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Sample records for falls efficacy scale

  1. Reliability and validity of the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International for Japanese older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamide, Naoto; Shiba, Yoshitaka; Sakamoto, Miki; Sato, Haruhiko

    2018-03-29

    The Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (Short FES-I) has been confirmed to be a good measure with reliability and validity in a UK sample; however, the reliability and validity of the Short FES-I for Japanese older people have not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of the Short FES-I for Japanese older people. The study participants were 519 older people aged 65 years and over who were living independently in their community. The Short FES-I is composed of seven items rated on a four-point Likert scale. Lower scores indicate better fall-related efficacy. To investigate the validity of the Short FES-I, previous falls, physical function such as grip strength and scores on the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, psychological factors such as self-rated health (SRH), cognitive function, and other confounding factors were collected. The association between the previous falls and the Short FES-I was analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Furthermore, factors related to the Short FES-I were investigated using multiple regression analysis. Cronbach's alpha for the Short FES-I was 0.87. Short FES-I scores were significantly higher in participants with a history of falls than in those without. In addition, Short FES-I scores were significantly and independently associated with falls in logistic regression analysis, and significantly associated with grip strength, TUG time, and SRH in multiple regression analysis. These results suggest that the Short FES-I is a reliable and valid fall-related measurement scale for Japanese older people.

  2. Validation of the Falls Efficacy Scale and Falls Efficacy Scale International in geriatric patients with and without cognitive impairment: results of self-report and interview-based questionnaires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauer, Kristiane; Yardley, L; Beyer, N

    2010-01-01

    Frail, old patients with and without cognitive impairment are at high risk of falls and associated medical and psychosocial issues. The lack of adequate, validated instruments has partly hindered research in this field. So far no questionnaire documenting fall-related self-efficacy/fear of falling...

  3. Reliability and Validity of the Short Falls Efficacy Scale International in English, Mandarin, and Bahasa Malaysia in Malaysia.

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    Tan, Maw Pin; Nalathamby, Nemala; Mat, Sumaiyah; Tan, Pey June; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Morgan, Karen

    2018-01-01

    While the prevalence of falls among Malaysian older adults is comparable to other older populations around the world, little is currently known about fear of falling in Malaysia. The Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) and short FES-I scales to measure fear of falling have not yet been validated for use within the Malaysian population, and are currently not available in Bahasa Malaysia (BM). A total of 402 participants aged ≥63 years were recruited. The questionnaire was readministered to 149 participants, 4 to 8 weeks after the first administration to determine test-retest reliability. The original version of the 7-item short FES-I is available in English, while the Mandarin was adapted from the 16-item Mandarin FES-I. The BM version was translated according to protocol by four experts. The internal structure of the FES-I was examined by factor analysis. The 7-item short FES-I showed good internal reliability and test-retest reliability for English, Mandarin, and BM versions for Malaysia.

  4. Cross-cultural adaptation and measurement properties testing of the Iconographical Falls Efficacy Scale (Icon-FES).

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    Franco, Marcia Rodrigues; Pinto, Rafael Zambelli; Delbaere, Kim; Eto, Bianca Yumie; Faria, Maíra Sgobbi; Aoyagi, Giovana Ayumi; Steffens, Daniel; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo

    2018-02-14

    The Iconographical Falls Efficacy Scale (Icon-FES) is an innovative tool to assess concern of falling that uses pictures as visual cues to provide more complete environmental contexts. Advantages of Icon-FES over previous scales include the addition of more demanding balance-related activities, ability to assess concern about falling in highly functioning older people, and its normal distribution. To perform a cross-cultural adaptation and to assess the measurement properties of the 30-item and 10-item Icon-FES in a community-dwelling Brazilian older population. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the recommendations of international guidelines. We evaluated the measurement properties (i.e. internal consistency, test-retest reproducibility, standard error of the measurement, minimal detectable change, construct validity, ceiling/floor effect, data distribution and discriminative validity), in 100 community-dwelling people aged ≥60 years. The 30-item and 10-item Icon-FES-Brazil showed good internal consistency (alpha and omega >0.70) and excellent intra-rater reproducibility (ICC 2,1 =0.96 and 0.93, respectively). According to the standard error of the measurement and minimal detectable change, the magnitude of change needed to exceed the measurement error and variability were 7.2 and 3.4 points for the 30-item and 10-item Icon-FES, respectively. We observed an excellent correlation between both versions of the Icon-FES and Falls Efficacy Scale - International (rho=0.83, pFisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Validity and sensitivity to change of the falls efficacy scales international to assess fear of falling in older adults with and without cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauer, Klaus A; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Schwenk, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Measures of fear of falling have not yet been validated in patients with dementia, leaving a methodological gap that limits research in a population at high risk of falling and fall-related consequences.......Measures of fear of falling have not yet been validated in patients with dementia, leaving a methodological gap that limits research in a population at high risk of falling and fall-related consequences....

  6. Cross-cultural validation of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) in Portuguese community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Daniela; Santos, Sónia

    The Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) is a highly reliable instrument to assess fear of falling among older population. This study aimed to develop a European Portuguese version of the FES-I (FES-I (P) ) and analyse its psychometric properties in terms of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent and convergent validity. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data collection integrated a socio-demographic questionnaire which included falls history and presence/absence of fear of falling, the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Timed Up and Go (TUG) and the Five Times Sit to Stand Test (FTSST). Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed. A total of 100 Portuguese community-dwelling older people (74.27±8.7years old) have participated in the study. From these, 82 have participated in the reliability study. The FES-I (P) had excellent internal consistency (α=0,978) and test-retest reliability (ICC 2,1 =0,999). A significant negative correlation was found between the FES-I (P) and the ABC (r s =-0.85; pvalidity. FES-I (P) scores were significantly higher among those who were female, had ≥1 falls in the last year and reported having fear of falling. Significant correlations were found between the FES-I (P) and age (r s =0.337; pvalidity. FES-I (P) is a reliable and valid measure of fear of falling for Portuguese community-living older people. Future studies should explore the FES-I (P) responsiveness to change over time and analyse its psychometric properties in samples of both non-community-dwelling and community-dwelling older adults with different health conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation and Reliability of Persian Version of Fall Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

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    Daryoush Khajavi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was validation and reliability determination of Persian translated version of Fall Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I. Methods & Materials: Statistical population was Arak,s men and women older adults in 2012-13 and sample was two groups of older adults (over 60 yrs, mean age=68.79±6.41 dwelling in Arak (203 and 120 subjects for exploring and confirmatory factor analysis respectively that availably selected. Sampling criterion was 5-subject for each item. Data were collected with Persian translated of Fall Efficacy Scale-International that measure concern about falling when performing 16-activities of daily living. Internal reliability with Cronbach,s alpha 0.98 and test-retest reliability with Pearson correlation coefficient 0.70 confirmed. Results: K-M-O measure was 0.965 and meaningful, indicating sampling adequacy. Factor analysis with Principal component and Varimax rotation resulted in one factor extraction with Eigenvalue over 1 (12.474 that predicted 77.96% of variance. Factor loading for 16-item ranged 0.637 to 0.859. Internal reliability was excellent (Cronbach,s Alpha 0.98 and 1 to 2-week test-retest reliability (n=36, 50% female was good (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.70. Statistical operation performs with SPSS-16. Conclusion: According the results, Persian translated version of «Fall Efficacy Scale-International» has acceptable validity and reliability for Iranian older adults' population and can be used in research and clinical purposes.

  8. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, Aisling M

    2011-12-19

    Abstract Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT), commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale) were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05) in older adults. An increase in omission errors was also associated with falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05). Upon controlling for age and gender affects, logistic regression modelling revealed that increasing variability associated with the vigilance (top-down) aspect of sustained attention was a retrospective predictor of falling (p < 0.01, OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03 - 1.26) in the previous year and was weakly correlated with reduced falls efficacy in non-fallers (p = 0.07). Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention

  9. Falls efficacy, postural balance, and risk for falls in older adults with falls-related emergency department visits: prospective cohort study.

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    Pua, Yong-Hao; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Clark, Ross Allan; Matcher, David B; Lim, Edwin Choon-Wyn

    2017-12-21

    Risk for falls in older adults has been associated with falls efficacy (self-perceived confidence in performing daily physical activities) and postural balance, but available evidence is limited and mixed. We examined the interaction between falls efficacy and postural balance and its association with future falls. We also investigated the association between falls efficacy and gait decline. Falls efficacy, measured by the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES), and standing postural balance, measured using computerized posturography on a balance board, were obtained from 247 older adults with a falls-related emergency department visit. Six-month prospective fall rate and habitual gait speed at 6 months post baseline assessment were also measured. In multivariable proportional odds analyses adjusted for potential confounders, falls efficacy modified the association between postural balance and fall risk (interaction P = 0.014): increasing falls efficacy accentuated the increased fall risk related to poor postural balance. Low baseline falls efficacy was strongly predictive of worse gait speed (0.11 m/s [0.06 to 0.16] slower gait speed per IQR decrease in MFES; P balance were at greater risk for falls than those with low falls efficacy; however, low baseline falls efficacy was strongly associated with worse gait function at follow-up. Further research into these subgroups of older adults is warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01713543 .

  10. The effects of obesity on fall efficacy in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byoung-Jin

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to identify the effects of obesity on falls as a practical verification of the importance of obesity-targeting interventions as part of future fall prevention programs. [Subjects and Methods] The study involved 351 elderly people (172 men, 179 women) living in rural areas. The dependent variable, fall efficacy, was measured using the Falls Efficacy Scale, while the independent variables, body mass index (BMI) and visceral fat, were measured using the InBody 720. The Faces Pain Scale was used to measure pain. Mobility was measured using the Timed Up and Go Test, and balance ability was measured according to the duration subjects could stand on one foot with their eyes closed. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed for the final data analysis. [Results] Investigation of the correlations between the variables revealed a negative correlation between fall efficacy and the other variables. Ultimatley, investigation of the causality of fall efficacy revealed that the BMI, pain, and mobility were influential factors. In other words, fall efficacy tends to be lower when there are higher degrees of obesity, increased pain, and decreased mobility. [Conclusion] To improve the fall efficacy of elderly people living in rural areas, pain management and the maintenance of physical functionality are required. The present study confirms that the elderly need continuous obesity management to lead healthy lives.

  11. The Relationship between Falls Efficacy and Improvement in Fall Risk Factors Following an Exercise Plus Educational Intervention for Older Adults with Hip Osteoarthritis.

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    Arnold, C M; Faulkner, R A; Gyurcsik, N C

    2011-01-01

    Older adults with decreased confidence in their ability to prevent a fall may benefit from an exercise programme that includes self-efficacy-enhancing education. The objectives of this study were to explore differences in fall-risk outcomes in older adults with higher vs. lower levels of falls efficacy and to evaluate the relationship between baseline falls-efficacy status and changes in fall risk factors following two interventions. Fifty-four older adults with hip osteoarthritis and at least one risk factor for falls received aquatic exercise twice weekly plus education once weekly (EE) or aquatic exercise only, twice weekly (EO), for 11 weeks. EE participants with low baseline falls efficacy demonstrated significantly (pfalls efficacy compared to EE participants with high baseline falls efficacy. In the EE group only, baseline falls-efficacy status (low vs. high median split on the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale) was significantly (pfalls-efficacy change scores (Spearman rank r=0.45 and 0.63 respectively). Individuals with one or more fall-risk factors and low falls efficacy may benefit from receiving an intervention that combines exercise with self-efficacy-enhancing education. Falls-efficacy screening may be important for decisions regarding referral to fall-prevention programmes.

  12. Adaptação transcultural e avaliação das propriedades psicométricas da Falls Efficacy Scale - International em idosos Brasileiros (FES-I-BRASIL Cross-cultural adaptation and evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale - International Among Elderly Brazilians (FES-I-BRAZIL

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    Flávia F. O. Camargos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Adaptar culturalmente a Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I e avaliar suas propriedades psicométricas em uma amostra de idosos brasileiros da comunidade. MÉTODOS: Conforme recomendações da Rede Européia de prevenção às quedas, o instrumento foi traduzido para o português do Brasil e adaptado culturalmente para a população brasileira (FES-I-Brasil. A FES-I-Brasil foi aplicada em 163 idosos (73,44±5,51 anos, e foram coletados dados demográficos e relacionados à história de quedas. Dentre esses idosos, 58 foram distribuídos aleatoriamente para avaliação da confiabilidade. A confiabilidade foi analisada pelo Índice de Correlação Intraclasse (ICC e a consistência interna pelo α de Cronbach. A estrutura interna da FES-I-Brasil foi avaliada pela análise fatorial exploratória. O modelo de regressão logística foi utilizado para identificar quais tarefas da escala eram mais relevantes para discriminar quedas. Para análise de sensibilidade e especificidade da FES-I-Brasil, empregou-se a curva Receiving Operator Characteristic (ROC. RESULTADOS: A consistência interna da FES-I-Brasil foi α=0,93, e a confiabilidade foi ICC=0,84 e 0,91 (intra e interexaminadores, respectivamente. A análise fatorial sugeriu dois fatores que verificavam preocupação em cair durante atividades de socialização e de vida diária (básicas e instrumentais e tarefas relacionadas ao controle postural. Uma pontuação >23 pontos na FES-I-Brasil sugeriu associação com histórico de queda esporádica, ao passo que uma pontuação >31 pontos ensejou uma associação com queda recorrente. CONCLUSÕES: A FES-I-Brasil apresentou-se semântica, linguística e psicometricamente adequada para avaliar o medo de cair na população de idosos brasileiros da comunidade.OBJECTIVES: To culturally adapt the Falls Efficacy Scale - International (FES-I and assess its psychometric properties in a sample of community-dwelling elderly Brazilians. METHODS

  13. Falls self-efficacy and falls incidence in community-dwelling older people: the mediating role of coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Christine C; Jones, Fergal W; Kneebone, Ian I

    2017-11-08

    A cognitive behavioral model predicts that coping responses mediate the relationship between falls related psychological concerns and falls incidence, in community-dwelling older people. If empirical support could be found for this pathway then interventions could be developed to reduce falls risk by targeting coping strategies. Therefore, this study aimed to begin the process of testing whether coping responses mediate the association between falls self-efficacy (a principal element of falls related psychological concerns) and falls incidence, in community-dwelling older people. In a cross-sectional design, 160 community-dwelling older people (31 male, 129 female; mean age 83.47 years) completed the Falls Efficacy Scale-International, the Revised-Ways of Coping Questionnaire, the Turning to Religion subscale of the COPE, and a falls questionnaire. Data were analyzed via mediation analysis using a bootstrapping approach. Lower falls self-efficacy was associated with higher falls incidence, and more self-controlling coping was found to be a partial mediator of this association, with a confidence interval for the indirect effect of (0.003, 0.021) and an effect size of κ 2 = 0.035. The association was not mediated by the other measured coping responses; namely, turning to religion, distancing, seeking social support, accepting responsibility, escape-avoidance, planful problem-solving, and positive reappraisal. Self-controlling coping may mediate the association between falls self-efficacy and falling. If longitudinal studies confirm this finding then coping could be targeted in interventions to reduce falls.

  14. Mobility, balance and muscle performance according to self-efficacy for falls in the elderly

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    Carolina Raíssa Bento Pereira da Silva

    Full Text Available Introduction Changes in mobility, postural balance and muscle strength in the aging process may cause a fall in the elderly by changing or not perceived self-efficacy in preventing falls, the goal is to compare mobility, body balance and muscle performance according to self-efficacy for falls in community-dwelling elderly women. Materials and methods A comparative study of cross-section, with 63 community-dwelling elderly. We evaluated sociodemographic data, cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, efficacy for falls (International Efficacy Scale for Falls, Brazil, mobility (Timed Up and Go Test, body balance by Berg Balance Scale, Balance Master System: Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB, Tandem walk (TW Sit to Stand (STS and muscular performance by isokinetic dynamometry. Using the cutoff point at or above 23 points, two groups, G1 with low perceived efficacy in preventing falls (n = 36 and G2 with high perceived efficacy in preventing falls (n = 27 were allocated. Student’s t test was performed for comparison between groups, with p value of 0.05. Results Comparing the elderly women regarding the efficacy of falls, significant differences were observed in the variables Timed Up and Go Test (p = 0.04, speed of oscillation test mCTSIB (p = 0.01 and the isokinetic dynamometry knee extension movement, peak torque (p = 0.04 and power (p = 0.03. Conclusion Comparing community-dwelling elderly women with low and high efficacy for falls, significant differences were in variables related to mobility, body balance and muscle function.

  15. Effect of guided relaxation and imagery on falls self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Kim, Bang Hyun; Newton, Roberta A; Sachs, Michael L; Glutting, Joseph J; Glanz, Karen

    2012-06-01

    To examine the effects of guided relaxation and imagery (GRI) on improvement in falls self-efficacy in older adults who report having a fear of falling. Randomized, controlled trial with allocation to GRI or guided relaxation with music of choice. General community. Ninety-one men and women aged 60 to 92. Participants were randomized to listen to a GRI audio compact disk (intervention group) or a guided relaxation audio compact disk and music of choice (control group) twice a week for 6 weeks for 10 minutes per session. Primary outcome measure was the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I). Secondary outcome measures were the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LTEQ) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) mobility test. GRI participants reported greater improvements on the Short FES-I (P = .002) and LTEQ (P = .001) scores and shorter time on the TUG (P = .002) than the guided relaxation and music-of-choice group. GRI was more effective at increasing falls self-efficacy and self-reported leisure time exercise and reducing times on a simple mobility test than was guided relaxation with music of choice. GRI is an effective, simple, low-cost tool for older adults to improve falls self-efficacy and leisure time exercise behaviors. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Fall risk assessment: retrospective analysis of Morse Fall Scale scores in Portuguese hospitalized adult patients.

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    Sardo, Pedro Miguel Garcez; Simões, Cláudia Sofia Oliveira; Alvarelhão, José Joaquim Marques; Simões, João Filipe Fernandes Lindo; Melo, Elsa Maria de Oliveira Pinheiro de

    2016-08-01

    The Morse Fall Scale is used in several care settings for fall risk assessment and supports the implementation of preventive nursing interventions. Our work aims to analyze the Morse Fall Scale scores of Portuguese hospitalized adult patients in association with their characteristics, diagnoses and length of stay. Retrospective cohort analysis of Morse Fall Scale scores of 8356 patients hospitalized during 2012. Data were associated to age, gender, type of admission, specialty units, length of stay, patient discharge, and ICD-9 diagnosis. Elderly patients, female, with emergency service admission, at medical units and/or with longer length of stays were more frequently included in the risk group for falls. ICD-9 diagnosis may also be an important risk factor. More than a half of hospitalized patients had "medium" to "high" risk of falling during the length of stay, which determines the implementation and maintenance of protocoled preventive nursing interventions throughout hospitalization. There are several fall risk factors not assessed by Morse Fall Scale. There were no statistical differences in Morse Fall Scale score between the first and the last assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of older adults' visual perceptual skills, cognitive function, and fall efficacy according to fall risk in the elderly.

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    Lee, HyeJin; Park, BoRa; Yang, YeongAe

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] This research aims to identify the relationships among visual perceptual skills, cognitive functioning, and fall efficacy of older adults based on whether they are at risk for falls. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects included 116 older adults over 65 years of age who use D Seniors Welfare Center and Y Senior Citizen Center in Busan Metropolitan City. All research subjects were classified based on balance maintenance ability evaluation and whether or not they had experienced falls more than once. Those with scores below the cut-off standard were selected as a group of older adults at risk for falls. An MVPT-3 test was used to assess visual perceptual skill, MMSE-KC, and MoCA-K tests to assess cognitive function, and the FES-K falls efficacy test to classify subjects as either at risk for falls or not. [Results] After comparing scores for visual perceptual skills, cognitive functioning, and fall efficacy, subjects at risk for falls showed significantly lower scores than did those not at risk. [Conclusion] The study found that there are significant differences in balance ability, visual perceptual skill, cognitive functioning, and fall efficacy between older adults at risk for falls and those not at risk.

  18. Comparison of fall prediction by the Hessisch Oldendorf Fall Risk Scale and the Fall Risk Scale by Huhn in neurological rehabilitation: an observational study.

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    Hermann, Olena; Schmidt, Simone B; Boltzmann, Melanie; Rollnik, Jens D

    2017-11-01

    To calculate scale performance of the newly developed Hessisch Oldendorf Fall Risk Scale (HOSS) for classifying fallers and non-fallers in comparison with the Risk of Falling Scale by Huhn (FSH), a frequently used assessment tool. A prospective observational trail was conducted. The study was performed in a large specialized neurological rehabilitation facility. The study population ( n = 690) included neurological and neurosurgery patients during neurological rehabilitation with varying levels of disability. Around the half of the study patients were independent and dependent in the activities of daily living (ADL), respectively. Fall risk of each patient was assessed by HOSS and FSH within the first seven days after admission. Event of fall during rehabilitation was compared with HOSS and FSH scores as well as the according fall risk. Scale performance including sensitivity and specificity was calculated for both scales. A total of 107 (15.5%) patients experienced at least one fall. In general, fallers were characterized by an older age, a prolonged length of stay, and a lower Barthel Index (higher dependence in the ADL) on admission than non-fallers. The verification of fall prediction for both scales showed a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 64% for the HOSS scale, and a sensitivity of 98% with a specificity of 12% for the FSH scale, respectively. The HOSS shows an adequate sensitivity, a higher specificity and therefore a better scale performance than the FSH. Thus, the HOSS might be superior to existing assessments.

  19. The Relationship between Falls Efficacy and Improvement in Fall Risk Factors Following an Exercise Plus Educational Intervention for Older Adults with Hip Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, C.M.; Faulkner, R.A.; Gyurcsik, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Older adults with decreased confidence in their ability to prevent a fall may benefit from an exercise programme that includes self-efficacy-enhancing education. The objectives of this study were to explore differences in fall-risk outcomes in older adults with higher vs. lower levels of falls efficacy and to evaluate the relationship between baseline falls-efficacy status and changes in fall risk factors following two interventions.

  20. WALKING CAPACITY AND FALLS-EFFICACY CORRELATES WITH PARTICIPATION RESTRICTION IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC STROKE: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

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    Neelam Nayak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobility impairments seen after Stroke impact walking speed, endurance and balance. Almost all the individuals with Stroke have fear of fall. The physical impairments in balance and gait along with individual’s perception about his/her own abilities to maintain balance might have an impact on level of activity and participation in the community. The association of these variables with recovery of Stroke has been well studied. However, it is currently unknown which of these variables are most associated with activity and participation in the community. This study aimed to identify the correlation of walking capacity and perception of fall with activity & participation. Methods: 30 Subjects were assessed for - walking capacity (6 minute walk test & Self-efficacy for falls (Modified Falls Efficacy scale. Level of Activity Limitation (AL & Participation Restriction (PR was graded on validated ICF Measure of Participation and Activities. (IMPACT-S Results: Data was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient & regression model. Walking distance and Falls-efficacy is significantly correlated (r=-0.751 and -0.683, respectively with Participation restriction. Walking distance correlated with Activity Limitation (r=-0.714 significantly. Falls efficacy has a correlation coefficient of -0.642 with Activity Limitation. When put into Regression models, Walking Capacity & Gait Velocity was found to be independently associated with AL &PR. Conclusion: There is significant relationship between falls self-efficacy, walking capacity and Post-stroke activity & participation. Participation can be impacted by factors such as self-motivation and confidence about one's balance abilities. This is reflected by the correlation between falls efficacy and participation. Physical parameters such as the distance walked can contribute to participating in the community, and can predict variation in AL-PR

  1. The effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation integration pattern exercise program on the fall efficacy and gait ability of the elders with experienced fall.

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    Song, Hyun-Seung; Park, Seong-Doo; Kim, Jin-Young

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of exercising program utilizing proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation integration pattern (PIP), which is effective in improvement of the physical function, on the fall efficacy and gait ability of the elders who experienced injuries from falls. Also, this study aims to investigate he applicability of exercise program as methods for fall reoccurrence prevention and physical functions enhancement. The subjects of the study were 30 elders in the local community with experience of injuries from falls. The period of the study was 4 weeks with 12 exercise sessions. The subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups where 15 elders were allocated to PIP and the rest 15 elders were allocated to general exercise (GE) group. Fall efficacy scale (FES) and GAITRite were used for the measurements in this study. Paired t-test was used to analyze the differences within the group while independent t-test was used to analyze the difference between two groups. In the comparison of measurements before and after exercise program, FES, velocity, cadence, and stride length were shown to be significantly increased in both PIP group and GE group. Also, in the comparison between two groups after the exercise program, the measurements of FES, cadence, stride length, and step length in PIP group were shown to be significantly increased compared to the GE group. Therefore, the PNF combined pattern is judged to be applicable to as methods for fall reoccurrence prevention and physical functions enhancement of the elders with experience of being fallen.

  2. Mobility, balance and muscle performance according to self-efficacy for falls in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Carolina Raíssa Bento Pereira da; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira; Fonsêca, Aline Medeiros Cavalcanti da; Gomes, Andréa de Carvalho; Maciel, Álvaro Campos Cavalcanti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Changes in mobility, postural balance and muscle strength in the aging process may cause a fall in the elderly by changing or not perceived self-efficacy in preventing falls, the goal is to compare mobility, body balance and muscle performance according to self-efficacy for falls in community-dwelling elderly women. Materials and methods A comparative study of cross-section, with 63 community-dwelling elderly. We evaluated sociodemographic data, cognition (Mini-Mental State Ex...

  3. Falls

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    ... falling off furniture or down the stairs. Older children may fall off playground equipment. For elderly people, falls can be especially serious. They are at higher risk of falling. They are also more likely to ...

  4. The effects of plantar perception training on balance and falls efficacy of the elderly with a history of falls: A single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hyuck

    2018-03-28

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of plantar perception training using a hardness discrimination task on balance and falls efficacy of the elderly who have experienced a fall. Sixty-two elderly persons 65 years of age or older were randomly allocated to the experimental group (n = 31) or the control group (n = 31). The experimental group performed a hardness discrimination task using five different levels of hardness of sponge mats, while the control group performed the same task except that they were not asked to discriminate hardness levels of sponge mats. All subjects performed 10 sessions for two weeks. Outcome measures were conducted using center of pressure (CoP) sway in the standing position, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and falls efficacy scale (FES) to measure balance and falls efficacy. There were no significant differences in general characteristics between both groups (p > .05). After 10 sessions, plantar perception was significantly improved in the experimental group (F = 101.18, p CoP sway with eye closed and TUG test were significantly different (p CoP sway with eye closed, -208.32 ± 74.89; TUG test, -1.91 ± 0.72) and the control group (CoP sway with eye closed, -14.55 ± 35.44; TUG test, -1.31 ± 0.75). These results showed that plantar perception training might be beneficial to improve falls efficacy as well as balance of the elderly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fall-related self-efficacy, not balance and mobility performance, is related to accidental falls in chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, M Y C; Eng, J J

    2008-07-01

    Chronic stroke survivors with low hip bone density are particularly prone to fractures. This study shows that fear of falling is independently associated with falls in this population. Thus, fear of falling should not be overlooked in the prevention of fragility fractures in these patients. Chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density (BMD) are particularly prone to fragility fractures. The purpose of this study was to identify the determinants of balance, mobility and falls in this sub-group of stroke patients. Thirty-nine chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD (T-score fall-related self-efficacy. Any falls in the past 12 months were also recorded. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the determinants of balance and mobility performance, whereas logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of falls. Multiple regression analysis revealed that after adjusting for basic demographics, fall-related self-efficacy remained independently associated with balance/mobility performance (R2 = 0.494, P fall-related self-efficacy, but not balance and mobility performance, was a significant determinant of falls (odds ratio: 0.18, P = 0.04). Fall-related self-efficacy, but not mobility and balance performance, was the most important determinant of accidental falls. This psychological factor should not be overlooked in the prevention of fragility fractures among chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD.

  6. The effects of aquatic walking and jogging program on physical function and fall efficacy in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Sung, Eunsook

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 12-week aqua walking and jogging program on muscle function, ankle range of motion (ROM), balance and fell efficacy in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) patients. Six patients (2 males, 4 females) with DLSS participated in aquatic exercise program 3 times per week with each session of 60 min (warming-up, aqua walking, aqua jogging and cool down) at 1 m 20 cm-1 m 30 cm deep pool. Janda's muscle function test, ankle ROM, Berg balance scale (BBS) and fall efficacy scale (FES) were analyzed before and after the training intervention. We found significant increases in balance, muscle function, ankle ROM and fall efficacy after training intervention. In conclusion, aquatic exercise seems to affect physical function and fall efficacy positively in elderly DLSS patients.

  7. Effects of supervised slackline training on postural instability, freezing of gait, and falls efficacy in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luis; Fernandez-Rio, Javier; Winge, Kristian; Barragán-Pérez, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Pérez, Vicente; González-Díez, Vicente; Blanco-Traba, Miguel; Suman, Oscar E; Philip Gabel, Charles; Rodríguez-Gómez, Javier

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether supervised slackline training reduces the risk of falls in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty-two patients with idiopathic PD were randomized into experimental (EG, N = 11) and control (CG, N = 11) groups. Center of Pressure (CoP), Freezing of Gait (FOG), and Falls Efficacy Scale (FES) were assessed at pre-test, post-test and re-test. Rate perceived exertion (RPE, Borg's 6-20 scale) and local muscle perceived exertion (LRPE) were also assessed at the end of the training sessions. The EG group showed significant improvements in FOG and FES scores from pre-test to post-test. Both decreased at re-test, though they did not return to pre-test levels. No significant differences were detected in CoP parameters. Analysis of RPE and LRPE scores revealed that slackline was associated with minimal fatigue and involved the major lower limb and lumbar muscles. These findings suggest that slacklining is a simple, safe, and challenging training and rehabilitation tool for PD patients. It could be introduced into their physical activity routine to reduce the risk of falls and improve confidence related to fear of falling. Implications for Rehabilitation Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) are twice as likely to have falls compared to patients with other neurological conditions. This study support slackline as a simple, safe, and challenging training and rehabilitation tool for people with PD, which reduce their risk of falls and improve confidence related to fear of falling. Slackline in people with PD yields a low tiredness or fatigue impact and involves the major lower limb and lumbar muscles.

  8. Content analysis of 4 fear of falling rating scales by linking to the international classification of functioning, disability and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladh, Stina; Nilsson, Maria H; Carlsson, Gunilla; Lexell, Jan

    2013-07-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of the content of 4 fear of falling (FOF) rating scales by linking them to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Linking study according to the ICF linking rules. Not applicable. Not applicable. The rating scales were the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), the Swedish version of the Falls Efficacy Scale (FES[S]), the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), and the modified Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE). The process followed the established and updated linking rules. Three linkers independently identified all meaningful concepts in the rating scales and linked them to the most precise ICF categories. The linkers then discussed their results to reach consensus. If consensus was not attained, the linkers pursued the discussions with a fourth person to reach consensus. Not applicable. Most meaningful concepts from the overall questions were linked to the ICF component of body functions. Of the 62 items, all but one meaningful concept were linked to the component of activities and participation. All 4 rating scales covered the chapters of mobility and domestic life and had most linkages to the mobility chapter. The linking process revealed similarities and differences between the 4 FOF rating scales, as well as methodologic challenges in linking instruments to the ICF. By providing a content description that allows for a direct comparison of the rating scales, the results may be helpful when choosing an appropriate rating scale assessing FOF in clinical practice and research. A further head-to-head comparison through psychometric analyses is required to recommend appropriate FOF rating scales. Studies are also needed to investigate how the overall question and response categories of a rating scale affect respondents' answers. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effects of Augmented Reality-based Otago Exercise on Balance, Gait, and Falls Efficacy of Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ha-Na; Chung, Eunjung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2013-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of augmented reality-based Otago exercise on balance, gait, and falls efficacy of elderly women. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 elderly women, who were randomly divided into two groups: an augmented reality-based Otago exercise group of 10 subjects and an Otago exercise group of 11 subjects. [Methods] All subjects were evaluated for balance (Berg Balance Scale, BBS), gait parameters (velocity, cadence, step length, and stride length), and falls efficacy. Within 12 weeks, Otago exercise for muscle strengthening and balance training was conducted three times, for a period of 60 minutes each, and subjects in the experimental group performed augmented reality-based Otago exercise. [Results] Following intervention, the augmented reality-based Otago exercise group showed significant increases in BBS, velocity, cadence, step length (right side), stride length (right side and left side) and falls efficacy. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest the feasibility and suitability of this augmented reality-based Otago exercise for elderly women.

  10. Development of a Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Charlotte A.; Hebert, Edward; Daigle, Kay; Martin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Relationships have been found between teacher efficacy and many teaching and learning variables, but few researchers have examined teaching efficacy in physical education. The instrument reported here, the Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale, was developed based on the teaching efficacy literature, existing scales, and National Association…

  11. Fear of falling: efficacy of virtual reality associated with serious games in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Fanny; Leboucher, Pierre; Rautureau, Gilles; Komano, Odile; Millet, Bruno; Jouvent, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Fear of falling is defined as an ongoing concern about falling that is not explained by physical examination. Focusing on the psychological dimension of this pathology (phobic reaction to walking), we looked at how virtual reality associated with serious games can be used to treat this pathology. Participants with fear of falling were randomly assigned to either a treatment group or a waiting list. The therapy consisted of 12 weekly sessions of virtual reality exposure therapy associated with serious games. Sixteen participants were included. The mean age of the treatment group was 72 years and that of the control group was 69 years. Participants' scores on the fear of falling measure improved after treatment with virtual reality associated with serious games, leading to a significant difference between the two groups. Virtual reality exposure therapy associated with serious games can be used in the treatment of fear of falling. The two techniques are complementary (top-down and bottom-up processes). To our knowledge, this is the first time that a combination of the two has been assessed. There was a specific effect of this therapy on the phobic reaction. Further studies are needed to confirm its efficacy and identify its underlying mechanism.

  12. Comparison of the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale, Mini-BESTest, and Berg Balance Scale to Predict Falls in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenstedt, Christian; Brombacher, Stephanie; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Weisser, Burkhard; Möller, Bettina; Deuschl, Günther

    2016-04-01

    The correct identification of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) at risk for falling is important to initiate appropriate treatment early. This study compared the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) scale with the Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) to identify individuals with PD at risk for falls and to analyze which of the items of the scales best predict future falls. This was a prospective study to assess predictive criterion-related validity. The study was conducted at a university hospital in an urban community. Eighty-five patients with idiopathic PD (Hoehn and Yahr stages: 1-4) participated in the study. Measures were number of falls (assessed prospectively over 6 months), FAB scale, Mini-BESTest, BBS, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. The FAB scale, Mini-BESTest, and BBS showed similar accuracy to predict future falls, with values for area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.68, 0.65, and 0.69, respectively. A model combining the items "tandem stance," "rise to toes," "one-leg stance," "compensatory stepping backward," "turning," and "placing alternate foot on stool" had an AUC of 0.84 of the ROC curve. There was a dropout rate of 19/85 participants. The FAB scale, Mini-BESTest, and BBS provide moderate capacity to predict "fallers" (people with one or more falls) from "nonfallers." Only some items of the 3 scales contribute to the detection of future falls. Clinicians should particularly focus on the item "tandem stance" along with the items "one-leg stance," "rise to toes," "compensatory stepping backward," "turning 360°," and "placing foot on stool" when analyzing postural control deficits related to fall risk. Future research should analyze whether balance training including the aforementioned items is effective in reducing fall risk. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  13. Musculoskeletal strength, balance performance, and self-efficacy in elderly ving tsun chinese martial art practitioners: implications for fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Liu, Karen P Y; Pang, Marco Y C; Lee, H W; Chung, Joanne W Y; Lam, Priscillia L; Guo, X

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To (1) compare the bone strength, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy between Ving Tsun (VT) martial art practitioners and nonpractitioners and (2) identify the associations between lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy among the VT-trained participants. Methods. Thirty-five VT practitioners (mean age ± SD = 62.7 ± 13.3 years) and 49 nonpractitioners (mean age ± SD = 65.9 ± 10.5 years) participated in the study. The bone strength of the distal radius, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy were assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer, the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSTS), the Berg balance scale (BBS), and the Chinese version of the activities-specific balance confidence scale, respectively. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to compare all the outcome variables between the two groups. Results. Elderly VT practitioners had higher radial bone strength on the dominant side (P performance (P = 0.003), and greater balance confidence (P < 0.001) than the nonpractitioners. Additionally, only the FTSTS time revealed a significant association with the BBS score (r = -0.575,  P = 0.013). Conclusions. VT may be a suitable health-maintenance exercise for the elderly. Our findings may inspire the development of VT fall-prevention exercises for the community-dwelling healthy elderly.

  14. Fear of falling: efficacy of virtual reality associated with serious games in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fanny Levy,1 Pierre Leboucher,2 Gilles Rautureau,2 Odile Komano,2 Bruno Millet,1 Roland Jouvent1 1Department of Adults Psychiatry, 2PRISME-Virtual Reality, ICM-A- IHU, UPMC UMR_S 975, Inserm U 1127, CNRS UMR 7225, GH Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France Objective: Fear of falling is defined as an ongoing concern about falling that is not explained by physical examination. Focusing on the psychological dimension of this pathology (phobic reaction to walking, we looked at how virtual reality associated with serious games can be used to treat this pathology.Methods: Participants with fear of falling were randomly assigned to either a treatment group or a waiting list. The therapy consisted of 12 weekly sessions of virtual reality exposure therapy associated with serious games.Results: Sixteen participants were included. The mean age of the treatment group was 72 years and that of the control group was 69 years. Participants’ scores on the fear of falling measure improved after treatment with virtual reality associated with serious games, leading to a significant difference between the two groups.Conclusion: Virtual reality exposure therapy associated with serious games can be used in the treatment of fear of falling. The two techniques are complementary (top-down and bottom-up processes. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a combination of the two has been assessed. There was a specific effect of this therapy on the phobic reaction. Further studies are needed to confirm its efficacy and identify its underlying mechanism. Keywords: fear of falling, virtual reality exposure therapy, serious games, phobia, anxiety disorders

  15. Efficacy of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to improve balance and prevent falls in older people: study protocol for a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls in older people are a major public health problem, with at least one in three people aged over 65 years falling each year. There is increasing evidence that foot problems and inappropriate footwear increase the risk of falls, however no studies have been undertaken to determine whether modifying these risk factors decreases the risk of falling. This article describes the design of a randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to reduce foot pain, improve balance, and reduce falls in older people. Methods Three hundred community-dwelling men and women aged 65 years and over with current foot pain and an increased risk of falling will be randomly allocated to a control or intervention group. The "usual cae" control group will receive routine podiatry (i.e. nail care and callus debridement. The intervention group will receive usual care plus a multifaceted podiatry intervention consisting of: (i prefabricated insoles customised to accommodate plantar lesions; (ii footwear advice and assistance with the purchase of new footwear if current footwear is inappropriate; (iii a home-based exercise program to strengthen foot and ankle muscles; and (iv a falls prevention education booklet. Primary outcome measures will be the number of fallers, number of multiple fallers and the falls rate recorded by a falls diary over a 12 month period. Secondary outcome measures assessed six months after baseline will include the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12 (SF-12, the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index, the Falls Efficacy Scale International, and a series of balance and functional tests. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Discussion This study is the first randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of podiatry in improving balance and preventing falls. The trial has been pragmatically designed to ensure that the findings can be generalised to clinical practice. If

  16. Efficacy of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to improve balance and prevent falls in older people: study protocol for a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spink, Martin J; Menz, Hylton B; Lord, Stephen R

    2008-11-25

    Falls in older people are a major public health problem, with at least one in three people aged over 65 years falling each year. There is increasing evidence that foot problems and inappropriate footwear increase the risk of falls, however no studies have been undertaken to determine whether modifying these risk factors decreases the risk of falling. This article describes the design of a randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to reduce foot pain, improve balance, and reduce falls in older people. Three hundred community-dwelling men and women aged 65 years and over with current foot pain and an increased risk of falling will be randomly allocated to a control or intervention group. The "usual cae" control group will receive routine podiatry (i.e. nail care and callus debridement). The intervention group will receive usual care plus a multifaceted podiatry intervention consisting of: (i) prefabricated insoles customised to accommodate plantar lesions; (ii) footwear advice and assistance with the purchase of new footwear if current footwear is inappropriate; (iii) a home-based exercise program to strengthen foot and ankle muscles; and (iv) a falls prevention education booklet. Primary outcome measures will be the number of fallers, number of multiple fallers and the falls rate recorded by a falls diary over a 12 month period. Secondary outcome measures assessed six months after baseline will include the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12 (SF-12), the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index, the Falls Efficacy Scale International, and a series of balance and functional tests. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. This study is the first randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of podiatry in improving balance and preventing falls. The trial has been pragmatically designed to ensure that the findings can be generalised to clinical practice. If found to be effective, the multifaceted podiatry

  17. Sliding scale insulin: will the false idol finally fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, N W; Chipps, D R

    2010-09-01

    Despite a lack of evidence that sliding scale insulin has any clinical benefit, and some evidence that it may even be detrimental, sliding scale insulin is still commonly prescribed in hospitals today. Adopting a proactive rather than a reactive approach to managing diabetes by the use of 'supplemental insulin', given in conjunction with either considered adjustments to the patient's regular anti-diabetic therapy or the provision of basal insulin, is a more effective and safer means of improving glycaemic control in hospital. There are now randomized trial data to support this approach. These data, together with the recognition that there is no evidence base for the use of sliding scale insulin, coupled with changes to insulin prescribing charts in Australia, should lead to the demise of sliding scale insulin use in hospital.

  18. Predicting which older adults will or will not fall using the Fullerton Advanced Balance scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Danielle; Rose, Debra J

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) scale can predict faller status in a group of independently functioning older adults. A cross-sectional design was used to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the FAB scale to predict faller status based on a retrospective self-reported fall history. For the purpose of this study, a faller was classified as an older adult with a history of 2 or more falls in the previous 12 months. Multipurpose senior centers in an urban community. A sample of independently functioning older adults (N=192; mean age+/-SD, 77+/-6.5 y). Not applicable. FAB scale, a retrospective history of falls. Binary logistic regression analysis indicated that the total FAB scale score could be used to predict faller status (as determined by a retrospective self-reported fall history). In the present sample, the probability of falling increased by 8% with each 1-point decrease in total FAB scale score. Receiver operating characteristic analysis determined that a cut-off score of 25 out of 40 on the FAB scale produced the highest sensitivity (74.6%) and specificity (52.6%) in predicting faller status. Five individual test items on the FAB scale were particularly predictive of faller status and could be combined to form a short version of the scale that may be even more predictive of faller status and require less time to administer. The FAB scale is a predictive measure of faller status when used with independently functioning older adults. A practitioner can be confident in more than 7 out of 10 cases that an older adult who scores 25 or lower on the FAB scale is at high risk for falls and in need of immediate intervention.

  19. Validation of the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn-Nilas, Christopher; Milhausen, Robin R.; Breuer, Rebecca; Bailey, Julia; Pavlou, Menelaos; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Wingood, Gina M.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed a newly developed Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale designed to measure the sexual communication self-efficacy of adolescent men and women. Three-hundred and seventy-four U.K. adolescents completed this new scale, along with several other validity measures. Factor analysis revealed that the Sexual Communication…

  20. The efficacy of fall-risk-increasing drug (FRID withdrawal for the prevention of falls and fall-related complications: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Yusen Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite limited evidence of effectiveness, withdrawal (discontinuation or dose reduction of high risk medications known as “fall-risk increasing drugs” (FRIDs is typically conducted as a fall prevention strategy based on presumptive benefit. Our objective is to determine the efficacy of fall-risk increasing drugs (FRIDs withdrawal on the prevention of falls and fall-related complications. Methods/design We will search for all published and unpublished randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of FRID withdrawal compared to usual care on the rate of falls, incidence of falls, fall-related injuries, fall-related fractures, fall-related hospitalizations, or adverse effects related to the intervention in adults aged 65 years or older. Electronic database searches will be conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, and CINAHL. A grey literature search will be conducted including clinical trial registries and conference proceedings and abstracts. Two reviewers will independently perform in duplicate citation screening, full-text review, data abstraction, and risk of bias assessment. Conflicts will be resolved through team discussion or by a third reviewer if no consensus can be reached. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE criteria will be used to independently rate overall confidence in effect estimates for each outcome. Results will be synthesized descriptively, and a random effects meta-analysis will be conducted for each outcome if studies are deemed similar methodologically, clinically, and statistically. Discussion We will attempt to determine whether a FRID withdrawal strategy alone is effective at preventing falls in older adults. Our results will be used to optimize and focus fall prevention strategies and initiatives internationally with a goal of improving the health of older adults. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD

  1. The efficacy of fall-risk-increasing drug (FRID) withdrawal for the prevention of falls and fall-related complications: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justin Yusen; Holbrook, Anne

    2017-02-20

    Despite limited evidence of effectiveness, withdrawal (discontinuation or dose reduction) of high risk medications known as "fall-risk increasing drugs" (FRIDs) is typically conducted as a fall prevention strategy based on presumptive benefit. Our objective is to determine the efficacy of fall-risk increasing drugs (FRIDs) withdrawal on the prevention of falls and fall-related complications. We will search for all published and unpublished randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of FRID withdrawal compared to usual care on the rate of falls, incidence of falls, fall-related injuries, fall-related fractures, fall-related hospitalizations, or adverse effects related to the intervention in adults aged 65 years or older. Electronic database searches will be conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and CINAHL. A grey literature search will be conducted including clinical trial registries and conference proceedings and abstracts. Two reviewers will independently perform in duplicate citation screening, full-text review, data abstraction, and risk of bias assessment. Conflicts will be resolved through team discussion or by a third reviewer if no consensus can be reached. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria will be used to independently rate overall confidence in effect estimates for each outcome. Results will be synthesized descriptively, and a random effects meta-analysis will be conducted for each outcome if studies are deemed similar methodologically, clinically, and statistically. We will attempt to determine whether a FRID withdrawal strategy alone is effective at preventing falls in older adults. Our results will be used to optimize and focus fall prevention strategies and initiatives internationally with a goal of improving the health of older adults. PROSPERO CRD42016040203.

  2. An Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy Scale with a Neutral Wording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Kåre

    In this book chapter I present a multidimensional entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) scale. The scale builds on three established ESE-scales, but the reliability of it is improved compared to the original three scales as the highly discipline-specific jargon is transformed to a more neutral...

  3. Principal Self-Efficacy and Work Engagement: Assessing a Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2011-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to develop and test the factor structure of a multidimensional and hierarchical Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale (NPSES). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between principal self-efficacy and work engagement. Principal self-efficacy was measured by the 22-item NPSES. Work…

  4. Musculoskeletal Strength, Balance Performance, and Self-Efficacy in Elderly Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Practitioners: Implications for Fall Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To (1 compare the bone strength, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy between Ving Tsun (VT martial art practitioners and nonpractitioners and (2 identify the associations between lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy among the VT-trained participants. Methods. Thirty-five VT practitioners (mean age ± SD = 62.7 ± 13.3 years and 49 nonpractitioners (mean age ± SD = 65.9 ± 10.5 years participated in the study. The bone strength of the distal radius, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy were assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer, the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSTS, the Berg balance scale (BBS, and the Chinese version of the activities-specific balance confidence scale, respectively. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to compare all the outcome variables between the two groups. Results. Elderly VT practitioners had higher radial bone strength on the dominant side (P<0.05, greater lower limb muscular strength (P=0.001, better functional balance performance (P=0.003, and greater balance confidence (P<0.001 than the nonpractitioners. Additionally, only the FTSTS time revealed a significant association with the BBS score (r=-0.575, P=0.013. Conclusions. VT may be a suitable health-maintenance exercise for the elderly. Our findings may inspire the development of VT fall-prevention exercises for the community-dwelling healthy elderly.

  5. Musculoskeletal Strength, Balance Performance, and Self-Efficacy in Elderly Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Practitioners: Implications for Fall Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Liu, Karen P. Y.; Pang, Marco Y. C.; Lee, H. W.; Chung, Joanne W. Y.; Lam, Priscillia L.; Guo, X.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To (1) compare the bone strength, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy between Ving Tsun (VT) martial art practitioners and nonpractitioners and (2) identify the associations between lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy among the VT-trained participants. Methods. Thirty-five VT practitioners (mean age ± SD = 62.7 ± 13.3 years) and 49 nonpractitioners (mean age ± SD = 65.9 ± 10.5 years) participated in the study. The bone strength of the distal radius, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy were assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer, the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSTS), the Berg balance scale (BBS), and the Chinese version of the activities-specific balance confidence scale, respectively. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to compare all the outcome variables between the two groups. Results. Elderly VT practitioners had higher radial bone strength on the dominant side (P < 0.05), greater lower limb muscular strength (P = 0.001), better functional balance performance (P = 0.003), and greater balance confidence (P < 0.001) than the nonpractitioners. Additionally, only the FTSTS time revealed a significant association with the BBS score (r = −0.575,  P = 0.013). Conclusions. VT may be a suitable health-maintenance exercise for the elderly. Our findings may inspire the development of VT fall-prevention exercises for the community-dwelling healthy elderly. PMID:25530782

  6. Comparison of the Berg Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale to predict falls in community-dwelling adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yong-Jin; Kim, Gyoung-Mo

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the predictive properties of Berg Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance Scales, in a group of independently-functioning community dwelling older adults. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety-seven community-dwelling older adults (male=39, female=58) who were capable of walking independently on assessment were included in this study. A binary logistic regression analysis of the Berg Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale scores was used to investigate a predictive model for fall risk. A receiver operating characteristic analysis was conducted for each, to determine the cut-off for optimal levels of sensitivity and specificity. [Results] The overall prediction success rate was 89.7%; the total Berg Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale scores were significant in predicting fall risk. Receiver operating characteristic analysis determined that a cut-off score of 40 out of 56 on the Berg Balance Scale produced the highest sensitivity (0.82) and specificity (0.67), and a cut-off score of 22 out of 40 on the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale produced the highest sensitivity (0.85) and specificity (0.65) in predicting faller status. [Conclusion] The Berg Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance Scales can predict fall risk, when used for independently-functioning community-dwelling older adults.

  7. Danish version of 'The COPD self-efficacy scale'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emme, Christina; Mortensen, Erik L; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2012-01-01

    enables assessment of self-efficacy in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The scale consists of 34 items, describing situations which may cause dyspnoea in patients with COPD. The CSES was translated into Danish using a standard forward-backward translation procedure......Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; 26; 615-623 Danish version of 'The COPD self-efficacy scale': translation and psychometric properties The aim of the study was to translate 'The COPD self-efficacy scale' (CSES) into Danish and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Danish version (CSES-DK). CSES...

  8. Fall detection and classifications based on time-scale radar signal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Ajay; Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Ahmad, Fauzia

    2014-05-01

    Unattended catastrophic falls result in risk to the lives of elderly. There are growing efforts and rising interest in detecting falls of the aging population, especially those living alone. Radar serves as an effective non-intrusive sensor for detecting human activities. For radar to be effective, it is important to achieve low false alarms, i.e., the system can reliably differentiate between a fall and other human activities. In this paper, we discuss the time-scale based signal analysis of the radar returns from a human target. Reliable features are extracted from the scalogram and are used for fall classifications. The classification results and the advantages of using a wavelet transform are discussed.

