided through telephone calls to patients' family members and caregivers, and their purpose was to encourage dialogue between the patients and their relatives about the topics related to diabetes. Regarding the clinical impact, the results showed that there was a greater reduction in blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin in the intervention group than in the control group, showing a positive effect on the control of the disease. Families should be incorporated into the care of people with diabetes mellitus and especially in health care programs, in particular those that can promote different forms of social support to strengthen the bond between family members. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on local postural muscle and central sensory feedback balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Mohler, Jane; Armstrong, David G; Talal, Talal K; Najafi, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control) and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing). DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2) and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2) with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, Pcontrol balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, Pcontrol rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, Pcontrols. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation mechanism using sensory feedback depends on the level of neuropathy and the history of diabetes.

  6. Central leptin gene therapy ameliorates diabetes type 1 and 2 through two independent hypothalamic relays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Satya P.

    2009-01-01

    Although its role in energy homeostasis is firmly established, the evidence accumulated over a decade linking the adipocyte leptin -hypothalamus axis in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus has received little attention in the contemporary thinking. In this context various lines of evidence are collated here to show that (1) under the direction of leptin two independent relays emanating from the hypothalamus restrain insulin secretion from the pancreas and mobilize peripheral organs - liver, skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue - to upregulate glucose disposal, and (2), leptin insufficiency in the hypothalamus produced by either leptinopenia or restriction of leptin transport across the blood brain barrier due to hyperleptinemia of obesity and aging, initiate antecedent pathophysiological sequalae of diabetes type 1 and 2. Further, we document here the efficacy of leptin replenishment in vivo, especially by supplying it to the hypothalamus with the aid of gene therapy, in preventing the antecedent pathophysiological sequalae-hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia - in various animal models and clinical paradigms of diabetes type 1 and 2 with or without attendant obesity. Overall, the new insights on the long-lasting antidiabetic potential of two independent hypothalamic relays engendered by central leptin gene therapy and the preclinical safety indicators in rodents warrant further validation in subhuman primates and humans. PMID:19647774

  7. An unusual case of central diabetes insipidus & hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state following cardiorespiratory arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We are describing an unusual case of severe hyperglycemia and hypernatremia, resistant to treatment. Case presentation A thirty year old female with adenocarcinoma of rectum was admitted with increasing lethargy, headache and drowsiness. She deteriorated rapidly and had cardiac arrest, following which she remained comatose. Her initial serum glucose and sodium were normal, but after receiving dexamethasone and mannitol, the serum glucose progressively increased to 54.7 mmol/L and sodium to 175 mmol/L, despite receiving very high dose of intravenous (IV) insulin infusion. She was evaluated for diabetes insipidus because of continued polyuria even after correction of hyperglycemia. Her serum osmolality was 337 mmol/kg, and urine osmolality was 141 mmol/kg which rose to 382 mmol/kg, after receiving 4 mcg of IV Desmopressin. Conclusion Our patient developed central diabetes insipidus post cardiac arrest and severe dehydration because of diabetes insipidus. Stress of critical illness, dehydration, dexamethasone and IV dextrose infusion were likely responsible for this degree of severe and resistant to treatment hyperglycemia. PMID:23947429

  8. Increased risk of metabolic disorders in healthy young adults with family history of diabetes: from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joon Ho; Roh, Eun; Oh, Tae Jung; Kim, Kyoung Min; Moon, Jae Hoon; Lim, Soo; Jang, Hak Chul; Choi, Sung Hee

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the impact of a family history of diabetes on type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and behavioral traits in young Korean adults. Subjects aged 25-44 years were included, and the presence of a family history of diabetes was obtained by a self-reported questionnaire (the Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey 2010). We compared the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, and other metabolic parameters, including blood pressure and lipid profile. Of 2059 participants, those with a family history of diabetes involving first-degree relatives (n = 489, 23.7%) had a significantly higher prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (14.3 vs. 11.7%) and type 2 diabetes (6.7 vs. 1.8%), compared to those without a family history ( P  metabolic syndrome (21.3 vs. 12.1%, P  family history of diabetes. Among subjects exhibiting normal glucose tolerance (n = 1704), those with a family history of diabetes had higher fasting glucose (89.0 vs. 87.8 mg/dL, P  family history of diabetes. Young adults with a family history of diabetes had an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, even though they currently exhibited a normal glycemic profile. Proactive lifestyle consultation is requested especially among healthy young population with a family history of diabetes.

  9. Animal models of Central Diabetes Insipidus: Human relevance of acquired beyond hereditary syndromes and the role of oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Antonio; Mahía, Javier; Puerto, Amadeo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to review different animal models of Central Diabetes Insipidus, a neurobiological syndrome characterized by the excretion of copious amounts of diluted urine (polyuria), a consequent water intake (polydipsia), and a rise in the serum sodium concentration (hypernatremia). In rodents, Central Diabetes Insipidus can be caused by genetic disorders (Brattleboro rats) but also by various traumatic/surgical interventions, including neurohypophysectomy, pituitary stalk compression, hypophysectomy, and median eminence lesions. Regardless of its etiology, Central Diabetes Insipidus affects the neuroendocrine system that secretes arginine vasopressin, a neurohormone responsible for antidiuretic functions that acts trough the renal system. However, most Central Diabetes Insipidus models also show disorders in other neurobiological systems, specifically in the secretion of oxytocin, a neurohormone involved in body sodium excretion. Although the hydromineral behaviors shown by the different Central Diabetes Insipidus models have usually been considered as very similar, the present review highlights relevant differences with respect to these behaviors as a function of the individual neurobiological systems affected. Increased understanding of the relationship between the neuroendocrine systems involved and the associated hydromineral behaviors may allow appropriate action to be taken to correct these behavioral neuroendocrine deficits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Central motor and sensory pathway involvement in an X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelis, T; Panas, M; Kokotis, P; Karadima, G; Kararizou, E; Karandreas, N

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the subclinical involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) in an X-linked Charcot-Marie-Toth (CMTX) family. Seven subjects, all members of one family with a C.462T > G connexin 32 (Cx32) mutation were investigated by Blink reflex, Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). There were five clinically symptomatic for CMT neuropathy (four male and one female) and two asymptomatic (female) subjects. Subclinical CNS involvement was observed in all, symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. This is the largest CMTX neuropathy family investigated for CNS involvement. Electrophysiological involvement of the CNS in every examined member of this family was observed, raising the question of a more systematic involvement of the CNS in CMTX disease.

  11. Knowledge and practice on prevention of diabetes mellitus among Diabetes mellitus family members, in suburban cities in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolde, Mistire; Berhe, Nega; van Die, Irma; Medhin, Girmay; Tsegaye, Aster

    2017-11-02

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the serious non communicable diseases worldwide. Presence of DM patient in a family may be considered as risk factor for other family members to acquire the disease, due to DM inheritance nature and/or similar life style pattern among family members. This paper assessed awareness of DM patients' family members (DMPFMs) about DM occurrence and prevention. A cross sectional study was conducted in 2014 in two suburban cities of Ethiopia, namely Kemisse, and Kombolcha using an interviewer administered questionnaire among primary or secondary degree DMPFMs and controls. Based on eligibility criteria study participants were selected by health extension workers on house to house visit. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20, and P value less than 0.05 considered as statistically significant. Of the total 347 study participants, 45.5% (n = 158) had DMPFMs. Majority, 60.8% of DMPFMs and 73.0% of controls were males. Mean age of DMPFMs (30.06 years) was less than that of the controls (37.38 years). On living style, 51.9% DMPFMs, and 42.8% of controls were single. In both study groups, the majority of study participants attended grade 7-12. The likelihood of having good level of knowledge among DMPFMs were 2.94 times (AOR = 2.94 95% CI 1.87-4.86) higher compared to those who did not. Those attaining higher educational levels were 3.41 times (AOR = 3.41, 95% CI 1.31-8.91) more likely to have good level of knowledge, as compared to those who were unable to read and write. The likelihood of having good level of positive practice among DMPFMs were 3.38 times (AOR = 3.38% CI 2.05-5.58) higher as compared to controls. Participants who were living in Kombolcha were 2.33 times (AOR = 2.33 95% CI 1.31-4.12) more likely to have good level of practice, as compared to individuals from Kemisse. Diabetes mellitus family members in the Ethiopian suburban cities Kemisse, and Kombolcha had better knowledge and practice about DM compared to

  12. [Clinical characteristics of central diabetes insipidus: a retrospective analysis of 230 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J P; Guo, Q H; Mu, Y M; Lyu, Z H; Gu, W J; Yang, G Q; Du, J; Ba, J M; Lu, J M

    2018-03-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and etiologies of central diabetes insipidus (CDI). Methods: The clinical data of 230 patients with CDI in the Department of Endocrinology of Chinese PLA General Hospital from 2008 June to 2014 December were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: The three most common causes of CDI were idiopathic CDI, lymphocytic hypophysitis and intracranial germ cell tumors. Among all the CDI, the idiopathic CDI accounted for 37.48%. There were significant differences in age onset and gender distribution among the different causes of CDI. The patients with intracranial germ cell tumors [age of onset(19.2±10.2) years] were younger than the other types of CDI. Germ cell tumors patients were more common in male, and lymphocytic hypophysitis patients were more common in female. The most frequent abnormality of anterior pituitary in patients with CDI was growth hormone deficiency, followed by hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency and hypothyroidism. The dysfunction of thyroid axis and adrenal axis in patients with germ cell tumor was more common than those in patients with idiopathic and lymphocytic hypophysitis. Conclusions: The most common causes of central diabetes insipidus were idiopathic CDI, lymphocytic hypophysitis and intracranial germ cell tumors. There were differences in age of onset, gender distribution and abnormal production of anterior pituitary hormones among all causes of CDI patients.

  13. Adult Multisystem Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus Successfully Treated with Chemotherapy

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    Jung-Eun Choi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the rare case of an adult who was diagnosed with recurrent multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH involving the pituitary stalk and lung who present with central diabetes insipidus and was successfully treated with systemic steroids and chemotherapy. A 49-year-old man visited our hospital due to symptoms of polydipsia and polyuria that started 1 month prior. Two years prior to presentation, he underwent excision of right 6th and 7th rib lesions for the osteolytic lesion and chest pain, which were later confirmed to be LCH on pathology. After admission, the water deprivation test was done and the result indicated that he had central diabetes insipidus. Sella magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass on the pituitary stalk with loss of normal bright spot at the posterior lobe of the pituitary. Multiple patchy infiltrations were detected in both lung fields by computed tomography (CT. He was diagnosed with recurrent LCH and was subsequently treated with inhaled desmopressin, systemic steroids, vinblastine, and mercaptopurine. The pituitary mass disappeared after two months and both lungs were clear on chest CT after 11 months. Although clinical remission in multisystem LCH in adults is reportedly rare, our case of adult-onset multisystem LCH was treated successfully with systemic chemotherapy using prednisolone, vinblastine, and 6-mercaptopurine, which was well tolerated.

  14. Comparison of desmopressin (DDAVP tablet and intranasal spray in the treatment of central diabetes insipidus

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    "Bagher Larijani

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Desmoperssin is the drug of choice for treatment of central diabetes insipidus and most commonly it is used as intranasal spray. In this study, efficacy and side effects of oral desmopressin was compared with the intranasal spray. This study was before -after clinical trial on 14 outpatients (9 F, 5 M, age 14 -50 Y with central diabetes insipidus who had been treated with intranasal spray of desmopressin previously. Weight, pulse rate and blood pressure (sitting -standing, biochemical profile, serum electrolytes, 24h urine volume, specific gravity of urine and LFT was measured before and after 1 month study. Starting dose for each patient was one oral tablet of DDAVP (0.1 mg per 8 hours. Paired Samples T-Test was used for data analysis. No clinically significant changes were found as regard to weight, pulse rate, blood pressure, blood chemistry, electrolyte and urinalysis. Single reported adverse effect was headache (43% in tablet group and dyspnea (7% in spray group. Both dosage forms were able to control diurnal polyuria and nocturnal polyuria. The antidiuretic dose - equivalence ratio for intranasal to oral desmopressin was 1: 18. Spray was superior in terms of rapid onset of action and duration of antidiuretic action in 100% and 78% of cases (not significant, respectively. Tablets were more available and much more easily consumed as reported by patients, in 86% (P=0.0006. Treatment with tablets offers a good alternative to the intranasal route, especially in patients with chronic rhinitis or common cold and similar conditions.

  15. Information Needs of Family Carers of People with Diabetes at the End of Life: A Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, M.F.; Dunning, T.; Savage, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent research identified the issue that family carers of people with diabetes at the end of life (EOL) did not receive sufficient information to enable them to help their relative manage their diabetes at the EOL. Aim: The aim of the current study was to identify by conducting a

  16. Type 2 diabetes in young adults in Central Auckland: demography and complications.

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    Beig, Junaid; Khanolkar, Manish; Cundy, Tim

    2018-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in young adults is associated with a high risk of diabetes complications. To investigated the demography and the emergence of complications of young adults with T2D in the central Auckland region where there has been substantial immigration. In total, 310 young adults with T2D (Auckland Diabetes Centre in 2015. We documented demographic, anthropometric and metabolic variables and prevalence and the emergence of complications. Three demographic groups accounted for 243 participants (78%): 135 (44%) were migrants of Asian or Pacific Island origin, diagnosed a median 9 years after migration at a mean age of 28 ± 6 years; 88 (29%) were New Zealand-born Pāsifika descent, with a high prevalence of morbid obesity and 37 (12%) had major mental illness or intellectual disability. At diagnosis, the median HbA1c was 80 mmol/mol, and in 28%, it was ≥100 mmol/mol. A median 6 years after diagnosis, 56% had some degree of retinopathy, with the prevalence related both to the duration of diabetes and glycaemic control (P = 0.001). Forty-four percent of subjects had abnormal albuminuria at diagnosis (12% with macroalbuminuria). Increased albuminuria was strongly associated with obesity (P = 0.002). The development of CKD stages 4-5 was related both to the severity of retinopathy and degree of albuminuria at diagnosis (P = 0.0001). Major cardiovascular events were related to the severity of retinopathy at diagnosis (P = 0.0001). New migrants, New Zealand-born Pāsifika and patients with mental illness or an intellectual disability comprise the bulk of young onset T2D. The disease is aggressive, and by the age of 40, patients are already developing advanced complications. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  17. Diabetes-specific genetic effects on obesity traits in American Indian populations: the Strong Heart Family Study

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    Howard Barbara V

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body fat mass distribution and deposition are determined by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and type 2 diabetes. We previously identified evidence for genotype-by-diabetes interaction on obesity traits in Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS participants. To localize these genetic effects, we conducted genome-wide linkage scans of obesity traits in individuals with and without type 2 diabetes, and in the combined sample while modeling interaction with diabetes using maximum likelihood methods (SOLAR 2.1.4. Methods SHFS recruited American Indians from Arizona, North and South Dakota, and Oklahoma. Anthropometric measures and diabetes status were obtained during a clinic visit. Marker allele frequencies were derived using maximum likelihood methods estimated from all individuals and multipoint identity by descent sharing was estimated using Loki. We used variance component linkage analysis to localize quantitative trait loci (QTLs influencing obesity traits. We tested for evidence of additive and QTL-specific genotype-by-diabetes interactions using the regions identified in the diabetes-stratified analyses. Results Among 245 diabetic and 704 non-diabetic American Indian individuals, we detected significant additive gene-by-diabetes interaction for weight and BMI (P P Conclusion These results suggest distinct genetic effects on body mass in individuals with diabetes compared to those without diabetes, and a possible role for one or more genes on chromosome 1 in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  18. Family history of type 2 diabetes, abdominal adipocyte size and markers of the metabolic syndrome.

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    Anthanont, P; Ramos, P; Jensen, M D; Hames, K C

    2017-11-01

    A major risk factor of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a positive family history of diabetes. First degree relatives (FDR) of patients with T2DM are more insulin resistant and are reported to have larger abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes than adults without a family history. Our objectives were to assess whether FDR of T2DM are associated with larger abdominal adipocytes independent of age, sex and abdominal subcutaneous fat and to assess whether a family history of T2DM is also independently related to femoral adipocyte size, as well as visceral fat and fasting plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations. We extracted adipocyte size, body composition, plasma TG and demographic data of non-diabetic research participants of previous studies conducted in our laboratory. We ascertained the family history of T2DM from the electronic medical records. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess whether FDR of T2DM are more likely to have other risk factors after adjusting for known covariates. Of 604 participants, 148 were FDR of T2DM. Although abdominal and femoral adipocyte size was greater in FDR of T2DM than those without a family history (0.74±0.33 vs 0.63±0.33 μg lipid per cell, Phistory of T2DM was a significant predictor of abdominal adipocyte size after adjustment for age and body fat distribution parameters in females (total R 2 =0.5, Phistory of T2DM was not independently predictive of femoral adipocyte size, visceral fat area or TG. Female FDR of T2DM have larger abdominal, but not femoral, adipocytes, even after accounting for age and body fat distribution.

  19. Perceptions of Family Among Low-Income Patients With Diabetes in a Text-Based Mobile Health Intervention.

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    Burner, Elizabeth R E; Menchine, Michael D; Kubicek, Katrina; Robles, Marisela; Kagawa Singer, Marjorie; Arora, Sanjay

    2018-04-01

    Diabetes disproportionately affects the US Latino population, due to socioeconomic pressures, genetics, reduced access to care and cultural practices. While efforts to improve self-care through interventions incorporating family are highly rated by Latinos, family can be both supportive and obstructive. To develop effective interventions, this role needs clarification. We conducted group interviews in Spanish and English with 24 participants with diabetes from a mobile health diabetes self-care intervention. We imported transcripts into Dedoose, a qualitative computer analysis program and analyzed them with a modified grounded theory technique. Utilizing an iterative process, we reexamined transcripts with new codes derived in each round of analysis until saturation was reached. We employed techniques to improve trustworthiness (co-coding, member checking). Broad categorical themes arose from the initial codes and were developed into a conceptual model of barriers to and strategies for diabetes management. Family and family responsibilities emerged as both a supportive and obstructive force for diabetes self-care. While the desire to care for family motivated patients, food at family gatherings and pressure from managing multiple family responsibilities contributed to poor diet choices. Yet, some patients believed their diabetes caused their immediate family to make healthier choices. Among these predominantly Latino patients, family and family responsibilities were key motivators as well as obstacles to self-care, particularly regarding nutrition. Finding the ideal design for social support mHealth-based interventions will require careful study and creation of culturally based programs to match the needs of specific populations, and may require educating family members to provide effective social support.

  20. Prediction of Adolescents’ Glycemic Control 1 Year After Diabetes-Specific Family Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E.; Guilfoyle, Shanna M.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test adherence to blood glucose monitoring (BGM) as a mediator between diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] levels) for 1 year. Design Three waves of prospective data spanning 1 year. Setting Diabetes clinic in a large tertiary care children’s hospital in the Midwestern United States. Participants One hundred forty-five dyads composed of an adolescent (aged 13–18 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus and a parent. Main Exposures Adolescent- and parent-rated diabetes-specific family conflict and mean daily BGM frequency obtained through meter downloads. Main Outcome Measure Levels of HbA1c, abstracted from the medical record. Results In separate general linear models, higher adolescent-rated family conflict scores at baseline predicted less frequent BGM at 6 months (β=−0.08 [P=.01]) and higher HbA1c levels at 12 months (β=0.08 [P=.02]). In the multivariate model including baseline conflict and BGM as predictors of HbA1c levels, BGM was a significant predictor (β=−0.24 [P=.007]) and conflict was no longer significant (β=0.05 [P=.11]), supporting the mediation hypothesis. Post hoc probing showed that BGM explained 24% of the variance in the conflict-HbA1c link. The mediation between parent-reported conflict andHbA1c levels via BGM adherence was partially supported (conflict predicting HbA1c in the zero-order equation, β=−0.24 [P=.004]; multivariate equation, β=0.06 [P=.02]), and BGM frequency explained 16% of the conflict-HbA1c link. Conclusions Diabetes-specific family conflict in adolescence predicts deteriorations in BGM and subsequent glycemic control for at least 1 year. Results support ongoing intervention research designed to reduce family conflict and thus prevent a trajectory of declining adherence and glycemic control across adolescence. PMID:21727273

  1. CENTRAL DIABETES INSIPIDUS: CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND LONG-TERM COURSE IN A LARGE COHORT OF ADULTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri-Iraqi, Hiba; Hirsch, Dania; Herzberg, Dana; Lifshitz, Avner; Tsvetov, Gloria; Benbassat, Carlos; Shimon, Ilan

    2017-05-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a rare heterogeneous condition with various underlying causes. This study sought to increase the still-limited data on the clinical characteristics and long-term course in adults diagnosed with CDI. Data on demographics, presentation, imaging findings, affected pituitary axes, treatment, and complications were collected retrospectively from the files of 70 adult patients with CDI followed at a referral endocrine clinic. Forty women and 30 men were included. Mean age was 46.8 ± 15 years at the time of this study and 29.3 ± 20 years at CDI diagnosis. Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed in childhood. Forty patients (57%) acquired CDI following surgery. Main sellar pathologies were: craniopharyngioma, 17 patients (11 diagnosed in childhood); Langerhans histiocytosis, 10 patients (5 diagnosed in childhood); 7 patients (all diagnosed as adults) had a growth hormone-secreting adenoma; 12 patients (17%; 6 diagnosed in childhood) had idiopathic CDI. At least one anterior pituitary axis was affected in 73% of the cohort: 59% had growth hormone deficiency, 56% hypogonadism, 55% central hypothyroidism, 44% adrenocorticotropic hormone-cortisol deficiency. Patients with postoperative/trauma CDI (n = 44) tended to have multiple anterior pituitary axes deficits compared to the nonsurgical group of patients. All patients were treated with vasopressin preparations, mostly nasal spray. Hyponatremia developed in 32 patients, more in women, and was severe (150 mEq/L) was noticed in 5 patients. Overall, the calculated complication rate was 22 in 1,250 treatment-years. Most adult patients with CDI have anterior pituitary dysfunction. Stability is usually achieved with long-term treatment. Women were more susceptible to desmopressin complications, albeit with an overall relatively low complication rate. ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone CDI = central diabetes insipidus GH = growth hormone MRI = magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Family CHAOS is associated with glycaemic control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, M; Taylor, B J; Lawrence, J; Healey, D; Reith, D M; Gray, A; Wheeler, B J

    2016-02-01

    Despite advances in the medical management of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), for many, glycaemic control remains substandard. Other factors are clearly important in determining success, or lack thereof, with diabetes management. With this in mind, we have investigated whether family CHAOS may provide a novel tool to identify when environmental confusion could impact on diabetes management and subsequent glycaemic control. A case-control study of children and adolescents with established T1DM and age-/sex-matched controls was conducted. Demographic information, both maternal and paternal CHAOS scores, and HbA1c were collected. Statistical analysis was undertaken to explore associations between T1DM and CHAOS and between CHAOS and HbA1c. Data on 65 children with T1DM and 60 age-/sex-matched controls were obtained. There was no evidence of group differences for maternal CHAOS (p = 0.227), but paternal CHAOS scores were higher for the T1DM group (p = 0.041). Greater maternal and paternal CHAOS scores were both associated with higher HbA1c (p ≤ 0.027). The maternal association remained after controlling for diabetes duration, SMBG frequency, and insulin therapy. In children with T1DM, there appears to be a negative association between increased environmental confusion, as rated by CHAOS, and glycaemic control. In addition, when compared to controls, fathers of children and adolescents with T1DM appear to experience CHAOS differently to mothers. These findings contribute to the growing body of literature exploring psychosocial factors in T1DM. Continuing efforts are required to fully understand how the family and psychosocial environment interact with diabetes to impact on long-term health outcomes.

  3. Psychological aspects of caregivers associated with family support in the therapeutic adherence of diabetic patients

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    Miriam Teresa Domínguez - Guedea

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the relationship of psychological aspects of family caregivers with the support that they offer to the diabetic patient’s adherence to treatment. The psychological aspects were: subjective well-being, attachment styles, coping strategies to problems and perceived social support. Methods: Joined in the study 29 family caregivers in a noneprobabilistic sample. Participants were contacted from three Mutual Aid Groups for diabetic and hypertensive patients in the city of Hermosillo, México. Questionnaires designed for the purposes of research were applied, as well as psychometric instruments previously validated in the cultural reference group. Results: The data showed that the psychological aspects that are statistically significant and negatively related to adherence therapy are avoidant attachment and negative affection, both associated to each other in a positive way, indicating that they occur in parallel. Avoidant attachment was positively associated with avoidant coping strategies and emotional disturbance, but negatively with secure attachment and material satisfaction. Negative affection were positively associated with emotional coping, but negatively with secure attachment and material satisfaction. Negative affect were positively associated with emotional confrontation, but negatively with positive affection, material satisfaction, emotional support and guidance support. Conclusions: More applied research in needed on the influence of family factors in achieving adherence to treatment, because so far, most work focuses more on the individual patient, disregarding the family factor.

  4. Ethnic differences in family member diabetes involvement and psychological outcomes: results from the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrot, Mark; Egede, Leonard E; Funnell, Martha M; Hsu, William C; Ruggiero, Laurie; Siminerio, Linda M; Stuckey, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    To assess differences among USA ethnic groups in psychological status of adult family members (FMs) and their involvement with the diabetes of another adult. Data are from the FM survey of the USA DAWN2 study, including 105 White non-Hispanics, 47 African Americans, 46 Hispanic Americans and 40 Chinese Americans. All FMs lived with and cared for an adult with diabetes. Analysis of covariance controlled for respondent and patient characteristics to assess ethnic group differences (P ethnic minority groups. African Americans reported the highest well-being and lowest negative life impact, Chinese Americans reported the most diabetes burden, Hispanic Americans reported the highest distress. There were no ethnic group differences in QoL. Ethnic minority FMs reported having more involvement with diabetes, greater support success, and more access to a diabetes support network than White non-Hispanics. Higher FM diabetes involvement was associated with negative psychological outcomes, while diabetes education, support success and diabetes support network size were associated with better psychological outcomes. Potential limitations are the sample sizes and representativeness. Minority ethnic FMs experienced both advantages and disadvantages in psychological outcomes relative to each other and to White non-Hispanics. Ethnic minority FMs had more involvement in diabetes care, support success and support from others, with the first associated with worse and the latter two with better psychological outcomes. Additional studies are needed with larger samples and broader representation of ethnic groups to better understand these associations and identify areas for intervention.

  5. Investigating diet and physical activity in Malaysia: education and family history of diabetes relate to lower levels of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Yeoh, Si Han; Wong, Chee Piau

    2014-01-01

    The National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS, 2011), estimates that the number of Malaysian adults suffering from type 2 diabetes has increased from 8.3 to 31.2% since 1996. This study is a preliminary investigation of possible factors contributing to this epidemic. Knowledge of diabetes, health locus of control, diet and exercise habits, as well as family history, education level and other demographic factors to better understand the correlates of risky and healthy behaviors. This was done as part of a larger initiative to improve prevention efforts. Questionnaires were completed by 770 individuals from three Malaysian states: Selangor, Penang, and Terengganu. Findings showed that people with better health knowledge and those who have a family history of type 2 diabetes were more likely to have healthy diets. Also, health knowledge related to lower alcohol consumption. Participants with diabetic family members, however, also reported higher levels of stress. Counterintuitively, higher educational levels, higher internal locus of control, better health knowledge, as well as a family history of diabetes all correlated with lower levels of physical activity. Thus, it is suggested that, while increasing health knowledge will be important in addressing the type 2 diabetes epidemic in Malaysia, especially in relation to diet, other cultural factors, specifically norms related to exercise and physical activity, also need to be addressed if the spread of type 2 diabetes is to be addressed over the long term.

  6. Investigating diet and physical activity in Malaysia: Education and family history of diabetes relate to lower levels of physical activity

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    Cai Lian eTam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS, 2011, estimates that the number of Malaysian adults suffering from type 2 diabetes has increased from 8.3% to 31.2% since 1996. This study is a preliminary investigation of possible factors contributing to this epidemic. Knowledge of diabetes, health locus of control, diet and exercise habits, as well as family history, education level and other demographic factors to better understand the correlates of risky and healthy behaviours. This was done as part of a larger initiative to improve prevention efforts. Questionnaires were completed by 770 individuals from three Malaysian states: Selangor, Penang, and Terengganu. Findings showed that people with better health knowledge and those who have a family history of type 2 diabetes were more likely to have healthy diets. Also, health knowledge related to lower alcohol consumption. Participants with diabetic family members, however, also reported higher levels of stress. Counterintuitively, higher educational levels, higher internal locus of control, better health knowledge, as well as a family history of diabetes all correlated with lower levels of physical activity. Thus, it is suggested that, while increasing health knowledge will be important in addressing the type 2 diabetes epidemic in Malaysia, especially in relation to diet, other cultural factors, specifically norms related to exercise and physical activity, also need to be addressed if the spread of type 2 diabetes is to be addressed over the long term.

  7. A Japanese Family with Central Hypothyroidism Caused by a Novel IGSF1 Mutation.

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    Nishigaki, Satsuki; Hamazaki, Takashi; Fujita, Keinosuke; Morikawa, Shuntaro; Tajima, Toshihiro; Shintaku, Haruo

    2016-12-01

    Hemizygous mutations in the immunoglobulin superfamily member 1 (IGSF1) gene have been demonstrated to cause congenital central hypothyroidism in males. This study reports a family with a novel mutation in the IGSF1 gene located on the long arm of the X chromosome. A two-month-old boy was diagnosed with central hypothyroidism because of prolonged jaundice. A thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation test indicated dysfunction in both the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland, and prompted the IGSF1 gene to be analyzed. The patient had a novel nonsense variant, c.2713C>T (p.Q905X), in exon 14 of the IGSF1 gene. Studies of the family revealed that the patient's sister and mother were heterozygous carriers of the IGSF1 mutation. The patient's maternal uncle carried the same mutation as the proband but had no overt symptoms. The mother and uncle started levothyroxine supplementation because of subclinical hypothyroidism. A novel mutation (c.2713C>T, p.Q905X) of the IGSF1 gene was identified that causes congenital central hypothyroidism in a Japanese family. The findings further expand the clinical heterogeneity of this entity.

  8. Explanatory models of adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from urban centers of central Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, Bruck M; Kebede, Tedla; Fenta, Teferi G; Boon, Heather

    2016-09-13

    Type 2 diabetes, which is increasing as a public health problem in the low resource settings of Africa has been associated with the high prevalence of micro-vascular complications and increasing levels of macro-vascular complications. There is evidence from the developed world that understanding patient perceptions of chronic illness is important to design effective strategies for helping patients manage these conditions. This study utilized Kleinman's model to explore the illness perceptions of type 2 diabetes patients attending treatment in Addis Ababa and Butajira (Ethiopia) and better understand how they manage their illness. Qualitative interviews were conducted to elicit the explanatory models of purposively sampled type 2 diabetes patients attending treatment in three hospitals in central Ethiopia until saturation of key emerging themes was achieved. Analysis of interview transcripts was guided by Kleinman's model. A total of 39 participants, 24 from Addis Ababa and the rest from Butajira took part in the study. This study revealed that patients' explanatory models were informed by both the traditional and biomedical models with emotional distress evident in some of the participants. The traditional model seemed to reflect the strong religious and cultural influences for the majority of study participants. The findings also revealed that symptoms played significant roles in how patients viewed their illness including assessment of its severity. Most were uncertain about the cause of their illness, with those expressing certainty citing factors over which they believed they had little or no control. This may have contributed to the perceptions about the use of religious healing and traditional medicines in a complementary or alternative manner to the biomedical regimen which could affect their adherence to recommended regimens and their health outcomes. This study suggests the need for a strong diabetes care program that is sensitive to patients' experiences

  9. A research on bread consumption of families living in the central district of Tokat province

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    Zeynep EKMEKCİ BAL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bread consumption statuses of families living in the central district of Tokat province were identified. Data were obtained from 272 consumers in November 2012. According to the findings, the amount of per capita bread consumption is 291.95 g which is lower than the national average consumption. The most frequently consumed bread type of families was loaf bread with 70.59%. Consumers were mainly purchased bread from supermarkets (80.51% and oven (25.37%. More than half of consumers think that the quality of bread sold in the market is insufficient. Several families cannot consume a significant portion of bread purchased during the day; they re-used some of the staled bread and wasted the rest of staled bread. Measures should be taken to prevent the waste of bread. The quality of the bread produced should be increased and a necessary care for hygiene should be taken during production and sales stages.

  10. The relationship between work-family conflict and central life interests amongst single working mothers

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    Taryn Wallis

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the experiences of work-family conflict amongst a group of twenty single working mothers with pre-school age children. Dubin’s (1992 theory of Central Life Interests was utilised to fully understand how the differential importance of the roles played by the women informed the level and nature of the conflict experienced. A two-phase research design was employed in which questionnaire responses from the first phase formed the basis for the second phase of in-depth qualitative interviews. Results indicated that participants viewed motherhood as their Central Life Interest and that this priority could lead them to experience greater conflict between work and family demands. Although work was rated second in importance when compared to family, it was still seen as being of great significance, not only for instrumental reasons, but also for the intellectual stimulation that it provided and opportunities to exercise independence and responsibility. Opsomming Die werk-en-familie konflik-ervarings van twintig werkende enkel-moeders met voorskoolse kinders is ondersoek in hierdie projek. Dubin (1992 se teorie van sentrale lewensbelangstellings is gebruik om te bepaal hoe die belangrikheid van die twee rolle die vlak en aard van die konflik bepaal het. Die navorsing is in twee fases gedoen: ‘n vraelys in die eerste fase, opgevolg deur in-diepte kwalitatiewe onderhoude. Resultate het gewys dat die deelnemers moederskap as hul sentrale lewensbelangstelling beskou het, en dat hierdie prioriteit kon lei tot groter konflik tussen die eise van werk en familie. Alhoewel werk as ondergeskik aan familie beoordeel is, was dit nogtans van groot belang. Aan die een kant was dit vir instrumentele redes, maar dit het ook intellektuele stimulasie verskaf en geleenthede gegee om onafhanklik en verantwoordelik op te tree.

  11. Family-friendly policy in Central European countries [Polityka rodzinna w krajach Europy Środkowej

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    Mirosław ZDULSKI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demographic changes in Central Europe which started in the 80s of the 20th century began to resemble the changes which were noticed earlier in the countries of Western Europe. Fertility gradually decreased, sometimes even below the simple reproduction rate, the number of marriages dropped and the age when they were made was changing. The model of the family underwent transformations which caused changes in family structures. What followed was a fast change from the so called traditional reproduction to modern reproduction. Demographers are looking for the causes of the above mentioned changes in the influence of economic factors and changes the world view. They also emphasised the need for a family-friendly policy. An important influence on the type of policy of a given country is tradition, the implemented socio-economic policy (e.g., conservative, liberal, the economic situation and public opinion. In a narrower sense it is defined as benefits and services for people with children and single parents. Such an approach means the readiness and constant support in the form of financial transfers made to the families, tax relief for families with children, maternity leaves, the creation and maintenance of institutions which offer child care and family law. In a broad sense, familyfriendly policy covers all areas of social policy which can potentially have an influence on the good of the family (subsidies towards children’s travel costs, education, safety, housing, etc.. The aim of this paper is to describe the changes in the field of demography which took place after 1989 and their effects on families, as well as the policies implemented in the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary in order to increase reproduction and the number of marriages.

  12. Study on the correlation of serum lipid metabolism and central retinal artery hemodynamics with diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran-Yang Guo

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the correlation of serum lipid metabolism and central retinal artery (CRA) hemodynamics with diabetic retinopathy (DR).Methods:A total of 120 patients with type 2 diabetes who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2015 to May, 2016 were included in the study and divided into NDR group (non-diabetic retinopathy), NPR group (non-proliferative retinopathy), and PR group (proliferative retinopathy) with 40 cases in each group according to DR clinical staging. Moreover, 50 healthy individuals who came for physical examinations were served as the control group. The full automatic biochemical analyzer was used to detect the levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C. The color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) was used to detect EDV, PSV, RI, and PI of CRA and OA.Results:The levels of TG, TC, and LDL-C in NDG, NPR, and PR groups were gradually increased with the aggravation of retinopathy, HDL-C was reduced, the comparison among the three groups was statistically significant, and the comparison with the control group was statistically significant. EDV, PSV, and PI of CRA and OA in NDG, NPR, and PR groups were gradually increased with the aggravation of retinopathy, RI was reduced, the comparison among the three groups was statistically significant, and the comparison with the control group was statistically significant. Conclusions: The lipid metabolism disorder can promote the occurrence and development of DR. The change of CRA and OA hemodynamics is an important pathological basis for developing DR. Clinical detection of serum lipid level and monitoring of the changes of fundus artery hemocynamic parameters are of great significance in early detecting DR.

  13. Development of Central Diabetes Insipidus in a Female Victim with Severe Brain Injury

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    N. V. Nikiforova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Case report. A pregnant woman with severe brain injury developed cerebral salt-wasting syndrome concurrent with diabetes insipidus. Placental enzymatic destruction of antidiuretic hormone and thyroid, adrenal, and renal dysfunction were excluded. Polyuria developed on day 3 when diuresis was less than 8.5 liters, there was hyponatremia (Na+ < 130 mmol/l with a urinary Na+ content of > 40 mmol/l. The administration of 3% sodium chloride solution considerably enhanced polyuria. When minirin was given in a daily dose of 0.4 mg, diuresis reached 32.4 liters, which exceeds the levels described for the complete absence of antidiuretic hormone. The use of minirin in the mean therapeutic dose (0.6 mg daily reduced, but failed to normalize diuresis. Evident hypernatremia and hypokalemia were absent in the existing polyuria. Brain injury in the female patient was suspected to cause and impair the synthesis of antidiuretic hormone and to increase the elaboration of ouabaine. This concomitance led to the concurrent development of central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome. On this basis, the dose of minirin was increased up to 1.2 mg daily; hypothiazid 50 mg twice daily was prescribed. Hydrocortisone 50 mg twice daily was intramuscularly injected after diuresis reduced to 4.7 liters and hyponatremia (Na+ = 112.2 mmol/l. The performed therapy could normalize diuresis up to 1.8 liters and correct the blood levels of electrolytes. Key words: brain injury, diabetes insipidus, cerebral salt-wasting syndrome.