  9. The Emotional Self-Efficacy Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qualter, P.; Dacre Pool, L.; Gardner, K.J.; Ashley-Kot, S.; Wise, A.; Wols, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional self-efficacy (ESE) is an important aspect of emotional functioning, with current measures for children and adolescents focused on the measurement of self-beliefs in relation to the management of emotions. In the present study, we report the psychometric properties of the first adaptation

  10. Development and validation of a French Canadian version of the Falls Behavioral (FaB) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiatrault, Johanne; Demers, Louise; Parisien, Manon; Lorthios-Guilledroit, Agathe; Kaegi, Christine; Ménard, Isabelle; Paniconi, Mary-Grace; St-Laurent, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    To develop a French Canadian version of the Falls Behavioral (FaB) Scale and examine its psychometric properties. The FaB was adapted in French Canadian (FaB-FC) and validated according to standard guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation of questionnaires. The internal consistency and construct validity of the FaB-FC were studied among 64 community-dwelling adults aged 60 and over. The concurrent validity and test-retest reliability of the FaB-FC were respectively examined among subsamples including 31 bilingual and 33 unilingual participants. The FaB-FC showed good concurrent validity with the original FaB (ICC2 = 0.94; 0.87-0.97), as well as good test-retest reliability (ICC2 = 0.94; 0.88-0.97). The FaB-FC also demonstrated high internal consistency (α = 0.91). Moreover, analyses showed significant associations of the FaB-FC scores with fear of falling and balance confidence scores, attesting to its construct validity. This study provides evidence that the FaB-FC has sound psychometric properties. Since falls are associated with multiple risk factors, including behavioral factors, the FaB-FC is undoubtedly a relevant assessment tool for clinicians and researchers working toward fall prevention among French-speaking community-dwelling seniors. Fall-related behaviors should be addressed in the assessment of community-dwelling seniors' fall risks. Like the original FaB, the French Canadian version of the tool (FaB-FC) is valid and reliable for assessing fall-related behaviors. The FaB-FC is a relevant complementary assessment tool for identifying seniors at risk for falls. The FaB-FC could also be useful in guiding fall prevention interventions and measuring the impact of these interventions on seniors' behaviors.

  11. Factor Structure of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n = 759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n = 1,798) supported this…

  12. Bone Mineral Density, Balance Performance, Balance Self-Efficacy, and Falls in Breast Cancer Survivors With and Without Qigong Training: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Choi, Anna W M; Luk, W S; Yam, Timothy T T; Leung, Joyce C Y; Chung, Joanne W Y

    2018-03-01

    A deterioration in bone strength and balance performance after breast cancer treatment can result in injurious falls. Therefore, interventions need to be developed to improve the bone strength and balance ability of breast cancer survivors. This cross-sectional exploratory study aimed to compare the bone mineral density (BMD), balance performance, balance self-efficacy, and number of falls between breast cancer survivors who practiced qigong, breast cancer survivors who did not practice qigong, and healthy individuals. The study included 40 breast cancer survivors with more than 3 months of qigong experience, 17 breast cancer survivors with no qigong experience, and 36 healthy controls. All the participants underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans to measure their lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, and total radius BMDs. The participants also underwent a timed one-leg stand test to measure their single-leg standing balance. The participants' balance self-efficacy was assessed using the activities-specific balance confidence scale, and the number of falls experienced by each participant was assessed in a face-to-face interview. The lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, and total radius BMDs were similar between the 3 groups ( P > .05). The breast cancer-qigong group outperformed the breast cancer-control group by 27.3% when they performed the one-leg stand test on a foam surface ( P = .025), and they also had a higher balance self-efficacy score ( P = .006). Nevertheless, the numbers of falls were comparable between the 3 groups ( P > .05). Qigong may be a suitable exercise for improving the balance performance and balance self-efficacy of breast cancer survivors.

  13. Validation of the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn-Nilas, Christopher; Milhausen, Robin R; Breuer, Rebecca; Bailey, Julia; Pavlou, Menelaos; DiClemente, Ralph J; Wingood, Gina M

    2016-04-01

    This study assessed a newly developed Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale designed to measure the sexual communication self-efficacy of adolescent men and women. Three-hundred and seventy-four U.K. adolescents completed this new scale, along with several other validity measures. Factor analysis revealed that the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale consisted of five underlying factors: contraception communication, positive sexual messages, negative sexual messages, sexual history, and condom negotiation. These factors demonstrated high internal consistency and presents evidence to support construct validity. This scale may have utility in assessing the effectiveness of interventions designed to enhance sexual communication and sexual health behaviors among young people. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. The efficacy of treadmill training with and without projected visual context for improving walking ability and reducing fall incidence and fear of falling in older adults with fall-related hip fracture: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Roerdink, Melvyn; Trekop, Marga; Janssen, Thomas W J; Beek, Peter J

    2016-12-28

    The ability to adjust walking to environmental context is often reduced in older adults and, partly as result of this, falls are common in this population. A treadmill with visual context projected on its belt (e.g., obstacles and targets) allows for practicing step adjustments relative to that context, while concurrently exploiting the great amount of walking practice associated with conventional treadmill training. The present study was conducted to compare the efficacy of adaptability treadmill training, conventional treadmill training and usual physical therapy in improving walking ability and reducing fear of falling and fall incidence in older adults during rehabilitation from a fall-related hip fracture. In this parallel-group, open randomized controlled trial, seventy older adults with a recent fall-related hip fracture (83.3 ± 6.7 years, mean ± standard deviation) were recruited from inpatient rehabilitation care and block randomized to six weeks inpatient adaptability treadmill training (n = 24), conventional treadmill training (n = 23) or usual physical therapy (n = 23). Group allocation was only blind for assessors. Measures related to walking ability were assessed as the primary outcome before and after the intervention and at 4-week and 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included general health, fear of falling, fall rate and proportion of fallers. Measures of general walking ability, general health and fear of falling improved significantly over time. Significant differences among the three intervention groups were only found for the Functional Ambulation Category and the dual-task effect on walking speed, which were in favor of respectively conventional treadmill training and adaptability treadmill training. Overall, adaptability treadmill training, conventional treadmill training and usual physical therapy resulted in similar effects on walking ability, fear of falling and fall incidence in older adults rehabilitating

  15. Widowed parenting self-efficacy scale: A new measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Teresa P; Yopp, Justin M; Park, Eliza M; Deal, Allison; Biesecker, Barbara B; Rosenstein, Donald L

    2018-04-01

    The authors developed and tested a novel measure of parenting self-efficacy specifically for recently widowed parents of dependent-age children. They tested the scale among 244 recently widowed fathers via an open-access web survey. Exploratory factor analysis identified 3 factors: perception of meeting parenting expectations (α = .88), provision of effective discipline (α = .69), and sense of parental burden (α = .69). Scores on the new scale correlated positively with Kansas Parenting Satisfaction and Psychological Adaptation Scale scores, and negatively with CES-D (depression) and TRIG (grief) scale scores. The resulting 9-item Widowed Parenting Self Efficacy Scale is a promising measure for use in research and clinical settings.

  16. Development of a Self-Efficacy Scale toward Piano Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtuldu, M. Kayhan; Bulut, Damla

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a valid and reliable scale to determine students' levels of self-efficacy toward piano lessons. The sample consisted of 456 university-level piano students enrolled in Music Education programs. Experts in language and the field of music were consulted to establish content validity of the items included in the scalar…

  17. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Larkin; Gammage, Kimberley L.; Sullivan, Philip J.; Gabriel, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale (SPES) developed by Gammage, Hall, and Martin Ginis (2004). University students (196 men and 269 women) completed the SPES and measures of social physique anxiety, fear of negative evaluation, and physical activity. Participants also completed the SPES a…

  18. Activities-specific balance confidence scale for predicting future falls in Indian older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiz JA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jamal Ali Moiz,1 Vishal Bansal,2 Majumi M Noohu,1 Shailendra Nath Gaur,3 Mohammad Ejaz Hussain,1 Shahnawaz Anwer,4,5 Ahmad Alghadir4 1Centre for Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India; 2Department of Physiology, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, University of Delhi, Delhi, India; 4Rehabilitation Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Musculoskeletal Science, Dr D.Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India Background: Activities-specific balance confidence (ABC scale is a subjective measure of confidence in performing various ambulatory activities without falling or experiencing a sense of unsteadiness. Objective: This study aimed to examine the ability of the Hindi version of the ABC scale (ABC-H scale to discriminate between fallers and non-fallers and to examine its predictive validity for prospective falls. Design: This was a prospective cohort study. Materials and methods: A total of 125 community-dwelling older adults (88 were men completed the ABC-H scale. The occurrence of falls over the follow-up period of 12 months was recorded. Discriminative validity was analyzed by comparing the total ABC-H scale scores between the faller and non-faller groups. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and a logistic regression analysis were used to examine the predictive accuracy of the ABC-H scale. Results: The mean ABC-H scale score of the faller group was significantly lower than that of the non-faller group (52.6±8.1 vs 73.1±12.2; P<0.001. The optimal cutoff value for distinguishing faller and non-faller adults was ≤58.13. The sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of the cutoff score were 86.3%, 87.3%, 0.91 (P<0.001, 6.84, and 0.16, respectively. The percentage test accuracy and false-positive and

  19. Developing and Validating the Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Gretchen L; Stylianou, Amanda M; Hetling, Andrea; Postmus, Judy L

    2017-05-01

    Experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) and financial hardship are often intertwined. The dynamics of an abusive relationship may include economic abuse tactics that compromise a survivor's ability to work, pursue education, have access to financial resources, and establish financial skills, knowledge, and security. An increasingly common goal among programs serving IPV survivors is increasing financial empowerment through financial literacy. However, providing financial education alone may not be enough to improve financial behaviors. Psychological factors also play a role when individuals make financial choices. Economic self-efficacy focuses on the individual's perceived ability to perform economic or financial tasks, and may be considered a primary influence on one's ability to improve financial decisions and behaviors. The current study tests the reliability and validity of a Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy with a sample of female survivors of IPV. This study uses a calibration and validation analysis model including full and split-sample exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, assesses for internal consistency, and examines correlation coefficients between economic self-efficacy, economic self-sufficiency, financial strain, and difficulty living with income. Findings indicate that the 10-item, unidimensional Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy demonstrates strong reliability and validity among this sample of IPV survivors. An ability to understand economic self-efficacy could facilitate individualized service approaches and allow practitioners to better support IPV survivors on their journey toward financial empowerment. Given the increase in programs focused on assets, financial empowerment, and economic well-being, the Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy has potential as a very timely and relevant tool in the design, implementation, and evaluation of such programs, and specifically for programs created for IPV survivors.

  20. Use and clinical efficacy of standard and health information technology fall risk assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Ruth C; Wilson, Anne; Ranasinghe, Damith; Visvanathan, Renuka

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the health information technology (HIT) compared to Fall Risk for Older Persons (FROP) tool in fall risk screening. A HIT tool trial was conducted on the geriatric evaluation and management (GEM, n = 111) and acute medical units (AMU, n = 424). Health information technology and FROP scores were higher on GEM versus AMU, with no differences between people who fell and people who did not fall. Both score completion rates were similar, and their values correlated marginally (Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.33, P technology tool acceptability and scoring were comparable to FROP screening, with mixed effects on fall rate with HIT tool implementation. Clinician partnership remains key to effective tool development. © 2017 AJA Inc.

  1. Self-efficacy scale for Brazilians with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Alves Gastal

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Diabetes is a public health problem and good glycemic control is able to prevent or contain its complications. Self-efficacy is a key factor in successfully achieving behavior goals. The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the insulin management diabetes self-efficacy scale (IMDSES on type 1 diabetes patients from southern Brazil. DESIGN AND SETTING: Validation study in two cities in southern Brazil. METHODS: The psychometric properties of IMDSES were evaluated in a population of type 1 diabetes patients (n = 213, from September to December 2004, who were attended within the Brazilian public healthcare system. Principal component analysis was conducted to develop the subscales. Cronbach’s alpha was used as the reliability coefficient. RESULTS: The analysis of psychometric properties resulted in an IMDSES consisting of 20 items and three subscales: diet (alpha: 0.83, insulin (alpha: 0.92 and general management (alpha: 0.78 and accounted for 53% of the variance. Criteria validity was investigated through two parameters: glycohemoglobin, which showed significant association with self-efficacy on the insulin subscale (p = 0.04, and the variable "adherence", which was significantly associated with self-efficacy on two subscales (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the IMDSES is valid and reliable, and can be used to measure results from diabetes educational programs and to measure self-efficacy relating to diabetes management, for possible interventions.

  2. Investigation of the falling water flow with evaporation for the passive containment cooling system and its scaling-down criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Li, Junming; Li, Le

    2018-02-01

    Falling water evaporation cooling could efficiently suppress the containment operation pressure during the nuclear accident, by continually removing the core decay heat to the atmospheric environment. In order to identify the process of large-scale falling water evaporation cooling, the water flow characteristics of falling film, film rupture and falling rivulet were deduced, on the basis of previous correlation studies. The influences of the contact angle, water temperature and water flow rates on water converge along the flow direction were then numerically obtained and results were compared with the data for AP1000 and CAP1400 nuclear power plants. By comparisons, it is concluded that the water coverage fraction of falling water could be enhanced by either reducing the surface contact angle or increasing the water temperature. The falling water flow with evaporation for AP1000 containment was then calculated and the feature of its water coverage fraction was analyzed. Finally, based on the phenomena identification of falling water flow for AP1000 containment evaporation cooling, the scaling-down is performed and the dimensionless criteria were obtained.

  3. Comparison of the Validity of Four Fall-Related Psychological Measures in a Community-Based Falls Risk Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Delilah S.; Ellis, Rebecca; Kosma, Maria; Fabre, Jennifer M.; McCarter, Kevin S.; Wood, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the measurement properties of fall-related psychological instruments with a sample of 133 older adults (M age = 74.4 years, SD = 9.4). Measures included the Comprehensive Falls Risk Screening Instrument, Falls-efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), modified Survey of Activities and Fear of…

  4. Validity and reliability of the Chinese version of the Daily Living Self-Efficacy Scale among stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Hui-Lin; Fang, Liang; Bi, Rui-Xue; Fang, Xiao-Qun; Hu, Min

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Daily Living Self-Efficacy Scale (DLSES) in stroke patients. In total, 172 participants were recruited from a local hospital in China. The internal consistent reliability and convergent validity of the total scale and activities of daily living (ADL) and psychosocial functioning subscales were examined and factor analysis was carried out. Cronbach's αs for the Chinese version of the DLSES, ADL subscale, and psychosocial subscale were 0.96, 0.90, and 0.95, respectively. In the factor analysis, two factors (ADL and psychosocial functioning) were extracted, explaining 84.4% of the total variance in self-efficacy (χ/d.f.=2.19, root mean square error of approximation=0.08, normed fit index=0.95, comparative fit index=0.98, incremental fit index=0.98). Convergent validity was confirmed by positive relationships between the Chinese version of the DLSES and the Modified Fall Efficacy Scale (r=0.87). The ADL subscale was associated positively with the Barthel Index (r=0.74) and the psychosocial functioning subscale was associated negatively with the Functional Activities Questionnaire (r=-0.73) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (r=-0.44). The Chinese version of the DLSES was shown to be a reliable and valid measure of self-efficacy in stroke patients.

  5. Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching Scale Development: Construct Validation with Elementary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangin, Selami; Sidekli, Sabri

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of teacher self-efficacy has a history of more than 30 years. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the development and validation of a new scale to measure the science teaching self-efficacy of elementary school teachers. Therefore, a scale has been created to measure elementary teachers' science teaching self-efficacy and…

  6. [Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale - Psychometric properties of the Polish version of the scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baka, Łukasz

    2017-10-17

    Self-efficacy refers to different spheres of human functioning and to different tasks, including teaching activity. It is regarded as an important personal resource related to coping with stress. This paper was aimed at presenting psychometric properties of the Norwegian Teachers Self-Efficacy Scale (NTSES), related to these beliefs in the group of teachers. Psychometric properties of the scale were evaluated on the basis of the data obtained from 404 teachers of elementary and middle schools. Our analyses of exploratory and confirmatory factor revealed a 3-dimensional structure, but not a 6-dimensional structure of NTSES as obtained in the original Norwegian study. They also showed high reliability and construct validity coefficients. Teachers self-efficacy was positively correlated with general self-efficacy, internal locus of control and negatively with job burnout. Although NTSES can be used in the study of Polish teachers, this should be done with great caution and the measure of global index of NTSES should be used. Additional studies on a larger sample of teachers are recommended. Med Pr 2017;68(6):743-755. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale – Psychometric properties of the Polish version of the scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Baka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-efficacy refers to different spheres of human functioning and to different tasks, including teaching activity. It is regarded as an important personal resource related to coping with stress. This paper was aimed at presenting psychometric properties of the Norwegian Teachers Self-Efficacy Scale (NTSES, related to these beliefs in the group of teachers. Material and Methods: Psychometric properties of the scale were evaluated on the basis of the data obtained from 404 teachers of elementary and middle schools. Results: Our analyses of exploratory and confirmatory factor revealed a 3-dimensional structure, but not a 6-dimensional structure of NTSES as obtained in the original Norwegian study. They also showed high reliability and construct validity coefficients. Teachers self-efficacy was positively correlated with general self-efficacy, internal locus of control and negatively with job burnout. Conclusions: Although NTSES can be used in the study of Polish teachers, this should be done with great caution and the measure of global index of NTSES should be used. Additional studies on a larger sample of teachers are recommended. Med Pr 2017;68(6:743–755

  8. Measuring technology self efficacy: reliability and construct validity of a modified computer self efficacy scale in a clinical rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Kate; George, Stacey; Ratcliffe, Julie; Crotty, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To describe a modification of the computer self efficacy scale for use in clinical settings and to report on the modified scale's reliability and construct validity. The computer self efficacy scale was modified to make it applicable for clinical settings (for use with older people or people with disabilities using everyday technologies). The modified scale was piloted, then tested with patients in an Australian inpatient rehabilitation setting (n = 88) to determine the internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Construct validity was assessed by correlation of the scale with age and technology use. Factor analysis using principal components analysis was undertaken to identify important constructs within the scale. The modified computer self efficacy scale demonstrated high internal consistency with a standardised alpha coefficient of 0.94. Two constructs within the scale were apparent; using the technology alone, and using the technology with the support of others. Scores on the scale were correlated with age and frequency of use of some technologies thereby supporting construct validity. The modified computer self efficacy scale has demonstrated reliability and construct validity for measuring the self efficacy of older people or people with disabilities when using everyday technologies. This tool has the potential to assist clinicians in identifying older patients who may be more open to using new technologies to maintain independence.

  9. Impact of SCALE-UP on science teaching self-efficacy of students in general education science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Mary Kay Kuhr

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two pedagogical models used in general education science on non-majors' science teaching self-efficacy. Science teaching self-efficacy can be influenced by inquiry and cooperative learning, through cognitive mechanisms described by Bandura (1997). The Student Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) model of inquiry and cooperative learning incorporates cooperative learning and inquiry-guided learning in large enrollment combined lecture-laboratory classes (Oliver-Hoyo & Beichner, 2004). SCALE-UP was adopted by a small but rapidly growing public university in the southeastern United States in three undergraduate, general education science courses for non-science majors in the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters. Students in these courses were compared with students in three other general education science courses for non-science majors taught with the standard teaching model at the host university. The standard model combines lecture and laboratory in the same course, with smaller enrollments and utilizes cooperative learning. Science teaching self-efficacy was measured using the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument - B (STEBI-B; Bleicher, 2004). A science teaching self-efficacy score was computed from the Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PTSE) factor of the instrument. Using non-parametric statistics, no significant difference was found between teaching models, between genders, within models, among instructors, or among courses. The number of previous science courses was significantly correlated with PTSE score. Student responses to open-ended questions indicated that students felt the larger enrollment in the SCALE-UP room reduced individual teacher attention but that the large round SCALE-UP tables promoted group interaction. Students responded positively to cooperative and hands-on activities, and would encourage inclusion of more such activities in all of the

  10. The Efficacy of Fish Scales as Bone Graft Alternative Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Gani Soulissa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bone graft application is a therapy that could be used to repair bone and minimize bone resorption. However, current bone graft materials carry risks for the recipient. Studies on alloplast, which can be found in fish bones and scales have been developed in the past few years. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the efficacy of hydroxyapatite powder from white barramundi (Lates calcarifer fish scales as bone graft material in the mandibular defect regeneration of rats. Methods: This experimental laboratory study utilized 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 16 weeks as test subjects, where 12 were used for control groups and the other 12 were used as the experimental group. All were given bone defects of 3 mm on the right mandible, split into 6 groups of 4 (3 experimental and 3 control groups, and the groups were observed for 2, 4, and 6 weeks respectively. The surgery results were assessed by radiography and histopathologic analysis. Result: Radiography results showed that the highest bone growth was found in the 6 weeks treatment group with 100% growth, followed by the 4 weeks treatment group with 88.89% growth, and last was the 2 weeks treatment group with 66.67% growth. The Mann-Whitney test showed that there is a significant difference between pre- and post-intervention (p-value=0.026. Histopathologic analysis showed the presence of osteocytes and osteoblasts in the 6 weeks treatment group. Conclusion: It can be concluded that hydroxyapatite powder from white barramundi fish scales can be used as a bone graft alternative material.

  11. Balance ability measured with the Berg balance scale: a determinant of fall history in community-dwelling adults with leg amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher Kevin; Chen, Christine C; Blackwell, Wren M; Rahal, Rana T; Benoy, Stephany A

    2015-01-01

    Falls are common among adults with leg amputations and associated with balance confidence. But subjective confidence is not equivalent with physical ability. This multivariate analyses of community-dwelling adults with leg amputations examined relationships among individual characteristics, falls, balance ability and balance confidence. Cross-sectional study. Community-dwelling adults with leg amputations recruited from a support group and prosthetic clinic. Subjects provided self-reported medical/fall history, prosthetic functional use, and Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) questionnaire data. Balance ability was assessed with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Fall incidence was categorized as any fall (one or more) and recurrent falls (more than one). Multivariate logistic regression analyzed relationships within the two fall categories. Cross tabulations and ANOVA analyzed differences among subcategories. Fifty-four subjects (mean age 56.8) with various etiologies, amputation levels, and balance abilities participated. 53.7% had any fall; 25.9% had recurrent falls. Models for both fall categories correctly classified fall history in > 70% of subjects with combinations of the variables ABC, BBS, body-mass-index, and amputation level. Falls occurred regardless of clinical characteristics. Total BBS and select item scores were independent determinants of fall history. Unlike other balance-impaired populations, adults with leg amputation and better balance ability had greater odds of falling.

  12. Self-Efficacy in Social Work: Development and Initial Validation of the Self-Efficacy Scale for Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Pedrazza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-efficacy beliefs do not reflect a generic sense of competence, but are instead context-specific. Therefore, self-efficacy should be assessed by using an ad hoc scale measuring individual behaviors that allows social workers to exercise influence over events that affect their work life. The present study describes the development and initial validation of the self-efficacy scale for social workers (SESSW. Items were generated through the Critical Incident Technique. Sixteen social workers with at least 10 years of service participated in two focus groups; they were asked to recall critical incidents in their work and to indicate the most effective behaviors to manage the incidents. Content analysis of the focus group transcripts provided 13 key self-efficacy beliefs. The 13-item scale was validated with a sample of 805 social workers. Data were analyzed using a split-sample technique. Exploratory factor analysis on the first split sample (n = 402 revealed three dimensions of self-efficacy, corresponding to emotion regulation, support request, and procedural self-efficacy. The three-factor structure of the scale was further confirmed with confirmatory factor analysis on the second split sample (n = 403. Our results show that SESSW is an adequate instrument for assessment of self-efficacy beliefs in social work.

  13. Fear of falling and falls in people with Parkinson's disease treated with deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M H; Rehncrona, S; Jarnlo, G-B

    2011-06-01

    No previous study prospectively investigated the effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on fear of falling (FOF) and falls. The aim was to prospectively explore whether FOF and fall rate were affected after STN stimulation in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty participants (mean age: 65, SD 6.4) were included. Falls and near falls were recorded (fall diary) during 3 months before and 1 year after surgery. FOF was evaluated using the Falls-Efficacy Scale, Swedish version, FES(S), and the modified Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE). After surgery, the FES(S) scores of complex activities improved (P=0.026), i.e. median 34 (q1-q3, 26-50) vs 43 (32-55). SAFFE scores also improved (P=0.007): median 25 (22-30) versus 22 (18-27). The rate of near falls decreased (P=0.014). Nine participants reported no near falls. For the remaining ten participants, the median near fall rate decreased from 6 (3-17) to 2 (1-8). The rate of falls showed no significant (P>0.3) difference. After surgery, fewer activities were avoided owing to the risk of falling, and fall-related self-efficacy had improved during complex activities. The rate of near falls decreased. The results cannot support any change in fall rate. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Compliant flooring to prevent fall-related injuries in older adults: A scoping review of biomechanical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and workplace safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Chantelle C; Jurkowski, Michal P; Dymarz, Ania C; Robinovitch, Stephen N; Feldman, Fabio; Laing, Andrew C; Mackey, Dawn C

    2017-01-01

    Compliant flooring, broadly defined as flooring systems or floor coverings with some level of shock absorbency, may reduce the incidence and severity of fall-related injuries in older adults; however, a lack of synthesized evidence may be limiting widespread uptake. Informed by the Arksey and O'Malley framework and guided by a Research Advisory Panel of knowledge users, we conducted a scoping review to answer: what is presented about the biomechanical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and workplace safety associated with compliant flooring systems that aim to prevent fall-related injuries in healthcare settings? We searched academic and grey literature databases. Any record that discussed a compliant flooring system and at least one of biomechanical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, or workplace safety was eligible for inclusion. Two independent reviewers screened and abstracted records, charted data, and summarized results. After screening 3611 titles and abstracts and 166 full-text articles, we included 84 records plus 56 companion (supplementary) reports. Biomechanical efficacy records (n = 50) demonstrate compliant flooring can reduce fall-related impact forces with minimal effects on standing and walking balance. Clinical effectiveness records (n = 20) suggest that compliant flooring may reduce injuries, but may increase risk for falls. Preliminary evidence suggests that compliant flooring may be a cost-effective strategy (n = 12), but may also result in increased physical demands for healthcare workers (n = 17). In summary, compliant flooring is a promising strategy for preventing fall-related injuries from a biomechanical perspective. Additional research is warranted to confirm whether compliant flooring (i) prevents fall-related injuries in real-world settings, (ii) is a cost-effective intervention strategy, and (iii) can be installed without negatively impacting workplace safety. Avenues for future research are

  15. Turkish validity and reliability of the Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talip Mankan

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale is a valid and reliable instrument for determining the self-efficacy of patients and providing a proper care. It can be suggested to investigate and evaluate the consistency of the scale by applying it to broader sample groups representing different socioeconomic levels.

  16. Low admission Norton scale scores are associated with falls long after rehabilitation in the elderly with hip fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halperin E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ehud Halperin,1 Tal Engel,2 Shany Sherman,2 Dan Justo2,31Department of Internal Medicine D, Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, 2Department of Internal Medicine E, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, 3Department of Geriatrics, Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, IsraelBackground: In this study, we investigated if low admission Norton scale scores (ANSS are associated with falls, fractures, hospitalizations, and death, after rehabilitation in the elderly with hip fractures.Methods: This prospective historical study followed consecutive elderly patients (≥65 years who were admitted for rehabilitation following hip fracture surgery during 2009 and followed up in January or February 2012. The incidence of falls, number of falls, incidence of fractures, number of hospitalizations, and death rates were compared between patients with low (≤14 and high (≥15 ANSS.Results: The final cohort included 174 patients of mean age 83.6 ± 6.2 years, with 133 (76.4% being women. Fifty-seven (27.0% patients died during follow-up. Of the remaining 127 patients, 44 (34.6% fell at least once and 15 (11.8% suffered fractures. Overall, 81 (46.6% patients had a low ANSS. Relative to patients with a high ANSS, they had a higher incidence of falls (odds ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.5–7.1; P = 0.002 and fell more times (1.2 ± 1.8 versus 0.6 ± 1.7; P = 0.002. Regression analysis showed that ANSS (as a parametric variable as well as a low ANSS (as a nonparametric variable were independently associated with falls (P = 0.002 and P = 0.009, respectively. There were no differences between patients with low and high ANSS in terms of incidence of fractures, number of hospitalizations, and death rates.Conclusion: The Norton scoring system may be used for predicting falls long after rehabilitation in the elderly with hip fractures.Keywords: falls, hip fracture, Norton scale, rehabilitation

  17. Fear of falling and associated factors in community elderly with cataracts

    OpenAIRE

    Cascalho, Lorena de Andrade; Paz, Leonardo Petrus da Silva; Romão, Juliana de Faria Fracon e; Menezes, Ruth Losada de

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate prevalence of the fear of falling of elderly with cataracts living in the community and the associated factors with high concern with falling occurrences. Methods: A cross-sectional, analytical and observational study. It was composed by 86 elderly diagnosed with bilateral cataracts. To quantify the fear of falling among elderly, the scale Falls Efficacy Scale-International-Brasil (FES-I-BRASIL) was used. Other variables were obtained through application o...

  18. Fear of Falling in Older Adults: Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukyoo Jung, PhD, RN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Fear of falling has been reported in a high percentage of community-dwelling elderly who both do and don't have a history of falling. The aims of this review are to: (a elucidate the definition of fear of falling; (b clarify measurements of fear of falling based on its definition; and (c describe the risk factors for fear of falling. Despite the importance of the percentage and the consequences of fear of falling, its definition is still vague and warrants clarification. Based on a literature review, major fear of falling measurements involve the evaluation of fear of falling and use of a fall efficacy scale. Using a correct definition of fear of falling, nurses working close with older adults need to identify the different definitions of fear of falling and fall efficacy scale. In addition, nurses who work closely with older adults should encourage them to increase or maintain modifiable factors by maximizing their basic health status and enhancing their physical activity to decrease fear of falling.

  19. [The validity and reliability of the general self-efficacy scale-Turkish form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Fatma; Ilhan, Inci Ozgür

    2010-01-01

    Self-efficacy, which is a basic construct in social cognitive theory, has been defined as one's belief in his/her ability to start, continue, and complete an action in a manner that has an impact on his/her environment. This study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of the General Self-Efficacy Scale-Turkish Form. The General Self-Efficacy Scale-Turkish Form was administered to 895 individuals ?18 years of age that had at least 5 years of education. Exploratory factor analysis, criterion validity testing (using the Beck Depression Scale, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory, Locus of Control Scale, Learned Resourcefulness Scale, and Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory), internal consistency analysis, and test-retest reliability analysis were performed. The 3-factor structure of the scale explained 41.5% of the observed variance. Correlations between the General Self-Efficacy Scale-Turkish Form and the other measures were statistically significant. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the entire scale was 0.80 and the test-retest reliability coefficient estimated from data for 236 individuals that were contacted for follow-up was 0.69. The General Self-Efficacy Scale-Turkish Form is a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of general self-efficacy in individuals ?18 years of age with at least 5 years of education.

  20. [Scale Mosaic: definition and testing of a tool for assessing the risk of falling and the care planning during hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprani, Riccarda; Taglioni, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    in year 2008 the Ausl of Ravenna had a small number of patients at risk among the patients fallen, and among the patients evaluated with risk for fall. This could be due to the rating scale used (Conley) that does not recognize the risk factors "drug therapy" and "conditions clinical care". to experiment a rating scale (Mosaic), to evaluate the performance indicators compared to the scales Conley, Fall Risk Assessment Scoring System (FRASS), Stratity; evaluate the effectiveness of actions taken to manage the risk; Operators remain vigilant about the risk falls. using the scale Mosaic for patients admitted in 16 Hospital Units for two-months. Performance indicators: sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative. Studies considered for comparison: Hospital (AO) Bologna for Conley, AO Bologna and AO Niguarda Cà Granda Milan for Stratify, AO Bergamo for FRASS. were analyzed 1474 tabs. Males are 848 (57.5%) and females 626 (43.5%), the average age is 70.8 years. Of these 42 patients have fallen (2.8%), including 25 males and 17 females and the average age is 72.2. Are not at risk 426 (29%) patients and at risk 1048 (71%) patients. In other assessments the patients at risk was 31% in AUSL Ravenna, 59% (Conley) and 13% (Stratify) in AO Bologna and 41.5% (FRASS) in AO Bergamo. The scale Mosaic has a sensitivity of 0.98 (Conley, Stratify and FRASS amounted to 0.69, to 0.20, to 0.50), a specificity of 0.30 (Conley, Stratify and FRASS amounted to 0.41, 0.87, 0.59.) The patients fallen are at risk in 41 cases (97%) and of these 24 low-risk. The most frequent risk factors are: "mobility and gait" (1209 items), "drug therapy" (850 items) , "conditions clinical care" (841 items). Planned actions have an average of 2.2 in patients fallen, of 3.5 in low-risk patients and of 4.48 in patients at high risk. Compared with the previous year shows a decrease of 14 falls and an increase in the level of outcome "no one" (from 61% to 73.5%). the greater number of falls

  1. An Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy Scale with a Neutral Wording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Kåre

    in the scale, and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) has been applied to investigate its convergent, discriminatory and nomological validity. The results demonstrate support for a multidimensional ESE-scale with high predictive validity regarding entrepreneurial behaviours and with high reliability...

  2. Discriminative and predictive validity of the short-form activities-specific balance confidence scale for predicting fall of stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, SeungHeon; Lee, Yunbok; Lee, DongGeon; Cho, Ki-Hun; Lee, GyuChang; Park, Dong-Sik

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to investigate the discriminative validity of the short-form activities-specific balance confidence scale (ABC scale) in predicting falls, and its validity. [Subjects and Methods] 43 stroke survivors were identified as a group with a history of multiple falls (faller group) and a group without or with a history of one falls (non-faller group). The balance confidence was examined using the ABC scale and the short-form ABC scale. Functional abilities were examined with Fugl-Meyer assessment, sit-to-stand test, and Berg balance scale. [Results] The area under the curve of the ABC scale and the short-form ABC scale in predicting fall was>0.77. This result indicates that both examination tools have discriminative validity in predicting falls. Although both tools showed an identical predictable specificity of 72% in the non-faller and faller groups, the short-form ABC scale exhibited a predictable sensitivity of 86% in the faller group, which is higher than that of the ABC scale (71%). [Conclusion] Results of this study showed that the short-form ABC scale is an efficient clinical tool to evaluate and predict the balance confidence of stroke survivors.

  3. Construction and Validation of a Self-Efficacy Scale for Latex Barrier Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell-Mengual, Vicente; Gil-Llario, María Dolores; Castro-Calvo, Jesús

    2016-03-22

    Some studies have concluded there is a relationship between perceived self-efficacy and behaviors that prevent HIV transmission. This paper presents the construction and validation of the latex barrier use self-efficacy scale (LBSS), which 480 participants filled out. Exploratory factor analysis yielded two components: positive expectations of self-efficacy (ES-POS) and negative expectations of self-efficacy (ES-NEG), which together accounted for 65.59% of total variance. That structure was later verified through confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was .80 for the total scale, and .78 for each of the two factors. Moreover, the instrument had adequate convergent validity and was positively related with condom use self-efficacy, attitudes toward condom and latex barrier use, and ability to refuse sex if the partner refuses to use preventive methods. In conclusion, this instrument is a useful measure of self-efficacy in latex barrier use.

  4. Comparison of the Berg Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale to predict falls in community-dwelling adults

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Yong-Jin; Kim, Gyoung-Mo

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the predictive properties of Berg Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance Scales, in a group of independently-functioning community dwelling older adults. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety-seven community-dwelling older adults (male=39, female=58) who were capable of walking independently on assessment were included in this study. A binary logistic regression analysis of the Berg Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance S...

  5. Technical Analysis of Scores on the "Self-Efficacy Self-Report Scale"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erford, Bradley T.; Schein, Hallie; Duncan, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary analysis of reliability and validity of scores on the "Self-Efficacy Self-Report Scale", which was designed to assess general self-efficacy in students aged 10 to 17 years. Confirmatory factor analysis on cross-validated samples was conducted revealing a marginal fit of the data to the…

  6. Reliability of a Scale of Work-Related Self-Efficacy for People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Work-related self-efficacy at a core task level fits with the social cognitive career theory explaining the career development of people with severe mental illness. The aim of this study was to further investigate the psychometric properties of the "Work-related Self- Efficacy Scale" for use with people with psychiatric disabilities. Sixty…

  7. A Scale to Measure Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Deaf-Blindness Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The Teacher Efficacy in Deafblindness Education Scale (TEDE) was developed to expand the construct of self-efficacy to teach children with deaf-blindness. Methods: Eighty-seven special educators in the United States were asked to rate their confidence to perform a variety of tasks that are associated with teaching children who are…

  8. Analysis of the Construct Validity and Measurement Invariance of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    The Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale – Short Form (CDSE-SF) is one of the most frequently used instruments to assess individual levels of career-related self-efficacy. The present study used the partial credit model within the framework of item response theory to examine the content, structural...

  9. Development of a Scale to Assess Physician Advance Care Planning Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Kristin R; Ludwick, Ruth; Fischbein, Rebecca; McCormick, Kenelm; Meeker, James; Hewit, Mike; Drost, Jennifer; Kropp, Denise

    2017-06-01

    Although patients prefer that physicians initiate advance care planning (ACP) conversations, few physicians regularly do so. Physicians may be reluctant to initiate ACP conversations because they lack self-efficacy in their skills. Yet, no validated scale on self-efficacy for ACP exists. Our objective was to develop a scale that measures physicians' ACP self-efficacy (ACP-SE) and to investigate the validity of the tool. Electronic questionnaires were administered to a random sample of family medicine physicians (n = 188). Exploratory factor analysis was performed to determine whether the scale was multidimensional. An initial assessment of the scale's validity was also conducted. The exploratory factor analysis indicated that a single factor was appropriate using all 17 items. A single, unidimensional scale was created by averaging the 17 items, yielding good internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.95). The average scale score was 3.94 (standard deviation = 0.71) on a scale from 1 to 5. The scale was moderately correlated with a global single-item measure of self-efficacy for ACP ( r = .79, P < .001), and the scale differentiated between physician groups based on how much ACP they were doing, how recently they had an ACP conversation, formal training on ACP, and knowledge of ACP. In a multivariate analysis, the ACP-SE scale was a strong predictor of the percentage of patients with chronic life-limiting diseases with whom the physician discussed ACP. The final ACP-SE scale included 17 items and demonstrated high internal consistency.

  10. 2011 Outstanding AFCPE[R] Conference Paper: Development and Validation of a Financial Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Jean M.

    2011-01-01

    This study developed a 6-item Financial Self-Efficacy Scale for use by researchers, educators, counselors, and advisors. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy and Prochaska's Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change provided the theoretical framework. Scale items were adapted from Schwarzer and Jerusalem's (1995) General Self-Efficacy Scale.…

  11. Validated scales to assess adult self-efficacy to eat fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainvil, Louise A; Lawson, Rob; Horwath, Caroline C; McKenzie, Joanne E; Reeder, Anthony I

    2009-01-01

    An audience-centered approach was used to develop valid and reliable scales to measure adult self-efficacy to eat fruit and vegetables. Cross-sectional survey of a national population. New Zealand. A sample of 350 adults ages 25 to 60 years was randomly selected from a nationally representative sampling frame. Overall, 231 questionnaires were returned, producing a 72% response rate. The mean age of subjects was 42.7years; 58% were female; 80% were of European descent; 11% were indigenous Maori. The 76-item, self-administered questionnaire collected data on demographics, fruit and vegetable intakes, stages of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy (24 items). Principal components analysis with oblimin rotation was performed. Principal components analysis yielded three distinct and reliable scales for self-efficacy to eat "vegetables," "fruit," and "fruit and vegetables" (Cronbach alpha = .80, .85, and .73, respectively). These scales were correlated, but only the "vegetable" scale was positively correlated with the "fruit and vegetable" scale (Kendall tau r = 0.30, -0.26 [fruit, "fruit and vegetables"], -0.38 [fruit, vegetable]). As predicted, self-efficacy was associated with intake (r = 0.30 [fruit], 0.34 [vegetables]). Assuming the factor structure is confirmed in independent samples, these brief psychometrically sound scales may be used to assess adult self-efficacy to eat fruit and to eat vegetables (separately) but not self-efficacy to eat "fruit and vegetables."

  12. What are the Main Physical Functioning Factors Associated With Falls Among Older People With Different Perceived Fall Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Mirian N; Bilton, Tereza L; Dias, Rosangela C; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Perracini, Monica R

    2017-07-01

    Fall risk perceptions may influence the judgement over physical and functional competencies to avoid falls. However, few studies have explored the physical functioning characteristics associated with falls among older people with low perceived fall risk. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of falls and physical functioning factors associated with falling among community-dwelling older adults with low and high perceived fall risk. We conducted a cross-sectional population based study with 773 community-dwelling elders. Perceived fall risk was investigated using Falls Efficacy Scale International. We considered fallers those who reported at least one fall in the previous 12 months. Physical functioning measures used were grip strength, usual gait speed, sit-to-stand test, five step test, timed up and go test, one-legged stance test, anterior and lateral functional reach test. At least one fall was reported by 103 (30%) participants with low perceived fall risk and by 196 (46%) participants with high perceived fall risk. The odds of falling were lower among those with greater grip strength and with a greater stance time in one-legged test, and the odds of falling among elders with high perceived fall risk were higher among those who took more time in performing the five step test. We believe that our results highlight the need of not neglecting the risk of falls among active older adults with low perceived fall risk, particularly in those elders that show reduced stability in a small base of support and a lower leg strength. In addition, we suggest that elders with high perceived fall risk should be assessed using anticipatory postural adjustment tests. Particularly, our results may help physiotherapists to identify eligible elders with different perceptions of fall risk for tailored interventions aimed at reducing falls. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Brief self-efficacy scales for use in weight-loss trials: Preliminary evidence of validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kathryn E; Harden, Samantha M; Almeida, Fabio A; You, Wen; Hill, Jennie L; Goessl, Cody; Estabrooks, Paul A

    2016-10-01

    Self-efficacy is a commonly included cognitive variable in weight-loss trials, but there is little uniformity in its measurement. Weight-loss trials frequently focus on physical activity (PA) and eating behavior, as well as weight loss, but no survey is available that offers reliable measurement of self-efficacy as it relates to each of these targeted outcomes. The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of brief, pragmatic self-efficacy scales specific to PA, healthful eating and weight-loss (4 items each). An adult sample (n = 1,790) from 28 worksites enrolled in a worksite weight-loss program completed the self-efficacy scales, as well as measures of PA, dietary fat intake, and weight, at baseline, 6-, and 12-months. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the hypothesized factor structure indicating, 3 latent self-efficacy factors, specific to PA, healthful eating, and weight-loss. Measurement equivalence/invariance between relevant demographic groups, and over time was also supported. Parallel growth processes in self-efficacy factors and outcomes (PA, fat intake, and weight) support the predictive validity of score interpretations. Overall, this initial series of psychometric analyses supports the interpretation that scores on these scales reflect self-efficacy for PA, healthful eating, and weight-loss. The use of this instrument in large-scale weight-loss trials is encouraged. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Brief Self-Efficacy Scales for use in Weight-Loss Trials: Preliminary Evidence of Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kathryn E.; Harden, Samantha M.; Almeida, Fabio A.; You, Wen; Hill, Jennie L.; Goessl, Cody; Estabrooks, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a commonly included cognitive variable in weight-loss trials, but there is little uniformity in its measurement. Weight-loss trials frequently focus on physical activity (PA) and eating behavior, as well as weight loss, but no survey is available that offers reliable measurement of self-efficacy as it relates to each of these targeted outcomes. The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of brief, pragmatic self-efficacy scales specific to PA, healthful eating and weight-loss (4 items each). An adult sample (n=1790) from 28 worksites enrolled in a worksite weight-loss program completed the self-efficacy scale, as well as measures of PA, dietary fat intake, and weight, at baseline, 6-, and 12-months. The hypothesized factor structure was tested through confirmatory factor analysis, which supported the expected factor structure for three latent self-efficacy factors, specific to PA, healthful eating, and weight-loss. Measurement equivalence/invariance between relevant demographic groups, and over time was also supported. Parallel growth processes in self-efficacy factors and outcomes (PA, fat intake, and weight) support the predictive validity of score interpretations. Overall, this initial series of psychometric analyses supports the interpretation that scores on these scales reflect self-efficacy for PA, healthful eating, and weight-loss. The use of this instrument in large-scale weight-loss trials is encouraged. PMID:26619093

  15. Adapting Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Özgen; Altun, Halis

    2014-01-01

    Students might have different type and different level of perceptions: Positive or negative perceptions on programming; a perception on benefit of programming, perceptions related to difficulties of programming process etc. The perception of student on their own competence is defined as self-efficacy. Based on the discussions reported in…

  16. Reliability and validity of a novel haemophilia-specific self-efficacy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, J; Raat, H; Peters, M; Tamminga, R Y J; Leebeek, F W G; Moll, H A; Cnossen, M H

    2014-07-01

    Higher self-efficacy in chronic disease patients is associated with higher development of self-management skills and increased quality-of-life. Quantification and monitoring of self-efficacy is therefore of importance. Self-efficacy in haemophilia patients has received little attention due to lack of standardized scales. To validate the novel Haemophilia-specific Self-Efficacy Scale (HSES) in haemophilia patients on prophylactic home treatment, haemophilia patients aged 1-18 years on prophylactic treatment ≥1 year were included from three Dutch Haemophilia Treatment Centres. The HSES consists of 12 items, relating to perceptions of the ability to function on a day-to-day basis with regard to patient's disease. Retest was performed in a subsample. Validity was proven by the General Self-Efficacy Scale and by the health-related quality-of-life assessment tool Haemo-QoL. Data were analysed from 53 children (response 75%), with a mean age of 9.8 years (SD 4.0). Mean total scale score of HSES was 55.5 (SD 4.7; range 38-60), with a ceiling effect of 17%. The HSES showed adequate internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.72) and good test-retest reliability (Intra-Class-Correlation coefficient 0.75; P self-efficacy correlated significantly with general self-efficacy (r = 0.38; P correlated significantly with quality-of-life as measured by the Haemo-QoL (r = -0.42; P ≤ 0.01). The novel HSES is a reliable and valid tool to assess self-efficacy in paediatric haemophilia patients on prophylactic home treatment. High self-efficacy correlated with higher quality-of-life, further underlining the importance to standardly assess, monitor and improve self-efficacy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Assessment of muscle mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly people with diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Azevedo Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective : To assess muscle mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly adults with diabetic neuropathy (DNP. Methods : 50 elderly patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and diabetic neuropathy (NPD participated in this study. Risk of falling was assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS. Fear of falling was assessed by means of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I. Muscle mass was assessed by tetrapolar bioimpedance analysis (BIA and Janssen's equation. Subjects were divided into two groups: one with a history of falls in the six months before study enrollment (G1 and the other without history of falls (G2. Results : There were statistically significant differences between G1 and G2 regarding lean body mass (p < 0.05, risk of falls as measured by the BBS (p < 0.01, and fear of falling as measured by the FES-I (p < 0.01. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the BBS and BIA (r = 0.45 and p < 0.01, showing that the greater the lean body mass, the lower the risk of falling. Conclusions : We found an association between lean mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly adults with DNP and a history of falls from own height.

  18. Psychometrics of the "Self-Efficacy Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables Scale" in African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittner, Lisaann S; Gittner, Kevin B

    2017-08-01

    Assess the psychometric properties of the Self-Efficacy Consumption of Fruit and Vegetable Scale (F/V scale) in African American women. Midwestern Health Maintenance Organization. 221 African American women age 40-65 with BMI≥30 MEASURES: F/V scale was compared to eating efficacy/availability subscale reported on the WEL and mean micronutrient intake (vitamins A, C, K, folate, potassium, and beta-carotene reported on 3-day food records. F/V scale construct validity and internal consistency were assessed and compared to: 1) the original scale validation in Chinese women, 2) WEL scale, and 3) to micronutrient intake from 3-day food records. Total scale scores differed between African American women (μ=1.87+/-0.87) and Chinese (μ=0.41). In a Chinese population, F/V scale factored into two subscales; the F/V factored into one subscale in African American women. Construct validity was supported with correlation between the F/V scale and the eating efficacy WEL subscale (r 2 =-0.336, p=0.000). There was not a significant correlation between dietary consumption of micronutrients representative of fruit and vegetable intake and the F/V scale. The F/V scale developed for Chinese populations can be reliably used with African American women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nursing Home Administrator Quality Improvement Self-Efficacy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Elena O; Zisberg, Anna; Bakerjian, Debra; Zysberg, Leehu

    Nursing home (NH) quality improvement (QI) is challenging. The critical role of NH leaders in successful QI is well established; however, current options for assessing the QI capabilities of leaders such as the licensed NH administrator are limited. This article presents the development and preliminary validation of an instrument to measure NH administrator self-efficacy in QI. We used a mixed-methods cross-sectional design to develop and test the measure. For item generation, 39 NH leaders participated in qualitative interviews. Item reduction and content validity were established with a sample of eight subject matter experts. A random sample of 211 administrators from NHs with the lowest and highest Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Five-Star Quality ratings completed the measure. We conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and tested the measure for internal reliability and convergent, discriminant, and known group validity. The final measure included five subscales and 32 items. Confirmatory factor analysis reaffirmed the factorial structure with good fit indices. The new measure's subscales correlated with valid measures of self-efficacy and locus of control, supporting the measure's convergent and discriminant validity. Significant differences in most of the subscales were found between the objective (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Five-Star Quality rating) and subjective (Self-Rated Facility QI Index) quality outcomes, supporting the measure's known group validity. The instrument has usefulness to both NH organizations and individual NH administrators as a diagnostic tool to identify administrators with higher/lower chances of successfully implementing QI. Organizations and individuals can use this diagnostic to identify the administrator's professional development needs for QI, in general, and specific to the instrument's five subscales, informing directions for in-house training, mentoring, and outside professional

  20. Study of the Validity and Reliability of a Self-Efficacy Scale of Teaching Material Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Ozgen

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a scale in order to detect the level of pre-service teachers' utilization from teaching materials based on their perception of self-efficacy. The sample group is composed of 439 students for the first application and 215 students for the second. In order to detect the validity of the scale, exploratory…

  1. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinslade, Susan; Paper, Bruce; Jing, Hongjuan; Quinn, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    No scales measure self-efficacy in women with Type 2 diabetes. A scale was developed and tested. Items generated, content validity index (CVI) assessed by experts, the 2-part Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale (DSLF-I and DSLF-II) was piloted with 62 women, administered to 208 women, and then readministered to 30 women to determine initial reliability. Factor analysis was conducted for construct validity. Discriminant, convergent, and predictive validity was examined. The CVI index was 98%. Cronbach's alphas were 0.88 (DSLF-I) and 0.82 (DSLF-II; pilot) and 0.87 and 0.86, respectively (main study); test-retest correlation was .60 (DSLF-I) and .69 (DSLF-II). There were 3 factors that emerged: diabetes knowledge of self-care activity, diabetes diet self-care, and diabetes medication self-care. The Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale demonstrates good initial reliability and validity.

  2. Development and validation of the Efficacious Self-Presentation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghi, Fiorenzo; Pallini, Susanna; D'Alessio, Maria; Baiocco, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    A new self-report measure of adolescent's self-presentation is described. The self-report scale was administered to 760 16-19-year-old subjects. Results of a factor analysis supported 6 identifiable factors reflecting different concepts, theoretically discussed, related to self-presentation: ability to regulate self-image, social sensitivity, body self-confidence, social self-confidence, social openness, and social desirability. The scale showed good convergent validity and internal consistency. Assertive tactics were predicted through ability to regulate self-image, social self-confidence, and social openness, whereas defensive tactics were predicted only through social openness and social sensitivity. The implications of the findings for future theoretical and empirical development of research in this field are discussed.