  14. Orthodontic correction of severely rotated maxillary central incisor in a diabetic adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Gyawali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthodontics has recently seen an increase in the number of adult population seeking treatment. Financial dependency, increasing awareness and availability of service can be the reasons behind this rise. Though, clinical myths regarding duration, effectiveness of treatment, associated systemic conditions still exist, these should be of no concern and with adequate monitoring and procedural modifications, conventional orthodontic treatment is possible.Case description: A 58 year old Type II diabetic male presented to orthodontic clinic with unesthetic gap between upper front teeth. The history revealed extraction of painful mesiodens. On examination, the patient had Class I molar, canine and incisor relationship. 21 was rotated with 5mm of space between central incisors. Fixed orthodontic treatment was planned after physician consultation regarding his diabetic condition. Bondable buccal tubes instead of bands were used in first molars, 0.022” Roth brackets were bonded on other maxillary teeth. The wire gradually progressed from 0.014”NiTi, 0.016”NiTi to 0.018”SS. Lingual button was attached on the labial and lingual surface of 21 to apply couple. After the correction of rotation of 21, remaining space closure with esthetic contouring of 21 was done. Maintenance of adequate oral hygiene was reinforced throughout the treatment period. Fixed lingual retainer was bonded and pericision performed to retain the achieved result.Conclusion: Orthodontic treatment can be carried out in diabetic adults with good glycemic control to achieve esthetic results; however, measures for maintenance of adequate oral hygiene should be undertaken. Interdisciplinary approach involving restorative procedures can enhance the esthetics achieved.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:30-34

  15. Opioid-induced hyponatremia in a patient with central diabetes insipidus: independence from ADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nandini; Balliu, Erjola; Osipoff, Jennifer; Lane, Andrew; Wilson, Thomas

    2017-05-24

    Hyponatremia can be a complication of opioid therapy, which has been postulated to occur secondary to inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion [SIADH]). We report severe hyponatremia following wisdom teeth extraction with opioid analgesia in a 19-year-old female with diabetes insipidus (DI) and acquired panhypopituitarism that challenges this theory. As this patient has DI, we believe opioid treatment caused severe hyponatremia by the following mechanisms: (1) Opioids have a direct antidiuretic effect independent of changes in ADH, as demonstrated in Brattleboro rats with central DI. (2) Hydrocodone may have stimulated this patient's thirst center contributing to hyponatremia, as demonstrated in animal studies. Opioid use can cause hyponatremia in patients independent of ADH. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this so that patients can be appropriately counseled.

  16. Enteroviral Meningoencephalitis Complicated by Central Diabetes Insipidus in a Neonate: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Garrett; Muriello, Michael; Patel, Aloka; Logan, Latania

    2015-06-01

    Enterovirus is a known cause of central nervous system infection in the neonatal population and typically has a benign course; however, neurologic complications have been reported. We describe what we believe to be the first documented case of enteroviral meningoencephalitis complicated by central diabetes insipidus in a neonate. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Financial costs for families of children with Type 1 diabetes in lower-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, G D; Kim, H; Middlehurst, A C; Silink, M; Jenkins, A J

    2016-06-01

    To assess the direct costs of necessary consumables for minimal care of a child with Type 1 diabetes in countries where the public health system does not regularly provide such care. Supply costs were collected between January 2013 and February 2015 from questionnaires submitted by centres requesting International Diabetes Federation Life for a Child Program support. All 20 centres in 15 countries agreed to the use of their responses. Annual costs for minimal care were estimated for: 18 × 10 ml 100 IU/ml insulin, 1/3 cost of a blood glucose meter, two blood glucose test strips/day, two syringes/week, and four HbA1c tests/year. Costs were expressed in US dollars, and as % of gross national income (purchasing power parity) per capita. The ranges (median) for the minimum supply costs through the private system were: insulin 10 ml 100 IU/ml equivalent vial: $5.10-$25 ($8.00); blood glucose meter: $15-$121 ($33.33); test strip: $0.15-$1.20 ($0.50); syringe: $0.10-$0.56 ($0.20); and HbA1c : $4.90-$20 ($9.75). Annual costs ranged from $255 (Pakistan) to $1,185 (Burkina Faso), with a median of $553. Annual % gross national income costs were 12-370% (median 56%). For the lowest 20% income earners the annual cost ranged 20-1535% (median 153%). St Lucia and Mongolia were the only countries whose governments consistently provided insulin. No government provided meters and strips, which were the most expensive supplies (62% of total cost). In less-resourced countries, even minimal care is beyond many families' means. In addition, families face additional costs such as consultations, travel and indirect costs. Action to prevent diabetes-related death and morbidity is needed. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  18. Medicinal plants used in the traditional management of diabetes and its sequelae in Central America: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Peter; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Edwards, Sarah E

    2016-05-26

    Globally 387 million people currently have diabetes and it is projected that this condition will be the 7th leading cause of death worldwide by 2030. As of 2012, its total prevalence in Central America (8.5%) was greater than the prevalence in most Latin American countries and the population of this region widely use herbal medicine. The aim of this study is to review the medicinal plants used to treat diabetes and its sequelae in seven Central American countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. We conducted a literature review and extracted from primary sources the plant use reports in traditional remedies that matched one of the following disease categories: diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, urinary problems, skin diseases and infections, cardiovascular disease, sexual dysfunctions, visual loss, and nerve damage. Use reports were entered in a database and data were analysed in terms of the highest number of use reports for diabetes management and for the different sequelae. We also examined the scientific evidence that might support the local uses of the most reported species. Out of 535 identified species used to manage diabetes and its sequelae, 104 species are used to manage diabetes and we found in vitro and in vivo preclinical experimental evidence of hypoglycaemic effect for 16 of the 20 species reported by at least two sources. However, only seven of these species are reported in more than 3 studies: Momordica charantia L., Neurolaena lobata (L.) R. Br. ex Cass., Tecoma stans (L.) Juss. ex Kunth, Persea americana Mill., Psidium guajava L., Anacardium occidentale L. and Hamelia patens Jacq. Several of the species that are used to manage diabetes in Central America are also used to treat conditions that may arise as its consequence such as kidney disease, urinary problems and skin conditions. This review provides an overview of the medicinal plants used to manage diabetes and its sequelae in Central America and of

  19. Use of a web portal by adult patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus seen in a family medicine outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Heboyan, Vahé; Young, Lufei; De Leo, Gianluca; Wilkins, Thad

    2018-05-01

    There has been increasing interest in the use of web portals by patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Studies of web portal use by patients with pre-diabetes have not been reported. To plan studies of web portal use by adult clinic patients seen for pre-diabetes and T2DM at an academic medical center, we examined characteristics of those who had or had not registered for a web portal. Electronic records were reviewed to identify web portal registration by patients treated for pre-diabetes or T2DM by age, sex, race and ethnicity. A total of 866 patients with pre-diabetes and 2,376 patients with T2DM were seen in a family medicine outpatient clinic. About 41.5% of patients with pre-diabetes and 34.7% of those with T2DM had registered for the web portal. In logistic regression analysis, web portal registration among patients with T2DM was significantly associated with age 41-45 years, and with Hispanic ethnicity. Similar results were obtained for pre-diabetes except that the positive association with age 41-45 years and inverse association with Hispanic ethnicity were not statistically significant. Among patients with pre-diabetes or T2DM, Black men and Black women were less likely to have registered than their white counterparts. Patients who were aged 18-25 and >65 years were less likely to have registered for the web portal than those 26-65 years. Additional research is needed to identify portal design features that improve health outcomes for patients with pre-diabetes and T2DM and interventions that will increase use of patient portals by pre-diabetic and diabetic patients, especially among Black patients and older patients.

  20. Family physician clinical inertia in glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bralić Lang, Valerija; Bergman Marković, Biserka; Kranjčević, Ksenija

    2015-02-05

    Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 15-25 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD ±26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control.

  1. Intensive multifactorial treatment modifies the effect of family history of diabetes on glycaemic control in people with Type 2 diabetes: a post hoc analysis of the ADDITION-Denmark randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliraqi, G M; Vistisen, D; Lauritzen, T; Sandbaek, A; Jørgensen, M E; Faerch, K

    2015-08-01

    To investigate whether intensive multifactorial treatment can reverse the predisposed adverse phenotype of people with Type 2 diabetes who have a family history of diabetes. Data from the randomized controlled trial ADDITION-Denmark were used. A total of 1441 newly diagnosed patients with diabetes (598 with family history of diabetes) were randomized to intensive treatment or routine care. Family history of diabetes was defined as having one parent and/or sibling with diabetes. Linear mixed-effects models were used to assess the changes in risk factors (BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, lipids and HbA1c ) after 5 years of follow-up in participants with and without a family history of diabetes. An interaction term between family history of diabetes and treatment group was included in the models to test for a modifying effect of the intervention. All analyses were adjusted for age, sex, baseline value of the risk factor and general practice (random effect). At baseline, participants with a family history of diabetes were younger and had a 1.1 mmol/mol (0.1%) higher HbA1c concentration at the time of diagnosis than those without a family history of diabetes. Family history of diabetes modified the effect of the intervention on changes in HbA1c levels. In the group receiving routine care, participants with a family history of diabetes experienced an improvement in HbA1c concentration that was 3.3 mmol/mol (0.3%) lower than the improvement found in those without a family history of diabetes after 5 years of follow-up. In the intensive treatment group, however, there was no difference in HbA1c concentrations between participants with and without a family history of diabetes after 5 years of treatment. Intensive treatment of diabetes may partly remove the adverse effects of family history of diabetes on glycaemic control. The effect of this improvement on long-term diabetic complications warrants further investigation. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine

  2. Variation of central corneal thickness in patients with diabetic retinopathy as detected by ultrasonic pachymetry in patients presenting to a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    To compare the central corneal thickness between patients with diabetic retinopathy and non diabetics. Study Design: A cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Lahore General Hospital Lahore, from 1st Dec 2015 to 31st May 2016. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the ophthalmology outpatient department of Lahore General Hospital. A total of one hundred and fifty subjects from different age groups were selected for the study. An ultrasound pachymeter was used to measure CCT. There were two groups for sample, 75 were patients with diabetic retinopathy and 75 of them were non-diabetic subjects. Results: The diabetic patients had average central corneal thickness of value 554.93 +- 33.73 microns. The average central corneal thickness found in non-diabetic patients was 520.41 +- 26.06 microns. The diabetic patients showed an increased central corneal thickness as compared to non-diabetics. The result of this study was statistically significant (p=0.001). Conclusion: The diabetic patients showed an increased central corneal thickness as compared to non-diabetic patients. (author)

  3. Combined association of maternal and paternal family history of diabetes with plasma leptin and adiponectin in overweight Hispanic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebnick, C; Kelly, L A; Lane, C J; Roberts, C K; Shaibi, G Q; Toledo-Corral, C M; Davis, J N; Weigensberg, M J; Goran, M I

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the importance of a maternal and paternal family history of Type 2 diabetes and their combined association with plasma leptin and adiponectin levels in overweight Latino children with a family history of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). This cross-sectional study investigated the combined association of a maternal and paternal family history of T2DM with leptin and adiponectin in 175 overweight Latino children (age 11.1 +/- 1.7 years). All subjects had a family history of T2DM. Plasma adiponectin and leptin levels, body fat measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, Tanner stage, age and insulin sensitivity were assessed. After adjustment for age, gestational diabetes, insulin sensitivity and body fat, a combined maternal and paternal family history of T2DM was associated with higher leptin concentrations (P = 0.004) compared with a maternal or paternal family history alone. This association was most pronounced at Tanner stage 1 (P for interaction family history x tanner stage = 0.022). The presence of a combined maternal and paternal family history of T2DM accounted for 4% (P = 0.003) of the variation in leptin concentrations. No such combined association was observed for adiponectin levels. Maternal and paternal family history of T2DM may have an additive impact on leptin, but not on adiponectin levels independent of adiposity and insulin sensitivity in overweight Latino children. This may contribute to a further clinically relevant deterioration of metabolic health in this population.

  4. Coexistent Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 2 diabetes mellitus neuropathies in a Chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-ping Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A is caused by duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 gene on chromosome 17. It is the most common inherited demyelinating neuropathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that frequently causes predominantly sensory neuropathy. In this study, we report the occurrence of CMT1A in a Chinese family affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this family, seven individuals had duplication of the PMP22 gene, although only four had clinical features of polyneuropathy. All CMT1A patients with a clinical phenotype also presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The other three individuals had no signs of CMT1A or type 2 diabetes mellitus. We believe that there may be a genetic link between these two diseases.

  5. We are family? Spanish law and lesbian normalization in Hospital Central.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Mónica; Escudero, Maite

    2009-01-01

    After four decades of a repressive dictatorial regime during which homosexuality was banned and punished with prison sentence and electroshock, Spain became a democratic country in 1978. The social, political, and legal debates previous to the passing of the law on same-sex marriage in June 2005 fueled lesbian visibility in the media. Considering that the emergence of lesbian representation has been linked to these social and political changes, our contribution centers on the ways in which the prime time TV series Hospital Central unravels as a vehicle for the normalization of lesbian relationships and families as addressed to a mostly heterosexual audience.

  6. Expression of Hepatoma-derived growth factor family members in the adult central nervous system

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    Abouzied Mekky M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF belongs to a polypeptide family containing five additional members called HDGF related proteins 1–4 (HRP-1 to -4 and Lens epithelial derived growth factor. Whereas some family members such as HDGF and HRP-2 are expressed in a wide range of tissues, the expression of others is very restricted. HRP-1 and -4 are only expressed in testis, HRP-3 only in the nervous system. Here we investigated the expression of HDGF, HRP-2 and HRP-3 in the central nervous system of adult mice on the cellular level by immunohistochemistry. In addition we performed Western blot analysis of various brain regions as well as neuronal and glial cell cultures. Results HDGF was rather evenly expressed throughout all brain regions tested with the lowest expression in the substantia nigra. HRP-2 was strongly expressed in the thalamus, prefrontal and parietal cortex, neurohypophysis, and the cerebellum, HRP-3 in the bulbus olfactorius, piriform cortex and amygdala complex. HDGF and HRP-2 were found to be expressed by neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. In contrast, strong expression of HRP-3 in the adult nervous system is restricted to neurons, except for very weak expression in oligodendrocytes in the brain stem. Although the majority of neurons are HRP-3 positive, some like cerebellar granule cells are negative. Conclusion The coexpression of HDGF and HRP-2 in glia and neurons as well as the coexpression of all three proteins in many neurons suggests different functions of members of the HDGF protein family in cells of the central nervous system that might include proliferation as well as cell survival. In addition the restricted expression of HRP-3 point to a special function of this family member for neuronal cells.

  7. Investigating diet and physical activity in Malaysia: Education and family history of diabetes relate to lower levels of physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Cai Lian eTam; Gregory eBonn; Gregory eBonn; Si Han eYeoh; Chee Piau eWong

    2014-01-01

    The National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS, 2011), estimates that the number of Malaysian adults suffering from type 2 diabetes has increased from 8.3% to 31.2% since 1996. This study is a preliminary investigation of possible factors contributing to this epidemic. Knowledge of diabetes, health locus of control, diet and exercise habits, as well as family history, education level and other demographic factors to better understand the correlates of risky and healthy behaviours. This was do...

  8. Investigating diet and physical activity in Malaysia: education and family history of diabetes relate to lower levels of physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Yeoh, Si Han; Wong, Chee Piau

    2014-01-01

    The National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS, 2011), estimates that the number of Malaysian adults suffering from type 2 diabetes has increased from 8.3 to 31.2% since 1996. This study is a preliminary investigation of possible factors contributing to this epidemic. Knowledge of diabetes, health locus of control, diet and exercise habits, as well as family history, education level and other demographic factors to better understand the correlates of risky and healthy behaviors. This was done...

  9. They say it runs in the family: diabetes and inheritance in Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Margaret

    2011-06-01

    The globalization of genetic discourses, especially where ethnicity is treated as a "risk factor" for disease, deserves special attention and concern. In countries such as Mexico, with large indigenous populations, the consequences of the Thrifty Genotype hypothesis and/or the attribution of type 2 diabetes to "family history" may be especially detrimental to poor rural communities, playing as they do into existing racial hierarchies. Based on semi-structured interviews with doctors and patients in a public clinic in a community near Oaxaca, Mexico, the study examines etiologies for type 2 diabetes. While notions of genetic inheritance and family history figure prominently in government and public health discourse, the "explanatory model" of patients places most emphasis on strong emotions, traumatic events, and dietary factors. Clinic doctors emphasize diet and lifestyle factors. The diffusion of "genetic risk" has had little impact on doctor-patient interactions in this community, but can be clearly seen in academic research, government policy, and medical specialties in the region, raising concerns about whether or not interventions will be directed at the social determinants of this growing health concern. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Usefulness of anti-rabphilin-3A antibodies for diagnosing central diabetes insipidus in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kanako; Yamashita, Rika; Niituma, Satsuki; Iwama, Shintaro; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arihara, Zenei; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2017-06-29

    We report a 27-year-old pregnant woman with polyuria, polydipsia and headache in the third trimester of pregnancy. Hypernatremia (153 mEq/L), high plasma osmolality (300 mOsm/kgH 2 O) and low urinary osmolality (92 mOsm/kgH 2 O) were observed at the admission to our hospital. Plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level was inappropriately low (2.2 pg/mL) compared to the high plasma osmolality. Plasma AVP responses to hypertonic-saline infusion were blunted, and her urine osmolality increased in response to desmopressin. The diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus was made from these results. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hypothalamic-pituitary region demonstrated a significant enlargement of the pituitary stalk, suggesting the presence of hypophysitis. In addition, serum anti-rabphilin-3A antibodies that have been recently reported as a biomarker of lymphocytic infundibulo-neurohypophysitis, were positive. Diabetes insipidus continued after delivery, suggesting that polyuria was not mainly due to excessive vasopressinase activity or reduced renal sensitivity to AVP by prostaglandin E 2 that can cause temporal polyuria during pregnancy. We therefore clinically diagnosed central diabetes insipidus due to lymphocytic infundibulo-neurohypophysitis, without performing invasive transsphenoidal pituitary biopsy. This case suggested the usefulness of anti-rabphilin-3A antibodies for the etiological diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus during pregnancy.

  11. Diabetes Distress and Glycemic Control: The Buffering Effect of Autonomy Support From Important Family Members and Friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aaron A; Piette, John D; Heisler, Michele; Rosland, Ann-Marie

    2018-06-01

    To examine whether autonomy support (defined as social support for an individual's personal agency) for diabetes management from informal health supporters (family/friends) reduces the detrimental effects of diabetes distress on glycemic control. Three hundred eight veterans with type 2 diabetes and one or more risk factors for diabetes complications completed a survey that included measures of diabetes distress and perceived autonomy support from their main informal health supporter. Hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) data from 12 months before and after the survey were extracted from electronic medical records. Linear mixed modeling examined the main effects and interaction of autonomy support and diabetes distress on repeated measures of HbA 1c over the 12 months after the survey, controlling for mean prior 12-month HbA 1c , time, insulin use, age, and race/ethnicity. Diabetes distress ( B = 0.12 [SE 0.05]; P = 0.023) was associated with higher and autonomy support ( B = -0.16 [SE 0.07]; P = 0.032) with lower subsequent HbA 1c levels. Autonomy support moderated the relationship between diabetes distress and HbA 1c ( B = -0.13 [SE 0.06]; P = 0.027). Greater diabetes distress was associated with higher HbA 1c at low ( B = 0.21 [SE 07]; P = 0.002) but not high ( B = 0.01 [SE 0.07]; P = 0.890) levels of autonomy support. Autonomy support from main health supporters may contribute to better glycemic control by ameliorating the effects of diabetes distress. Interventions that reduce diabetes distress and enhance the autonomy supportiveness of informal supporters may be effective approaches to improving glycemic control. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  12. A genetic diagnosis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY): experiences of patients and family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, A R; Rigter, T; Weinreich, S S; Cornel, M C; Henneman, L

    2015-10-01

    Genetic testing for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) facilitates a correct diagnosis, enabling treatment optimization and allowing monitoring of asymptomatic family members. To date, the majority of people with MODY remain undiagnosed. To identify patients' needs and areas for improving care, this study explores the experiences of patients and family members who have been genetically tested for MODY. Fourteen semi-structured interviews with patients and the parents of patients, and symptomatic and asymptomatic family members were conducted. Atlas.ti was used for thematic analysis. Most people with MODY were initially misdiagnosed with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes; they had been seeking for the correct diagnosis for a long time. Reasons for having a genetic test included reassurance, removing the uncertainty of developing diabetes (in asymptomatic family members) and informing relatives. Reasons against testing were the fear of genetic discrimination and not having symptoms. Often a positive genetic test result did not come as a surprise. Both patients and family members were satisfied with the decision to get tested because it enabled them to adjust their lifestyle and treatment accordingly. All participants experienced a lack of knowledge of MODY among healthcare professionals, in their social environment and in patient organizations. Additionally, problems with the reimbursement of medical expenses were reported. Patients and family members are generally positive about genetic testing for MODY. More education of healthcare professionals and attention on the part of diabetes organizations is needed to increase awareness and optimize care and support for people with MODY. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  13. Correlation of visual acuity and central macular morphology in different types of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Ju Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the correlation of visual acuity and central macular morphology in patients with different types of diabetic macular edema(DME. METHODS: Presented study was single-center, uncontrolled retrospective clinical study. Sixty-two patients(103 eyeswith DME were included. Best corrected visual acuity(BCVAwas evaluated using early treatment diabetic retinopathy study(ETDRSvision test chart. All patients were examined by non-contact tonometer, slit lamp, indirect ophthalmoscope, and fundus fluorescein angiography(FFA. Central subfield mean thickness(CSMTin the macular area of diameter 1mm was measured by optical coherence tomography(OCT.And in the same time the integrity of inner segments/ outer segments(IS/OSand external limiting membrane(ELMreflecting light strip of 350μm center horizontal scanning line was investigated by OCT. BCVA and CSMT in different types of DME patients were analyzed using Kruskal- Wallis test. BCVA and CSMT between the two-two groups in different types of DME patients were analyzed using Nemenyi test, and multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the relative factors of BCVA. RESULTS: In the 103 eyes, 47 eyes(45.6%were focal DME, 35 eyes(34.0%were diffuse DME, 6 eyes(5.8%were ischemic DME and 15 eyes(14.6%were proliferative DME. The difference of mean BCVA(H=69.167, PH=57.113, Pχ2=14.982,Pχ2=14.537,Pχ2=15.596,Pχ2=15.393,Pχ2=16.567,Pχ2=15.687,Pχ2=12.974、P=0.008; CSMT:χ2=13.999,Pr=-0.064,-0.207,-0.082 and -0.160, respectively, Pr=-0.885, -2.522, -1.504, and-0.595, respectively, P>0.05. CONCLUSION: There are statistically significant differences on macular morphology and vision function among different types of DME patients.

  14. REDUCING THE ROLE CONFLICT OF WORKING WOMAN: BETWEEN WORK AND FAMILY CENTRALITY

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    Desty Ranihusna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to find direct impact of pay satisfaction in WFC and examines direct impact of WFC and FWC for work satisfaction. It also examines impact of moderating variable of work-family centrality moderating variable from relation of WFC and FWC in work satisfaction (case study of married female lecturers in UNNES. This research was done because there were differences between results of WFC and FWC to JS and recommendation to add moderating variable and PS to WFC. It used SPSS to examine hypothesis with CFA, to test validity, classical assumption testing and t test was also used. Moderating variable was tested by value of absolute deviation. The data in this research is primary data in the form of questionnaire and interview.  The result shows that there are strong impacts between PS and WFC. There is no impact between WFC and FWC to JS. Supporting moderating variable is Work Centrality. Although, they prioritize their family, female lecturers are still trying to work professionally

  15. HLA non-class II genes may confer type I diabetes susceptibility in a Mapuche (Amerindian) affected family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Jose M; Moscoso, Juan; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Zamora, Jorge; Asenjo, Silvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of type I diabetes is studied in an Amerindian (Mapuche) family from Chile, analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet-cell autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. The affected sib is the only one that has one specific HLA haplotype combination that differs from the other sibs only in the HLA class I genes. It is concluded that HLA diabetes susceptibility factors may be placed outside the class II region or even that susceptibility factors do not exist in the HLA region in this Amerindian family.

  16. Impact of type 1 diabetes mellitus on the family is reduced with the medical home, care coordination, and family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michelle L; Laffel, Lori M; Perrin, James M; Kuhlthau, Karen

    2012-05-01

    To examine whether the medical home, care coordination, or family-centered care was associated with less impact of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) on families' work, finances, time, and school attendance. With the 2005 to 2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, we compared impact in children with T1D (n = 583) with that in children with other special health care needs (n = 39 944) and children without special health care needs (n = 4945). We modeled the associations of the medical home, care coordination, and family-centered care with family impact in T1D. Seventy-five percent of families of children with T1D reported a major impact compared with 45% of families of children with special health care needs (P families of children without special health care needs (P families of children with T1D, 35% reported restricting work, 38% reported financial impact, 41% reported medical expenses >$1000/year, 24% reported spending ≥11 hours/week caring or coordination care, and 20% reported ≥11 school absences/year. The medical home, care coordination, and family-centered care were associated with less work and financial impact. In childhood T1D, most families experience major impact. Better systems of health care delivery may help families reduce some of this impact. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Obstructive Sleep-Disordered Breathing Is More Common than Central in Mild Familial Dysautonomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilz, Max J.; Moeller, Sebastian; Buechner, Susanne; Czarkowska, Hanna; Ayappa, Indu; Axelrod, Felicia B.; Rapoport, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: In familial dysautonomia (FD) patients, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) might contribute to their high risk of sleep-related sudden death. Prevalence of central versus obstructive sleep apneas is controversial but may be therapeutically relevant. We, therefore, assessed sleep structure and SDB in FD-patients with no history of SDB. Methods: 11 mildly affected FD-patients (28 ± 11 years) without clinically overt SDB and 13 controls (28 ± 10 years) underwent polysomnographic recording during one night. We assessed sleep stages, obstructive and central apneas (≥ 90% air flow reduction) and hypopneas (> 30% decrease in airflow with ≥ 4% oxygen-desaturation), and determined obstructive (oAI) and central (cAI) apnea indices and the hypopnea index (HI) as count of respective apneas/hypopneas divided by sleep time. We obtained the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI4%) from the total of apneas and hypopneas divided by sleep time. We determined differences between FD-patients and controls using the U-test and within-group differences between oAIs, cAIs, and HIs using the Friedman test and Wilcoxon test. Results: Sleep structure was similar in FD-patients and controls. AHI4% and HI were significantly higher in patients than controls. In patients, HIs were higher than oAIs and oAIs were higher than cAIs. In controls, there was no difference between HIs, oAIs, and cAIs. Only patients had apneas and hypopneas during slow wave sleep. Conclusions: In our FD-patients, obstructive apneas were more common than central apneas. These findings may be related to FD-specific pathophysiology. The potential ramifications of SDB in FD-patients suggest the utility of polysomnography to unveil SDB and initiate treatment. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1583. Citation: Hilz MJ, Moeller S, Buechner S, Czarkowska H, Ayappa I, Axelrod FB, Rapoport DM. Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing is more common than central in mild familial

  18. An audit of the quality of care indicators for the management of diabetes in family practice clinics in karachi, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanani, R.; Mustafa, M.; Qureshi, R.

    2008-01-01

    Management of diabetes is a painstaking and careful approach. This study was aimed to evaluate the quality of care for the management of diabetes provided by family practitioners to their patients having diabetes. This is a retrospective audit of medical records conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital of private sector in Karachi for one month. For this study, 150 medical records of patients with type 2 diabetes that visited family practice clinics for their diabetes care were examined. A total of 88 patient's medical records were selected and analyzed who attended the studied clinics for at least one year and had minimum of four out-patient visits. Majority (68%) of the audited medical records were of females. Of the total medical records analyzed, only one-quarter of the cases qualified the criteria of excellent or good diabetes care. Monitoring of body weight of the patient was only one indicator which was according the recommendations in 100% case at every visit. The other nearest quality of care indicator documented was blood glucose advice at every visit in 79.5% (95% CI: 71.1-87.9) of cases. Physical activity advised/reinforced at every visit was least observed (27.3%; 95% CI: 18.0-36.6). In addition, blood sugar control was reported in less than a quarter (23.9%) with 95% CI of 15.0-32.8. This work has identified a big gap in the management of type 2 diabetes provided by family practitioners. In addition, majority of the patients found to have poor glycemic control. Interventions are suggested to improve the quality of diabetes care. More such audits and research are recommended at the larger scale. (author)

  19. Family Consumer Behaviors, Adolescent Prediabetes and Diabetes in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sairaman; Khokhar, Aditi; Holmes, Danielle Sweetnam; Chandwani, Sheenu

    2017-01-01

    Prediabetes or diabetes (characterized by hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] levels ≥ 5.7 gm%) has been associated with numerous long-term complications. Family consumer behaviors are important risk factors that lead to impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. However, few studies have studied the association between the family consumer environment and prediabetes and diabetes in adolescents. The aim of this study was to examine the association between family consumer behaviors (healthy food availability and supermarket spending) and adolescent prediabetes and diabetes (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier #NCT03136289.) Methods: Data from a nationwide survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES] 2007-2010 data) were used for these analyses. Adolescents aged 12-19 years were selected for this study. Bivariate analyses and logistic regression models assessed the relationship between family consumer behaviors and the prevalence of adolescent prediabetes and diabetes. Multivariable models adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, physical activity, education, income, and household size. A total of 2520 adolescents were eligible for this study. Adolescents with healthier household food availability had negative odds (odds ratio [OR] = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55-1.00), as did higher log supermarket spending (OR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.85). Interaction models demonstrated that adolescent females had more negative odds of prediabetes/diabetes for both healthier food availability (OR = 0.79, 95% CI, 0.39-1.29) and for greater log supermarket spending (OR = 0.69, 95% CI, 0.57-0.85). This study shows that both healthy food availability and an increase in supermarket spending were associated with a decreased adjusted prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes in adolescents, with a greater effect in females. These results suggest the need for policy and dietary interventions targeting the consumer

  20. Familial Aggregation between the 14th and 21st Century and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in an Isolated Dutch Population.

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    Kees L de Visser

    Full Text Available The development of type 2 diabetes results from an interaction of hereditary factors and environmental factors. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of interrelatedness to the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in an isolated Dutch population.A genealogical database from inhabitants living on the former island Urk between the 14th and 21st century was constructed. In a case-control study, effects of interrelatedness and the risk of type 2 diabetes were estimated with Kinship Coefficients (KCs. Relative risks in first, second, and third degree relatives and spouses of inhabitants with type 2 diabetes were compared to matched controls.Patients with type 2 diabetes were more interrelated, expressed by a higher KC compared to controls (7.2 vs. 5.2, p=0.001. First, second and third degree relatives had an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Second degree relatives had a similar risk,1.7 (1.5-2.0 as third degree relatives,1.8 (1.5-2.2. Spouses of patients with diabetes had a 3.4 (2.7-4.4 higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.Interrelatedness was higher among inhabitants with type 2 diabetes compared to controls. This differences extended beyond the nuclear family, thereby supporting the hypothesis that interrelatedness contributed to the development of type 2 diabetes on Urk. However, the size of this effect was small and the patterns of risk in first, second and third degree relatives suggested that factors other than interrelatedness were the main contributors to the development of type 2 diabetes on Urk.

  1. Stress, depression and medication nonadherence in diabetes: test of the exacerbating and buffering effects of family support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Egede, Leonard E; Wagner, Julie A; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2015-04-01

    Stressors and depressive symptoms have been associated with medication nonadherence among adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We tested whether these associations were exacerbated by obstructive family behaviors or buffered by supportive family behaviors in a sample of 192 adults with T2DM and low socioeconomic status using unadjusted and adjusted regression models. We found support for the exacerbating hypothesis. Stressors and nonadherence were only associated at higher levels of obstructive family behaviors (interaction AOR = 1.12, p = .002). Similarly, depressive symptoms and nonadherence were only associated at higher levels of obstructive family behaviors (interaction AOR = 3.31, p = .002). When participants reported few obstructive family behaviors, neither stressors nor depressive symptoms were associated with nonadherence. We did not find support for the buffering hypothesis; stressors and depressive symptoms were associated with nonadherence regardless of supportive family behaviors. Nonadherent patients experiencing stressors and/or major depressive symptoms may benefit from interventions that reduce obstructive family behaviors.

  2. Pituitary Morphology and Function in 43 Children with Central Diabetes Insipidus

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    Wendong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In pediatric central diabetes insipidus (CDI, etiology diagnosis and pituitary function monitoring are usually delayed. This study aimed to illustrate the importance of regular follow-up and pituitary function monitoring in pediatric CDI. Methods. The clinical, hormonal, and neuroradiological characteristics of children with CDI at diagnosis and during 1.5–2-year follow-up were collected and analyzed. Results. The study included 43 CDI patients. The mean interval between initial manifestation and diagnosis was 22.29 ± 3.67 months (range: 2–108 months. The most common complaint was polyuria/polydipsia. Causes included Langerhans cell histiocytosis, germinoma, and craniopharyngioma in 2, 5, and 4 patients; the remaining were idiopathic. No significant changes were found during the 1.5–2 years after CDI diagnosis. Twenty-three of the 43 cases (53.5% had ≥1 anterior pituitary hormone deficiency. Isolated growth hormone deficiency was the most frequent abnormality (37.5% and was not associated with pituitary stalk diameter. Multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies were found in 8 cases with pituitary stalk diameter > 4.5 mm. Conclusion. Diagnosis of CDI is usually delayed. CDI with a pituitary stalk diameter > 4.5 mm carries a higher risk of multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. Long-term MRI and pituitary function follow-ups are necessary for children with idiopathic CDI.

  3. Central proliferation and neurogenesis is impaired in type 2 diabetes and prediabetes animal models.

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    Juan Jose Ramos-Rodriguez

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is an important risk factor to suffer dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, and some neuropathological features observed in dementia could be mediated by T2D metabolic alterations. Since brain atrophy and impaired neurogenesis have been observed both T2D and AD we analyzed central nervous system (CNS morphological alterations in the db/db mice (leptin receptor KO mice, as a model of long-term insulin resistance and T2D, and in C57Bl6 mice fed with high fat diet (HFD, as a model of diet induced insulin resistance and prediabetes. Db/db mice showed an age-dependent cortical and hippocampal atrophy, whereas in HFD mice cortex and hippocampus were preserved. We also detected increased neurogenesis and cell proliferation rates in young db/db mice when compared with control littermates. Our study shows that metabolic parameters serve as predictors of both atrophy and altered proliferation and neurogenesis in the CNS. Moreover in the cortex, atrophy, cell proliferation and neurogenesis were significantly correlated. Our data suggest that T2D may underline some of the pathological features observed in the dementia process. They also support that blood glucose control in elderly patients could help to slow down dementia evolution and maybe, improve its prognosis.

  4. Management of central diabetes insipidus with oral desmopressin lyophilisate in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Hüseyin Anıl; Demir, Korcan; Kılıç, Fatma Kaya; Terek, Demet; Arslanoğlu, Sertaç; Dizdarer, Ceyhun; Ozkan, Behzat

    2014-09-01

    To assess the efficiency of oral desmopressin lyophilisate (ODL) in neonatal central diabetes insipidus (CDI). The characteristics of four newborns with CDI treated with ODL were evaluated. Four newborns with polyuria and hypernatremia were included [male, 2 (50%); mean postnatal age, 19±17 days]. At the time of hypernatremia, the mean serum and urine osmolality values were 310±16 and 179±48 mOsm/kg, respectively. Antidiuretic hormone levels were undetectable (<0.5 pmol/L) in all cases. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed anatomical malformations in all cases. ODL (60 μg/tablet) dissolved in water (3-5 mL) was initiated with a dose of 5 μg/kg/day in two equal doses, together with limitation of water intake to avoid hyponatremia. Serum sodium levels returned to normal in a mean duration of 58±9.9 h with a mean decline rate of 0.37±0.1 mEq/L/h after desmopressin administration. Rehospitalization was required for one of the infants because of hypernatremia due to non-compliance. No episode of hyponatremia was encountered. Weight gain and growth of the infants were normal during the mean follow-up duration of 8.5±1 months. ODL appears to be practical and safe in the treatment of CDI during the first year of life.

  5. Autoimmune central diabetes insipidus in a patient with ureaplasma urealyticum infection and review on new triggers of immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Spanò, Francesca; Ferone, Diego; Albertelli, Manuela; Schenone, Angelo; Contatore, Miriam; Guastalla, Andrea; De Bellis, Annamaria; Garibotto, Giacomo; Puppo, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease in which large volumes of dilute urine (polyuria) are excreted due to vasopressin (AVP) deficiency [central diabetes insipidus (CDI)] or to AVP resistance (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). In the majority of patients, the occurrence of CDI is related to the destruction or degeneration of neurons of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. The most common and well recognized causes include local inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, vascular disorders, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), sarcoidosis, tumors such as germinoma/craniopharyngioma or metastases, traumatic brain injuries, intracranial surgery, and midline cerebral and cranial malformations. Here we have the opportunity to describe an unusual case of female patient who developed autoimmune CDI following ureaplasma urealyticum infection and to review the literature on this uncommon feature. Moreover, we also discussed the potential mechanisms by which ureaplasma urealyticum might favor the development of autoimmune CDI.

  6. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño-Sánchez Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. Methods/Design Design: This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. Setting: The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Study population: Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Measurements: Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The

  7. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Emiliano; Castaño-Sánchez, Yolanda; de Cabo-Laso, Angela; Sánchez-Salgado, Benigna; Rodríguez-Martín, Carmela; Castaño-Sánchez, Carmen; Gómez-Sánchez, Leticia; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2010-03-18

    Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home) blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The medication used for diabetes, arterial hypertension and hyperlipidemia will be registered, together

  8. Holistic approach to prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a family setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Sandra N; Unachukwu, Chioma N

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic, progressive metabolic disorder with several complications that affect virtually all the systems in the human body. Type 2 DM (T2DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The management of T2DM is multifactorial, taking into account other major modifiable risk factors, like obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, blood pressure, and dyslipidemia. A multidisciplinary team is essential to maximize the care of individuals with DM. DM self-management education and patient-centered care are the cornerstones of management in addition to effective lifestyle strategies and pharmacotherapy with individualization of glycemic goals. Robust evidence supports the effectiveness of this approach when implemented. Individuals with DM and their family members usually share a common lifestyle that, not only predisposes the non-DM members to developing DM but also, increases their collective risk for CVD. In treating DM, involvement of the entire family, not only improves the care of the DM individual but also, helps to prevent the risk of developing DM in the family members.

  9. Holistic approach to prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a family setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofori SN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sandra N Ofori, Chioma N Unachukwu Department of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic, progressive metabolic disorder with several complications that affect virtually all the systems in the human body. Type 2 DM (T2DM is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD. The management of T2DM is multifactorial, taking into account other major modifiable risk factors, like obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, blood pressure, and dyslipidemia. A multidisciplinary team is essential to maximize the care of individuals with DM. DM self-management education and patient-centered care are the cornerstones of management in addition to effective lifestyle strategies and pharmacotherapy with individualization of glycemic goals. Robust evidence supports the effectiveness of this approach when implemented. Individuals with DM and their family members usually share a common lifestyle that, not only predisposes the non-DM members to developing DM but also, increases their collective risk for CVD. In treating DM, involvement of the entire family, not only improves the care of the DM individual but also, helps to prevent the risk of developing DM in the family members. Keywords: cardiovascular disease, multifactorial management

  10. Rathke cleft cyst in seven-year-old girl presenting with central diabetes insipidus and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evliyaoglu, Olcay; Evliyaoglu, Cetin; Ayva, Sebnem

    2010-05-01

    Rathke cleft cysts (RCC) are benign cysts derived from remnants of Rathke cleft, and are rarely symptomatic in children. Symptoms due to RCC are associated with mass effect and pituitary hormone deficiencies. Slow growth rate of the cyst makes its incidence increase with aging. Here we report on a seven-year-old girl who presented with central diabetes insipidus (CDI). Her sella MRI revealed a lesion in the sellar region which grew rapidly in follow-up. She underwent microneurosurgical operation and the lesion was totally excised. Pathologic examination revealed RCC with degenerative changes. In her follow-up, growth hormone deficiency developed in addition to arginine vasopressin deficiency. Rapid growth of the cyst is not the usual course of RCC's. Mechanisms regarding the cyst growth are unclear as they are in this case. This is the youngest child to date presenting with central diabetes insipidus due to RCC. Rapid growth of RCC can cause CDI in young children.

  11. A Case of Rathke’s Cleft Cyst Associated with Transient Central Adrenal Insufficiency and Masked Diabetes Insipidus

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    Masahiro Asakawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old woman admitted to our hospital because of headache, poor appetite, malaise, weight loss, and vomiting was found to have central adrenal insufficiency and thyrotoxicosis due to silent thyroiditis. Polyuria developed after replacement with glucocorticoid (masked diabetes insipidus, which was controlled with nasal administration of desmopressin. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large cystic pituitary mass (18 × 18 × 12 mm extending suprasellarly to the optic chiasm. Transsphenoidal surgery revealed that the pituitary tumor was Rathke’s cleft cyst. Following surgery, replacement with neither glucocorticoid nor desmopressin was needed any more. Therefore, it is suggested that Rathke’s cleft cyst is responsible for the masked diabetes insipidus and the central insufficiency. Furthermore, it is speculated that thyrotoxicosis with painless thyroiditis might induce changes from subclinical adrenal insufficiency to transiently overt insufficiency.

  12. [Quality in diabetes mellitus control in Primary Care Units in Mexico. A study of the perspectives of the patient's family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos García, María Isabel; López Ramón, Concepción; Morales García, Manuel Higinio; Priego Álvarez, Heberto Romeo; Garrido Pérez, Silvia María Guadalupe; Cargill Foster, Nelly Ruth

    2017-01-01

    To identify the perspectives of the patient's family in the quality of diabetes mellitus control. Qualitative methodology of exploratory design, oriented towards health services research, conducted in 2014 using non-probability sampling. Primary Care Units mainly situated in the state of Tabasco, Mexico. 42 family members were selected, who agreed to participate voluntarily in the study. Six focus groups were set up; interview guides and group dynamics were employed. The information was documented, saturated and categorised; the most representative discourses were used, and conclusions reached. The results show a highly critical position of the families as regards the patient, some of which appear justified, and others have a cultural, historical, and to some extent, an ignorance connotation. They have also commented on the health care and the role that patients and families can play, in both cases, also expressed critically. The family perspectives reveal what they think and feel about diabetes mellitus. It is important to note their lack of support and the content of their expressions due to lack of knowledge of the disease. Their discourses are critical, mythical, and with false beliefs of the fear of being future carriers of the disease. They feel sorry for the patient but they resist taking care of them, and do not want a life with diabetes. The family is the closest support for patients and an invaluable human resource for health services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of gender, age, family support, and treatment on perceived stress and coping of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yoriko; Hisatomi, Mizuho; Ito, Hisao; Nakao, Motoyuki; Tsuboi, Koji; Ishihara, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that the empowerment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus can be strongly affected by gender and age in addition to self-managed diet and exercise behaviors and treatment. This study was to examine the effects of gender, age, family support, and treatment on the perceived stress and coping of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus living with family. A survey was conducted of 140 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were living with family. There was no significant difference in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) between male and female. Perceived stress and coping were measured with the Japanese version of the Appraisal of Diabetes Scale and the Lazarus Type Stress Coping Inventory. Stepwise regression analysis and path analysis were performed to identify factors that affect the perceived stress and coping of patients. (1) Perceived stress and coping were strongly affected by gender. (2) Perceived stress and coping were affected by age for males, but perceived stress was not affected by age for females. However, females showed a greater "psychological impact of diabetes" than did males. Females aged between 50 and 69 years engaged in active problem solving, but awareness of diabetes was low. (3) Treatment regimens had an effect on HbA1c for both sexes, and diet therapy affected the awareness of diabetes of males and coping of females. (4) For females, "sense of self-control" was strongly associated with coping, and those who were living with non-spouse family members had a greater psychological impact of diabetes than those living with only their spouse. (5) For males, coping was strongly affected by living with their spouse. The results suggest that perceived stress, coping, and diet regimen are deeply associated with gender and age and that a male with type 2 diabetes mellitus living with his spouse is strongly dependent on support from the spouse. It is important to take into account gender, age, and family environment to provide patients with

  14. A pilot Diabetic Support Service based on family practice attenders: comparison with diabetic clinics in east London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, B J; Claff, H R; Edmonson, M; Evans, S; Harris, B T; Hull, S A; Jones, E J; Mellins, D H; Safir, J G; Taylor, B

    1987-01-01

    A pilot Diabetic Support Service (DSS) based on a computer register was devised for diabetic patients identified within three group practices in an inner city district of London. Of 159 eligible diabetics, 142 were followed over 2 years. Glycosylated haemoglobin (GHb) monitoring and adequacy of clinic reviews were audited. Care achieved by the DSS was compared with conventional Diabetic Clinic (DC) management of a sample of 200 diabetics from the same district. Serial GHb measurements were made on 66.2% of DSS and 44.5% of DC patients: GHb fell significantly only in DSS patients (13.1% to 11.4%). Proportional falls in GHb were comparable in each DSS treatment group (diet alone, oral hypoglycaemic agents, and insulin) and for hospital attenders and non-attenders equally. The planned clinical reviews were achieved in 40.1% of DSS patients entered (29% GP only, 54% of clinic attenders) and in 15% of DC patients (plus 75% fundal and blood pressure examination). The study led to provision of a formal diabetic clinic annual review system, diabetic mini-clinics in two of the three group practices, and the appointment of two Diabetic Liaison Sisters. With administrative simplification the system is to be made available to all diabetics in the District through their GPs during 1986-8.

  15. Sansevieria roxburghiana Schult. & Schult. F. (Family: Asparagaceae) Attenuates Type 2 Diabetes and Its Associated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Niloy; Khanra, Ritu; Dua, Tarun K; Das, Susmita; De, Bratati; Zia-Ul-Haq, M; De Feo, Vincenzo; Dewanjee, Saikat

    2016-01-01

    Sansevieria roxburghiana Schult. & Schult. F. (Family: Asparagaceae) rhizome has been claimed to possess antidiabetic activity in the ethno-medicinal literature in India. Therefore, present experiments were carried out to explore the protective role of edible (aqueous) extract of S. roxburghiana rhizome (SR) against experimentally induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its associated cardiomyopathy in Wistar rats. SR was chemically characterized by GC-MS analysis. Antidiabetic activity of SR (50 and 100 mg/kg, orally) was measured in high fat diets (ad libitum) + low-single dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) induced type 2 diabetic (T2D) rat. Fasting blood glucose level was measured at specific intermissions. Serum biochemical and inflammatory markers were estimated after sacrificing the animals. Besides, myocardial redox status, expressions of signal proteins (NF-κB and PKCs), histological and ultrastructural studies of heart were performed in the controls and SR treated T2D rats. Phytochemical screening of the crude extract revealed the presence of phenolic compounds, sugar alcohols, sterols, amino acids, saturated fatty acids within SR. T2D rats exhibited significantly (p disintegration, oxidative stress, vascular inflammation and prevented the activation of oxidative stress induced signaling cascades leading to cell death. Histological and ultra-structural studies of cardiac tissues supported the protective characteristics of SR. From the present findings it can be concluded that, SR could offer protection against T2DM and its associated cardio-toxicity via multiple mechanisms viz. hypoglycemic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions.

  16. It's like a family: the significance attributed by health professionals to diabetes health education groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Lucas Pereira de

    2016-08-01

    This article analyzes the significance that health professionals attribute to health education groups for people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). This ethnographic study was developed with five professionals from an Expanded Family Health team that operated in five diabetes health education groups. Information was gathered using participant observations and semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by means of a thematic coding technique. Three different categories emerged: (1) It is a way of educating them: groups as an educational and clinical monitoring forum; (2) they know I will be there for them: the groups as a resource to access the health system; and (3) this serves as a self-help group: after all, what purpose does this group serve? The conclusion reached is that the groups studied were a therapy and support hybrid that, by means of their structure, made it possible for the informants (perhaps, also for the patients) to construct other significance for the standardization of health policies and the dilemma of chronicity. Such hybridization made it possible to create outcomes for the specificities of health work in a "total life" context.

  17. A genetic diagnosis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY): experiences of patients and family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, A.R.; Rigter, T.; Weinreich, S.S.; Cornel, M.C.; Henneman, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Genetic testing for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) facilitates a correct diagnosis, enabling treatment optimization and allowing monitoring of asymptomatic family members. To date, the majority of people with MODY remain undiagnosed. To identify patients' needs and areas for

  18. Centralized Outpatient Education Center for Patients with Diabetes at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-16

    rated into the study where appropriate. Interviews with education coordinators from nonmilitary diabetes treatment facilities were evaluated and...personnel were evaluated to determine the acceptance of the concept of an outpatient education center for diabetic patients. 12 The data from the...step was to evaluate the data from 100 outpatients to ascertain the degree of acceptance of an outpatient education center for diabetic patients. The

  19. Hypoadiponectinemia in obese subjects with type II diabetes: A close association with central obesity indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorban Mohammadzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adiponectin is an adipocyte secreted protein with important biological functions Hypoadiponectinemia is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and type II diabetes This study aimed to evaluate serum adiponectin level in obese subjects with type II diabetes and its correlation with metabolic parameters Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 40 obese subjects with type II diabetes and 40 non-diabetic obese control subjects Fasting lipid profile was measured by the enzymatic methods The NycoCard HbA1c protocol was used to measure HbAlc The Serum adiponectin, insulin and glucose levels were measured using an enzyme immunoassay and glucose oxidase methods respectively Results: Type II diabetes was associated with hypoadiponectinemia, in both men and women Serum adiponectin level in non-diabetic subjects (6.44 ± 2.47 μg/ml was significantly higher than diabetics (4.55 ± 1.88 μg/ml Furthermore, serum adiponectin concentration in females was significantly higher than males in non-diabetics (7.18 ± 2.68 vs 5.61 ± 0.57 and diabetic groups (5.18 ± 2.08 vs 3.99 ± 1.5 There was a negative and significant correlation between serum adiponectin level with waist (r = -0.451, p = 0.003, waist to hip ratio (r = -0.404, p = 0.01 and BMI (r = - 0.322, p = 0.042 and a positive correlation with HDL (r = 0.337, p = 0.034 in non-diabetic group In diabetic group, there was only found a negative correlation between adiponectin and waist size (r = -0.317, p = 0.046 Conclusions: Obesity and type II diabetes are associated with low serum adiponectin concentration

  20. The relationship of family history and risk of type 2 diabetes differs by ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, B G; Becker, D M; Yanek, L R; Vaidya, D; Mathias, R A; Becker, L C; Kalyani, R R

    2018-05-21

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in a first-degree relative is a risk factor for incident diabetes. Americans of African ancestry (AA) have higher rates of T2DM than Americans of European ancestry (EA). Thus, we aimed to determine whether the presence, number and kinship of affected relatives are associated with race-specific T2DM incidence in a prospective study of participants from the Genetic Study of Atherosclerosis Risk (GeneSTAR), who underwent baseline screening including a detailed family history. Nondiabetic healthy siblings (n=1405) of patients with early-onset coronary artery disease (18-59 years) were enrolled (861 EA and 544 AA) and followed for incident T2DM (mean 14±6 years). Baseline age was 46.2±7.3 years and 56% were female. T2DM occurred in 12.3% of EA and 19.1% of AA. Among EA, 32.6% had ≥1 affected first-degree relatives versus 53.1% in AA, Phistory was related to incident T2DM in EA (HR=2.53, 95% CI: 1.58-4.06) but not in AA (HR=1.01, 0.67-1.53). The number of affected relatives conferred incremental risk of T2DM in EA with HR=1.82 (1.08-3.06), 4.83 (2.15-10.85) and 8.46 (3.09-23.91) for 1, 2, and ≥3 affected, respectively. In AA only ≥3 affected increased risk (HR=2.45, 1.44-4.19). Specific kinship patterns were associated with incident T2DM in EA but not in AA. The presence of any first-degree relative with T2DM does not discriminate risk in AA given the high race-specific prevalence of diabetes. Accounting for the number of affected relatives may more appropriately estimate risk for incident diabetes in both races. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) in families with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Results from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wägner, Ana M; Santana, Ángelo; Hernández, Marta; Wiebe, Julia C; Nóvoa, Javier; Mauricio, Didac

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. The presence of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) may represent a distinct form of autoimmune diabetes, with involvement of specific mechanisms. The aim of this study was to find predictors of AAID in the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) data set. Methods 3263 families with at least 2 siblings with T1D were included. Clinical information was obtained using questionnaires, anti-GAD and anti-IA-2 were measured and HLA-genotyping was performed. Siblings with T1D with and without AAID were compared and a multivariate regression analysis was performed to find predictors of AAID. T1D-associated HLA haplotypes were defined as the 4 most susceptible and protective, respectively. Results AAID was present in 14.4% of the T1D affected siblings. Age of diabetes onset, current age and time since diagnosis were higher, and there was a female predominance and more family history of AAID in the group with AAID, as well as more frequent anti-GAD and less frequent anti-IA2 positivity. Risk and protective HLA haplotype distributions were similar, though DRB1*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 was more frequent in the group with AAID. In the multivariate analysis, female gender, age of onset, family history of AAID, time since diagnosis and anti-GAD positivity were significantly associated with AAID. Conclusions In patients with T1D, the presence of AAID is associated with female predominance, more frequent family history of AAID, later onset of T1D and more anti-GAD antibodies, despite longer duration of the disease. The predominance of certain HLA haplotypes suggests that specific mechanisms of disease may be involved. PMID:21744463

  2. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Central Repositories: A Valuable Resource for Nephrology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akolkar, Beena; Spain, Lisa M.; Guill, Michael H.; Del Vecchio, Corey T.; Carroll, Leslie E.

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Central Repositories, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), are an important resource available to researchers and the general public. The Central Repositories house samples, genetic data, phenotypic data, and study documentation from >100 NIDDK-funded clinical studies, in areas such as diabetes, digestive disease, and liver disease research. The Central Repositories also have an exceptionally rich collection of studies related to kidney disease, including the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease landmark study and recent data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort and CKD in Children Cohort studies. The data are carefully curated and linked to the samples from the study. The NIDDK is working to make the materials and data accessible to researchers. The Data Repositories continue to improve flexible online searching tools that help researchers identify the samples or data of interest, and NIDDK has created several different paths to access the data and samples, including some funding initiatives. Over the past several years, the Central Repositories have seen steadily increasing interest and use of the stored materials. NIDDK plans to make more collections available and do more outreach and education about use of the datasets to the nephrology research community in the future to enhance the value of this resource. PMID:25376765

  3. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Central Repositories: a valuable resource for nephrology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Rebekah S; Akolkar, Beena; Spain, Lisa M; Guill, Michael H; Del Vecchio, Corey T; Carroll, Leslie E

    2015-04-07

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Central Repositories, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), are an important resource available to researchers and the general public. The Central Repositories house samples, genetic data, phenotypic data, and study documentation from >100 NIDDK-funded clinical studies, in areas such as diabetes, digestive disease, and liver disease research. The Central Repositories also have an exceptionally rich collection of studies related to kidney disease, including the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease landmark study and recent data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort and CKD in Children Cohort studies. The data are carefully curated and linked to the samples from the study. The NIDDK is working to make the materials and data accessible to researchers. The Data Repositories continue to improve flexible online searching tools that help researchers identify the samples or data of interest, and NIDDK has created several different paths to access the data and samples, including some funding initiatives. Over the past several years, the Central Repositories have seen steadily increasing interest and use of the stored materials. NIDDK plans to make more collections available and do more outreach and education about use of the datasets to the nephrology research community in the future to enhance the value of this resource. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Leptin reverses hyperglycemia and hyperphagia in insulin deficient diabetic rats by pituitary-independent central nervous system actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre A da Silva

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis has been postulated to play a major role in mediating the antidiabetic effects of leptin. We tested if the pituitary is essential for the chronic central nervous system mediated actions of leptin on metabolic and cardiovascular function in insulin-dependent diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Male 12-week-old hypophysectomized Sprague-Dawley rats (Hypo, n = 5 were instrumented with telemetry probes for determination of mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR 24-hrs/day and an intracerebroventricular (ICV cannula was placed into the brain lateral ventricle for continuous leptin infusion. In additional groups of Hypo and control rats (n = 5/group, diabetes was induced by single injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, IP. Hypo rats were lighter, had lower MAP and HR (83±4 and 317±2 vs 105±4 mmHg and 339±4 bpm, with similar caloric intake per kilogram of body weight and fasting plasma glucose levels (84±4 vs 80±4 mg/dl compared to controls. Chronic ICV leptin infusion (7 days, 0.62 μg/hr in non-diabetic rats reduced caloric intake and body weight (-10% in Hypo and control rats and markedly increased HR in control rats (~25 bpm while causing only modest HR increases in Hypo rats (8 bpm. In diabetic Hypo and control rats, leptin infusion reduced caloric intake, body weight and glucose levels (323±74 to 99±20 and 374±27 to 108±10 mg/dl, respectively; however, the effects of leptin on HR were abolished in Hypo rats. These results indicate that hypophysectomy attenuates leptin's effect on HR regulation without altering leptin's ability to suppress appetite or normalize glucose levels in diabetes.

  5. Apoptosis of supraoptic AVP neurons is involved in the development of central diabetes insipidus after hypophysectomy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lijin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that various types of axonal injury of hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal tract can result in degeneration of the magnocellular neurons (MCNs in hypothalamus and development of central diabetes insipidus (CDI. However, the mechanism of the degeneration and death of MCNs after hypophysectomy in vivo is still unclear. This present study was aimed to disclose it and to figure out the dynamic change of central diabetes insipidus after hypophysectomy. Results The analysis on the dynamic change of daily water consumption (DWC, daily urine volume(DUV, specific gravity of urine(USG and plasma vasopressin concentration showed that the change pattern of them was triphasic and neuron counting showed that the degeneration of vasopressin neurons began at 10 d, aggravated at 20 d and then stabilized at 30 d after hypophysectomy. There was marked upregulation of cleaved Caspase-3 expression of vasopressin neurons in hypophysectomy rats. A "ladder" pattern of migration of DNA internucleosomal fragments was detected and apoptotic ultrastructure was found in these neurons. There was time correlation among the occurrence of diabetes insipidus, the changes of plasma vasopressin concentration and the degeneration of vasopressin neurons after hypophysectomy. Conclusion This study firstly demonstrated that apoptosis was involved in degeneration of supraoptic vasopressin neurons after hypophysectomy in vivo and development of CDI. Our study on time course and correlations among water metabolism, degeneration and apoptosis of vasopressin neurons suggested that there should be an efficient therapeutic window in which irreversible CDI might be prevented by anti-apoptosis.

  6. Impact of Education on Disease Knowledge and Glycaemic Control Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Family Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Herenda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In patients with diabetes type 2, good knowledge about disease often doesn’t follow appropriate behavior in their life. Therefore, we wanted to find out basic level of disease knowledge and glycemic control among type 2 diabetic patients, and after that impact of passive and intensive education on knowledge and glycemic control. Starting with 130 participants, 91 patients with type 2 diabetes, from four family medicine services in Tuzla Canton, completed six months education about their disease. Disease Knowledge Test of Michigan Diabetes Training and Research Center was used to evaluate knowledge about diabetes and glycaemic control was assessed by HbAic. Participants were tested at the beginning of survey, after 3 months of passive education and additional 3 months of intensive one. Basic test showed good knowledge of participants (score 8,3 out of 15, improved knowledge after passive education (score 9,23 and intensive one (11,19 (P<0,0001. Demographic characteristics of patients (age, sex, living area, level of education, duration of disease and type of treatment had no influence on disease knowledge and glycaemic control during education. Generally, patient education improved significantly glycaemic control by HbA1c reduction 0,45% (P=0,011 without significant differences between passive and intensive one. Education of patients improves both disease knowledge and glycaemic control among type 2 diabetic patients.

  7. Influence of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus on Women's Nutritional Beliefs and Lifestyle Choices for Themselves and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnedu, Cordelia Chinwe; Gayle, Lynette; Popoola, Sola

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the impact of type 1 diabetes on women's nutritional beliefs and their lifestyle choices both for themselves and for their families. The data sources used were the online databases of OVID, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsyINFO, PsyARTICLE, ERIC, Health Source Nursing/Academic edition, and the Centers for Disease Control from January 2000 to 2012. The concentration of the search was to identify literature with the key words "nutrition," "lifestyle," or "women with type 1 diabetes." The researchers found 28 data-based research articles that examined women with type 1 diabetes. The articles were individually scrutinized for relevance and limited to English language articles. Data concerning the nutritional beliefs, lifestyle choices, andfamily dynamics among women with DM1 were extracted. The research articles consisted of 19 qualitative studies, 7 quantitative studies, and 2 theory-testing studies. The themefor the studies included, but was not limited to, birth size, eating disorders, complications of diabetes mellitus, theory testing, documentations of effectiveness, estimations of carbohydrates, weight, changes during pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and their educational preferences. This integrative review described the effects of DM1 on women's nutritional belief and lifestyle choices. Results demonstrated the importance of education and follow-ups; however, future studies are needed to identify factors that contribute to noncompliance and waysfor patients to comprehend the seriousness of complications that can arise from type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Family Planning Behavior and Small Family Concept Acceptance in Two Different Geographical Characteristics Municipality of South Klaten, Klaten, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Priyono

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The research aim to know the family planning behaviour, the acceptance small family norm and the influential factors in two villages that have different geographical aspect. The behaviour involve the knowledge, the attitude and the practice where as the influential factors involve education, accupation, values of children, income, children still born and family size desired. The research areas are chosen purposive in two villages that have different geographical aspect, social aspect and cultural aspect. The aspect are: 1 location and topography, 2 socialy  structure, and 3 the achievement of effective acceptor. Based on the three aspects, Ngalas village (developing and Sumberejo (developed are chosen as research areas. The recorded as ative acceptor (recordedin RI/PUS/1991 form. The respondents are chosen by cencus at two neighborhoord association at every village. There are six variables in this research are assumed influence the periode of the contraceptives use, such as education, occupation status, values of children, family income, children still born, and family size desired. There are three variables are assumed influence the small family norm, such as education, occupation status, and values of children. The data was analyzed by frequency table, crosee table, and statistical analysis (Q square and Regresion. The data was always compared between the two villages. The analysis use computer by Microsoft Program.  The research result showed that Sumberejo was better than Ngalas in the knowledge, the attitude, and the practice of family planning. Most of the people who live in Sumberejo understood the contraception device well (52,4%, where as in Ngalas (26,8%. Both of them agreed on using contraception device (more than 70%. The respondent who live in Sumberejo used IUD (40% and MOW/MOP (23,23%. They had used of the contraception device for 4.8 years on an average. Mean  while the respondents in Ngalas use IUD (23,68% and MOW/MOP (2

  9. 76 FR 22748 - Wisconsin Central Ltd.-Intra-Corporate Family Merger Exemption-Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... Ltd.--Intra-Corporate Family Merger Exemption-- Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway Company and Duluth, Winnipeg and Pacific Railway Company Wisconsin Central Ltd. (WCL), Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway Company (DMIR) and Duluth, Winnipeg and Pacific Railway Company (DWP) have jointly filed a...

  10. Glycemic control, cognitive function, and family support among middle-aged and older Hispanics with diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strizich, Garrett; Kaplan, Robert C; González, Hector M; Daviglus, Martha L; Giachello, Aida L; Teng, Yanping; Lipton, Richard B; Grober, Ellen

    2016-07-01

    To examine among Hispanics in the U.S., a population with increased reliance on informal healthcare support structures, (1) the association between cognitive function and control of diabetes; and (2) whether this association is modified by family support. The Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), word fluency, and learning and delayed recall components of the Spanish English Verbal Learning Test were administered to 1794 Hispanic adults aged 45-76years with diagnosed diabetes. An executive function index and global cognitive function index (GCFI) were derived. Uncontrolled diabetes (HbA1c⩾7% [53mmol/mol]) was compared across quartiles of cognitive function using multivariable logit models with interaction terms for cognitive function and family support. After adjustment, lower DSST scores were associated with uncontrolled diabetes (P=0.03). Family support modified the relationship between other measures of cognition and diabetes control (Pinteraction: 0.002, 0.09). Among individuals with low family support, as cognitive function declined, the odds of uncontrolled diabetes increased (P-trend across quartiles of the GCFI, 0.015). Among those with low family support, persons in the lowest quartile of global cognitive function were more than twice as likely to have uncontrolled diabetes as those in the highest performing quartile (OR=2.31; 95% CI: 1.17, 4.55). There was no similar effect among those with high family support. Family support may buffer the negative association between low cognitive functioning and diabetes control in US Hispanics/Latinos. Educational programs targeted at family members of middle-age and older persons with diabetes regardless of neurocognitive status may help improve population-level glycemic control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Combined Central Diabetes Insipidus and Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuehai; Zhou, Xiaolan; Gao, Liang; Wu, Xing; Fei, Li; Mao, Ying; Hu, Jin; Zhou, Liangfu

    2016-04-01

    Combined central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is rare, is characterized by massive polyuria leading to severe water and electrolyte disturbances, and usually is associated with very high mortality mainly as a result of delayed diagnosis and improper management. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical presentation, management, and outcomes of 11 patients who developed combined central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome after traumatic brain injury to define distinctive features for timely diagnosis and proper management. The most typical clinical presentation was massive polyuria (10,000 mL/24 hours or >1000 mL/hour) refractory to vasopressin alone but responsive to vasopressin plus cortisone acetate. Other characteristic presentations included low central venous pressure, high brain natriuretic peptide precursor level without cardiac dysfunction, high 24-hour urine sodium excretion and hypovolemia, and much higher urine than serum osmolarity; normal serum sodium level and urine specific gravity can also be present. Timely and adequate infusion of sodium chloride was key in treatment. Of 11 patients, 5 had a good prognosis 3 months later (Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score ≥6), 1 had an Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4, 2 died in the hospital of brain hernia, and 3 developed a vegetative state. For combined diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome after traumatic brain injury, massive polyuria is a major typical presentation, and intensive monitoring of fluid and sodium status is key for timely diagnosis. To achieve a favorable outcome, proper sodium chloride supplementation and cortisone acetate and vasopressin coadministration are key. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between family history of type 2 diabetes and serum FGF21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Greggory R; Deville, Tiffany; Guillory, Joshua; Bellar, David; Nelson, Arnold G

    2017-11-01

    Determining predictive markers for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), particularly in young individuals, offers immense potential benefits in preventative medicine. Previous research examining serum fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in humans has revealed equivocal relationships with clinical markers of metabolic dysfunction. However, it is unknown to what extent, if any, first-degree family history of T2D (mother or father of the participant diagnosed with T2D) level affects serum FGF21 levels. The aim of this study was to determine whether in healthy individuals with FH+ (n = 18) and without FH- (n = 17) a family history of T2D affects serum FGF21. Fasting serum and clinical, metabolic and anthropometric measures were determined using a cross-sectional design. Differences between groups for FGF21 were not significant (FH+ = 266 pg/mL ± 51·4, FH = 180 pg/mL ± 29; Z = 0·97, P = 0·33). Adiponectin values were lower in FH+ (8·81 μg/mL ± 2·14) compared to FH- (10·65 μg/mL ± 1·44; F = 8·83, P = 0·01). Resistin was negatively correlated with FGF21 for all participants (r = -0·38, P = 0·03), but no other clinical, metabolic, or serum markers were predictive for serum FGF21 in FH+ or FH-. Serum FGF21 is not significantly different between FH+ and FH- in young, healthy individuals. Based upon the data of this pilot study, it is unclear whether serum FGF21 can be used as a stand-alone predictive marker for T2D in healthy subjects. © 2017 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  13. Transient polyuria related to central diabetes insipidus caused by lymphocytic infundibulo-neurohypophysitis in a patient treated for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masanori; Sato, Ai; Nishio, Shin-ichi; Uehara, Takeshi; Komatsu, Mitsuhisa

    2010-01-01

    A 45-year-old man was hospitalized because of weight loss, finger tremor, thirst, polydipsia and increased urinary frequency. He was diagnosed with Graves' disease (GD) and central diabetes insipidus (CDI). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the enlarged posterior pituitary with thickened stalk. Histological examination obtained from biopsy of the pituitary revealed lymphocytic infundibulo-neurohypophysitis. He received treatment with thiamazole (MMI) for GD and desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) for CDI. However, DDAVP administration could be discontinued as GD was gradually improved. This course indicates that not only the recovered renal response to arginine-vasopressin but also the immunomodulative effects of MMI might attribute to the improvement of polyuria.

  14. Rural Hispanic populations at risk in developing diabetes: sociocultural and familial challenges in promoting a healthy diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuman, Amy N; Scholl, Juliann C; Wilkinson, Kenton

    2013-01-01

    Type II diabetes affects Hispanic populations disproportionately and is the fifth leading cause of death for Hispanic people in the United States ( Smith & Barnett, 2005 ). Risk of diabetes is of great concern throughout the United States and is clearly of epidemic proportions for regions such as the Southwest and Texas where the primary minority populations are Mexican American. We conducted four focus groups with a total of 49 Hispanic participants (23 adults and 26 adolescents) from rural West Texas communities to gain insights about participants' eating habits, knowledge of diabetes, and potential barriers to preventive care. From the data, we identified a three-tiered predisposition or vulnerability to diabetes-heredity; preferences for unhealthy, culturally based food; and temptations from U.S. mainstream fast food culture. These vulnerabilities added to the sociocultural concerns that participants identified-importance of parental and familial modeling; challenges to healthy eating based on a culturally based diet and mainstream fast food culture; and a lack of support from the larger sociocultural networks such as teachers, community leaders, and the media. From these data, we have a better understanding of familial and sociocultural factors that need to be addressed in the development of preventive public awareness and educational plans. We outline implications for practitioners and educators from an integrated cultural biomedical approach.

  15. Low serum adiponectin levels in Korean children with a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yeon Joung; Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Rhie, Young Jun; Park, Sang Hee; Lee, Kee-Hyoung

    2012-01-01

    The current worldwide increases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children coincide with increases in the prevalence of obesity. We investigated the insulin resistance and adiponectin levels of children and adolescents with a family history of T2DM (FHD). Our sample included 131 children and adolescents aged 8-15 years. Fasting plasma glucose, lipids, fasting insulin, adiponectin levels and HOMA-IR were analyzed according to FHD and obesity. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed in all subjects except non-obese subjects without FHD. Adiponectin levels of subjects with FHD were significantly lower than those of subjects without FHD in both the obese and nonobese groups. HOMA-IR was significantly higher in obese subjects with FHD than in those without FHD. Adiponectin levels were found to be independently associated with FHD and Matsuda index. The frequency of impaired glucose tolerance in obese subjects with FHD was more than four times higher compared to obese subjects without FHD. Our results suggest that FHD could be a risk factor of T2DM in obese Korean children, especially with low serum levels of adiponectin.

  16. Progressive polyuria without vasopressin neuron loss in a mouse model for familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Arima, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Hiroi, Maiko; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Noriaki; Ueda, Masatsugu; Shiota, Akira; Oiso, Yutaka

    2009-05-01

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI), an autosomal dominant disorder, is mostly caused by mutations in the gene of neurophysin II (NPII), the carrier protein of arginine vasopressin (AVP). Previous studies suggest that loss of AVP neurons might be the cause of polyuria in FNDI. Here we analyzed knockin mice expressing mutant NPII that causes FNDI in humans. The heterozygous mice manifested progressive polyuria as do patients with FNDI. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that inclusion bodies that were not immunostained with antibodies for mutant NPII, normal NPII, or AVP were present in the AVP cells in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), and that the size of inclusion bodies gradually increased in parallel with the increases in urine volume. Electron microscopic analyses showed that aggregates existed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as in the nucleus of AVP neurons in 1-mo-old heterozygous mice. At 12 mo, dilated ER filled with aggregates occupied the cytoplasm of AVP cells, while few aggregates were found in the nucleus. Analyses with in situ hybridization revealed that expression of AVP mRNA was significantly decreased in the SON in the heterozygous mice compared with that in wild-type mice. Counting cells expressing AVP mRNA in the SON indicated that polyuria had progressed substantially in the absence of neuronal loss. These data suggest that cell death is not the primary cause of polyuria in FNDI, and that the aggregates accumulated in the ER might be involved in the dysfunction of AVP neurons that lead to the progressive polyuria.

  17. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) The NIDDK-sponsored Diabetes Prevention ... Diabetes Prevention Program for those who are eligible. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) DPP Goal The DPP looked ...

  18. Genome-Wide Association and Trans-ethnic Meta-Analysis for Advanced Diabetic Kidney Disease: Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Sudha K; Sedor, John R; Freedman, Barry I; Kao, W H Linda; Kretzler, Matthias; Keller, Benjamin J; Abboud, Hanna E; Adler, Sharon G; Best, Lyle G; Bowden, Donald W; Burlock, Allison; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Cole, Shelley A; Comeau, Mary E; Curtis, Jeffrey M; Divers, Jasmin; Drechsler, Christiane; Duggirala, Ravi; Elston, Robert C; Guo, Xiuqing; Huang, Huateng; Hoffmann, Michael Marcus; Howard, Barbara V; Ipp, Eli; Kimmel, Paul L; Klag, Michael J; Knowler, William C; Kohn, Orly F; Leak, Tennille S; Leehey, David J; Li, Man; Malhotra, Alka; März, Winfried; Nair, Viji; Nelson, Robert G; Nicholas, Susanne B; O'Brien, Stephen J; Pahl, Madeleine V; Parekh, Rulan S; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; Rasooly, Rebekah S; Rotimi, Charles N; Rotter, Jerome I; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Seldin, Michael F; Shah, Vallabh O; Smiles, Adam M; Smith, Michael W; Taylor, Kent D; Thameem, Farook; Thornley-Brown, Denyse P; Truitt, Barbara J; Wanner, Christoph; Weil, E Jennifer; Winkler, Cheryl A; Zager, Philip G; Igo, Robert P; Hanson, Robert L; Langefeld, Carl D

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the industrialized world and accounts for much of the excess mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Approximately 45% of U.S. patients with incident end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) have DKD. Independent of glycemic control, DKD aggregates in families and has higher incidence rates in African, Mexican, and American Indian ancestral groups relative to European populations. The Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND) performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) contrasting 6,197 unrelated individuals with advanced DKD with healthy and diabetic individuals lacking nephropathy of European American, African American, Mexican American, or American Indian ancestry. A large-scale replication and trans-ethnic meta-analysis included 7,539 additional European American, African American and American Indian DKD cases and non-nephropathy controls. Within ethnic group meta-analysis of discovery GWAS and replication set results identified genome-wide significant evidence for association between DKD and rs12523822 on chromosome 6q25.2 in American Indians (P = 5.74x10-9). The strongest signal of association in the trans-ethnic meta-analysis was with a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs12523822 (rs955333; P = 1.31x10-8), with directionally consistent results across ethnic groups. These 6q25.2 SNPs are located between the SCAF8 and CNKSR3 genes, a region with DKD relevant changes in gene expression and an eQTL with IPCEF1, a gene co-translated with CNKSR3. Several other SNPs demonstrated suggestive evidence of association with DKD, within and across populations. These data identify a novel DKD susceptibility locus with consistent directions of effect across diverse ancestral groups and provide insight into the genetic architecture of DKD.

  19. Genome-Wide Association and Trans-ethnic Meta-Analysis for Advanced Diabetic Kidney Disease: Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha K Iyengar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic kidney disease (DKD is the most common etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the industrialized world and accounts for much of the excess mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Approximately 45% of U.S. patients with incident end-stage kidney disease (ESKD have DKD. Independent of glycemic control, DKD aggregates in families and has higher incidence rates in African, Mexican, and American Indian ancestral groups relative to European populations. The Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS contrasting 6,197 unrelated individuals with advanced DKD with healthy and diabetic individuals lacking nephropathy of European American, African American, Mexican American, or American Indian ancestry. A large-scale replication and trans-ethnic meta-analysis included 7,539 additional European American, African American and American Indian DKD cases and non-nephropathy controls. Within ethnic group meta-analysis of discovery GWAS and replication set results identified genome-wide significant evidence for association between DKD and rs12523822 on chromosome 6q25.2 in American Indians (P = 5.74x10-9. The strongest signal of association in the trans-ethnic meta-analysis was with a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs12523822 (rs955333; P = 1.31x10-8, with directionally consistent results across ethnic groups. These 6q25.2 SNPs are located between the SCAF8 and CNKSR3 genes, a region with DKD relevant changes in gene expression and an eQTL with IPCEF1, a gene co-translated with CNKSR3. Several other SNPs demonstrated suggestive evidence of association with DKD, within and across populations. These data identify a novel DKD susceptibility locus with consistent directions of effect across diverse ancestral groups and provide insight into the genetic architecture of DKD.