  3. Characteristics of the Spanish- and English-Language Self-Efficacy to Manage Diabetes Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Philip L; Lorig, Kate; Laurent, Diana D

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of the Spanish-language diabetes self-efficacy scale (DSES-S) and the English-language version (DSES). This study consists of secondary data from 3 randomized studies that administered the DSES-S and DSES at 2 time points. The scales consist of 8 Likert-type 10-point items. Principal component analysis was applied to determine if the scales were unitary or consisted of subscales. Univariate statistics were used to describe the scales. Sensitivity to change was measured by comparing randomized treatment with control groups, where the treatment included methods designed to enhance self-efficacy. General linear models were used to examine the association between the scales and the 8 medical outcomes after controlling for demographic variables. Principal component analysis indicated that there were 2 subscales for both versions: self-efficacy for behaviors and self-efficacy to manage blood levels and medical condition. The measures had similar means across the 3 studies, high internal consistent reliability, values distributed across the entire range, and they showed no evidence of floor effects and little evidence of ceiling effects. The measures were sensitive to change. They were associated with several health indicators and behaviors at baseline, and changes were associated with changes in health measures. The self-efficacy measures behaved consistently across the 3 studies and were highly reliable. Associations with medical indicators and behaviors suggested validity, although further study would be desirable to compare other measures of self-efficacy for people with type 2 diabetes. These brief scales are appropriate for measuring self-efficacy to manage diabetes. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. [Psychometric properties of a self-efficacy scale for physical activity in Brazilian adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Sarabia, Tais Taiana; Fermino, Rogério César; Hallal, Pedro Curi; Reis, Rodrigo Siqueira

    2011-04-01

    To test the validity and reliability of a self-efficacy scale for physical activity (PA) in Brazilian adults. A self-efficacy scale was applied jointly with a multidimensional questionnaire through face-to-face interviews with 1,418 individuals (63.4% women) aged ≥ 18 years. The scale was submitted to validity (factorial and construct) and reliability analysis (internal consistency and temporal stability). A test-retest procedure was conducted with 74 individuals to evaluate temporal stability. Exploratory factor analyses revealed two independent factors: self-efficacy for walking and self-efficacy for moderate and vigorous PA (MVPA). Together, these two factors explained 65.4% of the total variance of the scale (20.9% and 44.5% for walking and MVPA, respectively). Cronbach's alpha values were 0.83 for walking and 0.90 for MVPA, indicating high internal consistency. Both factors were significantly and positively correlated (rho ≥ 0.17, P activities), indicating an adequate construct validity. The scale's validity, internal consistency, and reliability were adequate to evaluate self-efficacy for PA in Brazilian adults.

  5. Preliminary studies of adaptation of Self- efficacy Scale for Sources of Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez Flores, Celia María

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the field of educational psychologically the construct of self-efficacy has received special attention. It has been shown that those students who trust in their own abilities get better academic performance. However, few studies analyze the sources of self-efficacy. Self-efficacy believes are developed according to how people interpret information coming from four different sources: experience skills, vicarious learning, social persuasion, and physiological states. Recently, Usher & Pajares (2009 developed an instrument to assess sources of self-efficacy in Math. The goal of the present work was to evaluate psychometric properties of this scale in a local sample of adolescents from 13 to 15 years old. Preliminary results supported the use of this measure as an adequate alternative to assess self-efficacy in Math. However, more studies are needed in order to obtain a measure more contextualized to the educational system of local students.

  6. Proposal for a New Predictive Scale for Recurrent Risk of Fall in a Cohort of Community-Dwelling Patients with Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Elen Beatriz; Nascimento, Carla; Monteiro, Maiana; Castro, Mayra; Maso, Iara; Campos, Adriana; Marinho, Camila; Barreto-Neto, Nestor J; Lopes, Antônio A; Jesus, Pedro A P; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to determine risk factors related to the occurrence of falls in stroke patients and to propose a new predictive scale for falls. Demographic and clinical data were collected and the following scales were applied: Barthel Index, Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Subjects were followed prospectively for 2 years for the occurrence of recurrent (≥2) falls. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed and univariable associations were tested using log-rank test. Two separate multivariable models were then used: the first used Cox proportional hazards regression and the second used Poisson regression. In each model, significant associations were considered present with a P value less than .05. We evaluated 150 individuals and the final analysis included 131 patients; the average age of the patients was 55.8 ± 13 years, 52% were women, and the median NIHSS score was 2 (interquartile range = 1-5). Falls occurred in 17% of patients, with a median of 23 months of follow-up (interquartile range = 16-26 months). In the multivariable Cox regression model, only TUG quartile, female gender, and posterior circulation territory involvement remained significant predictors of recurrent falls. We used the predictors from the Cox regression model to propose a new recurrent fall risk scale. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 73%, 95% confidence interval = 62%-83%, P = .001, with 81.3% sensitivity and 41.8% specificity. The new predictive scale for recurrent risk (including TUG, posterior circulation territory involvement, and female gender) is presented as an instrument for monitoring the risk of recurrent falls. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reliability and Validity of the Self Efficacy Expectations and Outcome Expectations After ICD Implantation Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Johnston, Sandra K.; Thompson, Elaine Adams

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity characteristics of two new scales that measure self-efficacy expectations (SE-ICD) and outcome expectations (OE-ICD) in survivors (n=168) of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), all of whom received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Cronbach's alpha reliability demonstrated good internal consistency (SE-ICD α = 0.93 and OE-ICD α = 0.81). Correlations with other self-efficacy instruments (general self-efficacy and soci...

  8. Seizure Self-Efficacy Scale for Children with Epilepsy: Confirmatory and Exploratory Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerife Tutar Güven

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In the past few years, the concept of self-efficacy in children with epilepsy has become increasingly important. This study aimed to analyze the psychometric aspects of the Turkish version of the Seizure Self-Efficacy Scale for Children. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey. The study data were collected using the Seizure Self-Efficacy Scale for Children and Child Introduction Form. The study sample included 166 children who were between 9 and 17 years of age. The authors assessed the reliability and construct validity of the study data using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA. Results: The original model was not confirmed by the CFA. The analysis tool included 15 items in two factors. Reliability analysis showed that the two factors were acceptable and valid. The tool was valid and reliable for measuring the self-efficacy of epileptic children. The factor structure was derived from and confirmed by the original tool. It was found that the Turkish version of the modified Seizure Self-Efficacy Scale for Children had excellent satisfactory psychometric aspects for a Turkish population. Conclusion: Health professionals can present a more effective drug process and nursing care by identifying and assessing seizure self-efficacy levels in children with epilepsy, and they can make a positive contribution to disease management and the way the child deals with the disease.

  9. Persian version of the Moorong Self-Efficacy Scale: psychometric study among subjects with physical disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajati, Fatemeh; Ghanbari, Masoud; Hasandokht, Tolou; Hosseini, Seyed Younes; Akbarzadeh, Rasool; Ashtarian, Hossein

    2017-11-01

    Self-efficacy plays a key role in varying areas of human conditions which can be measured by different scales. The present study was aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of Moorong Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES) in Iranian Subjects with Physical Disability (SWPD). Data were collected by face-to-face interviews and self-report surveys from 214 subjects. The face and content validity, and reliability were evaluated. Discriminates were evaluated between the sub-groups of disability levels, physical activity, and health condition levels. The concurrent, convergent, divergent, and construct validity were assessed by short form health survey scale (SF-36), general self-efficacy scale (GSES), hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), respectively. Replaceable exploratory factor analysis was evaluated. SPSS software was used for statistical analysis. There were acceptable face and content validity, and reliability. Furthermore, significant correlation was found between PSES and SF-36 (p disability levels (p = 0.02), physical activity levels (p disability problems. Implications for rehabilitation Psychometric properties of the Persian version of self-Efficacy scale (PSES) appear to be similar to original, English version. The PSES has been shown to have validity and reliability in Persian physical disables and can be used for patients with more different types of physical disability than individuals suffering from only Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). The PSES can be used in clinical practice and research work to evaluate the patients' confidence in performing daily activities.

  10. Musculoskeletal Strength, Balance Performance, and Self-Efficacy in Elderly Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Practitioners: Implications for Fall Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Liu, Karen P. Y.; Pang, Marco Y. C.; Lee, H. W.; Chung, Joanne W. Y.; Lam, Priscillia L.; Guo, X.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To (1) compare the bone strength, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy between Ving Tsun (VT) martial art practitioners and nonpractitioners and (2) identify the associations between lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy among the VT-trained participants. Methods. Thirty-five VT practitioners (mean age ± SD = 62.7 ± 13.3 years) and 49 nonpractitioners (mean age ± SD = 65.9 ± 10.5 y...

  11. Development and validation of the Nursing Profession Self-Efficacy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, R; Pittella, F; Zaghini, F; Fida, R; Sili, A

    2016-09-01

    This study describes the development and validation of the Nursing Profession Self-Efficacy Scale. Self-efficacy can be useful in predicting performance, job satisfaction or well-being. In the nursing field, there is a shortage of studies on self-efficacy with regard to nurses' global confidence in coping ability across a range of everyday, challenging work situations. To define the theoretical framework of nursing professional self-efficacy, two focus groups and a literature review were performed. An empirical study was then conducted to test validity and reliability. Face and content validity, construct validity, concurrent validity, internal consistency and test-retest reliability were examined. The content validity index was evaluated by 12 experts who suggested deleting 11 redundant items. The final developed tool was tested for construct analysis using a cross-validation approach, randomly splitting the overall sample of 917 nurses in two sub-groups. The construct validity indicated two dimensions. The face and content validity were adequate. Test-retest reliability displayed a good stability, and internal consistency (Cronbach's α) was acceptable. Moreover, concurrent validity using the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale was in line with the theoretical framework. The scale showed evidence of validity and reliability. The major limitation is the strong influence of the Italian context in the tool development. The Nursing Profession Self-Efficacy Scale could be a fruitful tool that facilitates the application of theories (i.e. social-cognitive theory) in the nursing field and even development of interventions. Furthermore, a measurement of self-efficacy could be used to predict nursing clinical performance. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  12. The SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES: development and psychometric properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Pei-Shu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rising prevalence of secondary conditions among persons with spinal cord injury (SCI has focused recent attention to potential health promotion programs designed to reduce such adverse health conditions. A healthy lifestyle for people with SCI, including and specifically, the adoption of a vigorous exercise routine, has been shown to produce an array of health benefits, prompting many providers to recommend the implementation of such activity to those with SCI. Successfully adopting such an exercise regimen however, requires confidence in one's ability to engage in exercise or exercise self-efficacy. Exercise self-efficacy has not been assessed adequately for people with SCI due to a lack of validated and reliable scales, despite self efficacy's status as one of the most widely researched concepts and despite its broad application in health promotion studies. Exercise self efficacy supporting interventions for people with SCI are only meaningful if appropriate measurement tools exist. The objective of our study was to develop a psychometrically sound exercise self-efficacy self-report measure for people with SCI. Methods Based on literature reviews, expert comments and cognitive testing, 10 items were included and made up the 4-point Likert SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES in its current form. The ESES was administered as part of the first wave of a nationwide survey (n = 368 on exercise behavior and was also tested separately for validity in four groups of individuals with SCI. Reliability and validity testing was performed using SPSS 12.0. Results Cronbach's alpha was .9269 for the ESES. High internal consistency was confirmed in split-half (EQ Length Spearman Brown = .8836. Construct validity was determined using principal component factor analysis by correlating the aggregated ESES items with the Generalised Self Efficacy Scale (GSE. We found that all items loaded on one factor only and that there was a

  13. The SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES): development and psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Thilo; Kehn, Matthew; Ho, Pei-Shu; Groah, Suzanne

    2007-08-30

    Rising prevalence of secondary conditions among persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused recent attention to potential health promotion programs designed to reduce such adverse health conditions. A healthy lifestyle for people with SCI, including and specifically, the adoption of a vigorous exercise routine, has been shown to produce an array of health benefits, prompting many providers to recommend the implementation of such activity to those with SCI. Successfully adopting such an exercise regimen however, requires confidence in one's ability to engage in exercise or exercise self-efficacy. Exercise self-efficacy has not been assessed adequately for people with SCI due to a lack of validated and reliable scales, despite self efficacy's status as one of the most widely researched concepts and despite its broad application in health promotion studies. Exercise self efficacy supporting interventions for people with SCI are only meaningful if appropriate measurement tools exist. The objective of our study was to develop a psychometrically sound exercise self-efficacy self-report measure for people with SCI. Based on literature reviews, expert comments and cognitive testing, 10 items were included and made up the 4-point Likert SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES) in its current form. The ESES was administered as part of the first wave of a nationwide survey (n = 368) on exercise behavior and was also tested separately for validity in four groups of individuals with SCI. Reliability and validity testing was performed using SPSS 12.0. Cronbach's alpha was .9269 for the ESES. High internal consistency was confirmed in split-half (EQ Length Spearman Brown = .8836). Construct validity was determined using principal component factor analysis by correlating the aggregated ESES items with the Generalised Self Efficacy Scale (GSE). We found that all items loaded on one factor only and that there was a statistically significant correlation between Exercise Self-Efficacy

  14. Assessing alcohol abstinence self-efficacy in undergraduate students: psychometric evaluation of the alcohol abstinence self-efficacy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozah, Franklin N; Adu, Nana Ama Takyibea; Komesuor, Joyce

    2015-11-25

    Alcohol use is a major public health concern with respect to its impact on youth morbidity and mortality. Self-efficacy to abstain from alcohol use in young people is an important prevention and intervention strategy in future alcohol dependence. However, research on the assessment of self-efficacy to abstain from alcohol use among undergraduate students is almost non-existent in Ghana, apparently due to the unavailability of a standardised testing instrument. The purpose of this study was to examine the factor validity, structure, and reliability of the 20-item Alcohol Abstinence Self-efficacy Scale (AASES) in undergraduate students in Ghana. Two hundred and fifteen undergraduate students studying in a private university with a mean age of 23.5 years participated in the study by completing the AASES. Results of a confirmatory factor analysis showed that the data did not fit the initial four-factor AASES model. Subsequent exploratory factor analysis showed that the AASES is a unidimensional construct (in the total sample and a subsample of drinkers), contrary to findings found in western cultures. The AASES also had a high Cronbach's alpha. Although the AASES was unidimensional in this study, each of the original four-factor model also had high and acceptable Cronbach's alpha. The original AASES structure was not confirmed in this study but a unidimensional factor was found suggesting that the AASES could be used as an instrument for assessing alcohol abstinence self-efficacy in undergraduate students in Ghana, although further validation research is needed in larger as well as in different samples.

  15. Astronomy Teaching Self-Efficacy Belief Scale: The Validity and Reliability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Filiz; Ozyurek, Cengiz

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a reliable and safe scale for determining the self-efficacy levels of science teachers in the teaching of astronomy subjects. The study used a survey approach, which is a qualitative research method. The study was conducted with a total of 106 science teachers working in the secondary schools of Ordu city…

  16. A Measurement Invariance Analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale on Two Different Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Kam, Chester

    2014-01-01

    The 10-item General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) was developed to assess an individual's beliefs to cope with a variety of situations in life. Despite the GSES being used in numerous research from researchers in different countries and presented in different languages, little is known about the use of its validity in an Asian culture. The aim of the…

  17. A Scenario-Based Dieting Self-Efficacy Scale: The DIET-SE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, Christine; Knauper, Barbel; Tint, Ami

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses a scenario-based dieting self-efficacy scale, the DIET-SE, developed from dieter's inventory of eating temptations (DIET). The DIET-SE consists of items that describe scenarios of eating temptations for a range of dieting situations, including high-caloric food temptations. Four studies assessed the psychometric properties of…

  18. Gender fairness in self-efficacy? A Rasch-based validity study of the General Academic Self-efficacy scale (GASE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine; Vang, Maria Louison; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Studies have reported gender differences in academic self-efficacy. However, how and if academic self-efficacy questionnaires are gender-biased has not been psychometrically investigated. The psychometric properties of a general version of The Physics Self-Efficacy Questionnaire – the General...... Academic Self-Efficacy Scale (GASE) – were analyzed using Rasch measurement models, with data from 1018 Danish university students (psychology and technical), focusing on gender invariance and the sufficiency of the score. The short 4-item GASE scale was found to be essentially objective and construct...... valid and satisfactorily reliable, though differential item functioning was found relative to gender and academic discipline, and can be used to assess students’ general academic self-efficacy. Research on gender and self-efficacy needs to take gender into account and equate scores appropriately...

  19. The Self-Efficacy Scale for Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (SESAMeD): A scale construction and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Esther; Gutiérrez-Domingo, Tamara; Castillo-Mayen, Rosario; Luque, Bárbara; Arenas, Alicia; Taberneroa, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has several beneficial impacts on health. Self-efficacy may be crucial for adhering to the diet. This study set out to develop a reliable and valid instrument that would enable measurement of the extent to which people are confident about their ability to adhere to the Mediterranean diet: the Self-Efficacy Scale for Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (SESAMeD). The study was carried out in two stages. In Stage 1, a pilot questionnaire was administrated to 170 students to reduce and refine items. In Stage 2, the validity and reliability of the scale were evaluated among a sample of 348 patients who have suffered from cardiovascular disease. After items reduction, the scale consisted of 22 items. The factor structure of SESAMeD was tested across exploratory factorial analysis and confirmatory factorial analysis, with both analyses confirming a robust adjustment for the bi-factorial structure. The two factors identified were (a) self-efficacy for the avoidance of determined unhealthy foods not recommended in the Mediterranean diet and (b) self-efficacy for the consumption of determined healthy foods recommended in this diet. The pattern of relations between the SESAMeD and the SESAMeD subscales and other different psychological variables (outcome expectancies, motivation, affective balance, and life satisfaction) supported the validity of the bi-factorial structure and provided strong evidence of construct validity. The instrument can help health professionals and researchers to assess patients' confidence of their ability to adhere to the Mediterranean diet, a psychological variable that may affect adherence to this healthy food consumption pattern. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and validation of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Anaïs; Bourgault, Patricia; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Courtemanche-Harel, Roxanne; Choinière, Manon

    2015-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy is a non-negligible outcome when measuring the impact of self-management interventions for chronic pain patients. However, no validated, chronic pain-specific self-efficacy scales exist for studies conducted with French-speaking populations. To establish the validity of the use of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (FC-CPSES) among chronic pain patients. The Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale is a validated 33-item self-administered questionnaire that measures perceived self-efficacy to perform self-management behaviours, manage chronic disease in general and achieve outcomes (a six-item version is also available). This scale was adapted to the context of chronic pain patients following cross-cultural adaptation guidelines. The FC-CPSES was administered to 109 fibromyalgia and 34 chronic low back pain patients (n=143) who participated in an evidence-based self-management intervention (the PASSAGE program) offered in 10 health care centres across the province of Quebec. Cronbach's alpha coefficients (α) were calculated to determine the internal consistency of the 33- and six-item versions of the FC-CPSES. With regard to convergent construct validity, the association between the FC-CPSES baseline scores and related clinical outcomes was examined. With regard to the scale's sensitivity to change, pre- and postintervention FC-CPSES scores were compared. Internal consistency was high for both versions of the FC-CPSES (α=0.86 to α=0.96). Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with higher mental health-related quality of life and lower pain intensity and catastrophizing (P<0.05), supporting convergent validity of the scale. There was a statistically significant increase in FC-CPSES scores between pre- and postintervention measures for both versions of the FC-CPSES (P<0.003), which supports their sensitivity to clinical change during an intervention. These data suggest that both versions of the FC-CPSES are reliable

  1. Development and Validation of Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuntiryaki, Esen; Çapa Aydın, Yeşim

    2009-08-01

    This study described the process of developing and validating the College Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale (CCSS) that can be used to assess college students’ beliefs in their ability to perform essential tasks in chemistry. In the first phase, data collected from 363 college students provided evidence for the validity and reliability of the new scale. Three dimensions emerged: self-efficacy for cognitive skills, self-efficacy for psychomotor skills, and self-efficacy for everyday applications. In the second phase, data collected from an independent sample of 353 college students confirmed the factorial structure of the 21-item CCSS. The Cronbach alpha coefficients ranged from 0.82 to 0.92. In addition, each dimension of the CCSS had moderate and significant correlations with student chemistry achievement and differentiated between major and non-major students. Followed by the additional validation studies, the CCSS will serve as a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers in science education to assess college students’ chemistry self-efficacy beliefs.

  2. Cross-Cultural and Psychometric Properties Assessment of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisconti, Fernando; Mahmoud Smaili Santos, Suhaila; Lopes, Josiane; Rosa Cardoso, Jefferson; Lopes Lavado, Edson

    2017-11-29

    The Exercise Self-Efficacy scale (ESES) is a reliable measure, in the English language, of exercise self-efficacy in individuals with spinal cord injury. The aim of this study was to culturally adjust and validate the Exercise Self-Efficacy scale in the Portuguese language. The Exercise Self-Efficacy scale was applied to 76 subjects, with three-month intervals (three applications in total). The reliability was appraised using the intra-class correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman methods, and the internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach´s alpha. The Exercise Self-Efficacy scale was correlated with the domains of the Quality of life Questionnaire SF-36 and Functional Independence Measure and tested using the Spearman rho coefficient. The Exercise Self-Efficacy scale-Brazil presented good internal consistency (alpha 1 = 0.856; alpha 2 = 0.855; alpha 3 = 0.822) and high reliability in the test-retest (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.97). There was a strong correlation between the Exercise Self-Efficacy scale-Brazil and the SF-36 only in the functional capacity domain (rho = 0.708). There were no changes in Exercise Self-Efficacy scale-Brazil scores between the three applications (p = 0.796). The validation of the Exercise Self-Efficacy scale questionnaire permits the assessor to use it reliably in Portuguese speaking countries, since it is the first instrument measuring self-efficacy specifically during exercises in individuals with spinal cord injury. Furthermore, the questionnaire can be used as an instrument to verify the effectiveness of interventions that use exercise as an outcome. The results of the Brazilian version of the Exercise Self-Efficacy scale support its use as a reliable and valid measurement of exercise self-efficacy for this population.

  3. Psychometric properties of the self-efficacy for clinical evaluation scale in Turkish nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Neriman; Pınar, Rukiye; Akinci, Ayse Cil; Yildiz, Hicran

    2014-04-01

    To examine psychometric properties of the Self-Efficacy for Clinical Evaluation Scale (SECS) in a nursing student sample. Self-efficacy is a good choice to be used in order to make a prediction of nursing students' performance in clinical practice. The SECS, consisting of perceived self-efficacy and importance subscales, seems to be suitable to evaluate self-efficacy regarding care skills for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is not a valid tool to evaluate the perception of self-efficacy for Turkish nursing students. Cross-sectional methodological design. The sample included 400 Turkish nursing students who attended practicum at a hospital. Content of the SECS was evaluated by content validity index (CVI). Reliability was evaluated with internal consistency, item-total correlation and test-retest reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and convergent and divergent validity were used to test the validity. The CVI results were satisfactory. We found satisfactory evidence for internal consistency and item-total correlations. Intraclass correlation coefficients showed stability of subscales. The CFA replicated two-factor structure for the SECS. This was reflected in all fit indices. All factor loadings were positive and were above the perfect level. The convergent validity was supported by the correlation between SECS and General Self-Efficacy Scale. The divergent validity findings demonstrated that SECS differentiated between students with various levels of general point average, which is an indicator of academic success. In conclusion, SECS is a reliable and valid tool used in clinical nursing education settings. Measuring students' self-efficacy in a clinical environment can provide an insight for students into what they have learned. Nurse educators can also use the SECS to spot nursing students with weaknesses in care activities and create educational strategies to help them to enhance their academic performance. Using the SECS can yield an

  4. Development and psychometric evaluation of the arterial puncture self-efficacy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Padilla, José Manuel; Granero-Molina, José; Márquez-Hernández, Verónica V; Suthers, Fiona; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano

    2016-05-01

    Arterial puncture for arterial blood gases (ABG) analysis can be a risky, painful, difficult-to-perform procedure that is often insufficiently practised and generates stress and discomfort amongst patients and healthcare professionals. Self-efficacy is a key component in the acquisition of procedural skills. Therefore, professionals' self-efficacy in arterial puncture should be measured before attempting the procedure on real patients. To develop and psychometrically assess a self-efficacy scale in arterial puncture. An observational cross-sectional design was used in this study. Faculty of Education Sciences, Nursing and Physiotherapy in a higher education institution in the south of Spain. A convenience sample of 342 nursing students entered and completed the study. All participants met the following inclusion criteria: (1) ≥18years old and (2) enrolled in a nursing degree programme during the 2014/2015 academic year. Participants were 74% female (n=254) and their age ranged from 18 to 50, with a mean age of 21.74years (SD=5.14). The Arterial Puncture Self-Efficacy Scale (APSES) was developed and psychometrically tested. Reliability and content validity were studied. Predictive validity and concurrent validity assessed criterion validity. In addition, principal component analysis and known-group analysis evaluated construct validity. Principal component analysis revealed the two-subscale structure of the final 22-item version of the Arterial Puncture Self-Efficacy Scale (APSES). A total Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.97 showed its high reliability. The APSES' content validity index was excellent (S-CVI/Ave=0.95). Predictive and concurrent validity analysis demonstrated the good criterion validity of the tool. Supporting the APSES' sensitivity and specificity, known-groups analysis evidenced significant differences (pgood psychometric properties for measuring self-efficacy in arterial puncture for ABG analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  5. Function Self-Efficacy Scale-FSES: Development, Evaluation, and Contribution to Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovel, Hava; Carmel, Sara

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Function Self-Efficacy Scale (FSES) for assessing the degree of confidence in self-functioning while facing decline in health and function (DHF). The FSES was evaluated in two studies of older Israelis, aged 75+ years. Data were collected by structured home interviews. Exploratory factor analyses conducted in both studies clearly revealed two underlying factors: emotion self-efficacy and action self-efficacy. Confirmatory factor analyses resulted in acceptable model fit criteria. The shortened final 13-item FSES had good internal consistency and satisfactory criterion and convergent validity. Multiple regression analyses, conducted to predict subjective well-being in each of the studies, showed that function self-efficacy had a positive and significant contribution to the explanation of well-being, while controlling for general self-efficacy, self-rated health, and sociodemographic variables. We propose that appropriate interventions can strengthen function self-efficacy, thus improving the well-being of elderly persons and their ability to cope with DHF. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Validation of the Greek Version of the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale (GR-DMSES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fappa, Evaggelia; Efthymiou, Vasiliki; Landis, George; Rentoumis, Anastasios; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    Self-efficacy has been found to have a direct relation with self-care in diabetes. Several tools have been developed and used for evaluating self-efficacy of diabetic patients, the most widely used being the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale (DMSES). The aim of the present study was to translate, culturally adapt, and validate the Greek DMSES (GR-DMSES) in order for it to be used in the ATTICA pilot study of the SmartCare EU-funded project. Using standard procedures, the original version of DMSES was translated and culturally adapted into Greek. Content validity was assessed by an expert panel with the calculation of a content validity index of the overall scale. Α convenient sample was recruited to complete the questionnaire. Psychometric testing of the produced instrument included internal consistency test (Cronbach's alpha), construct validity (factor analysis), and stability (intraclass correlation coefficient). One hundred and sixteen patients, aged 36-86 years, with type 2 diabetes (T2D) participated in the study. There were no items excluded from the original scale after the content validity procedure. The coefficient Cronbach's alpha for the internal consistency was 0.93 and the intraclass correlation coefficient for the stability with a 5-week time interval was 0.87 (P self-efficacy related to diabetes self-management, thus providing a quick and easy-to-use tool for health professionals dealing with Greek adults with T2D.

  7. [Validity and reliability of a scale to assess self-efficacy for physical activity in elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Rossana Arruda; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Meurer, Simone Teresinha; Benedetti, Tânia Rosane Bertoldo

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the confirmatory factor validity and reliability of a self-efficacy scale for physical activity in a sample of 118 elderly (78% women) from 60 to 90 years of age. Mplus 6.1 was used to evaluate the confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was tested by internal consistency and temporal stability. The original scale consisted of five items with dichotomous answers (yes/no), independently for walking and moderate and vigorous physical activity. The analysis excluded the item related to confidence in performing physical activities when on vacation. Two constructs were identified, called "self-efficacy for walking" and "self-efficacy for moderate and vigorous physical activity", with a factor load ≥ 0.50. Internal consistency was adequate both for walking (> 0.70) and moderate and vigorous physical activity (> 0.80), and temporal stability was adequate for all the items. In conclusion, the self-efficacy scale for physical activity showed adequate validity, reliability, and internal consistency for evaluating this construct in elderly Brazilians.

  8. Aging and health: Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertina L Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To validate the Escala de Autoeficácia para a Autodireção na Saúde (EAAS – Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale. METHODS Non-experimental quantitative study of EAAS validation, by confirmatory factorial analyses, evaluating a sample of 508 older adults from the north and the center of Portugal with mean age of 71.67 (from 51 to 96 years, to whom the Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale were applied. The EAAS was developed from the theoretical constructs of self-efficacy and from self-directed learning within the PALADIN European project framework, aiming to develop an instrument able to assess the extent to which older adults take good care of their health. RESULTS The internal consistency was 0.87 (Cronbach’s alpha and confirmatory factorial analyses enabled to find a model near the one theoretically proposed, indicating a structure consisting of four dimensions: physical exercise, healthy diet, engaging in health-related learning, and visits to health professionals. From the psychometric point of view, the model in four factors showed quite satisfactory fit indicators. CONCLUSIONS The Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale, with 16 items, is adequate to evaluate to what extent older adults have confidence in their ability to take care of their own health, with high degree of autonomy.

  9. Self-Efficacy Scale for Weight Loss among Multi-Ethnic Women of Lower Income: A Psychometric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Lara; Walker, Lorraine O.; Kim, Sunghun; Pasch, Keryn E.; Sterling, Bobbie Sue

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct and predictive validity of the Physical Activity and Nutrition Self-Efficacy (PANSE) scale, an 11-item instrument to assess weight-loss self-efficacy among postpartum women of lower income. Methods: Seventy-one women completed the PANSE scale and…

  10. Translation and validation of the condom self-efficacy scale with Thai adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thato, Sathja; Hanna, Kathleen M; Rodcumdee, Branom

    2005-01-01

    To translate the 14-item Condom Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) into Thai and to validate the Thai version of the Condom Self-efficacy Scale (CSES-T) among Thai adolescents and young adults. The CSES was translated using a back-translation technique and validated with a cluster-based sample of 425 participants aged 18 to 22 years from eight randomly selected private vocational schools in Bangkok. Participants completed anonymous self-administered scales. Principal component analysis with varimax rotation was conducted to identify latent factors. Factor analysis indicated three factors: communication, correct use, and consistent use. Items loading on the original CSES also loaded on the same factors of the CSES-T except one item. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients were .85 for the total scale, .70 for consistent use, .79 for correct use, and .80 for communication. Based on psychometric properties, the CSES-T is a valid and reliable tool. It is culturally appropriate for Thai young adults. Thai researchers and health care providers can use the CSES-T to assess adolescents' and young adults' self-efficacy to use condoms as well as to further develop and evaluate interventions to increase condom use.

  11. Exploring Changes in Two Types of Self-Efficacy Following Participation in a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

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    Graham, Kay; Smith, Matthew Lee; Hall, Jori N.; Emerson, Kerstin G.; Wilson, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic conditions and falls are related issues faced by many aging adults. Stanford’s Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) added brief fall-related content to the standardized 6-week workshop; however, no research had examined changes in Fall-related self-efficacy (SE) in response to CDSMP participation. This study explored relationships and changes in SE using the SE to manage chronic disease scale (SEMCD Scale) and the Fall Efficacy Scale (FallE Scale) in participants who successfully completed CDSMP workshops within a Southern state over a 10-month period. SE scale data were compared at baseline and post-intervention for 36 adults (mean age = 74.5, SD = ±9.64). Principal component analysis (PCA), using oblimin rotation was completed at baseline and post-intervention for the individual scales and then for analysis combining both scales as a single scale. Each scale loaded under a single component for the PCA at both baseline and post-intervention. When both scales were entered as single meta-scale, the meta-scale split along two factors with no double loading. SEMCD and FallE Scale scores were significantly correlated at baseline and post-intervention, at least p change was also significant only for the FallE Scale (p = 0.043). The SEMCD Scale scores did not change significantly. Study findings from the exploratory PCA and significant correlations indicated that the SEMCD Scale and the FallE Scale measured two distinct but related types of SE. Though the scale scores were correlated at baseline and post-intervention, only the FallE Scale scores significantly differed post-intervention. Given this relationship and CDSMP’s recent addition of a 10-min fall prevention segment, further exploration of CDSMP’s possible influence on Fall-related SE would provide useful understanding for health promotion in aging adults. PMID:27699164

  12. Development of a community's self-efficacy scale for preventing social isolation among community-dwelling older people (Mimamori Scale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadaka, Etsuko; Kono, Ayumi; Ito, Eriko; Kanaya, Yukiko; Dai, Yuka; Imamatsu, Yuki; Itoi, Waka

    2016-11-28

    Among older people in developed countries, social isolation leading to solitary death has become a public health issue of vital importance. Such isolation could be prevented by monitoring at-risk individuals at the neighborhood level and by implementing supportive networks at the community level. However, a means of measuring community confidence in these measures has not been established. This study is aimed at developing the Community's Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES; Mimamori scale in Japanese) for community members preventing social isolation among older people. The CSES is a self-administered questionnaire developed on the basis of Bandura's self-efficacy theory. The survey was given to a general population (GEN) sample (n = 6,000) and community volunteer (CVOL) sample (n = 1,297). Construct validity was determined using confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was calculated using Cronbach's alpha. The Generative Concern Scale (GCS-R) and Brief Sense of Community Scale (BSCS) were also administered to assess criterion-related validity of the CSES. In total, 3,484 and 859 valid responses were received in the GEN and CVOL groups, respectively. The confirmatory factor analysis identified eight items from two domains-community network and neighborhood watch-with goodness of fit index = 0.984, adjusted goodness of fit index = 0.970, comparative fit index = 0.988, and root mean square error of approximation = 0.047. Cronbach's alpha for the entire CSES was 0.87 and for the subscales was 0.80 and higher. The score of the entire CSES was positively correlated with the GCS-R in both the GEN (r = 0.80, p social isolation among older people. The scale is potentially useful for promoting health policies, practices, and interventions within communities. This may help prevent social isolation among older people and contribute to overall well-being in aging societies in Japan and abroad.

  13. Farsi Version of the Mammography Self-efficacy Scale for Iranian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Masoumeh; Hidarnia, Alireza; Aminshokravi, Farkhondeh; Lamyian, Minoor; Hassanpour, Kazem; Akaberi, Arash; Tavafian, Sedigheh Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a crucial factor in adopting mammography behavior. A reliable and valid instrument is necessary to measure self-efficacy among Iranian women. The aim of this study is to translate the original version of Champion's Mammography Self-efficacy Scale into Farsi and then to estimate the Farsi version's reliability and validity. In a cross-sectional study, 200 women 40 years or older who were referred to health centers in Iran were invited to complete the related questionnaires during an interview. Cronbach's α coefficients and item-total correlations were measured to evaluate the reliability of the scales. Content and face validities were evaluated using the opinions of a panel of experts, and construct validity was estimated through applying confirmatory factor analysis. Logistic regression and χ tests were used to estimate theoretical relationships. In terms of reliability, the internal consistency α was .904 and the test-retest reliability correlation over a 4-week period was 0.624. With regard to the confirmatory factor analysis, the proportion of χ to degrees of freedom was 0.394, giving a P value of .852 and a root-mean-square error of approximation less than 0.001 with confidence intervals of less than 0.001 and 0.018, with a comparative fit index of 1, normed fit index of 0.999, relative fit index of 0.993, and incremental fit index of 1. The items that form the self-efficacy measurement scale in the Farsi version are highly reliable and valid. Healthcare professionals and nursing health communities may apply the instrument to determine women's self-efficacy and to plan appropriate educational interventions, aiming at promoting women's mammography behavior.

  14. The development and psychometric evaluation of a self-efficacy scale for practicing pelvic floor exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinara Sacomori

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy has been shown to be a predictor of many health-related behaviors, including the practice of pelvic floor exercises with a focus on prevention or cure. OBJECTIVES: To describe the process of construction and the psychometric properties of the scale of self-efficacy for the practice of pelvic floor exercises (EAPEAP. METHOD: A cross-sectional study of validation was carried out with 81 from community and 96 postpartum women, 54.8% of them complained of urinary leakage. An exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency analysis was performed. To check predictive capacity, we analyzed the adherence at 3 months post - intervention and compared the scores of self-efficacy between adherent and non-adherent women. Reliability was analyzed by split half procedure. RESULTS: The instrument showed α=0.923, and revealed three factors: performance expectation considering the action, performance expectation considering the preparation for action and outcome expectations. These factors accounted for 65.32% of the total variance. The instrument was able to differentiate between women who adhere and have not adhered to the exercises (U=352, p=0.013 and there was strong correlation between the two halves of the instrument (rho=0.889, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The scale is a valid and reliable tool to measure self-efficacy to practice pelvic floor exercises.

  15. Epistemological beliefs and the Self-efficacy Scale in nursing students.

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    Orgun, Fatma; Karaoz, Banu

    2014-06-01

    Epistemological beliefs in their most general form define an individual's subjective beliefs about what knowledge is and how knowing and learning occur. To investigate epistemological beliefs and the Self-efficacy Scale in nursing students. Prospective survey study. University School of Nursing. Nursing students. Outcome parameters included Nurses' Descriptive Characteristics Data Form, Epistemological Beliefs Questionnaire and Self-efficacy Scale. As for the subscales of epistemological beliefs, Effort Subscale was 38.89 ± 11.62, Ability Subscale was 24.02 ± 6.19 and Unchanging Truth Subscale was 30.65 ± 5.74. Total score of the self-efficacy subscales was 74.39 ± 13.59. It has been determined that the majority (60.8%) of nursing students have chosen the nursing profession willingly, 82.8% of them like the nursing profession and 59.8% of students have a good perception of their own academic achievements. Understanding student's epistemological beliefs, trying to improve them and creating suitable learning environments for the development of self-efficacy should be the aim of an education that values individual differences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychometric evaluation of the Marijuana Reduction Strategies Self-Efficacy Scale with young recreational marijuana users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alan K; Osborn, Lawrence A; Rosenberg, Harold; Cross, Nicole; Lauritsen, Kirstin J; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Bradbury, Stacey; Feuille, Margaret; Lackey, Jennifer H; Hawley, Anna; Leith, Jaclyn

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the cue-reactivity and several psychometric properties of a questionnaire designed to assess marijuana users' self-efficacy to employ 21 specific cognitive-behavioral strategies to reduce their marijuana use. Using a web-based recruitment and data-collection procedure, 513 regular marijuana users completed dependent measures following marijuana-related or control cue exposure. Although exposure to marijuana-related stimuli significantly increased reported craving, mean reduction-strategy self-efficacy scores did not differ as a function of cue exposure. Reliability analyses supported retaining all 21 items as a single scale. Reduction-strategy self-efficacy was positively associated with marijuana-refusal self-efficacy and with recent past use of reduction strategies, was negatively associated with quantity and frequency of marijuana use and marijuana-related problems, and was positively but weakly associated with general self-efficacy. The most frequently reported strategies that were employed reflected restricting marijuana use to once per day, not keeping a large stash available, turning down unwanted hits, and not obtaining more marijuana right away if one's supply runs out. These findings further support the reliability and validity of the questionnaire when administered to a diverse sample of regular marijuana users. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Are Virtual Rehabilitation Technologies Feasible Models to Scale an Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Program? A Pilot Study Using the Kinect Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, Tiffany E; Basnett, Jeanna; Chokshi, Anang; Barrett, Mark; Komatireddy, Ravi

    2015-11-05

    Falls in older adults are a significant public health issue. Interventions have been developed and proven effective to reduce falls in older adults, but these programs typically last several months and can be resource intensive. Virtual rehabilitation technologies may offer a solution to bring these programs to scale. Off-the-shelf and custom exergames have demonstrated to be a feasible adjunct to rehabilitation with older adults. However, it is not known if older adults will be able or willing to use a virtual rehabilitation technology to participate in an evidence-based fall prevention program. To have the greatest impact, virtual rehabilitation technologies need to be acceptable to older adults from different backgrounds and level of fall risk. If these technologies prove to be a feasible option, they offer a new distribution channel to disseminate fall prevention programs. Stand Tall (ST) is a virtual translation of the Otago Exercise Program (OEP), an evidence-based fall prevention program. Stand Tall was developed using the Virtual Exercise Rehabilitation Assistant (VERA) software, which uses a Kinect camera and a laptop to deliver physical therapy exercise programs. Our purpose in this pilot study was to explore if ST could be a feasible platform to deliver the OEP to older adults from a variety of fall risk levels, education backgrounds, and self-described level of computer expertise. Adults age 60 and over were recruited to participate in a one-time usability study. The study included orientation to the program, navigation to exercises, and completion of a series of strength and balance exercises. Quantitative analysis described participants and the user experience. A diverse group of individuals participated in the study. Twenty-one potential participants (14 women, 7 men) met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 69.2 (± 5.8) years, 38% had a high school education, 24% had a graduate degree, and 66% classified as "at risk for falls". Eighteen

  18. Cultural adaptation of the Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale (CUSES in Ghana

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    Doku Paul N

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate assessment of self-reports of sexual behaviours is vital to the evaluation of HIV prevention and family planning interventions. This investigation was to determine the cross-cultural suitability of the Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale (CUSES originally developed for American adolescents and young adults by examining the structure and psychometric properties. Method A self-administered cross-sectional survey of a convenient sample of 511 participants from a private university in Ghana with mean age 21.59 years. Result A Principal Component Analysis with varimax rotation identified a 14 item scale with four reliable factors labelled Appropriation (Cronbach alpha = .85, Assertive (Cronbach alpha = .90, Pleasure and Intoxicant (Cronbach alpha = .83, and STDs (Cronbach alpha = .81 that altogether explained 73.72% of the total variance. The scale correlated well with a measure of condom use at past sexual encounter (r = .73, indicating evidence of construct and discriminatory validity. The factor loadings were similar to the original CUSES scale but not identical suggesting relevant cultural variations. Conclusion The 14 item scale (CUSES-G is a reliable and valid instrument for assessing condom use self efficacy. It is culturally appropriate for use among Ghanaian youth to gauge actual condom use and to evaluate interventions meant to increase condom use. Finally, the study cautioned researchers against the use of the original CUSES without validation in African settings and contexts.

  19. Computer User Self-Efficacy Scale – CUSE: A preliminary study to portuguese population

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    Ricardo Pocinho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 177 976 USAL 8 2 1151 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} The instrument Computer User Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSE; Cassidy & Eachus, 2002 was developed in order to measure and analyze the self-efficacy of the adult population in the context of computer use. Arises in a context where many authors were interested in the study of self-efficacy and who considered that this had a strong influence on the performance of tasks that were required the use of computers. The present preliminary study aims to adapt and to validate the instrument Computer User Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSE; Cassidy & Eachus, 2002 for the portuguese population, specifically in the retired population who uses the computer. The results indicate that this scale has a high internal consistency and acceptable standards featuring reliability and validity. It was also found that self-efficacy is positively correlated with moderate and statistically previous experience with using computers. The results indicate that the instrument Computer User Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSE; Cassidy & Eachus, 2002 is valid for the study and analysis of the effectiveness of self-use of computers in portuguese people who are retired and who use computer.

  20. Action Schools! BC implementation: from efficacy to effectiveness to scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Heather A; Macdonald, Heather M; Nettlefold, Lindsay; Masse, Louise C; Day, Meghan; Naylor, Patti-Jean

    2015-02-01

    To describe Action Schools! BC (AS! BC) from efficacy to scale-up. Education and health system stakeholders and children in grades 4-6 from elementary schools in British Columbia, Canada. At the provincial level, the AS! BC model reflected socioecological theory and a partnership approach to social change. Knowledge translation and exchange were embedded as a foundational element. At the school level, AS! BC is a comprehensive school health-based model providing teachers and schools with training and resources to integrate physical activity (PA) and healthy eating (HE) into the school environment. Our research team partnered with key community and government stakeholders to deliver and evaluate AS! BC over efficacy, effectiveness and implementation trials. On the basis of significant increases in PA, cardiovascular fitness, bone and HE in AS! BC schools during efficacy trials, the BC government supported a provincial scale-up. Since its inception, the AS! BC Support Team and >225 trained regional trainers have delivered 4677 teacher-focused workshops (training approximately 81,000 teachers), reaching approximately 500,000 students. After scale-up, PA delivery was replicated but the magnitude of change appeared less. One (HE) and 4 (PA) years after scale-up, trained AS! BC teachers provided more PA and HE opportunities for students even in the context of supportive provincial policies. Whole school models like AS! BC can enhance children's PA and health when implemented in partnership with key stakeholders. At the school level, adequately trained and resourced teachers and supportive school policies promoted successful scale-up and sustained implementation. At the provincial level, multisectoral partnerships and embedded knowledge exchange mechanisms influenced the context for action at the provincial and school level, and were core elements of successful implementation. Clinical Trials Registry NCT01412203. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  1. Determinants of disparities between perceived and physiological risk of falling among elderly people: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbaere, Kim; Close, Jacqueline C T; Brodaty, Henry; Sachdev, Perminder; Lord, Stephen R

    2010-08-18

    To gain an understanding of elderly people's fear of falling by exploring the prevalence and determinants of perceived and physiological fall risk and to understand the role of disparities in perceived and physiological risk in the cause of falls. Prospective cohort study. Community sample drawn from eastern Sydney, Australia. 500 men and women aged 70-90 years. Baseline assessment of medical, physiological, and neuropsychological measures, with physiological fall risk estimated with the physiological profile assessment, and perceived fall risk estimated with the falls efficacy scale international. Participants were followed up monthly for falls over one year. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that perceived and physiological fall risk were both independent predictors of future falls. Classification tree analysis was used to split the sample into four groups (vigorous, anxious, stoic, and aware) based on the disparity between physiological and perceived risk of falling. Perceived fall risk was congruent with physiological fall risk in the vigorous (144 (29%)) and aware (202 (40%)) groups. The anxious group (54 (11%)) had a low physiological risk but high perceived fall risk, which was related to depressive symptoms (P=0.029), neurotic personality traits (P=0.026), and decreased executive functioning (P=0.010). The stoic group (100 (20%)) had a high physiological risk but low perceived fall risk, which was protective for falling and mediated through a positive outlook on life (P=0.001) and maintained physical activity and community participation (P=0.048). Many elderly people underestimated or overestimated their risk of falling. Such disparities between perceived and physiological fall risk were primarily associated with psychological measures and strongly influenced the probability of falling. Measures of both physiological and perceived fall risk should be included in fall risk assessments to allow tailoring of interventions for preventing falls in

  2. Development and psychometric testing of a breast cancer survivor self-efficacy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Victoria L; Ziner, Kim W; Monahan, Patrick O; Stump, Timothy E; Cella, David; Smith, Lisa G; Bell, Cynthia J; Von Ah, Diane; Sledge, George W

    2013-11-01

    To describe the development of a self-efficacy instrument that measures perceived ability to manage symptoms and quality-of-life problems resulting from the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Items were developed and content validity assessed. A 14-item scale was psychometrically evaluated using internal consistency reliability and several types of construct validity. 1,127 female breast cancer survivors (BCSs). Written consents were mailed to the research office. Data were collected via mail and telephone. Demographics, symptom bother, communication with healthcare provider, attention function, fear of recurrence, depression, marital satisfaction, fatigue, sexual functioning, trait and state anxiety, and overall well-being. Data demonstrated that the breast cancer self-efficacy scale (BCSES) was reliable, with an alpha coefficient of 0.89, inter-item correlations ranging from 0.3-0.6, and item-total correlation coefficients ranging from 0.5-0.73. Three of 14 items were deleted because of redundancy as identified through high (> 0.7) inter-item correlations. Factor analysis revealed that the scale was unidimensional. Predictive validity was supported through testing associations between self-efficacy and theoretically supported quality-of-life variables, including physical, psychological, and social dimensions, as well as overall well-being. The BCSES demonstrated high internal consistency reliability, unidimensionality, and excellent content and construct validity. This scale should be integrated into interventions that target self-efficacy for managing symptoms in BCSs. Nurses working with BCSs may use this tool to assess areas in which survivors might need to build confidence to adequately cope with their specific survivorship concerns. The use of the BCSES can inform nurse researchers about the impact of an intervention on self-efficacy in the context of breast cancer survivorship, improving the ability to deliver effective interventions. The scale is

  3. Translation and Validation of a Condom Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) Chinese Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanping; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Miu, Heidi Yin Hai; Yuen, Winnie Wing Yan; Chin, Weng Yee; Luo, Tongyong; Wong, William Chi Wai

    2016-12-01

    The English version of the Condom Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) was translated, back-translated, and tested among a representative sample of the Hong Kong general population. It then underwent reconsolidation, confirmation, and validation following standard procedures. Construct validity was performed by exploratory factor analysis and item-scale correlation. Independent t-test and effect size were used to identify the score differences between consistent and non-consistent condom users. The factor loading scores of 14 items ranged between 0.749 and 0.884. Cronbach's alpha for the traditional Chinese version of CSES (CSES-TC) was 0.96 for the overall scale. The CSES-TC was highly correlated with self-reported condom use among the 265 participants who indicated they had been sexually active in the past 12 months. The CSES-TC demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of validity, reliability, and sensitivity. This scale can be used as an instrument to measure condom use efficacy for condom promotion and intervention purposes.

  4. The breastfeeding self-efficacy scale: psychometric assessment of the short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Cindy-Lee

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the number of items on the original Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) and psychometrically assess the revised BSES-Short Form (BSES-SF). As part of a longitudinal study, participants completed mailed questionnaires at 1, 4, and 8 weeks postpartum. Health region in British Columbia. A population-based sample of 491 breastfeeding mothers. BSES, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Perceived Stress Scale. Internal consistency statistics with the original BSES suggested item redundancy. As such, 18 items were deleted, using explicit reduction criteria. Based on the encouraging reliability analysis of the new 14-item BSES-SF, construct validity was assessed using principal components factor analysis, comparison of contrasted groups, and correlations with measures of similar constructs. Support for predictive validity was demonstrated through significant mean differences between breastfeeding and bottle feeding mothers at 4 (p < .001) and 8 (p < .001) weeks postpartum. Demographic response patterns suggested the BSES-SF is a unique tool to identify mothers at risk of prematurely discontinuing breastfeeding. These psychometric results indicate the BSES-SF is an excellent measure of breastfeeding self-efficacy and considered ready for clinical use to (a) identify breastfeeding mothers at high risk, (b) assess breastfeeding behaviors and cognitions to individualize confidence-building strategies, and (c) evaluate the effectiveness of various interventions and guide program development.

  5. Development and evaluation of the Marijuana Reduction Strategies Self-Efficacy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alan K; Osborn, Lawrence A; Leith, Jaclyn; Rosenberg, Harold; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Hawley, Anna; Bannon, Erin E; Jesse, Samantha; Kraus, Shane; Kryszak, Elizabeth; Cross, Nicole; Carhart, Victoria; Baik, Kyoung-deok

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate several psychometric properties of a questionnaire designed to assess college students' self-efficacy to employ 21 cognitive-behavioral strategies intended to reduce the amount and/or frequency with which they consume marijuana, we recruited 273 marijuana-using students to rate their confidence that they could employ each of the strategies. Examination of frequency counts for each item, principal components analysis, internal consistency reliability, and mean interitem correlation supported retaining all 21 items in a single scale. In support of criterion validity, marijuana use-reduction self-efficacy scores were significantly positively correlated with cross-situational confidence to abstain from marijuana, and significantly negatively correlated with quantity and frequency of marijuana use and marijuana-related problems. In addition, compared with respondents whose use of marijuana either increased or remained stable, self-efficacy was significantly higher among those who had decreased their use of marijuana over the past year. This relatively short and easily administered questionnaire could be used to identify college students who have low self-efficacy to employ specific marijuana reduction strategies and as an outcome measure to evaluate educational and skill-training interventions.

  6. Confirmatory factor analysis of the generalized self-efficacy scale in Brazil and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leme, Vanessa B R; Coimbra, Susana; Gato, Jorge; Fontaine, Anne Marie; Del Prette, Zilda A P

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the construct validity, internal consistency and cross-cultural invariance of the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale-Portuguese version (GSE) in a Brazilian and Portuguese sample. The GSE is composed of 10 items, designed to parsimoniously and comprehensively assess self-efficacy beliefs to deal with a wide range of stress-inducing situations. The construct validity (factorial, convergent and discriminant) and internal consistency of the instrument were established within a sample of 304 Portuguese adolescents (study 1) and a sample of 477 Brazilian adolescents (study 2). Then, the invariance of the GSE was tested in a sample of Brazilian adolescents (study 3), using Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis (MGCFA). In the first two studies, the construct validity of the GSE was demonstrated in its three components and the reliability of the scales was confirmed based on satisfactory levels of internal consistency. In the third study, the cross-cultural invariance of the instrument was established. This work adds to previous research on generalized self-efficacy instruments, with good psychometric qualities. Moreover, comparisons can now be made with confidence using this instrument among adolescent samples from Portugal and Brazil.