  20. Diabetes: importancia de la familia y el trabajo en la adhesión al tratamiento Diabetes: the importance of family and work for the compliance with treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana C. Azzollini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio correlacional con el objetivo de analizar la percepción del apoyo social en el ámbito familiar y laboral que tienen los pacientes con diagnóstico de diabetes tipo 2 y su relación con la adhesión a los tratamientos médicos. Se seleccionó una muestra probabilística al azar sistemático de 337 pacientes entre 40 y 79 años que concurrían a consultorios externos de cuatro hospitales públicos de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires durante el año 2010. Se administró, entre otros instrumentos, un cuestionario de datos personales y de percepción de apoyo social familiar y laboral, y una escala de frecuencias sobre prácticas de autocuidado; todos validados durante una investigación previa. Se concluye que el apoyo social, tanto familiar como laboral, favorece una mayor adherencia a los tratamientos a través del cumplimiento de pautas de autocuidado en pacientes con diagnóstico de diabetes tipo 2 que concurren a hospitales públicos.Objective: To analyze how patients who suffer from diabetes type II perceive the social support in two areas: family and work. Research design and Methods: In this correlational research of patients with diabetes type II, who are treated in public hospitals of Buenos Aires city, it was selected a probabilistic random systematic sampling composed by 337 patients (ages between 40 -79. They were given several instruments, including a questionnaire about biographic, personal, laborer, and social network´s questions, and a self-care practices scale. All the instruments were previously validated. Results: According to the breakthroughs, social support, from both family and work, favour the compliance with treatment by following the self care´s prescriptions.

  1. Endogenous GLP-1 mediates postprandial reductions in activation in central reward and satiety areas in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Veltman, Dick J; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The central nervous system (CNS) is a major player in the regulation of food intake. The gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed to have an important role in this regulation by relaying information about nutritional status to the CNS. We hypothesised that end......Aims/hypothesis The central nervous system (CNS) is a major player in the regulation of food intake. The gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed to have an important role in this regulation by relaying information about nutritional status to the CNS. We hypothesised...... that endogenous GLP-1 has effects on CNS reward and satiety circuits. Methods This was a randomised, crossover, placebo-controlled intervention study, performed in a university medical centre in the Netherlands. We included patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy lean control subjects. Individuals were eligible...

  2. Central diabetes insipidus as a very late relapse limited to the pituitary stalk in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Hazeki, Daisuke; Imamura, Mari; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and relapse are frequently seen in multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). We present two females with multifocal LCH who developed CDI 9 and 5 years after the initial diagnosis, respectively, as a relapse limited to the pituitary stalk. Combination chemotherapy with cytarabine reduced the mass in the pituitary stalk. Although CDI did not improve, there has been no anterior pituitary hormone deficiency (APHD), neurodegenerative disease in the central nervous system (ND-CNS) or additional relapse for 2 years after therapy. It was difficult to predict the development of CDI in these cases. CDI might develop very late in patients with multifocal LCH, and therefore strict follow-up is necessary, especially with regard to symptoms of CDI such as polydipsia and polyuria. For new-onset CDI with LCH, chemotherapy with cytarabine might be useful for preventing APHD and ND-CNS.

  3. Analysis of access to hypertensive and diabetic drugs in the Family Health Strategy, State of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Maria Nelly Sobreira de Carvalho; Cesse, Eduarda Ângela Pessoa; Lima, Rodrigo Fonseca; Marinho, Michelly Geórgia da Silva; Specht, Yuri da Silva; de Carvalho, Eduardo Maia Freese; Fontbonne, Annick

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the access to drugs for hypertension and diabetes and the direct cost of buying them among users of the Family Health Strategy (FHS) in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Population-based, cross-sectional study of a systematic random sample of 785 patients with hypertension and 823 patients with diabetes mellitus who were registered in 208 randomly selected FHS teams in 35 municipalities of the state of Pernambuco. The selected municipalities were classified into three levels with probability proportional to municipality size (LS, large-sized; MS, medium-sized; SS, small-sized). To verify differences between the cities, we used the χ2 test. Pharmacological treatment was used by 91.2% patients with hypertension whereas 85.6% patients with diabetes mellitus used oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), and 15.4% used insulin. The FHS team itself provided antihypertensive medications to 69.0% patients with hypertension, OADs to 75.0% patients with diabetes mellitus, and insulin treatment to 65.4%. The 36.9% patients with hypertension and 29.8% with diabetes mellitus that had to buy all or part of their medications reported median monthly cost of R$ 18.30, R$ 14.00, and R$ 27.61 for antihypertensive drugs, OADs, and insulin, respectively. It is necessary to increase efforts to ensure access to these drugs in the primary health care network.

  4. Analysis of access to hypertensive and diabetic drugs in the Family Health Strategy, State of Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Nelly Sobreira de Carvalho Barreto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the access to drugs for hypertension and diabetes and the direct cost of buying them among users of the Family Health Strategy (FHS in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil.METHODS: Population-based, cross-sectional study of a systematic random sample of 785 patients with hypertension and 823 patients with diabetes mellitus who were registered in 208 randomly selected FHS teams in 35 municipalities of the state of Pernambuco. The selected municipalities were classified into three levels with probability proportional to municipality size (LS, large-sized; MS, medium-sized; SS, small-sized. To verify differences between the cities, we used the χ2 test.RESULTS: Pharmacological treatment was used by 91.2% patients with hypertension whereas 85.6% patients with diabetes mellitus used oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs, and 15.4% used insulin. The FHS team itself provided antihypertensive medications to 69.0% patients with hypertension, OADs to 75.0% patients with diabetes mellitus, and insulin treatment to 65.4%. The 36.9% patients with hypertension and 29.8% with diabetes mellitus that had to buy all or part of their medications reported median monthly cost of R$ 18.30, R$ 14.00, and R$ 27.61 for antihypertensive drugs, OADs, and insulin, respectively.CONCLUSION: It is necessary to increase efforts to ensure access to these drugs in the primary health care network.

  5. Familial young-onset diabetes, pre-diabetes and cardiovascular disease are associated with genetic variants of DACH1 in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Lee, Heung Man; Lam, Vincent Kwok Lim; Tam, Claudia Ha Ting; Ho, Janice Siu Ka; Zhao, Hai-Lu; Guan, Jing; Kong, Alice Pik Shan; Lau, Eric; Zhang, Guozhi; Luk, Andrea; Wang, Ying; Tsui, Stephen Kwok Wing; Chan, Ting Fung; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Wei Ping; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Furuta, Hiroto; Nanjo, Kishio; Tai, E Shyong; Ng, Daniel Peng-Keat; Tang, Nelson Leung Sang; Woo, Jean; Leung, Ping Chung; Xue, Hong; Wong, Jeffrey; Leung, Po Sing; Lau, Terrence C K; Tong, Peter Chun Yip; Xu, Gang; Ng, Maggie Chor Yin; So, Wing Yee; Chan, Juliana Chung Ngor

    2014-01-01

    In Asia, young-onset type 2 diabetes (YOD) is characterized by obesity and increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 99 Chinese obese subjects with familial YOD diagnosed before 40-year-old and 101 controls, the T allele of rs1408888 in intron 1 of DACH1(Dachshund homolog 1) was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.49(95% confidence intervals:1.57-3.96, P = 8.4 × 10(-5)). Amongst these subjects, we found reduced expression of DACH1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 63 cases compared to 65 controls (P = 0.02). In a random cohort of 1468 cases and 1485 controls, amongst top 19 SNPs from GWAS, rs1408888 was associated with type 2 diabetes with a global P value of 0.0176 and confirmation in a multiethnic Asian case-control cohort (7370/7802) with an OR of 1.07(1.02-1.12, P(meta)  = 0.012). In 599 Chinese non-diabetic subjects, rs1408888 was linearly associated with systolic blood pressure and insulin resistance. In a case-control cohort (n = 953/953), rs1408888 was associated with an OR of 1.54(1.07-2.22, P = 0.019) for CVD in type 2 diabetes. In an autopsy series of 173 non-diabetic cases, TT genotype of rs1408888 was associated with an OR of 3.31(1.19-9.19, P = 0.0214) and 3.27(1.25-11.07, P = 0.0184) for coronary heart disease (CHD) and coronary arteriosclerosis. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that rs1408888 lies within regulatory elements of DACH1 implicated in islet development and insulin secretion. The T allele of rs1408888 of DACH1 was associated with YOD, prediabetes and CVD in Chinese.

  6. Familial young-onset diabetes, pre-diabetes and cardiovascular disease are associated with genetic variants of DACH1 in Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Ching Wan Ma

    Full Text Available In Asia, young-onset type 2 diabetes (YOD is characterized by obesity and increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS of 99 Chinese obese subjects with familial YOD diagnosed before 40-year-old and 101 controls, the T allele of rs1408888 in intron 1 of DACH1(Dachshund homolog 1 was associated with an odds ratio (OR of 2.49(95% confidence intervals:1.57-3.96, P = 8.4 × 10(-5. Amongst these subjects, we found reduced expression of DACH1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from 63 cases compared to 65 controls (P = 0.02. In a random cohort of 1468 cases and 1485 controls, amongst top 19 SNPs from GWAS, rs1408888 was associated with type 2 diabetes with a global P value of 0.0176 and confirmation in a multiethnic Asian case-control cohort (7370/7802 with an OR of 1.07(1.02-1.12, P(meta  = 0.012. In 599 Chinese non-diabetic subjects, rs1408888 was linearly associated with systolic blood pressure and insulin resistance. In a case-control cohort (n = 953/953, rs1408888 was associated with an OR of 1.54(1.07-2.22, P = 0.019 for CVD in type 2 diabetes. In an autopsy series of 173 non-diabetic cases, TT genotype of rs1408888 was associated with an OR of 3.31(1.19-9.19, P = 0.0214 and 3.27(1.25-11.07, P = 0.0184 for coronary heart disease (CHD and coronary arteriosclerosis. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that rs1408888 lies within regulatory elements of DACH1 implicated in islet development and insulin secretion. The T allele of rs1408888 of DACH1 was associated with YOD, prediabetes and CVD in Chinese.

  7. Optimal central obesity measurement site for assessing cardiometabolic and type 2 diabetes risk in middle-aged adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán R Millar

    Full Text Available Despite recommendations that central obesity assessment should be employed as a marker of cardiometabolic health, no consensus exists regarding measurement protocol. This study examined a range of anthropometric variables and their relationships with cardiometabolic features and type 2 diabetes in order to ascertain whether measurement site influences discriminatory accuracy. In particular, we compared waist circumference (WC measured at two sites: (1 immediately below the lowest rib (WC rib and (2 between the lowest rib and iliac crest (WC midway, which has been recommended by the World Health Organisation and International Diabetes Federation.This was a cross-sectional study involving a random sample of 2,002 men and women aged 46-73 years. Metabolic profiles and WC, hip circumference, pelvic width and body mass index (BMI were determined. Correlation, logistic regression and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to evaluate obesity measurement relationships with metabolic risk phenotypes and type 2 diabetes.WC rib measures displayed the strongest associations with non-optimal lipid and lipoprotein levels, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, impaired fasting glucose, a clustering of metabolic risk features and type 2 diabetes, in both genders. Rib-derived indices improved discrimination of type 2 diabetes by 3-7% compared to BMI and 2-6% compared to WC midway (in men and 5-7% compared to BMI and 4-6% compared to WC midway (in women. A prediction model including BMI and central obesity displayed a significantly higher area under the curve for WC rib (0.78, P=0.003, Rib/height ratio (0.80, P<0.001, Rib/pelvis ratio (0.79, P<0.001, but not for WC midway (0.75, P=0.127, when compared to one with BMI alone (0.74.WC rib is easier to assess and our data suggest that it is a better method for determining obesity-related cardiometabolic risk than WC midway. The clinical utility of rib-derived indices, or

  8. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you, discussing your symptoms, and going over your health history, your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests: Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done ...

  9. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  10. Expression of the central obesity and Type 2 Diabetes mellitus genes is associated with insulin resistance in young obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczen, S; Wojcik, M; Fijorek, K; Siedlar, M; Starzyk, J B

    2015-04-01

    The assessment of the health consequences associated with obesity in young children is challenging. The aims of this study were: (1) to compare insulin resistance indices derived from OGTT in obese patients and healthy control (2) to analyze central obesity and Type 2 Diabetes genes expression in obese children, with special attention to the youngest group (10 years old). The study included 49 children with obesity (median age 13.5 years old), and 25 healthy peers. Biochemical blood tests and expression of 11 central obesity and 33 Type 2 Diabetes genes was assessed. A significant difference in insulin resistance between obese and non-obese adolescents was observed in all studied indices (mean values of the insulin levels: 24.9 vs. 9.71 mIU/L in T0, 128 vs. 54.7 mIU/L in T60 and 98.7 vs. 41.1 mIU/L in T120 respectively; AUC: 217 vs. 77.2 ng/ml*h, mean values of B% (state beta cell function), S% (insulin sensitivity), and IR were 255 (±97) vs. 135 (±37.8), 46.6 (±37.3) vs. 84.2 (±29.6) and 3 (±1.55) vs. 1.36 (±0,56); HIS, WBIS and ISIBel median 3.89, 44.7, 0.73 vs. 8.57, 110, 2.25. All comparisons differed significantly p1). Moreover, insulin sensitivity was significantly better in the older obese group (>10 years old): median AUC 239 vs. 104 ng/ml*h, and HIS, WBIS and ISIBel 3.57, 38, 0.67 vs. 6.23, 75.6, 1.87 respectively in the obese older compared to the obese younger subgroup, pobesity genes and 70% of Type 2 Diabetes genes was higher in the obese compared to control groups. The differences were more pronounced in the younger obese group. Insulin resistance may develop in early stage of childhood obesity and in very young children may be associated with higher expression of the central obesity and Type 2 Diabetes genes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Central diabetes insipidus associated with impaired renal aquaporin-1 expression in mice lacking liver X receptor β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbi, Chiara; Kong, Xiaomu; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Gao, Min; Jia, Xiao; Ohnishi, Hideo; Ueta, Yoichi; Warner, Margaret; Guan, Youfei; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2012-02-21

    The present study demonstrates a key role for the oxysterol receptor liver X receptor β (LXRβ) in the etiology of diabetes insipidus (DI). Given free access to water, LXRβ(-/-) but not LXRα(-/-) mice exhibited polyuria (abnormal daily excretion of highly diluted urine) and polydipsia (increased water intake), both features of diabetes insipidus. LXRβ(-/-) mice responded to 24-h dehydration with a decreased urine volume and increased urine osmolality. To determine whether the DI was of central or nephrogenic origin, we examined the responsiveness of the kidney to arginine vasopressin (AVP). An i.p. injection of AVP to LXRβ(-/-) mice revealed a partial kidney response: There was no effect on urine volume, but there was a significant increase of urine osmolality, suggesting that DI may be caused by a defect in central production of AVP. In the brain of WT mice LXRβ was expressed in the nuclei of magnocellular neurons in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. In LXRβ(-/-) mice the expression of AVP was markedly decreased in the magnocellular neurons as well as in urine collected over a 24-h period. The persistent high urine volume after AVP administration was traced to a reduction in aquaporin-1 expression in the kidney of LXRβ(-/-) mice. The LXR agonist (GW3965) in WT mice elicited an increase in urine osmolality, suggesting that LXRβ is a key receptor in controlling water balance with targets in both the brain and kidney, and it could be a therapeutic target in disorders of water balance.

  12. In silico analysis of a novel MKRN3 missense mutation in familial central precocious puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neocleous, Vassos; Shammas, Christos; Phelan, Marie M; Nicolaou, Stella; Phylactou, Leonidas A; Skordis, Nicos

    2016-01-01

    The onset of puberty is influenced by the interplay of stimulating and restraining factors, many of which have a genetic origin. Premature activation of the GnRH secretion in central precocious puberty (CPP) may arise either from gain-of-function mutations of the KISS1 and KISS1R genes or from loss-of-function manner mutations of the MKRN3 gene leading to MKRN3 deficiency. To explore the genetic causes responsible for CPP and the potential role of the RING finger protein 3 (MKRN3) gene. We investigated potential sequence variations in the intronless MKRN3 gene by Sanger sequencing of the entire 507 amino acid coding region of exon 1 in a family with two affected girls presented with CPP at the age of 6 and 5·7 years, respectively. A novel heterozygous g.Gly312Asp missense mutation in the MKRN3 gene was identified in these siblings. The imprinted MKRN3 missense mutation was also identified as expected in the unaffected father and followed as expected an imprinted mode of inheritance. In silico analysis of the altered missense variant using the computational algorithms Polyphen2, SIFT and Mutation Taster predicted a damage and pathogenic alteration causing CPP. The pathogenicity of the alteration at the protein level via an in silico structural model is also explored. A novel mutation in the MKRN3 gene in two sisters with CPP was identified, supporting the fundamental role of this gene in the suppression of the hypothalamic GnRH neurons. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. hyperuricaemia in obese type 2 diabetics in jos, north central nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zamzar

    Methodology: 100 patients with Type 2 diabetes visiting a private health facility in ... The data obtained for analysis from each participant were ..... a meta analysis BMC Public Health 2011;11;832 ... Albogai O.A., Odeh A.A., Al Hourani H.M., Al.

  14. Management of Type 1 diabetes in a limited resource context: A study of the diabetes research education and management trust model in Nagpur, Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Sarah Zuijdwijk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Diabetes Research Education and Management (DREAM Trust (DT is a charitable organisation that offers free insulin and healthcare to children and youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D in central India. We systematically describe DT's model of care and evaluate medical and sociodemographic factors influencing glycaemic control in this resource-poor setting. Methods: Study of DT patients diagnosed with T1D <16 years old and followed at DT ≥1 year. Participants completed an interview, retrospective chart review and prospective haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c measurements. Uni- and multi-variate linear regressions determined factors associated with HbA1c. Percentage of underweight patients (as proxy for glycaemic control was compared at presentation to DT versus time of interview. Results: A total of 102 DT patients (51% female completed the interview and chart review. 74 had HbA1c measured. Median HbA1c was 10.4% (90.2 mmol/mol. In multivariate regression, higher HbA1c was independently associated with higher insulin dose/kg (P < 0.001 and holding a below the poverty line certificate (P = 0.004. There was no association between HbA1c and age, sex, caste, religion or experience of stigma. However, the psychosocial burden of T1D (expressed as concern about others learning about the diagnosis, and worry about the future, and experience of stigma were substantial. Percentage of patients with underweight body mass index was significantly lower at the time of study vs. presentation to DT (P = 0.005. Conclusions: The DT charitable programme overcomes social status, gender inequalities and experience of social stigma to provide life-saving treatment to children with T1D in central India. Glycaemic control remains inadequate however, with children living in extreme poverty most at risk.

  15. Fertility and Family Policies in Central and Eastern Europe after 1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Frejka

    2016-06-01

    For the first time ever an overview and analysis of CEE family policies is conceptualized in this paper. It demonstrates that fertility trends and family policies are a matter of serious concern throughout the region. The following family policy types have been identified: comprehensive family policy model; pro-natalist policies model; temporary male bread-winner model; and conventional family policies model. The majority of family policies in CEE countries suffer from a variety of shortcomings that impede them from generating enhanced family welfare and from providing conditions for cohort fertility to increase. The likely further decline of cohort fertility, or its stagnation, may entail long-term demographic as well as other societal consequences, such as continuous declines in total population numbers, changes in age structures, as well as implications for health and social security costs.

  16. Which Measurement of Blood Pressure Is More Associated With Albuminuria in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Central Blood Pressure or Peripheral Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Okada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Muhei; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Kimura, Toshihiro; Nakano, Koji; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether central systolic blood pressure (SBP) was associated with albuminuria, defined as urinary albumin excretion (UAE) ≥30 mg/g creatinine, and, if so, whether the relationship of central SBP with albuminuria was stronger than that of peripheral SBP in patients with type 2 diabetes. The authors performed a cross-sectional study in 294 outpatients with type 2 diabetes. The relationship between peripheral SBP or central SBP and UAE using regression analysis was evaluated, and the odds ratios of peripheral SBP or central SBP were calculated to identify albuminuria using logistic regression model. Moreover, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of central SBP was compared with that of peripheral SBP to identify albuminuria. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that peripheral SBP (β=0.255, PAUC of peripheral SBP was significantly greater than that of central SBP to identify albuminuria (P=0.035). Peripheral SBP is superior to central SBP in identifying albuminuria, although both peripheral and central SBP are associated with UAE in patients with type 2 diabetes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mental Models of Cause and Inheritance for Type 2 Diabetes Among Unaffected Individuals Who Have a Positive Family History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Shah, Lisa L; Cady, Alyssa D

    2018-03-01

    Using the familial risk perception (FRP) model as a framework, we elicited causal and inheritance explanations for type 2 diabetes (T2D) from people who do not have T2D but have a family history for it. We identified four composite mental models for cause of T2D: (a) purely genetic; (b) purely behavioral/environmental; (c) direct multifactorial, in which risk factors interact and over time directly lead to T2D; and (d) indirect multifactorial, in which risk factors interact and over time cause a precursor health condition (such as obesity or metabolic syndrome) that leads to T2D. Interestingly, participants described specific risk factors such as genetics, food habits, lifestyle, weight, and culture as "running in the family." Our findings provide insight into lay beliefs about T2D that can be used by clinicians to anticipate or make sense of responses to questions they pose to patients about mental models for T2D.

  18. PHOX2B mutation-confirmed congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in a Chinese family: presentation from newborn to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peilin; Su, Yi-Ning; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Huey-Dong

    2009-02-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is characterized by compromised chemoreflexes resulting in sleep hypoventilation. We report a Chinese family with paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B) mutation-confirmed CCHS, with a clinical spectrum from newborn to adulthood, to increase awareness of its various manifestations. After identifying central hypoventilation in an adult man (index case), clinical evaluation was performed on the complete family, which consisted of the parents, five siblings, and five offspring. Pulmonary function tests, overnight polysomnography, arterial blood gas measurements, hypercapnia ventilatory response, and PHOX2B gene mutation screening were performed on living family members. Brain MRI, 24-h Holter monitoring, and echocardiography were performed on members with clinically diagnosed central hypoventilation. The index patient and four offspring manifested clinical features of central hypoventilation. The index patients had hypoxia and hypercapnia while awake, polycythemia, and hematocrit levels of 70%. The first and fourth children had frequent cyanotic spells, and both died of respiratory failure. The second and third children remained asymptomatic until adulthood, when they experienced impaired hypercapnic ventilatory response. The third child had nocturnal hypoventilation with nadir pulse oximetric saturation of 59%. Adult-onset CCHS with PHOX2B gene mutation of the + 5 alanine expansions were confirmed in the index patient and the second and third children. The index patient and the third child received ventilator support system bilevel positive airway pressure treatment, which improved the hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and polycythemia without altering their chemosensitivity. Transmission of late-onset CCHS is autosomal-dominant. Genetic screening of family members of CCHS probands allows for early diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Division of Labour or Sharing the Burden? State Support for Competing Family Models in Central and Eastern Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mitchell, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 8, 7-8 (2010), s. 12-17 ISSN 1214-1720 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB700280901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : work - life balance * family policy * Central and Eastern Europe Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography http://www.socioweb.cz/upl/editorial/download/181_pdf%202010%2007%2008.pdf

  20. A "Family-Based" Approach to the Treatment of Obese Type II Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Rena R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Assigned 49 obese diabetic patients with obese spouses (diabetic or nondiabetic) to an alone or together (with spouses) treatment condition of behavioral weight control program. Found no significant differences in weight losses of patients at posttreatment or one-year followup, but did find that women did better when treated with their spouses,…

  1. Polyuria and polydipsia in a young child: diagnostic considerations and identification of novel mutation causing familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Matthew D; Fenwick, Raymond G; Brosnan, Patrick G

    2012-12-01

    A 3-year 5-month-old boy was seen for second opinion regarding polydipsia and polyuria. Previously, a diagnosis of primary polydipsia was made after normal urine concentration after overnight water deprivation testing. The boy's father, paternal grandfather, and paternal aunt had diabetes insipidus treated with desmopressin acetate. Based on this young boy's symptoms, ability to concentrate urine after informal overnight water deprivation, and family history of diabetes insipidus, we performed AVP gene mutation testing. Analysis of the AVP gene revealed a novel mutation G54E that changes a normal glycine to glutamic acid, caused by a guanine to adenine change at nucleotide g.1537 (exon 2) of the AVP gene. Commonly, patients with familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNHDI) present within the first 6 years of life with progressively worsening polyuria and compensatory polydipsia. Since these patients have progressive loss of arginine vasopressin (AVP), they may initially respond normally to water deprivation testing and have normal pituitary findings on brain MRI. Genetic testing may be helpful in these patients, as well as preemptively diagnosing those with a mutation, thereby avoiding unnecessary surveillance of those unaffected.

  2. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  3. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  4. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and familial colorectal cancer in Central part of Iran, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Nemati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a lack of data on familial aggregation of colorectal cancer (CRC in Iran. We aimed to deter-mine the frequency of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC and familial colorectal cancer (FCC and to determine the frequency of extracolonic cancers in these families in Isfahan. Methods: We reviewed documents of all patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of CRC admitted to Isfa-han referral hospitals between 1995 and 2006. We also studied our CRC registry at Poursina Hakim Research Institute from 2003 to 2008. We found HNPCC and FCC families based on the Amsterdam II criteria and interviewed them for family history of CRC and extracolonic tumors. The family history was taken at least up to the second-degree relatives. Results: During 1996 to 2008, a total of 2580 CRC cases have been diagnosed. We found 14 HNPCC and 53 FCC families. Mean age of CRC at diagnosis was 48.0 ΁ 14.6 and 49.0 ΁ 13.9 years in the HNPCC and FCC families, re-spectively (p > 0.05. The total numbers of observed extracolonic tumors were 70 (21.6%; mean age = 53.6 ΁ 11.0 years and 157 (13.8%; mean age = 54.8 ΁ 18.0 years in HNPCC and FCC families, respectively (p > 0.05. CRC was respectively found in 52 and 76 members of the HNPCC and FCC families, revealing the frequency of HNPCC and FCC as 2.0% (52/2580 and 2.9% (76/2580, respectively. Conclusions: We found a relative high frequency of HNPCC (2.0% and FCC (2.9% among CRC cases in our socie-ty and high incidence of extracolonic tumors in their families. Further studies focusing on molecular basis in this field and designing a specific screening and national cancer registry program for HNPCC and FCC families should be con-ducted.

  5. Central executive network in young people with familial risk for psychosis--the Oulu Brain and Mind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukuri, Tuomas; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Nikkinen, Juha; Miettunen, Jouko; Mäki, Pirjo; Mukkala, Sari; Koivukangas, Jenni; Nordström, Tanja; Parkkisenniemi, Juha; Moilanen, Irma; Barnett, Jennifer H; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Graham K; Veijola, Juha

    2015-02-01

    The central executive network controls and manages high-level cognitive functions. Abnormal activation in the central executive network has been related to psychosis and schizophrenia but it is not established how this applies to people with familial risk for psychosis (FR). We conducted a resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) in 72 (29 males) young adults with a history of psychosis in one or both parents (FR) but without psychosis themselves, and 72 (29 males) similarly healthy control subjects without parental psychosis. Both groups in the Oulu Brain and Mind Study were drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. Participants were 20-25years old. Parental psychosis was established using the Care Register for Health Care. R-fMRI data pre-processing was conducted using independent component analysis with 30 and 70 components. A dual regression technique was used to detect between-group differences in the central executive network with pcontrol subjects in the right inferior frontal gyrus, a key area of central executive network corresponding to Brodmann areas 44 and 45, known as Broca's area. The volume of the lower activation area with 30 components was 896mm(3) and with 70 components was 1151mm(3). The activity of the central executive network differed in the right inferior frontal gyrus between FR and control groups. This suggests that abnormality of the right inferior frontal gyrus may be a central part of vulnerability for psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Individual and family strengths: an examination of the relation to disease management and metabolic control in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Eleanor Race; Hilliard, Marisa E; Berger, Sarah Shafer; Streisand, Randi; Chen, Rusan; Holmes, Clarissa

    2011-12-01

    We examined the association of youths' positive qualities, family cohesion, disease management, and metabolic control in Type 1 diabetes. Two-hundred fifty-seven youth-parent dyads completed the Family Cohesion subscale of the Family Environment Scale, the Diabetes Behavior Rating Scale, 24-hour diabetes interview, and youth completed the Positive Qualities subscale of the Youth Self Report (YSR-PQ). Structural equation modeling demonstrated that YSR-PQ scores were associated with metabolic control mediated by associations with more family cohesion and better disease management. That is, youth with higher YSR-PQ scores had more cohesive families, better disease management, and, indirectly, better metabolic control. Family cohesion was indirectly associated with better metabolic control mediated by its association with better disease management, but not mediated by its association with YSR-PQ scores. Youth who reported more positive qualities, as measured by the YSR-PQ subscale, had better disease management and metabolic control through the association with more family cohesion. However, the current results did not support an alternative hypothesis that cohesive families display better diabetes management mediated by higher YSR-PQ scores.

  7. Autosomal inheritance of diabetes in two families characterized by obesity and a novel H241Q mutation in NEUROD1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonsorcíková, Lucie; Pruhová, Stepánka; Cinek, Ondrej

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to search for mutations in the NEUROD1 and IPF-1 genes in patients with clinical characteristics of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) but with no mutations in the HNF-4A (MODY1), GCK (MODY2) and TCF1 (MODY3) genes. METHODS: We studied 30 unrelated...... Czech probands with a clinical diagnosis of MODY (median age at testing, 18 yr; median age at the recognition of hyperglycaemia, 16 yr). The promoter, exons and exon/intron boundaries of the NEUROD1 and IPF-1 genes were examined by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing high performance liquid...... chromatography and direct sequencing. RESULTS: While no mutations were found in the IPF-1 gene, a novel H241Q substitution of NEUROD1 gene was identified in two unrelated families. In the first proband, the H241Q mutation led to early diagnosed (20 yr) hyperglycaemia followed by development of diabetic...

  8. The centrality of women in moral teachings in Yoruba family system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For example, relating with elders and people of same age group, humility, diligence, truthful and accommodating. Culturally among the Yoruba people, Women within the family settings are socialized differently from Men. Women are socialized to be relationship oriented in marriages, families, communities, provision of love ...

  9. Correlates of blood pressure in young insulin-dependent diabetics and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarn, A C; Thomas, J M; Drury, P L

    1990-09-01

    We compared the correlates of blood pressure in 163 young patients with insulin-dependent diabetes and in 232 of their non-diabetic siblings. A single observer recorded blood pressure in all subjects, plus all their available parents, using a standardized technique. Other variables recorded included age, weight, height, presence of diabetes and urinary albumin. The major factors accounting for over 50% of the variance of systolic blood pressure (SBP) in both groups were age, weight, paternal SBP and sex. In addition, in the diabetic group the logarithm of the random urinary albumin concentration was a significant explanatory variable. For diastolic blood pressure (DBP) approximately 16% of the variance was explained by age, weight and maternal DBP. Parental blood pressure was an important determinant of blood pressure in both the diabetic and non-diabetic sibling groups. The similarity of the correlates of blood pressure in the two groups suggests that the determinants of blood pressure in young insulin-dependent diabetic patients and in the general population are similar.

  10. Contribution of family labour to the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production systems in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas-Domínguez, Rodolfo Rogelio; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos Manuel; Martínez-Castañeda, Francisco Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of family labour on the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy farms in the highlands of Central Mexico. Economic data from 37 farms were analysed from a stratified statistical sampling with a Neyman assignment. Three strata were defined taking herd size as criterion. Stratum 1: herds from 3 to 9 cows plus replacements, Stratum 2: herds from 10 to 19 cows and Stratum 3: herds from 20 to 30 cows. The policy analysis matrix was used as the method to determine profitability and competitiveness. The coefficient of private profitability (CPP) when the economic cost of family labour is included in the cost structure was 8.0 %, 31.0 % and 46.0 %. When the economic cost of family labour is not included, CPP increase to 47.0 %, 57.0 % and 66.0 % for each strata, respectively. The private cost ratio (PCR) when family labour is included was 0.79, 0.51 and 0.42 for strata 1, 2 and 3, respectively. When family labour is not included, the PCR was 0.07, 0.25 and 0.26. Net profit per litre of milk including family labour was US$0.03 l(-1) for Stratum 1, US$0.09 for Stratum 2 and US$0.12 l(-1) for Stratum 3; but increased to $0.12, 0.14 and 0.15, respectively, when the economic cost of family labour is not included. It is concluded that family labour is a crucial factor in the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production.

  11. Clinical presentation and outcome of children with central diabetes insipidus associated with a self-limited or transient pituitary stalk thickening, diagnosed as infundibuloneurohypophysitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefers, J; Cools, M; De Waele, K; Gies, I; Beauloye, V; Lysy, P; Francois, I; Beckers, D; De Schepper, J

    2017-08-01

    Despite lymphocytic or autoimmune infundibuloneurohypophysitis (INH) is an increasingly recognized aetiology in children with central diabetes insipidus (CDI); clinical data on epidemiology (clinical evolution, predisposing factors, complications), diagnosis and management of this entity are limited and mostly based on published case reports. The aim of this study was to gain a broader insight in the natural history of this disease by analysing the clinical presentation, radiological pituitary stalk changes, associated autoimmunity and hormonal deficiencies in children with CDI and a self-limiting or transient stalk thickening (ST), diagnosed as autoimmune infundibuloneurohypophysitis, during the last 15 years in four Belgian university hospitals. The medical files of nine CDI patients with a ST at initial presentation and no signs of Langerhans cell histiocytosis or germinoma at presentation and/or during follow-up of more than 1.5 years were reviewed. Age at presentation ranged from 3 to 14 years. Two patients had a positive family history of autoimmunity. Three children presented with associated growth failure, two with nausea and one with long-standing headache. Median maximal diameter of the stalk was 4.6 mm (2.7-10 mm). Four patients had extra-pituitary brain anomalies, such as cysts. One patient had central hypothyroidism, and another had a partial growth hormone deficiency at diagnosis. Within a mean follow-up of 5.4 (1.5-15) years, stalk thickening remained unchanged in two patients, regressed in one and normalized in six children. CDI remained in all, while additional pituitary hormone deficiencies developed in only one patient. In this series of children INH with CDI as initial presentation, CDI was permanent and infrequently associated with anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies, despite a frequent association with nonstalk cerebral lesions. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Endocrinology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Central diabetes insipidus in a dog with a pro-opiomelanocortin-producing pituitary tumor not causing hyperadrenocorticism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goossens, M.M.C.; Rijnberk, A.; Mol, J.A.; Wolfswinkel, J.; Voorhout, G.

    1995-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus was diagnosed by vasopressin measurements during hypertonic stimulation in a 9-year-old male giant Schnauzer with polyuria and polydipsia. The impaired release of vasopressin was believed to be caused by a large pituitary tumor, which was visualized by computed tomography. Studies of the function of the anterior lobe and the pars intermedia of the pituitary gland were conducted, and high concentrations of ACTH and alpha-melanotrophic hormone (alpha-MSH) were found without concomitant hyperadrenocorticism. Studies of the molecular size of the immunoreactive ACTH in plasma by gel filtration revealed that most of the circulating immunoreactivity was not ACTH but its precursor pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and low-molecular-weight POMC-derived peptides. The pituitary tumor of this dog probably originated from melanotrophic cells of the pars intermedia. The sensitivity of the pituitary-adrenocortical system for the suppressive effect of dexamethasone was unaffected

  13. Central Diabetes Insipidus in Refractory Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Keiji; Morishita, Michiko; Watanabe, Haruki; Sada, Ken-Ei; Katsuyama, Takayuki; Miyawaki, Yoshia; Katsuyama, Eri; Narazaki, Mariko; Tatebe, Noriko; Watanabe, Katsue; Kawabata, Tomoko; Wada, Jun

    2017-11-01

    We herein describe two cases of refractory antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) complicated with diabetes insipidus (DI) possibly related to hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP). One patient had microscopic polyangiitis and HP, which were refractory to cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and mizoribine. Remission was finally achieved with the use of etanercept, but DI occurred 5 years later. The other patient had granulomatosis with polyangiitis, which that was refractory to cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, MMF, and rituximab. DI subsequently developed, but was successfully treated with etanercept. Dura mater hypertrophy was macroscopically observed in the latter case.

  14. Euglycemia Restoration by Central Leptin in Type 1 Diabetes Requires STAT3 Signaling but Not Fast-Acting Neurotransmitter Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Chang, Jeffrey T; Myers, Martin G; Xu, Yong; Tong, Qingchun

    2016-04-01

    Central leptin action is sufficient to restore euglycemia in insulinopenic type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. To examine the role of intracellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathways, we used LepRs/s mice with disrupted leptin-phosphorylated STAT3 signaling to test the effect of central leptin on euglycemia restoration. These mice developed streptozocin-induced T1D, which was surprisingly not associated with hyperglucagonemia, a typical manifestation in T1D. Further, leptin action on euglycemia restoration was abrogated in these mice, which was associated with refractory hypercorticosteronemia. To examine the role of fast-acting neurotransmitters glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), two major neurotransmitters in the brain, from leptin receptor (LepR) neurons, we used mice with disrupted release of glutamate, GABA, or both from LepR neurons. Surprisingly, all mice responded normally to leptin-mediated euglycemia restoration, which was associated with expected correction from hyperglucagonemia and hyperphagia. In contrast, mice with loss of glutamate and GABA appeared to develop an additive obesity effect over those with loss of single neurotransmitter release. Thus, our study reveals that STAT3 signaling, but not fast-acting neurotransmitter release, is required for leptin action on euglycemia restoration and that hyperglucagonemia is not required for T1D. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  15. The Effect of Family-centered Care on Management of Blood Glucose Levels in Adolescents with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Fatemeh; Shamsaei, Farshid; Mortazavi, Sayyedeh Zohreh; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    Responsibility for diabetes management tasks must shift from caregivers to adolescents as adolescents grow older. Also, family-centered care is a way to provide efficient care for them at home. This study aimed to identify the effect of family-centered care on management of blood glucose levels in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This is a Pre-experimental study with a pre- and post-test design. The participants consisted of forty adolescents with T1DM, aged between 10-14 years, with their caregivers who were selected through simple random sampling from Hamadan Diabetes Research Center in Iran in 2013. The sample was divided into four similar groups. Educational sessions were conducted for each group for 30 to 40 minutes. Data collection tools were "Supervisory Behaviors of Caregiver" (SBC), "Management Behaviors of adolescents" (MBA) questionnaires, and the "Blood Glucose Levels Record Sheet". Data were analyzed using SPSS 19 and based on descriptive statistics, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, paired t-test and Pearson coefficient. There was a significant difference between the subjects' MBA and SBC mean scores before (110.17±26.6) and after (134.6±1.28) intervention in four domains: "blood glucose testing", "insulin therapy", "meal plan" and "physical activity" (PPearson coefficient showed a positive relationship between the supervisory behaviors of caregivers with management behaviors of adolescents before and after the intervention (Pmanagement of blood glucose levels and reduce their HbA1Clevels. Therefore, Family-centered care could provide for better regime adherence at home.

  16. Management of diabetic ketosis and ketoacidosis with intramuscular regular insulin in a low-resource family medicine setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar Basetty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is facing an epidemic of diabetes mellitus (DM. Effective management of complications of DM is a challenge in resource-poor areas of India. This study addresses the need to explore low-cost methods to manage diabetic ketosis (DK and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. Objectives: To demonstrate the use of intramuscular (IM regular insulin as a safe alternative method to control DK and DKA in a family practice setting. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was done for 34 patients admitted with DK and DKA in a family medicine unit for the urban poor over 5 years. Data on age, sex, precipitating factors, blood pressure, number of days of hospitalization, amount of insulin, and time required to control blood glucose (BG and to correct acidosis were entered into EpiData version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS software version 17. Results: Administration of IM regular insulin was effective in reducing the BG to < 250 mg/dL in patients with DK and DKA. The mean time required for this in the ketosis group was 3.8 h and in the ketoacidosis group was 3.9 h. The mean amount of insulin required for correction of acidosis in the ketoacidosis group was 72.3 units and the mean time to achieve this was 33 h. Of the 34 patients, only one in the ketoacidosis group had hypoglycemia. There was no fatality or referral of any patient. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that IM regular insulin is a safe alternative method in managing DK and DKA in a family medicine setting.

  17. Associations between Familial Factor, Trait Conscientiousness, Gender and the Occurrence of Type 2 Diabetes in Adulthood: Evidence from a British Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Cheng

    Full Text Available To investigate social, familial, and psychological factors in influencing the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in adulthood.Some 17,415 babies born in Great Britain in 1958 and followed up at 7, 11, 33, and 50 years of age. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes at age 50 years was the outcome measure.Some 5,032 participants with data on parental social class, childhood cognitive ability tests scores at age 11 years, educational qualifications at age 33 years, personality traits, occupational levels, and type 2 diabetes (all measured at age 50 years were included in the study. Available information also included whether cohort members' parents or siblings had diabetes. Using logistic regression analyses, results showed that sex (OR=0.63: 0.42-0.92, p<.05, family history (OR=3.40: 1.76-6.55, p<.01, and trait conscientiousness (OR=0.76: 0.64-0.90, p<.001 were all significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. It appears that the occurrence of type 2 diabetes is greater among men than women (4.3% vs 2.5%.Familial (genetic and non-genetic and psychological factors are significantly associated with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adulthood.

  18. IS HEMOGLOBIN E GENE WIDELY SPREAD IN THE STATE OF MADHYA PRADESH IN CENTRAL INDIA? EVIDENCE FROM FIVE TYPICAL FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Balgir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red cell inherited hemoglobin anomalies are commonly encountered in the central region of India. These cause a public health concern due to high degree of morbidity, mortality, and fetal loss in the backward, underprivileged, and vulnerable people. Purpose: To report five typical families of hemoglobin E disorders identified for the first time in the state of Madhya Pradesh from central India. Methods: Out of a total of 445 couples/families (excluding the present study with 1526 persons (848 males and 678 females referred from a tertiary hospital in central India for investigations of anemia/hemoglobinopathies during the period from March 2010 to February 2014, we came across five typical rare couples/families of hemoglobin E disorders worthy of detailed investigations. Laboratory investigations were carried out following the standard procedures after cross checking for quality control from time to time. Results: For the first time, we have encountered nine cases of heterozygous hemoglobin E trait, two members with hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia (double heterozygosity, two cases of sickle cell-hemoglobin E disease (double heterozygosity, and none with homozygous hemoglobin E. Cases  of hemoglobin E trait, hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia, sickle cell-β-thalassemia and sickle cell-E disease showed moderate to severe anemia, and target cells, and reduced values of red cell indices like RBC, Hb level, HCT, MCV, MCH and MCHC, representing abnormal hematological profile and clinical manifestations before blood transfusion. Conclusions: Double heterozygosity for hemoglobinopathies such as occurrence of β-thalassemia mutation with structurally abnormal hemoglobins (Hb S and Hb E is a rare entity, but occurs with severe clinical manifestations only in those areas or communities where these are highly prevalent, testifying the migrations and genetic admixture. Distribution of hemoglobin E and β-thalassemia in different districts of Madhya Pradesh

  19. Bridging the digital divide in diabetes: family support and implications for health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Lindsay S; Kripalani, Sunil; Rothman, Russell L; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2011-10-01

    Abstract Background: Patient web portals (PWPs) offer patients remote access to their medical record and communication with providers. Adults with health literacy limitations are less likely to access and use health information technology (HIT), including PWPs. In diabetes, PWP use has been associated with patient satisfaction, patient-provider communication, and glycemic control. Using mixed methods, we explored the relationships between health literacy, numeracy, and computer literacy and the usage of a PWP and HIT. Participants (N=61 adults with type 2 diabetes) attended focus groups and completed surveys, including measures of health literacy, numeracy, and computer anxiety (an indicator of computer literacy) and frequency of PWP and HIT use. Computer literacy was positively associated with health literacy (r=0.41, Pdigital divide" in diabetes by helping adults access a PWP or HIT for diabetes management.

  20. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacteria from diabetic foot infections Haji Adam Malik central general hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulolo, B. A.; Pase, M. A.; Ginting, F.

    2018-03-01

    Increasing rate of Diabetic Foot Infections (DFIs) caused by multi-drug-resistance pathogens plays a huge role in the duration of hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality of diabetic patients. The aim of the study is to assess the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacteria in DFIs and causative microorganisms. Using cross-sectional retrospective study, data were collected from medical records of DFIs patients previously hospitalized atHaji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan from January to July 2017. 33 patients met the criteria and got enrolled in the study. The classification of DFIs was evaluated according to Wagner’s Classification. Evaluation of antibiotic sensitivity and identification of causative microorganisms were performed in standard microbiologic methods. The most common grade of DFIs was Grade-4 (48.5%), followed by Grade-3 (39.4%) and Grade-5 (9.1%). A total of 12 pathogens were identified. The most common infecting microorganism isolated on pus cultures was Klebsiella pneumonia (33.3%), followed by Escherichia coli (24.2%), Acinetobacter baumanni (12.1%), and Staphylococcus aureus (9.1%). Frequent susceptible antibiotics were Amikacin (88.8%), Imipenem (87%), Meropenem (84.6%), Erythromycin (75%), and Cefoperazone/Sulbactam (68.9%). DFIs are polymicrobial infections in this study K. pneumonia was the most common cause microorganism.

  1. Aspartic acid at position 57 of the HLA-DQ beta chain protects against type I diabetes: a family study.

    OpenAIRE

    Morel, P A; Dorman, J S; Todd, J A; McDevitt, H O; Trucco, M

    1988-01-01

    One hundred seventy-two members from 27 randomly selected multiple case Caucasian families of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were studied at the DNA level to ascertain the reliability of codon 57 of the HLA-DQ beta-chain gene as a disease protection/susceptibility marker. The analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA encoding the first domain of the DQ beta chain and by dot blot analysis of the amplified material with allele-specific ...

  2. The effect of γ-linolenic acid-α-lipoic acid on functional deficits in the peripheral and central nervous system of streptozotocin- diabetic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Biessels, G.J.; Smale, S.; Duis, S.E.; Kamal, A.

    2001-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus can lead to functional and structural deficits in both the peripheral and central nervous system. The pathogenesis of these deficits is multifactorial, probably involving, among others, microvascular dysfunction and oxidative stress. The present study examined the effects of 12

  3. Influence of a mini-trampoline rebound exercise program on insulin resistance, lipid profile and central obesity in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuhu, Jibril M; Maharaj, Sonill S

    2018-04-01

    Exercises are important as an adjuvant for managing diabetes but due to fatigue and time constraints, individuals with diabetes may not engage in them. Jumping on a mini-trampoline referred to as rebound exercise is an aerobic activity used for exercise training benefits but only little research is available on its effects in diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of mini-trampoline rebound exercise on insulin resistance, lipid profile and central obesity in type 2 diabetics. Sixty non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetics (median age: 39.0 years, median body mass index: 25.2 kg/m2) recruited using convenience sampling were randomized to a rebound exercise group (N.=30) or a control group (N.=30). The control group read health magazines or watched television while the rebound exercise group jumped on a mini-trampoline at moderate intensity for 30 minutes three times per week for 12 weeks. Postrebound exercise, significant improvements in insulin resistance, lipid profile and waist circumference were noted when compared to the control (Ptrampoline rebound exercise is beneficial for individuals with type 2 diabetes and can serve as a useful exercise approach in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  4. Central leptin action on euglycemia restoration in type 1 diabetes: Restraining responses normally induced by fasting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Tong, Qingchun

    2017-07-01

    Leptin monotherapy is sufficient to restore euglycemia in insulinopenic type 1 diabetes (T1D), yet the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that the brain mediates the leptin action on euglycemia restoration. Here, we first review evidence supporting that symptoms in T1D resemble an uncontrolled response to fasting. Then, we discuss recent research progress on brain neurons and their neurotransmitters that potentially mediate the leptin action. Finally, peripheral effective pathways, which are normally involved in fasting responses and associated with leptin action on euglycemia restoration in T1D, will also be discussed. This summary complements several previous excellent reviews on this topic (Meek and Morton, 2016; Perry et al., 2016; Fujikawa and Coppari, 2015). A deep understanding of neurocircuitry and the peripheral effective pathways that mediate the leptin action on euglycemia restoration will likely lead to novel targets for an insulin-independent therapeutics against T1D. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7, ectopic virus integration site-1 overexpression and central diabetes insipidus: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongbing; Yang, Jing; Xiang, Bing; Jia, Yongqian

    2015-06-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare complication in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), typically occurring in patients with abnormalities of chromosomes 3 or 7. The association between AML with monosomy 7 and DI has been described in a number of studies; however, DI has been rarely reported in cases of ectopic virus integration site-1 ( EVI1 )-positive AML with monosomy 7. The current study reports a case of AML with monosomy 7 and EVI1 overexpression, with central DI as the initial symptom. The patient was an 18-year-old female who presented with polyuria and polydipsia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed 83.5% myeloperoxidase-positive blasts without trilineage myelodysplasia. The karyotype was 45,XX,-7, and the patient presented monosomy 7 and EVI1 overexpression (- 7/EVI1 + ) without 3q aberration. Treatment with induction therapy was unsuccessful. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of DI-AML with - 7/EVI1 + and without a 3q aberration. The possible mechanisms associated with EVI1 , monosomy 7 and DI were investigated.

  6. Adolescent gynecomastia is associated with a high incidence of obesity, dysglycemia, and family background of diabetes mellitus

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    Bindu Kulshreshtha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gynecomastia during adolescence is common though etiology is not clear. We studied the clinical and hormonal profile of adolescent patients with gynecomastia. Methodology: Patients who had onset of breast development between age 10 and 20 years were included in this study. Their clinical profile, biochemical, and hormonal parameters were studied. Results: Of 94 patients with gynecomastia, 4 had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, 4 had hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and 1 had fibroadenosis, but in majority (90.4%, no apparent cause for breast enlargement was evident. In the idiopathic group, majority were obese (63%. Fourteen (16% patients had impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. Another twenty patients had subtle abnormalities (high 1 h glucose or glucose peak at 2 h. Twenty-nine percent of lean and 38% of obese patients had mild abnormalities in glucose profile. Sixty percent of patients had family background of diabetes. Obese patients had lower testosterone as compared to lean patients; however, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels were similar in the two groups. Conclusion: Gynecomastia during adolescence is associated with obesity, dysglycemia, and family background of diabetes mellitus.

  7. Quality of primary health care and autonomous motivation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Anne M Koponen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that of the six central quality dimensions of primary health care (access to care, continuity of care, diabetes counseling, autonomy support from one’s physician, trust, patient-centered care, autonomy support from one’s physician was most strongly associated with autonomous motivation (self-regulation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes ( n  = 2866. However, overall support for diabetes care received from friends, family members, other patients with diabetes, and health care professionals may even play a greater role.

  8. International challenges without borders: a descriptive study of family physicians' educational needs in the field of diabetes

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    Posel Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal care of persons with diabetes by general practitioners and family physicians (GP/FP is complex and requires multiple competencies. This is a fairly unrecognized key challenge in the healthcare systems. In some cases, local and national Continuous Professional Development (CPD initiatives target these challenges; however there have been few international initiatives, possibly because challenges emerging from different studies have not been linked across national boundaries. In this context, the authors have compiled data about gaps and/or barriers inherent to GP/FP care of persons with type 2 diabetes from Austria, Canada, Germany and the United Kingdom. Methods Secondary analyzes of pre-existing studies were conducted to identify challenges in the care of patients with type 2 diabetes as faced by GPs/FPs. Two sources of data were reviewed: unpublished research data from collaborating organizations and articles from a literature search (in English and German. Articles retrieved were scanned by the research team for relevance to the study objectives and to extract existing gaps and barriers. The identified challenges were then categorized along three major axes: (1 phase of the continuum of care {from screening to management}; (2 learning domain {knowledge, skills, attitudes, behavior, context}; and (3 by country/region. Compilation and categorization were performed by qualitative researchers and discrepancies were resolved through discussion until concordance was achieved. Results and discussion Thirteen challenges faced by GPs/FPs in the care for patients with type 2 diabetes were common in at least 3 of the 4 targeted countries/regions. These issues were found across the entire continuum of care and included: pathophysiology of diabetes, diagnostic criteria, treatment targets assessment, drugs' modes of action, decision-making in therapies, treatment guidelines, insulin therapy, adherence, management of

  9. Everything in Moderation--Dietary Diversity and Quality, Central Obesity and Risk of Diabetes.

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    Marcia C de Oliveira Otto

    Full Text Available Diet guidelines recommend increasing dietary diversity. Yet, metrics for dietary diversity have neither been well-defined nor evaluated for impact on metabolic health. Also, whether diversity has effects independent of diet quality is unknown. We characterized and evaluated associations of diet diversity and quality with abdominal obesity and type II diabetes (T2D in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. At baseline (2000-02, diet was assessed among 5,160 Whites, Hispanic, Blacks, and Chinese age 45-84 y and free of T2D, using a validated questionnaire. Three different aspects of diet diversity were characterized including count (number of different food items eaten more than once/week, a broad measure of diversity, evenness (Berry index, a measure of the spread of the diversity, and dissimilarity (Jaccard distance, a measure of the diversity of the attributes of the foods consumed. Diet quality was characterized using aHEI, DASH, and a priori pattern. Count and evenness were weakly positively correlated with diet quality (r with AHEI: 0.20, 0.04, while dissimilarity was moderately inversely correlated (r = -0.34. In multivariate models, neither count nor evenness was associated with change in waist circumference (WC or incident T2D. Greater food dissimilarity was associated with higher gain in WC (p-trend<0.01, with 120% higher gain in participants in the highest quintile of dissimilarity scores. Diet diversity was not associated with incident T2D. Also, none of the diversity metrics were associated with change in WC or incident T2D when restricted to only healthier or less healthy foods. Higher diet quality was associated with lower risk of T2D. Our findings provide little evidence for benefits of diet diversity for either abdominal obesity or diabetes. Greater dissimilarity among foods was actually associated with gain in WC. These results do not support the notion that "eating everything in moderation" leads to greater diet quality or

  10. The effects of nutrition rehabilitation at three Family Life Training Centres in Central Province, Kenya

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    Hoorweg, J.C.; Niemeijer, R.

    1982-01-01

    During the course of 1978, the three Family Life Training Centres studied admitted 273 women accompanied by 674 children. Women with malnourished children (and their siblings) are admitted to these centres for a 3-week course consisting primarily of nutrition and health education, but also covering

  11. Development of Family-Based Dietary Self-Management Support Program on Dietary Behaviors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Indonesia: A Literature Review

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    Aklima Aklima

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: WHO statistics show that Indonesia has the fourth highest number of diabetes sufferers. The International Diabetes Federation‟s 5th estimated that in 2011 there were 71.4 million people in South East Asia region were suffering with DM Purpose: To develop a family-based dietary self-management support program to improve dietary behaviors in patients with T2DM. Method: A literature review was conducted by reviewing articles related evidence-based practices. Only articles in the English and Indonesian languages were reviewed. The search found eleven published experimental studies related to the topic. Result: Even though dietary self-management has benefits for patients with diabetes, many studies have found that these patients often have difficulty in establishing or maintaining an effective program to self-manage their dietary behaviors. Lack of family support is one factor that often seems to be related to such failures. Family participation in a diabetes education program also had positive psychosocial impacts. Otherwise, another study found that family might not always have a positive impact on self-management. Therefore, this review recommends that development of a family-based support program could be a positive factor in helping to improve dietary self-management behaviors in patients with T2DM. Self-management theory by Funnell and Anderson‟s work (2004 can guide the development of a program with the goal of empowering individuals and families in improving the patient‟s dietary behaviors. The program consists of: (1 reflecting on current and/or past self-management experiences by listening to the patient about their dietary behaviors, (2 discussing the emotions and feelings of the patients, (3 engaging the patient in improving their situation by active listening and helping the patient reflect on their problems and identifying effective strategies, (4 providing information about dietary management and problem

  12. Central obesity and risk for type 2 diabetes in Maori, Pacific and European young men in New Zealand

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    Rush, E.; Laulu, M.S.; Mitchelson, E.; Plank, L.

    2002-01-01

    Thirty healthy male volunteers between the ages of 18 and 27 and of a wide range of fatness were recruited for this study. Equal numbers (10) self identified as belonging to each of the Maori Pacific and European ethnic groups. Originally it was intended that 90 men(30 in each group) should be measured but the cost and availability of the doubly-labelled water prevented this. Specific measurements undertaken included resting metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry, total energy expenditure over 14 days by the doubly-labelled water technique; total and regional body fat from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; anthropometry (body mass index, skinfold thicknesses and girths); fat and carbohydrate utilisation from respiratory quotients and from carbon-13 analysis of expired breath; and dietary intake of macronutrients. Glucose tolerance, insulin, thyroid hormone, leptin and blood lipid determinations were also performed. The groups did not differ significantly in BMI, height body mass or fat mass - but the European group had significantly lower subscapular to triceps skinfolds and fat free mass than the Maori and Pacific group. Resting metabolic rate adjusted for fat mass and fat free mass was not different among the groups. Carbon-13 in expired breath was positively correlated to the subscapular to triceps skinfold ratio and insulin. Reported intake of dietary fibre was negatively related to blood lipids and subscapular to triceps skinfold ratio. Central obesity showed strong associations with biochemical measures of Type 2 diabetes risk These findings emphasise the relationships between body composition and fat distribution with risk of diabetes independent of ethnicity. (author)

  13. Central obesity and risk for type 2 diabetes in Maori, Pacific and European young men in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, E; Laulu, M S [Department of Applied Science, Auckland Institute of Technology, Auckland (New Zealand); Mitchelson, E [Department of Nursing, Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland (New Zealand); Plank, L [Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2002-07-01

    Thirty healthy male volunteers between the ages of 18 and 27 and of a wide range of fatness were recruited for this study. Equal numbers (10) self identified as belonging to each of the Maori Pacific and European ethnic groups. Originally it was intended that 90 men(30 in each group) should be measured but the cost and availability of the doubly-labelled water prevented this. Specific measurements undertaken included resting metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry, total energy expenditure over 14 days by the doubly-labelled water technique; total and regional body fat from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; anthropometry (body mass index, skinfold thicknesses and girths); fat and carbohydrate utilisation from respiratory quotients and from carbon-13 analysis of expired breath; and dietary intake of macronutrients. Glucose tolerance, insulin, thyroid hormone, leptin and blood lipid determinations were also performed. The groups did not differ significantly in BMI, height body mass or fat mass - but the European group had significantly lower subscapular to triceps skinfolds and fat free mass than the Maori and Pacific group. Resting metabolic rate adjusted for fat mass and fat free mass was not different among the groups. Carbon-13 in expired breath was positively correlated to the subscapular to triceps skinfold ratio and insulin. Reported intake of dietary fibre was negatively related to blood lipids and subscapular to triceps skinfold ratio. Central obesity showed strong associations with biochemical measures of Type 2 diabetes risk These findings emphasise the relationships between body composition and fat distribution with risk of diabetes independent of ethnicity. (author)

  14. Association of the TPO gene in Colombian families with type 1 diabetes Asociación del gen TPO en familias colombianas con la diabetes tipo 1

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    Federico Uribe Londoño

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US;">We have found linkage and association of type 1 diabetes (T1D to 2p25. The TPO gene lies within this region. Our aim was to test the association of this gene with the susceptibility to T1D in a group of Colombian families, all of them originated in Antioquia, a special population in northwestern Colombia. One hundred familial trios with type 1 diabetes (T1D were analyzed. They had already been studied for anti-glutamic acid descarboxilase (GAD antibodies and the marker locus D2S319.

    family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US;">For further characterization, the probands were tested for autoantibodies against insulin, TPO and thyrosine phosphatase 2 (IA-2. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (rs4927611 and rs732609 were tested in TPO. These two markers were chosen considering that the polymorphism changes the encoded amino-acid and a minor allele frequency, MAF, ≥ 0.3. SNP typing was carried out by means of the polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP and the tetraprimer amplification  refractory   mutation    system  (ARMS-PCR methods. Hardy-Weinberg family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US;">equilibrium (HWE and linkage disequilibrium (LD analyses were separately tested on both parents and probands. Genetic association was tested by the

  15. Pediatric Diabetes Telemedicine Program Improves Access to Care for Rural Families: Role of APRNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nancy Marie; Satyshur, Rosemarie DiMauro

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus has increased in children by 23% from 2001 to 2009. Rural communities additionally have increased disparities related to access barriers and a large minority population with poorer overall health. Research evidence supports telemedicine as an effective alternative to bring preventive diabetes care to remote areas. This article presents an overview of the leadership role of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) with the implementation and evaluation of a pediatric diabetes telemedicine program at a rural pediatric outpatient specialty clinic in partnership with a tertiary center telemedicine network. The telemedicine program quality improvement (QI) project explored caregiver satisfaction with a convenience sample of caregivers (N = 14) using a nine-item Telemedicine Diabetes Caregiver Satisfaction Survey (TDCSS), with responses ranging from 1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree. Findings indicate caregivers were highly satisfied with communication/ privacy (M = 4.8), access to care (M = 4.1), and quality of services (M = 5.0). The multidisciplinary collaborative teamwork, continuous QI, and dependable technology were integral to the quality of the telemedicine clinical initiative. APRNs provided technology expertise, interdisciplinary collaboration leadership, care coordination, and advocacy for policy changes. Results demonstrate that telemedicine and APRN leadership can help implement innovative programs into rural communities to improve access to care, healthcare cost, and outcomes.

  16. The burden of gestational diabetes mellitus in Jamaican women with a family history of autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes La carga de la diabetes mellitus gestacional en mujeres de Jamaica con antecedentes familiares de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2

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    Rachael R. Irving

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine if Jamaican women of African descent with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes have greater odds of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM than those without a family history of the disease. METHODS: A comparative study was conducted of two groups of pregnant Jamaican women: the first with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes; the second with no history of the disease. Incidence, odds for developing GDM, and metabolic profiles in first and second trimesters were assessed using SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, United States. RESULTS: The incidence of GDM was 12.0 % in women with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes and 1.5% in women without a family history of the disease (P OBJETIVOS: Determinar si las mujeres jamaicanas de ascendencia africana con antecedentes familiares de inicio temprano de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2 tienen mayor probabilidad de desarrollar diabetes mellitus gestacional (DMG que las que no tienen esos antecedentes familiares. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio comparativo con dos grupos de mujeres jamaicanas embarazadas: el primero con mujeres que tenían antecedentes familiares de inicio temprano de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2 y el segundo con mujeres sin antecedentes familiares de esa enfermedad. Se empleó el programa SPSS v. 11.5 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, Estados Unidos de América para analizar los resultados y calcular la incidencia, la probabilidad de desarrollar DMG y los perfiles metabólicos en el primer y el segundo trimestres de gestación. RESULTADOS: La incidencia de DMG fue de 12,0% en las mujeres con antecedentes familiares de inicio temprano de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2 y de 1,5% en las mujeres sin antecedentes familiares de esa enfermedad (P < 0,05. Las mujeres del primer grupo tuvieron nueve veces más probabilidades de desarrollar DMG que las

  17. Magnitude and determinants of diabetic retinopathy among persons with diabetes registered at employee health department of a tertiary Eye Hospital of central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandekar, Rajiv; Al Hassan, Arif; Al Dhibi, Hassan; Al Bahlal, Abdullah; Al-Futais, Muneera

    2015-01-01

    Background: To estimate the magnitude and determinants of diabetic retinopathy (DR) among persons with diabetes registered at the employee health department of King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH). Methods: A retrospective review of medical records was conducted in 2013–14 at KKESH. The case record review extracted demographic, profile of diabetes, diabetic complications, and different blood indices to determine the status of potential risk factors. Ocular profile, especially DR was also noted. Results: Our cohort had 94 staff with diabetes. Eye examination was carried out in 51 (54.8%) of them. The rate of DR was 52% (95% confidence interval (CI) 28–66). Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) (proliferative DR and/or diabetic macular edema) was present in 40% of those examined. Good glycemic control was noted in 42% of participants. Duration of diabetes was associated with DR (P = 0.04). Good glycemic control was negatively associated to DR (odds ratio = 0.2 [95% CI 0.04–0.6]). The coverage of eye screening was 55% only. Laser treatment was given to 80% of STDR cases. The lens opacity and glaucoma rate was 15% and 8.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Low coverage for eye screening and laser treatment to diabetics among the staff of an eye hospital is a matter of concern. The underlying causes of low coverage of screening, digital fundus photography as a screening tool and management should be addressed. PMID:26903721

  18. Magnitude and determinants of diabetic retinopathy among persons with diabetes registered at employee health department of a tertiary Eye Hospital of central Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandekar, Rajiv; Al Hassan, Arif; Al Dhibi, Hassan; Al Bahlal, Abdullah; Al-Futais, Muneera

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the magnitude and determinants of diabetic retinopathy (DR) among persons with diabetes registered at the employee health department of King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH). A retrospective review of medical records was conducted in 2013-14 at KKESH. The case record review extracted demographic, profile of diabetes, diabetic complications, and different blood indices to determine the status of potential risk factors. Ocular profile, especially DR was also noted. Our cohort had 94 staff with diabetes. Eye examination was carried out in 51 (54.8%) of them. The rate of DR was 52% (95% confidence interval (CI) 28-66). Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) (proliferative DR and/or diabetic macular edema) was present in 40% of those examined. Good glycemic control was noted in 42% of participants. Duration of diabetes was associated with DR (P = 0.04). Good glycemic control was negatively associated to DR (odds ratio = 0.2 [95% CI 0.04-0.6]). The coverage of eye screening was 55% only. Laser treatment was given to 80% of STDR cases. The lens opacity and glaucoma rate was 15% and 8.3%, respectively. Low coverage for eye screening and laser treatment to diabetics among the staff of an eye hospital is a matter of concern. The underlying causes of low coverage of screening, digital fundus photography as a screening tool and management should be addressed.

  19. The Relationship Between Maternal Awareness, Socioeconomic Situation of Families and Metabolic Control in Children With Type 1 Diabetes Miletus in an Iranian Population

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    Soheilipour

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is one of the most common chronic pediatric conditions, with potentially life-threatening sequels. However, good metabolic control can protect the patients against sequels. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between awareness of the mothers about this disease on improving diabetic children metabolic control and also, to examine the relationship between socioeconomic situations of families and control of diabetes in this group of patients. Patients and Methods This is a cross-sectional descriptive analytic study on 80 diabetic children and their mothers, who were registered in the diabetes association of Iran, for outpatient control of disease. Diabetes knowledge was measured by Michigan diabetes knowledge test and glycemic control was assessed by glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c. To assess the socio-economic status of a diabetic child’s family, educational level, occupational and marital status of parents were asked and the socioeconomic status (SES was evaluated with Hollingshed four-factor index of SES. Results Mothers’ mean knowledge score was 17.72, children’s mean HbA1c was 7.77 and mean of SES was 27.89. There was no significant correlation between children’s HbA1c and mother’s SES. Also, there was an inverse linear relationship between mothers’ knowledge score and children’s HbA1c and there was a direct linear relationship between the mothers’ knowledge score and SES. Conclusions Finally, based on the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that the awareness of mothers of T1DM children has a good impact on blood sugar control, whereas the SES of families has no direct effect on blood sugar control. Additionally, SES can indirectly impact on the consciousness of mothers and lead to the reduction of HbA1c.

  20. Determinants of low family planning use and high unmet need in Butajira District, South Central Ethiopia

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    Mekonnen Wubegzier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid population growth does not match with available resource in Ethiopia. Though household level family planning delivery has been put in place, the impact of such programs in densely populated rural areas was not studied. The study aims at measuring contraception and unmet need and identifying its determinants among married women. Methods A total of 5746 married women are interviewed from October to December 2009 in the Butajira Demographic Surveillance Area. Contraceptive prevalence rate and unmet need with their 95% confidence interval is measured among married women in the Butajira district. The association of background characteristics and family planning use is ascertained using crude and adjusted Odds ratio in logistic regression model. Results Current contraceptive prevalence rate among married women is 25.4% (95% CI: 24.2, 26.5. Unmet need of contraception is 52.4% of which 74.8% was attributed to spacing and the rest for limiting. Reasons for the high unmet need include commodities' insecurity, religion, and complaints related to providers, methods, diet and work load. Contraception is 2.3 (95% CI: 1.7, 3.2 times higher in urbanites compared to rural highlanders. Married women who attained primary and secondary plus level of education have about 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1, 1.6 and 2 (95% CI: 1.4, 2.9 times more risk to contraception; those with no child death are 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1, 1.5 times more likely to use contraceptives compared to counterparts. Besides, the odds of contraception is 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1, 1.6 and 1.5 (1.1, 2.0 times more likely among women whose partners completed primary and secondary plus level of education. Women discussing about contraception with partners were 2.2 (95% CI: 1.8, 2.7 times more likely to use family planning. Nevertheless, contraception was about 2.6 (95% CI: 2.1, 3.2 more likely among married women whose partners supported the use of family planning. Conclusions The local government

  1. Prevalence and determinants of erectile dysfunction among diabetic patients attending in hospitals of central and northwestern zone of Tigray, northern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seid, Awole; Gerensea, Hadgu; Tarko, Shambel; Zenebe, Yosef; Mezemir, Rahel

    2017-03-15

    The prevalence of erectile dysfunction among diabetic men varies between 35-90%. Although erectile dysfunction is widespread among men with diabetes, the condition often remains undiagnosed and demands appropriate assessment and prompt treatment. Erectile dysfunction can affect all aspects of a patient's life including physical, emotional, social, sexual, and relationships. The main aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and determinants of erectile dysfunction among diabetic patients attending hospitals in the Central and Northwest zone of Tigray, Ethiopia. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted on 249 male diabetic patients attending five hospitals in the Central and Northwestern Zone of Tigray, Ethiopia using systematic random sampling. The data was collected from January 1 - February 30, 2016 and was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Correlation and multivariate logistic regression was employed to test associations between independent and outcome variables. The mean age of study participants was 43.39 years and the mean duration of diabetes diagnosis was 6.22 years. The overall prevalence of erectile dysfunction was 69.9%, with 32.9% suffering from mild, 31.7% moderate, and 5.2% severe erectile dysfunction. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that erective dysfunction was significantly predicted by old age (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] =15.013, CI:3.212-70.166), longer duration of diabetes (AOR = 3.77, CI:1.291-11.051), and lower monthly income (AOR = 0.285, CI:0.132-0.615). No association was found with body mass index, co-morbidity, glycemic control, and alcohol consumption. The prevalence of erective dysfunction in this study population was very high. Age, income, and duration of diabetes were the independent predictors of erectile dysfunction. Nearly all of the patients in the sample (97%) had not been screened or treated for erectile dysfunction. Assessment and management of erectile dysfunction in the

  2. Effect of telmisartan on arterial distensibility and central blood pressure in patients with mild to moderate hypertension and Type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Roland Asmar

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Arterial wall stiffness is an important independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in hypertensive patients, which is further exacerbated by co-existent diabetes mellitus. Increased arterial stiffness is directly associated with an increase in pulse wave velocity (PWV and indirectly with increased central and peripheral blood pressure. Following a two-week placebo run-in period, 27 patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension and Type 2 diabetes mellitus, were randomised to once daily treatment with either telmisartan 40 mg or placebo for three weeks, and after a two-week washout period, crossed-over to the alternative treatment for a further three weeks. Carotid/femoral and carotid/radial PWV were measured non-invasively using the automatic Complior® device, and central parameters (central blood pressure, pulse contour analysis, and augmentation index were measured using the SphygmoCor® system, at the start and end of each treatment period. Compared with placebo, treatment with telmisartan significantly reduced carotid/femoral PWV (mean adjusted treatment difference -0.95 m/s, 95% confidence intervals: -1.67, -0.23 m/s, p=0.013, as well as peripheral and central diastolic, systolic and pulse pressure. In conclusion, the results of this study show that telmisartan is effective in reducing arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and may potentially have beneficial effects on cardiovascular outcomes, beyond blood-pressure lowering effects, in this patient group.

  3. Type 2 diabetes family histories, body composition and fasting glucose levels: a cross-section analysis in healthy sedentary male and female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Antonino; Pomara, Francesco; Thomas, Ewan; Paoli, Antonio; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Petrucci, Marco; Proia, Patrizia; Bellafiore, Marianna; Palma, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes type 2 is a world wide spread disease with a multifactorial pathogenetic evolution. Various factors like obesity, physical inactivity and poor lifestyle habits contribute to its development. The aim of this study was to verify if in young healthy sedentary male and female there is positive correlation between family history to type 2 diabetes and an increase in body weight and fat mass, or alterations in basal glycemia values. Totally183 male and 237 female healthy sedentary subjects were analysed in 2012, in Italy. They were divided in three groups: FH(+) with first degree family history, FH(++) with second degree family history and FH(-) with no family history. Anthropometrics, body composition and blood parameters were assessed. Male had the highest BMI values (Plife-style changes, such as increased physical activity and controlled quantity and quality of food intake.

  4. Characterization of families of varieties according to the time of harvest at two locations in the central region of Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Were evaluated 46 varieties at two locations in the central region of the country in two types of soil, plant cane between 13 and 19 months during the months of November 2010 to May 2011 in the variables t cane / ha,% pol t cane / ha. Three stages were established harvest; cultivars were grouped into families according to their sugar behavior, defining moments of harvest and groups of families of varieties in each harvest period. One Discriminant Factorial Analysis was performed, the qualitative variable used in the first case being the so-called time and the second group of the cultivars. Obtained results allowed the discriminant group the harvest time and the families of varieties for each harvest period with higher percentages of good classification to 75%. The Complete Model confirmed the existence of genotype - environment interaction and quantified a high contribution of the environment, mostly attributed to the towns and the experimental error for cane and pol t / ha, while for the sugar content was the time of harvest. The Reduced Model offered that for t cane / ha Moment in one and three, the variance of genotype - environment interaction was higher than ambient

  5. Low physical activity and energy dense Malaysian foods are associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in centrally obese but not in non-centrally obese patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wah-Kheong; Tan, Alexander Tong-Boon; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna; Tah, Pei-Chien; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-01-01

    To study the dietary intake and level of physical activity (PA) of patients with diabetes mellitus and the association with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Consecutive adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus seen in our hospital diabetes clinic were enrolled. The Global Physical Activity Questionnaire and a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire were used to assess PA and dietary intake, respectively. Diagnosis of NAFLD was ultrasound-based and following exclusion of significant alcohol intake and other causes of chronic liver disease. Data for 299 patients were analyzed (mean age 63.3±10.5 years old, 41.1% male). Prevalence of NAFLD was 49.2%. Patients with low PA were more likely to have NAFLD (OR=1.75, 95% CI=1.03-2.99, p=0.029). There was no significant difference in energy intake, intake of macronutrients and percentage energy intake from each macronutrient, high sugar food, high cholesterol food and high SFA food between patients with and without NAFLD. Among centrally obese patients, patients with low PA and in the highest quartile of percentage energy intake from fat (OR=4.03, 95% CI=1.12-15.0, p=0.015), high cholesterol food (OR=3.61, 95% CI=1.37-9.72, p=0.004) and high SFA food (OR=2.67, 95% CI=1.08-6.67, p=0.019) were most likely to have NAFLD. Among those who were not centrally obese, PA and percentage energy intake from fat, high cholesterol food and high SFA food was not associated with NAFLD. Low PA and high percentage energy intake from fat, high cholesterol food and high SFA food is associated with NAFLD in centrally obese but not in non-centrally obese patients with diabetes mellitus.

  6. [Perioperative management of a child with central diabetes insipidus who underwent two surgeries before and after desmopressin administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Keiji; Tachibana, Kazuya; Nishimura, Nobuyuki; Takeuchi, Muneyuki; Kinouchi, Keiko

    2013-03-01

    A 14-year-old girl weighing 32 kg was diagnosed with suprasellar tumor causing hydrocephalus, hypothyroidism, adrenal dysfunction and central diabetes insipidus. She was treated with levothyroxine and hydrocortisone and urged to take fluid to replace urine. She was scheduled to undergo ventricular drainage to relieve hydrocephalus prior to tumor resection. For the first surgery, desmopressin was not started and urine output reached 4,000 to 6,000 ml x day(-1), urine osmolality 64 mOsm x l(-1) and urine specific gravity 1.002. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. Maintenance fluid was with acetated Ringer's solution and urine loss was replaced with 5% dextrose. Bradycardia and hypotension occurred after intubation, which was treated with volume load. Infusion volume was 750 ml and urine output was 1100 ml during 133 min of anesthesia. Postoperative day 1 nasal desmopressin was started. Ten days later, partial tumor resection was performed. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and fentanyl and maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. Infusion volume was 610 ml, urine output 380 ml, and blood loss 151 ml during 344 min of anesthesia. Hemodynamic parameters were stable throughout the procedure. Pathology of the tumor was revealed to be germinoma. Bradycardia and hypotension experienced during the first surgery was suspected to be caused by preoperative hypovolemia brought by polyuria. Desmopressin was proved to be effective to treat excessive urine output and to maintain good perioperative water balance.

  7. The central Myanmar (Burma) oil family - composition and implications for source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiale, J A; Kyi, P; Collins, I D; Din, A; Nyein, K; Nyunt, M; Stuart, C J [Unocal Inc., Brea, CA (United States). Energy Resources Division

    1994-11-01

    Geochemical characteristics of 13 Miocene through Eocene oils/seeps, an Eocene coal and an Eocene resin from the central Myanmar (Burma) basin system are examined. Geologic arguments suggest a deep Paleogene source for these oils. Two geochemical arguments that support this inference are (a) the occurrence of saturated and unsaturated C-15 and C-30 cadinane monomers and dimers in pyrolyzates of an Eocene resin and the kerogen from an Eocene coal, and (b) identical compound-specific carbon isotope ratios for selected isoprenoids and n-alkanes in a typical central Myanmar oil and the hydrous pyrolyzate expelled from an Eocene coal. The authors propose an Eocene resinous shale/coal source for these oils, with the oldest (Eocene) reservoirs filling first and the youngst (Miocene) reservoirs filling last, consistent with the observation that the least mature oils are present in the oldest reservoirs. According to this model, surface seepage and near-surface oil could result from subsurface traps that are filled to spillpoint.