  7. Cultural adaptation and linguistic validation of the Family Decision Making Self Efficacy Scale (FDMSES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limardi, S; Rocco, G; Stievano, A; Vellone, E; Valle, A; Torino, F; Alvaro, R

    2014-01-01

    Nurses, following their ethical mandate, collaborate with other health and social professionals or people involved in caring activities. Caregivers in this context are becoming more and more significant for the family or the cared person, who for their stable presence and emotional proximity play a pivotal caring role. To maximize the contribution of caregivers, objective tools that emphasize their skill sets are necessary. The cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Family Decision Making Self-Efficacy Scale is part of a larger project aimed at understanding the resilience of caregivers in the field of palliative care. Self-efficacy is one of the aspects of personality most closely associated with resilience. Self-efficacy is shown in a specific context, therefore, its study and evaluation of its level, require capabilities that enable individuals perceive themselves as effective in a particular circumstance. The Family Decision Making Self- Efficacy Scale assesses the behavior of caregivers of patients at the end of their life. The Family Decision Making Self-Efficacy Scale was translated (forward and back translation) and was adapted to the Italian clinical cultural setting by a research team that included experts in palliative care, native translators with experience in nursing and experts in nursing. A consensus on the wording of each item in relation to semantic, idiomatic, experiential and conceptual equivalence was sought. The clarity of the wording and the pertinence of the items of the scenario with the conscious patient and with the unconscious patient were evaluated by a group of caregivers who tested the instrument. The Italian version of the instrument included 12 items for the scenario with the conscious patient and 12 for the scenario with the unconscious patient. The working group expressed consensus on the pretesting version of the instrument. The pre-testing version of the scale was tested on 60 caregivers, 47 taking care of conscious

  8. Validation of a Yoruba version of the arthritis self-efficacy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, B O A; Odole, A C; Adekunle-Balogun, A T; Umar, I

    2016-06-01

    The Arthritis Self Efficacy Scale (ASES) measures a patient's perceived efficacy to cope with the consequences of chronic arthritis. The aim of this, study was to translate ASES in to Yoruba, one of the indigenous Nigerian languages, and to investigate the validity and reliability of the translated version. Forty one (21 males; 20 females).patients diagnosed with arthritis participated in this cross sectional survey, although only thirty seven (87.8%) were available for the reliability study. The ASES was translated to Yoruba language using forward-backward translations. Participants completed both English and Yoruba version of ASES on the first day while the second administration of the two versions of ASES was.. completed at one week after the first administrations. Data was analyzed -using descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation and intra-class correlation (at p=0.05). There was a significant direct correlation (pcorrelation (phealth outcomes assessment in Yoruba-speaking populations.

  9. Psychometric properties of a driving self-efficacy scale – short form in Argentinean drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Alberto Trogolo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to translate and examine the psychometric properties of a driving self-efficacy scale developed by Dorn and Machin (2004. The factor structure, reliability and external validity of the scale were examined in a sample of 447 drivers from Cordoba, Argentina. In addition, measurement invariance across sex was also tested. Results from a confirmatory factor analysis support the unidimensional structure of the scale and the invariance of its parameters (configural, metric and scalar between men and women. Reliability analyses using alpha and omega coefficients revealed high internal consistency (coefficients equal to 0.81 in both cases and satisfactory evidence of external validity of the scale scores, with measures of risk perception, risky driving, history of traffic crashes and fines. Finally, results also showed that the scale seems to be relatively robust against response biases due to social desirability. In summary, findings support the validity and reliability of the scale in Argentina. However, further studies analyzing additional psychometric properties are needed.

  10. A Dutch translation of the Self-Efficacy for Rehabilitation Outcome Scale (SER) : a first impression on reliability and validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, M; van den Akker-Scheek, [No Value; van Horn, [No Value; Akker-Scheek, I.; van Horn, J.R.

    Self-efficacy is a relevant factor during rehabilitation after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Research was done into the reliability and validity of a Dutch translation of the Self-Efficacy for Rehabilitation Outcome Scale (SER). One hundred and forty-one persons filled in the SER questionnaire and

  11. Psychometric properties of the exercise self-efficacy scale in Dutch primary care patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, M.M.P.; Pouwer, F.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excercise self-efficacy is believed to influence physical activity bahavior. Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess the psychometric aspects of the Exercise Self-efficacy Scale (ESS) in a type 2 diabetes Dutch Primary care sample. Method Type 2 diabetes patients (n = 322; <80

  12. The Impact of Fear of Falling on Functional Independence Among Older Adults Receiving Home Health Services

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    Katherine A. Lawson OTR, LMSSW, PhD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are the fifth leading cause of death for adults aged 65 years and older. Several intrinsic and extrinsic fall risk factors have been identified, butthere is less understanding of the impact of a fear of falling on falls. Seventy percent of recent fallers and 40% percent of non-fallers report a fear of falling. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between a fear of falling and a history of falls, as well as the impact on the functional independence of community-dwelling older adults receiving home health services. Methods: The participants completed the Falls Efficacy Scale, the Modified Timed Up and Go Test, self- reported fear of falling, and the KATZ ADL-staircase. The participants were primarily Hispanic females. Results: There was not a significant correlation between a fear of falling and a history of falls. Only participants' age, gender, and the number of medical diagnoses were predictive of past falls. There was a moderate correlation between impaired functional mobility and dependence with activities of daily living (ADL. Additionally, a fear of falling was associated with dependence to perform ADLs as measured objectively. Conclusion: Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of interventions that include dual-task challenges during therapeutic interventions and ADL retraining to reduce fall risk among older adults.

  13. Elementary student self efficacy scale development and validation focused on student learning, peer relations, and resisting drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertman, Carl I; Primack, Brian A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a child self efficacy scale for learning, peer interactions, and resisting pressure to use drugs, to use in an elementary school drug prevention education program based on social cognitive theory. A diverse cohort of 392 4th and 5th grade students completed the 20-item self efficacy scale and social support and social skills instruments. The results provide evidence for a valid and reliable 3-factor self efficacy scale. Subscale internal consistency reliability was good to excellent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.75, 0.83, 0.91). Construct validity was supported by correlations between each subscale and social skills, social support, and demographic data. The scale has potential as a tool to measure self efficacy in children related to learning, peer interactions, and resisting peer pressure to use drugs and to help shape drug education programs.

  14. The efficacy of Clorhexidine 0.2% after scaling in marginal gingivitis

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    M Shahrohisham

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Thirty male subjects aged around 20-30 years old, with complete anterior teeth, no inter proximal caries and good general health conditions were selected by using simple random sampling. The anterior teeth were divided into 2 segments right side for 11, 12, 13 and left side for 21, 22, and 23. These two sites were treated by different way for comparing two treatment variables, between scaling therapy alone and scaling therapy with adjunction of Chlorhexidine (CHX 0.2%. Gingival Index (GI score was used to determine the gingivitis status of the subjects. Clinical experiment showed that the duration of healing process in subjects treated with scaling with adjunction of CHX 0.2% was faster than scaling therapy alone group. However, in the statistical analysis, there was no significant difference because of several factors. In conclusion, it was found that CHX 0.2% had the efficacy to enhance the healing process in the marginal gingivitis patient that was treated by scaling therapy, but further study using CHX 0.2% with longer duration time should be done to achieve more pronounce effect

  15. Measuring the impact of multiple sclerosis on psychosocial functioning: the development of a new self-efficacy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airlie, J; Baker, G A; Smith, S J; Young, C A

    2001-06-01

    To develop a scale to measure self-efficacy in neurologically impaired patients with multiple sclerosis and to assess the scale's psychometric properties. Cross-sectional questionnaire study in a clinical setting, the retest questionnaire returned by mail after completion at home. Regional multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatient clinic or the Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) at a large neuroscience centre in the UK. One hundred persons with MS attending the Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery and Clatterbridge Hospital, Wirral, as outpatients. Cognitively impaired patients were excluded at an initial clinic assessment. Patients were asked to provide demographic data and complete the self-efficacy scale along with the following validated scales: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Impact, Stigma and Mastery and Rankin Scales. The Rankin Scale and Barthel Index were also assessed by the physician. A new 11-item self-efficacy scale was constructed consisting of two domains of control and personal agency. The validity of the scale was confirmed using Cronbach's alpha analysis of internal consistency (alpha = 0.81). The test-retest reliability of the scale over two weeks was acceptable with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.79. Construct validity was investigated using Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient resulting in significant correlations with depression (r= -0.52) anxiety (r =-0.50) and mastery (r= 0.73). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that these factors accounted for 70% of the variance of scores on the self-efficacy scale, with scores on mastery, anxiety and perceived disability being independently significant. Assessment of the psychometric properties of this new self-efficacy scale suggest that it possesses good validity and reliability in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  16. Adaptation and validation of the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale to Brazilian Portuguese 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Ana Emilia; Gomes, Lilian Cristiane; Bertolin, Daniela Comelis; Loureiro, Helena Maria Almeira Macedo; Bijl, Jaap Van Der; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: to perform the cultural adaptation and validation of the Diabetes Management Self-efficacy Scale for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with a Brazilian population sample. Method: cross-sectional methodological study in which the adaptation and validation process included the stages recommended in the literature. Construct validity and reliability were assessed with 200 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results: the items indicated by the panel of judges and by the target population were adjusted in the cultural adaptation to improve clarity and understanding. The instrument's four factors remained in the confirmatory factor analysis with factor loadings of items greater than 0.30, except for factor 4; convergent validity, verified by the multitrait-multimethod analysis, presented inter-item correlations from 0.37 to 0.92, while for discriminant validity, 100% of the items presented greater correlation in their own factors. Cronbach's coefficient alpha for the total scale was 0.78, ranging from 0.57 to 0.86 among factors. Conclusion: semantic, cultural, conceptual and idiomatic equivalences were achieved and the instrument's Brazilian version also presented psychometric properties that showed evidence of reliability and validity. Thus, it can be applied both in clinical practice and research. Self-efficacy is useful for planning and assessing educational interventions, as well as predicting behavior modification in self-care. PMID:28562700

  17. Correlation Between Pain, Fear of Falling and Disability in Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Bharat Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Objective To ascertain if there is a correlation between low back pain (LBP), fear of falling, and disability so that the patients with LBP are aware of the fact that other problems may occur with LBP. Hence, steps can be taken for decreasing the fear of falling and disability in order to improve the condition of patients. Methods A sample size of 100 patients with low back pain, with a range of ages from 40 to 73 years, participated in the study. The Falls Efficacy Scale was used to assess the fear of falling and the Oswestry Disability Index was used to assess the disability and pain in LBP individuals. Results The Pearson correlation analysis signifies the relationship between pain, fear of falling, and disability in LBP. Conclusion First, LBP increases the fear of falling. Second, LBP can result in a person becoming disabled. Third, the fear of falling and disability are correlated with each other. PMID:26605180

  18. Aging and health: Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Albertina L; Silva, José T; Lima, Margarida P

    2016-07-04

    To validate the Escala de Autoeficácia para a Autodireção na Saúde (EAAS - Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale). Non-experimental quantitative study of EAAS validation, by confirmatory factorial analyses, evaluating a sample of 508 older adults from the north and the center of Portugal with mean age of 71.67 (from 51 to 96 years), to whom the Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale were applied. The EAAS was developed from the theoretical constructs of self-efficacy and from self-directed learning within the PALADIN European project framework, aiming to develop an instrument able to assess the extent to which older adults take good care of their health. The internal consistency was 0.87 (Cronbach's alpha) and confirmatory factorial analyses enabled to find a model near the one theoretically proposed, indicating a structure consisting of four dimensions: physical exercise, healthy diet, engaging in health-related learning, and visits to health professionals. From the psychometric point of view, the model in four factors showed quite satisfactory fit indicators. The Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale, with 16 items, is adequate to evaluate to what extent older adults have confidence in their ability to take care of their own health, with high degree of autonomy. Validar a Escala de Autoeficácia para a Autodireção no domínio da Saúde (EAAS). Estudo quantitativo não experimental de validação da EAAS, por meio de análises fatoriais confirmatórias, avaliando amostra de 508 seniores e idosos provenientes das regiões Norte e Centro de Portugal com média etária de 71.67 (51 a 96 anos), a quem foram aplicadas a Escala de Autoeficácia para a Autodireção na Saúde, a Escala de Autoestima de Rosenberg, a Escala de Afeto Positivo e Afeto Negativo, a Escala de

  19. Adaptation of the contraceptive self-efficacy scale for heterosexual Mexican men and women of reproductive age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, María Luisa Flores; Champion, Jane Dimmitt; Soto, Norma Elva Sáenz

    2017-08-01

    Development of a Spanish Version Contraceptive Self-efficacy Scale for use among heterosexual Mexican populations of reproductive age inclusive of 18-35years. Methods of family planning have decreased in Mexico which may lead to an increase in unintended pregnancies. Contraceptive self-efficacy is considered a predictor and precursor for use of family planning methods. Cross-sectional, descriptive study design was used to assess contraceptive self-efficacy among a heterosexual Mexican population (N=160) of reproductive age (18-35years). Adaptation of a Spanish Version Contraceptive Self-efficacy scale was conducted prior to instrument administration. Exploratory and confirmatory factorial analyses identified seven factors with a variance of 72.812%. The adapted scale had a Cronbach alpha of 0.771. A significant correlation between the Spanish Version Contraceptive Self-efficacy Scale and the use of family planning methods was identified. The Spanish Version Contraceptive Self-efficacy scale has an acceptable Cronbach alpha. Exploratory factor analysis identified 7 components. A positive correlation between self-reported contraceptive self-efficacy and family planning method use was identified. This scale may be used among heterosexual Mexican men and women of reproductive age. The factor analysis (7 factors versus 4 factors for the original scale) identified a discrepancy for interpretation of the Spanish versus English language versions. Interpretation of findings obtained via the Spanish versión among heterosexual Mexican men and women of reproductive age require interpretation based upon these differences identified in these analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Validity and Reliability of Preschool, First and Second Grade Versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale

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    Shahrbanoo Tajeri

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: The purpose of this study is to examine the factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting self-efficacy scale. "nMethod:  The subjects were 317 mothers: (102 mothers of preschool children, 111 mothers of first grade children and 104 mothers of second grade children who were randomly selected from schools in Tehran. They completed Berkeley parenting self-efficacy and Rotter `s locus of control scales. Factor analysis using the principle component method was used to identify the factor structure of parenting self-efficacy scale. Cronbach`s alpha coefficient was used to identify the reliability of parenting self efficacy scale. "nResults: Results of this study indicated that the cronbach`s alpha coefficient was 0.84, 0.87, 0.64 for preschool, first grade and second grade versions respectively. Based on the scree test ,,factor analysis produced two factors of maternal strategy and child outcome, and it also produced the highest level of total variance explained by these 2 factors. The Parenting self-efficacy scale was negatively associated with measure of locus of control(r=-0.54 for the preschool version, -0.64 for the first grade version and -0.54 for the second grade version. "nConclusion: Due to relatively high reliability and validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy scale, this scale could be used as a reliable and valid scale in other research areas

  1. Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale: Adaptation and Validation in the Turkish Population

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    Mehmet Emin Turan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to adapt and conduct reliability and validity studies of the Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale. Participants were 1047 students in İstanbul. To assess content validity, expert consultancy was utilized and to assess construct validity confirmatory factor analysis was utilized. Reliability of the scale was examined with Cronbach’s Alpha, split-half reliability, test of upper and lower 27% of the groups in terms of item mean differences. Confirmatory factor analysis results showed that chi-square was significant (χ2 = 719.30, SD = 130, p = .00; and fit indices were as follows RMSEA = .066, GFI = .93, AGFI = .91, CFI = .93, IFI = .93, NFI = .91, RFI = .90, SRMR = .041. According to the model results provided a good fit to the data and factor structure in the Turkish form was parallel to the original factor structure. In terms of reliability, internal consistency reliability was. 92 and split-half reliability was. 86. Furthermore, corrected item total correlations were ranged between. 49 and. 67 and all the differences between upper and lower 27% groups were significant. The results of the analysis supported the conclusion that the Turkish form of Career and Talent Development Scale is a reliable and valid measurement tool.

  2. Development and initial validation of the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale--Racial Diversity Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Hung-Bin; Lent, Robert W

    2007-03-01

    Drawing upon social-cognitive theory and the multicultural counseling competency literature, the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale-Racial Diversity Form (MCSE-RD) was developed to assess perceived ability to counsel racially diverse clients. Data were collected from 181 graduate students in counseling-related programs, 41 undergraduate psychology students, and 22 graduate students enrolled in a prepracticum course. Results of an exploratory factor analysis retained 37 items and identified three underlying factors: Multicultural Intervention, Multicultural Assessment, and Multicultural Session Management. MCSE-RD subscale and total scores produced adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability estimates. Initial validity findings indicated theory-consistent relations of MCSE-RD scores with general counseling self-efficacy, multicultural counseling competency, social desirability, therapist demographics, and educational/training variables. Participation in prepracticum was associated with positive change in MCSE-RD scores. Implications for training and future research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Standards of Evidence for Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Scale-up Research in Prevention Science: Next Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfredson, Denise C; Cook, Thomas D; Gardner, Frances E M; Gorman-Smith, Deborah; Howe, George W; Sandler, Irwin N; Zafft, Kathryn M

    2015-10-01

    A decade ago, the Society of Prevention Research (SPR) endorsed a set of standards for evidence related to research on prevention interventions. These standards (Flay et al., Prevention Science 6:151-175, 2005) were intended in part to increase consistency in reviews of prevention research that often generated disparate lists of effective interventions due to the application of different standards for what was considered to be necessary to demonstrate effectiveness. In 2013, SPR's Board of Directors decided that the field has progressed sufficiently to warrant a review and, if necessary, publication of "the next generation" of standards of evidence. The Board convened a committee to review and update the standards. This article reports on the results of this committee's deliberations, summarizing changes made to the earlier standards and explaining the rationale for each change. The SPR Board of Directors endorses "The Standards of Evidence for Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Scale-up Research in Prevention Science: Next Generation."

  4. Psychometric properties of the Exercise Self-efficacy Scale in Dutch Primary care patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, M M P; Pouwer, F; Pop, V J M

    2014-04-01

    Excercise self-efficacy is believed to influence physical activity bahavior. The purpose of this study is to assess the psychometric aspects of the Exercise Self-efficacy Scale (ESS) in a type 2 diabetes Dutch Primary care sample. Type 2 diabetes patients (n = 322; diabetes patients. The 13-item ESS could be useful in (intervention) research on physical activity in type 2 diabetes patients.

  5. Perceived Fall Risk and Functional Decline: Gender Differences in Patient's Willingness to Discuss Fall Risk, Fall History, or to Have a Home Safety Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marna Rayl; Moore, Elizabeth C; Nguyen, Michael C; Stello, Brian; Goldberg, Arnold; Barraco, Robert D; Porter, Bernadette G; Kurt, Anita; Dusza, Stephen W; Kane, Bryan G

    2016-06-01

    The CDC reports that among older adults, falls are the leading cause of injury-related death and rates of fall-related fractures among older women are twice those of men. We set out to 1) determine patient perceptions (analyzed by gender) about their perceived fall risk compared to their actual risk for functional decline and death and 2) to report their comfort level in discussing their fall history or a home safety plan with their provider. Elders who presented to the Emergency Department (ED†) were surveyed. The survey included demographics, the Falls Efficacy Scale (FES) and the Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES); both validated surveys measuring fall concern and functional decline. Females had higher FES scores (mean 12.3, SD 5.9) than males (mean 9.7, SD 5.9 p = .007) in the 146 surveys analyzed. Females were more likely to report an increased fear of falling, and almost three times more likely to have a VES score of 3 or greater than males (OR = 2.86, 95% CI: 1.17-7.00, p = .02). A strong correlation was observed between FES and VES scores (r = 0.80, p fall risk with a provider; there was no difference between genders (p = .57). In this study, irrespective of gender, there appears to be a high association between subjects' perceived fall risk and risk for functional decline and death. The majority of patients are likely willing to discuss their fall risk with their provider. These findings may suggest a meaningful opportunity for fall risk mitigation in this setting.

  6. THE PROGRESS STUDY OF TRADITIONAL TURKISH MUSIC LESSONS SELF-EFFICACY PERCEPTION SCALE FOR MUSIC TEACHING PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Celenk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop a scale in order to determine the perspective of self-efficacy related to the course Traditional Turkish Music (Traditional Turkish Folk Music/Traditional Turkish Classical Music, which takes place in the curriculum of Faculty of Education, Department of Fine Arts Education, Division of Music Education. The working group of this research consists of 97 students who receive training in the division of Music Education in Atatürk, Niğde (Ömer Halisdemir, Uludağ and Pamukkale Universities. The research is a descriptive study. In the research, general scanning method has been used, self efficacy- scale both in and non-area have been examined, literature review has been done and a scale, as research result, has been developed in order to determine possible Music teachers’ perspective of self-efficacy related to the course Traditional Turkish Music. An item pool has been formed for the validity of the scale, having prepared an expert opinion form the items have been submitted for consideration, getting the content validity ratios (CVR of the items and the content validity index of the whole scale, taking the margin of error of 5 percent, statistical significance has been tested. To determine the construct validity of the scale the factor analysis has been made and it has been confirmed that the scale has a single factor structure and establishes construct validity. Pilot scheme has been done to check the validity of the scale. Within this scope, the reliability coefficient of the scale has been calculated as 0.842 cronbach’s alpha and the scale developed is highly reliable. As a result, the scale developed is a valid and reliable tool to determine possible Music teachers’ perspective of self-efficacy related to the course Traditional Turkish Music.

  7. Preventing falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more difficult to stand up or keep your balance are a common cause of falls. Balance problems can also cause falls. When you walk, ... 2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  8. Multiple sclerosis severity and concern about falling: Physical, cognitive and psychological mediating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Rob; Hoang, Phu; Lord, Stephen; Gandevia, Simon; Delbaere, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Concern about falling can have devastating physical and psychological consequences in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, little is known about physical and cognitive determinants for increased concern about falling inthis group. To investigate direct and indirect relationships between MS severity and concern about falling using structural equation modelling (SEM). Two hundred and ten community-dwelling people (21-73 years) with MS Disease Steps 0-5 completed several physical, cognitive and psychological assessments. Concern about falling was assessed using the Falls Efficacy Scale-International. Concern about falling was significantly associated with MS Disease Step and also balance, muscle strength, disability, previous falls, and executive functioning. SEM revealed a strong direct path between MS Disease Step and concern about falling (r = 0.31, p falling in people with MS and had an excellent goodness-of-fit. The relationship between MS severity and increased concern about falling was primarily mediated by reduced physical ability (especially if this resulted in disability and falls) and less so by executive functioning. This suggests people with MS have a realistic appraisal of their concern about falling.

  9. The Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy Scale: Issues of Reliability and Validity Within a Turkish Sample Group

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    Tarık Totan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to psychometrically evaluate the Turkish version of the Regulatory Emotional Self-efficacy Scale (RESE. The RESE, the Emotional Self-efficacy Scale, the Self-liking/Self-competence Scale, and the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire were applied to 303 university students in total, 180 were women (59.4% and 123 were men (40.6%. According to results of confirmatory factor analysis applied in the study are founded enough conformity between the priori hypothesis model and the data. In addition, the metric invariance model shows that there were no gender differences on this confirmatory model. Internal consistency coefficients were all above the acceptable for the RESE’s sub-scale and total. Moreover, positive correlations were found between regulatory emotional self-efficacy dimensions and emotional self-efficacy, self-esteem, and happiness. According to these research findings, the RESE is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring regulatory self-efficacy in Turkish.

  10. The Smoking Outcome Expectation Scale and Anti-Smoking Self-Efficacy Scale for Early Adolescents: Instrument Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-Ju; Yeh, Ming-Chen; Tang, Fu-In; Yu, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Smoking-related outcome expectation and self-efficacy have been found to be associated with adolescent smoking initiation. There is, however, a lack of appropriate instruments to investigate early adolescents' smoking outcome expectations and antismoking self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Smoking Outcome…

  11. The English and Spanish Self-Efficacy to Manage Chronic Disease Scale measures were validated using multiple studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Philip L; Lorig, Kate

    2014-11-01

    Self-efficacy theory, as developed by Bandura, suggests that self-efficacy is an important predictor of future behavior. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program was designed to enhance self-efficacy as one approach to improving health behaviors and outcomes for people with varying chronic diseases. The six-item Self-Efficacy to Manage Chronic Disease Scale (SEMCD) and the four-item Spanish-language version (SEMCD-S) were developed to measure changes in self-efficacy in program participants and have been used in a numerous evaluations of chronic disease self-management programs. This study describes the development of the scales and their psychometric properties. Secondary analyses of questionnaire data from 2,866 participants in six studies are used to quantify and evaluate the SEMCD. Data from 868 participants in two studies are used for the SEMCD-S. Subjects consisted of individuals with various chronic conditions, who enrolled in chronic disease self-management programs (either small group or Internet based). Subjects came from United States, England, Canada, Mexico, and Australia. Descriptive statistics are summarized, reliability tested (Cronbach alpha), and principal component analyses applied to items. Baseline and change scores are correlated with baseline and change scores for five medical outcome variables that have been shown to be associated with self-efficacy measures in past studies. Principal component analyses confirmed the one-dimensional structure of the scales. The SEMCD had means ranging from 4.9 to 6.1 and the SEMCD-S 6.1 and 6.2. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach alpha, 0.88-0.95). The scales were sensitive to change and significantly correlated with health outcomes. The SEMCD and SEMCD-S are reliable and appear to be valid instruments for assessing self-efficacy for managing chronic disease. There was remarkable consistency across a range of studies from varying countries using two languages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  12. Psychometric Characteristics of a New Scale for Measuring Self-efficacy in the Regulation of Gambling Behavior

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    Claudio Barbaranelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in 1977, self-efficacy has proven to be a fundamental predictor of positive adjustment and achievement in many domains. In problem gambling studies, self-efficacy has been defined mainly as an individual's ability to avoid gambling in risky situations. The interest in this construct developed mainly with regard to treatment approaches, where abstinence from gambling is required. Very little is known, however, regarding self-efficacy as a protective factor for problem gambling. This study aims to fill this gap, proposing a new self-efficacy scale which measures not only the ability to restrain oneself from gambling but also the ability to self-regulate one's gambling behavior. Two studies were conducted in which the data from two Italian prevalence surveys on problem gambling were considered. A total of about 6,000 participants were involved. In the first study, the psychometric characteristics of this new self-efficacy scale were investigated through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. The results indicated the presence of two different factors: self-efficacy in self-regulating gambling behavior and self-efficacy in avoiding risky gambling behavior. The second study confirmed the replicability of the two-factor solution and displayed high correlations among these two self-efficacy dimensions and different measures of gambling activities as well as other psychological variables related to gambling (gambling beliefs, gambling motivation, risk propensity, and impulsiveness. The results of logistic regression analyses showed the particular importance of self-regulating gaming behavior in explaining problem gambling as measured by Problem Gambling Severity Index and South Oaks Gambling Screen, thus proving the role of self-efficacy as a pivotal protective factor for problem gambling.

  13. Psychometric Characteristics of a New Scale for Measuring Self-efficacy in the Regulation of Gambling Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaranelli, Claudio; Ghezzi, Valerio; Fida, Roberta; Vecchione, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1977, self-efficacy has proven to be a fundamental predictor of positive adjustment and achievement in many domains. In problem gambling studies, self-efficacy has been defined mainly as an individual's ability to avoid gambling in risky situations. The interest in this construct developed mainly with regard to treatment approaches, where abstinence from gambling is required. Very little is known, however, regarding self-efficacy as a protective factor for problem gambling. This study aims to fill this gap, proposing a new self-efficacy scale which measures not only the ability to restrain oneself from gambling but also the ability to self-regulate one's gambling behavior. Two studies were conducted in which the data from two Italian prevalence surveys on problem gambling were considered. A total of about 6,000 participants were involved. In the first study, the psychometric characteristics of this new self-efficacy scale were investigated through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. The results indicated the presence of two different factors: self-efficacy in self-regulating gambling behavior and self-efficacy in avoiding risky gambling behavior. The second study confirmed the replicability of the two-factor solution and displayed high correlations among these two self-efficacy dimensions and different measures of gambling activities as well as other psychological variables related to gambling (gambling beliefs, gambling motivation, risk propensity, and impulsiveness). The results of logistic regression analyses showed the particular importance of self-regulating gaming behavior in explaining problem gambling as measured by Problem Gambling Severity Index and South Oaks Gambling Screen, thus proving the role of self-efficacy as a pivotal protective factor for problem gambling. PMID:28676781

  14. The Cardiac Self-Efficacy Scale, a useful tool with potential to evaluate person-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Andreas; Ulin, Kerstin; Cliffordson, Christina; Ekman, Inger; Brink, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac self-efficacy is a person's belief in his/her ability to manage the challenges posed by a coronary disease, and its role has been evaluated in several coronary populations using the Cardiac Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE Scale). Self-efficacy has an important role in person-centred care, however there is a lack of appropriate instruments that evaluate person-centred interventions. The purpose of this study was to validate the CSE Scale by examining its psychometric properties as a first step in evaluating a person-centred care intervention in persons with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The study sample consisted of 288 persons (72 women, 216 men) who completed the Swedish version of the CSE Scale two months after hospitalisation for an ACS event. Construct validity was psychometrically evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Additionally, convergent and discriminant validity were tested using correlation analyses. The results revealed that the CSE Scale was represented by three dimensions (control symptoms, control illness and maintain functioning). The analyses also showed that the CSE Scale is suitable for providing a total summary score that represents a global cardiac self-efficacy dimension. Evaluation of convergent and discriminant validity showed the expected correlations. The CSE Scale is a valid and reliable measure when evaluating self-efficacy in patients with ACS. It also seems to be a useful tool to promote person-centred care in clinical practice since it may offer useful guidance in the dialogue with the patient in the common creation of a personal health plan. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  15. Psychometric testing of Korean versions of self-efficacy and outcome expectations for restorative care activities scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dukyoo; Byun, Jinyee; Lee, Minkyung; Kim, Hyejin

    This study aimed to examine the validity and reliability of Korean versions of the Nursing Assistant Self-Efficacy for Restorative Care Scale, and the Nursing Assistant Outcome Expectations for Restorative Care Scale. Psychometric testing was performed with 697 direct care workers in long-term care facilities in South Korea. Data were analyzed using SPSS/WIN 21.0, AMOS 22.0, and WINSTEPS 3.68.2. There was evidence for content validity. Factor loading in the Korean versions of the Nursing Assistant Self-Efficacy for Restorative Care Scale was 0.66-0.94, and Nursing Assistant Outcome Expectations for Restorative Care Scale was 0.43-0.77. Scores on the Korean versions of the Nursing Assistant Outcome Expectations for Restorative Care Scale correlated positively with scores on a scale of knowledge of restorative care. Additionally, Rasch model analysis of the K-NASERC and K-NAOERC indicates acceptable item data fit. These results indicated that the Korean versions of the Nursing Assistant Self-Efficacy, and Outcome Expectations for Restorative Care Scale are satisfactorily valid and reliable for the measurement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid large- and site scale RPAS mission planning for remote sensing of rock falls and landslides in alpine areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräupl, Thomas; Pschernig, Elias; Rokitansky, Carl-Herbert; Oleire-Oltmanns, Sebastian; Zobl, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Since landslides and rock falls are complex phenomena involving a multitude of factors, current and historic surface data play besides geologic conditions and others an important role in analyzing hazard situation and efficient site-specific remediation actions. Especially in displacement acceleration phases which are frequently linked to bad weather conditions, data acquisition remains difficult. Therefore RPAS with their small ground sampling distance and correspondingly high resolution open up possibilities for surveying ground situations not only for visual inspection but also for geodetic data acquisition. Both, visual and geodetic data provide valuable information for geologists and related decision makers. Slides or rock falls in alpine areas pose special challenges due to mostly acute and unforeseen displacements on the one hand and geographic conditions of narrow valleys along with steep slopes on the other hand. Rapid RPAS mission planning and mission adaption for individual requirements according to different project stages (initial investigation, repeat measurements, identification of hazard zones for urgent remediation actions, etc.) is therefore of particular importance. Here we present a computer-simulation supported approach to RPAS mission planning taking the identified thematic and remote sensing targets, the relevant terrain and obstacle databases, legal restrictions, aircraft performance, sensor characteristics, and communication ranges into account in order to produce a safe and mission-optimized flight route. For the RPAS mission planning, we combine and adapt tools developed at University of Salzburg, namely a flight track generator taking into account a 3D-model of the earth surface with both, focus on large area coverage (e.g. Austria) and the highest available resolution (e.g. sub-meter for specific areas), available obstacle data bases for the mission area (e.g. cable car lines, power lines, buildings, slope stabilization constructions

  17. Effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on fall incidence and physical function in community-dwelling older adults with risk of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsuei-Chen; Chang, Ku-Chou; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Hung, Jen-Wen; Huang, Yu-Ching; Lin, Sang-I

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on fall incidence and physical function in community-dwelling older adults. Multicenter randomized controlled trial. Three medical centers and adjacent community health centers. Community-dwelling older adults (N=616) who have fallen in the previous year or are at risk of falling. After baseline assessment, eligible subjects were randomly allocated into the intervention group (IG) or the control group (CG), stratified by the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) fall risk level. The IG received a 3-month multifactorial intervention program including 8 weeks of exercise training, health education, home hazards evaluation/modification, along with medication review and ophthalmology/other specialty consults. The CG received health education brochures, referrals, and recommendations without direct exercise intervention. Primary outcome was fall incidence within 1 year. Secondary outcomes were PPA battery (overall fall risk index, vision, muscular strength, reaction time, balance, and proprioception), Timed Up & Go (TUG) test, Taiwan version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, EuroQol-5D, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and the Falls Efficacy Scale-International at 3 months after randomization. Participants were 76±7 years old and included low risk 25.6%, moderate risk 25.6%, and marked risk 48.7%. The cumulative 1-year fall incidence was 25.2% in the IG and 27.6% in the CG (hazard ratio=.90; 95% confidence interval, .66-1.23). The IG improved more favorably than the CG on overall PPA fall risk index, reaction time, postural sway with eyes open, TUG test, and GDS, especially for those with marked fall risk. The multifactorial fall prevention program with exercise intervention improved functional performance at 3 months for community-dwelling older adults with risk of falls, but did not reduce falls at 1-year follow-up. Fall incidence might have been decreased simultaneously in both

  18. Early experience of a fall and fracture prevention clinic at Mayo General Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanley, A

    2010-06-01

    Falls in the elderly are a significant public health problem. Previous studies have shown that most falls are multifactorial and an efficacious way of reducing the risk of falling is provided by a falls clinic.

  19. Reliability and validity of a novel Haemophilia-specific Self-Efficacy Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lock, J.; Raat, H.; Peters, M.; Tamminga, R. Y. J.; Leebeek, F. W. G.; Moll, H. A.; Cnossen, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Higher self-efficacy in chronic disease patients is associated with higher development of self-management skills and increased quality-of-life. Quantification and monitoring of self-efficacy is therefore of importance. Self-efficacy in haemophilia patients has received little attention due to lack

  20. Reliability and validity of a novel Haemophilia-specific Self-Efficacy Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lock, J.; Raat, H.; Peters, M.; Tamminga, R. Y. J.; Leebeek, F. W. G.; Moll, H. A.; Cnossen, M. H.

    Higher self-efficacy in chronic disease patients is associated with higher development of self-management skills and increased quality-of-life. Quantification and monitoring of self-efficacy is therefore of importance. Self-efficacy in haemophilia patients has received little attention due to lack

  1. Reliability and validity of a novel haemophilia-specific self-efficacy scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Lock (Janske); H. Raat (Hein); M.A.D. Peters (Marjolein); R. Tamminga; F.W.G. Leebeek (Frank); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); M.H. Cnossen (Marjon)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractHigher self-efficacy in chronic disease patients is associated with higher development of self-management skills and increased quality-of-life. Quantification and monitoring of self-efficacy is therefore of importance. Self-efficacy in haemophilia patients has received little attention

  2. Validating a Scale That Measures Scientists' Self-Efficacy for Public Engagement with Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson Evia, Jane; Peterman, Karen; Cloyd, Emily; Besley, John

    2018-01-01

    Self-efficacy, or the beliefs people hold about their ability to succeed in certain pursuits, is a long-established construct. Self-efficacy for science communication distinguishes scientists who engage with the public and relates to scientists' attitudes about the public. As such, self-efficacy for public engagement has the potential to serve as…

  3. Cardiovascular Management Self-efficacy: Psychometric Properties of a New Scale and Its Usefulness in a Rehabilitation Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steca, Patrizia; Greco, Andrea; Cappelletti, Erika; D'Addario, Marco; Monzani, Dario; Pancani, Luca; Ferrari, Giovanni; Politi, Alessandro; Gestra, Roberta; Malfatto, Gabriella; Parati, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs have been shown to affect various effective health-promoting behaviors in patients. Unfortunately, availability of reliable and valid measures of self-efficacy in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is still very limited. The aims of this study were to present a new scale measuring self-efficacy beliefs in managing CVD and to examine its psychometric properties. The study involved 172 patients (mean age = 66.4 years; SD = 9.99 years; 76.2% men) undergoing cardiovascular rehabilitation. Various psychological factors and CVD severity indicators were collected. An Exploratory Structural Equation Model showed that the Cardiovascular Management Self-efficacy Scale has three factors: Cardiac Risk Factors, Adherence to Therapy, and Recognition of Symptoms. They all showed high internal consistency, and good convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity. Furthermore, these factors showed significant relations with CVD severity indicators. The Cardiovascular Management Self-efficacy Scale could be a helpful instrument to monitor differences during interventions to improve good disease management.

  4. Highly Challenging Balance Program Reduces Fall Rate in Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, David; DeAngelis, Tamara R.; Hendron, Kathryn; Thomas, Cathi A.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Ellis, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is a paucity of effective treatment options to reduce falls in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although a variety of rehabilitative approaches have been shown to improve balance, evidence of a reduction in falls has been mixed. Prior balance trials suggest that programs with highly challenging exercises had superior outcomes. We investigated the effects of a theoretically driven, progressive, highly challenging group exercise program on fall rate, balance, and fear of falling. Methods Twenty-three subjects with PD participated in this randomized cross-over trial. Subjects were randomly allocated to 3 months of active balance exercises or usual care followed by the reverse. During the active condition, subjects participated in a progressive, highly challenging group exercise program twice weekly for 90 minutes. Outcomes included a change in fall rate over the 3-month active period and differences in balance (Mini-BESTest), and fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I)) between active and usual care conditions. Results: The effect of time on falls was significant (regression coefficient = −0.015 per day, p<0.001). The estimated rate ratio comparing incidence rates at time points one month apart was 0.632 (95% CI 0.524 to 0.763). Thus, there was an estimated 37% decline in fall rate per month (95% CI 24% to 48%). Improvements were also observed on the Mini-BESTest (p=0.037) and FES-I (p=0.059). Discussion and Conclusions The results of this study show that a theoretically based, highly challenging, and progressive exercise program was effective in reducing falls, improving balance, and reducing fear of falling in PD. PMID:26655100

  5. Advancing Accounting Research of Teaching Efficacy: Developing a Scale to Measure Student Attitudes toward Active Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burney, Laurie; Zascavage, Victoria; Matherly, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Literature consistently documents a positive, direct effect of students' attitudes on learning (Lizzio, Wilson, & Simons, 2002). Hence, accounting studies describing active learning activities often report student attitudes as evidence of efficacy (e.g., Matherly & Burney, 2013), but rely on single-item instead of multi-item scales. This…

  6. Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

  7. Promoting Leisure Physical Activity Participation among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Validation of Self-Efficacy and Social Support Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jana J.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Lowe, John B.; Nothwehr, Faryle K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many individuals with intellectual disabilities are not sufficiently active for availing health benefits. Little is known about correlates of physical activity among this population on which to build health promotion interventions. Materials and Methods: We developed scales for measurement of self-efficacy and social support for…

  8. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide on Escherichia coli inactivation during pilot-scale fresh-cut lettuce processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banach, J.L.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Zouwen, van der P.S.; Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.

    2018-01-01

    Controlling water quality is critical in preventing cross-contamination during fresh produce washing. Process wash water (PWW) quality can be controlled by implementing chemical disinfection strategies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pilot-scale efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) during

  9. An Examination of the Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (Short Form) among Italian High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Alessandro Lo; Pace, Francesco; Mondo, Marina; Nota, Laura; Casarubia, Provvidenza; Ferrari, Lea; Betz, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the factor structure of Career Decision Self-Efficacy scale-short form in a sample of Italian high school adolescents. confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the degree to which a one-factor structure and a five-factor structure provided the best fit. In view of available research the five-factor structure…

  10. Fear and Risk of Falling, Activities of Daily Living, and Quality of Life: Assessment When Older Adults Receive Emergency Department Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çinarli, Tuğba; Koç, Zeliha

    Falls tend to create fear and concern in older adults who also seek care in emergency departments (EDs) at high rates. The purposes of this study were to (a) describe risk and fear of falling in older adults seeking care in the ED and (b) explore relationships between risk and fear of falling with activities of daily living and quality of life. The study was conducted in the ED of Ondokuz Mayis University Hospital in Samsun, Turkey. Data were collected for 7 months in 2013-2014. Adults aged 65 years and above who scored at least 20 on the Standardized Mini-Mental Test and who presented for care in the ED were eligible to take part. Patients self-reported demographic information and completed the Tinetti Falls Efficacy Scale, the Morse Fall Scale, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and the Modified Barthel Index (MBI). A total of 151 older adults took part. Prevalence of falls was high (48.3%), as well as fear of falling (63.6%). Risk of falling (Morse Fall Scale scores) was negatively correlated with the ability to carry out activities of daily living (MBI scores; r = -.50, p falling (Falls Efficacy Scale scores) was negatively correlated with the ability to carry out activities of daily living (MBI scores; r = -.79, p Older adults seeking care in the ED who have a higher risk of falling are more dependent in daily living activities and experience lower quality of life. Care seeking in the ED offers an opportunity to assess fall risk and fear of falling and provide guidance on prevention and management of falls in older adults.

  11. Fall prevention in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Hauge, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    that the number of hospitalization after a fall injury will become an even greater task for the Danish hospitals, The aim of the study was to show if there is a relationship between physically frail elderly nursing home resident’s subjective evaluation of fall-risk and an objective evaluation of their balance....... Further, to suggest tools for fall prevention in nursing home settings on the basis of the results of this study and the literature. A quantitative method inspired by the survey method was used to give an overview of fall patterns, subjective and objective evaluations of fallrisk. Participants were 16...... physically frail elderly nursing home residents from three different nursing homes. Measures: a small staff-questionnaire about incidences and places where the participants had falling-episodes during a 12 month period, The Falls Effi cacy Scale Swedish version (FES(S)) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) Results...

  12. Adaptation and evaluation of the measurement properties of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Rafaela Batista dos Santos; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus

    2016-01-01

    to undertake the cultural adaptation of, and to evaluate the measurement properties of, the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, with outpatient monitoring at a teaching hospital. the process of cultural adaptation was undertaken in accordance with the international literature. The data were obtained from 147 CHD patients, through the application of the sociodemographic/clinical characterization instrument, and of the Brazilian versions of the Morisky Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence Scale, the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale. the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of semantic-idiomatic, conceptual and cultural equivalencies, with high acceptability and practicality. The floor effect was evidenced for the total score and for the domains of the scale studied. The findings evidenced the measure's reliability. The domains of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented significant inverse correlations of moderate to strong magnitude between the scores of the Morisky scale, indicating convergent validity, although correlations with the measure of general self-efficacy were not evidenced. The validity of known groups was supported, as the scale discriminated between "adherents" and "non-adherents" to the medications, as well as to "sufficient dose" and "insufficient dose". the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of reliability and validity in coronary heart disease outpatients.

  13. Reliability and validity of perceived self-efficacy in wheeled mobility scale among elite wheelchair-dependent athletes with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fliess-Douer, Osnat; Vanlandewijck, Yves C.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To study the reliability and validity of the perceived self-efficacy in wheeled mobility scale among elite athletes with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Method: During the Beijing Paralympics, 79 participants with SCI completed the SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES), the revised

  14. Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Overcome Barriers to Physical Activity Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, John J. M.; Chulak, Tala; Maitland, Scott; Allison, Kenneth R.; Lysy, Daria C.; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Sheeshka, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical…

  15. Comparison of seven fall risk assessment tools in community-dwelling Korean older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taekyoung; Xiong, Shuping

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to compare seven widely used fall risk assessment tools in terms of validity and practicality, and to provide a guideline for choosing appropriate fall risk assessment tools for elderly Koreans. Sixty community-dwelling Korean older women (30 fallers and 30 matched non-fallers) were evaluated. Performance measures of all tools were compared between the faller and non-faller groups through two sample t-tests. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were generated with odds ratios for discriminant analysis. Results showed that four tools had significant discriminative power, and the shortened version of Falls Efficacy Scale (SFES) showed excellent discriminant validity, followed by Berg Balance Scale (BBS) with acceptable discriminant validity. The Mini Balance Evaluation System Test and Timed Up and Go, however, had limited discriminant validities. In terms of practicality, SFES was also excellent. These findings suggest that SFES is the most suitable tool for assessing the fall risks of community-dwelling Korean older women, followed by BBS. Practitioner Summary: There is no general guideline on which fall risk assessment tools are suitable for community-dwelling Korean older women. This study compared seven widely used assessment tools in terms of validity and practicality. Results suggested that the short Falls Efficacy Scale is the most suitable tool, followed by Berg Balance Scale.

  16. Determinants of Falls and Fear of Falling in Ambulatory Persons With Late Effects of Polio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogårdh, Christina; Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt; Lexell, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Falls and fear of falling (FOF) are common in persons with late effects of polio, but there is limited knowledge of associated factors. To determine how knee muscle strength, dynamic balance, and gait performance (adjusted for gender, age, and body mass index) are associated with falls and FOF in persons with late effects of polio. A cross-sectional study. A university hospital outpatient clinic. Eighty-one ambulatory persons with verified late effects of polio (43 men; mean age 67 years). Number of falls the past year, Falls Efficacy Scale-International to assess FOF, a Biodex dynamometer to measure knee muscle strength, the Timed Up & Go test to assess dynamic balance, and the 6-Minute Walk test to assess gait performance. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used for falls (categorical data) and linear regression analyses for FOF (continuous data) as dependent variables. Fifty-nine percent reported at least 1 fall during the past year, and 79% experienced FOF. Reduced knee muscle strength in the more affected limb and gait performance were determinants of falls. An increase of 10 Nm in knee flexor and knee extensor strength reduced the odds ratio between 0.70 and 0.83 (P = .01), and an increase of 100 m in 6-Minute Walk test reduced the odds ratio to 0.41 (P = .001). All factors were determinants of FOF; reduced knee muscle strength in the more and less affected limbs explained 17%-25% of the variance in FOF, dynamic balance 30%, and gait performance 41%. Gender, age, and body mass index only marginally influenced the results. Reduced gait performance, knee muscle strength, and dynamic balance are to a varying degree determinants of falls and FOF in ambulatory persons with late effects of polio. Future studies need to evaluate whether rehabilitation programs targeting these factors can reduce falls and FOF in this population. IV. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  17. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in Spanish community-dwelling middle-aged and older women: Association with balance confidence, fear of falling and fall risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aibar-Almazán, Agustín; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Cruz-Díaz, David; Jiménez-García, José D; Achalandabaso, Alexander; Sánchez-Montesinos, Indalecio; de la Torre-Cruz, Manuel; Hita-Contreras, Fidel

    2018-01-01

    To analyze the association of sarcopenia, obesity, and sarcopenic obesity (SO) with fear of falling (FoF) and balance confidence in a Spanish sample of middle-aged and older community-dwelling women. A total of 235 women (69.21±7.56 years) participated in this study. Body composition (bioelectrical impedance analysis), hand-grip strength, and physical performance (gait speed) were evaluated for the diagnosis of sarcopenia, obesity, and SO. Anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) and the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) were employed to assess FoF and balance confidence, respectively. Scores of >26 on the FES-I and risk of falling. The independent associations of sarcopenia, obesity and SO with FoF, balance confidence, and fall risk were evaluated by multivariate linear and logistic regressions, adjusting for potential confounding variables. 27.23% and 18.72% of women presented with sarcopenia and SO, respectively. Gait speed, body mass index (BMI), and fall history were independently associated with ABC score (adjusted-R 2 =0.152) and fall risk (ABC) (adjusted-R 2 =0.115). FES-I score was independently associated (adjusted-R 2 =0.193) with fall history, gait speed, BMI, and depression, which, together with obesity (BMI) and SO, remained independent factors for fall risk measured as FES-I score (adjusted-R 2 =0.243). In community-dwelling middle-aged and older Spanish women, BMI, gait speed, and fall history were independently associated with FoF, balance confidence, and fall risk. Depression was related only to FoF, and, together with obesity (BMI) and SO, was an independent predictor of fall risk as assessed by the FES-I. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Students fall for Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Kara

    2012-02-01

    From Boston to Beijing, thousands of students traveled to San Francisco for the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. Of those who participated, 183 students were able to attend thanks to AGU's student travel grant program, which assists students with travel costs and seeks to enrich the meeting through ethnic and gender diversity. Students at Fall Meeting enjoyed a variety of programs and activities designed to help them better network with their peers, learn about new fields, and disseminate their research to the interested public. More than 800 students attended AGU's first annual student mixer, sharing drinks and ideas with fellow student members and future colleagues as well as forging new friendships and intellectual relationships.

  19. The Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest) Demonstrates Higher Accuracy in Identifying Older Adult Participants With History of Falls Than Do the BESTest, Berg Balance Scale, or Timed Up and Go Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingyongyudha, Anyamanee; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon; Panichaporn, Wanvisa; Boonsinsukh, Rumpa

    2016-01-01

    Balance deficits a significant predictor of falls in older adults. The Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) and the Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest) are tools that may predict the likelihood of a fall, but their capabilities and accuracies have not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aimed at examining the capabilities of the BESTest and Mini-BESTest for identifying older adult with history of falls and comparing the participants with history of falls identification accuracy of the BESTest, Mini-BESTest, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) for identifying participants with a history of falls. Two hundred healthy older adults with a mean age of 70 years were classified into participants with and without history of fall groups on the basis of their 12-month fall history. Their balance abilities were assessed using the BESTest, Mini-BESTest, BBS, and TUG. An analysis of the resulting receiver operating characteristic curves was performed to calculate the area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, cutoff score, and posttest accuracy of each. The Mini-BESTest showed the highest AUC (0.84) compared with the BESTest (0.74), BBS (0.69), and TUG (0.35), suggesting that the Mini-BESTest had the highest accuracy in identifying older adult with history of falls. At the cutoff score of 16 (out of 28), the Mini-BESTest demonstrated a posttest accuracy of 85% with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 75%. The Mini-BESTest had the highest posttest accuracy, with the others having results of 76% (BESTest), 60% (BBS), and 65% (TUG). The Mini-BESTest is the most accurate tool for identifying older adult with history of falls compared with the BESTest, BBS, and TUG.