  8. IL12RB2 gene is associated with the age of type 1 diabetes onset in Croatian family Trios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pehlić

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Common complex diseases are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Many genetic factors overlap between various autoimmune diseases. The aim of the present study is to determine whether four genetic variants known to be risk variants for several autoimmune diseases could be associated with an increased susceptibility to type 1 diabetes mellitus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We genotyped four genetic variants (rs2358817, rs1049550, rs6679356, rs9865818 within VTCN1, ANXA11, IL12RB2 and LPP genes respectively, in 265 T1DM family trios in Croatian population. We did not detect association of these polymorphisms with T1DM. However, quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT, orthogonal model revealed a significant association between the age of onset of T1DM and IL12RB2 rs6679356 variant. An earlier onset of T1DM was associated with the rs6679356 minor dominant allele C (p = 0.005. The association remained significant even after the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing and permutation. CONCLUSIONS: Variants originally associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (VTCN1 gene, sarcoidosis (ANXA11 gene, primary biliary cirrhosis (IL12RB2 gene and celiac disease (LPP gene were not associated with type 1 diabetes in our dataset. Nevertheless, association of IL12RB2 rs6679356 polymorphism with the age of T1DM onset suggests that this gene plays a role in defining the time of disease onset.

  9. Expression of three different mutations in the arginine vasopressin gene suggests genotype-phenotype correlation in familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus kindreds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard, Charlotte; Christensen, Jane Hvarregaard; Corydon, Thomas Juhl

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND STUDY DESIGN: The autosomal dominant form of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI) is a rare disease characterized by a severe and progressive deficiency of AVP secondary to mutations in the gene encoding the AVP precursor. Whereas a number of studies have investigated...

  10. Clinical and molecular evidence of abnormal processing and trafficking of the vasopressin preprohormone in a large kindred with familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a signal peptide mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard, C; Rittig, S; Corydon, T J

    1999-01-01

    The autosomal dominant form of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI) is a rare disease characterized by postnatal onset of polyuria and a deficient neurosecretion of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Since 1991, adFNDI has been linked to 31 different mutations...

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by a variant in the AVP gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toustrup, Lise Bols; Zhou, Yan; Kvistgaard, Helene

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI) is caused by variants in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a 42-year-old man carrying an adFNDI causing variant in exon 1 of the AVP gene using...

  12. Number and Severity of Type 2 Diabetes among Family Members Are Associated with Nutrition and Physical Activity Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Oyare Amuta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AimA binary measurement of type 2 diabetes (T2D has been found not to influence behaviors. We aimed to examine the influence of other measures of family history such as number of relatives, genetic closeness of relatives, and severity of T2D of family members on nutrition and physical activity behaviors among college students.MethodsStudents across four colleges in Texas were sampled. Multiple linear regression models, controlling for covariates, were used to model results. Cross-sectional data were used.ResultsMore number of relatives with T2D was associated with vegetable consumption (β = 0.131, p = 0.007 and exercise (β = 0.129, p = 0.037. Having relatives with severe T2D was associated with vegetable consumption (β = 0.157, p = 0.002 and exercise (β = 106, p = 0.027. Closer genetic relationship with someone with T2D was associated with increased vegetable consumption (β = 0.107, p = 0.023 and exercise (β = 0.096, p = 0.047.ConclusionIt is likely that the severe complications that may accompany the relatives T2D or having an immediate family member living with T2D may in fact motivate other family members without T2D to modify their attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge about T2D, thus encourage health-protective behaviors.

  13. [HLA genetic markers and auto-antibody profile in a Mapuche family with a case affected of type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Sylvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Pérez, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (DM1) is caused by an autoimmune process that destroys beta cells of pancreas. Not all carriers of susceptible HLA genes and positive for autoantibodies develop the disease. Environmental factors play a role in triggering the autoimmune process. To analyze an exceptional case of DM1 in a Mapuche family in the context of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. A study of a family with an affected female child was carried out in a Mapuche community in Southern Chile (VIII region). This is an unique and sporadic DM1 case with Mapuche heritage. Nutritional and viral infections data were collected by interview and clinical records. A genetic analysis by PCR was done to detect class I and II HLA genes by reverse dot blot. The proband, her mother and sister had positive islet cell antibodies (ICA). Her father and brother were negative. All thefamily was positive for anti glutamic decarboxylase antibodies (GAD65). All subjects had HLA-DRB1 0407/0407 and HLA-DQB1 0302/0302 alleles. The index case and her father were homozygotes for the HLA-A1:A*68012/A*68012 allele. Mean breastfeeding lapse was 18 months in all children. No evidences for viral infections such as rubella, mumps or measles were found in this family. There was an altered profile of autoantibodies in the family of the index case. All genotypes were comparable with the European population where the diabetogenic combination DR4/DQB1*0302 is the most prevalent. No environmental factors could be incriminated as triggers of the disease.

  14. Estimating the extent of subclinical arteriosclerosis of persons with prediabetes and diabetes mellitus among Japanese urban workers and their families: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namekata, Tsukasa; Shirai, Kohji; Tanabe, Naohito; Miyanishi, Kunio; Nakata, Mitsuko; Suzuki, Kenji; Arai, Chikao; Ishizuka, Norio

    2016-02-24

    Diabetes mellitus (hereafter called diabetes) is considered to accelerate arteriosclerosis leading to coronary heart disease and stroke. Thus, it is important to quantitatively estimate the extent of subclinical arteriosclerosis. A new method called cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is developed to reflect arterial stiffness independently from blood pressure at the time of measurement. Then, we examined if CAVI scores could discriminate the extent of arteriosclerosis between persons with prediabetes (or borderline diabetes) and with diabetes among Japanese urban workers and their families. Subjects were 9881 men and 12033 women of company employees and their families who participated in cardiovascular disease screening in Japan. Persons having diabetes and prediabetes were defined based on the criteria set by American Diabetes Association. CAVI scores were measured by VaSera VS-1000. We applied the established age-sex specific cutoff points of CAVI scores above which were determined to be abnormally high or advanced level of arteriosclerosis. To examine the association of prediabetes and diabetes with CAVI scores, CAVI scores of screening participants were converted to a binary variable: 1 for less than cutoff points and 2 for equal or greater than cutoff points or abnormally high CAVI scores. Logistic regression method was used to examine the association of prediabetes and diabetes with CAVI scores after adjusting for major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Prevalence of abnormally high CAVI scores was significantly higher after 40 years of age among persons with diabetes than either among persons with prediabetes or among normal persons in both genders. Significantly elevated odds ratios (ORs) of abnormally high CAVI scores appeared among persons with prediabetes: 1.29 (95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.11-1.48) for men and 1.14 (CI, 1.01-1.28) for women, and among persons with diabetes: 2.41 (CI, 1.97-2.95) for men and 2.52 (CI, 1.94-3.28) for women

  15. [A Case of Central Diabetes Insipidus That Was Caused by Pituitary Metastasis of Lung Adenocarcinoma and Was Controlled by Radiation Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yusuke; Masuda, Takeshi; Nabeshima, Shinji; Horimasu, Yasushi; Nakashima, Taku; Miyamoto, Shintaro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Murakami, Yuji; Hamada, Hironobu; Nagata, Yasushi; Hattori, Noboru

    2017-06-01

    Pituitary metastasis of lung cancer is rare; however, it often causes diabetes insipidus. Although the majority of such patients are treated with radiation therapy, it remains unclear whether diabetes insipidus can be controlled by radiation therapy. A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for hemosputum, headache, and polyuria. A chest CT scan showed a 3.0 cm mass in the left upper lobe of his lung. Bronchofiberscopy results confirmed the pathological diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma. Based on the findings from PET-CT, head MRI, and endocrine tests, the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma( cT1bN0M1b, stage IV)accompanied with central diabetes insipidus caused by pituitary metastasis was made. Oral administration of desmopressin reduced urine volumes; however, chemotherapy for achieving stable disease in the primary tumor was ineffective in controlling the symptoms of diabetes insipidus. Chemotherapy was discontinued after 4 months because of severe hematological toxicity. During 2 months after the cessation of chemotherapy, polyuria worsened and, therefore, radiation therapy for pituitary metastasis was started. Following the radiation therapy, an apparent reduction in urine volume was observed. Our experience of this case suggests that radiation therapy for pituitary metastasis should be considered at the time when diabetes insipidus becomes clinically overt.

  16. A case of central diabetes insipidus that was caused by pituitary metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma and was controlled by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Yusuke; Masuda, Takeshi; Nabeshima, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Pituitary metastasis of lung cancer is rare; however, it often causes diabetes insipidus. Although the majority of such patients are treated with radiation therapy, it remains unclear whether diabetes insipidus can be controlled by radiation therapy. A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for hemosputum, headache, and polyuria. A chest CT scan showed a 3.0 cm mass in the left upper lobe of his lung. Bronchofiberscopy results confirmed the pathological diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma. Based on the findings from PET-CT, head MRI, and endocrine tests, the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma (cT1bN0M1b, stage four) accompanied with central diabetes insipidus caused by pituitary metastasis was made. Oral administration of desmopressin reduced urine volumes; however, chemotherapy for achieving stable disease in the primary tumor was ineffective in controlling the symptoms of diabetes insipidus. Chemotherapy was discontinued after 4 months because of severe hematological toxicity. During 2 months after the cessation of chemotherapy, polyuria worsened and, therefore, radiation therapy for pituitary metastasis was started. Following the radiation therapy, an apparent reduction in urine volume was observed. Our experience of this case suggests that radiation therapy for pituitary metastasis should be considered at the time when diabetes insipidus becomes clinically overt. (author)

  17. Selecting SNPs informative for African, American Indian and European Ancestry: application to the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert C; Elston, Robert C; Kumar, Pankaj; Knowler, William C; Abboud, Hanna E; Adler, Sharon; Bowden, Donald W; Divers, Jasmin; Freedman, Barry I; Igo, Robert P; Ipp, Eli; Iyengar, Sudha K; Kimmel, Paul L; Klag, Michael J; Kohn, Orly; Langefeld, Carl D; Leehey, David J; Nelson, Robert G; Nicholas, Susanne B; Pahl, Madeleine V; Parekh, Rulan S; Rotter, Jerome I; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Sedor, John R; Shah, Vallabh O; Smith, Michael W; Taylor, Kent D; Thameem, Farook; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Winkler, Cheryl A; Guo, Xiuqing; Zager, Phillip; Hanson, Robert L

    2016-05-04

    The presence of population structure in a sample may confound the search for important genetic loci associated with disease. Our four samples in the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND), European Americans, Mexican Americans, African Americans, and American Indians are part of a genome- wide association study in which population structure might be particularly important. We therefore decided to study in detail one component of this, individual genetic ancestry (IGA). From SNPs present on the Affymetrix 6.0 Human SNP array, we identified 3 sets of ancestry informative markers (AIMs), each maximized for the information in one the three contrasts among ancestral populations: Europeans (HAPMAP, CEU), Africans (HAPMAP, YRI and LWK), and Native Americans (full heritage Pima Indians). We estimate IGA and present an algorithm for their standard errors, compare IGA to principal components, emphasize the importance of balancing information in the ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and test the association of IGA with diabetic nephropathy in the combined sample. A fixed parental allele maximum likelihood algorithm was applied to the FIND to estimate IGA in four samples: 869 American Indians; 1385 African Americans; 1451 Mexican Americans; and 826 European Americans. When the information in the AIMs is unbalanced, the estimates are incorrect with large error. Individual genetic admixture is highly correlated with principle components for capturing population structure. It takes ~700 SNPs to reduce the average standard error of individual admixture below 0.01. When the samples are combined, the resulting population structure creates associations between IGA and diabetic nephropathy. The identified set of AIMs, which include American Indian parental allele frequencies, may be particularly useful for estimating genetic admixture in populations from the Americas. Failure to balance information in maximum likelihood, poly-ancestry models creates biased

  18. Co-inheritance of HNF1a and GCK mutations in a family with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY): implications for genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Garrido, M P; Herranz-Antolín, S; Alija-Merillas, M J; Giralt, P; Escribano, J

    2013-09-01

    To determine the genetic basis of dominant early-onset diabetes mellitus in two families. Molecular analysis by PCR sequencing of the promoter, the 5' untranslated region (UTR) and exons of both GCK and HNF1A genes was carried out in two families with clinically diagnosed dominant diabetes mellitus. The novel HNF1A c.-154_-160TGGGGGT mutation, located in the 5' UTR, was present in several members of the two families in the heterozygous state. Interestingly, the GCK p.Y61X mutation was also identified in three members of one of the families, and two of them carried both mutations in heterozygosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the co-inheritance of GCK and HNF1A mutations and the coexistence of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) 2, MODY 3 and unusual MODY 2-3 genotypes in the same family. Carriers of both GCK and HNF1A mutations manifested a typical MODY 3 phenotype and showed that the presence of a second mutation in the GCK gene apparently did not modify the clinical outcome, at least at the time of this study. Our data show that co-inheritance of MODY 2 and MODY 3 mutations should be considered, at least in some cases, for accurate genetic testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Adaptation and evaluation of the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertzon, Mats; Alvariza, Anette; Winnberg, Elisabeth; Leksell, Janeth; Andershed, Birgitta; Goliath, Ida; Momeni, Pardis; Kneck, Åsa; Skott, Maria; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2018-03-31

    To adapt the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (FIAQ) for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care and to evaluate its validity and reliability. Involvement in the professional care has proven to be important for family members. However, they have described feelings of alienation in relation to how they experienced the professionals' approach. To explore this issue, a broad instrument that can be used in different care contexts is needed. A psychometric evaluation study, with a cross-sectional design. The content validity of the FIAQ was evaluated during 2014 by cognitive interviews with 15 family members to adults in different care contexts. Psychometric evaluation was then conducted (2015-2016). A sample of 325 family members participated, 103 of whom in a test-retest evaluation. Both parametric and non-parametric methods were used. The content validity revealed that the questionnaire was generally understood and considered to be relevant and retrievable by family members in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. Furthermore, the FIAQ (Revised), demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of data quality, homogeneity, unidimensionality (factor structure), internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The study provides evidence that the FIAQ (Revised) is reliable and valid for use in further research and in quality assessment in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Lack of Association between SLC30A8 Variants and Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican American Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SLC30A8 encodes zinc transporter 8 which is involved in packaging and release of insulin. Evidence for the association of SLC30A8 variants with type 2 diabetes (T2D is inconclusive. We interrogated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs around SLC30A8 for association with T2D in high-risk, pedigreed individuals from extended Mexican American families. This study of 118 SNPs within 50 kb of the SLC30A8 locus tested the association with eight T2D-related traits at four levels: (i each SNP using measured genotype approach (MGA; (ii interaction of SNPs with age and sex; (iii combinations of SNPs using Bayesian Quantitative Trait Nucleotide (BQTN analyses; and (iv entire gene locus using the gene burden test. Only one SNP (rs7817754 was significantly associated with incident T2D but a summary statistic based on all T2D-related traits identified 11 novel SNPs. Three SNPs and one SNP were weakly but interactively associated with age and sex, respectively. BQTN analyses could not demonstrate any informative combination of SNPs over MGA. Lastly, gene burden test results showed that at best the SLC30A8 locus could account for only 1-2% of the variability in T2D-related traits. Our results indicate a lack of association of the SLC30A8 SNPs with T2D in Mexican American families.

  1. The CRF Family of Neuropeptides and their Receptors - Mediators of the Central Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedic, Nina; Chen, Alon; Deussing, Jan M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Dysregulated stress neurocircuits, caused by genetic and/or environmental changes, underlie the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the major physiological activator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and conse-quently a primary regulator of the mammalian stress response. Together with its three family members, urocortins (UCNs) 1, 2, and 3, CRF integrates the neuroendocrine, autonomic, metabolic and behavioral responses to stress by activating its cognate receptors CRFR1 and CRFR2. Objective: Here we review the past and current state of the CRF/CRFR field, ranging from pharmacologi-cal studies to genetic mouse models and virus-mediated manipulations. Results: Although it is well established that CRF/CRFR1 signaling mediates aversive responses, includ-ing anxiety and depression-like behaviors, a number of recent studies have challenged this viewpoint by revealing anxiolytic and appetitive properties of specific CRF/CRFR1 circuits. In contrast, the UCN/CRFR2 system is less well understood and may possibly also exert divergent functions on physiol-ogy and behavior depending on the brain region, underlying circuit, and/or experienced stress conditions. Conclusion: A plethora of available genetic tools, including conventional and conditional mouse mutants targeting CRF system components, has greatly advanced our understanding about the endogenous mecha-nisms underlying HPA system regulation and CRF/UCN-related neuronal circuits involved in stress-related behaviors. Yet, the detailed pathways and molecular mechanisms by which the CRF/UCN-system translates negative or positive stimuli into the final, integrated biological response are not completely un-derstood. The utilization of future complementary methodologies, such as cell-type specific Cre-driver lines, viral and optogenetic tools will help to further dissect the function of genetically defined CRF/UCN neurocircuits in the context of

  2. [The efficacy of desmopressin in the treatment of central diabetes insipidus after resection of chiasmo-sellar region tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astaf'eva, L I

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a neuroendocrine disease, the pathogenesis of which is associated with abnormal secretion of the antidiuretic hormone. One of the specific causes of CDI is neurosurgical resection of chiasmatic-sellar region tumors. to study the efficacy and safety of desmopressin in CDI patients after resection of chiasmatic-sellar region (CSR) tumors. Examination and treatment of patients were performed at a hospital for 7-14 days after surgery and then were continued after discharge. During treatment, the following tests were performed: a daily fluid intake and excretion volume, serum levels of sodium, potassium, and glucose twice a day, morning urine specific gravity, and Zimnitsky's test. Twenty-three patients with CSR tumors (11 craniopharyngiomas, 10 pituitary adenomas, 1 skull base chordoma, and 1 CSR meningioma) and CDI after neurosurgical treatment received desmopressin. On treatment, a thirst decrease, a reduced rate of diuresis, a reduced amount of excreted urine, and normalization of the sodium level were observed in all patients. In 12 patients (with pituitary adenoma, skull base chordoma, and meningioma) with transient CDI, desmopressin therapy was discontinued upon regression of symptoms 7-30 days after surgery. Eleven patients with permanent CDI continued to receive the drug at a dose of 1 to 4 doses per day. All patients well tolerated the drug without significant adverse effects. Therapy with desmopressin in the form of a nasal spray (vazomirin) in patients with transient and permanent CDI after resection CSR tumors of various histological nature (craniopharyngiomas, pituitary adenomas, meningiomas, and chordomas) was effective and safe in the early postoperative and long-term postoperative periods.

  3. Congenital central diabetes insipidus and optic atrophy in a Wolfram newborn: is there a role for WFS1 gene in neurodevelopment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardello, Stefano; Dusi, Elisa; Castiglione, Bianca; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio

    2014-09-26

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus (DM), optic atrophy (OA), central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and deafness (D). The phenotype of the disease has been associated with several mutations in the WFS1 gene, a nuclear gene localized on chromosome 4. Since the discovery of the association between WFS1 gene and Wolfram syndrome, more than 150 mutations have been identified in WS patients. We previously described the first case of perinatal onset of Wolfram syndrome newborn carrying a segmental uniparental heterodysomy affecting the short arm of chromosome 4 responsible for a significant reduction in wolframin expression. Here we review and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms that we believe responsible for the perinatal onset of Wolfram syndrome as these data strongly suggest a role for WFS1 gene in foetal and neonatal neurodevelopment. We described a male patient of 30 weeks' gestation with intrauterine growth restriction and poly-hydramnios. During the first days of life, the patient showed a 19% weight loss associated with polyuria and hypernatremia. The presence of persistent hypernatremia (serum sodium 150 mEq/L), high plasma osmolarity (322 mOsm/L) and low urine osmolarity (190 mOsm/l) with a Uosm/Posm ratio diabetes mellitus. By the end of the second year of life, primary non-autoimmune central hypothyroidism and mild neurodevelopment retardation were diagnosed. The analysis of our case, in the light of the most recent literature, suggests a possible role for WFS1 gene in the development of certain brain structures during the fetal period. Wolfram syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the rare cases of congenital central diabetes insipidus developed in the neonatal period.

  4. Impaired fat oxidation after a single high-fat meal in insulin-sensitive nondiabetic individuals with a family history of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronn, Leonie K; Gregersen, Søren; Shirkhedkar, Deepali; Hu, Dachun; Campbell, Lesley V

    2007-08-01

    Individuals with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes have an impaired ability to switch appropriately between carbohydrate and fatty acid oxidation. However, whether this is a cause or consequence of insulin resistance is unclear, and the mechanism(s) involved in this response is not completely elucidated. Whole-body fat oxidation and transcriptional regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle were measured after a prolonged fast and after consumption of either high-fat (76%) or high-carbohydrate (76%) meals in individuals with no family history of type 2 diabetes (control, n = 8) and in age- and fatness-matched individuals with a strong family history of type 2 diabetes (n = 9). Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were performed before and 3 h after each meal. Insulin sensitivity and fasting measures of fat oxidation were not different between groups. However, subjects with a family history of type 2 diabetes had an impaired ability to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to the high-fat meal (P FAT)/CD36 (P fat meal in both groups, but it was not changed after the high-carbohydrate meal. In conclusion, an impaired ability to increase fatty acid oxidation precedes the development of insulin resistance in genetically susceptible individuals. PGC1alpha and FAT/CD36 are likely candidates in mediating this response.

  5. Family history and body mass index predict perceived risks of diabetes and heart attack among community-dwelling Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans--DiLH Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Choi, JiWon; S Bender, Melinda; Gonzalez, Prisila; Arai, Shoshana

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the perceived risk for diabetes and heart attack and associated health status of Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans without diabetes. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 904 urban adults (mean age 44.3±16.1 years; 64.3% female) in English, Spanish or Korean between August and December 2013. Perceived risk for developing diabetes was indicated by 46.5% (n=421), and 14.3% (n=129) perceived themselves to be at risk for having a heart attack in their lifetime. Significant predictors of pessimistic diabetes risk perceptions: Filipino (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.7; 95% CI: 1.04-2.86) and Korean (AOR=2.4; 1.33-4.48) ethnicity, family history of diabetes (AOR=1.4; 1.00-1.84), female gender (AOR=1.4; 1.04-1.96), high cholesterol (AOR= 1.6; 1.09-2.37) and higher body mass index (BMI) (AOR=1.1; 1.08-1.15). Predictors of pessimistic heart attack risk perceptions were family history of an early heart attack (AOR=2.9; 1.69-5.02), high blood pressure (AOR=2.4; 1.45-3.84), and higher BMI (AOR=1.1; 1.04-1.12) after controlling for socio-demographic factors. Older age, physical inactivity, smoking, and low HDL levels were not associated with risk perceptions. Multiple risk factors were predictive of greater perceived diabetes risk, whereas, only family history of heart attack, high blood pressure and increases in BMI significantly contributed to perceived risk of heart attack among ethnically diverse at risk middle-aged adults. It is important that healthcare providers address the discordance between an individual's risk perceptions and the presence of actual risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetes mellitus: fatores associados entre usuários da Estratégia Saúde da Família Diabetes mellitus: factores asociados entre usuarios de la Estrategia Salud de la Familia Diabetes mellitus: associated factors among users of the Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niciane Bandeira Pessoa Marinho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar os fatores associados ao Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2 (DM2 em usuários da Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF da cidade de Itapipoca-Ceará. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal, realizado no período de março/2009 a outubro/2010, em 11 unidades básicas de saúde, nas quais foram coletados dados sociodemográficos e clínicos de amostra de 419 usuários dessas unidades. RESULTADOS: Entre os participantes do estudo, 250 (59,7% estavam com excesso de peso, 352 (84,0% com obesidade central, 349 (83,3% eram sedentários e 225 (53,7% não comiam frutas e/ou verduras diariamente. Houve associação estatisticamente significante entre as variáveis obesidade central e sexo (pOBJETIVO: Identificar los factores asociados a la Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2 (DM2 en usuarios de la Estrategia Salud de la Familia (ESF de la ciudad de Itapipoca-Ceará. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal, realizado en el período de marzo/2009 a octubre/2010, en 11 unidades básicas de salud, en las cuales fueron recolectados los datos sociodemográficos y clínicos de la muestra de 419 usuarios de esas unidades. RESULTADOS: Entre los participantes del estudio, 250 (59,7% estaban con exceso de peso, 352 (84,0% con obesidad central, 349 (83,3% eran sedentarios y 225 (53,7% no comían frutas y/o verduras diariamente. Hubo asociación estadísticamente significativa entre las variables obesidad central y sexo (pOBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with type 2 diabetes (DM2 in users of the Family Health Strategy (FHS in the city of Itapipoca, Ceará (Brazil. METHODS: A transversal study, conducted during the period from March/2009 to October/2010, in 11 basic health units, in which sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from a sample of 419 users of these units. RESULTS: Among the study participants, 250 (59.7% were overweight, 352 (84.0% had central obesity, 349 (83.3% were sedentary, and 225 (53.7% did not eat fruits and/or vegetables daily. There was a

  7. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training decreases peripheral but not central artery wall thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Munckhof, I.C.L. van den; Poelkens, F.; Hopman, M.T.; Thijssen, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness in type 2 diabetes. We examined the local and systemic impact of exercise training on superficial femoral (SFA), brachial (BA), and carotid artery (CA) wall thickness in type 2 diabetes patients and

  8. The ProActive trial protocol – a randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of a family-based, domiciliary intervention programme to increase physical activity among individuals at high risk of diabetes [ISRCTN61323766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekelund Ulf

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing prevalence of obesity and disorders associated with sedentary living constitute a major global public health problem. While previous evaluations of interventions to increase physical activity have involved communities or individuals with established disease, less attention has been given to interventions for individuals at risk of disease. Methods/design ProActive aims to evaluate the efficacy of a theoretical, evidence- and family-based intervention programme to increase physical activity in a sedentary population, defined as being at-risk through having a parental family history of diabetes. Primary care diabetes or family history registers were used to recruit 365 individuals aged 30–50 years, screened for activity level. Participants were assigned by central randomisation to three intervention programmes: brief written advice (comparison group, or a psychologically based behavioural change programme, delivered either by telephone (distance group or face-to-face in the family home over one year. The protocol-driven intervention programme is delivered by trained facilitators, and aims to support increases in physical activity through the introduction and facilitation of a range of self-regulatory skills (e.g. goal setting. The primary outcome is daytime energy expenditure and its ratio to resting energy expenditure, measured at baseline and one year using individually calibrated heart rate monitoring. Secondary measures include self-report of individual and family activity, psychological mediators of behaviour change, physiological and biochemical correlates, acceptability, and costs, measured at baseline, six months and one year. The primary intention to treat analysis will compare groups at one-year post randomisation. Estimation of the impact on diabetes incidence will be modelled using data from a parallel ten-year cohort study using similar measures. Discussion ProActive is the first efficacy trial of an

  9. Psychological trauma symptoms and Type 2 diabetes prevalence, glucose control, and treatment modality among American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Michelle M; Gonzales, Kelly L; Calhoun, Darren; Beals, Janette; Muller, Clemma Jacobsen; Goldberg, Jack; Nelson, Lonnie; Welty, Thomas K; Howard, Barbara V

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to examine the relationship between psychological trauma symptoms and Type 2 diabetes prevalence, glucose control, and treatment modality among 3776 American Indians in Phase V of the Strong Heart Family Study. This cross-sectional analysis measured psychological trauma symptoms using the National Anxiety Disorder Screening Day instrument, diabetes by American Diabetes Association criteria, and treatment modality by four categories: no medication, oral medication only, insulin only, or both oral medication and insulin. We used binary logistic regression to evaluate the association between psychological trauma symptoms and diabetes prevalence. We used ordinary least squares regression to evaluate the association between psychological trauma symptoms and glucose control. We used binary logistic regression to model the association of psychological trauma symptoms with treatment modality. Neither diabetes prevalence (22%-31%; p=0.19) nor control (8.0-8.6; p=0.25) varied significantly by psychological trauma symptoms categories. However, diabetes treatment modality was associated with psychological trauma symptoms categories, as people with greater burden used either no medication, or both oral and insulin medications (odds ratio=3.1, ppsychological trauma symptoms suggests future research investigate patient and provider treatment decision making. © 2013.

  10. The Effects of Lycopene and Insulin on Histological Changes and the Expression Level of Bcl-2 Family Genes in the Hippocampus of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymaninejad, Masoume; Joursaraei, Seyed Gholamali; Feizi, Farideh; Jafari Anarkooli, Iraj

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of antioxidants lycopene and insulin on histological changes and expression of Bcl-2 family genes in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats. Forty-eight Wistar rats were divided into six groups of control (C), control treated with lycopene (CL), diabetic (D), diabetic treated with insulin (DI), diabetic treated with lycopene (DL), and diabetic treated with insulin and lycopene (DIL). Diabetes was induced by an injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, IP), lycopene (4 mg/kg/day) was given to the lycopene treated groups as gavages, and insulin (Sc, 1-2 U/kg/day) was injected to the groups treated with insulin. The number of hippocampus neurons undergoing cell death in group D had significant differences with groups C and DIL ( p lycopene alone or together reduced the expression of Bax , but increased Bcl-2 and Bcl-x L levels in DI, DL, and DIL rats, especially when compared to group D ( p lycopene contribute to the prevention of cell death by reducing the expression of proapoptotic genes and increasing the expression of antiapoptotic genes in the hippocampus.

  11. Comparison of health care needs of child family members of adults with alcohol or drug dependence versus adults with asthma or diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, G Thomas; Mertens, Jennifer R; Weisner, Constance

    2014-05-01

    To compare the health problems, preventive care utilization, and medical costs of child family members (CFMs) of adults diagnosed with alcohol or drug dependence (AODD) to CFMs of adults diagnosed with diabetes or asthma. Child family members of adults diagnosed with AODD between 2002 and 2005 and CFMs of matched adults diagnosed with diabetes or asthma were followed up to 7 years after diagnosis of the index adult. Logistic regression was used to determine whether the CFMs of AODD adults were more likely to be diagnosed with medical conditions, or get preventive care, than the CFMs of adults with asthma or diabetes. Children's health services use was compared using multivariate models. In Year 5 after index date, CFMs of adults with AODD were more likely to be diagnosed with depression and AODD than CFMs of adults with asthma or diabetes and were less likely to be diagnosed with asthma, otitis media, and pneumonia than CFMs of adults with asthma. CFMs of AODD adults were less likely than CFMs of adult asthmatic patients to have annual well-child visits. CFMs of AODD adults had similar mean annual total health care costs to CFMs of adults with asthma but higher total costs ($159/yr higher, confidence interval, $56-$253) than CFMs of adult diabetic patients. CFMs of adults with AODD had higher emergency department, higher outpatient alcohol and drug program, higher outpatient psychiatry, and lower primary care costs than CFMs of either adult asthmatic patients or diabetic patients. Children in families with an alcohol- or drug-dependent adult have unique patterns of health conditions, and differences in the types of health services used, compared to children in families with an adult asthmatic or diabetic family member. However, overall cost and utilization for health care services is similar or only somewhat higher. This is the first study of its kind, and the results have implications for the reduction of parental alcohol or drug dependence stigma by health care

  12. A Family History of Diabetes Modifies the Association between Elevated Urine Albumin Concentration and Hyperglycemia in Nondiabetic Mexican Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Jiménez-Corona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the frequency of elevated urine albumin concentration (UAC and its association with metabolic syndrome (MetS and metabolic markers in 515 nondiabetic Mexican adolescents stratified by family history of diabetes (FHD. UAC was measured in a first morning urine sample and considered elevated when excretion was ≥20 mg/mL. MetS was defined using International Diabetes Federation criteria. Fasting insulin, insulin resistance, and lipids were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Elevated UAC was present in 12.4% and MetS was present in 8.9% of the adolescents. No association was found between elevated UAC and MetS. Among adolescents with FHD, 18.4% were overweight and 20.7% were obese, whereas, among those without a FHD, 15.9% were overweight and 7.5% were obese. Hyperglycemia was higher in those with elevated UAC than in those without (44.4% versus 5.1%, p=0.003. Hyperglycemia (OR = 9.8, 95% CI 1.6–59.4 and number of MetS components (OR = 4.5, 95% CI 1.5–13.3 were independently associated with elevated UAC. Among female participants, abdominal obesity was associated with elevated UAC (OR = 4.5, 95% CI 1.2–16.9. Conclusion. Elevated UAC was associated neither with MetS nor with any metabolic markers in nondiabetic adolescents. However, FHD modified the association of elevated UAC with hyperglycemia and the number of MetS components.

  13. EIF4A2 is a positional candidate gene at the 3q27 locus linked to type 2 diabetes in French families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheyssac, Claire; Dina, Christian; Leprêtre, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    .01 at D3S3686, P = 0.0001) was identified in a set of French families. To assess genetic variation underlying both age-of-onset QTL and our previous type 2 diabetes linkage in a 3.87-Mb interval, we explored 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two biologically relevant candidate genes for glucose...... homeostasis, kininogen (KNG1), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4alpha2 (EIF4A2). Analysis of 148 families showed significant association of a frequent SNP, rs266714, located 2.47 kb upstream of EIF4A2, with familial type 2 diabetes (family-based association test, P = 0.0008) and early age......RNA translation and protein synthesis rate in pancreatic beta-cells, and our data indicates that EIF4A2 is downregulated by high glucose in rat beta-INS832/13 cells. The potential role of EIF4A2 in glucose homeostasis and its putative contribution to type 2 diabetes in the presence of metabolic stress...

  14. Supporting At-Risk Youth and Their Families to Manage and Prevent Diabetes: Developing a National Partnership of Medical Residency Programs and High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefter, Liana; Morioka-Douglas, Nancy; Srivastava, Ashini; Rodriguez, Eunice

    2016-01-01

    The Stanford Youth Diabetes Coaches Program (SYDCP) is a school based health program in which Family Medicine residents train healthy at-risk adolescents to become diabetes self-management coaches for family members with diabetes. This study evaluates the impact of the SYDCP when disseminated to remote sites. Additionally, this study aims to assess perceived benefit of enhanced curriculum. From 2012-2015, 10 high schools and one summer camp in the US and Canada and five residency programs were selected to participate. Physicians and other health providers implemented the SYDCP with racial/ethnic-minority students from low-income communities. Student coaches completed pre- and posttest surveys which included knowledge, health behavior, and psychosocial asset questions (i.e., worth and resilience), as well as open-ended feedback questions. T-test pre-post comparisons were used to determine differences in knowledge and psychosocial assets, and open and axial coding methods were used to analyze qualitative data. A total of 216 participating high school students completed both pre-and posttests, and 96 nonparticipating students also completed pre- and posttests. Student coaches improved from pre- to posttest significantly on knowledge (pknowledge gain, pride in helping family members, improved relationships and connectedness with family members, and lifestyle improvements. Overall, when disseminated, this program can increase health knowledge and some psychosocial assets of at-risk youth and holds promise to empower these youth with health literacy and encourage them to adopt healthy behaviors.

  15. Brief Computer-Delivered Intervention to Increase Parental Monitoring in Families of African American Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Deborah A; Idalski Carcone, April; Ondersma, Steven J; Naar-King, Sylvie; Dekelbab, Bassem; Moltz, Kathleen

    2017-06-01

    African American adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are at elevated risk for poor diabetes management and metabolic control. Parental supervision and monitoring of adolescent diabetes management have been shown to promote better diabetes management among adolescents, but parents typically decrease their oversight during the transition to independent diabetes care. The purpose of the study was to conduct a randomized clinical trial to test the feasibility and efficacy of a three-session, computer-delivered motivational intervention (The 3Ms) to promote increased parental monitoring among primary caregivers of young African American adolescents with T1D. The intervention was brief and optimized for delivery during routine diabetes clinic visits. Sixty-seven adolescents with T1D aged 11-14 and their primary caregiver were randomly assigned to one of three arms: adolescent and parent motivational intervention (Arm 1), adolescent control and parent motivational intervention (Arm 2), or adolescent and parent control (Arm 3). Intervention effects were assessed 1 month after intervention completion. Parents in Arm 1 and Arm 2 had significant increases in knowledge of the importance of monitoring adolescents' diabetes care. Parents in Arm 2 also had trend to significant increases in direct observation and monitoring of adolescent diabetes care, and adolescents in Arm 2 had significant improvements in glycemic control. Findings from the present study provide preliminary support for the efficacy of a brief, computer-delivered parenting intervention for improving family management practices and adolescent health outcomes among African American adolescents with T1D and their caregivers.

  16. Diabetic Retinopathy.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AmL

    diabetic foot were significantly associated with DR. Within patients' practice, regular .... Major limb complications included foot ulcer, claudication .... Flat. 217 44.5 66 30.6. Family income / month (KD). 1500. 45 9.2 24 ...

  17. Magnitude and determinants of diabetic retinopathy among persons with diabetes registered at employee health department of a tertiary Eye Hospital of central Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Khandekar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Low coverage for eye screening and laser treatment to diabetics among the staff of an eye hospital is a matter of concern. The underlying causes of low coverage of screening, digital fundus photography as a screening tool and management should be addressed.

  18. ANTI-DIABETIC EFFICACY AND PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF METHANOLIC LEAF EXTRACT OF PAWPAW (Carica papaya GROWN IN NORTH CENTRAL NIGERIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayorinde Victor Ogundele

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Carica papaya leaves samples (Green were freshly harvested from Islamic village in Ilorin, Ilorin west local Government, Kwara State Nigeria. The leaves were extracted with methanol; the resulting extracts were screened for the phytochemical constituents using standard procedure. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of bioactive compounds such as tannins, saponins, terpenoids, glycosides and alkaloids. The in-vitro anti-diabetic potential of the plant was also determined so as to justify the traditional usage of the plant in treating diabetes. The result of the present study confirmed that the methanolic extract of C.papaya leaves possess significant anti-diabetic activity in-vitro, this shows that the leaves has the potential for the development of drugs in combating diabetes.