  20. [The biological effects of a nuclear explosion. Introduction of a new system on a colorimetric scale (black, grey, red, orange, yellow and white zone) to estimate the effects of fall-out on civilian populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacci, G

    2002-08-01

    Following September 11 the eventuality of terrorist attacks using bags containing nuclear devices is considered possible in western cities like New York, London, Paris, Rome, Berlin, Moscow etc. However, with a modern Civil Defence programme the effects of a catastrophe of this nature can be partially limited, at least as far as Fall-out is concerned. The present paper explains the medical reasons for building anti-fall-out shelters for the larger part of western populations: from the USA to Russia. The paper also sets out a new method for classifying levels of radioactive Fall-out based on a scale of colours (black, grey, red, orange, yellow and white) whatever kind of radioactivity is involved (total gamma levels, Cesium 137 levels, Strontium 90 levels). The arrival times for fall-out in each area of the scale are fixed, whatever the energy of the explosion and the speed of the wind might be. The radioactive decay in each area of the scale, from the time of arrival of the fall-out is described with precision. Also described are the acute radiation syndrome, tumours, miscarriages and genetic diseases. A nomogram is attached for civil defence purposes showing the leeward extension of these areas, easily measurable in just a few minutes, if four parameters are known: ground zero (locality) of the explosion, the energy of the explosion, the direction of the wind and the speed of the wind.

  1. Confirmatory factor analysis of the career decision-making self-efficacy scale among South African university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MB Watson

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for South African researchers to explore the potential utility of career decision-making self-efficacy in understanding the career behaviour of tertiary students. Given the lack of standardised measures for this construct, the responses of 364 South African university students to the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale : Short Form (CDMSE-SF were analysed using item statistics, Cronbachs alpha and confirmatory factor analysis to determine whether items supported the theorized subscales. Opsomming Dit is noodsaaklik vir Suid-Afrikaanse navorsers om die potensiele bruikbaarheid van loopbaanbesluitnemmgself-doeltreffendheid ("career decision-making self-efficacy" te ondersoek in n poging om die tersiere studente beter te begryp. Gegewe die gebrek aan gestandaardiseerde meetinstrumente vir hierdie konstruk, is response van 364 Suid-Afrikaanse universiteitstudente op die Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale: Short Form (CDMSE-SF met behulp van itemontleding, Cronbach se alpha en bevestigende faktorontleding ontleed, om te bepaal of die vraelys-items die teoretiese subskale ondersteun.

  2. Item response modeling: a psychometric assessment of the children's fruit, vegetable, water, and physical activity self-efficacy scales among Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Tzu-An; Baranowski, Tom; Lau, Patrick W C

    2017-09-16

    This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of four self-efficacy scales (i.e., self-efficacy for fruit (FSE), vegetable (VSE), and water (WSE) intakes, and physical activity (PASE)) and to investigate their differences in item functioning across sex, age, and body weight status groups using item response modeling (IRM) and differential item functioning (DIF). Four self-efficacy scales were administrated to 763 Hong Kong Chinese children (55.2% boys) aged 8-13 years. Classical test theory (CTT) was used to examine the reliability and factorial validity of scales. IRM was conducted and DIF analyses were performed to assess the characteristics of item parameter estimates on the basis of children's sex, age and body weight status. All self-efficacy scales demonstrated adequate to excellent internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α: 0.79-0.91). One FSE misfit item and one PASE misfit item were detected. Small DIF were found for all the scale items across children's age groups. Items with medium to large DIF were detected in different sex and body weight status groups, which will require modification. A Wright map revealed that items covered the range of the distribution of participants' self-efficacy for each scale except VSE. Several self-efficacy scales' items functioned differently by children's sex and body weight status. Additional research is required to modify the four self-efficacy scales to minimize these moderating influences for application.

  3. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale-8 (ASES-8) in a rheumatoid arthritis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Cui; Li, Miao-Miao; Yuan, Ji-Qing; Cui, Xue-Jun; Shi, Bao-Xin

    2017-05-01

    The Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale-8 (ASES-8) is a valid tool to measure patients' arthritis-specific self-efficacy. However, evidence about reliability and validity of the ASES-8 in Chinese arthritis patients is lacking. This study aimed to culturally adapt and test the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the ASES-8. Chinese ASES-8 was translated from original English version using translation and back-translation procedures. Validation survey was then conducted in a university-affiliated hospital by a set of questionnaires comprised Chinese ASES-8, pain-VAS, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue (FACIT-F), and Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) physical functioning subscale. A convenience sample of 134 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was recruited from the department of rheumatology. Validity was assessed by Pearson's correlation analysis and exploratory factor analysis. Reliability was assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach's alpha. Exploratory factor analysis extracted one dimension that explained of the 71.35% variation. Significant negative correlations were found between the ASES-8 and pain-VAS, HADS-D, HADS-A scores (r -0.487 to -0.656, p correlations were found between the ASES-8 and SF-36 PH (r = 0.561, p self-efficacy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This disease-specific scale is particularly valuable for use among patients with rheumatoid arthritis from the Chinese population.

  4. Self-efficacy scale for the establishment of good relationships with families in neonatal and pediatric hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cascaes Cruz

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Self-efficacy Scale for the Establishment of Good Relationships with Families in Neonatal and Pediatric Hospital Settings. METHOD Methodological study grounded on self-efficacy theory was conducted in three phases: conceptual and operational definition (review of the literature and interviews with the target population, content validity (opinion of five experts e three clinical nurses, and exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency reliability (cross-sectional survey with a valid sample of 194 nurses. RESULTS A ten-point Likert scale with 40-item was designed and one item was excluded after review by experts. Three factors emerged from the exploratory factor analysis. The Cronbach's alpha for all items was 0.983 with item-total correlations in the range 0.657 to 0.847. Cronbach's alpha value if item deleted were less than or equal to 0.983. CONCLUSION The final version of the scale demonstrated psychometric adequacy. It is a useful tool to be administered in the clinical, educational and research nursing fields to measure nurses’ self-efficacy beliefs concerning the establishment of good relationships with families.

  5. The elderly and falls : Factors associated with quality of life A cross-sectional study using large-scale national data in Korea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noh, Jin-Won; Kim, Kyoung-Beom; Lee, Ju Hyun; Lee, Byeong-Hui; Kwon, Young Dae; Lee, Seon Heui

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors of fall injury and measuring the relationship between health-related quality of life in the elderly. Methods: We analyzed the data on 38,627 persons of aged 65 years or older who have experienced falls drawn from the Korean Community Health Survey 2011. Binomial

  6. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: scale development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Magfiret; van der Bijl, Jaap J; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M; Asti, Turkinaz; Erguney, Seher

    2006-07-01

    As a profession, nurses are particularly concerned with cross-cultural influences that affect the health practices of populations. Although the international literature describes questionnaires and specific scales in health and disease behaviours, adequate Turkish-language instruments are scarce. Therefore, suitable Turkish-language instruments need to be developed or adapted for the Turkish population. Study aim was to adapt a Dutch/English version of the diabetes management self-efficacy (SE) scale for use with a Turkish population and evaluate its psychometric properties. Methodological research design. Attendants of an outpatient clinic of a university hospital in Turkey. A convenience sample of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Translation and back-translation of the original English instrument and content validation through a expert panel were the first two steps of the study. Third step was the psychometric testing of the adapted instrument by establishing internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha), stability (test-retest reliability), and construct validity (factor analysis). Content validity procedure resulted in a final scale that consisted of 20 items. Internal consistency of the total scale was coefficient alpha=0.88, and test-retest reliability with a 4-week time interval was r=0.91 (pmanagement SE scale for people with type 2 DM were reached, cultural factors appeared to play a role in the applicability of some items of the scale.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale in patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong XF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-fang Dong,1 Yan-jin Liu,2 Ai-xia Wang,1 Pei-hua Lv1 1Neurology Department, 2Nursing Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: It has been reported that stroke has a higher incidence and mortality rate in the People’s Republic of China compared to the global average. These conditions can be managed by proper medication use, but ensuring medication adherence is challenging.Objective: To translate the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale into Chinese and test its validity and reliability in patients with stroke.Methods: Instrument performances were measured from January 15, 2015 to April 28, 2015 on a convenience sample of 400 patients with stroke recruited at four neurology departments of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. Questionnaires included the Chinese versions of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale (C-SEAMS and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (C-GSE. Construct validity, convergent validity, internal consistency, and test–retest reliability were measured.Results: Item analysis showed that item-to-total correlations were in the range of 0.362–0.672. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors (which accounted for 60.862% of total variance, with factor loading ranging from 0.534 to 0.756. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to support the results, with an acceptable fit (χ2=73.716; df=64; P<0.01; goodness-of-fit index =0.902; adjusted goodness-of-fit index =0.897; comparative fit index =0.865; root-mean-square error of approximation =0.058. The convergent validity of the C-SEAMS correlated well with the validated measure of the C-GSE in measuring self-efficacy (r=0.531, P<0.01. Good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.826 to 0.915 and test–retest reliability (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r=0.642, P<0.01 were found.Conclusion: The C-SEAMS is a brief and

  8. Efficacy of Modafinil in 10 Taiwanese Patients With Narcolepsy: Findings Using the Multiple Sleep Latency Test and Epworth Sleepiness Scale

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    Shih-Bin Yeh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This is the first report describing the efficacy of modafinil therapy for narcolepsy in patients in Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to compare the objective Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT and the subjective Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS for evaluating the efficacy of modafinil in treating excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with narcolepsy in Taiwan. Ten consecutive patients with narcolepsy-with-cataplexy who were treated with 200 mg/day modafinil for more than 6 months at our sleep center between January 2003 and December 2007 were included in this study. This comparative study was prompted by the requirement of the Bureau of National Health Insurance in Taiwan that modafinil users need to be followed up with MSLTs every 6–12 months. The mean age at onset of narcolepsy onset in these 10 patients was 11.8 ± 3.3 years, and eight (80% were male. We compared the differences in MSLT and ESS between baseline and follow-up at 6–12 months after starting modafinil therapy using paired t tests. ESS scores (p < 0.001 were considerably more sensitive than MSLT scores (p < 0.05 in documenting efficacy of modafinil and that the improvements in MSLT scores were minimal and remained in the pathologically sleepy range. These findings suggest that the ESS is a more sensitive and clinically meaningful tool to evaluate the efficacy of modafinil in narcolepsy.

  9. A Persian Adaptation of Medication Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (MASES) in Hypertensive Patients: Psychometric Properties and Factor Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Mohsen; Zeidi, Isa Mohammadi; Fridlund, Bengt; Chen, Hui; Pakpour, Amir H

    2015-09-01

    Poor adherence to anti-hypertensive treatment significantly contributes to the failure to achieve well-controlled blood pressure in patients with hypertension. To convert the original English version of Medication Adherence Self-efficacy Scale (MASES) into a Persian version for clinical application in hypertensive patients. The backward-forward translation method was used to produce the Persian version of the questionnaire. Then the internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Exploratory Factor Analysis was applied to extract the components of the questionnaire. Correlation between blood pressures and drug adherence was then determined using the Persian MASES in hypertensive patients. Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the Persian version of MASES was >0.92, suggesting that it can yield consistent results. Exploratory Factor Analysis suggested an uni-dimensionality of the scale. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension showed poor adherence to hypertensive medications, therefore had significant lower self-efficacy scores than those with well-controlled blood pressure by medications. The Persian version of MASES is valid and reliable to assess self-efficacy of antihypertensive medication adherence in hypertensive patient, which is helpful to improve medication compliance in such patients in order to achieve better blood pressure controls.

  10. The development and psychometric testing of a Disaster Response Self-Efficacy Scale among undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Bi, Rui-Xue; Zhong, Qing-Ling

    2017-12-01

    Disaster nurse education has received increasing importance in China. Knowing the abilities of disaster response in undergraduate nursing students is beneficial to promote teaching and learning. However, there are few valid and reliable tools that measure the abilities of disaster response in undergraduate nursing students. To develop a self-report scale of self-efficacy in disaster response for Chinese undergraduate nursing students and test its psychometric properties. Nursing students (N=318) from two medical colleges were chosen by purposive sampling. The Disaster Response Self-Efficacy Scale (DRSES) was developed and psychometrically tested. Reliability and content validity were studied. Construct validity was tested by exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was tested by internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The DRSES consisted of 3 factors and 19 items with a 5-point rating. The content validity was 0.91, Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.912, and the intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.953. The construct validity was good (χ 2 /df=2.440, RMSEA=0.068, NFI=0.907, CFI=0.942, IFI=0.430, pself-efficacy in disaster response for Chinese undergraduate nursing students. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Fear of falling and associated factors in community elderly with cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena de Andrade Cascalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate prevalence of the fear of falling of elderly with cataracts living in the community and the associated factors with high concern with falling occurrences. Methods: A cross-sectional, analytical and observational study. It was composed by 86 elderly diagnosed with bilateral cataracts. To quantify the fear of falling among elderly, the scale Falls Efficacy Scale-International-Brasil (FES-I-BRASIL was used. Other variables were obtained through application of a structured questionnaire. Results: Between participants, 41.9% reported low concern of falling, while 58.1% reported high concern. From those last ones, 52% fell at least once on the past 12 months and, 30% of them are recurrent fallers. The activities "to walk in slippery surfaces", "to walk in irregular surfaces" and, "to walk up and down the stairs" represented higher concern for elderly. Conclusion: Cataracts or any other visual issue predispose falls due to difficulty in overcoming obstacles present in the environment. Fear of falling is especially associated with factors acquired after the first fall episode.

  12. The predictive value of fall assessment tools for patients admitted to hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Rebecca J; Slobodian, Dana; Debanne, Sara; Huang, Ying; Wellman, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Fall assessment tools are commonly used to evaluate the likelihood of fall. For patients found to be at high risk, patient-specific fall prevention interventions are implemented. The purposes of this study were to describe the population, evaluate and compare the efficacy of fall assessment tools, and suggest the best use for these tools in hospice. Data were downloaded from the electronic medical record for all patients who were admitted to and died in hospice care in 2013. Variables included demographic, clinical and initial fall assessment scores that had been computed on admission to hospice care, using our standard fall assessment tool. To facilitate comparison among three tools, additional fall assessment calculations were made for each patient using the Morse Fall Scale and MACH-10, two tools commonly used in a variety of healthcare settings. Data were available for 3446 hospice patients. Female patients were less likely to fall than males; Fallers lived longer than Nonfallers; and patients with a primary dementia diagnosis fell 10 days sooner than those with a primary non-dementia diagnosis. A comparison of three fall assessment tools revealed that no tool had a good positive predictive value, but each demonstrated a good negative predictive value. Fall assessment scores should not be used as the sole predictor of likelihood of fall, and are best used as a supplement to clinical judgement. Patients with a primary dementia diagnosis are likely to fall earlier in their hospice care than those with other primary diagnoses. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Constructing and validating a global student-centered nursing curriculum learning efficacy scale: a confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Fang

    2013-10-01

    Previous evidence-based studies have lacked a comprehensive student-centered scale to measure the learning efficacy of pre-registered nursing students. This study developed and validated a global scale for measuring learning efficacy among pre-registered nurses in Taiwan. Evaluated nursing courses included fundamental nursing, medical-surgical nursing, maternal-newborn nursing, pediatric nursing, psychiatric nursing, and community health nursing. All participants had previously completed the nursing professional curricula. This study comprised four phases, which were design of the initial study questionnaire, testing of the validity of the responses of experts to the questionnaire, exploratory factor analysis based on random sampling, and confirmatory factor analysis based on a large-scale investigation. The content validity index for the questionnaire was .89. Item analysis results yielded a Cronbach's α coefficient of between .90 and .92. Item-total correlation coefficients ranged from .51 to .76. The critical ratio, obtained from t-test results, ranged from 6.07 to 9.96. Exploratory factor analysis revealed that factor loadings for individual items ranged from .46 to .96, and eigenvalues ranged from 1.43 to 8.19. The three factors "learning preparation," "advancement of competency," and "learning evaluation" explained 63.5% of total factor loading. In the confirmatory factor analysis, the overall internal consistency reliability coefficient was .95; convergent reliability was .96, and convergent validity was .59. Evaluation scales demonstrated well construct validity and goodness-of-fit for the model. The comprehensive student-centered evaluation scale revealed rigorous construct validity. This scale can serve as an index of learning effectiveness in professional nursing curricula. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychometric properties of the Danish versions of headache-specific locus of control scale and headache management self-efficacy scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jacob Sander; Bendtsen, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to test the cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of a Danish version of the Headache-Specific Locus of Control Scale (HSLC) and the Headache Management Self-Efficacy Scale (HMSE) in a tertiary headache centre. HSLC and HMSE are headache-specific measures...... of locus of control (LOC) and SE. The Danish versions of the HSLC and the HMSE were created according to the guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures. The HSLC and HMSE were administered to 135 consecutively referred headache patients in a tertiary headache centre together...... with other self-report measures concerning general distress, anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life. Internal stability of the HSLC subscales and the HMSE were analysed using Chronbach's alpha coefficient. The psychometric properties of the Danish version of the HSLC and the HMSE were...

  15. Development of a community’s self-efficacy scale for preventing social isolation among community-dwelling older people (Mimamori Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuko Tadaka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among older people in developed countries, social isolation leading to solitary death has become a public health issue of vital importance. Such isolation could be prevented by monitoring at-risk individuals at the neighborhood level and by implementing supportive networks at the community level. However, a means of measuring community confidence in these measures has not been established. This study is aimed at developing the Community’s Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES; Mimamori scale in Japanese for community members preventing social isolation among older people. Methods The CSES is a self-administered questionnaire developed on the basis of Bandura’s self-efficacy theory. The survey was given to a general population (GEN sample (n = 6,000 and community volunteer (CVOL sample (n = 1,297. Construct validity was determined using confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was calculated using Cronbach’s alpha. The Generative Concern Scale (GCS-R and Brief Sense of Community Scale (BSCS were also administered to assess criterion-related validity of the CSES. Results In total, 3,484 and 859 valid responses were received in the GEN and CVOL groups, respectively. The confirmatory factor analysis identified eight items from two domains—community network and neighborhood watch—with goodness of fit index = 0.984, adjusted goodness of fit index = 0.970, comparative fit index = 0.988, and root mean square error of approximation = 0.047. Cronbach’s alpha for the entire CSES was 0.87 and for the subscales was 0.80 and higher. The score of the entire CSES was positively correlated with the GCS-R in both the GEN (r = 0.80, p < 0.001 and CVOL (r = 0.86, p < 0.001 samples. Conclusions The CSES demonstrated adequate reliability and validity for assessing a community’s self-efficacy to aid in its preventing social isolation among older people. The scale is potentially useful for

  16. Test-retest reliability at the item level and total score level of the Norwegian version of the Spinal Cord Injury Falls Concern Scale (SCI-FCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roaldsen, Kirsti Skavberg; Måøy, Åsa Blad; Jørgensen, Vivien; Stanghelle, Johan Kvalvik

    2016-05-01

    Translation of the Spinal Cord Injury Falls Concern Scale (SCI-FCS), and investigation of test-retest reliability on item-level and total-score-level. Translation, adaptation and test-retest study. A specialized rehabilitation setting in Norway. Fifty-four wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury. The median age of the cohort was 49 years, and the median number of years after injury was 13. Interventions/measurements: The SCI-FCS was translated and back-translated according to guidelines. Individuals answered the SCI-FCS twice over the course of one week. We investigated item-level test-retest reliability using Svensson's rank-based statistical method for disagreement analysis of paired ordinal data. For relative reliability, we analyzed the total-score-level test-retest reliability with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2.1), the standard error of measurement (SEM), and the smallest detectable change (SDC) for absolute reliability/measurement-error assessment and Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency. All items showed satisfactory percentage agreement (≥69%) between test and retest. There were small but non-negligible systematic disagreements among three items; we recovered an 11-13% higher chance for a lower second score. There was no disagreement due to random variance. The test-retest agreement (ICC2.1) was excellent (0.83). The SEM was 2.6 (12%), and the SDC was 7.1 (32%). The Cronbach's alpha was high (0.88). The Norwegian SCI-FCS is highly reliable for wheelchair users with chronic spinal cord injuries.

  17. Talent Development, Work Habits, and Career Exploration of Chinese Middle-School Adolescents: Development of the Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Mantak; Gysbers, Norman C.; Chan, Raymond M. C.; Lau, Patrick S. Y.; Shea, Peter M. K.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of an instrument--the "Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale (CTD-SES)"--for assessing students' self-efficacy in applying life skills essential for personal talent development, acquisition of positive work habits, and career exploration. In Study 1, data were obtained from a large…

  18. Psychometric properties of the mammography self-efficacy and fear of breast cancer scales in Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshki, Mahdi; Shahgheibi, Shole; Taymoori, Parvaneh; Moradi, Amjad; Roshani, Deam; Holt, Cheryl L

    2017-05-31

    Research investigating mammography screening has often reported low mammography self-efficacy and breast cancer fear contribute to underutilization of mammography. This study aimed to examine the reliability and validity of Champion's Mammography Self-efficacy Scale (CMSS) and Champion's Breast Cancer Fear Scale (CBCFS) in a sample of Iranian women. The adapted instruments were administered to a community sample of 482 women aged 40 years or older. They inhibited in Sanandaj, Iran. Cronbach's α coefficients, item-total, and test-retest correlations were used to assess the reliability of the scales. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to assess construct validity. The α coefficients for the Farsi 14-item CMSS and 8-item BCFS were .87 and.95, respectively. In terms of the CMSS confirmatory factor analysis, the proportion of x 2 /df was 2.4, Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.93, Tucker Lewis Index (TLI) = 0.96 providing a strong fit to the data induced by two-factor model. With regard to CBCFS, x 2 /df was 86.33, CFI =0.99, and TLI =0.99 supporting one-factor model. The CMSS and CBCFS exhibited strong initial psychometric properties; therefore, they are recommended to understand women's breast cancer screening behaviors better.

  19. Adaptation and evaluation of the measurement properties of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale

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    Rafaela Batista dos Santos Pedrosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to undertake the cultural adaptation of, and to evaluate the measurement properties of, the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale in coronary heart disease (CHD patients, with outpatient monitoring at a teaching hospital. Method: the process of cultural adaptation was undertaken in accordance with the international literature. The data were obtained from 147 CHD patients, through the application of the sociodemographic/clinical characterization instrument, and of the Brazilian versions of the Morisky Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence Scale, the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale. Results: the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of semantic-idiomatic, conceptual and cultural equivalencies, with high acceptability and practicality. The floor effect was evidenced for the total score and for the domains of the scale studied. The findings evidenced the measure's reliability. The domains of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented significant inverse correlations of moderate to strong magnitude between the scores of the Morisky scale, indicating convergent validity, although correlations with the measure of general self-efficacy were not evidenced. The validity of known groups was supported, as the scale discriminated between "adherents" and "non-adherents" to the medications, as well as to "sufficient dose" and "insufficient dose". Conclusion: the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of reliability and validity in coronary heart disease outpatients.

  20. The development and initial evaluation of the Pornography-Use Avoidance Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Shane W.; Rosenberg, Harold; Martino, Steve; Nich, Charla; Potenza, Marc N.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims This study employed a newly developed questionnaire to evaluate whether men’s self-efficacy to avoid using pornography in each of 18 emotional, social, or sexually arousing situations was associated with either their typical frequency of pornography use or their hypersexuality. Methods Using an Internet-based data collection procedure, 229 male pornography users (Mage = 33.3 years, SD = 12.2) who had sought or considered seeking professional help for their use of pornography completed questionnaires assessing their situationally specific self-efficacy, history of pornography use, self-efficacy to employ specific pornography-reduction strategies, hypersexuality, and demographic characteristics. Results Frequency of pornography use was significantly negatively associated with level of confidence in 12 of the 18 situations. In addition, lower hypersexuality and higher confidence to employ pornography-use-reduction strategies were associated with higher confidence to avoid using pornography in each of the 18 situations. A principal axis factor analysis yielded three clusters of situations: (a) sexual arousal/boredom/opportunity, (b) intoxication/locations/easy access, and (c) negative emotions. Discussion and conclusions This questionnaire could be employed to identify specific high-risk situations for lapse or relapse and as a measure of treatment outcome among therapy clients, but we recommend further examination of the psychometric properties and clinical utility of the questionnaire in treatment samples. Because only one of the three clusters reflected a consistent theme, we do not recommend averaging self-efficacy within factors to create subscales. PMID:28889754

  1. Development of a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and its association with both reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleath, Betsy; Carpenter, Delesha M; Blalock, Susan J; Davis, Scott A; Hickson, Ryan P; Lee, Charles; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Scott, Jennifer E; Rodebaugh, Lisa B; Cummings, Doyle M

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there are several different general diabetes self-efficacy scales, there is a need to develop a self-efficacy scale that providers can use to assess patient’s self-efficacy regarding medication use. The purpose of this study was to: 1) develop a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and 2) examine how diabetes medication self-efficacy is associated with patient-reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence. Patients and methods Adult English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a family medicine clinic and a pharmacy in Eastern North Carolina, USA. The patients were eligible if they reported being nonadherent to their diabetes medicines on a visual analog scale. Multivariable regression was used to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and the number of reported diabetes medication problems and adherence. Results The diabetes medication self-efficacy scale had strong reliability (Cronbach’s alpha =0.86). Among a sample (N=51) of mostly African-American female patients, diabetes medication problems were common (6.1±3.1) and a greater number of diabetes medications were associated with lower medication adherence (odds ratio: 0.35; 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.89). Higher medication self-efficacy was significantly related to medication adherence (odds ratio: 1.17; 95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.30) and inversely related to the number of self-reported medication problems (β=−0.13; P=0.006). Conclusion Higher diabetes medication self-efficacy was associated with fewer patient-reported medication problems and better medication adherence. Assessing medication-specific self-efficacy may help to identify medication-related problems that providers can help the patients address, potentially improving adherence and patient outcomes. PMID:27354769

  2. Impact of Falls on Physical Activity in People with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiorth, Ylva Hivand; Larsen, Jan Petter; Lode, Kirsten; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Godfrey, Alan; Lord, Sue; Rochester, Lynn; Pedersen, Kenn Freddy

    2016-01-01

    A complex relationship exists between motor impairment, physical activity (sedentary behavior, standing and ambulatory activity) and falls in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). To explore associations between recent fall history and the ability to retain an active lifestyle as determined by the volume, pattern and variability of physical activity in people with PD. Forty-eight participants with PD were recruited from the Norwegian ParkWest study. Body posture and ambulatory activity were monitored objectively over 7 days using the activPAL3 accelerometer. Clinical assessments included the Hoehn and Yahr stage, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor section and Falls Efficacy Scale-International. Structured interviews were performed to obtain information about demographics, fall history last 6 months, mobility and dementia. Participants with a fall history (n = 20) spent more time sedentary and less time standing than non-falling participants (n = 28). There were no significant differences regarding pattern or variability of sedentary behavior, standing or ambulatory activity in falling versus non-falling participants. Confidence in being able to get up from floor contributed significantly to time spent in sedentary behavior and ambulatory activity in participants with fall history, whereas motor impairment was significantly associated with time spent in all facets of physical activity for non-falling participants. Fall history in our PD cohort was associated with a more sedentary lifestyle, but not less ambulatory activity. More emphasis on improving the capacity to safely complete activities of daily living and increase confidence in getting up from floor may reduce sedentary behavior in people with PD.

  3. Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale: Validation of the Italian Version and Correlation With Breast-feeding at 3 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrozzi, Angela; Gagliardi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Psychological factors can influence breast-feeding. We translated into Italian and validated the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale Short Form (BSES-SF) and investigated its predictive ability and its relation with postpartum depression symptoms.BSES-SF and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were administered 2 to 3 days after delivery to 122 mothers. Breast-feeding was assessed at 3 months.The BSES-SF displayed good validity (receiver operating characteristic area = 0.69) for predicting full breast-feeding at 3 months. In multivariate analysis, the probability of full breast-feeding increased 2.4% for 1-point increase of BSES-SF. The BSES-SF and EPDS scores were inversely correlated. BSES-SF is a useful tool to identify the risk of early breast-feeding attrition.

  4. Fall Protection Introduction, #33462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-23

    The proper use of fall prevention and fall protection controls can reduce the risk of deaths and injuries caused by falls. This course, Fall Protection Introduction (#33462), is designed as an introduction to various types of recognized fall prevention and fall protection systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including guardrail systems, safety net systems, fall restraint systems, and fall arrest systems. Special emphasis is given to the components, inspection, care, and storage of personal fall arrest systems (PFASs). This course also presents controls for falling object hazards and emergency planning considerations for persons who have fallen.

  5. Development and validation of a self-efficacy scale for postoperative rehabilitation management of lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei-Fei; Yang, Qing; Han, Xuan Ye; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Ting

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Self-Efficacy Scale for Rehabilitation Management designed specifically for postoperative lung cancer patients (SESPRM-LC) and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Based on the concept of self-management of chronic disease, items were developed from literature review and semistructured interviews of 10 lung cancer patients and screened by expert consultation and pilot testing. Psychometric evaluation was done with 448 postoperative lung cancer patients recruited from 5 tertiary hospitals in Fuzhou, China, by incorporating classical test theory and item response theory methods. A 6-factor structure was illustrated by exploratory factor analysis and confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis, explaining 60.753% of the total variance. The SESPRM-LC achieved Cronbach's α of 0.694 to 0.893, 2-week test-retest reliability of 0.652 to 0.893, and marginal reliability of 0.565 to 0.934. The predictive and criterion validities were demonstrated by significant association with theoretically supported quality-of-life variables (r = 0.211-0.392, P theory analysis showed that the SESPRM-LC offers information about a broad range of self-efficacy measures and discriminates well between patients with high and low levels of self-efficacy. We demonstrated initial support for the reliability and validity of the 27-item SESPRM-LC, as a developmentally appropriate instrument for assessing self-efficacy among lung cancer patients during postoperative rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Swedish Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES-S): reliability and validity in a rheumatoid arthritis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessen, Thomas; Demmelmaier, Ingrid; Nordgren, Birgitta; Opava, Christina H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate aspects of reliability and validity of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES-S) in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population. A total of 244 people with RA participating in a physical activity study were included. The six-item ESES-S, exploring confidence in performing exercise, was assessed for test-retest reliability over 4-6 months, and for internal consistency. Construct validity investigated correlation with similar and other constructs. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.59 (95% CI 0.37-0.73) was found for 84 participants with stable health perceptions between measurement occasions. Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.87 and 0.89 were found at the first and second measurements. Corrected item-total correlation single ESES-S items ranged between 0.53 and 0.73. Construct convergent validity for the ESES-S was partly confirmed by correlations with health-enhancing physical activity and outcome expectations respectively (Pearson's r = 0.18, p correlations with age or gender. No floor or ceiling effects were found for ESES-S. The results indicate that the ESES-S has moderate test-retest reliability and respectable internal consistency in people with RA. Construct validity was partially supported in the present sample. Further research on construct validity of the ESES-S is recommended. Physical exercise is crucial for management of symptoms and co-morbidity in rheumatoid arthritis. Self-efficacy for exercise is important to address in rehabilitation as it regulates exercise motivation and behavior. Measurement properties of self-efficacy scales need to be assessed in specific populations and different languages.

  7. Research on the influence factors of the fall efficiency of the hospitalized geriatric patients with cerebrovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weili; Cheng, Ruilian

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the fall efficiency and its influence factors of the hospitalized geriatric patients with cerebrovascular diseases. The Modified Fall Efficacy Scale (MFES), Morse Fall Risk Assessment Scales (MFS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Tinetti Gait Analysis (TGA) were adopted and the combined ways of questionnaires and observation were utilized to investigate the 113 hospitalized geriatric patients with cerebrovascular diseases. The fall efficiency of the geriatric patients with cerebrovascular diseases were 7.85±2.57 scores. The two projects "walking up and down stairs" and "taking public transport means" have got the lowest scores; The two projects "stretching out the hand to the box or the drawer for taking something" and "sitting up and down to the chair" have got the highest scores. It was found that there were three factors which had significant influences on the fall efficiency, they were myodynamia of the right upper extremity, Berg balance functions and gait. For the sake of helping the geriatric patients with cerebrovascular diseases to establish the self-confidence of preventing the falls, the medical workers need to take further psychological counseling for the patients and befittingly and specifically to improve the fall efficiency of patients so as to effectively prevent the occurring of the fall on the basis of improving the balance ability and gait of patients.

  8. Return-to-work self-efficacy: development and validation of a scale in claimants with musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Sandra; Franche, Renée-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Lee, Hyunmi; Krause, Niklas; Shaw, William S

    2011-06-01

    INTRODUCTION We report on the development and validation of a 10-item scale assessing self-efficacy within the return-to-work context, the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy (RTWSE) scale. METHODS Lost-time claimants completed a telephone survey 1 month (n = 632) and 6 months (n = 446) after a work-related musculoskeletal injury. Exploratory (Varimax and Promax rotation) and confirmatory factor analyses of self-efficacy items were conducted with two separate subsamples at both time points. Construct validity was examined by comparing scale measurements and theoretically derived constructs, and the phase specificity of RTWSE was studied by examining changes in strength of relationships between the RTWSE Subscales and the other constructs at both time measures. RESULTS Factor analyses supported three underlying factors: (1) Obtaining help from supervisor, (2) Coping with pain (3) Obtaining help from co-workers. Internal consistency (alpha) for the three subscales ranged from 0.66 to 0.93. The total variance explained was 68% at 1-month follow-up and 76% at 6-month follow-up. Confirmatory factor analyses had satisfactory fit indices to confirm the initial model. With regard to construct validity: relationships of RTWSE with depressive symptoms, fear-avoidance, pain, and general health, were generally in the hypothesized direction. However, the hypothesis that less advanced stages of change on the Readiness for RTW scale would be associated with lower RTWSE could not be completely confirmed: on all RTWSE subscales, RTWSE decreased significantly for a subset of participants who started working again. Moreover, only Pain RTWSE was significantly associated with RTW status and duration of work disability. With regard to the phase specificity, the strength of association between RTWSE and other constructs was stronger at 6 months post-injury compared to 1 month post-injury. CONCLUSIONS A final 10-item version of the RTWSE has adequate internal consistency and validity to assess

  9. Characteristics and fall experiences of older adults with and without fear of falling outdoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippendale, Tracy; Lee, Chang Dae

    2018-06-01

    Using a theoretical model that combines an ecological perspective and Bandura's theory of self-efficacy as a guide, we sought to compare experiences and characteristics of community dwelling older adults with and without concern about falling outdoors. A survey of randomly selected community dwelling older adults across NYC (N = 120) was conducted using the outdoor falls questionnaire. Descriptive quantitative analyses of participant characteristics were conducted for all participants and for those with and without concern about falling outside. Conventional content analysis using two coders was employed to examine outdoor fall experiences for each group. A mixed methods matrix was used to integrate qualitative and quantitative findings. Some participant characteristics were more common among those with a concern about falling outside such as decreased functional status, female gender, and number of prior outdoor falls. As per descriptions of outdoor fall experiences, participants with concern were more likely to report a fall while climbing stairs or stepping up a curb, describe an intrinsic factor as a cause of their fall, use an injury prevention strategy during the fall, sustain a moderate to severe injury, seek medical attention, have had an ambulance called, require help to get up, and describe implementation of a behavioral change after the fall. Differences exist in participant characteristics and outdoor fall experiences of those with and without concern about falling outside. The proposed model can be used to understand fear of falling outdoors and can help to inform the target population and content of intervention programs.

  10. Psychometric evaluation of the Korean version of the Diabetes Self-efficacy Scale among South Korean older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sun Ju; Song, Misoon; Im, Eun-Ok

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the psychometric properties (reliability and validity) of the Korean version of the Diabetes Self-efficacy Scale among South Korean older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Self-efficacy has been reported to be a key component of enhancing diabetes self-management, and many healthcare providers have paid attention to the instruments to accurately measure self-efficacy as related to diabetes self-management. A psychometric test of an instrument measuring self-efficacy as related to diabetes self-management. A total of 278 Korean older adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited in one senior centre in Seoul, South Korea. The instrument included the Diabetes Self-efficacy Scale and the summary of the Diabetes Self-care Activities. Item analyses, reliability including internal consistency and stability, and validity including exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and hypothesised relationships test were used to examine the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Diabetes Self-efficacy Scale. The item-total correlation coefficients of all items were >0·30 and ranged from 0·47-0·73. The coefficient alpha for the internal consistency was 0·89, and the intraclass correlation coefficient for the stability was 0·90. Two factors were extracted from the exploratory factor analysis (factor 1, self-efficacy for diet-related self-management behaviours; factor 2, self-efficacy for diabetes self-management behaviours except diet), and the two-factor model for the confirmatory factor analysis had good fitness indices. The diabetes self-efficacy scores were positively correlated with the level of diabetes self-management. The findings supported that the Korean version of the Diabetes Self-efficacy Scale was reliable and valid in measuring self-efficacy as related to diabetes self-management in Korean older adults with type 2 diabetes. The Korean version of the Diabetes Self-efficacy Scale can allow healthcare providers to

  11. Developing the Scale of Teacher Self-Efficacy in Teaching Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Fahrettin; Unsal, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a reliable and valid measurement tool which will reveal teachers' self-competence in education process. Participants of the study are 300 teachers working at state primary schools in the province of Gaziantep. Results of the exploratory factor analysis administered to the scale in order to determine its…

  12. Assessing Self-Efficacy in Infant Care: A Comparison of Two Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tassanee Prasopkittikun, RN, PhD

    2008-09-01

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that correlations between SICS and two different response formats do not reach the criteria for use as alternatives to each other. However, further research is needed, with particular emphasis on the investigation of construct validity and comparisons between the two scales.

  13. Using Climber's Guidebooks to Assess Rock Fall Patterns Over Large Spatial and Decadal Temporal Scales: An Example from the Swiss Alps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temme, A.J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    High-mountain geomorphic processes enjoy increasing scientific and societal interest. This is because these processes are perceived to be changing more than elsewhere and because their effects on infrastructure and tourism are significant. Rock fall is among the processes that receive most attention

  14. Reliability and validity of perceived self-efficacy in wheeled mobility scale among elite wheelchair-dependent athletes with a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliess-Douer, Osnat; Vanlandewijck, Yves C; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2013-05-01

    To study the reliability and validity of the perceived self-efficacy in wheeled mobility scale among elite athletes with a spinal cord injury (SCI). During the Beijing Paralympics, 79 participants with SCI completed the SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES), the revised Self-Efficacy in Wheeled Mobility scale (SEWM) and the perceived wheeled mobility (WM) at present Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Sample included athletes from 18 countries and subcategorized by gender, lesion level/completeness and type of sports. Reliability and concurrent validity were determined. SEWM Cronbach's α was 0.905. High internal consistency was confirmed in Split-half correlation coefficient (r = 0.87). Validity was supported by significant correlations between SWEM and ESES total scores (r = 0.64, p athletes with tetraplegia showed significantly lower WM self-efficacy levels than those with paraplegia. There was a significant difference in perceived WM self-efficacy between athletes who participated in dynamic wheelchair sports and those who participated in non-wheelchair sports (p athletes with SCI. Findings confirmed a significantly higher perception of self-efficacy in WM among athletes who participated in dynamic wheelchair sports. • Increased self-efficacy in wheeled mobility (WM) may encourage wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (SCI) to approach, persist, and persevere at WM related tasks that were previously avoided. • The perceived self-efficacy in WM scale (SEWM), which is available on-line in five different languages, may find clinical applications for people with SCI in different countries. • The SEWM can be applied to the assessment of progress in WM levels during the acute rehabilitation phase, and also in structured WM workshops conducted after discharge from the hospital.

  15. The mediating role of psychological symptoms on falls risk among older adults with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat, Sumaiyah; Ng, Chin Teck; Fadzil, Farhana; Rozalli, Faizatul Izza; Tan, Maw Pin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of fear of falling (FoF) and psychological symptoms in explaining the relationship between osteoarthritis (OA) symptom severity and falls. Individuals aged ≥65 years with ≥2 falls or ≥1 injurious fall over the past 12 months were included in the falls group, while volunteers aged ≥65 years with no history of falls over 12 months were recruited as controls. The presence of lower extremity OA was determined radiologically and clinically. Severity of symptoms was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire. FoF and psychological status were measured with the shortened version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International and the 21-item Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21), respectively. Of 389 (229 fallers, 160 non-fallers) potential participants, mean (SD) age: 73.74 (6.60) years, 141 had clinical OA and 171 had radiological OA. Fallers with both radiological OA and clinical OA had significantly higher FoF and DASS-21 scores than non-fallers. FoF was significantly positively correlated with symptom severity in fallers and non-fallers with radiological and clinical OA. Depression, anxiety, and stress scores were only significantly correlated with symptom severity among fallers but not non-fallers in both clinical and radiological OA. The relationship between mild symptoms and reduced risk of falls compared to no symptoms in those with radiological OA was attenuated by increased anxiety. The increased falls risk associated with severe symptoms compared to mild symptoms in clinical OA was attenuated by FoF. FoF may, therefore, be a potentially modifiable risk factor for OA-associated falls which could be considered in future intervention studies.

  16. German Language Adaptation of the Headache Management Self-Efficacy Scale (HMSE-G) and Development of a New Short Form (HMSE-G-SF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graef, Julia E; Rief, Winfried; French, Douglas J; Nilges, Paul; Nestoriuc, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop and validate a German version of French and colleagues' Headache Management Self-efficacy Scale and to construct an abbreviated form for use in behavioral headache research. Furthermore, the contribution of headache-specific self-efficacy to pain-related disability in German chronic headache sufferers was examined. Headache-specific self-efficacy refers to an individuals' confidence that they can engage in behaviors to either prevent headache episodes or to manage headache-related pain and disability. Self-efficacy beliefs have been shown repeatedly to be positively associated with psychological well-being, effective coping, and enhanced treatment outcomes. A cross-sectional sample of 304 individuals diagnosed with either migraine, chronic tension-type headache, or a combination of 2 or more headache disorders completed the German Headache Management Self-efficacy Scale and questionnaires assessing headache activity, pain-related coping, general self-efficacy, depression, and anxiety. Responsiveness of the scale was analyzed in a longitudinal subsample of 32 inpatients undergoing headache treatment. Finally, a short form was constructed and evaluated regarding psychometric properties. The German Headache Management Self-efficacy Scale showed good reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.87) as did the 6-item short form (Cronbach's α = 0.72). In the longitudinal sample, both versions showed a good ability to change over time (SRM= 0.52-1.16). Chronic headache patients with higher levels of self-efficacy reported lower levels of disability (r = -0.26 to -0.31). Multiple regression analyses revealed headache intensity and headache-specific self-efficacy as strongest predictors of headache-related disability (βself-efficacy  = -0.21, βintensity  = 0.26). Both the 25-item version and the 6-item version appear to be valid, reliable measures of self-efficacy beliefs. These scales will allow clinicians to identify headache sufferers

  17. The reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Short-form Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scales for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Susan Ka Yee; Wong, Frances Ky

    2014-04-01

    To examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Short-form Chronic Disease Self Efficacy Scales. The prevalence of chronic disease is accelerating globally, advancing across every region and pervading all socioeconomic classes. Among the interventions, self-management programmes focusing on increasing self-efficacy have demonstrated significant patient outcomes, including the improvement of quality of life and functional status. The Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scales (CDSES) system developed by Lorig in 1996 has been widely used by healthcare professionals from different disciplines to measure self-efficacy for chronic disease patients due to their tested psychometric properties. The Short-form of the scales system is used today, as it takes substantially less time to administer. This study used psychometric testing to establish the validity and reliability of the Short-form Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scales (CDSES). A convenience sample of 163 older patients with chronic diseases were recruited. The Chinese version of the CDSES, short-form CDSES, SF-36 and self-rated health were used to test for construct validity, concurrent validity, convergent validity and internal consistency. Short-form CDSES had a single-factor structure with high internal consistency (0·96) and demonstrated no floor or ceiling effects. High intraclass correlation, 0·98, was demonstrated in test-retest. Correlations with the domain scores of the CDSES were found to be r = 0·97 and 0·98. The scale also demonstrated significant moderate correlations with SF-36 and self-rated health. The Chinese version of the Short-form CDSES has shown statistically acceptable levels of reliability and validity for assessing self-efficacy in older patients with chronic diseases. The scale is particularly valuable for use among older patients with chronic illness. The questionnaire can be used to assess nursing interventions focusing on increasing patients' self-efficacy or

  18. Falling Liquid Films

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliadasis, S; Scheid, B

    2012-01-01

    This research monograph gives a detailed review of the state-of-the-art theoretical methodologies for the analysis of dissipative wave dynamics and pattern formation on the surface of a film falling down a planar, inclined substrate. This prototype is an open-flow hydrodynamic instability representing an excellent paradigm for the study of complexity in active nonlinear media with energy supply, dissipation and dispersion. Whenever possible, the link between theory and experiments is illustrated and the development of order-of-magnitude estimates and scaling arguments is used to facilitate the

  19. Reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Yang, Shu-Min; Wu, Hui; Chen, Bing; Wang, Chong-Jian; Li, Xiao-Fang

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to translate the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (HIV-ASES) and evaluate its reliability and validity in people living with HIV (PLWHIV) in mainland China. The original HIV-ASES was translated from English into Chinese and adapted for cultural context according to cross-cultural adaptation guidelines. A cross-sectional survey investigating 1742 PLWHIV receiving antiretroviral treatment was conducted. Exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation confirmed the presence of two factors with an accumulated contribution rate of 58.357%. Furthermore, confirmatory factor analysis revealed the model's goodness-of-fit index. The comparative fit index was greater than 0.9 and the overall efficacy of the model was satisfactory. The Cronbach α coefficient of the questionnaire was 0.876 (95% CI: 0.868-0.885), and the correlation coefficient of each item and the total was 0.536-0.660 ( P < 0.01). The Chinese version of the HIV-ASES has high reliability and validity; however, the individual item requires some adjustment.

  20. Evaluating self-efficacy for managing chronic disease: psychometric properties of the six-item Self-Efficacy Scale in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Gensichen, J.; Goetz, K.; Szecsenyi, J.; Mahler, C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Self-efficacy - the confidence to carry out certain behaviour in order to achieve a specific goal - has increasingly been recognized as an essential prerequisite of effective self-management of chronic diseases. Therefore, valid and reliable measures are needed to evaluate self-efficacy

  1. Comparative efficacy of a self-report scale and physiological measures in dental anxiety of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manepalli, Swapna; Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Kamatham, Rekhalakshmi; Nirmala, Sunkara

    2014-11-01

    To determine and correlate dental anxiety in children, using psychometric and physiological measures. On hundred children (51 boys and 49 girls) were selected and anxiety was assessed using psychometric (Modified Child Dental Anxiety Scale) and physiological measures (pulse rate and oxygen saturation levels), for local anesthetic administration. Statistical analysis was carried out with SPSS software version 11.0. Metric continuous data are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Analysis between groups was carried out by using one way anova. Categorical variables were analyzed with "Fisher's exact test". For statistical significance, the probability value of anxiety. Both psychometric and physiological measures have their own merits and are important clinically. Even behavioral measures, although having observer bias, can be used as an adjuvant along with these measures. It is essential to take two or more measures into consideration rather than just one to assess dental anxiety. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Validation of English-language versions of three scales measuring attitudes towards smoking, smoking-related self-efficacy and the use of smoking cessation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Derek H; Etter, Jean-François

    2005-06-01

    To assess the validity of English translations of three scales initially developed in French, measuring perception of the adverse effects of smoking, self-efficacy and the use of smoking cessation strategies. Between 1999 and 2001, 5667 people from 97 countries (4724 smokers and 943 ex-smokers) answered the scales on the internet, of which 997 (18%) took part in a follow-up 86 days later. The factor structures of the scales were generally maintained after translation. Internal consistency coefficients were 0.5-0.9. Test-retest reliability was >0.7 for the "Adverse effects" and self-efficacy scales, but was low (0.2-0.4) for self-change strategies, which probably reflects active use of these strategies in this sample. The translated scales performed adequately in most tests of construct validity. In particular, higher self-efficacy ratings predicted smoking cessation at follow-up, and a lower self-efficacy predicted relapse in baseline ex-smokers. The validity of the scales was maintained after translation in English.

  3. Validation of the Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium's Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, Sara Nicole; Zaluski, Neal; Petrie, Amanda; Arnold, Cathy; Basran, Jenny; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the concurrent validity of the Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium's Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm (FSRA). Method: A total of 29 older adults (mean age 77.7 [SD 4.0] y) residing in an independent-living senior's complex who met inclusion criteria completed a demographic questionnaire and the components of the FSRA and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). The FSRA consists of the Elderly Fall Screening Test (EFST) and the Multi-factor Falls Questionnaire (MFQ); it is de...

  4. Efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder: a subgroup analysis and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression item analyses of the Aripiprazole Depression Multicenter Efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Norio; Otsubo, Tempei; Kato, Masaki; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Ono, Hiroaki; Kamijima, Kunitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Results from this randomized, placebo-controlled study of aripiprazole augmentation to antidepressant therapy (ADT) in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) (the Aripiprazole Depression Multicenter Efficacy [ADMIRE] study) revealed that aripiprazole augmentation was superior to ADT alone and was well tolerated. In subgroup analyses, we investigated the influence of demographic- and disease-related factors on the observed responses. We also examined how individual symptom improvement was related to overall improvement in MDD. Data from the ADMIRE study were analyzed. Subgroup analyses were performed on the primary outcome measures: the mean change in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score from the end of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)/serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) treatment to the end of the randomized treatment. Changes in the MADRS total scores were consistently greater with aripiprazole than placebo in each of the subgroups. Efficacy was not related to sex, age, number of adequate ADT trials in the current episode, MDD diagnosis, number of depressive episodes, duration of the current episode, age at first depressive episode, time since the first depressive episode, type of SSRI/SNRI, or severity at the end of SSRI/SNRI treatment phase. Compared to placebo, aripiprazole resulted in significant and rapid improvement on seven of the 10 MADRS items, including sadness. These post-hoc analyses indicated that aripiprazole was effective for a variety of Japanese patients with MDD who had exhibited inadequate responses to ADT. Additionally, we suggest that aripiprazole significantly and rapidly improved the core depressive symptoms. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  5. Development and validation of green eating behaviors, stage of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy scales in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Kathryn E; Greene, Geoffrey W; Redding, Colleen A; Paiva, Andrea L; Lofgren, Ingrid; Nash, Jessica T; Kobayashi, Hisanori

    2014-01-01

    To develop and validate an instrument to assess environmentally conscious eating (Green Eating [GE]) behavior (BEH) and GE Transtheoretical Model constructs including Stage of Change (SOC), Decisional Balance (DB), and Self-efficacy (SE). Cross-sectional instrument development survey. Convenience sample (n = 954) of 18- to 24-year-old college students from a northeastern university. The sample was randomly split: (N1) and (N2). N1 was used for exploratory factor analyses using principal components analyses; N2 was used for confirmatory analyses (structural modeling) and reliability analyses (coefficient α). The full sample was used for measurement invariance (multi-group confirmatory analyses) and convergent validity (BEH) and known group validation (DB and SE) by SOC using analysis of variance. Reliable (α > .7), psychometrically sound, and stable measures included 2 correlated 5-item DB subscales (Pros and Cons), 2 correlated SE subscales (school [5 items] and home [3 items]), and a single 6-item BEH scale. Most students (66%) were in Precontemplation and Contemplation SOC. Behavior, DB, and SE scales differed significantly by SOC (P college students. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of Videogames on Balance and Fear of Falling in Chronic Stroke Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neshat Rahimi S.Monfared

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Balance disorder is one of the most common problems after stroke causes falling and fear of falling in some patients. The balance based video games are newly used in people with motor problems. It is very important to use different interventions for balance issues. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of videogame on balance and fear of falling in one participant. Methods: This experimental study was done in a single subject system, A-B design for one patient with chronic stroke. This method including repetitive measures conducted in two phases, baseline and then twelve intervention sessions. Berg Balance Scale, Timed up and go, Functional Reach, the maximum weight bearing in different directions and the deviation from center were conducted for balance assessing. Fear of falling questionnaire was used to assess fear of falling. Analysis of results was done by C-statistic, Bayesian factor, Mann Whitney U, and visual analysis graphs. Results: The results showed significant improvement for balance skills, the maximum force produced by lower extremities and reducing fear of falling parameters. But the deviation from center graphs did not showed distinct pattern. Discussion: All analysis confirmed the efficacy of videogames on balance skills and fear of falling improvement. However, the deviation from center did not show improvement and it seems to need more studies.

  7. Medication use and fall-risk assessment for falls in an acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ming-Huang; Lee, Hsin-Dai; Hwang, Hei-Fen; Wang, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Mau-Roung

    2015-07-01

    A nested case-control study was carried out to examine relationships of a fall-risk score and the use of single medications and polypharmacy with falls among hospitalized patients aged 50 years and older in Taiwan. There were 83 patients who experienced a fall during hospitalization in an acute-care hospital. Matched by age and sex, five control patients for each case were randomly selected from all other inpatients who had not experienced any fall at the time of the index fall. Patients who took tricyclic antidepressants, diuretics, and narcotics were 3.36-, 1.83- and 2.09-fold, respectively, more likely to experience a fall than their counterparts. Conversely, patients who took beta-blockers were 0.34-fold more likely than those who did not take them to experience a fall. Patients taking ≥6 medications were 3.08-fold more likely than those taking fewer medications to experience a fall, whereas those with anxiety were 4.72-fold more likely to experience a fall than those without. A high fall-risk score was not significantly associated with the occurrence of falls. Among older hospitalized patients, tricyclic antidepressants, diuretics, narcotics, and polypharmacy should be mindfully prescribed and reviewed on a regular basis. A fall-risk scale developed from community-dwelling older people might not accurately predict falls in hospitalized patients. Further research to validate the negative effect of beta-blocker use on falls is required. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Pilot scale production of highly efficacious and stable enterovirus 71 vaccine candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Hsiang Chou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has caused several epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD in Asia and now is being recognized as an important neurotropic virus. Effective medications and prophylactic vaccine against EV71 infection are urgently needed. Based on the success of inactivated poliovirus vaccine, a prototype chemically inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate has been developed and currently in human phase 1 clinical trial. PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this report, we present the development of a serum-free cell-based EV71 vaccine. The optimization at each step of the manufacturing process was investigated, characterized and quantified. In the up-stream process development, different commercially available cell culture media either containing serum or serum-free was screened for cell growth and virus yield using the roller-bottle technology. VP-SFM serum-free medium was selected based on the Vero cell growth profile and EV71 virus production. After the up-stream processes (virus harvest, diafiltration and concentration, a combination of gel-filtration liquid chromatography and/or sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation down-stream purification processes were investigated at a pilot scale of 40 liters each. Although the combination of chromatography and sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation produced extremely pure EV71 infectious virus particles, the overall yield of vaccine was 7-10% as determined by a VP2-based quantitative ELISA. Using chromatography as the downstream purification, the virus yield was 30-43%. To retain the integrity of virus neutralization epitopes and the stability of the vaccine product, the best virus inactivation was found to be 0.025% formalin-treatment at 37 °C for 3 to 6 days. Furthermore, the formalin-inactivated virion vaccine candidate was found to be stable for >18 months at 4 °C and a microgram of viral proteins formulated with alum adjuvant could induce strong virus-neutralizing antibody responses in mice

  9. Self-efficacy scale for the establishment of good relationships with families in neonatal and pediatric hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andréia Cascaes; Angelo, Margareth; Santos, Bernardo Pereira Dos

    2017-05-25

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Self-efficacy Scale for the Establishment of Good Relationships with Families in Neonatal and Pediatric Hospital Settings. Methodological study grounded on self-efficacy theory was conducted in three phases: conceptual and operational definition (review of the literature and interviews with the target population), content validity (opinion of five experts e three clinical nurses), and exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency reliability (cross-sectional survey with a valid sample of 194 nurses). A ten-point Likert scale with 40-item was designed and one item was excluded after review by experts. Three factors emerged from the exploratory factor analysis. The Cronbach's alpha for all items was 0.983 with item-total correlations in the range 0.657 to 0.847. Cronbach's alpha value if item deleted were less than or equal to 0.983. The final version of the scale demonstrated psychometric adequacy. It is a useful tool to be administered in the clinical, educational and research nursing fields to measure nurses' self-efficacy beliefs concerning the establishment of good relationships with families. El propósito de este estudio fue desarrollar y probar las propiedades psicométricas de la Escala de Autoeficacia para el Establecimiento de Buenas Relaciones con las Familias en Ambientes Neonatales y Pediátricos. Estudio metodológico fundamentado en la teoría de la auto-eficacia se realizó en tres fases: conceptual y definición operacional (revisión de la literatura y entrevistas con la población objetivo), la validez de contenido (opinión de cinco expertos y tres enfermeras clínicas), y el factor de análisis exploratorio e fiabilidad interna de consistencia (estudio transversal con una muestra válida de 194 enfermeras). La escala de Likert de diez puntos con 40 ítems fue diseñada y un elemento fue excluido después de la revisión por expertos. Hay tres factores que

  10. Implementing a Pediatric Fall Prevention Policy and Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; Vess, Joy; Edlund, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Preventing patient falls begins with an accurate assessment of a patient's risk of falling followed by the initiation and continued evaluation of a fall prevention program based on patient-specific identified risks. Children have a normal tendency to fall based on developmental growth, and each child is different in physical and cognitive abilities. Falls may occur both in and out of the hospital setting. Prevention programs that have revealed the most favorable restuls include the use of a validated fall risk assessment tool. The Humpty Dumpty fall Scale is a screening tool specifically developed for pediatric patients to assess risk for fall. This project developed a pediatric fall prevention policy and implemented an inpatient pediatric fall prevention program. Pediatric staff contributed to the development of this policy and program by providing feedback, support, and cooperation, which was instrumental in the success of this program resulting in no falls after implementation.

  11. Reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the situational self-efficacy scale for fruit and vegetable consumption in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Hasibe; Erol, Saime; Ergun, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the situational self-efficacy scale for vegetable and fruit consumption in adolescents. This was a methodological study. The study was conducted in four public secondary schools in Istanbul, Turkey. Subjects were 1586 adolescents. Content and construct validity were assessed to test the validity of the scale. The reliability was assessed in terms of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. For confirmatory factor analysis, χ(2) statistics plus other fit indices were used, including the goodness-of-fit index, the adjusted goodness-of-fit index, the nonnormed fit index, the comparative fit index, the standardized root mean residual, and the root mean square error of approximation. Pearson's correlation was used for test-retest reliability and item total correlation. The internal consistency was assessed by using Cronbach α. Confirmatory factor analysis strongly supported the three-component structure representing positive social situations (α = .81), negative effect situations (α = .93), and difficult situations (α = .78). Psychometric analyses of the Turkish version of the situational self-efficacy scale indicate high reliability and good content and construct validity. Researchers and health professionals will find it useful to employ the Turkish situational self-efficacy scale in evaluating situational self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption in Turkish adolescents.

  12. Validity and Reliability Study of the Self-Efficacy Scale in Rendering Piano Education to Children of 6-12 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to develop a valid and reliable scale that can be used in measuring self-efficacy of candidate music teachers in rendering piano education to children of 6-12 years. To this end, a pool of 51 items was created by using the literature, and taking the opinions of piano professors and piano instructors working with…

  13. Fear of falling in patients with hip fractures: prevalence and related psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visschedijk, Jan; van Balen, Romke; Hertogh, Cees; Achterberg, Wilco

    2013-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of fear of falling (FoF) in patients after a hip fracture, to investigate the relation with time after fracture, and to assess associations between FoF and other psychological factors. Cross-sectional study performed between September 2010 and March 2011 in elderly patients after a hip fracture. Ten postacute geriatric rehabilitation wards in Dutch nursing homes. A total of 100 patients aged ≥65 years with a hip fracture admitted to a geriatric rehabilitation ward. FoF and related concepts such as falls-related self-efficacy, depression, and anxiety were measured by means of self-assessment instruments. Of all patients, 36% had a little FoF and 27% had quite a bit or very much FoF. Scores on the Falls Efficacy Scale-International were 30.6 in the first 4 weeks after hip fracture, 35.6 in the second 4 weeks, and 29.4 in the period ≥8 weeks after fracture. In these 3 periods, the prevalence rates of FoF were 62%, 68%, and 59%, respectively. Significant correlations were found between FoF and anxiety (P falls-related self-efficacy. During rehabilitation, FoF is greatest in the second 4 weeks after hip fracture. More studies are needed to explore the determinants of FoF and develop interventions to reduce FoF and improve outcome after rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. A seasonal-scale climatological analysis correlating spring tornadic activity with antecedent fall-winter drought in the southeastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, Marshall; Mote, Thomas L; Niyogi, Dev

    2009-01-01

    Using rain gauge and satellite-based rainfall climatologies and the NOAA Storm Prediction Center tornado database (1952-2007), this study found a statistically significant tendency for fall-winter drought conditions to be correlated with below-normal tornado days the following spring in north Georgia (i.e. 93% of the years) and other regions of the Southeast. Non-drought years had nearly twice as many tornado days in the study area as drought years and were also five to six times more likely to have multiple tornado days. Individual tornadic events are largely a function of the convective-mesoscale thermodynamic and dynamic environments, thus the study does not attempt to overstate predictability. Yet, the results may provide seasonal guidance in an analogous manner to the well known Sahelian rainfall and Cape Verde hurricane activity relationships.

  15. [Functional impairment, fear of falling and body composition in institutionalized elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    São Romão Preto, Leonel; Nogueiro Santos, Ana Luisa; Mendes, Maria Eugénia; Pinto Novo, André; Pimentel, Maria Helena

    2015-01-01

    To analyze changes in the aging process of institutionalized elderly over a 24 months period, including physical condition, fear of falling, and body composition. A longitudinal, analytic and prospective study was implemented in 3 residential care homes for seniors. Data were collected using a socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire, the Rikli and Jones Senior Fitness Test, handgrip dynamometry and bioelectric impedance. The Portuguese version of the Falls Efficacy Scale was used for measure fear of falling. Fifty-one institutionalized elderly (82.5 ± 7.4 years) were included. In the 24 months analysis period, functional decline was observed (Pdecrease of self-efficacy to prevent falling, and falls prevalence was 42.1%. Results suggest a functional decrease, mainly in variables related with strength and muscular control of arms and legs, agility/dynamic balance and flexibility. Data don't highlight significant changes in body composition, however, tend to a muscle mass and bone mineral mass reduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychometric evaluation of the Korean Version of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mona; Ahn, Sangwoo; Jung, Dukyoo

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale (SEE-K). The SEE-K consists of nine items and was translated into Korean using the forward-backward translation method. We administered it to 212 community-dwelling older adults along with measures of outcome expectation for exercise, quality of life, and physical activity. The validity was determined using confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis with INFIT and OUTFIT statistics, which showed acceptable model fit. The concurrent validity was confirmed according to positive correlations between the SEE-K, outcome expectation for exercise, and quality of life. Furthermore, the high physical activity group had higher SEE-K scores. Finally, the reliability of the SEE-K was deemed acceptable based on Cronbach's alpha, coefficients of determination, and person and item separation indices with reliability. Thus, the SEE-K appears to have satisfactory validity and reliability among older adults in South Korea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Methylphenidate Efficacy: Immediate versus Extended Release at Short Term in Mexican Children with ADHD Assessed by Conners Scale and EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Durand-Rivera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD affects 5-6% of school aged children worldwide. Pharmacological therapy is considered the first-line treatment and methylphenidate (MPH is considered the first-choice medication. There are two formulations: immediate release (IR MPH and long-acting (or extended release formulation (MPH-ER. In this work, we measure the efficacy of treatment for both presentations in one month with Conners’ scales and electroencephalography (EEG. Results. for IR group, in parents and teachers Conners test, all items showed significant differences, towards improvement, except for teachers in perfectionism and emotional instability. For ER group in parent’s Conners test, the items in which there were no significant differences are psychosomatic and emotional instability. For teachers, there were no significant differences in: hyperactivity and perfectionism. Comparing the Conners questionnaires (parents versus teachers we find significant differences before and after treatment in hyperactivity, perfectionism, psychosomatics, DSM-IV hyperactive-impulsive, and DSM-IV total. In the EEG the Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference (P<0.0001. As we can see, both presentations are suitable for managing the ADHD and have the same effect on the symptomatology and in the EEG.

  18. How to identify patients with cancer at risk of falling: a review of the evidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol A

    2011-02-01

    Clinical experience and a limited number of studies suggest that a cancer diagnosis confers a high risk of accidental falls. The negative sequelae of falls in older persons are well documented; risk factors for falls in this population have been extensively investigated and evidence for the efficacy of interventions to reduce falls is steadily emerging. It is not known whether the risk factors for falls and effective interventions for falls risk reduction in patients with cancer are different from those in older persons.

  19. Preventing falls and fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfarsson, J; Robinson, B E

    1994-11-01

    One of four persons over age 65 in the community falls; those over age 75 in institutions fall more frequently. Falls, a complex phenomena suggesting present disease and predicting future disability, are caused by interactions between the environment and dynamic balance which is determined by the quality of sensory input, central processing, and motor responses. Clinical factors which predispose to falling often produce observable disturbances in gait and balance, making observation critical in assessment. Acute illness and drug therapy produce particularly preventable falls. Therapeutic exercise and environmental modification for safety are the clinical interventions most likely to successfully prevent fall-related injury.

  20. Psychometric Characteristics of a New Scale for Measuring Self-efficacy in the Regulation of Gambling Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Barbaranelli; Claudio Barbaranelli; Valerio Ghezzi; Roberta Fida; Roberta Fida; Michele Vecchione

    2017-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1977, self-efficacy has proven to be a fundamental predictor of positive adjustment and achievement in many domains. In problem gambling studies, self-efficacy has been defined mainly as an individual's ability to avoid gambling in risky situations. The interest in this construct developed mainly with regard to treatment approaches, where abstinence from gambling is required. Very little is known, however, regarding self-efficacy as a protective factor for problem ga...

  1. The Predictive Validity of the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy Scale for Return-to-Work Outcomes in Claimants with Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Sandra; Amick, Benjamin C; Lee, Hyunmi; Franche, Renée-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah

    2015-12-01

    To examine the predictive validity of the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy (RTWSE) Scale in terms of the scale's baseline absolute values and of changes in self-efficacy scores, with the outcome of return-to-work (RTW) status in a sample of injured workers with upper extremity and back musculoskeletal disorders. RTWSE was measured with a 10-item scale assessing Overall RTWSE and three self-efficacy subdomains: (1) ability to cope with pain, (2) ability to obtain help from supervisor and (3) ability to obtain help from co-workers. Outcome measures included RTW status (yes/no) measured at 6- and 12-month follow-up. RTWSE improvement was defined as an increase in self-efficacy scores between baseline and 6-month follow-up time points. Logistic regression analyses were performed with RTW status as the dependent variable and adjusted for age, gender, educational level, personal income, pain site, pain severity, functional status, and depressive symptoms, and for baseline RTWSE scores in the improvement score analyses. A total of 632 claimants completed the baseline telephone interview 1 month post-injury; 446 subjects completed the 6-month interview (71 %) and 383 subjects completed the 12-month interview (61 %). The baseline Pain RTWSE scores were found to be useful to predict RTW status 6 months post-injury, with a trend for baseline Overall RTWSE. Improvements over time in Overall RTWSE and in Co-worker RTWSE were found to be useful to predict 12-month RTW status, with trends for improvements in Supervisor RTWSE and Pain RTWSE. The study found evidence supporting the predictive validity of the RTWSE scale within 12 months after injury. The RTWSE scale may be a potentially valuable scale in research and in managing work disabled claimants with musculoskeletal disorders.

  2. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Home Improvements Prevent Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... and ensure your safety. "Safe-ty-fy" Your Home Some Questions for Your Provider Will my medicines ...

  3. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  4. New methods for fall risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejupi, Andreas; Lord, Stephen R; Delbaere, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Accidental falls are the leading cause of injury-related death and hospitalization in old age, with over one-third of the older adults experiencing at least one fall or more each year. Because of limited healthcare resources, regular objective fall risk assessments are not possible in the community on a large scale. New methods for fall prediction are necessary to identify and monitor those older people at high risk of falling who would benefit from participating in falls prevention programmes. Technological advances have enabled less expensive ways to quantify physical fall risk in clinical practice and in the homes of older people. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that sensor-based fall risk assessments of postural sway, functional mobility, stepping and walking can discriminate between fallers and nonfallers. Recent research has used low-cost, portable and objective measuring instruments to assess fall risk in older people. Future use of these technologies holds promise for assessing fall risk accurately in an unobtrusive manner in clinical and daily life settings.

  5. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone

  6. Falls in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dieën, Jaap H.; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    Falls are common incidents, which can have major con-sequences. For example, falls and the interrelated category of accidents being struck by or against objects account for more than 40% of injuries and 30% of injury costs in the USA (Corso et al., 2006). Especially among older adults, falls occur

  7. Peralta Facts: Fall 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    Data were collected in fall 1983 to provide a profile of the student population of the Peralta Community College District (PCCD). The data revealed: (1) total student enrollment declined by 12% from fall 1982 (N=38,976) to fall 1983 (N=34,183); (2) 57% of the students whose sex was identified were women; (3) minorities constituted 58% of the…

  8. Self efficacy for fruit, vegetable and water intakes: expanded and abbreviated scales from item response modeling analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to improve an existing measure of fruit and vegetable intake self efficacy, by including items that varied on levels of difficulty, and testing a corresponding measure of water intake self efficacy. A cross sectional assessment was used. Items were modified to have easy, moderate, ...

  9. The mediating role of psychological symptoms on falls risk among older adults with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sumaiyah Mat,1 Chin Teck Ng,1–3 Farhana Fadzil,4 Faizatul Izza Rozalli,4 Maw Pin Tan1,5 1Ageing and Age-Associated Disorders Research Group, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, 3Duke-NUS Medical School, National University Singapore, Singapore; 4Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 5Geriatric Division, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of fear of falling (FoF and psychological symptoms in explaining the relationship between osteoarthritis (OA symptom severity and falls. Individuals aged ≥65 years with ≥2 falls or ≥1 injurious fall over the past 12 months were included in the falls group, while volunteers aged ≥65 years with no history of falls over 12 months were recruited as controls. The presence of lower extremity OA was determined radiologically and clinically. Severity of symptoms was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC questionnaire. FoF and psychological status were measured with the shortened version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International and the 21-item Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21, respectively. Of 389 (229 fallers, 160 non-fallers potential participants, mean (SD age: 73.74 (6.60 years, 141 had clinical OA and 171 had radiological OA. Fallers with both radiological OA and clinical OA had significantly higher FoF and DASS-21 scores than non-fallers. FoF was significantly positively correlated with symptom severity in fallers and non-fallers with radiological and clinical OA. Depression, anxiety, and stress scores were only significantly correlated with symptom severity among fallers but not non-fallers in both clinical and radiological OA. The relationship between mild symptoms and reduced risk of falls

  10. Fall Prevention: Simple Tips to Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bars for the shower or tub A sturdy plastic seat for the shower or tub — plus a ... healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/fall-prevention/art-20047358 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  11. Tradução e adaptação cultural da Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para o português Traducción y adaptación cultural de la Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para el portugués Translation and cultural adaptation of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale to Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Oliveira Batista Oriá

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: traduzir e adaptar a Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale ( BSES, para a realidade cultural do Brasil e avaliar a validade de conteúdo da versão em português, para que possa ser utilizada na população brasileira. MÉTODOS: O estudo envolveu duas fases (1. protocolo de tradução e adaptação cultural e 2. validade de conteúdo. RESULTADOS: O escore total variou de 93 a 162 pontos (M = 127,03; DP = 19,62. Quando considerado apenas as multíparas, a pontuação da escala variou de 106 a 156 (M = 131,66; DP = 15,91. A versão mostrou ser de fácil compreensão, obtendo-se adequada validação semântica e de consistência. O Índice de Validação de Conteúdo foi 0,84 e o coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSÕES: Os achados sugerem que a BSES é adequada para screening da confiança materna no seu potencial para amamentar. No entanto, é necessário avaliar as propriedades psicométricas deste instrumento em amostra com diferentes níveis sociais e educacionais e em outras regiões do Brasil.OBJETIVOS: traducir y adaptar la escala Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES, para la realidad cultural de Brasil y evaluar la validez de contenido de la versión en portugués para que pueda ser utilizada en la población brasileña. MÉTODOS: El estudio se realizó en dos fases (1- protocolo de traducción y adaptación cultural, y 2- Validación del contenido. RESULTADOS: El puntaje total varió de 93 a 162 puntos (P = 127,03; DE = 19,62. Cuando fueron consideradas apenas las multíparas, la puntuación de la escala varió de 106 a 156 (P = 131,66; DE = 15,91. La versión mostró ser de fácil comprensión, obteniéndose una adecuada validación semántica y de consistencia. El Índice de Validación de Contenido fue 0,84 y el coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSIONES: Los hallazgos sugieren que la BSES es adecuada para detectar la confianza materna en su potencialidad para amamantar. Sin embargo, es necesario evaluar las

  12. Effectiveness of simple balancing training program in elderly patients with history of frequent falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuptniratsaikul V

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Vilai Kuptniratsaikul1, Rungnirand Praditsuwan2, Prasert Assantachai3, Teerada Ploypetch1, Suthipol Udompunturak4, Julaporn Pooliam41Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, 4Office for Research and Development, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, ThailandObjective: To study the effectiveness of simply-performed balancing exercises in fall prevention.Design: Pre- and post-trial.Setting: University hospital from January 2009 to May 2010.Participants: Elderly with falls in the previous year.Intervention: Simple balancing exercise was performed at home every day and was recorded in the booklet.Measurements: New falling events and a battery of balancing abilities including the Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT, chair stand, functional reach, and Berg balance scale-short form were evaluated at baseline, 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month periods. Fear of falling and quality of life scores were assessed at baseline and 12-month periods.Results: 146 subjects were recruited, 116 female (79.5% with a mean age of 67.1 years. At the end of the study, 49% of participants had not fallen. All of the balancing abilities were compared between frequent and infrequent fallers and were significantly improved (P < 0.001 except for functional reach in the frequent fall group. Most subjects (72%–79% complied well with the exercise program. However, compliance had no effect on balancing abilities. About 36.4% of participants had adverse events from exercise, of which knee pain was the top ranked. The quality of life and the fall efficacy scores increased significantly at the end of the study. Factors affecting falling were compliance with exercise (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 2.55, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.04, 6.30 and a history of falling ≥3 times in the previous year (adjusted OR: 3.76, 95% CI: 1.18, 11.98.Conclusion: Performing simply-designed balancing exercises, at least 3 days per week, can increase

  13. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  14. Self-efficacy is independently associated with brain volume in older women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer C.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Hsu, Chun Liang; Beattie, B. Lynn; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Aging is highly associated with neurodegeneration and atrophy of the brain. Evidence suggests that personality variables are risk factors for reduced brain volume. We examine whether falls-related self-efficacy is independently associated with brain volume. Method A cross-sectional analysis of whether falls-related self-efficacy is independently associated with brain volumes (total, grey, and white matter). Three multivariate regression models were constructed. Covariates included in the models were age, global cognition, systolic blood pressure, functional comorbidity index, and current physical activity level. MRI scans were acquired from 79 community-dwelling senior women aged 65 to 75 years old. Falls-related self-efficacy was assessed by the Activities Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale. Results After accounting for covariates, falls-related self-efficacy was independently associated with both total brain volume and total grey matter volume. The final model for total brain volume accounted for 17% of the variance, with the ABC score accounting for 8%. For total grey matter volume, the final model accounted for 24% of the variance, with the ABC score accounting for 10%. Conclusion We provide novel evidence that falls-related self-efficacy, a modifiable risk factor for healthy aging, is positively associated with total brain volume and total grey matter volume. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00426881. PMID:22436405

  15. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of self-efficacy and adherence scales for caregivers of patients with a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, Jesus; Wu, Horng-Shiuann; Harden, Janet; Carie, Austen; Chern, Joy

    2015-06-01

    No published instrument has been designed to measure caregivers' self-efficacy for and adherence to the complex home-care regimen of patients with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). To evaluate the psychometric properties of 2 newly developed instruments: the LVAD Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale (LCSS) and the LVAD Caregiver Home Management Adherence Scale (LCAS). A multistage design was employed for this instrumentation study. Of the 125 LVAD caregivers recruited from online support groups, 98 (78.4%) provided complete data. Participants were predominantly female (80%), aged 18 to 79 years, from 4 regions of the United States. They completed the following instruments: LCSS, LCAS, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE), and the confidence and maintenance subscales of the Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of Heart Failure Index (CC-SCHFI). Item analyses, factorial construct validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency reliability of the scales were evaluated. The analysis of the LCSS (21 items) revealed a 2-factor solution, which consisted of a 17-item routine factor and a 4-item anticipatory factor. Convergent validity of the LCSS was supported by moderate correlations among LCSS, GSE, and CC-SCHFI-confidence. The analysis of LCAS (17 items) revealed a 1-factor solution. Its convergent validity was supported by moderate correlation between LCAS and CC-SCHFI-maintenance. Internal consistency reliability coefficients of the LCSS and LCAS were α = 0.93 and α = 0.96, respectively. These data suggest that the 2 instruments are adequately valid and reliable measures of self-efficacy and adherence in the context of LVAD patient care managed by home caregivers. Further research is needed to support the applicability of these instruments in other research and practice settings.

  16. Development and validation of the Parents' Perceived Self-Efficacy to Manage Children's Internet Use Scale for parents of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ping; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Wang, Peng-Wei; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2017-12-01

    Background and aims This study developed and validated the Parents' Perceived Self-Efficacy to Manage Children's Internet Use Scale (PSMIS) in the parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods In total, 231 parents of children with ADHD were invited to complete the PSMIS, followed by the Chen Internet Addiction Scale and the short version of Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham, Version IV Scale - Chinese version for analyzing Internet addiction severity and ADHD symptoms, respectively. Results The results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the four-factor structure of the 18-item PSMIS. The significant difference in the levels of parents' perceived self-efficacy between the parents of children with and without Internet addiction supported the criterion-related validity of the PSMIS. The internal consistency and 1-month test-retest reliability were acceptable. Conclusion The results indicate that the PSMIS has acceptable validity and reliability and can be used for measuring parents' perceived self-efficacy to manage children's Internet use among parents of children with ADHD.

  17. Political Efficacy and Participation of Nurse Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Nancy C; Crawford, Sybil L; Morris, Nancy S; Pulcini, Joyce

    2017-08-01

    Twenty-eight states have laws and regulations limiting the ability of nurse practitioners (NPs) to practice to the full extent of their education and training, thereby preventing patients from fully accessing NP services. Revisions to state laws and regulations require NPs to engage in the political process. Understanding the political engagement of NPs may facilitate the efforts of nurse leaders and nursing organizations to promote change in state rules and regulations. The purpose of this study was to describe the political efficacy and political participation of U.S. NPs and gain insight into factors associated with political interest and engagement. In the fall of 2015, we mailed a survey to 2,020 NPs randomly chosen from the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners' database and 632 responded (31% response rate). Participants completed the Trust in Government (external political efficacy) and the Political Efficacy (internal political efficacy) scales, and a demographic form. Overall, NPs have low political efficacy. Older age ( p≤.001), health policy mentoring ( p≤.001), and specific education on health policy ( p≤.001) were all positively associated with internal political efficacy and political participation. External political efficacy was not significantly associated with any of the study variables. Political activities of NPs are largely limited to voting and contacting legislators. Identifying factors that engage NPs in grassroots political activities and the broader political arena is warranted, particularly with current initiatives to make changes to state laws and regulations that limit their practice.

  18. Meteorite falls in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiri, Fouad; Ibhi, Abderrahmane; Saint-Gerant, Thierry; Medjkane, Mohand; Ouknine, Lahcen

    2017-10-01

    The study of meteorites provides insight into the earliest history of our solar system. From 1800, about the year meteorites were first recognized as objects falling from the sky, until December 2014, 158 observed meteorite falls were recorded in Africa. Their collected mass ranges from 1.4 g to 175 kg with the 1-10 kg cases predominant. The average rate of African falls is low with only one fall recovery per 1.35-year time interval (or 0.023 per year per million km2). This African collection is dominated by ordinary chondrites (78%) just like in the worldwide falls. The seventeen achondrites include three Martian meteorite falls (Nakhla of Egypt, Tissint of Morocco and Zagami of Nigeria). Observed Iron meteorite falls are relatively rare and represent only 5%. The falls' rate in Africa is variable in time and in space. The number of falls continues to grow since 1860, 80% of which were recovered during the period between 1910 and 2014. Most of these documented meteorite falls have been recovered from North-Western Africa, Eastern Africa and Southern Africa. They are concentrated in countries which have a large surface area and a large population with a uniform distribution. Other factors are also favorable for observing and collecting meteorite falls across the African territory, such as: a genuine meteorite education, a semi-arid to arid climate (clear sky throughout the year most of the time), croplands or sparse grasslands and possible access to the fall location with a low percentage of forest cover and dense road network.

  19. Review of perioperative falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronzer, V. L.; Wildes, T. M.; Stark, S. L.; Avidan, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Falls are a known public health problem, and there is increasing recognition of the importance of perioperative falls for risk prediction and quality assessment. Our objective was to review existing literature regarding the occurrence, injuries, and risk factors of preoperative and postoperative falls. A systematized search of PubMed entries between 1947 and November 2015 produced 24 articles that met inclusion criteria. Most studied orthopaedic surgery patients older than 65 yr. Four were rated ‘good’ quality. Interrater reliability for the quality assessment was moderate (κ = 0.77). In the 3–12 months before surgery, the proportion of preoperative patients who fell ranged from 24 to 48%. Injuries were common (70%). The rate of postoperative falls ranged from 0.8 to 16.3 per 1000 person-days, with a gradual decline in the months after surgery. Injuries from postoperative falls occurred in 10–70% of fallers, and 5–20% experienced a severe injury. Risk factors were not well studied. Prospective studies reported a higher percentage of falls and fall-related injuries than retrospective studies, suggesting that there may be underdetection of falls and injuries with retrospective studies. Perioperative falls were more common than falls reported in the general community, even up to 12 months after surgery. Surgery-related falls may therefore occur beyond the hospitalization period. Future studies should use a prospective design, validated definitions, and broader populations to study perioperative falls. In particular, investigations of risk factors and follow-up after hospitalization are needed. Registry number: PROSPERO registration number CRD42015029971. PMID:27956670

  20. Falls among union carpenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Hester J; Li, Leiming; Dement, John M

    2003-08-01

    Falls are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the construction trades. We identified a cohort of 16,215 active union carpenters, hours worked, and their workers' compensation claims for a 10-year period. The data on this well-defined cohort were used to describe their work-related falls; to define rates of injury and the associated costs; and to identify high-risk groups. Same level falls occurred at a rate of 1.8/200,000 hours worked; falls from elevations at a rate of 2.3/200,000 hours worked. These injuries resulted in direct payments of 0.30 dollars per hour of work or 2.40 dollars per 8-hr day. Mean costs per fall increased with increasing age. Age was not associated with risk of falls from elevations; younger carpenters had modestly reduced rates of falls from the same level. Rates of falls decreased with increasing time in the union. Carpenters whose usual work involved drywall installation or residential work were at highest risk. Falls are a significant public health risk for carpenters and they are responsible for a significant burden of work-related injury costs. While there is a need for prevention of falls from elevations--through training, enforcement of fall protection regulations, improved safety climate, or engineering changes--there is also the need to prevent falls from lower elevations. Differences in risk likely reflect varying exposures and safety practices in different areas of carpentry, as well as training, experience, and job assignments based on longevity in the union. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Development and initial evaluation of the psychometric properties of self-efficacy and adherence scales for patients with a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, Jesus; Wu, Horng-Shiuann; Harden, Janet; Chern, Joy; Carie, Austen

    2015-06-01

    No tools exist to measure patients' self-efficacy for and adherence to the complex home-care regimen after having a left ventricular device (LVAD) implanted. To develop 2 new instruments, the LVAD Patient Self-Efficacy Scale (LPSES) and the LVAD Patient Home Management Adherence Scale (LPHMAS), and evaluate their psychometric properties. This multistage instrumentation study recruited 102 patients (77.5% men and 22.5% women) aged 20 to 82 years, predominantly from the Midwest (34.3%) and the Northeast (26.5%) regions of the United States. Main indications for LVAD were bridge-to-transplant (69.6%) and destination therapy (21.6%), with mean implant duration of 19.9 (SD, 15.5) months. Study participants completed the following instruments: LPSES, LPHMAS, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), Medical Outcomes Study General Adherence (MOSGA), and Self-Care Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) confidence and maintenance subscales. Item analyses, psychometric properties including factorial and convergent validities, and internal consistency reliability were tested. Factor analyses showed that the variances for the 20-item LPSES and 9-item LPHMAS were 60.2% and 53.6%, respectively. Convergent validity of the newly developed instruments was supported by the following correlations: LPSES and GSES (r = 0.34); LPSES and SCHFI-confidence (r = 0.60); LPHMAS and MOSGA (r = 0.33); LPHMAS and SCHFI-maintenance (r = 0.40). Internal consistency reliability coefficients were 0.94 (LPSES) and 0.84 (LPHMAS). Based on these data, the LPSES and LPHMAS are valid and reliable measures of self-efficacy and adherence specific for LVAD patients. Confirmatory testing is needed to further support the validity of these instruments for use in research and clinical practice.

  2. The Frequency of Falling Elderly and Evaluation of the Behavioral Factors Related to Preventing the Falls

    OpenAIRE

    DURU, Pınar; ÖRSAL, Özlem; ÜNSAL, Alaettin; BALCI ALPARSLAN, Güler

    2015-01-01

    Present study was carried out to determine the frequency of fall in people over the age of 60 years and to evaluate the awareness of and behaviors related to the prevention of fall among elderly people. A total of 724 individuals including 164 elderly people from nursing homes and 560 elderly people living at their home were included in the study group. The “Falls Behavioral Scale for Older People” was used to evaluate the presence or absence of protective behaviors from falls. The frequency ...

  3. Development and Preliminary Evaluation of Psychometric Properties of Symptom-Management Self-Efficacy Scale for Breast Cancer Related to Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kuo, Chiu-Ya; Lu, Yu-Ying

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and preliminarily evaluate the reliability and validity of the Symptom-Management Self-Efficacy Scale-Breast Cancer (SMSES-BC) related to chemotherapy. The study included three stages. This paper presents the results of stage 2 and stage 3. In total, 34 items in the SMSES-BC were found during stage 1 from qualitative findings, a literature review, and expert suggestions; the 34 items were used for the psychometric properties test. Test-retest reliability and Cronbach α were assessed in the first sample, which included 45 participants for the pilot test (stage 2). The second sample, which included 152 patients, was used to assess the construct validity and concurrent validity (stage 3). The pilot test results revealed a test-retest reliability of .73 (p Correlation coefficient r was .40 (p Self-Efficacy Scale for concurrent validity. The study results demonstrate acceptable reliability and validity for the SMSES-BC that was developed for measuring symptom-management self-efficacy related to chemotherapy for patients with breast cancer. This study suggests further research to validate the construct of the SMSES-BC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The interplay between gait, falls and cognition: can cognitive therapy reduce fall risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev-Jacubovski, Orit; Herman, Talia; Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we briefly summarize the incidence and significant consequences of falls among older adults, the insufficient effectiveness of commonly used multifactorial interventions and the evidence linking falls and cognitive function. Recent pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies that evaluated the effects of cognitive therapy on fall risk are reviewed. The results of this article illustrate the potential utility of multiple, diverse forms of cognitive therapy for reducing fall risk. The article also indicates that large-scale, randomized controlled trials are warranted and that additional research is needed to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the interplay between human mobility, fall risk and cognitive function. Nonetheless, we suggest that multimodality interventions that combine motor and cognitive therapy should, eventually, be incorporated into clinical practice to enable older adults and patients to move safer and with a reduced fall risk. PMID:21721921

  5. The large-scale distribution and internal geometry of the fall 2000 Po River flood deposit: Evidence from digital X-radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Stevens, A.W.; Hunt, L.M.; Milligan, T.G.

    2006-01-01

    Event-response coring on the Po River prodelta (northern Adriatic Sea) coupled with shipboard digital X-radiography, resistivity profiling, and grain-size analyses permitted documentation of the initial distribution and physical properties of the October 2000 flood deposit. The digital X-radiography system comprises a constant-potential X-ray source and an amorphous silicon imager with an active area of 29??42 cm and 12-bit depth resolution. Objective image segmentation algorithms based on bulk density (brightness), layer contacts (edge detection) and small-scale texture (fabric) were used to identify the flood deposit. Results indicate that the deposit formed in water depths of 6-29 m immediately adjacent to the three main distributary mouths of the Po (Pila, Tolle and Gnocca/Goro). Maximal thickness was 36 cm at a 20-m site off the main mouth (Pila), but many other sites hadthicknesses >20 cm. The Po flood deposit has a complex internal stratigraphy, with multiple layers, a diverse suite of physical sedimentary structures (e.g., laminations, ripple cross bedding, lenticular bedding, soft-sediment deformation structures), and dramatic changes in grain size that imply rapid deposition and fluctuations in energy during emplacement. Based on the flood deposit volume and well-constrained measurements of deposit bulk density the mass of the flood deposit was estimated to be 16??109 kg, which is about two-thirds of the estimated suspended sediment load delivered by the river during the event. The locus of deposition, overall thickness, and stratigraphic complexity of the flood deposit can best be explained by the relatively long sediment throughput times of the Po River, whereby sediment is delivered to the ocean during a range of conditions (i.e., the storm responsible for the precipitation is long gone), the majority of which are reflective of the fair-weather condition. Sediment is therefore deposited proximal to the river mouths, where it can form thick, but

  6. Falls in institutions for older adults: characterization of fall occurrences and associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rosa Soares Lavareda Baixinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Falls are the main accident for older adults, with consequences on functionality. Older adults impose restrictions or have restrictions imposed on their activities for fear of new falls. This prospective longitudinal study was conducted with 104 institutionalized older adults during six months with the following goals: to determine the prevalence of falls, to characterize the falls according to place, time, resulting injuries, supervision of the older adult, action performed at the time of the fall, and to relate the occurrence of the fall to the risk of falling, medical diagnoses, number of medications in use, type of medication, degree of dependency, age, and gender. The prevalence of falls was 37.5%, and they happened mostly in the bedroom, while walking after getting up from the bed. Those under risk in the Morse Fall Scale (p=0.034 and on sedatives (p=0.007 face a higher prevalence of falls. This study enables the possibility of making suggestions for practice, training and investigation.

  7. [Influence of balance exercises during an attention task on fear of falling among frail elderly fallen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Itsushi

    2010-01-01

    Recent research suggests that the fear of falling may be a more serious problem than actual falling among frail elderly people. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not it is possible to influence the fear of falling among frail elderly people who previously had fallen, by balance exercises under attention tasks. The subjects were 22 frail elderly people in nursing homes (3 men and 19 women, mean age 83.1+/-5.2 SD) who had fallen. Written informed consent was given for participation in the study. Subjects were divided into two groups at random: the balance exercise group (the control group) and the balance exercise during an attention task (the attention group). Balance exercise continued for 10 weeks, consisting of one 5 minute session, 3 times weekly. The control and intervention subjects were evaluated using the Fall Efficacy Scale (FES), Functional Reach Test (FRT), Timed Up & Go Test (TUGT) and walking speed, before the program, at the end of the trial, and 10 weeks after the program. There was no change in walking speed in either group, and difference in TUGT of the control group was observed. We found improvement in FRT and TUGT of the attention group. The FES decreased in the attention group. These findings indicate that balance exercise during an attention task can improve standing posture balance in frail elderly people who have fallen. These results also suggest that it is important to intervene in both motor function and attention function to decrease the fear of falling.

  8. Falls and comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Terese Sara Høj; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Sahlberg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To compare nationwide time trends and mortality in hip and proximal humeral fractures; to explore associations between incidences of falls risk related comorbidities (FRICs) and incidence of fractures. Methods: The study is a retrospective cohort study using nationwide Danish administrative....... Conclusions: The results suggest that the overall reduction in fractures can be explained by reduction in falls related comorbidity....

  9. Fall Leaf Portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can create a stunning as well as economical mosaic utilizing fall's brilliantly colored leaves, preserved at their peak in color. Start by choosing a beautiful fall day to take students on a nature walk to collect a variety of leaves in different shapes, sizes, and colors. Focus on collecting a…

  10. Validity of the visual analogue scale as an instrument to measure self-efficacy in resuscitation skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, Nigel M.; de Leemput, Anita J. van; Draaisma, Jos M. T.; Oosterveld, Paul; ten Cate, Olle Th J.

    CONTEXT Self-efficacy is an important factor in many areas of medical education, including self-assessment and self-directed learning, but has been little studied in resuscitation training, possibly because of the lack of a simple measurement instrument. OBJECTIVE We aimed to assess the validity of

  11. Psychometric qualities of the short form of the self-efficacy for parenting tasks index-toddler scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rijen, E. H M; Gasanova, N.; Boonstra, A. M.; Huijding, J.

    2014-01-01

    Parental self-efficacy (PSE; parental self-perceived competence in parenting) is known to have considerable impact on parenting quality. Although PSE is particularly under pressure during the turbulent period of toddlerhood, most studies so far have focused on PSE in parents of older children. The

  12. Zero-Inflated Poisson Modeling of Fall Risk Factors in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dukyoo; Kang, Younhee; Kim, Mi Young; Ma, Rye-Won; Bhandari, Pratibha

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for falls among community-dwelling older adults. The study used a cross-sectional descriptive design. Self-report questionnaires were used to collect data from 658 community-dwelling older adults and were analyzed using logistic and zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression. Perceived health status was a significant factor in the count model, and fall efficacy emerged as a significant predictor in the logistic models. The findings suggest that fall efficacy is important for predicting not only faller and nonfaller status but also fall counts in older adults who may or may not have experienced a previous fall. The fall predictors identified in this study--perceived health status and fall efficacy--indicate the need for fall-prevention programs tailored to address both the physical and psychological issues unique to older adults. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Fall prevention strategy in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muray, Mwali; Bélanger, Charles H; Razmak, Jamil

    2018-02-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to document the need for implementing a fall prevention strategy in an emergency department (ED). The paper also spells out the research process that led to approving an assessment tool for use in hospital outpatient services. Design/methodology/approach The fall risk assessment tool was based on the Morse Fall Scale. Gender mix and age above 65 and 80 years were assessed on six risk assessment variables using χ 2 analyses. A logistic regression analysis and model were used to test predictor strength and relationships among variables. Findings In total, 5,371 (56.5 percent) geriatric outpatients were deemed to be at fall risk during the study. Women have a higher falls incidence in young and old age categories. Being on medications for patients above 80 years exposed both genders to equal fall risks. Regression analysis explained 73-98 percent of the variance in the six-variable tool. Originality/value Canadian quality and safe healthcare accreditation standards require that hospital staff develop and adhere to fall prevention policies. Anticipated physiological falls can be prevented by healthcare interventions, particularly with older people known to bear higher risk factors. An aging population is increasing healthcare volumes and medical challenges. Precautionary measures for patients with a vulnerable cognitive and physical status are essential for quality care.

  14. Veterans' fall risk profile: a prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Patricia A; Palacios, Polly; Spehar, Andrea M

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) serves the health care needs of an adult, predominantly male, and aging population. The aging profile of VHA patients is 25% greater than the civilian sector (DVA 2001). Aged patients are at higher risk for falls. In February 2002, 6 VHA medical centers profiled their inpatients' fall risk profile as one aspect of program initiatives targeted at reducing veterans' fall risk and fall-related injuries, participating in a one-day collection of fall risk measurement using the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) for all inpatients (n = 1819), acute and long-term care units. Data results are reported for age, MFS score, and the relationship between age and score, and by type of ward/unit, ie, predominately acute and critical care or long-term care. The results of this prevalence study documented that the veteran inpatient population are at high-risk for anticipated physiological falls. This Veteran Integrated Services Network-wide Deployment of an Evidence-based Program to Prevent Patient Falls study was completed as part of a nationally funded clinical initiative, National Program Initiative 20-006-1.

  15. Chair Lift Falls and Injuries in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glissmeyer, Eric W; Metzger, Ryan R; Bolte, Robert

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare demographic injury and treatment characteristics of hospitalized pediatric cases of falls from chair lifts to cases of other ski and snowboarding injuries and identify potential interventions for preventing falls from chair lifts. Retrospective query of the trauma registry of Utah's only pediatric trauma center for children younger than 18 years requiring hospitalization for a ski or snowboarding injury from November 2004 to February 2014. There were 443 cases of hospitalized ski and snowboarding injuries during the study period. Twenty-nine cases (7%) fell from height while riding a chair lift. Children falling from chair lifts were more likely to be younger (6.9 years vs 12.1, P chair lift falls with a significant injury (abbreviated injury scale, ≥3) was lower extremity (4/29, all femur fractures). Patient age discriminated chair lift falls well (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.87) with age of 7 years and below predicting chair lift fall with a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 91%. Injuries requiring hospitalization after falls from chair lifts occur at regulated facilities and are more common in younger female children when compared with other ski and snowboarding injuries. Interventions for reducing falls from chair lifts may be most effective applied to children 7 years and younger.

  16. Falls and stumbles in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, C M; Busse, M E; Sampson, C M; Rogers, M T; Fenton-May, J; van Deursen, R

    2006-03-01

    To investigate falls and risk factors in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared with healthy volunteers. 13 sequential patients with DM1 from different kindreds were compared with 12 healthy volunteers. All subjects were evaluated using the Rivermead Mobility Index, Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment, and modified Activities Specific Balance Confidence scale. Measures of lower limb muscle strength, gait speed, and 7-day ambulatory activity monitoring were recorded. Subjects returned a weekly card detailing stumbles and falls. 11 of 13 patients (mean age 46.5 years, seven female) had 127 stumbles and 34 falls over the 13 weeks, compared with 10 of 12 healthy subjects (34.4 years, seven female) who had 26 stumbles and three falls. Patients were less active than healthy subjects but had more falls and stumbles per 5000 right steps taken (mean (SD) events, 0.21 (0.29) v 0.02 (0.02), p = 0.007). Patients who fell (n = 6) had on average a lower Rivermead Mobility score, slower self selected gait speed, and higher depression scores than those who did not. DM1 patients stumble or fall about 10 times more often than healthy volunteers. Routine inquiry about falls and stumbles is justified. A study of multidisciplinary intervention to reduce the risk of falls seems warranted.

  17. The REFORM study protocol: a cohort randomised controlled trial of a multifaceted podiatry intervention for the prevention of falls in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockayne, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Corbacho Martin, Belen; Fairhurst, Caroline; Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Hull, Robin; Keenan, Anne Maree; Lamb, Sarah E; Loughrey, Lorraine; McIntosh, Caroline; Menz, Hylton B; Redmond, Anthony C; Rodgers, Sara; Vernon, Wesley; Watson, Judith; Torgerson, David

    2014-12-17

    Falls and fall-related injuries are a serious cause of morbidity and cost to society. Foot problems and inappropriate footwear may increase the risk of falls; therefore podiatric interventions may play a role in reducing falls. Two Cochrane systematic reviews identified only one study of a podiatry intervention aimed to reduce falls, which was undertaken in Australia. The REFORM trial aims to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted podiatry intervention in reducing falls in people aged 65 years and over in a UK and Irish setting. This multicentre, cohort randomised controlled trial will recruit 2600 participants from routine podiatry clinics in the UK and Ireland to the REFORM cohort. In order to detect a 10% point reduction in falls from 50% to 40%, with 80% power 890 participants will be randomised to receive routine podiatry care and a falls prevention leaflet or routine podiatry care, a falls prevention leaflet and a multifaceted podiatry intervention. The primary outcome is rate of falls (falls/person/time) over 12 months assessed by patient self-report falls diary. Secondary self-report outcome measures include: the proportion of single and multiple fallers and time to first fall over a 12-month period; Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International; fear of falling in the past 4 weeks; Frenchay Activities Index; fracture rate; Geriatric Depression Scale; EuroQoL-five dimensional scale 3-L; health service utilisation at 6 and 12 months. A qualitative study will examine the acceptability of the package of care to participants and podiatrists. The trial has received a favourable opinion from the East of England-Cambridge East Research Ethics Committee and Galway Research Ethics Committee. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conference presentations. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68240461 assigned 01/07/2011. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  18. The Efficacy of Arabic Version of the Developmental Assessment of Young Children Second Edition (DAYC-2) Scale in Detecting Developmental Delay among Jordanian Children Aged Birth to 71 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Rawan M. Abu; Smadi, Jamil M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of the developmental assessment of young children second edition (DAYC-2) Scale in detecting Developmental Delay among Jordanian children aged birth to 71 months. Firstly, the scale was translated and reviewed for language and cultural appropriateness. Secondly, the Arabic Jordanian version of the scale was…

  19. The Association between Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Subthreshold Anxiety Symptoms and Fear of Falling among Older Adults: Preliminary Results from a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Marie-Christine; Bélanger, Claude; Benyebdri, Fethia; Filiatrault, Johanne; Bherer, Louis; Bertrand, Josie-Anne; Nadeau, Alexandra; Bruneau, Marie-Andrée; Clerc, Doris; Saint-Martin, Monique; Cruz-Santiago, Diana; Ménard, Caroline; Nguyen, Philippe; Vu, T T Minh; Comte, Francis; Bobeuf, Florian; Grenier, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    A relationship between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and fear of falling (FOF) has long been proposed but never specifically studied. This study aimed at analyzing the relationship between FOF and GAD or anxiety symptoms, while controlling for major depressive episodes (MDE), depressive symptoms, fall risk, and sociodemographic variables. Twenty-five older adults participated in this pilot study. Assessments included the following: Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule, Geriatric Anxiety Inventory, Geriatric Depression Scale, Falls-Efficacy Scale-International. A multidisciplinary team evaluated fall risk. FOF was significantly correlated with GAD, MDE, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and fall risk, but not with sociodemographic variables. Multiple regression analyses indicated that GAD and anxiety symptoms were significantly and independently associated with FOF. Although the results of this pilot study should be replicated with larger samples, they suggest that FOF is associated with GAD and anxiety symptoms even when considering physical factors that increase the risk of falling. Treatment of FOF in patients with GAD may present a particular challenge because of the central role of intolerance of uncertainty, which may prevent patients from regaining confidence despite the reduction of fall risk. Clinicians should screen for GAD and anxiety symptoms in patients with FOF to improve detection and treatment.

  20. Effects of the visual-feedback-based force platform training with functional electric stimulation on the balance and prevention of falls in older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Force platform training with functional electric stimulation aimed at improving balance may be effective in fall prevention for older adults. Aim of the study is to evaluate the effects of the visual-feedback-based force platform balance training with functional electric stimulation on balance and fall prevention in older adults. Methods A single-centre, unblinded, randomized controlled trial was conducted. One hundred and twenty older adults were randomly allocated to two groups: the control group (n = 60, one-leg standing balance exercise, 12 min/d or the intervention group (n = 60, force platform training with functional electric stimulation, 12 min/d. The training was provided 15 days a month for 3 months by physical therapists. Medial–lateral and anterior–posterior maximal range of sway with eyes open and closed, the Berg Balance Scale, the Barthel Index, the Falls Efficacy scale-International were assessed at baseline and after the 3-month intervention. A fall diary was kept by each participant during the 6-month follow-up. Results On comparing the two groups, the intervention group showed significantly decreased (p < 0.01 medial–lateral and anterior–posterior maximal range of sway with eyes open and closed. There was significantly higher improvement in the Berg Balance Scale (p < 0.05, the Barthel Index (p < 0.05 and the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (p < 0.05, along with significantly lesser number of injurious fallers (p < 0.05, number of fallers (p < 0.05, and fall rates (p < 0.05 during the 6-month follow-up in the intervention group. Conclusion This study showed that the visual feedback-based force platform training with functional electric stimulation improved balance and prevented falls in older adults.