  19. INSULIN IN THE BRAIN: ITS PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS FOR STATES RELATED WITH CENTRAL INSULIN RESISTANCE, TYPE 2 DIABETES AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENRIQUE eBLÁZQUEZ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the brain has been considered an insulin-insensitive organ, recent reports on the location of insulin and its receptors in the brain have introduced new ways of considering this hormone responsible for several functions. The origin of insulin in the brain has been explained from peripheral or central sources, or both. Regardless of whether insulin is of peripheral origin or produced in the brain, this hormone may act through its own receptors present in the brain. The molecular events through which insulin functions in the brain are the same as those operating in the periphery. However, certain insulin actions are different in the CNS, such as hormone-induced glucose uptake due to a low insulin-sensitive GLUT-4 activity, and because of the predominant presence of GLUT-1 and GLUT-3. In addition, insulin in the brain contributes to the control of nutrient homeostasis, reproduction, cognition and memory, as well as to neurotrophic, neuromodulatory, and neuroprotective effects. Alterations of these functional activities may contribute to the manifestation of several clinical entities, such as central insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2DM and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A close association between T2DM and AD has been reported, to the extent that AD is twice more frequent in diabetic patients, and some authors have proposed the name type 3 diabetes for this association. There are links between AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM through mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress, altered energy and glucose metabolism, cholesterol modifications, dysfunctional protein OGlcNAcylation, formation of amyloid plaques, altered Aβ metabolism, and tau hyperphosphorylation. Advances in the knowledge of preclinical AD and T2DM may be a major stimulus for the development of treatment for preventing the pathogenic events of

  20. Data on medicinal plants used in Central America to manage diabetes and its sequelae (skin conditions, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, urinary problems and vision loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Giovannini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data described in this article is related to the review article “Medicinal plants used in the traditional management of diabetes and its sequelae in Central America: a review” (Giovannini et al., 2016 [1]. We searched publications on the useful plants of Central America in databases and journals by using selected relevant keywords. We then extracted reported uses of medicinal plants within the disease categories: diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, urinary problems, skin diseases and infections, cardiovascular disease, sexual dysfunction, vision loss, and nerve damage. The following countries were included in our definition of Central America: Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. Data were compiled in a bespoke Access database. Plant names from the published sources were validated against The Plant List (TPL, (The Plant List, 2013 [2] and accepted names and synonyms were extracted. In total, the database includes 607 plant names obtained from the published sources which correspond to 537 plant taxa, 9271 synonyms and 1055 use reports.

  1. Diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels......, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved...... (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser...

  2. Overview Chapter 5: Determinants of family formation and childbearing during the societal transition in Central and Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Frejka

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Societal conditions for early and high rates of childbearing were replaced by conditions generating late and low levels of fertility common in Western countries. Central among factors shaping the latter behaviour (job insecurity, unstable partnership relationships, expensive housing, and profound changes in norms, values and attitudes were the following: increasing proportions of young people were acquiring advanced education, a majority of women were gainfully employed, yet women were performing most household maintenance and childrearing duties. Two theories prevailed to explain what caused changes in family formation and fertility trends. One argues that the economic and social crises were the principal causes. The other considered the diffusion of western norms, values and attitudes as the prime factors of change. Neither reveals the root cause: the replacement of state socialist regimes with economic and political institutions of contemporary capitalism. The extraordinarily low period TFRs around 2000 were the result of low fertility of older women born around 1960 overlapping with low fertility of young women born during the 1970s.

  3. Increased expression of endosomal members of toll-like receptor family abrogates wound healing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanhaiya; Agrawal, Neeraj K; Gupta, Sanjeev K; Mohan, Gyanendra; Chaturvedi, Sunanda; Singh, Kiran

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory phase of wound healing cascade is an important determinant of the fate of the wound. Acute inflammation is necessary to initiate proper wound healing, while chronic inflammation abrogates wound healing. Different endosomal members of toll-like receptor (TLR) family initiate inflammatory signalling via a range of different inflammatory mediators such as interferons, internal tissue damaged-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and hyperactive effector T cells. Sustained signalling of TLR9 and TLR7 contributes to chronic inflammation by activating the plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Diabetic wounds are also characterised by sustained inflammatory phase. The objective of this study was to analyse the differential expression of endosomal TLRs in human diabetic wounds compared with control wounds. We analysed the differential expression of TLR7 and TLR9 both at transcriptional and translational levels in wounds of 84 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 6 control subjects without diabetes using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot and immunohistochemistry. TLR7 and TLR9 were significantly up-regulated in wounds of the patients with T2DM compared with the controls and were dependent on the infection status of the diabetic wounds, and wounds with microbial infection exhibited lower expression levels of endosomal TLRs. Altered endosomal TLR expression in T2DM subjects might be associated with wound healing impairment. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Step 1: Learn about Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 1: Learn About Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... the whole family healthy! Here are four key steps to help you control your diabetes and live ...

  5. Effect of TV and radio family planning messages on the probability of modern contraception utilization in post-Soviet Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibov, Nazim; Zainiddinov, Hakim

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of family planning message broadcast on radio and TV on the probability of modern contraception utilization in post-Soviet Central Asia. Viewing family planning messages on TV improves the chances of using modern contraception for a woman who actually saw the messages by about 11 and 8 per cent in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, respectively. If every woman in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan had an opportunity to watch a family planning message on TV, then the likelihood of using modern contraception would have improved by 10 and 7 per cent in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, respectively. By contrast, the effect of hearing family planning messages on radio is not significant in both countries. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Health Planning and Management published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Viewing family planning messages on TV improves the chances of using modern contraception for a woman who actually saw the messages by about 11 and 8 per cent in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, respectively. If every woman in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan had an opportunity to watch a family planning message on TV, then the probability of using modern contraception would have improved by 10 and 7 per cent in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, respectively. Consequently, using TV family planning messages in both countries should be encouraged. In comparison, the effect of hearing family planning messages on radio is not significant in both countries. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Health Planning and Management published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. For Debate: Personalized Health Care: As Exemplified by Home Sodium Measurements in a Child with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Impaired Thirst Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, A A A; van Herwaarden, A E; Oosting, J D; Claahsen-van der Grinten, H L; de Grouw, E P L M

    2018-04-01

    We describe a 6-year old boy with central diabetes insipidus (CDI) caused by destruction of the pituitary gland due to treatment of an optical pathway glioma. He has been treated with chemotherapy and has had several debulking operations over the past years and consequently developed central hypocortisolism, hypothyroidism and CDI. The treatment of CDI was gravely complicated by an impaired thirst perception and compulsive drinking behavior. He was frequently seen at the ER or admitted due to dysregulation of fluid balance. In order to provide better self-reliance, home point of care testing (POCT) sodium measurement was introduced. Realizing POCT sodium measurement resulted in a significant decrease of ER visits and clinical admissions due to dysregulation of fluid balance. This case is an example of personalized health care and has led to better self-reliance and quality of life. Copyright© of YS Medical Media ltd.

  7. Increasing Use of Postpartum Family Planning and the Postpartum IUD: Early Experiences in West and Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleah, Tsigue; Hyjazi, Yolande; Austin, Suzanne; Diallo, Abdoulaye; Dao, Blami; Waxman, Rachel; Karna, Priya

    2016-08-11

    A global resurgence of interest in the intrauterine device (IUD) as an effective long-acting reversible contraceptive and in improving access to a wide range of contraceptive methods, as well as an emphasis on encouraging women to give birth in health care facilities, has led programs to introduce postpartum IUD (PPIUD) services into postpartum family planning (PPFP) programs. We describe strategic, organizational, and technical elements that contributed to early successes of a regional initiative in West and Central Africa to train antenatal, maternity, and postnatal care providers in PPFP counseling for the full range of available methods and in PPIUD service delivery. In November 2013, the initiative provided competency-based training in Guinea for providers from the main public teaching hospital in 5 selected countries (Benin, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Niger, and Senegal) with no prior PPFP counseling or PPIUD capacity. The training was followed by a transfer-of-learning visit and monitoring to support the trained providers. One additional country, Togo, replicated the initiative's model in 2014. Although nascent, this initiative has introduced high-quality PPFP and PPIUD services to the region, where less than 1% of married women of reproductive age use the IUD. In total, 21 providers were trained in PPFP counseling, 18 of whom were also trained in PPIUD insertion. From 2014 to 2015, more than 15,000 women were counseled about PPFP, and 2,269 women chose and received the PPIUD in Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Niger, Senegal, and Togo. (Introduction of PPIUD services in Chad has been delayed.) South-South collaboration has been central to the initiative's accomplishments: Guinea's clinical centers of excellence and qualified trainers provided a culturally resonant example of a PPFP/PPIUD program, and trainings are creating a network of regional trainers to facilitate expansion. Two of the selected countries (Benin and Niger) have expanded their PPFP/PPUID training

  8. Central nervous system changes complicating the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of a nasopharyngeal neoplasm in a diabetic patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.M.; McGinnis, W.; Cook, J.; Latourette, H.

    1979-01-01

    A case is reported of a diabetic patient with a nasopharyngeal neoplasm who developed radiation induced brainstem damage even though irradiated at a conventional time-dose-volume relationship. The clinical course was correlated with autopsy findings which revealed radiation changes in the brainstem consisting primarily of vascular hyalinization with foci of infarction, edema, and demyelination. Atherosclerotic changes were conspicuously absent and therefore not the cause of the alterations. The changes occurred three months after completion of therapy, which was more rapid than expected for radiation injury. It is hypothesized that diabetes may have predisposed the patient to this severe complication of standard therapy. More needs to be learned concerning the relationship between diabetes mellitus and radiation complications. Perhaps a modified time-dose relationship should be considered

  9. Central leptin gene therapy ameliorates diabetes type 1 and 2 through two independent hypothalamic relays; a benefit beyond weight and appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Satya P

    2009-10-01

    Although its role in energy homeostasis is firmly established, the evidence accumulated over a decade linking the adipocyte leptin-hypothalamus axis in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus has received little attention in the contemporary thinking. In this context various lines of evidence are collated here to show that (1) under the direction of leptin two independent relays emanating from the hypothalamus restrain insulin secretion from the pancreas and mobilize peripheral organs--liver, skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue--to upregulate glucose disposal, and (2), leptin insufficiency in the hypothalamus produced by either leptinopenia or restriction of leptin transport across the blood brain barrier due to hyperleptinemia of obesity and aging, initiate antecedent pathophysiological sequalae of diabetes type 1 and 2. Further, we document here the efficacy of leptin replenishment in vivo, especially by supplying it to the hypothalamus with the aid of gene therapy, in preventing the antecedent pathophysiological sequalae--hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia--in various animal models and clinical paradigms of diabetes type 1 and 2 with or without attendant obesity. Overall, the new insights on the long-lasting antidiabetic potential of two independent hypothalamic relays engendered by central leptin gene therapy and the preclinical safety indicators in rodents warrant further validation in subhuman primates and humans.

  10. WHO and national lists of essential medicines in Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean: are they adequate to promote paediatric endocrinology and diabetes care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Amanda; Acosta-Gualandri, Alejandra; Guevara-Aguirre, Jaime; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric endocrinology and diabetes is a paediatric specialty with less common conditions and higher cost medicines. Access to medicines for our specialty in low and middle income countries remains limited. We analysed the content of the WHO (children and adults) and of all available national Model Lists of Essential Medicines (EMLs) for Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America from a paediatric endocrinology and diabetes standpoint. A master list of medicines deemed necessary in paediatric endocrinology and diabetes was established and compared with the WHO and national EMLs, taking into account the gross national income. The WHO EMLs, which are largely recognised as an international benchmark and drive the content of the national EMLs, included many but not all medicines present on our master list. Interestingly, several national EMLs from richer countries included medicines that were not present in the WHO EMLs. Our analysis suggests that these medicines could be considered by the WHO for inclusion in their EMLs, which may promote the adoption of more medicines by individual countries. We also propose several changes to the WHO and national EMLs that could facilitate access to medicines in our specialty: age cut-off for a child using physical maturity rather than a set age limit; greater standardisation of the formatting of the national EMLs for easier comparison and collaborations between countries; greater emphasis on age-specificity and population-specificity for some medicines; and formatting of the EMLs in a disease-focused manner rather than as individual medicines. PMID:28588968

  11. Long-term correction of type 1 and 2 diabetes by central leptin gene therapy independent of effects on appetite and energy expenditure

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    Masako Nakano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipocyte-derived leptin is a hormone associated with the regulation of energy homeostasis, including glucose metabolism. Hyperleptinemia, induced by the consumption of energy-enriched diets, inhibits leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier, and thereby produces leptin insufficiency in the hypothalamus. As a result of sustained leptin insufficiency, the hypothalamic restraint on pancreatic insulin secretion is lost. Additionally, both glucose metabolism and energy expenditure are also diminished, and both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are induced. A replication-deficient recombinant adeno-associated virus vector engineered to encode the leptin gene (rAVV-LEP has been used in models of diabetes as a novel therapeutic approach. After rAVV-LEP injection in ob/ob mice, hypothalamic leptin expression was increased, body weight was suppressed, and hyperinsulinemia was ameliorated. Additionally injection of rAVV-LEP into the hypothalamus suppressed the expression of orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY and enhanced anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC in the arcuate nucleus (ARC in rats. It is proposed that central leptin gene therapy should be tested clinically to reduce the worldwide epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and shortened life span. In this article, the information has been assembled from published review articles on this topic.

  12. The central role of vascular extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: the matrix preloaded

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    Tyagi Suresh C

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The vascular endothelial basement membrane and extra cellular matrix is a compilation of different macromolecules organized by physical entanglements, opposing ionic charges, chemical covalent bonding, and cross-linking into a biomechanically active polymer. These matrices provide a gel-like form and scaffolding structure with regional tensile strength provided by collagens, elasticity by elastins, adhesiveness by structural glycoproteins, compressibility by proteoglycans – hyaluronans, and communicability by a family of integrins, which exchanges information between cells and between cells and the extracellular matrix of vascular tissues. Each component of the extracellular matrix and specifically the capillary basement membrane possesses unique structural properties and interactions with one another, which determine the separate and combined roles in the multiple diabetic complications or diabetic opathies. Metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and their parallel companion (atheroscleropathy are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities and chronic injurious stimuli. The adaptable quality of a matrix or form genetically preloaded with the necessary information to communicate and respond to an ever-changing environment, which supports the interstitium, capillary and arterial vessel wall is individually examined.

  13. Measurement of HbA1c in multicentre diabetes trials - should blood samples be tested locally or sent to a central laboratory: an agreement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Barbara N; Blair, Joanne; McKay, Andrew; Gregory, John W; Newland, Paul; Gamble, Carrol

    2016-10-24

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is an important outcome measure in diabetes clinical trials. For multicentre designs, HbA1c can be measured locally at participating centres or by sending blood samples to a central laboratory. This study analyses the agreement between local and central measurements, using 1-year follow-up data collected in a multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) of newly diagnosed children with type I diabetes. HbA1c measurements were routinely analysed both locally and centrally at baseline and then at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months and the data reported in mmol/mol. Agreement was assessed by calculating the bias and 95 % limits of agreement, using the Bland-Altman analysis method. A predetermined benchmark for clinically acceptable margin of error between measurements was subjectively set as ±10 % for HbA1c. The percentage of pairs of measurements that were classified as clinically acceptable was calculated. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the agreement within centres. Treatment group was not considered. Five hundred and ninety pairs of measurement, representing 255 children and 15 trial centres across four follow-up time points, were compared. There was no significant bias: local measurements were an average of 0.16 mmol/mol (SD = 4.5, 95 % CI -0.2 to 0.5) higher than central. The 95 % limits of agreement were -8.6 to 9.0 mmol/mol (local minus central). Eighty percent of local measurements were within ±10 % of corresponding central measurements. Some trial centres were more varied in the differences observed between local and central measurements: IQRs ranging from 3 to 9 mmol/mol; none indicated systematic bias. Variation in agreement between HbA1c measurements was greater than had been expected although no overall bias was detected and standard deviations were similar. Discrepancies were present across all participating centres. These findings have implications for the comparison of standards of clinical care between centres

  14. Studies of genetic variability of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α gene in an Indian maturity-onset diabetes of the young family.

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    Yang, Jing; Jiang, Feng; Guo, Hui; Soniya, Thadimacca; Yan, Chun-Xia; Tian, Zhu-Fang; Shi, Bing-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), one of the specific types of diabetes mellitus, is a monogenetic disorder characterized by an autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance and β-cell dysfunction. To study an Indian family with clinical diagnosis of MODY and detect the genetic mutations in the aspect of molecular mechanism, seven blood samples were obtained from the diabetic patients of this pedigree and genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes. The exon1, exon2 and exon4 of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α) gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Then the products were sequenced and compared with standard sequences on gene bank. As a result, two mutations were detected in exon1. That was CTC → CTG (Leu → Leu) in codon17 and ATC → CTC (Ile → Leu) in codon27. I27L was speculated to have a close relationship with the glycometabolism and the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus together with the putative novel mutation existed in this Indian pedigree. Meanwhile, one mutation of GGG → GGC (Gly → Gly) in codon288 of exon4 was detected in the proband. No mutations were found in exon2 but a G → T base substitution in the intron4 region among all seven samples was detected. It may have some potential effects on the onset of diabetes in this family, but we do not have any evidence right now. Although it requires further investigation on the function of mutations found in the intron region, our research may provide some clue for this issue and it deserves more attention.

  15. The familial dysautonomia disease gene IKBKAP is required in the developing and adult mouse central nervous system

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    Marta Chaverra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs are a genetically and clinically diverse group of disorders defined by peripheral nervous system (PNS dysfunction. HSAN type III, known as familial dysautonomia (FD, results from a single base mutation in the gene IKBKAP that encodes a scaffolding unit (ELP1 for a multi-subunit complex known as Elongator. Since mutations in other Elongator subunits (ELP2 to ELP4 are associated with central nervous system (CNS disorders, the goal of this study was to investigate a potential requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS of mice. The sensory and autonomic pathophysiology of FD is fatal, with the majority of patients dying by age 40. While signs and pathology of FD have been noted in the CNS, the clinical and research focus has been on the sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and no genetic model studies have investigated the requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS. Here, we report, using a novel mouse line in which Ikbkap is deleted solely in the nervous system, that not only is Ikbkap widely expressed in the embryonic and adult CNS, but its deletion perturbs both the development of cortical neurons and their survival in adulthood. Primary cilia in embryonic cortical apical progenitors and motile cilia in adult ependymal cells are reduced in number and disorganized. Furthermore, we report that, in the adult CNS, both autonomic and non-autonomic neuronal populations require Ikbkap for survival, including spinal motor and cortical neurons. In addition, the mice developed kyphoscoliosis, an FD hallmark, indicating its neuropathic etiology. Ultimately, these perturbations manifest in a developmental and progressive neurodegenerative condition that includes impairments in learning and memory. Collectively, these data reveal an essential function for Ikbkap that extends beyond the peripheral nervous system to CNS development and function. With the identification of discrete CNS cell types and structures that depend on

  16. Mutations in the coding regions of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha in Iranian families with maturity onset diabetes of the young

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    Tavakolafshari Jalil

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α is a nuclear receptor involved in glucose homeostasis and is required for normal β cell function. Mutations in the HNF4α gene are associated with maturity onset diabetes of the young type 1 (MODY1. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and nature of mutations in HNF4α gene in Iranian patients with a clinical diagnosis of MODY and their family members. Twelve families including 30 patients with clinically MODY diagnosis and 21 members of their family were examined using PCR-RFLP method and in case of mutation confirmed by sequencing techniques. Fifty age and sex matched subjects with normal fasting blood sugar (FBS and Glucose tolerance test (GTT were constituted the control group and investigated in the similar pattern. Single mutation of V255M in the HNF4α gene was detected. This known mutation was found in 8 of 30 patients and 3 of 21 individuals in relatives. Fifty healthy control subjects did not show any mutation. Here, it is indicated that the prevalence of HNF4α mutation among Iranian patients with clinical MODY is considerable. This mutation was present in 26.6% of our patients, but nothing was found in control group. In the family members, 3 subjects with the age of ≤25 years old carried this mutation. Therefore, holding this mutation in this range of age could be a predisposing factor for developing diabetes in future.

  17. Arginine vasopressin neuronal loss results from autophagy-associated cell death in a mouse model for familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus

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    Hagiwara, D; Arima, H; Morishita, Y; Wenjun, L; Azuma, Y; Ito, Y; Suga, H; Goto, M; Banno, R; Sugimura, Y; Shiota, A; Asai, N; Takahashi, M; Oiso, Y

    2014-01-01

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) characterized by progressive polyuria is mostly caused by mutations in the gene encoding neurophysin II (NPII), which is the carrier protein of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Although accumulation of mutant NPII in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) could be toxic for AVP neurons, the precise mechanisms of cell death of AVP neurons, reported in autopsy studies, remain unclear. Here, we subjected FNDI model mice to intermittent water deprivation (WD) in order to promote the phenotypes. Electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that, while aggregates are confined to a certain compartment of the ER in the AVP neurons of FNDI mice with water access ad libitum, they were scattered throughout the dilated ER lumen in the FNDI mice subjected to WD for 4 weeks. It is also demonstrated that phagophores, the autophagosome precursors, emerged in the vicinity of aggregates and engulfed the ER containing scattered aggregates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that expression of p62, an adapter protein between ubiquitin and autophagosome, was elicited on autophagosomal membranes in the AVP neurons, suggesting selective autophagy induction at this time point. Treatment of hypothalamic explants of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) transgenic mice with an ER stressor thapsigargin increased the number of GFP-LC3 puncta, suggesting that ER stress could induce autophagosome formation in the hypothalamus of wild-type mice as well. The cytoplasm of AVP neurons in FNDI mice was occupied with vacuoles in the mice subjected to WD for 12 weeks, when 30–40% of AVP neurons are lost. Our data thus demonstrated that autophagy was induced in the AVP neurons subjected to ER stress in FNDI mice. Although autophagy should primarily be protective for neurons, it is suggested that the organelles including ER were lost over time through autophagy, leading to autophagy

  18. Psychosocial family factors and glycemic control among children aged 1-15 years with type 1 diabetes: a population-based survey

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    Haugstvedt Anne

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being the parents of children with diabetes is demanding. Jay Belsky's determinants of parenting model emphasizes both the personal psychological resources, the characteristics of the child and contextual sources such as parents' work, marital relations and social network support as important determinants for parenting. To better understand the factors influencing parental functioning among parents of children with type 1 diabetes, we aimed to investigate associations between the children's glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c and 1 variables related to the parents' psychological and contextual resources, and 2 frequency of blood glucose measurement as a marker for diabetes-related parenting behavior. Methods Mothers (n = 103 and fathers (n = 97 of 115 children younger than 16 years old participated in a population-based survey. The questionnaire comprised the Life Orientation Test, the Oslo 3-item Social Support Scale, a single question regarding perceived social limitation because of the child's diabetes, the Relationship Satisfaction Scale and demographic and clinical variables. We investigated associations by using regression analysis. Related to the second aim hypoglycemic events, child age, diabetes duration, insulin regimen and comorbid diseases were included as covariates. Results The mean HbA1c was 8.1%, and 29% had HbA1c ≤ 7.5%. In multiple regression analysis, lower HbA1c was associated with higher education and stronger perceptions of social limitation among the mothers. A higher frequency of blood glucose measurement was significantly associated with lower HbA1c in bivariate analysis. Higher child age was significantly associated with higher HbA1c both in bivariate and multivariate analysis. A scatterplot indicated this association to be linear. Conclusions Most families do not reach recommended treatment goals for their child with type 1 diabetes. Concerning contextual sources of stress and support, the families who

  19. Familial Aggregation between the 14th and 21st Century and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in an Isolated Dutch Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Kees L.; Landman, Gijs W. D.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty; de Visser, Wim; te Meerman, Gerard J.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of type 2 diabetes results from an interaction of hereditary factors and environmental factors. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of interrelatedness to the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in an isolated Dutch population. Materials and Methods A

  20. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boccalandro, C.; Mattia, F.P. de; Guo, D.C.; Xue, L.; Orlander, P.; King, T.M.; Gupta, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Lavis, V.R.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria

  1. The impact of parental history of type 2 diabetes on hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in subjects from central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Negrete, Ana Paula; Porchia, Leonardo M; Gonzalez-Mejia, M Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Solis-Cano, Dania G; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2017-12-01

    Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance are both associated with the development of Type 2 Diabetes and other pathologies; however, the influence of parental history of Type 2 diabetes (PH-T2D) has yet to be investigated. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of PH-T2D has on the risk of developing hyperinsulinemia and IR. 1092 subjects (703 non-pregnant females and 389 males) were enrolled for a cross-sectional study. Clinical and biochemical parameters were collected. Subjects were allocated according to their PH-T2D: no parents, one parent, or both parents. Insulin resistance was calculated using the HOMA1 equation (HOMA1-IR). Logistic regression was used to determine the association (odds ratio) between PH-T2D and hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance. Increasing degrees of PH-T2D were associated with significant increases in fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and HOMA1-IR (p insulin resistance (odds ratio=1.47, 95%CI: 1.08-2.00 and odds ratio=1.77, 95%CI: 1.09-2.87, respectively), when adjusting for age, sex, BMI, fasting plasma glucose, and triglycerides. The presences of PH-T2D significantly increased the risk of developing hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7 and inv(3)(q21q26.2) complicated with central diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanno, Satoru; Hagihara, Kiyoyuki; Sakabe, Manami; Okamura, Hiroshi; Inaba, Akiko; Nagata, Yuki; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Shimono, Taro; Hino, Masayuki

    2013-04-01

    A 20-year-old female presented with thirst, polyposia, and polyuria and was referred to our hospital because of leukocytosis and anemia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed 66.8% myeloperoxidase-positive blasts and trilineage myelodysplasia. The karyotype was 45, XX, inv(3)(q21q26.2), -7[19]. Therefore, a diagnosis of AML with inv(3)(q21q26.2) complicated by -7 was made. Moreover, hyposthenuria and a low anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) level were observed. Although cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the absence of hyperintensity in the neurohypophysis in T1-weighted images. Therefore, she was also diagnosed with diabetes insipidus. After she was administered a desmopressin nasal spray, the volume of urine produced decreased. Following treatment with second induction therapy containing high-dose cytarabine for AML, she achieved complete remission in the bone marrow. Moreover, when the abnormality on MRI and the volume of urine were normalized, she discontinued desmopressin. Although diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of AML, the majority of AML patients who have diabetes insipidus have the abnormal karyotypes with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) and monosomy 7. Further study is required to clarify the pathogenesis and develop a strategy for the treatment of this category of AML.

  3. Family support is associated with success in achieving weight loss in a group lifestyle intervention for diabetes prevention in Arab Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Nicole R; Brown, Morton B; Herman, William H; Jaber, Linda A

    2011-01-01

    We have recently shown the feasibility of a community-based, culturally-specific, Diabetes Prevention Program-adapted, goal-oriented group lifestyle intervention targeting weight loss in Arab Americans. The objective of this study was to examine factors associated with weight-loss goal attainment at 24-weeks of the lifestyle intervention. We assessed the relationship among demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral measures and the attainment of > or =7% decrease of initial body weight among 71 lifestyle intervention participants. Weight loss goal of > or = 7% of body weight was achieved by 44% of study participants. Demographic and psychosocial factors were not associated with weight loss. Individuals attaining the weight loss goal were more likely to have family support during the core curriculum sessions (70% vs 30%; P=.0023). Decrease in body weight was positively correlated with attendance at sessions (r=.46; P=.0016) and physical activity minutes (r=.66; Pwomen; these trends were similar but not significant in men. Family support was an important predictor of attainment of the weight loss goal. Family-centered lifestyle interventions are likely to succeed in curtailing the rising epidemic of diabetes in the Arab-American Community.

  4. Possible pharmacological interactions in hypertensive and/or diabetic elderly in family health units at Blumenau (SC

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    Vicente Codagnone Neto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the possible adverse drug-drug interactions in the elderly population (>60 years diagnosed either with diabetes, arterial hypertension or both, at a Family Health Unit (FHU clinic in Blumenau, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. For this purpose 318 subjects were interviewed using a pretested form with social and demographic aspects regarding their disease and its complications. All drugs used by this population were grouped, and the drug-drug interactions were detected by using the "Drug Interaction Checker" software, and classified for frequency and severity. The average age of patients was 70.6 years, with a higher number of female patients (216; 67.9%. Most subjects were being treated for both diseases (149; 46.86%. Out of a total of 1,541 medications prescribed, the most prevalent were: hydrochlorothiazide (131; 8.4% and enalapril maleate (130; 8.4%. A total of 295 possible drug-drug interactions were detected in 152 patients (1.9 interactions per subject, 275 (93.2% moderate and 20 (6.8% severe or highly severe. The possible interaction prevalence was 0.93 (0.55 to 1.40 depending on health unit. The most frequent possible interaction was that between acetylsalicylic acid and enalapril maleate (37; 12.5%. Patients had an average consumption of 6.6 drugs and 9.8% of subjects reported physical discomfort when using medicines. Elderly patients use many medications that could cause adverse reactions and possible drug-drug interactions, where this issue warrants closer attention of prescribers and health providers.Buscou-se identificar possíveis interações medicamentosas em pessoas idosas com diabetes melito (DM e/ou hipertensão arterial sistêmica (HAS sendo atendidas em unidades de Saúde da Família, em Blumenau (SC. Entrevistaram-se 318 pessoas com 60 e mais anos, portadoras de DM e/ou HAS, mediante questionário estruturado pré-testado, com variáveis sócio-demográficas da doença e do tratamento. As

  5. Regular, high, and moderate intake of vegetables rich in antioxidants may reduce cataract risk in Central African type 2 diabetics

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    Mvitu M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Moise Mvitu,1 Benjamin Longo-Mbenza,2 Dieudonné Tulomba,3 Augustin Nge31Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Walter Sisulu University, South Africa; 3Biostatistics Unit, Lomo Medical Center and Heart of Africa Center of Cardiology, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of CongoBackground: Antioxidant nutrients found in popularly consumed vegetables, including red beans, are thought to prevent diabetic complications. In this study, we assessed the frequency and contributing factors of intake of fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants, and we determined their impact on the prevention of diabetes-related cataract extraction.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, run in Congo among 244 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An intake of ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants/day, intake of red beans, consumption of fruit, and cataract extraction were considered as dependent variables.Results: No patient reported a fruit intake. Intake of red beans was reported by 64 patients (26.2%, while 77 patients (31.6% reported ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants. High socioeconomic status (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1–12.5; P = 0.030 and moderate alcohol intake (OR = 4; 95% CI: 1.1–17.4; P = 0.049 were the independent determinants of eating ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants. Red beans intake (OR = 0.282; 95% CI: 0.115–0.687; P > 0.01 and eating ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants (OR = 0.256; 95% CI: 0.097–0.671; P = 0.006 were identified as independent and protective factors against the presence of cataracts (9.8% n = 24, whereas type 2 diabetes mellitus duration ≥3 years was the independent risk factor for cataract extraction (OR = 6.3; 95% CI: 2.1–19.2; P > 0.001 in the model with red beans intake and OR = 7.1; 95% CI: 2.3–22.2; P > 0.001 in the model with ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants

  6. 77 FR 34125 - Wisconsin Central Ltd.-Intra-Corporate Family Merger Exemption-Elgin, Joliet and Eastern Railway...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... reporting, accounting, IT systems, and corporate filings that are required to support the separate existence... Ltd.--Intra-Corporate Family Merger Exemption-- Elgin, Joliet and Eastern Railway Company Wisconsin... 49 CFR 1180.2(d)(3) for an intra-corporate family transaction. WCL, a rail carrier, is a wholly owned...

  7. Identification and Functional Characterization of P159L Mutation in in a Family with Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young 5 (MODY5

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    Eun Ky Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in HNF1B, the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β gene, results in maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY 5, which is characterized by gradual impairment of insulin secretion. However, the functional role of HNF-1β in insulin secretion and glucose metabolism is not fully understood. We identified a family with early-onset diabetes that fulfilled the criteria of MODY. Sanger sequencing revealed that a heterozygous P159L (CCT to CTT in codon 159 in the DNA-binding domain mutation in HNF1B was segregated according to the affected status. To investigate the functional consequences of this HNF1B mutation, we generated a P159L HNF1B construct. The wild-type and mutant HNF1B constructs were transfected into COS-7 cells in the presence of the promoter sequence of human glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2. The luciferase reporter assay revealed that P159L HNF1B had decreased transcriptional activity compared to wild-type (p < 0.05. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed reduced DNA binding activity of P159L HNF1B. In the MIN6 pancreatic β-cell line, overexpression of the P159L mutant was significantly associated with decreased mRNA levels of GLUT2 compared to wild-type (p < 0.05. However, INS expression was not different between the wild-type and mutant HNF1B constructs. These findings suggests that the impaired insulin secretion in this family with the P159L HNF1B mutation may be related to altered GLUT2 expression in β-cells rather than decreased insulin gene expression. In conclusion, we have identified a Korean family with an HNF1B mutation and characterized its effect on the pathogenesis of diabetes.

  8. Secondary nocturnal enuresis related to central diabetes insipidus as an early manifestation of intracranial germinomatous germ cell tumors in a series of male youngsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaefthimiou, Apostolos; Kyrgios, Ioannis; Kotanidou, Eleni P; Maggana, Ioanna; Mouzaki, Konstantina; Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina

    2015-02-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is a common symptom in children. It is usually attributed to benign causes and diagnostic evaluation is not carried out. We report three male young patients initially presenting with short stature and nocturnal enuresis, related to diabetes insipidus, caused by intracranial germinomatous germ cell tumors. In all three cases, water deprivation tests confirmed diabetes insipidus. Extensive endocrinological investigation also showed further hormone deficiencies. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed the presence of a central nervous system lesion and histology confirmed the final diagnosis. Surgery, radiation with or without chemotherapy was conducted and the patients were treated with hormone replacement therapies. The patients after a long follow-up were free of disease. We present these cases to alert clinicians to bear in mind that the presence of an intracranial germinomatous germ cell tumor should at least be considered in a child presenting with bed wetting, especially if additional symptoms and signs, including late onset puberty and growth delay or morning hypernatremia, may coexist. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Resistencia a la insulina e historia familiar de diabetes en niños y adolescentes obesos con acantosis nigricans y sin ella Insulin resistance and family history of diabetes in obese children and with and without acanthosis nigricans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro González Fernández

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: las complicaciones metabólicas más importantes para la morbilidad y mortalidad que se derivan de la obesidad tienen como común denominador la resistencia a la insulina. Objetivo: determinar la existencia de resistencia a la insulina e historia familiar de diabetes en un grupo de niños y adolescentes obesos con y sin acantosis nigricans. Métodos: se estudiaron 46 sujetos obesos con y sin acantosis nigricans (21 varones y 25 hembras, con edades entre 4 y 16 años, procedentes de la consulta de endocrinología del Hospital Pediátrico Docente "William Soler", en el período de noviembre de 2006 a febrero de 2007. Se les realizó, además de examen físico y anamnesis, prueba de tolerancia a la glucosa con determinación de glucemia e insulinemia en ayunas y a las 2 h. Se utilizó como criterio de resistencia a la insulina el índice HOMA. Resultados: la mayoría de los pacientes (36 sujetos presentaron resistencia a la insulina, independientemente de la presencia o no de acantosis nigricans, que no estuvo relacionada con el grado de obesidad ni con el pliegue tricipital de grasa, pero sí con la historia familiar de diabetes tipo 2. La presencia de acantosis nigricans estuvo relacionada con el grado de obesidad. Se encontró un 13 % de pacientes con criterios de prediabetes. Conclusiones: la obesidad y la historia familiar de diabetes tipo 2 en los niños y adolescentes se relacionan con la presencia de resistencia a la insulina, independientemente de la presencia de acantosis nigricans.Introduction: the more important metabolic complications for morbidity and mortality derived from obesity have in common the insulin resistance. Objective: to determine the insulin resistance and the family history of diabetes in a group of obese children and adolescents with and without acanthosis nigricans. Methods: forty six obese subjects with and without acanthosis nigricans (21 boys and 25 girls aged between 4 and 16, from the "William

  10. Educational level and family structure influence the dietary changes after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: evidence from the E3N study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Francesca Romana; Affret, Aurelie; Dow, Courtney; Balkau, Beverley; Bihan, Hélène; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bonnet, Fabrice; Fagherazzi, Guy

    2017-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has no cure but can be controlled by medication, diet, and lifestyle changes. It has been suggested that diabetes dietary self-management is more difficult for people with socioeconomic difficulties. The objective of our study was to test the hypothesis that socioeconomic factors impact the change of diet after T2D diagnosis. The 57 304 French women included in the present study answered food frequency questionnaires in 1993 and 2005 and questionnaires on socioeconomic factors, and were free from T2D in 1993. Between 1993 and 2005, 1249 women developed T2D. Linear regression models evaluated whether having T2D diagnosed had an impact on energy and nutrient intakes and whether socioeconomic factors were implicated. T2D was associated with a reduction of energy (β=-312.54 kJ/d, Peducation of T2D patients and whether or not they had a family (having a partner and/or children). The present study provides evidence that socioeconomic factors impact the way people with T2D change their dietary habits after diagnosis. Furthermore, the family plays a crucial role in dietary self-management, probably encouraging T2D patients to follow dietary recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of dietary pattern and education on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at Dr. Sardjito Central General Hospital, Yogyakarta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinorita, Hemi; Saádah; Jazakillah, Setyowati

    2008-04-01

    to recognize the effect of education and diet on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at Dr. Sardjito Central General Hospital, Jogjakarta. a cross-sectional study was conducted in 88 patients with type 2 DM who had routine visit to the outpatient clinic in Endocrinology Division of Dr. Sardjito Central General Hospital, Jogjakarta. As inclusion criteria, patients who had routine visit in 3 month continuously with fasting plasma glucose (GDN) 126 mg/dl as poor glycemic control group. Data were recorded which included age, sex, period of DM, daily diet pattern, and education received. we found that glycemic control was not affected by sex (p=0.52) and age (p=0.38), but it was affected by period of DM (p=0.02). Glycemic control in the present study was affected by dietary pattern (p=0.01), but not by education (p=1.00). the present study has found significant correlation between regulation of dietary pattern and glycemic control (p=0.01).

  12. Soluble Forms of Intercellular and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecules Independently Predict Progression to Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican American Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kulkarni

    Full Text Available While the role of type 2 diabetes (T2D in inducing endothelial dysfunction is fairly well-established the etiological role of endothelial dysfunction in the onset of T2D is still a matter of debate. In the light of conflicting evidence in this regard, we conducted a prospective study to determine the association of circulating levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1 and soluble vessel cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1 with incident T2D.Data from this study came from 1,269 Mexican Americans of whom 821 initially T2D-free individuals were longitudinally followed up in the San Antonio Family Heart Study. These individuals were followed for 9752.95 person-years for development of T2D. Prospective association of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 with incident T2D was studied using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and mixed effects Cox proportional hazards modeling to account for relatedness among study participants. Incremental value of adhesion molecule biomarkers was studied using integrated discrimination improvement (IDI and net reclassification improvement (NRI indexes.Decreasing median values for serum concentrations of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were observed in the following groups in this order: individuals with T2D at baseline, individuals who developed T2D during follow-up, individuals with prediabetes at baseline and normal glucose tolerant (NGT individuals who remained T2D-free during follow-up. Top quartiles for sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were strongly and significantly associated with homeostatic model of assessment--insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Mixed effects Cox proportional hazards modeling revealed that after correcting for important clinical confounders, high sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were associated with 2.52 and 1.99 times faster progression to T2D as compared to low concentrations, respectively. Individuals with high concentrations for both sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 progressed to T2D 3.42 times faster than those with low values for both

  13. Genetic Counseling for Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Stephanie A.; Maloney, Kristin L.; Pollin, Toni I.