  1. A comparison of the effect of education through video versus demonstration on fear of falling in nursing home residents of Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Najafi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fear of falling is one of the most serious potential health problems. This issue is of high importance in the elderly with serious consequences such as limitations in daily activities, gait imbalance, social isolation, and increased risk of falling. One way to resolve this problem is the use of modern teaching methods such as demonstration and videos. The present study aimed at comparing the effect of education through video versus demonstration on fear of falling in nursing home residents of Mashhad city, Iran. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study (with pre-test and post-test was performed among 66 elderly residents of nursing homes in Mashhad. The participants were randomly divided into two groups of demonstration and video. Then, they received training using the abovementioned methods. The participants' level of fear of falling was measured through Fall Efficacy Scale. Results: After the intervention, mean scores of the fear of falling were 47.50 and 49.84 in demonstration and video groups, respectively. As indicated by the results, after the intervention, participants' fear of falling decreased by 23.7% and 20.7% in demonstration and video groups, respectively. This difference is statistically significant (P = 0.001. Conclusions: Training through video methods reduces the fear of falling in the elderly. Because of the special conditions of the elderly, the video training method may require more consideration due to its lower costs and easier performance.

  2. Prospective study of falls and risk factors for falls in adults with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Carol A; Lawlor, Peter G; Savva, George M; Bennett, Kathleen; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2012-06-10

    Retrospective studies of inpatients with cancer suggest that a cancer diagnosis confers a high risk of falls. In adults with advanced cancer, we aimed to prospectively document the incidence of falls, identify the risk factors, and determine if falls in this population occur predominantly in older patients. Patients admitted consecutively to community and inpatient palliative care services with metastatic or locoregionally advanced cancer who were mobile without assistance were recruited. Risk-factor assessment was conducted on initial encounter. Patients underwent follow-up via weekly telephone contact for 6 months or until time of fall or death. Relationship between covariates and time to fall was examined using hazard ratios (HRs) derived from univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Of 185 participants (52.4% men; mean age 68 ± standard deviation of 12.6 years), 50.3% fell; 35 (53%) of 66 participants age falls occurred in the community; 42% resulted in injury. Median time to fall was 96 days (95% CI, 64.66 to 127.34). Primary brain tumor or brain metastasis (HR 2.5; P = .002), number of falls in the preceding 3 months (HR, 1.27; P = .005), severity of depression (HR, 1.12; P = .012), benzodiazepine dose (HR, 1.05; P = .004), and cancer-related pain (HR, 1.96; P = .024) were independently associated with time to fall in multivariate analysis. Fifty percent of adults with advanced cancer, regardless of age, will experience a fall associated with high risk of physical injury. There is a compelling need to assess the efficacy of assessment and management of modifiable fall risk factors in patients with advanced cancer.

  3. Prevalence and cost of imaging in inpatient falls: the rising cost of falling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jessica Fields,1 Tahani Alturkistani,2 Neal Kumar,3 Arjun Kanuri,3 Deeb N Salem,1 Samson Munn,2 Deborah Blazey-Martin1 1Department of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Radiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 3Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Objective: To quantify the type, prevalence, and cost of imaging following inpatient falls, identify factors associated with post-fall imaging, and determine correlates of positive versus negative imaging. Design: Single-center retrospective cohort study of inpatient falls. Data were collected from the hospital's adverse event reporting system, DrQuality. Age, sex, date, time, and location of fall, clinical service, Morse Fall Scale/fall protocol, admitting diagnosis, and fall-related imaging studies were reviewed. Cost included professional and facilities fees for each study. Setting: Four hundred and fifteen bed urban academic hospital over 3 years (2008–2010. Patients: All adult inpatient falls during the study period were included. Falls experienced by patients aged <18 years, outpatient and emergency patients, visitors to the hospital, and staff were excluded. Measurements and main results: Five hundred and thirty inpatient falls occurred during the study period, average patient age 60.7 years (range 20–98. More than half of falls were men (55% and patients considered at risk of falls (56%. Falls were evenly distributed across morning (33%, evening (34%, and night (33% shifts. Of 530 falls, 178 (34% patients were imaged with 262 studies. Twenty percent of patients imaged had at least one positive imaging study attributed to the fall and 82% of studies were negative. Total cost of imaging was $160,897, 63% ($100,700 from head computed tomography (CT. Conclusion: Inpatient falls affect patients of both sexes, all ages, occur at any time of day and lead to expensive imaging, mainly from head CTs. Further study should be targeted toward

  4. Geriatric fall-related injuries.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The majority of geriatric fall-related injuries were due to fall from the same level at home. Assessment of risk fac- tors for falls including home hazards is essential for prevention of geriatric fall-related injuries. Keywords: Accidental fall, geriatrics, injury, trauma registry. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v16i2.24.

  5. Incidence and characteristics of accidental falls in hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Inagaki, Yuko; Suzuki, Yusuke; Ando, Kei; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    Aging of the patient population has led to increased occurrence of accidental falls in acute care settings. The aim of this study is to survey the annual occurrence of falls in a university hospital, and to examine procedures to prevent fall. A total of 49,059 inpatients were admitted to our hospital from April 2015 to March 2016. A fall assessment scale was developed to estimate the risk of fall at admission. Data on falls were obtained from the hospital incident reporting system. There were fall-related incidents in 826 patients (1.7%). Most falls occurred in hospital rooms (67%). Adverse events occurred in 101 patients who fell (12%) and were significantly more frequent in patients aged ≥80 years old and in those wearing slippers. The incidence of falls was also significantly higher in patients in the highest risk group. These results support the validity of the risk assessment scale for predicting accidental falls in an acute treatment setting. The findings also clarify the demographic and environmental factors and consequences associated with fall. These results of the study could provide important information for designing effective interventions to prevent fall in elderly patients.

  6. [Fear of falling and the relationship with the measure of functional independence and quality of life in post-Cerebral Vascular Accident (Stroke) victims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Raquel Buarque Caminha; Laurentino, Glória Elizabeth Carneiro; Melo, Priscilla Gonçalves de; Cabral, Dinalva Lacerda; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the fear of falling of 52 chronic post-stroke individuals and to assess its relationship with measures of functional independence and quality of life (QOL). Fear of falling was assessed by the Brazilian version of Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I-BRAZIL) and functional independence by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and QOL by the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) scale. Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to verify the associations between FES-I-BRAZIL and the other instruments, and the Mann-Whitney U test to compare groups with low and high fall concerns. There was a predominance of individuals with high concerns regarding falling, higher QOL, and independence. FES-I-BRAZIL was statistically associated with FIM and SSQOL. Significant relationships were also found between FES-I-Brazil with FIM transfer and locomotion sub-scales, as well as with the following SSQOL energy, family role, language, mobility, mood, self-care, and upper extremity function domains. Thus, fear of falling may contribute to reduced functional independence and QOL in post-stroke individuals and should be included in the evaluation process of these patients to ensure greater benefits during rehabilitation.

  7. Determining Whether a Dosage-Specific and Individualized Home Exercise Program With Consults Reduces Fall Risk and Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Difficulty Walking: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Estelle; Stelmach, Maria; Frigeri, Fernanda; Ahn, Dong-Hyun

    2016-11-23

    The development and implementation of effective interventions to prevent falls in older adults is a public health priority. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of a new practice model, incorporating Shubert's evidence-based fall prevention recommendations, with the usual ambulatory physical therapy (PT) at Rusk Rehabilitation, to decrease fall risk among older adults living in the community. The hypotheses were (1) the proposed program would decrease participants' fall risk, (2) it would be more effective than our usual PT, and (3) the addition of 4 consults after discharge would improve compliance with a home exercise program. This was a randomized controlled trial. Sixty-nine participants who were independent community dwellers, were 65 years or older, had difficulty walking or complaints of instability, and had 1 or more risk of falls were randomly assigned into a usual care group (UCG, n = 43) or an experimental group (EG, n = 26). Both groups received PT 2 times per week for 30 minutes for 10 to 32 visits. The UCG received the usual PT delivered at Rusk. The EG was instructed in a moderate- to high-intensity home exercise program designed after completing the mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test to assist with exercise prescription. The EG was educated on performing a recommended dosage of exercise over 6 months using a diary. The EG received 4 additional 30-minute consults every 2 to 4 weeks postdischarge to reinforce compliance. Self-report of number of falls, number of minutes of exercise per week, and performance on outcome measures (Timed Up and Go, 5-times sit-to-stand, Berg Balance Scale, and Activity Balance Confidence Scale) were monitored at evaluation, 2, 4, and 6 months. Thirty-five participants completed the study (UCG n = 22; EG n = 13). Both groups were similar at baseline on outcome measures and number of visits. Random effect model analyses demonstrated that both groups made significant reductions in fall risk over 6 months

  8. Fear of falling and self-perception of health in older participants and non-participants of physical activity programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Kruleske da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fear of falling, self-perception of health, and participation in physical activity programs have been associated with several variables related to health and performance in older adults. The purpose of this study was to evaluate self-perception of health and fear of falling in older adult participants and non-participants of physical activity programs, and to verify the relationship between these variables. A total of 40 healthy but sedentary older adults, and 45 physically active older adults were assessed through the Falls Efficacy Scale International-Brazil (FES-I and a questionnaire that measured their self-perception of health. The older adults that did not participate in regular physical activity programs presented higher scores of fear of falling, which, in turn, is associated with an increase of risk for falls. Moreover, older adults, participants in regular physical activity programs exhibited a more positive health perception than did the non-participants. Also, non-participants of physical activity programs perceived their health status as being poor or very poor as well as expressing great concern about falling compared to those who considered their health as excellent, good or regular. The results of this study have important implications for making clinical decisions in prevention or rehabilitation of older people, and they justify recommendations to the public health system.

  9. Falls in the nursing home: are they preventable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Man Quang; Weintraub, Nancy; Rubenstein, Laurence Z

    2004-01-01

    Falls are prevalent in elderly patients residing in nursing homes, with approximately 1.5 falls occurring per nursing home bed-years. Although most are benign and injury-free, 10% to 25% result in hospital admission and/or fractures. Primary care providers for nursing home residents must therefore aim to reduce both the fall rate as well as the rate of fall-related morbidity in the long-term care setting. Interventions have been demonstrated to be successful in reducing falls in community-dwelling elderly patients. However, less evidence supports the efficacy of fall prevention in nursing home residents. The authors conducted a Medline search using the key words Falls and Nursing Homes. Several studies examined the efficacy of multifaceted intervention programs on reducing falls in nursing homes with varied results. Components of these intervention programs include: environmental assessment, assistive device evaluation and modification, medication changes, gait assessment and training, staff education, exercise programs, hip protector use, and blood pressure evaluation. Current literature supports the use of environmental assessment and intervention in reducing falls in nursing homes, and demonstrates an association between certain medications and falls. However, there are no studies that examine the effect of medication adjustments on fall rates. Also, the literature does not strongly suggest that exercise programs are effective in fall reduction. Although not effective in reducing fall rates, the use of hip protectors appears to result in less fall-related morbidity. More studies must be done to clarify the effects of high-risk medication reduction, the optimal nature and intensity of exercise programs, and patient targeting criteria to maximize the effectiveness of nursing home fall prevention programs. Based on the current literature, an effective multifaceted fall prevention program for nursing home residents should include risk factor assessment and

  10. Evaluation of Efficacy and Sedative Profiles of H1 Antihistamines by Large-Scale Surveillance Using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Izumi

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions: The sedative properties of the H1 antihistamines obtained from VAS analysis were very similar to those of H1R occupancy from positron emission tomography (PET studies and PIR from meta-analysis. Our results indicate that large-scale surveillance using VAS might be useful to evaluate the profiles of H1 antihistamines.

  11. Catapults fall short

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marcus

    2018-01-01

    In reply to the news story "UK Catapults fall short, claims review of technology centres", which describes an independent review that criticized the management of the UK's network of technology innovation centres.

  12. Fall Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Fall Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1963 and covered an area from Hudson Canyon, NY to Nova Scotia, Canada. Throughout the years,...

  13. The efficacy of scale sampling for monitoring trace element concentrations and stable isotopes in commercially harvested walleye (Sander vitreus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofukany, Amy F A; Hobson, Keith A; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Bond, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    Commercial and sport fishes are subject to rigorous monitoring for concentrations of elements that could pose threats to human health, with numerous advisories issued by authorities annually for those fisheries with high mercury (Hg) concentrations. In Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, the commercial walleye fishery is valued at more than $20 million/year, but has historically been subject to Hg advisories. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the utility of non-destructive fish-scale sampling to predict As, Mn and Hg concentrations, as well as stable isotope values in walleye muscle by analysing paired samples. Hg concentrations in scales were significantly related to those in muscle (r(2) = 0.75), but the relationships were weaker for As and Mn. The δ(15)N values in scales predicted δ(15)N in muscle reasonably well (r(2) = 0.72), whereas scale δ(13)C and δ(34)S had less predictive power for estimating their respective muscle stable isotope values. For all three isotope values, sex was a marginal predictor, with parameter confidence intervals bounding zero. Analytical constraints currently limit the utility of non-destructively analysing scales for Hg, but hindcasting trophic changes using archived walleye scales may be useful in understanding shifts in nutrients and production, particularly in impacted lake systems.

  14. Falls and depression in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, Alin; Toubin, Sandrine; Mourey, France; D'Athis, Philippe; Manckoundia, Patrick; Pfitzenmeyer, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common risk factors for falls, but links between falls and depression are still unclear. Few studies have examined the relationship between depression and gait alteration, which may increase the risk of fall. This study aims to assess a possible relationship between depression, postural and gait abnormalities, and falls. We conducted a 1-year prospective study on patients >/=70 years who were admitted to a geriatric unit for 'spontaneous' unexplained falls. Patients were tested for depression using the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Their motor performances were assessed using the Mini Motor Test (MMT), which is an easy direct-observation test, validated in France, for assessment of frail old people who present with severe postural and gait impairment. This scale is composed of 4 categories of items: (1) abilities in bed; (2) quality of the sitting position; (3) abilities in the standing position, and (4) quality of gait. Sixty-nine patients were included. Depression was found in 46 patients (66.7%). The MMT score was higher in the non-depressed fallers (NDF) group (GDS 10; p predispose to falls. In clinical practice, more attention should be given to old fallers concerning diagnosis and treatment of associated depression. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Relationship between self-efficacy and patient knowledge on adherence to oral contraceptives using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Daniel; Aronson, Benjamin D; Kading, Margarette; Morisky, Donald

    2017-09-06

    Preconception care, including family planning, is a vital component of healthcare for women of reproductive age. An average female spends the majority of her reproductive life trying to prevent a pregnancy. In order to prevent unintended pregnancy, women often rely on the use of hormonal contraceptives. In the United States, the majority of hormonal contraceptive users are prescribed oral contraceptive pills (OCPs). Reduced adherence to OCPs decreases their ability to prevent pregnancy. The study aimed to measure OCP adherence among female college students, and explore the relationship between OCP adherence, knowledge, and self-efficacy. This cross-sectional study recruited a random sample of female college students to participate in an online survey. OCP adherence was based on the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Secondary reporting of medication adherence included participant reports of the number of missed OCP doses in the previous month and typical month of use. Of the 5000 invited, 1559 (31.3%) completed the survey. Of those responding, 670 (41.3%) reported use of OCPs. A total of 293 (44.3%) OCP users met criteria for low adherence, 241 (36.4%) met criteria for medium adherence, and 128 (19.3%) met criteria for high adherence. Those with high adherence had higher self-efficacy (P media to increase the knowledge and self-efficacy of patients using OCPs may improve adherence rates. Additional research is needed to evaluate the impact of innovative interventions focused on social and behavioral patient factors, like knowledge and self-efficacy, on adherence to OCPs.

  16. A multi-perspective focus-group approach to revise items in a dietary self-efficacy scale for older Taiwanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jung-Hua; Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Chen, Su-Hui

    2015-01-01

    To revise items in the Cardiac Diet Self-Efficacy Scale, Chinese version (CDSE-C) using focus groups. There is limited literature on using focus groups with older adults as well as nursing and nutrition professionals to revise a questionnaire. A qualitative research with multi-perspective focus-group approach was used from February through June 2009. Four serial focus groups were conducted including two focus groups of older adults from Taipei County (n = 6) and Yilan County (n = 6), one group of 5 nursing professionals, and one group of 4 nutritionists. Serial focus group discussions added one category to the CDSE-C (reducing salt) and 3 items, resulting in an 18-item scale with six categories: healthy eating behaviors, reducing fat and cholesterol, resisting relapse, increasing fiber and vegetable, reducing sugar, and reducing salt. This revised measure can serve as a reliable tool for assessing older Chinese adults' healthy eating self-efficacy to evaluate and improve nutritional status in this population.

  17. Fall prevention by nursing assistants among community-living elderly people. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlström, Gunilla; Kamwendo, Kitty; Forsberg, Jenny; Bodin, Lennart

    2017-08-29

    Falls among elderly are a major public health issue in Sweden. The aim was to determine whether nursing assistants can prevent falls by supervising community-living elderly individuals with a history of falling in performing individually designed home exercise programmes. A randomised controlled trial was performed in Sweden, in eight municipalities in the county of Örebro, during 2007-2009. Community-living persons 65 years or older having experienced at least one fall during the last 12 months were included. The intervention group consisted of 76 participants, and there were 72 in the control group. The interventions were free of charge and were shared between a physiotherapist and a nursing assistant. The former designed a programme aiming to improve balance, leg strength and walking ability. The nursing assistant supervised the performance of activities during eight home visits during a 5-month intervention period. The measures and instruments used were health-related quality of life (SF-36), activity of daily living (ADL-staircase), balance, (Falls Efficacy Scale, and Berg Balance Scale), walking ability (Timed Up and Go and the 3-metre walking test), leg strength, (chair stand test). All participants were asked to keep a structured calendar of their physical exercise, walks and occurrence of falls during their 12-month study period. Hospital healthcare consumption data were collected. Although the 5-month intervention did not significantly decrease the risk for days with falls, RR 1.10 (95% CI 0.58, 2.07), p = 0.77, significant changes in favour of the intervention group were noted for balance (p = 0.03), ADL (p = 0.035), bodily pain (p = 0.003) and reported health transition over time (p = 0.008) as well as less hospital care due to fractures (p = 0.025). Additional studies with more participants are needed to establish whether or not falls can be significantly prevented with this model which is workable in home-based fall prevention. © 2017

  18. The relationship between objective balance, perceived sense of balance, and fear of falling in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Semra; Demirbuken, Ilksan; Kavlak, Bahar; Acar, Gonul; Yurdalan, Saadet Ufuk; Polat, Mine Gulden

    2017-10-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the relationship between objective balance, fear of falling, and perceived sense of balance (PSB) in stroke patients. Seventy patients aged 18-65 years with chronically developed hemiplegia or hemiparesis were enrolled in the study. Patients' objective balance scores, fear of falling, and PSB were obtained using the berg balance scale (BBS), the falls efficacy scale (FES), and a visual analog scale, respectively. The Standard Mini-Mental Examination was performed to exclude patients with mental disorders from the study. There was a moderate negative correlation between PSB and BBS scores (p = 0.001, ρ = -0.588); a strong negative correlation between BBS and FES scores (p = 0.001, ρ = -0.808); and a strong positive correlation between PSB and FES scores (p = 0.001, ρ = 0.714). We found that BBS scores had negative correlation with PBS scores in left hemiplegic patients while there was no any relationship between BBS and PBS scores in right hemiplegic patients. PSB assessment, besides the BBS, should be considered among the routine assessment methods that enable the rehabilitation team to be aware of patients' balance capacities.

  19. Falls prevention in hospitals and mental health units: an extended evaluation of the FallSafe quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Frances; Lowe, Derek; Darowski, Adam; Windsor, Julie; Treml, Jonathan; Byrne, Lisa; Husk, Janet; Phipps, Jill

    2014-07-01

    inpatient falls are a major patient safety issue causing distress, injury and death. Systematic review suggests multifactorial assessment and intervention can reduce falls by 20-30%, but large-scale studies of implementation are few. This paper describes an extended evaluation of the FallSafe quality improvement project, which presented key components of multifactorial assessment and intervention as a care bundle. : data on delivery of falls prevention processes were collected at baseline and for 18 months from nine FallSafe units and nine control units. Data on falls were collected from local risk management systems for 24 months, and data on under-reporting through staff surveys. : in FallSafe units, delivery of seven care bundle components significantly improved; most improvements were sustained after active project support was withdrawn. Twelve-month moving average of reported fall rates showed a consistent downward trend in FallSafe units but not controls. Significant reductions in reported fall rate were found in FallSafe units (adjusted rate ratio (ARR) 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68-0.84 P control units (ARR 0.91, 95% CI 0.81-1.03 P = 0.13). No significant changes in injurious fall rate were found in FallSafe units (ARR 0.86, 95% CI 0.71-1.03 P = 0.11), or controls (ARR 0.88, 95% CI 0.72-1.08 P = 0.13). In FallSafe units, staff certain falls had been reported increased from 60 to 77%. : introducing evidence-based care bundles of multifactorial assessment and intervention using a quality improvement approach resulted in improved delivery of multifactorial assessment and intervention and significant reductions in fall rates, but not in injurious fall rates. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The neurobiology of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alfonso; Plotnik, Meir; Bove, Francesco; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    Falling is a major clinical problem; especially, in elderly population as it often leads to fractures, immobilization, poor quality of life and life-span reduction. Given the growing body of evidences on the physiopathology of balance disorders in humans, in recent years the approach of research on falls has completely changed and new instruments and new definitions have been formulated. Among them, the definition of "idiopathic faller" (i.e. no overt cause for falling in a given subject) represented a milestone in building the "science of falling". This review deals with the new determinants of the neurobiology of falling: (1) the role of motor impairment and particularly of those "mild parkinsonian signs" frequently detectable in elderly subjects, (2) the role of executive and attentive resources when coping with obstacles, (3) the role of vascular lesions in "highest level gait disorder" (a condition tightly connected with senile gait, cautious gait and frailty), (4) the role of the failure of automaticity or inter-limbs coordination/symmetry during walking and such approach would definitely help the development of screening instrument for subjects at risk (still lacking in present days). This translational approach will lead to the development of specific therapeutic interventions.

  1. Problems and fall risk determinants of quality of life in older adults with increased risk of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sang-I; Chang, Ku-Chou; Lee, Hsuei-Chen; Yang, Yi-Ching; Tsauo, Jau-Yih

    2015-05-01

    Determine quality of life and its association with fall risk factors in older adults with increased risk of falling. A total of 597 community-dwelling Taiwanese older adults who were screened to have increased risk of falling participated in the present study. The fall risk factors included sociodemographics, physical and psychological function, Timed Up and Go, past fall/medical histories, fear of falling and medications. The Euro QOL EQ-5D was used to measure health-related quality of life. Pain/discomfort was the EQ-5D dimension most frequently reported to be impaired (35%), regardless of the level of fall risk or age groups, followed by mobility (25%). Hierarchical regression analysis showed that Geriatric Depression Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, physiological function, up-and-go, fear of falling and psychotropic medication were independent predictors for total EQ-5D, explaining 68.37% of the variance. Logistic regression analysis showed that for the five EQ-5D dimensions, Geriatric Depression Scale and Up and Go time were the most common determinants. Pain/discomfort was the leading impairment, and greater Geriatric Depression Scale and longer up-and-go time were the main contributing factors in declines in quality of life in older adults with increased risk of falling. These factors are often modifiable, and their management might be considered a priority in falls prevention. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Step length appears to be a strong discriminant gait parameter for elderly females highly concerned about falls: a cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Renata Noce; de Souza Moreira, Bruno; Vallone, Márcia L D C; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa; Sampaio, Rosana Ferreira

    2011-06-01

    To determine if gait parameters and the Timed Up and Go test can discriminate between elderly females with high and low concern about falls. Knowledge of these parameters could help in the development of rehabilitation programmes focused on the prevention of falls, fear of falling and functional decline. Cross-sectional, observational study. Human motion laboratory. One hundred and fifty-four elderly females (aged 64 to 83 years), divided into two groups based on their Falls Efficacy Scale International score: high concern (n=81) and low concern (n=73) about falls. Eight gait parameters recorded with the GAITRite system and the Timed Up and Go test score. Factor 2 (composed of step length, gait velocity and Timed Up and Go mobility test) explained 20% of the variability of the data and was the only factor to discriminate between the groups, with 63% correct classifications. Step length proved to be the variable with the greatest discriminant ability, with a much higher discriminant coefficient (0.889) than the Timed Up and Go test (-0.369) and gait velocity (-0.268). High concern about falls is primarily associated with decreased step length. Step length could be used as a screening tool to identify elderly women with low and high concern about falls in order to target these groups in a rehabilitation programme aimed to slow reduction in gait velocity and mobility. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of a complex intervention on fall risk in the general practitioner setting: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberger, Ellen; Blank, Wolfgang A; Salb, Johannes; Geilhof, Barbara; Hentschke, Christian; Landendoerfer, Peter; Halle, Martin; Siegrist, Monika

    2013-01-01

    To study the feasibility of first, reaching functionally declined, but still independent older persons at risk of falls through their general practitioner (GP) and second, to reduce their physiological and psychological fall risk factors with a complex exercise intervention. We investigated the effects of a 16-week exercise intervention on physiological (function, strength, and balance) and psychological (fear of falling) outcomes in community-dwelling older persons in comparison with usual care. In addition, we obtained data on adherence of the participants to the exercise program. Tests on physical and psychological fall risk were conducted at study inclusion, and after the 16-week intervention period in the GP office setting. The 16-week intervention included progressive and challenging balance, gait, and strength exercise as well as changes to behavioral aspects. To account for the hierarchical structure in the chosen study design, with patients nested in GPs and measurements nested in patients, a three-level linear mixed effects model was determined for analysis. In total, 33 GPs recruited 378 participants (75.4% females). The mean age of the participants was 78.1 years (standard deviation 5.9 years). Patients in the intervention group showed an improvement in the Timed-Up-and-Go-test (TUG) that was 1.5 seconds greater than that showed by the control group, equivalent to a small to moderate effect. For balance, a relative improvement of 0.8 seconds was accomplished, and anxiety about falls was reduced by 3.7 points in the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), in the intervention group relative to control group. In total, 76.6% (N = 170) of the intervention group participated in more than 75% the supervised group sessions. The strategy to address older persons at high risk of falling in the GP setting with a complex exercise intervention was successful. In functionally declined, community-dwelling, older persons a complex intervention for reducing fall

  4. A multifactorial falls risk prediction model for hospitalized older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GholamHosseini, Hamid; Baig, Mirza Mansoor; Connolly, Martin J; Lindén, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ageing population worldwide has grown fast with more cases of chronic illnesses and co-morbidity, involving higher healthcare costs. Falls are one of the leading causes of unintentional injury-related deaths in older adults. The aim of this study was to develop a robust multifactorial model toward the falls risk prediction. The proposed model employs real-time vital signs, motion data, falls history and muscle strength. Moreover, it identifies high-risk individuals for the development falls in their activity of daily living (ADL). The falls risk prediction model has been tested at a controlled-environment in hospital with 30 patients and compared with the results from the Morse fall scale. The simulated results show the proposed algorithm achieved an accuracy of 98%, sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 100% among a total of 80 intentional falls and 40 ADLs. The ultimate aim of this study is to extend the application to elderly home care and monitoring.

  5. Fear of Falling and Cognitive Impairments in Elderly People with Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kasai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the estimated prevalence of dementia and the relationship between cognitive impairment and fear of falling in patients with hip fractures. Methods: Analysis 1 included 100 patients with hip fractures. Analysis 2 included a subgroup of subjects with ≥75 years of functional independence: 46 patients with hip fractures and 46 control subjects without hip fractures, and presence or absence of dementia. We used an informant-rated questionnaire including the AD8 for screening for dementia, the Barthel Index for assessing activities of daily living, and the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I for assessing fear of falling. Results: The estimated prevalence of dementia was 66% in patients with hip fractures. There were significant fracture and dementia effects, with significant covariate effects of age and gender on the Short FES-I scores. Conclusion: Our results suggested that more than two-thirds of patients with hip fractures had dementia. Fear of falling may reflect not only physical functions but also cognitive impairments.

  6. Efficacy of solar power units for small-scale businesses in a remote rural area, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajat, A.; Shackleton, C.M. [Dept of Environmental Science, Rhodes University, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Banks, D.; Aiken, R. [Restio Energy, 14 Clifton Road, Mowbray, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2009-12-15

    Much work has considered the practicalities and affordability of solar systems for domestic energy supplies in remote rural areas. There is less understanding of its utility for small-scale business enterprises in such areas. We examined the patterns of use of two 12 V and one 24 V systems for small-scale enterprises housed in transportable containers. Monitoring of load shed and top of charge indicated that the 12 V systems were inadequate to meet the requirements of the enterprises. The 24 V operation performed a lot better. Despite some technical limitations the system offered a number of social, economic and environmental positives; primarily the offering of business products not otherwise available in the area, incomes to the entrepreneurs and greater connectivity with regional centres through office services such as cell-phone charging and faxing. Customers of the small-scale enterprises felt that their presence in the area saved them some money because they no longer had to travel as frequently to regional urban centres. (author)

  7. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, Building Dept has required elevation certs when house falls inside flood zone - paper copies only, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset current as of 2010. Building Dept has required elevation certs when house falls inside flood zone - paper...

  8. Adaptation and validation of scales to measure self-efficacy and empowerment for self-care in Mexican climacteric stage women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V Doubova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To adapt and validate in Spanish of Mexico scales to measure self-efficacy (SES and empowerment for self-care (ES among climacteric women. Materials and methods. The study was conducted from February to July 2011 in two family medicine clinics in Mexico City. The adaptation phase was done through testing for language comprehension. To validate the scales we used the principal Axis factoring analysis with oblique rotation technique and estimation of Cronbach’s alpha (CA. Results. Three hundred eighty women aged 45-59 years participated in the study. SES had 16 items with four factors: participation in the doctor-patient relationship; in the study control of mental health and sexual changes; risk of dying from cancer, and other health risks that explained 39.8% of the variability, CA= 0.84. ES had eight items with one factor explaining 47.1% variability; CA= 0.83. Conclusion. Both scales had acceptable psychometric properties and are suitable for interventions aimed at improving self-care of climacteric women.

  9. [Adaptation and validation of scales to measure self-efficacy and empowerment for self-care in Mexican climacteric stage women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Espinosa-Alarcón, Patricia; Infante, Claudia; Aguirre-Hernández, Rebeca; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Leticia; Olivares-Santos, Roberto; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    To adapt and validate in Spanish of Mexico scales to measure self-efficacy (SES) and empowerment for self-care (ES) among climacteric women. The study was conducted from February to July 2011 in two family medicine clinics in Mexico City. The adaptation phase was done through testing for language comprehension. To validate the scales we used the principal Axis factoring analysis with oblique rotation technique and estimation of Cronbach's alpha (CA). Three hundred eighty women aged 45-59 years participated in the study. SES had 16 items with four factors: participation in the doctor-patient relationship; in the study control of mental health and sexual changes; risk of dying from cancer, and other health risks that explained 39.8% of the variability, CA = 0.84. ES had eight items with one factor explaining 47.1% variability; CA = 0.83. Both scales had acceptable psychometric properties and are suitable for interventions aimed at improving self-care of climacteric women.

  10. The Short Form of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale as a Prognostic Factor of Exclusive Breastfeeding among Mandarin-Speaking Chinese Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Wan-Yim; Gao, Ling-Ling; Choi, Kai-Chow; Chau, Janita Pak-Chun; Xiao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about the effect of maternal perceived breastfeeding self-efficacy on the exclusive breastfeeding rate at 6 months postpartum in mainland China. The aim of this study was to examine the relative effect of maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy and selected relevant factors on the exclusive breastfeeding rate at 6 months postpartum. The internal consistency and construct validity of the Chinese (Mandarin) version of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF) were also examined. This was a prospective cohort study conducted at a regional teaching hospital in Guangzhou, China. A total of 562 in-hospital mothers who were within 72 hours postpartum were recruited to the study and followed up by telephone for 6 months. Although all of the mothers breastfed their babies within 72 hours postpartum, only 25% of the mothers breastfed exclusively. The mean survival time of continuation of exclusive breastfeeding was 16.7 days. The proportion of mothers who breastfed exclusively after discharge was 14.8%, 2.0%, and 0.2% at 1, 4, and 6 months, respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed that the mothers who had a higher BSES-SF score at baseline, underwent cesarean section, and practiced exclusive breastfeeding within 72 hours after delivery were significantly associated with a lower hazard of discontinuation of exclusive breastfeeding before 6 months postpartum. The exclusive breastfeeding rate among Chinese women is far from satisfactory. The Chinese (Mandarin) version of the BSES-SF can help in identifying mothers who need more support for exclusive breastfeeding before 6 months postpartum.

  11. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP by using Magnifying Loupes (ML and dental operating microscope (DOM. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided, Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001 difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ≅ Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05, also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  12. Women's perspectives on falls and fall prevention during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Dorothy; Naninni, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Falls are the leading cause of unintentional injury in women. During pregnancy, even a minor fall can result in adverse consequences. Evidence to inform effective and developmentally appropriate pregnancy fall prevention programs is lacking. Early research on pregnancy fall prevention suggests that exercise may reduce falls. However, acceptability and effectiveness of pregnancy fall prevention programs are untested. To better understand postpartum women's perspective and preferences on fall prevention strategies during pregnancy to formulate an intervention. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 31 postpartum women using descriptive qualitative methodology. Discussion of falls during pregnancy and fall prevention strategies was guided by a focus group protocol and enhanced by 1- to 3-minute videos on proposed interventions. Focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo 10 software. Emerging themes were environmental circumstances and physical changes of pregnancy leading to a fall, prevention strategies, barriers, safety concerns, and marketing a fall prevention program. Wet surfaces and inappropriate footwear commonly contributed to falls. Women preferred direct provider counseling and programs including yoga and Pilates. Fall prevention strategies tailored to pregnant women are needed. Perspectives of postpartum women support fall prevention through provider counseling and individual or supervised exercise programs.

  13. I see falling stars

    CERN Document Server

    Orr, Tamra B

    2015-01-01

    "Young children are naturally curious about the world around them. I See Falling Stars offers answers to their most compelling questions about meteors. Age-appropriate explanations and appealing photos encourage readers to continue their quest for knowledge. Additional text features and search tools, including a glossary and an index, help students locate information and learn new words."-- Provided by publisher.

  14. Fall Back Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppe, J.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hendrickx, R.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Fall back equilibrium is a refinement of the Nash equilibrium concept. In the underly- ing thought experiment each player faces the possibility that, after all players decided on their action, his chosen action turns out to be blocked. Therefore, each player has to decide beforehand on a back-up

  15. Fall 1982 Retention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    In fall 1982, a study was conducted in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) using withdrawal and grade distribution data to analyze student retention patterns. Successful retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received a passing grade, while total retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received…

  16. Fall 1984 Retention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    A study was conducted of the retention patterns of students enrolled in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) in fall 1984 using college reports on withdrawals and grade distributions. The study focused on successful retention (i.e., all students who received a passing grade) and on total retention (i.e., all students who received any…

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale in Korean Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hyun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aims of this study were to perform a cultural translation of the DMSES and evaluate the psychometric properties of the translated scale in a Korean population with type 2 diabetics. Methods. This study was conducted in patients with diabetes recruited from university hospitals. The first stage of this study involved translating the DMSES into Korean using a forward- and backward-translation technique. The content validity was assessed by an expert group. In the second stage, the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the DMSES (K-DMSES were evaluated. Results. The content validity of the K-DMSES was satisfactory. Sixteen-items clustered into four-subscales were extracted by exploratory factor analysis, and supported by confirmatory factor analysis. The construct validity of the K-DMSES with the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities scale was satisfactory (r=0.50, P<0.001. The Cronbach’s alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient were 0.92 and 0.85 (P<0.001; 95% CI=0.75–0.91, respectively, which indicate excellent internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability. Conclusions. The K-DMSES is a brief instrument that has demonstrated good psychometric properties. It is therefore feasible to use in practice, and is ready for use in clinical research involving Korean patients with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Analysis of falls that caused serious events in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Inagaki, Yuko; Suzuki, Yusuke; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-12-01

    Falls are common adverse events for hospitalized elderly patients that can cause fracture, which decreases activities of daily living, and other injuries that can be fatal. The purpose of the present study was to investigate serious events due to fall, and to consider measures for fall prevention. Incidents of fall were obtained from a database of 163 558 inpatients at Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan, from April 2012 to March 2016. The risk of fall was evaluated using a fall assessment score sheet at admission and during hospitalization, based on which patients were divided into risk grades 1, 2 and 3. A fall that led to fracture or a life-threatening injury was defined as a serious event. Fall occurred in 3099 patients for 4 years (1.89%). Most patients that fell (45%) were in the highest (grade 3) risk category. Serious events associated with fall occurred in 36 of the 3099 patients (1.2%), and the overall incidence of serious events was 0.22%. These events included fracture in 24 patients, intracranial injury in 10 patients and others in two patients. Finally, one patient died. Serious events occurred significantly more frequently after falls in patients wearing slippers compared with other footwear (P < 0.01). The incidences of serious events and fall were significantly higher in patients with a higher risk of fall (P < 0.05). The present results support the validity of our risk assessment scale for fall, but it should be recognized that fall can also occur in a patient with a low predicted risk of fall. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2403-2406. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Gender Differences in Risk Factors for Single and Recurrent Falls Among the Community-Dwelling Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mei O

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify gender differences in risk factors of fall accidents among older people, and whether these factors differ between single and recurrent fallers. A total of 4,426 individuals aged ≥65 years from two large-scale health surveys provided data. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify risk factors and to determine the risk model for falling and recurrent falling in men and women separately. Three major risk factors for falling regardless of gender or fall history are fear of falling, limitations in activities of daily living (ADL, and age ≥75 years. Fear of falling remains one of the common modifiable risk factors. Among those without a fall history, the use of sedatives or tranquilizers increases the risk of falling. Regarding gender differences, ADL limitations and fear of falling appear to be stronger fall risk factors for men than for women. Among women, alcohol use and educational level are significant risk factors for falling, while loneliness is associated with recurrent falling. Men with fear of falling or ADL limitations are at higher risk to have a recurrent fall accident than women with these conditions. Having a visual impairment or living with someone is associated with recurrent falling among men. Our findings emphasize the importance of multifactorial fall interventions, taking into account a variety of subgroup characteristics such as gender and fall history.

  20. Efficacy of the SU(3) scheme for ab initio large-scale calculations beyond the lightest nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytrych, T. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (ASCR), Prague (Czech Republic); Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Maris, Pieter [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Launey, K. D. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Draayer, J. P. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Vary, James [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Langr, D. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Aerospace Research and Test Establishment, Prague (Czech Republic); Saule, E. [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States); Caprio, M. A. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Catalyurek, U. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Sosonkina, M. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-06-09

    We report on the computational characteristics of ab initio nuclear structure calculations in a symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM) framework. We examine the computational complexity of the current implementation of the SA-NCSM approach, dubbed LSU3shell, by analyzing ab initio results for 6Li and 12C in large harmonic oscillator model spaces and SU(3)-selected subspaces. We demonstrate LSU3shell's strong-scaling properties achieved with highly-parallel methods for computing the many-body matrix elements. Results compare favorably with complete model space calculations and signi cant memory savings are achieved in physically important applications. In particular, a well-chosen symmetry-adapted basis a ords memory savings in calculations of states with a fixed total angular momentum in large model spaces while exactly preserving translational invariance.

  1. Falls Reduction and Exercise Training in an Assisted Living Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Kimberly J.; Kirchner, Shannen; Chu, Serena; Smith, Sarah; Winnick-Baskin, Wendy; Mielenz, Thelma J.

    2015-01-01

    Multicomponent exercise programs are currently an efficacious fall prevention strategy among community dwelling older adults although research documents differential falls susceptibility among frail older adults. This study aimed to examine the association between the Boston FICSIT (Frailty and Injuries: Cooperative Studies of Intervention Techniques) exercise program (the original exercise program to demonstrate that nursing home residents can increase strength) and falls incidents in an assisted living community. A descriptive cross-sectional study matched exercise charts for frequency and duration of training with number of reported fall incidents. Among 39 participants, 33% (n = 13) reported a fall incident. Adults without a fall history reported more time in aerobic (26.30 versus 20.00, P value = 0.71) and strength (1.50 versus 0.50, P value = 0.01) training sessions compared to those with a fall history. Multivariate models adjusting for covariates illustrated a significant protective association between strength training and fall incidents (OR = 0.25; 95% CI = 0.07, 0.85). In this cross-sectional study, this progressive resistance exercise training program into an assisted living population was associated with a decrease in the number of fall incidents. PMID:26345431

  2. Maple sugaring with vacuum pumping during the fall season

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith; Alan G., Jr. Snow

    1971-01-01

    Vacuum pumping of sugar maple trees during the late fall and early winter months is not advisable in northern Vermont. However, fall pumping may be profitable in other areas of the sugar maple range. It is recommended that the weather pattern in a given locale be observed; and if conditions are favorable, vacuum pumping should be tried on a small scale before...

  3. Maxillofacial Fractures due to Falls: does Fall Modality Determine the Pattern of Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Roccia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In several epidemiological studies of maxillofacial trauma, falls were one of the most frequent causes of facial injury. The aim of this study is to analyse the patterns of fall-related maxillofacial injuries based on the height of the fall. Material and Methods: Using a systematic computer-assisted database of patients hospitalised with maxillofacial fractures, only those with fall-related injuries were considered. The falls were divided into four groups: falls from slipping, tripping or stumbling (STSF, loss of consciousness (LOCF, stairs (SAF, and height (HF. Data on the age, gender, fracture site, Facial Injury Severity Scale (FISS, facial lacerations, associated lesions, type of treatment, and length of hospital stay were also analysed. Results: This study included 557 patients (338 males, 219 females; average age 51.5 years [range 4 - 99 years]. In the over 60 age group, females were more prevalent in STSF than males. According to aetiology, STSF was the most frequent cause of maxillofacial fractures (315 patients; 56.5% followed by LOCF (157; 28.2%, HF (55; 9.9%, and SAF (30; 5.4%. The middle third of the face was affected most frequently. After LOCF, however, the inferior third was prevalently involved. The majority of associated fractures, as well as the most severe injuries and greatest rate of facial lacerations, occurred secondary to HF. Conclusions: This study showed that fracture severity and site are influenced not only by patient age, but also by the nature of the fall.

  4. Diagnosis and Tests: Evaluating a Fall or Risk of Falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a physical therapist, who can evaluate your fall risk. If your healthcare provider concludes that you are ... to check for things that can impact your fall risk, such as electrolyte balance and the possibility of ...

  5. Falling and fall risk in adult patients with severe haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Hanna; Schmolders, Jan; Koob, Sebastian; Bornemann, Rahel; Goldmann, Georg; Oldenburg, Johannes; Pennekamp, Peter; Strauss, Andreas C

    2017-05-10

    The objective of this study was to define fall rates and to identify possible fall risk factors in adult patients with severe haemophilia. 147 patients with severe haemophilia A and B were evaluated using a standardized test battery consisting of demographic, medical and clinical variables and fall evaluation. 41 (27.9 %) patients reported a fall in the past 12 months, 22 (53.7 %) of them more than once. Young age, subjective gait insecurity and a higher number of artificial joints seem to be risk factors for falling. Falls seem to be a common phenomenon in patients with severe haemophilia. Fall risk screening and fall prevention should be implemented into daily practice.

  6. Relationships Among the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument, Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale, Deamonte Driver Survey, and Defining Issues Test 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cynthia W

    2016-03-01

    Concordance studies indicate the degree to which instruments measure the same or similar constructs or something different. The aims of this study were to identify the factor structure of the Deamonte Driver Survey and determine the relationship between the Deamonte Driver (a measure of social class stereotyping), the Defining Issues Test 2 (DIT2; a measure of ethical sensitivity), the Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale (CoBRAS; a measure of racial stereotyping), and the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument (KEPI; a measure of cultural competence). The results showed a three-factor solution for the Deamonte Driver Survey and significant relationships between CoBRAS and DIT2 subscales and between CoBRAS and Deamonte Driver subscales. Significant relationships between the measures and exploratory variables, underrepresented minority status, age, citizenship, marital status, political stance, English as a first language, and gender were found. The lack of a significant relationship between the KEPI and Deamonte Driver, DIT2, or CoBRAS subscales suggests that the KEPI is measuring a unique construct. These findings showed how these scales contributed to the assessment of cultural competence among dental students and faculty.

  7. The clinical practice guideline for falls and fall risk

    OpenAIRE

    Vance, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Falling is a significant cause of injury and death in frail older adults. Residents in long-term care (LTC) facilities fall for a variety of reasons and are more likely to endure injuries after a fall than those in the community The American Medical Directors Association (AMDA) Clinical Practice Guideline is written to give LTC staff an understanding of risk factors for falls and provide guidance for a systematic approach to patient assessment and selection of appropriate interventions. It is...

  8. Urban fall traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia de Almeida Valsecchi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the repercussion of falls in the elderly peoplewho live in the city of São Paulo and address - though synthetically- some questions regarding the city and its relation to aging and thequality of life of the elderly. Methods: This is a qualitative study. As fordata collection, “in-depth individual interviews” were applied. Selectionof subjects was guided by a procedure named as “network”. Results:Ten interviews were performed, nine with elderly individuals who werevictims of falls and one with a public authority representative. Dataresulting from interviews confirmed that significant changes occurin live of the elderly, who are victims of what has been called “urbantraps”, and that, by extrapolating mobility and dependence contexts,invade feelings, emotions and desires. The inappropriate environmentprovided by the city of São Paulo is confirmed by absence of adequateurban planning and lack of commitment of public authorities. It alsorevealed that the particular way of being old and living an elderlylife, in addition to right to citizenship, is reflected by major or lesserdifficulties imposed to the elderly to fight for their rights and have theirpublic space respected. Conclusion: The city of São Paulo is not anideal locus for an older person to live in. To the traps that are found inpublic places one can add those that are found in private places andthat contribute to the hard experience of falls among the elderly, anexperience that is sometimes fatal. In Brazil, the attention is basicallyfocused on the consequences of falls and not on prevention, by meansof urban planning that should meet the needs of the most vulnerablegroups - the physically disabled and the elderly.

  9. The falling slinky

    OpenAIRE

    Unruh, W. G.

    2011-01-01

    The slinky, released from rest hanging under its own weight, falls in a peculiar manner. The bottom stays at rest until a wave hits it from above. Two cases - one unphysical one where the slinky is able to pass through itself, and the other where the coils of the slinky collide creating a shock wave travelling down the slinky are analysed. In the former case, the bottom begins to move much later than in the latter.

  10. The Resource. Fall 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Adams, Director of Scientific Visualization, initiated a Bring Your Own Data ( BYOD ) workshop for MSRC users. The first workshop was held June 25-26 in...leverage these assets in their future work. The first BYOD workshop was definitely a benefit to the users. Chris Stone, in particular was able to...publications 28 ERDC MSRC The Resource, Fall 2001 ac ro ny m s AG Access Grid AMR Adaptive Mesh Refinement BYOD Bring Your Own Data CDC Control Data

  11. Improving nursing students' assessment of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Susan K

    2016-12-09

    Nationally, approximately one third of older adults fall each year. Falls and resulting injury result in decreased mobility, functional impairment, loss of independence, and increased mortality. Utilization of evidence-based protocols by health care providers to identify older adults at risk of falling is limited, and rates of participation by older adults in prevention activities is low. Because of nursing's increasing role in caring for older adults, development of fall prevention education for nursing students would result in increased awareness of the need for fall prevention in community-dwelling older adults and increased access of older adults to falls risk assessment. There is a need to extend research to inform teaching and learning strategies for fall prevention. After pretesting, a convenience sample of 52 undergraduate nursing students and 22 graduate nursing students completed an online education program and performed a falls risk assessment on an older adult. After completing the clinical assignment, students completed a posttest and self-efficacy survey. Data were analyzed using multivariate statistical tests. Results revealed an increase in knowledge and student self-reporting of efficacy of fall risk assessment skills for the older adult population. This study suggests that nursing students acquired the necessary knowledge and self-efficacy for assessing fall risk of older adults through the combination of an online learning module and participating in actual fall risk assessment of an older adult.

  12. Fall Prevention in Apprentice Carpenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskutas, Vicki; Dale, Ann Marie; Lipscomb, Hester; Gaal, John; Fuchs, Mark; Evanoff, Bradley; Faucette, Julia; Gillen, Marion; Deych, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Falls from heights are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the construction industry, especially among inexperienced workers. We surveyed apprentice carpenters to identify individual and organizational factors associated with falls from heights. Methods We developed a 72-item fall prevention survey with multiple domains including fall experience, fall prevention knowledge, risk perceptions, confidence in ability to prevent falls, training experience, and perceptions of the safety climate and crew safety behaviors. We administered the questionnaire to apprentice carpenters in this cross-sectional study. Results Of the 1,025 respondents, 51% knew someone who had fallen from height at work and 16% had personally fallen in the past year, with ladders accounting for most of the falls. Despite participation in school-based and on-the-job training, fall prevention knowledge was poor. Ladders were perceived as low risk and ladder training was rare. Apprentices reported high levels of unsafe fall-related behaviors on their work crews. Apprentices working residential construction were more likely to fall than those working commercial construction, as were apprentices working on crews with fewer senior carpenters to provide mentorship, and those reporting more unsafe behaviors among fellow workers. Conclusions Despite participation in a formal apprenticeship program, many apprentices work at heights without adequate preparation and subsequently experience falls. Apprenticeship programs can improve the timing and content of fall prevention training. This study suggests that organizational changes in building practices, mentorship, and safety culture must also occur in order to decrease worker falls from heights. PMID:19953214

  13. Modeling a falling slinky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, R. C.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    A slinky is an example of a tension spring: in an unstretched state a slinky is collapsed, with turns touching, and a finite tension is required to separate the turns from this state. If a slinky is suspended from its top and stretched under gravity and then released, the bottom of the slinky does not begin to fall until the top section of the slinky, which collapses turn by turn from the top, collides with the bottom. The total collapse time tc (typically ˜0.3 s for real slinkies) corresponds to the time required for a wave front to propagate down the slinky to communicate the release of the top end. We present a modification to an existing model for a falling tension spring [Calkin, Am. J. Phys. 61, 261-264 (1993)] and apply it to data from filmed drops of two real slinkies. The modification of the model is the inclusion of a finite time for collapse of the turns of the slinky behind the collapse front propagating down the slinky during the fall. The new finite-collapse time model achieves a good qualitative fit to the observed positions of the top of the real slinkies during the measured drops. The spring constant k for each slinky is taken to be a free parameter in the model. The best-fit model values for k for each slinky are approximately consistent with values obtained from measured periods of oscillation of the slinkies.