    2014-01-01

    Most diabetes is polygenic in etiology, with (type 1 diabetes, T1DM) or without (type 2 diabetes, T2DM) an autoimmune basis. Genetic counseling for diabetes generally focuses on providing empiric risk information based on family history and/or the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on pregnancy outcome. An estimated one to five percent of diabetes is monogenic in nature, e.g., maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY), with molecular testing and etiology-based treatment available. However, recent studies show that most monogenic diabetes is misdiagnosed as T1DM or T2DM. While efforts are underway to increase the rate of diagnosis in the diabetes clinic, genetic counselors and clinical geneticists are in a prime position to identify monogenic cases through targeted questions during a family history combined with working in conjunction with diabetes professionals to diagnose and assure proper treatment and familial risk assessment for individuals with monogenic diabetes. PMID:25045596

  14. 76 FR 28850 - Northern Plains Railroad, Inc.-Intra-Corporate Family Operation Exemption-Mohall Central Railroad...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... Railroad, Inc. (NPR), a Class III rail common carrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49... to operate the rail line of Mohall Central Railroad, Inc. (MHC), also a Class III rail carrier.\\1...\\ however, since MHC became a Class III rail carrier, it has abandoned 2 segments of its rail line.\\3\\ This...

  15. Role of the Diabetes Educator in Inpatient Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    It is the position of American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) that all inpatient interdisciplinary teams include a diabetes educator to lead or support improvement efforts that affect patients hospitalized with diabetes or hyperglycemia. This not only encompasses patient and family education but education of interdisciplinary team members and achievement of diabetes-related organizational quality metrics and performance outcomes.

  16. Role of the Diabetes Educator in Inpatient Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    It is the position of American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) that all inpatient interdisciplinary teams include a diabetes educator to lead or support improvement efforts that affect patients hospitalized with diabetes or hyperglycemia. This not only encompasses patient and family education but education of interdisciplinary team members and achievement of diabetes-related organizational quality metrics and performance outcomes.

  17. Socioeconomic and familial characteristics influence caretakers' adherence to the periodic vitamin A capsule supplementation program in Central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangaribuan, Rosnani; Scherbaum, Veronika; Erhardt, Jürgen G; Sastroamidjojo, Soemilah; Biesalski, Hans K

    2004-06-01

    The adherence of program participants to periodic vitamin A capsule (VAC) supplementation among children aged 1-5 years (n = 677) in Central Java, Indonesia was assessed. Fourteen villages from five sub-districts and one ward from one sub-district in Central Java were included in the study to represent rural and suburban areas. All questions about demographic factors, socioeconomic conditions, current dietary practice and healthcare-seeking attitudes for common childhood illnesses, previous breastfeeding experience, their knowledge about vitamin A and adherence to the VAC program after capsule distribution (two periods in 2000) were asked. Caretakers with limited knowledge about the health benefits of vitamin A, households with more than one preschool child, and households with older children (> 36 months) were associated with a decreased likelihood of regular participation in the program with odds ratios of 0.38, 0.55, and 0.26, respectively (p program regularly with an odds ratio of 2.02 (p program.

  18. The potential impact of family history of metabolic syndrome and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: In a highly endogamous population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Darwish, Sarah; Al-Hamaq, Abdulla O A; Yousafzai, Mohammad T; Nasralla, Eman A

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to determine the potential impact of positive family history of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) among two generations, on developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and the potential relation of consanguineous marriage among patients with MetS to the risk of developing T2DM among a sample of Qataris. A cross-sectional study. Primary healthcare (PHC) centers. The survey and measurement were conducted from April 2011 to December 2012 among Qatari nationals above 20 years of age. Of the 2,182 subjects, who were approached to participate in the study, 1,552 (71%) gave their consent. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire followed by anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) as well as International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.2% according to ATP III and 36.9% according to IDF (P family history for MetS was significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (46.7% vs. 33.8%; P = 0.009). The proportion of positive family history of MetS among fathers (35% vs. 21.9%; P = 0.005), mothers (30.5% vs. 18.8%; P = 0.008), maternal aunt (18.3% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.055), and maternal grand father (19.5% vs. 10%; P = 0.010) were significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to the counterpart. The proportion of consanguineous marriages was almost two times higher among MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (80.9% vs. 41.9%; P Family history of MetS among parents, maternal aunt, maternal grandfather, and consanguineous marriages among patients of MetS are significantly associated with the development of T2DM in Qatar. These results support the necessity of earlier screening for T2DM among MetS patients with positive family history of MetS.

  19. Alcohol and drug consumption, depressive features, and family violence as associated with complaints to the Prosecutor's Office in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermina Natera; García, Francisco Juárez; Icaza, María Elena Medina-Mora; Sainz, Marcela Tiburcio

    2007-01-01

    The article is aimed at reporting the characteristics of the population detected at State Prosecutors' Offices including the two such offices that existed in the city selected for the study, one located in a general hospital for the inspection of violence-related cases (n = 156); and the second in the facility where all detainees are taken when arrested (n = 129), and where victims can file a complaint (n = 186). A household survey undertaken among the population 18 to 65 years of age (n = 887) was used as a group of reference. Both studies were undertaken in Pachuca City, the capital of Hidalgo, located 100 km from Mexico City during the second half of 1996. Face-to-face questionnaires were used to obtain sociodemographic data, drug use and drinking patterns, depressive symptomatology, and family violence. Discriminant and logistic regression analysis were undertaken. The age group from 18 to 24 displayed the highest number of legal complaints and arrests (OR = 1.773). The likelihood for appearing at a State Prosecutor's Office was higher for those living in an atmosphere of threats and injuries within the family (OR = 19) and for those that reported alcohol consumption on the day of the event (OR = 14). Extremely high rates of family violence were obtained in this sample, increasing the likelihood of arriving at the Prosecutor's Office either because arrested or for being a victim. Results confirm the relationship between alcohol use, depression, and violence, reinforcing the need to prevent alcohol abuse, especially among youth.

  20. It Takes a Family

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    This podcast follows an African American man with diabetes and his family as they discuss living healthfully with diabetes.  Created: 11/1/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/12/2007.

  1. A genome-wide search for linkage of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR in the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farook Thameem

    Full Text Available Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, a measure of kidney function, is heritable, suggesting that genes influence renal function. Genes that influence eGFR have been identified through genome-wide association studies. However, family-based linkage approaches may identify loci that explain a larger proportion of the heritability. This study used genome-wide linkage and association scans to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL that influence eGFR.Genome-wide linkage and sparse association scans of eGFR were performed in families ascertained by probands with advanced diabetic nephropathy (DN from the multi-ethnic Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND study. This study included 954 African Americans (AA, 781 American Indians (AI, 614 European Americans (EA and 1,611 Mexican Americans (MA. A total of 3,960 FIND participants were genotyped for 6,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs using the Illumina Linkage IVb panel. GFR was estimated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD formula.The non-parametric linkage analysis, accounting for the effects of diabetes duration and BMI, identified the strongest evidence for linkage of eGFR on chromosome 20q11 (log of the odds [LOD] = 3.34; P = 4.4 × 10(-5 in MA and chromosome 15q12 (LOD = 2.84; P = 1.5 × 10(-4 in EA. In all subjects, the strongest linkage signal for eGFR was detected on chromosome 10p12 (P = 5.5 × 10(-4 at 44 cM near marker rs1339048. A subsequent association scan in both ancestry-specific groups and the entire population identified several SNPs significantly associated with eGFR across the genome.The present study describes the localization of QTL influencing eGFR on 20q11 in MA, 15q21 in EA and 10p12 in the combined ethnic groups participating in the FIND study. Identification of causal genes/variants influencing eGFR, within these linkage and association loci, will open new avenues for functional analyses and development of novel diagnostic markers

  2. A genome-wide search for linkage of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thameem, Farook; Igo, Robert P; Freedman, Barry I; Langefeld, Carl; Hanson, Robert L; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Elston, Robert C; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Nicholas, Susanne B; Goddard, Katrina A B; Divers, Jasmin; Guo, Xiuqing; Ipp, Eli; Kimmel, Paul L; Meoni, Lucy A; Shah, Vallabh O; Smith, Michael W; Winkler, Cheryl A; Zager, Philip G; Knowler, William C; Nelson, Robert G; Pahl, Madeline V; Parekh, Rulan S; Kao, W H Linda; Rasooly, Rebekah S; Adler, Sharon G; Abboud, Hanna E; Iyengar, Sudha K; Sedor, John R

    2013-01-01

    Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function, is heritable, suggesting that genes influence renal function. Genes that influence eGFR have been identified through genome-wide association studies. However, family-based linkage approaches may identify loci that explain a larger proportion of the heritability. This study used genome-wide linkage and association scans to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that influence eGFR. Genome-wide linkage and sparse association scans of eGFR were performed in families ascertained by probands with advanced diabetic nephropathy (DN) from the multi-ethnic Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND) study. This study included 954 African Americans (AA), 781 American Indians (AI), 614 European Americans (EA) and 1,611 Mexican Americans (MA). A total of 3,960 FIND participants were genotyped for 6,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the Illumina Linkage IVb panel. GFR was estimated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula. The non-parametric linkage analysis, accounting for the effects of diabetes duration and BMI, identified the strongest evidence for linkage of eGFR on chromosome 20q11 (log of the odds [LOD] = 3.34; P = 4.4 × 10(-5)) in MA and chromosome 15q12 (LOD = 2.84; P = 1.5 × 10(-4)) in EA. In all subjects, the strongest linkage signal for eGFR was detected on chromosome 10p12 (P = 5.5 × 10(-4)) at 44 cM near marker rs1339048. A subsequent association scan in both ancestry-specific groups and the entire population identified several SNPs significantly associated with eGFR across the genome. The present study describes the localization of QTL influencing eGFR on 20q11 in MA, 15q21 in EA and 10p12 in the combined ethnic groups participating in the FIND study. Identification of causal genes/variants influencing eGFR, within these linkage and association loci, will open new avenues for functional analyses and development of novel diagnostic markers

  3. Utilizing Genomics through Family Health History with the Theory of Planned Behavior: Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors and Preventive Behavior in an African American Population in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborn, Cynthia; Suther, Sandra; Lee, Torhonda; Kiros, Gebre-Egziabher; Becker, Alan; Campbell, Ellen; Collins-Robinson, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to assess to what extent African Americans' knowledge and awareness of family health history and related risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes influence their likelihood of adopting a preventive behavior. This study employed an anonymous pencil-and-paper, self-administered survey consisting of two sections. Section 1 was a modified version of the US Surgeon General's Family Health History Initiative and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Risk Factor Survey. Section 2 of the survey was based on the constructs of the theory of planned behavior. Over 394 African American participants completed the survey. 'Perceived behavioral control' was the strongest predictor of 'likelihood of adopting preventive behavior'. Participants were aware of their family history as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but it was not a significant predictor of behavior modifications based on that knowledge. The lack of perceived risk in this population shows the importance of not only knowing one's risk factors but translating those risk factors to a more personalized form that fits into the current lifestyle of the individual in a meaningful way. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. A Research on a Certain Family of Numbers and Polynomials Related to Stirling Numbers, Central Factorial Numbers, and Euler Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, many mathematicians have studied different kinds of the Euler, Bernoulli, and Genocchi numbers and polynomials. In this paper, we give another definition of polynomials Ũn(x. We observe an interesting phenomenon of “scattering” of the zeros of the polynomials Ũn(x in complex plane. We find out some identities and properties related to polynomials Ũn(x. Finally, we also derive interesting relations between polynomials Ũn(x, Stirling numbers, central factorial numbers, and Euler numbers.

  5. Diversity and distibution of Braconidae, a family of parasitoid wasps in the Central European peatbogs of South Bohemia, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lozan, Aurel; Belokobylskij, S.; van Achterberg, C.; Monaghan, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 16 (2010), s. 1-21 ISSN 1536-2442 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500070505; GA AV ČR IAA600070501 Grant - others:European Science Foundation(BE) 1667; Russian Foundation for Basic Research(RU) 07-04-00454; EU Synthesys(GB) GB-TAF-2063; EU Synthesys(PL) PL-TAF-3266 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Central Europe * Hymenoptera * Braconidae Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.014, year: 2010

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by a variant in the AVP gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Bols Toustrup

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI is caused by variants in the arginine vasopressin (AVP gene. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a 42-year-old man carrying an adFNDI causing variant in exon 1 of the AVP gene using lentivirus-mediated nuclear reprogramming. The iPSCs carried the expected variant in the AVP gene. Furthermore, the iPSCs expressed pluripotency markers; displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers and had a normal karyotype consistent with the original fibroblasts. This iPSC line is useful in future studies focusing on the pathogenesis of adFNDI.

  7. Left atrium volume index is influenced by aortic stiffness and central pulse pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a hemodynamic and echocardiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapolski, Tomasz; Wysokiński, Andrzej

    2013-03-04

    Left atrial volume index (LAVI) has recently emerged as a useful biomarker for risk stratification and risk monitoring in many clinical settings. Many hemodynamic factors such as preload and afterload have an effect on evaluating left atrium function. This study was performed to investigate the relationship between LAVI and aortic stiffness index (ASI) and selected markers characterizing hemodynamic state in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The study population consisted of 100 patients (56 men, 44 women), 67.2 (±10.9) years old DM2, scheduled for routine coronary angiography. Standard transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure parameters needed for calculation of LAVI and ASI. During invasive procedures, central pulse pressure (CPP) in the ascendens aorta and left ventricle end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) were recorded. Selected laboratory parameters were obtained, including lipidogram, serum uric acid, hs-CRP, fibrinogen, cTnT, myoglobin, BNP, HbA1C, creatinine, and GFR. Both LAVI and ASI were greater and CPP and LVEDP were markedly elevated in DM2 patients compared to controls. The independent predictors of LAVI were ASI (ß=0.331; p=0.011), CPP (ß=0.312; p=0.020), LVEDP (ß=0.381; p=0.006), HbA1C (ß=0.379; p=0.008), and BNP (ß=0,423; pDM2 patients.

  8. The Prediction of Type 1 Diabetes in discordant and concordant families: 16 years of follow-up. Focus on the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vitalyevna Titovich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For 40 years, research continues to improve the forecasting methods and the development of effective and safe methods of preventing type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.АimPrediction of the early preclinical stage of T1DM.Materials and methodsWe studied the predisposing and protective haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, gene DQ together with immunological markers (ICA, GADA, IAA in 224 discordant/concordant families.ResultsAt the Endocrinology Research Centre, population and family risks of the development of T1DM in Russia were calculated on the basis of population genetic approaches. The analysis of the prevalence of HLA genotypes among T1DM patients revealed that the high-risk haplotypes in the structure of genotype(s DQ2 and/or DQ8 in combination with the others were 78%: of these genotypes DQ2/DQ8, DQ2/DQ2, and DQ8/DQ8 accounted for 35%; DQ2/X* and DQ8/X* accounted for 43%; and the low-risk genotype Х*/Х* accounted for 22%. The genotype Х/Х consisted of weaker predisposing haplotypes that were specific to the Russian population in combination with neutral haplotypes or those consisting of neutral haplotypes only. The analysis of patients with T1DM genotypes revealed that high-risk genotypes (DQ2/DQ8 were more common in ill children up to the age of 5 (33% of cases than in T1DM children over 10 years (23% (p=0.05. Conversely, the low-risk genotypes were significantly less likely to be found in children with manifestations of diabetes up to 5 years than in sick people over 10 years [5% and 13%, respectively (p <0.05]. This is consistent with hereditary load of diabetes manifestations in young children and with the earlier data. The 16-year prospective surveillance showed that the manifestation of the disease occurred in 8.4% of siblings. The analysis of the frequency of autoantibodies revealed that autoantibodies were identified the most reliably prior to the manifestation of the disease compared with T1DM patients in the initial period and healthy siblings

  9. Therapeutic itinerary of the family and adolescent with type i mellitus diabetes El itinerario terapéutico del adolescente con diabetes mellitus tipo i y sus familiares Itinerário terapêutico do adolescente com diabetes mellitus tipo 1 e seus familiares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariza Maria Serafim Mattosinho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative assistential convergent study. Its main objective is to understand the therapeutic itinerary of adolescents with type 1 mellitus diabetes, as well as that of their families. The sample was composed of adolescents, between 15 and 25 years old, involved with a health institution in Florianópolis through the Health Care model that includes professional, family, and popular subsystems. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews and field observation of 20 people (relatives and adolescents with diabetes. The data analysis included data codification and categorization. Two categories were constructed: Decisions and negotiations about health, care and treatment; and the journey through the three subsystems of health care. The study permitted to understand that the treatment and care within the professional subsystem are not the only ones available. There are different practices in health performed from the evaluation each family makes, of what they believe adequate for their adolescent with diabetes.Estudio de naturaleza cualitativa, de tipo convergente-asistencial, tuvo como objetivo comprender el camino terapéutico de los adolescentes con diabetes mellitus tipo I y sus familiares, vinculados a una institución de salud de Florianópolis, entre las edades de 15 y 25 años, a través del modelo del Cuidado para la Salud, que incluye los subsistemas profesional, familiar y popular. Los datos fueron obtenidos a través de la entrevista en profundidad y la observación de campo con 20 personas (familiares y adolescentes con diabetes. El análisis incluye la codificación y la categorización de los datos. Fueron construidos dos categorias: Las decisiones y negociaciones sobre la salud, los cuidados y los tratamientos y El percurso en los tres subsistemas de la salud. El estudio permitió comprender que los tratamientos y los cuidados del subsistema profesional no son los únicos, existiendo diferentes prácticas en la salud que

  10. Demand for long acting and permanent contraceptive methods and associated factors among family planning service users, Batu town, Central Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Anley; Fantahun, Mesganaw

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests a high unsatisfied demand for long acting and permanent contraceptive methods in sub-Saharan Africa. However, there is limited knowledge on demand for long acting and permanent contraceptive methods and associated factors in Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to assess demand for long acting and permanent contraceptive methods and associated factors among women of age group 18-49 years in Batu town, East Shoa Zone, Ethiopia. A facility based cross-sectional survey was conducted in six service delivery points from March to April 2009 on 398 women of age 18-49 years old. Thirteen (3%) were using long acting and permanent contraceptive methods and 89 (22.4%) wanted no more child in the future making the total demand of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods 24.4%. Older age group, multiparty, that the provider asked about reproductive intention, and the provider explained side effects of method selected were significantly associated with using LA and MPs (P demand and several socio demographic and family planning service quality related factors were associated with demand for long acting and permanent contraceptive methods indicating that multi-dimensional measures are needed to improve the use of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods.

  11. Family planning utilization and factors associated among women receiving abortion services in health facilities of central zone towns of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia: a cross sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagos, Goshu; Tura, Gurmesa; Kahsay, Gizienesh; Haile, Kebede; Grum, Teklit; Araya, Tsige

    2018-06-05

    Abortion remains among the leading causes of maternal death worldwide. Post-abortion contraception is significantly effective in preventing unintended pregnancy and abortion if provided before women leave the health facilty. However, the status of post-abortion family planning (PAFP) utilization and the contributing factors are not well studied in Tigray region. So, we conduct study aimed on family planning utilization and factors associated with it among women receiving abortion services. A facility based cross-sectional study design was conducted among women receiving abortion services in central zone of Tigray from December 2015to February 2016 using a total of 416 sample size. Women who came for abortion services were selected using systematic random sampling technique.. The data were collected using a pre-tested interviewer administered questionnair. Data were coded and entered in to Epi info 7 and then exported to SPSS for analysis. Descriptive statisticslike frequencies and mean were computed to display the results. Both Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression was used in the analysis. Variables statistically significant at p < 0.05 in the bivariable analysis were checked in multivariable logistic regration to identify independently associated factors. Then variables which were significantly associated with post abortion family planning utilization at p-value < 0.05 in the multivariable analysis were declared as significantly associated factors. A total of 409 abortion clients were interviewed in this study with 98.3% of response rate. Majority 290 (70.9%) of study participants utilized contracepives after abortion. Type of health facility, the decision maker on timing of having child, knowledge that pregnancy can happen soon after abortion and husband's opposition towards contraceptives were significantly associated with Post-abortion family planning ustilization. About one-third of abortion women failed to receive contraceptive before

  12. Association of the HindIII and S447X Polymorphisms in LPL Gene with Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Muñoz-Barrios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein lipase (LPL is a key enzyme in lipid metabolismand is associatedwith obesity, dyslipidemias, hypertension (HTN and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. LPL gene polymorphisms can be related with the development of cardiovascular risk factors. The present study was conducted to analyze the relationship of the HindIII and S447X polymorphisms in LPL gene with cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican families. The study population comprised ninety members of 30 Mexican families, in which an index case had obesity, were included in the study. We evaluated the body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Peripheral blood samples were collected to determine biochemical parameters. Screening for both polymorphisms was made by PCR-RFLPs. In the parents, both polymorphisms were in Hardy-Weinberg’s equilibrium. We found that the genotype T/T of HindIII was associated with diastolic blood pressure ≧ 85 mmHg (OR = 1.1; p = 0.011, whereas the genotype C/C of S447X was associated with systolic blood pressure ≧ 130 mmHg (OR = 1.2; p < 0.001, diastolic blood pressure ≧ 85 mmHg (OR = 1.3; p < 0.001, T2DM (OR = 1.3; p < 0.001 and with increase of total cholesterol (β = 23.6 mg/mL; p = 0.03. These data suggest that the HindIII and S447X LPL gene polymorphisms can confer susceptibility for the development of hypertension and T2DM in Mexican families.

  13. An Examination of Family, Healthcare Professionals, and Peer Advice on Physical Activity Behaviors among Adolescents at High Risk for Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuta, Ann O; Jacobs, Wura; Barry, Adam E

    2017-07-01

    Studies have shown that many college students do not meet the recommended daily physical activity (PA) levels, and about 22% of these students are overweight. Given that engaging in PA is a protective behavior against many chronic conditions, it is imperative to understand what sources of information/advice to engage in PA is most influential. Hence, the purpose of this study was to examine the relative impact of different sources of advice regarding exercise and PA on actual PA engagement among obese/overweight adolescents. Using data from 319 overweight/obese college students, multivariate regression analyses were conducted to examine which source of advice (from parents, peers, or healthcare provider) to engage in PA was associated with PA behavior among these adolescents. Influence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) family history on PA behavior was also examined. Moderate and vigorous PA behavior was more likely among obese/overweight adolescents who received advice to exercise or engage in PA from their peers (B = 200.85, β = 0.193, p = 0.001; B = 121.19, β = 0.145, p = 0.014). Overweight/obese adolescents with a T2D family history were more likely to walk compared with those without a T2D family history (χ 2  = 12.97, p = 0.000). Findings suggest that although healthcare professionals advise obese/overweight adolescents, those who received advice regarding PA behavior from their peers were more likely to heed the advice and exercise/engage in PA. In essence, intervention efforts should focus on employing peer ambassadors to counsel other adolescents on the importance of PA.

  14. The Function of Credit Scheme to Improve Family Income among Beef Cattle Farmers in Central Java Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, E.; Ekowati, T.; Roessali, W.; Gayatri, S.

    2018-02-01

    The aims of study were: (i) identify of beef cattle fattening credit scheme, (ii) calculating and analyze of beef cattle farmers’ income, (iii) analyze of factors influencing beef cattle credit scheme towards farmer’s income. The research was held in five regencies in Central Java Province. Beef cattle fattening farm was standardized as an elementary unit. Survey method was used, while Two Stage Cluster Purposive Sampling was used for determining of sample. Data were analyzed using statistical method of quantitative descriptive and inferential statistics in term of income analysis and multiple linear regression models. The result showed that farmers used their own capital to run the farm. The average amount was IDR 10,769,871. Kredit Ketahanan Pangan dan Energi was credit scheme which was dominantly access by farmers. The average credit was IDR 23,312,200/farmer with rate of credit equal to 6.46%, the time of credit returning equal to 24.60 monthand the prediction of average collateral equal to IDR 35,800,00. The average of farmers’ income was IDR 4,361,611.60/2.96 head of beef cattle/fattening period. If the labour cost did not calculate as a cost production, hence the farmer’ income was IDR 7,608,630.41 or in other word the farmer’ income increase 74.44%. Factors of credit scheme which partially significant influence to the farmers’ income were number of own capital usage and value of credit collateral. Meanwhile, name of credit scheme, financing institution as a creditor, amount of credit, rate of credit scheme and time of returning credit were not significantly influence towards farmers’ income.

  15. A family with a novel termination mutation in hepatic nuclear factor 1α in maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3 which is unresponsive to sulphonylurea therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demol, S; Lebenthal, Y; Bar-Meisels, M; Phillip, M; Gat-Yablonski, G; Gozlan, Y

    2014-01-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a monogenic form of diabetes mellitus. To identify the genetic basis in a family with 3 generations of diabetes and to assess the concordance between the genotype and phenotype. A molecular analysis was performed on genomic DNA using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing. A mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT) was performed with/without glibenclamide. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed on all family members with diabetes due to the location of the mutation. A novel c.618G>A, p.W206X termination mutation was identified in the hepatic nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) gene. The mutation was identified in the proband and 8 of the 14 family members tested. An MMTT stimulus (±2.5 and 5 mg glibenclamide) produced a similar glucose profile and C-peptide graph in both the obese proband and her nonobese mother, showing no effect of the glibenclamide. No evidence of liver adenomas was found in the abdominal ultrasonography. We described a novel c.618G>A, p.W206X mutation in HNF1α associated with MODY 3 but not with hepatocellular adenoma. In contradistinction to most MODY 3 mutations, treatment with sulphonylurea was found to be a clinically ineffective alternative to insulin therapy.

  16. Opthalmic problems in diabetic patients: a statistical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahuddin; Asim, S.M.; Iqbal, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Odds ratio analysis were performed to look at the association of diabetic retinopathy with Duration of diabetes, Type of diabetes, Hypertension, Intra Ocular Pressure (lOP), Age, Sex, and Family history of diabetes. The analysis suggested that longer duration of diabetes, Type-2 diabetes, hypertension and old age (40 years or more) were significant risk factors for the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy, whereas Intra Ocular Pressure (lOP), Sex and Family history were not significant risk factors. (author)

  17. MEN`S PHYSICAL, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSE TO VASECTOMY ACCEPTOR OF FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAM IN SUKOHARJO CENTRAL JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winarsih Nur Ambarwati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Indonesia is on the fourth position in the world as the most populated nation in 2009. Great number of people with lack of skill would give potential burden in the nation development. Generally, the outcome of Indonesian Family Planing Program(FPP acceptor to Indonesian women is sufficient which is ranging to 59 percent of the total 60,3 percent of participants but if compared to men's participation in is still insignificant. Husband's participation as participant is still low 1.3% consisted of 0.9 percent condom user, 0.4 percent vasectomy user. To describe experiences of Indonesian men following vasectomy in relation to their physical, psychological and social responses to vasectomy. Method: The research design of this research uses descriptive qualitative study. The sample selection was done using theoretical sampling technique. The data collection instrument of grounded theory research is the researcher herself, while other instruments are namely field report, audiotape, videotape, and notes. The data analysis is utilized Colaizzi`s method. Result: Numbers of participants were 7 persons. Physical change after the vasectomy surgery is on general physical change (there is no change felt, the body's stamina raises, healthier, less energy, or weary and physical change on reproduction organ is none. Sexual ability has no change, it increases, it also decreases. The sexual satisfaction is the same, more satisfi ed, or less satisfied. The characteristic change of spermatid is the same, there is change (lesser quantity, more dissolved, and ignore it. All participants said that they feel more comfortable in doing sex after vasectomy surgery. Most participants feel confidence of their sexual ability. The participants' perspective had no difference and feel difference, or there is a change. Most participants stated that vasectomy is the right decision, but few felt disappointed. The social environment response toward men as the

  18. Diabetes screening in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Tauna; Boggs, Dusta; Mullins, Rebecca; Brock, Emily

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of diabetes has increased worldwide and the pathophysiological problems associated with diabetes increase the potential for employees' physical disabilities. These complications, including neuropathy, nephropathy, and visual impairment, negatively impact the job performance of employees and compromise workplace safety. Occupational health nurses can provide diabetes screening programs to employees and identify chronic disease risk factors early. This article describes an occupational diabetes screening program at a major corporation in Belize, Central America, defines diabetes, outlines the diabetes teaching plan, and presents the demographics of the participants and results of the screening. Cultural considerations and recommendations for future occupational diabetes screenings are proposed. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H A Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of water and electrolyte balance is frequently encountered in clinical medicine. Regulating water metabolism is critically important. Diabetes insipidus (DI) presented with excessive water loss from the kidney is a major disorder of water metabolism. To understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of DI and rationales of clinical management of DI is important for both research and clinical practice. This chapter will first review various forms of DI focusing on central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI ) . This is followed by a discussion of regulatory mechanisms underlying CDI and NDI , with a focus on the regulatory axis of vasopressin, vasopressin receptor 2 (V2R ) and the water channel molecule, aquaporin 2 (AQP2 ). The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of various forms of DI will also be discussed with highlights of some of the latest therapeutic strategies that are developed from in vitro experiments and animal studies.

  20. The potential impact of family history of metabolic syndrome and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: In a highly endogamous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to determine the potential impact of positive family history of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS among two generations, on developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM and the potential relation of consanguineous marriage among patients with MetS to the risk of developing T2DM among a sample of Qataris. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Primary healthcare (PHC centers. Materials and Methods: The survey and measurement were conducted from April 2011 to December 2012 among Qatari nationals above 20 years of age. Of the 2,182 subjects, who were approached to participate in the study, 1,552 (71% gave their consent. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire followed by anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III as well as International Diabetes Federation (IDF. Results: Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.2% according to ATP III and 36.9% according to IDF (P < 0.0001. The mean age of MetS patients with T2DM was significantly higher than those without T2DM (Mean 48 ± 9.9 vs. 42.5 ± 9.2; P < 0.001. The proportion of females was higher among MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (61% vs. 51%; P = 0.053. In addition, there were significant differences between MetS patients with and without DM in terms of co-morbidities of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and high cholesterol. The proportion of MetS patients with positive family history for MetS was significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (46.7% vs. 33.8%; P = 0.009. The proportion of positive family history of MetS among fathers (35% vs. 21.9%; P = 0.005, mothers (30.5% vs. 18.8%; P = 0.008, maternal aunt (18.3% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.055, and maternal grand father (19.5% vs. 10%; P = 0.010 were significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to the

  1. [Familial combined hyperlipidemia: consensus document].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Pedro; Alonso, Rodrigo; Ruíz-Garcia, Antonio; Díaz-Díaz, Jose L; González, Noemí; Gijón-Conde, Teresa; Martínez-Faedo, Ceferino; Morón, Ignacio; Arranz, Ezequiel; Aguado, Rocío; Argueso, Rosa; Perez de Isla, Leopoldo

    2014-10-01

    Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH) is a frequent disorder associated with premature coronary artery disease. It is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner, although there is not a unique gene involved. The diagnosis is performed using clinical criteria, and variability in lipid phenotype and family history of hyperlipidemia are necessaries. Frequently, the disorder is associated with type2 diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and central obesity. Patients with FCH are considered as high cardiovascular risk and the lipid target is an LDL-cholesterol <100mg/dL, and <70mg/dL if cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes are present. Patients with FCH require lipid lowering treatment using potent statins and sometimes, combined lipid-lowering treatment. Identification and management of other cardiovascular risk factors as type 2 diabetes and hypertension are fundamental to reduce cardiovascular disease burden. This document gives recommendations for the diagnosis and global treatment of patients with FCH directed to specialists and general practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Cognitive decline affects diabetic women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perzyński Adam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: DM provokes peripheral complications and changes in central nervous system. Central changes in the course of diabetes mellitus (DM include changes in brain tissue structure, electrophysiological abnormalities but also disturbances in neurotransmission leading to cognitive decline.

  3. Discriminative Ability of Plasma Branched-Chain Amino Acid Levels for Glucose Intolerance in Families At Risk for Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jainandunsing, Sjaam; Wattimena, J L Darcos; Verhoeven, Adrie J M; Langendonk, Janneke G; Rietveld, Trinet; Isaacs, Aaron J; Sijbrands, Eric J G; de Rooij, Felix W M

    2016-04-01

    Insulin resistance and glucose intolerance have been associated with increased plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). BCAA levels do not predict T2DM in the population. We determined the discriminative ability of fasting BCAA levels for glucose intolerance in nondiabetic relatives of patients with T2DM of two different ethnicities. Based on oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), first-degree relatives of patients with T2DM were categorized as normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, or T2DM. Included were 34, 12, and 18 Caucasian and 22, 12, and 23 Asian Indian participants, respectively. BCAA levels were measured in fasting plasma together with alanine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. Insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function were assessed by indices derived from an extended OGTT and their relationship with plasma BCAA levels was assessed in multivariate regression analysis. The value of the amino acids for discriminating prediabetes among nondiabetic family members was determined with the area under the curve of receiver-operated characteristics (c-index). BCAA levels were higher in diabetic than in normoglycemic family members in the Caucasians (P = 0.001) but not in the Asian Indians. In both groups, BCAA levels were associated with waist-hip ratio (β = 0.31; P = 0.03 and β = 0.42; P = 0.001, respectively) but not with indices of insulin sensitivity or beta-cell function. The c-index of BCAA for discriminating prediabetes among nondiabetic participants was 0.83 and 0.74 in Caucasians and Asian Indians, respectively, which increased to 0.84 and 0.79 by also including the other amino acids. The c-index of fasting glucose for discriminating prediabetes increased from 0.91 to 0.92 in Caucasians and 0.85 to 0.97 (P = 0.04) in Asian Indians by inclusion of BCAA+alanine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. Adding fasting plasma BCAA levels, combined with phenylalanine, tyrosine and alanine to fasting glucose improved discriminative ability for the prediabetic state

  4. 多波长激光治疗DR合并视网膜中央静脉阻塞%Efficacy observation on multiple wave length laser for diabetic retinopathy and central retinal vein occlusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田涛; 刘茹; 彭婧利; 谢丽莲; 邝国平

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察多波长激光治疗糖尿病视网膜病变( diabetic retinopathy,DR)合并视网膜中央静脉阻塞( central retinal vein occlusion, CRVO)的疗效。  方法:选取DR合并CRVO患者95例100眼,采用多波长激光进行光凝治疗。其中黄斑区以氪黄激光治疗为主,包括局部光凝和格栅光凝,周边光凝以氪绿或氪红激光进行治疗。手术前后均进行视力、眼底、荧光素眼底血管造影检查。术后随访12~48 wk。观察比较两组光凝前后视力及黄斑水肿变化,并做统计学分析。  结果:在黄斑格栅光凝组,有效率为61.2%,在黄斑局部光凝组,有效率为86.3%,后者总有效率高于前者,有统计学差异(P  结论:多波长激光治疗DR合并CRVO患者的黄斑水肿安全、有效。%AlM:To observe the efficacy of the multiple wave length laser in treating diabetic retinopathy combined with central retinal vein occlusion. METHODS:Totally 95 cases ( 100 eyes ) with diabetic retinopathy combined with central retinal vein occlusion were treated by multiple wave length laser. Krypton yellow laser was used for macular edema in focal photocoagulation and diffuse photocoagulation. For peripheral retina, krypton green or krypton red laser were used. Visual acuity, slit - lamp biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and fundus fluorescein angiography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. The patients were followed up for 12 to 48wk. ln this study, change in visual acuity and macular edema were observed in both groups, and statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: The effective rate was 61. 2% in diffuse macular edema group and 86. 3% in focal macular edema group. The general effective rate of later was higher than the former, while the treatment effect had significant statistical difference (P CONCLUSlON:Multiple wave length laser is an effective and safe way to treat diabetic macular edema of diabetic retinopathy combined with central retinal vein

  5. Diabetes education on wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardway, D; Weatherly, K S; Bonheur, B

    1993-01-01

    Diabetes education programs remain underdeveloped in the pediatric setting, resulting in increased consumer complaints and financial liability for hospitals. The Diabetes Education on Wheels program was designed to provide comprehensive, outcome-oriented education for patients with juvenile diabetes. The primary goal of the program was to enhance patients' and family members' ability to achieve self-care in the home setting. The program facilitated sequential learning, improved consumer satisfaction, and promoted financial viability for the hospital.

  6. Prevention of diabetes in overweight/obese children through a family based intervention program including supervised exercise (PREDIKID project): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenaza, Lide; Medrano, María; Amasene, María; Rodríguez-Vigil, Beatriz; Díez, Ignacio; Graña, Manuel; Tobalina, Ignacio; Maiz, Edurne; Arteche, Edurne; Larrarte, Eider; Huybrechts, Inge; Davis, Catherine L; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B; Margareto, Javier; Labayen, Idoia

    2017-08-10

    The global pandemic of obesity has led to an increased risk for prediabetes and type-2 diabetes (T2D). The aims of the current project are: (1) to evaluate the effect of a 22-week family based intervention program, including supervised exercise, on insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) risk in children with a high risk of developing T2D and (2) to identify the profile of microRNA in circulating exosomes and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in children with a high risk of developing T2D and its response to a multidisciplinary intervention program including exercise. A total of 84 children, aged 8-12 years, with a high risk of T2D will be included and randomly assigned to control (N = 42) or intervention (N = 42) groups. The control group will receive a family based lifestyle education and psycho-educational program (2 days/month), while the intervention group will attend the same lifestyle education and psycho-educational program plus the exercise program (3 days/week, 90 min per session including warm-up, moderate to vigorous aerobic activities, and strength exercises). The following measurements will be evaluated at baseline prior to randomization and after the intervention: fasting insulin, glucose and hemoglobin A1c; body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); ectopic fat (magnetic resonance imaging); microRNA expression in circulating exosomes and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MiSeq; Illumina); cardiorespiratory fitness (cardiopulmonary exercise testing); dietary habits and physical activity (accelerometry). Prevention and identification of children with a high risk of developing T2D could help to improve their cardiovascular health and to reduce the comorbidities associated with obesity. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT03027726 . Registered on 16 January 2017.

  7. MODY diabetes - diagnostika a terapie

    OpenAIRE

    Verner, Miroslav