  14. Smallest detectable change and test-retest reliability of a self-reported outcome measure: Results of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, and 12-item General Health Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shotaro; Takahashi, Kana; Inoue, Aimi; Takada, Koki; Ishihara, Yoshiaki; Tanigawa, Masaru; Hirao, Kazuki

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to examine the smallest detectable change (SDC) and test-retest reliability of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), and 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). We tested 154 young adults at baseline and 2 weeks later. We calculated the intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) for test-retest reliability with a two-way random effects model for agreement. We then calculated the standard error of measurement (SEM) for agreement using the ICC formula. The SEM for agreement was used to calculate SDC values at the individual level (SDC ind ) and group level (SDC group ). The study participants included 137 young adults. The ICCs for all self-reported outcome measurement scales exceeded 0.70. The SEM of CES-D was 3.64, leading to an SDC ind of 10.10 points and SDC group of 0.86 points. The SEM of GSES was 1.56, leading to an SDC ind of 4.33 points and SDC group of 0.37 points. The SEM of GHQ-12 with bimodal scoring was 1.47, leading to an SDC ind of 4.06 points and SDC group of 0.35 points. The SEM of GHQ-12 with Likert scoring was 2.44, leading to an SDC ind of 6.76 points and SDC group of 0.58 points. To confirm that the change was not a result of measurement error, a score of self-reported outcome measurement scales would need to change by an amount greater than these SDC values. This has important implications for clinicians and epidemiologists when assessing outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Development and evaluation of an automated fall risk assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Jin, Yinji; Piao, Jinshi; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-04-01

    Fall risk assessment is the first step toward prevention, and a risk assessment tool with high validity should be used. This study aimed to develop and validate an automated fall risk assessment system (Auto-FallRAS) to assess fall risks based on electronic medical records (EMRs) without additional data collected or entered by nurses. This study was conducted in a 1335-bed university hospital in Seoul, South Korea. The Auto-FallRAS was developed using 4211 fall-related clinical data extracted from EMRs. Participants included fall patients and non-fall patients (868 and 3472 for the development study; 752 and 3008 for the validation study; and 58 and 232 for validation after clinical application, respectively). The system was evaluated for predictive validity and concurrent validity. The final 10 predictors were included in the logistic regression model for the risk-scoring algorithm. The results of the Auto-FallRAS were shown as high/moderate/low risk on the EMR screen. The predictive validity analyzed after clinical application of the Auto-FallRAS was as follows: sensitivity = 0.95, NPV = 0.97 and Youden index = 0.44. The validity of the Morse Fall Scale assessed by nurses was as follows: sensitivity = 0.68, NPV = 0.88 and Youden index = 0.28. This study found that the Auto-FallRAS results were better than were the nurses' predictions. The advantage of the Auto-FallRAS is that it automatically analyzes information and shows patients' fall risk assessment results without requiring additional time from nurses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  16. Disability is an Independent Predictor of Falls and Recurrent Falls in People with Parkinson's Disease Without a History of Falls: A One-Year Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Lorena R S; Sherrington, Catherine; Allen, Natalie E; Paul, Serene S; Valenca, Guilherme T; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Canning, Colleen G

    2015-01-01

    Predictors of falls in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) who have not previously fallen are yet to be identified. We aimed to identify predictors of all falls and recurrent falls in people with PD who had not fallen in the previous year and to explore the timing of falls in a 12-month follow-up period. Participants with PD (n = 130) were assessed by disease-specific, self-report and balance measures. Falls were recorded prospectively for 12 months. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to investigate time to falling. Forty participants (31%) had ≥1 fall during follow-up and 21 (16%) had ≥2 falls. Disability, reduced balance confidence and greater concern about falling were associated with ≥1 fall in univariate analyses. Additionally, PD duration and severity, freezing of gait and impaired balance were associated with ≥2 falls (p Disability (Schwab and England scale, Odds Ratio [OR] = 0.56 per 10 points increase; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39-0.80; p = 0.002) was associated with ≥1 fall in the final multivariate model (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.65; 95% CI 0.55-0.76; p = 0.005). Disability (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale activities of daily living, OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.07-1.34; p = 0.001) and levodopa equivalent dose (OR = 1.11 per 100 mg increase; 95% CI 0.95-1.30; p = 0.19) were associated with ≥2 falls in the final multivariate model (AUC = 0.72; 95% CI 0.60-0.84; p = 0.001). Recurrent fallers experienced their first fall earlier than single fallers (p disability was the strongest single predictor of all falls and recurrent falls.

  17. Regional Gray Matter Volumes Are Related to Concern About Falling in Older People: A Voxel-Based Morphometric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuerk, Carola; Zhang, Haobo; Sachdev, Perminder; Lord, Stephen R; Brodaty, Henry; Wen, Wei; Delbaere, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Concern about falling is common in older people. Various related psychological constructs as well as poor balance and slow gait have been associated with decreased gray matter (GM) volume in old age. The current study investigates the association between concern about falling and voxel-wise GM volumes. A total of 281 community-dwelling older people aged 70-90 years underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging. Concern about falling was assessed using Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I). For each participant, voxel-wise GM volumes were generated with voxel-based morphometry and regressed on raw FES-I scores (p brain volume (r = -.212; p ≤ .001), GM volume (r = -.210; p ≤ .001), and white matter volume (r = -.155; p ≤ .001). Voxel-based morphometry analysis revealed significant negative associations between FES-I and GM volumes of (i) left cerebellum and bilateral inferior occipital gyrus (voxels-in-cluster = 2,981; p fall risk did not alter these associations. After adjustment for anxiety, only left cerebellum and bilateral inferior occipital gyrus remained negatively associated with FES-I scores (voxels-in-cluster = 2,426; p falling is negatively associated with brain volumes in areas important for emotional control and for motor control, executive functions and visual processing in a large sample of older men and women. Regression analyses suggest that these relationships were primarily accounted for by psychological factors (generalized anxiety and neuroticism) and not by physical fall risk or vision. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Fall prevention walker during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Kian Sek; E, Chun Zhi; Saim, Hashim; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Khialdin, Safinaz Binti Mohd; Isa, Hazlita; Awad, M. I.; Soon, Chin Fhong

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes on the design of a walker for the prevention of falling among elderlies or patients during rehabilitation whenever they use a walker to assist them. Fall happens due to impaired balance or gait problem. The assistive device is designed by applying stability concept and an accelerometric fall detection system is included. The accelerometric fall detection system acts as an alerting device that acquires body accelerometric data and detect fall. Recorded accelerometric data could be useful for further assessment. Structural strength of the walker was verified via iterations of simulation using finite element analysis, before being fabricated. Experiments were conducted to identify the fall patterns using accelerometric data. The design process and detection of fall pattern demonstrates the design of a walker that could support the user without fail and alerts the helper, thus salvaging the users from injuries due to fall and unattended situation.

  19. Stick balancing, falls and Dragon-Kings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, J. L.; Milton, J. G.

    2012-05-01

    The extent to which the occurrence of falls, the dominant feature of human attempts to balance a stick at their fingertip, can be predicted is examined in the context of the "Dragon-King" hypothesis. For skilled stick balancers, fluctuations in the controlled variable, namely the vertical displacement angle θ, exhibit power law behaviors. When stick balancing is made less stable by either decreasing the length of the stick or by requiring the subject to balance the stick on the surface of a table tennis racket, systematic departures from the power law behaviors are observed in the range of large θ. This observation raises the possibility that the presence of departures from the power law in the large length scale region, possibly Dragon-Kings, may identify situations in which the occurrence of a fall is more imminent. However, whether or not Dragon-Kings are observed, there is a Weibull-type survival function for stick falling. The possibility that increased risk of falling can, at least to some extent, be predicted from fluctuations in the controlled variable before the event occurs has important implications for the development of preventative strategies for the management of phenomena ranging from earthquakes to epileptic seizures to falls in the elderly.

  20. Fear of falling in older adults living at home: associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorino, Luciano Magalhães; Teixeira, Carla Araujo Bastos; Boas, Eliandra Laís Vilas; Pereira, Rúbia Lopes; Santos, Naiana Oliveira Dos; Rozendo, Célia Alves

    2017-04-10

    To identify the factors associated with the fear of falling in the older adultliving at home. Cross-sectional study with probabilistic sampling of older adultenrolled in two Family Health Strategies (FHS). The fear of falling was measured by the Brazilian version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International and by a household questionnairethat contained the explanatory variables. Multiple Linear Regression using the stepwise selection technique and the Generalized Linear Models were used in the statistical analyses. A total of170 older adultsparticipated in the research, 85 from each FHS. The majority (57.1%) aged between 60 and 69; 67.6% were female; 46.1% fell once in the last year. The majority of the older adults(66.5%) had highfear of falling. In the final multiple linear regression model, it was identified that a higher number of previous falls, female gender, older age, and worse health self-assessment explained 37% of the fear of falling among the older adult. The findings reinforce the need to assess the fear of falling among the older adultliving at home, in conjunction with the development and use ofstrategies based on modifiable factors by professionalsto reduce falls and improve health status, which may contribute to the reduction of the fear of falling among the older adult. Identificar os fatores associados ao medo de cair em idosos residentes no domicílio. Estudo transversal com amostragem probabilística de idosos cadastrados em duas Estratégias Saúde da Família (ESF). O medo de cair foi avaliado pela versão brasileira da escala Falls Efficacy Scale International e por um inquérito domiciliar que continha as variáveis explicativas.A Regressão Linear Múltipla por meio da técnica stepwise selectione osModelos Lineares Generalizados foram utilizados nas análises estatísticas. Participaram da pesquisa170 idosos, 85 de cada ESF. A maioria (57,1%) tinha entre 60 e 69 anos de idade; 67,6% eram do sexo feminino; 46,1% tiveram queda no último ano

  1. Translation and validation of the Malay version of Shiffman-Jarvik withdrawal scale and cessation self-efficacy questionnaire: a review of psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Eng Wah; Lee, Yuin Yi; Khoo, Selina; Morris, Tony

    2015-04-09

    Smoking tobacco is a major concern in Malaysia, with 23.1% of Malaysian adults smoking tobacco in 2012. Withdrawal symptoms and self-efficacy to quit smoking have been shown to have significant effects on the outcomes of smoking cessation. The Shiffman-Jarvik Withdrawal Scale (Psychopharmacology, 50: 35-39, 1976) and the Cessation Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (Cognitive Ther Res 5: 175-187, 1981) are two questionnaires that have been widely used in various smoking cessation research. The short SJWS consists of 15 items with five subscales: physical symptoms, psychological symptoms, stimulation/sedation, appetite, and cravings. The CSEQ is a 12-item questionnaire that assesses participant's self-efficacy to avoid smoking in various situations described in each item. The aim of this study was to translate and validate the Malay language version of the SJWS and the CSEQ. The SJWS and CSEQ were translated into the Malay language based on the back translation method. A total of 146 participants (25.08 ± 5.19 years) answered the translated questionnaires. Psychometrics properties such as reliability (internal consistency and test-retest) and validity (content validity, construct validity and face validity) were examined. Both questionnaires showed acceptable internal consistency; SJWS-M (α = 0.66) and CSEQ-M (α = 0.90) and good test-retest reliability; SJWS-M (r = 0.76) and the CSEQ-M (r = 0.80). SJWS-M (χ(2) = 15.964, GFI = 0.979, CFI = 1.000, RMSEA = 0.000, ChiSq/df = 0.939, AGFI = 0.933, TLI = 1.004, and NPI = 0.978) and CSEQ-M (of χ(2) = 35.16, GFI = 0.960, CFI = 0.999, RMSEA = 0.015, ChiSq/df = 1.034, AGFI = 0.908, TLI = 0.999, and NPI = 0.979) also showed good construct validity. Both questionnaires showed sufficient item to item convergent validity and item discriminant validity. Content validity was established (reassess) by experts in the field of psychology, culture and language whereas face validity was confirmed by smokers. The translated Malay

  2. The falls and the fear of falling among elderly institutionalized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Almeida

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study it is intended to characterize the history of falls and to evaluate the fear to fall in aged institutionalized. The sample is composed for 113 institutionalized aged people, 32 men and 81 women with a average 82,96 ± 7,03 age of years. The data had been collected by means of a questionnaire and statistical analyzed (descriptive statistics, parametric tests - Test T and Anova - Test U-Mann Whitney, and Test of Kruskal-Wallis – and the Test of Tukey. The results point in the direction of that the women present a bigger number of falls (24.8% and greater fear to fall (Med=55. The falls had occurred in its majority in the context of the room of the institutions. It was verified that people who had at least a fall experience present greater fear to fall comparatively (Med=55 with that they had not the same had no incident of fall in period of time (Med=77. Our results come to strengthen the hypothesis of the changeable sex to be able to be considered a factor of fall risk. Aged that they present a history of falls seems to be more vulnerable to develop the fear to fall.

  3. Mitigating fall risk: A community fall reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso, Humberto; McCaffrey, Ruth G; Taylor, David W M

    One fourth of all American's over 65 years of age fall each year. Falls are a common and often devastating event that can pose a serious health risk for older adults. Healthcare providers are often unable to spend the time required to assist older adults with fall risk issues. Without a team approach to fall prevention the system remains focused on fragmented levels of health promotion and risk prevention. The specific aim of this project was to engage older adults from the community in a fall risk assessment program, using the Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths & Injuries (STEADI) program, and provide feedback on individual participants' risks that participants could share with their primary care physician. Older adults who attended the risk screening were taking medications that are known to increase falls. They mentioned that their health care providers do not screen for falls and appreciated a community based screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An analysis of the relationship between bodily injury severity and fall height in victims of fatal falls from height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Teresiński

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : One of the basic issues discussed in forensic literature regarding falls from a height is determination of fall heights and differentiation between suicidal and accidental falls. The aim of the study was to verify the usefulness of the available methods for the purposes of forensic expertises. Material and methods : The study encompassed fatalities of falls from a height whose autopsies were performed in the Department of Forensic Medicine in Lublin. Results : Similarly to other authors, the severity of injuries was assessed using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS and injury severity score (ISS. The study findings demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between the fall height and the severity of injuries according to ISS and a statistically significant difference in fall heights between the groups of accidents and suicides.

  5. Telephone Care Management of Fall Risk:: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Elizabeth A; Pence, Maureen; Williams, Barbara; MacCornack, Frederick A

    2017-03-01

    Care management has been found to be more effective than usual care for some chronic conditions, but few studies have tested care management for prevention of elder falls. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of telephone care management of older adults presenting for medical attention due to a fall. The setting was an independent practice association in western Washington serving 1,300 Medicare Advantage-insured patients. Patients aged ≥65 years treated for a fall in an emergency department or their primary care provider's office were contacted via telephone by a care manager within 48 hours of their fall-related visit and invited to participate in a telephone-administered interview to identify modifiable fall risk factors and receive recommendations and follow-up to address identified risk factors. Data from care manager records, patient medical records, and healthcare claims for the first 6 months (November 2009-April 2010) of program implementation were analyzed in 2011. The feasibility of screening and management of fall risk factors over the telephone and the effect on medically attended falls were assessed. Twenty-two patients eligible for fall care management were reached and administered the protocol. Administration took 15-20 minutes and integrated easily with the care manager's other responsibilities. Follow-through on recommendations varied, from 45% for those for whom exercise participation was recommended to 100% for other recommendations. No medically attended falls occurred over 6 months of follow-up. Telephone care management of fall risk appears feasible and may reduce falls requiring medical attention. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling a falling slinky

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, R. C.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    A slinky is an example of a tension spring: in an unstretched state a slinky is collapsed, with turns touching, and a finite tension is required to separate the turns from this state. If a slinky is suspended from its top and stretched under gravity and then released, the bottom of the slinky does not begin to fall until the top section of the slinky, which collapses turn by turn from the top, collides with the bottom. The total collapse time t_c (typically ~0.3 s for real slinkies) correspon...

  7. Falls and cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Damulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the main causes of falls. Whatever their cause is, falls may lead to severe maladjustment in everyday life. In nearly 1 out of 10 cases, they are accompanied by severe injuries, including fractures (most commonly those of the proximal femur and humerus, hands, pelvic bones, and vertebrae, subdural hematoma, and severe soft tissue and head injuries. This process is emphasized to be multifactorial. Particular emphasis is laid on the involvement of the cerebellum and its associations, which may be accompanied by falls. This is clinically manifested mainly by gait disorders. Walking is a result of an interaction of three related functions (locomotion, maintenance of balance and adaptive reactions. In addition to synergies related to locomotion and balance maintenance, standing at rest and walking are influenced bythe following factors: postural and environmental information (proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual, the capacity to interpret and integrate this information, the ability of the musculoskeletal system to make movements, and the capability to optimally modulate these movements in view of the specific situation and the ability to choose and adapt synergy in terms of external factors and the capacities and purposes of an individual. The clinical signs of damage to the cerebellum and its associations are considered in detail. These structures are emphasized to be involved not only in movements, but also in cognitive functions. The major symptoms that permit cerebellar dysfunction to be diagnosed are given. Symptoms in cerebellar injuries are generally most pronounced when suddenly changing the direction of movements or attempting to start walking immediately after a dramatic rise. The magnitude of ataxia also increases in a patient who tries to decrease the step size. Falling tendencies or bending to one side (in other symptoms characteristic of cerebellar diseases suggest injury of the corresponding

  8. Multifactorial screening for fall risk in community-dwelling older adults in the primary care office: development of the fall risk assessment & screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfro, Mindy Oxman; Fehrer, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Unintentional falls is an increasing public health problem as incidence of falls rises and the population ages. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 1 in 3 adults aged 65 years and older will experience a fall this year; 20% to 30% of those who fall will sustain a moderate to severe injury. Physical therapists caring for older adults are usually engaged with these patients after the first injury fall and may have little opportunity to abate fall risk before the injuries occur. This article describes the content selection and development of a simple-to-administer, multifactorial, Fall Risk Assessment & Screening Tool (FRAST), designed specifically for use in primary care settings to identify those older adults with high fall risk. Fall Risk Assessment & Screening Tool incorporates previously validated measures within a new multifactorial tool and includes targeted recommendations for intervention. Development of the multifactorial FRAST used a 5-part process: identification of significant fall risk factors, review of best evidence, selection of items, creation of the scoring grid, and development of a recommended action plan. Fall Risk Assessment & Screening Tool has been developed to assess fall risk in the target population of older adults (older than 65 years) living and ambulating independently in the community. Many fall risk factors have been considered and 15 items selected for inclusion. Fall Risk Assessment & Screening Tool includes 4 previously validated measures to assess balance, depression, falls efficacy, and home safety. Reliability and validity studies of FRAST are under way. Fall risk for community-dwelling older adults is an urgent, multifactorial, public health problem. Providing primary care practitioners (PCPs) with a very simple screening tool is imperative. Fall Risk Assessment & Screening Tool was created to allow for safe, quick, and low-cost administration by minimally trained office staff with interpretation and

  9. The ability of clinical balance measures to identify falls risk in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gillian; Comber, Laura; Galvin, Rose; Coote, Susan

    2017-12-01

    To determine the ability of clinical measures of balance to distinguish fallers from non-fallers and to determine their predictive validity in identifying those at risk of falls. AMED, CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, PubMed Central and Google Scholar. First search: July 2015. Final search: October 2017. Inclusion criteria were studies of adults with a definite multiple sclerosis diagnosis, a clinical balance assessment and method of falls recording. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Study quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 scale and the modified Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Statistical analysis was conducted for the cross-sectional studies using Review Manager 5. The mean difference with 95% confidence interval in balance outcomes between fallers and non-fallers was used as the mode of analysis. We included 33 studies (19 cross-sectional, 5 randomised controlled trials, 9 prospective) with a total of 3901 participants, of which 1917 (49%) were classified as fallers. The balance measures most commonly reported were the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go and Falls Efficacy Scale International. Meta-analysis demonstrated fallers perform significantly worse than non-fallers on all measures analysed except the Timed Up and Go Cognitive ( p Balance Confidence Scale had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value (0.92), but without reporting corresponding measures of clinical utility. Clinical measures of balance differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers but have poor predictive ability for falls risk in people with multiple sclerosis.

  10. Influence of focus of attention, reinvestment and fall history on elderly gait stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melker Worms, Jonathan L A; Stins, John F; van Wegen, Erwin E H; Loram, Ian D; Beek, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Falls represent a substantial risk in the elderly. Previous studies have found that a focus on the outcome or effect of the movement (external focus of attention) leads to improved balance performance, whereas a focus on the movement execution itself (internal focus of attention) impairs balance performance in elderly. A shift toward more conscious, explicit forms of motor control occurs when existing declarative knowledge is recruited in motor control, a phenomenon called reinvestment. We investigated the effects of attentional focus and reinvestment on gait stability in elderly fallers and nonfallers. Full body kinematics was collected from twenty-eight healthy older adults walking on a treadmill, while focus of attention was manipulated through instruction. Participants also filled out the Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale (MSRS) and the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I), and provided details about their fall history. Coefficients of Variation (CV) of spatiotemporal gait parameters and Local Divergence Exponents (LDE) were calculated as measures of gait variability and gait stability, respectively. Larger stance time CV and LDE (decreased gait stability) were found for fallers compared to nonfallers. No significant effect of attentional focus was found for the gait parameters, and no significant relation between MSRS score (reinvestment) and fall history was found. We conclude that external attention to the walking surface does not lead to improved gait stability in elderly. Potential benefits of an external focus of attention might not apply to gait, because walking movements are not geared toward achieving a distinct environmental effect. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  11. The efficacy of capacitive radio-frequency diathermy in reducing buttock and posterior thigh cellulite measured through the cellulite severity scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Casa Almeida, Maria; Suarez Serrano, Carmen; Medrano Sánchez, Ester Maria; Diaz Mohedo, Esther; Chamorro Moriana, Gema; Rebollo Salas, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Cellulite, despite its high prevalence in women, has been subjected to very little research, while the majority has been carried out using unvalidated evaluation tools. To determine the efficacy of capacitive radio-frequency diathermy (CRFD) in reducing buttock and posterior thigh cellulite and to verify its relationship with the reduction of body weight. Design: Experimental clinical study consists of two parallel groups. Totally 54 lower limbs of 27 women (26.41 ± 6.16 years) were considered with each patient's two limbs being assigned one to each group via simple random distribution. First group received local application of CRFD (30 min) and the second received the same treatment followed by a supplementary whole-segment application of CRFD (20 min). Each limb received 20 sessions, twice a week. Cellulite Severity Scale dimensions score, weight and Body Mass Index (BMI) were taken for the evaluation of the study. A significance of p less than 0.01 was observed for all the variables in both groups, thereby demonstrating the effectiveness of both the treatments; no significant differences were observed between groups (p > 0.05). Monopolar static application of CRFD is effective in reducing buttock and posterior thigh cellulite. It appears that there is not necessarily any relationship between weight loss, decreased BMI and reduction in cellulite.

  12. On the Nature of Fear of Falling in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the elderly, fear of falling (FoF can lead to activity restriction and affect quality of life (QoL. Our aim was to identify the characteristics of FoF in Parkinson's disease and assess its impact on QoL. We assessed FoF in 130 patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD on scales measuring perceived self-efficacy in performing a range of activities (FES, perceived consequences of falling (CoF, and activity avoidance (SAFFE. A significant difference was found in FoF between PD patients who had previously fallen and those who had not and between frequent and infrequent fallers. Patient-rated disability significantly influenced FoF. Difficulty in rising from a chair, difficulty turning, start hesitation, festination, loss of balance, and shuffling were the specific mobility problems which were associated with greater FoF in PD. Disability was the main predictor of FoF, additionally depression predicted perceived consequences of falling, while anxiety predicted activity avoidance. The FoF measures explained 65% of the variance of QoL in PD, highlighting the clinical importance of FoF. These results have implications for the clinical management of FoF in PD.

  13. Tools for assessing fall risk in the elderly: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Hi

    2018-01-01

    The prevention of falls among the elderly is arguably one of the most important public health issues in today's aging society. The aim of this study was to assess which tools best predict the risk of falls in the elderly. Electronic searches were performed using Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, etc., using the following keywords: "fall risk assessment", "elderly fall screening", and "elderly mobility scale". The QUADAS-2 was applied to assess the internal validity of the diagnostic studies. Selected studies were meta-analyzed with MetaDisc 1.4. A total of 33 studies were eligible out of the 2,321 studies retrieved from selected databases. Twenty-six assessment tools for fall risk were used in the selected articles, and they tended to vary based on the setting. The fall risk assessment tools currently used for the elderly did not show sufficiently high predictive validity for differentiating high and low fall risks. The Berg Balance scale and Mobility Interaction Fall chart showed stable and high specificity, while the Downton Fall Risk Index, Hendrich II Fall Risk Model, St. Thomas's Risk Assessment Tool in Falling elderly inpatients, Timed Up and Go test, and Tinetti Balance scale showed the opposite results. We concluded that rather than a single measure, two assessment tools used together would better evaluate the characteristics of falls by the elderly that can occur due to a multitude of factors and maximize the advantages of each for predicting the occurrence of falls.

  14. Validating Fall Prevention Icons to Support Patient-Centered Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Wai Yin; Adelman, Jason; Bates, David W; Businger, Alexandra; Dykes, John S; Ergai, Awatef; Hurley, Ann; Katsulis, Zachary; Khorasani, Sarah; Scanlan, Maureen; Schenkel, Laura; Rai, Amisha; Dykes, Patricia C

    2017-02-22

    Falls with injury are the most prevalent hospital adverse event. The objective of this project was to refine fall risk and prevention icons for a patient-centric bedside toolkit to promote patient and nurse engagement in accurately assessing fall risks and developing a tailored fall prevention plan. Eighty-eight patients and 60 nurses from 2 academic medical centers participated in 4 iterations of testing to refine 6 fall risk and 10 fall prevention icons. During individual interviews, participants rated their satisfaction with the degree to which that icon represented the concept on a 4-point Likert scale, enabling computation of a Content Validity Index (CVI), and provided comments and suggestions for improvement. After reviewing CVI scores and feedback, the research team consulted with the illustrator to revise the icons. Content Validity Index scores improved after icon modifications. Icons that depicted multiple concepts required further iterations to be acceptable. Using icons to depict an accurate and easy-to-interpret fall risk assessment and intervention plan for all care team members including patients and family to follow should lead to improved adherence with that plan and decreased falls. All 16 icons were refined and used to form the basis for a bedside fall prevention toolkit.

  15. Adaptación transcultural de la escala para medir autoeficacia en el uso del condón masculino Cross cultural adaptation of condom uses self-efficacy scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hernández Cortina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo principal: adaptar culturalmente la escala para medir autoeficacia en el uso del condón masculino, determinando su fiabilidad y validez para la investigación en el contexto cubano. Metodología: diseño transversal con metodología exploratoria en una muestra de 38 estudiantes de enfermería entre 17 y 42 años de edad. Resultados: el Alpha Cronbach para la escala total fue de 0,78 y el Índice de Correlación Interclase fue de 0,73. Conclusiones: la escala es confiable y válida para medir el uso del condón masculino en el contexto cubano.Objective: The purpose of this manuscript is to evaluate a Spanish version of the Condom Uses Self Efficacy Scale, and to determine its reliability and validity for use in cross-cultural research among Cuban populations. Methods: A cross- sectional design an exploratory survey methodology was used in 38 nursing students between 17 and 41 years old. Results: The Alpha Coefficient for the total scale was 0,78. The interclass correlation coefficient to measure scale's stability over time was 0,73 (test-retest two weeks. Conclusions: Findings support that Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale is a reliable and valid scale in measuring condom self-efficacy among Cuban persons.

  16. Issues in Geriatric Care: Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dipesh; Ackermann, Richard J

    2018-05-01

    One in three older adults falls each year. There are approximately 2.5 million falls among older adults treated in emergency departments. Falls account for 87% of all fractures in this age group. The biggest risk factor for falling is a history of falls. Other risk factors include frailty, sedative and anticholinergic drugs, polypharmacy, and a variety of medical conditions. Current recommendations are that all patients age 65 years and older should be asked about falls each year. Patients also can be screened for fall risk with a variety of approaches including questionnaires and the Timed Up & Go test. For patients who have fallen or are at risk, care should focus on correcting reversible home environmental factors that predispose to falls, minimizing the use of drugs with sedating properties, addressing vision conditions, recommending physical exercise (including balance, strength, and gait training), and managing postural hypotension as well as foot conditions and footwear. In addition, vitamin D and calcium supplementation should be considered. For patients needing anticoagulation for medical reasons, an assessment must balance fall risk (and thus bleeding from a fall) versus the risk of discontinuing anticoagulation (eg, sustaining an embolic stroke from atrial fibrillation). Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  17. Translation and psychometric analysis of the Malaysian version of medication understanding and use self-efficacy scale (m-muse for diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa A Al Abboud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enhancing diabetes self-efficacy (SE level can improve the self-management behaviour in patients living with diabetes mellitus (DM. This study aimed to translate and assess the psychometric properties of Malaysian version of diabetes Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (M-MUSE. Methods: Following the translation of English version of MUSE to Malay language using established international standard translation guidelines, 252 adult diabetics (≥ 18 years old; DM type 1 or 2 attending the Endocrine Clinic at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were recruited in this cross-sectional study. After testing the face and content validity, the psychometric properties of the final M-MUSE were evaluated using the Classical Test Theory (CTT for reliability (Cronbach’s alpha (α and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC and construct validity (factor analysis (FA. Results: The semantic and conceptual problems in M-MUSE were identified and modified by a qualified professional translation committee. The final version showed good reliability values for internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.89 and one month test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.72. The Bartlett’s test of sphericity and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin tests proved the suitability of M-MUSE for factor analysis. The extracted single component M-MUSE (eigenvalue > 1 explained a total variance of 57.58% with an eigenvalue of 4.60. The two factor structures; namely taking medication (item # 1, 6, 7 and 8 and learning about medication (item # 2, 3, 4 and 5 explained a total variance of 59.25% with good factor loading values (ranged from 0.63 to 0.89 for taking medication, and 0.66 to 0.83 for learning about medication. Conclusion: The M-MUSE appears to be a linguistically reliable and valid measure that is conceptually equivalent to the original version. The M-MUSE can be used in Malaysian healthcare settings to evaluate the SE in understanding and using prescribed

  18. Determining a Cut-Off Point for Scores of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form: Secondary Data Analysis of an Intervention Study in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Nanishi

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding self-efficacy can be measured with the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF. Mothers with low BSES-SF scores stop exclusive breastfeeding prematurely, but specific interventions can prevent that undesirable outcome. Because those interventions can be expensive, often one must decide which mothers will receive them. For that purpose, a cut-off BSES-SF score would be useful, but none is available. Therefore, we aimed to assess the overall accuracy of BSES-SF scores as predictors of not practicing post-discharge exclusive breastfeeding, and to choose an appropriate cut-off score for making that prediction.This is a secondary data analysis of an intervention study. Data from 378 women in two non-Baby-Friendly Hospitals were analyzed. Participants were women in their third trimester who were 16 years of age or older, were able to read and write Japanese, were expected to have a singleton birth, and had completed the BSES-SF before discharge. BSES-SF scores were measured before discharge. Breastfeeding status was assessed 4 weeks and 12 weeks postpartum. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves were used to assess the predictive ability of the BSES-SF and to inform the choice of a cut-off point.For both of the ROC curves (4 and 12 weeks postpartum the area under the curve was 0.74. To obtain a high sensitivity, a cut-off score of 50 was chosen. With that cut-off score the sensitivity was 79% and the specificity was 52% 4 weeks postpartum, and they were 77% and 52%, respectively, 12 weeks postpartum.In conclusion, the BSES-SF has moderate overall accuracy to distinguish women who will not practice exclusive breastfeeding after discharge from those who will. At non-Baby-Friendly hospitals in Japan, interventions to support exclusive breastfeeding might be considered for new mothers who have BSES-SF scores that are less than or equal to 50.

  19. Falls, muscle strength, and functional abilities in community-dwelling elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Santos Borges

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Falls are among the most common and serious problems facing elderly women. Falling is associated with increased mortality, morbidity, reduced functioning, loss of independence and hospitalization. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association among fear of falling, muscle strength, and functional abilities in community-dwelling elderly women. Methods: Forty-nine elderly women (70.57 ± 5.59 years participated in this study. Records of falls, self-efficacy associated with falls (FES-I Brazil, functional abilities (the Timed Up and Down Stairs test [TUDS] and the Timed Up and Go test [TUG], lower limb muscle strength (knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors, and hand grip strength were investigated as variables of interest. Descriptive statistics, the one-way ANOVA, and linear regression tests were used to analyze the association between fear of falling and falls with other variables (α = 0.05. Results: Elderly women who presented records of falls within the last year had lesser strength of knee extensors and plantar flexors (p ≤. 05. Those who had low self-efficacy associated with falls presented lower strength of knee extensors (p ≤. 01. Variables associated with functional abilities (r = 0.70 and lower limb strength (r = 0.53 showed a positive correlation (p ≤. 01. Conclusion: The concern with the fear of falling and falls may be negative effects caused by lower limb muscle weakness.

  20. Social Dancing and Incidence of Falls in Older Adults: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merom, Dafna; Mathieu, Erin; Cerin, Ester; Morton, Rachael L; Simpson, Judy M; Rissel, Chris; Anstey, Kaarin J; Sherrington, Catherine; Lord, Stephen R; Cumming, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    The prevention of falls among older people is a major public health challenge. Exercises that challenge balance are recognized as an efficacious fall prevention strategy. Given that small-scale trials have indicated that diverse dance styles can improve balance and gait of older adults, two of the strongest risk factors for falls in older people, this study aimed to determine whether social dance is effective in i) reducing the number of falls and ii) improving physical and cognitive fall-related risk factors. A parallel two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial was undertaken in 23 self-care retirement villages (clusters) around Sydney, Australia. Eligible villages had to have an appropriate hall for dancing, house at least 60 residents, and not be currently offering dance as a village activity. Retirement villages were randomised using a computer generated randomisation method, constrained using minimisation. Eligible participants had to be a resident of the village, be able to walk at least 50 m, and agree to undergo physical and cognitive testing without cognitive impairment. Residents of intervention villages (12 clusters) were offered twice weekly one-hour social dancing classes (folk or ballroom dancing) over 12 mo (80 h in total). Programs were standardized across villages and were delivered by eight dance teachers. Participants in the control villages (11 clusters) were advised to continue with their regular activities. falls during the 12 mo trial and Trail Making Tests. The Physiological Performance Assessment (i.e., postural sway, proprioception, reaction time, leg strength) and the Short Physical Performance Battery; health-related physical and mental quality of life from the Short-Form 12 (SF-12) Survey. Data on falls were obtained from 522 of 530 (98%) randomised participants (mean age 78 y, 85% women) and 424 (80%) attended the 12-mo reassessment, which was lower among folk dance participants (71%) than ballroom dancing (82%) or control

  1. Fall prevention in acute care hospitals: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Carroll, Diane L; Hurley, Ann; Lipsitz, Stuart; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Meltzer, Seth; Tsurikova, Ruslana; Zuyov, Lyubov; Middleton, Blackford

    2010-11-03

    Falls cause injury and death for persons of all ages, but risk of falls increases markedly with age. Hospitalization further increases risk, yet no evidence exists to support short-stay hospital-based fall prevention strategies to reduce patient falls. To investigate whether a fall prevention tool kit (FPTK) using health information technology (HIT) decreases patient falls in hospitals. Cluster randomized study conducted January 1, 2009, through June 30, 2009, comparing patient fall rates in 4 urban US hospitals in units that received usual care (4 units and 5104 patients) or the intervention (4 units and 5160 patients). The FPTK integrated existing communication and workflow patterns into the HIT application. Based on a valid fall risk assessment scale completed by a nurse, the FPTK software tailored fall prevention interventions to address patients' specific determinants of fall risk. The FPTK produced bed posters composed of brief text with an accompanying icon, patient education handouts, and plans of care, all communicating patient-specific alerts to key stakeholders. The primary outcome was patient falls per 1000 patient-days adjusted for site and patient care unit. A secondary outcome was fall-related injuries. During the 6-month intervention period, the number of patients with falls differed between control (n = 87) and intervention (n = 67) units (P=.02). Site-adjusted fall rates were significantly higher in control units (4.18 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.45-5.06] per 1000 patient-days) than in intervention units (3.15 [95% CI, 2.54-3.90] per 1000 patient-days; P = .04). The FPTK was found to be particularly effective with patients aged 65 years or older (adjusted rate difference, 2.08 [95% CI, 0.61-3.56] per 1000 patient-days; P = .003). No significant effect was noted in fall-related injuries. The use of a fall prevention tool kit in hospital units compared with usual care significantly reduced rate of falls. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT

  2. Rock-fall Hazard In The Yosemite Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetti, F.; Reichenbach, P.; Wieczorek, G. F.

    Rock slides and rock falls are the most frequent slope movements in Yosemite Na- tional Park, California. In historical time (1851-2001), more than 400 rock falls and rock slides have been documented in the valley, and some of them have been mapped in detail. We present the preliminary results of an attempt to assess rockfall hazard in the Yosemite Valley using STONE, a 3-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. The software computes 3-dimensional rock-fall trajectories starting from a digital terrain model (DTM), the location of rock-fall release points (source areas), and maps of the dynamic rolling coefficient and of the coefficients of normal and tan- gential energy restitution. For each DTM cell the software also calculates the number of rock falls passing through the cell, the maximum rock-fall velocity and the maxi- mum flying height. For the Yosemite Valley, a DTM with a ground resolution of 10 x 10 m was prepared using topographic contour lines from USGS 1:24,000-scale maps. Rock-fall release points were identified as DTM cells having a slope steeper than 60 degrees, an assumption based on the location of historical rock falls. Maps of the nor- mal and tangential energy restitution coefficients and of the rolling friction coefficient were produced from a surficial geologic map. The availability of historical rock falls mapped in detail allowed us to check the computer program performance and to cali- brate the model parameters. Visual and statistical comparison of the model results with the mapped rock falls confirmed the accuracy of the model. The model results are also compared with a geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazard based on potential energy referred to as a "shadow angle" approach, recently completed for the Yosemite Valley.

  3. Development of the Parental Self-Efficacy Scale for Child Autonomy toward Minor Surgery (PSESCAMS): based on results of questionnaire surveys of parents raising children between 3 and 6 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Satomi; Manabe, Yukiko

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare the Parental Self-Efficacy Scale for Child Autonomy toward Minor Surgery (PSESCAMS) and verify its reliability and validity. The PSESCAMS was developed based on the findings of previous qualitative studies on preschool children aged 3-6 years who were undergoing day surgery and their parents. The Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale, Maternal Self-Accomplishment Scale (MSAS), and Japanese-language version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory A-trait subscale (STAI: A-trait) were used to examine the criterion-related validity of the PSESCAMS. In addition, the test-retest method was utilized for the PSESCAMS. The number of valid responses was 586. A principle component analysis of the PSESCAMS was conducted of 18 items, extracting two factors. As a result of factor analysis that assumed two factors, the two factors were named "self-efficacy for support related to child's emotional control for minor surgery" and "self-efficacy for support related to child's understanding of minor surgery". A structural equation model having high goodness of fit for the PSESCAMS was shown by a covariance structure analysis. The correlations between GSES, MSAS, STAI: A-trait and the PSESCAMS were r = 0.323 (P correlation between both was significant. The PSESCAMS consists of two categories and includes 18 items. The reliability and validity of the PSESCAMS were proved. © 2013 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2013 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  4. Machines that go "ping" may improve balance but may not improve mobility or reduce risk of falls: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett, Amy M; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of computer-based electronic devices that provide feedback in improving mobility and balance and reducing falls. Randomized controlled trials were searched from the earliest available date to August 2013. Standardized mean differences were used to complete meta-analyses, with statistical heterogeneity being described with the I-squared statistic. The GRADE approach was used to summarize the level of evidence for each completed meta-analysis. Risk of bias for individual trials was assessed with the (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) PEDro scale. Thirty trials were included. There was high-quality evidence that computerized devices can improve dynamic balance in people with a neurological condition compared with no therapy. There was low-to-moderate-quality evidence that computerized devices have no significant effect on mobility, falls efficacy and falls risk in community-dwelling older adults, and people with a neurological condition compared with physiotherapy. There is high-quality evidence that computerized devices that provide feedback may be useful in improving balance in people with neurological conditions compared with no therapy, but there is a lack of evidence supporting more meaningful changes in mobility and falls risk.

  5. Relapse of polymyalgia rheumatica after a fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Ciro; Natale, Maria

    2017-01-01

    multicentric data, the assessment of the risk of falls through specific scales should be an integral part of the visit of all PMR patients.

  6. Preventing falls in assisted living: Results of a quality improvement pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Greene, Angela; Sloane, Philip D; Mitchell, Madeline; Giuliani, Carol; Nyrop, Kirsten; Walsh, Edith

    Residents of assisted living (AL) communities are at high risk for falls, which result in negative outcomes and high health care costs. Adapting effective falls prevention programs for AL quality improvement (QI) has the potential to reduce falls, improve resident quality of life, and reduce costs. This project tested the feasibility and outcomes of an evidence-based multi-component QI program, the Assisted Living Falls Prevention and Monitoring Program (AL-FPMP). Resident posture and gait improved, likely due to exercise and/or physical therapy. Effective falls prevention QI programs can be implemented in AL, and are advised to (1) establish and maintain a falls team to create a culture focused on the reduction of falls risk; (2) teach staff to assess residents using the Morse Falls Scale to increase their awareness of residents' falls risk and improvement; and (3) modify existing exercise programs to address balance and lower body strength. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Assess Parental Self-Efficacy for Influencing Children's Dietary, Physical Activity, Sedentary, and Screen Time Behaviors in Disadvantaged Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Åsa; Bohman, Benjamin; Nyberg, Gisela; Schäfer Elinder, Liselotte

    2018-01-01

    Background: According to social cognitive theory, self-efficacy is central to behavior change. Consequently, parental self-efficacy (PSE) for influencing children's dietary, physical activity (PA), sedentary, and screen time behaviors is important for child obesity prevention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of an…

  8. Martial arts fall training to prevent hip fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, B E; Smulders, E; de Kam, D; Duysens, J; Weerdesteyn, V

    2010-02-01

    Hip fractures are a common and serious consequence of falls. Training of proper fall techniques may be useful to prevent hip fractures in the elderly. The results suggested that martial arts fall techniques may be trainable in older individuals. Better performance resulted in a reduced impact force. Hip fractures are a common and serious consequence of falls. Fall training may be useful to prevent hip fractures in the elderly. This pilot study determined whether older individuals could learn martial arts (MA) fall techniques and whether this resulted in a reduced hip impact force during a sideways fall. Six male and nineteen female healthy older individuals completed a five-session MA fall training. Before and after training, force and kinematic data were collected during volitional sideways falls from kneeling position. Two MA experts evaluated the fall performance. Fear of falling was measured with a visual analog scale (VAS). After fall training, fall performance from a kneeling position was improved by a mean increase of 1.6 on a ten-point scale (P < 0.001). Hip impact force was reduced by a mean of 8% (0.20 N/N, P = 0.016). Fear of falling was reduced by 0.88 on a VAS scale (P = 0.005). MA techniques may be trainable in older individuals, and a better performance may reduce the hip impact force in a volitional sideways fall from a kneeling position. The additional reduction of fear of falling might result in the prevention of falls and related injuries.

  9. Development of the Return-to-Work Obstacles and Self-Efficacy Scale (ROSES) and Validation with Workers Suffering from a Common Mental Disorder or Musculoskeletal Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbière, Marc; Negrini, Alessia; Durand, Marie-José; St-Arnaud, Louise; Briand, Catherine; Fassier, Jean-Baptiste; Loisel, Patrick; Lachance, Jean-Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Introduction Common mental disorders (CMDs) and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) lead the list of causes for work absence in several countries. Current research is starting to look at workers on sick leave as a single population, regardless of the nature of the disease or accident. The purpose of this study is to report the validation of the Return to Work Obstacles and Self-Efficacy Scale (ROSES) for people with MSDs and CMDs, based on the disability paradigm. Methods From a prospective design, the ROSES' reliability and validity were investigated in a Canadian sample of workers on sick leave due to MSDs (n = 206) and CMDs (n = 157). Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed that 46 items spread out on 10 conceptual dimensions (e.g., Fears of a relapse, Job demands, Difficult relation with the immediate supervisor), with satisfactory alpha coefficients and test-retest reliability for all subscales. Finally, several dimensions of ROSES also predict the participant's RTW within 6 months for MSDs (e.g., job demands), and CMDs (e.g., difficult relation with the immediate supervisor), even when adjusted by several variables (e.g., age, severity of symptoms). Apart from the job demands dimension, when the ROSES dimension is more external to the individual, only the perception of obstacles remains significant to predict RTW whereas it is the opposite result when the dimension is more internal (e.g., fears of a relapse). Conclusion The ROSES demonstrated satisfactory results regarding its validity and reliability with people having MSDs or CMDs, at the time of the return-to-work process.

  10. Toward improving food safety in the domestic environment: a multi-item Rasch scale for the measurement of the safety efficacy of domestic food-handling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Arnout R H; Frewer, Lynn J; Nauta, Maarten J

    2006-10-01

    To reduce consumer health risks from foodborne diseases that result from improper domestic food handling, consumers need to know how to safely handle food. To realize improvements in public health, it is necessary to develop interventions that match the needs of individual consumers. Successful intervention strategies are therefore contingent on identifying not only the practices that are important for consumer protection, but also barriers that prevent consumers from responding to these interventions. A measure of food safety behavior is needed to assess the effectiveness of different intervention strategies across different groups of consumers. A nationally representative survey was conducted in the Netherlands to determine which practices are likely conducted by which consumers. Participants reported their behaviors with respect to 55 different food-handling practices. The Rasch modeling technique was used to determine a general measure for the likelihood of an average consumer performing each food-handling behavior. Simultaneously, an average performance measure was estimated for each consumer. These two measures can be combined to predict the likelihood that an individual consumer engages in a specific food-handling behavior. A single "food safety" dimension was shown to underlie all items. Some potentially safe practices (e.g., use of meat thermometers) were reported as very difficult, while other safe practices were conducted by respondents more frequently (e.g., washing of fresh fruit and vegetables). A cluster analysis was applied to the resulting data set, and five segments of consumers were identified. Different behaviors may have different effects on microbial growth in food, and thus have different consequences for human health. Once the microbial relevance of the different consumer behaviors has been confirmed by experiments and modeling, the scale developed in the research reported here can be used to develop risk communication targeted to the needs

  11. Evaluation of the STRATIFY falls prediction tool on a geriatric unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Esther; Oliver, David

    2003-01-01

    Accurate prediction of fall-prone hospitalized older adults may be integral to reducing falls. The STRATIFY, a simple 5-point falls prediction tool, was prospectively validated on a Geriatric Assessment and Rehabilitation Unit as a one-time initial predictor of patients likely to fall. Sensitivity and specificity were lower than in the original British study. Introducing risk assessments validated elsewhere on a patient care unit or on a hospital-wide scale requires caution.

  12. A piece of paper falling faster than free fall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, F; Rivera, R

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls with acceleration g. To test if the paper falls behind the book in a nearly free fall motion or if it is dragged by the book, we designed a version of this experiment that includes a ball and a piece of paper over a book that is forced to fall using elastic cords. We recorded a video of our experiment using a high-speed video camera at 300 frames per second that shows that the book and the paper fall faster than the ball, which falls well behind the book with an acceleration approximately equal to g. Our experiment shows that the piece of paper is dragged behind the book and therefore the paper and book demonstration should not be used to show that all objects fall with acceleration g independently of their mass.

  13. Relationship between occurrence of falls and fall-risk scores in an acute care setting using the Hendrich II fall risk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzell, Kristen L; Fulton, Janet S; Friesth, Barbara Manz

    2013-01-01

    Falls are a common clinical problem in the acute care setting, and fall-related injuries can include fractures, subdural hematomas, excessive bleeding, and even death (Hitcho et al., 2004). Several instruments are used clinically to estimate a patient's risk of falling. The STRATIFY (Oliver, Britton, Seed, Martin, & Hopper, 1997), the Morse Fall Scale (Morse, Black, Oberle, & Donahue, 1989), and the Hendrich II Fall Risk Model (Hendrich, Bender, & Nyhuis, 2003) are three instruments widely used in clinical practice by nurses. To be clinically useful, a fall risk assessment instrument should be easy to use with only a small number of items, perform consistently across target populations, and have evidence-based scoring and good inter-rater reliability. Oliver (2008), author of the STRATIFY tool, questioned the merits of any instrument used to assess fall risk in hospital inpatients in the absence of interventions to modify the risk factors. Too often, patient assessment and assignment of a score become required tasks and resulting data do not drive interventions. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between scores on the Hendrich II Fall Risk Model (HIIFRM) and fall occurrence as recorded in the medical record for patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, stroke, or heart failure in an acute care inpatient setting. To determine if a relationship existed between the occurrence of a fall and the HIIFRM score, the study used a random sample of patients who fell during admission and a matched control group of patients who did not fall. Fall cases were identified based on an admission Medical Severity-Diagnosis Related Group (MS-DRG) (Schmidt & Stegman, 2008) of stroke or secondary International Classification of Diseases (9th revision) (ICD-9) code (Hart, Stegman, & Ford, 2009) of heart failure or diabetes. Non-faller matched controls were selected at random from the same admission MS-DRG or secondary ICD-9 code as the fall case and matched for

  14. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Painful shoulder post fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Alistair Iw; Jariwala, Arpit

    2018-03-03

    CLINICAL INTRODUCTION: A 32-year-old man presented to the ED after a heavy fall on his left shoulder. He presented the following day with pain and gross limitation of movement in the left shoulder. There was no history of previous injury to the left shoulder. This was his non-dominant limb and he worked in a manual occupation. He was neurovascularly intact. His initial radiographs are shown in figures 1 and 2.emermed;emermed-2017-207003v1/F1F1F1Figure 1Anteroposterior radiograph (AP) radiograph of left shoulder.emermed;emermed-2017-207003v1/F2F2F2Figure 2Lateral radiograph of left shoulder.  QUESTION: Management options:Anterior shoulder dislocation - closed reductionAnterior shoulder dislocation - CT scanPosterior shoulder dislocation - closed reductionPosterior shoulder dislocation - CT scan. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Fall Meeting Hydrology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Roger

    The AGU 1992 Fall Meeting in San Francisco offered the full range of subjects represented by the Hydrology Section's technical committees. The total number of papers was double the number of just 4 years ago. Sessions were well attended. The following highlights were prepared from material written by session organizers.There were 3 full days of papers on snow, ice, and permafrost. One highlight was the special session on new developments in glacier mass-balance studies, which was organized to compare existing methods and examine new techniques for assessing changes in ice mass of the polar ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Current methods for assessing mass change of the ice sheets include satellite laser altimetry to detect surface-elevation changes, surface-based control volume methods to determine net ice flux in a region, and ice-shelf melting and iceberg calving to determine mass loss from the ice sheet. Using these techniques, it is difficult to tell whether the ice sheet is gaining or losing mass. Methods that use drainage basin inputs/outputs indicate a net mass increase, whereas methods that emphasize oceanographic estimates of ice-shelf melting suggest a net mass decrease and estimates based on satellite altimetry are equivocal.

  17. Predictive Factors for Inpatient Falls among Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemdaroğlu, Ebru; Özbudak, Sibel Demir; Mandiroğlu, Sibel; Biçer, Seda Alakoç; Özgirgin, Neşe; Uçan, Halil

    Inpatient falls are of significant concern. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. A total of 93 patients with cerebral palsy were assessed based on history, physical findings, the Selective Motor Control Test, the Gross Motor Functional Classification System, the Berg Balance Scale and the Manual Ability Classification System. Previous history of falls/frequent falls, and any falls which occurred during hospitalization, were recorded. Of all 93 patients, 25 (27%) fell and 68 (73%) did not fall. The mean age of the fallers (6.3±2.0 years) was lower than that of the non-fallers (8.1±3.9 years). Behavioral problems according to the mother's statement (OR 26.454), not being able to maintain a long sitting position (OR 10.807), ability to balance on knees without support (OR 9.810), a history of frequent falls (OR 4.893) and a negative Thomas test (OR 4.192 fold) were found to increase the risk of inpatient falls. In these children with cerebral palsy, behavioral problems according to the mother's statement, a history of frequent falls, not being able to maintain a long sitting position, a negative Thomas test, and able to balance on knees without support were associated with the risk of inpatient falls. Children with cerebral palsy may experience inpatient falls. Further studies are required in order to develop prevention programs. For patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy, these results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fear of falling after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collicutt McGrath, Joanna

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence and nature of fear of falling in a sample of people with severe acquired brain injury. A descriptive study. A regional inpatient neurological rehabilitation unit. One hundred and five adults with acquired brain injury of mixed aetiology. All 105 participants were rated by observers who were asked to judge the degree to which fear behaviour interfered with rehabilitation therapy (activity limitation). Eighty-two participants also rated themselves. They were asked to report the degree of distress caused by fear. Both participants and observers were asked to describe the focus of any reported fear. Two stepwise logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify variables that predicted fear giving rise to significant activity limitation and fear giving rise to significant subjective distress. Self and observer rating scales designed and constructed specifically for the study. Raters reported significant fear-related activity limitation in 12-15% of participants. Significant fear-related subjective distress was reported by 40% of participants. Fear of falling, fear of physical harm and fear of not making sufficient rehabilitation progress dominated the reports of both observers and participants. The variables predicting significant activity limitation were premorbid alcohol misuse, low functional ability and the occurrence of a fall since onset. The variables predicting significant subjective distress were poor motor coordination and organization, and good verbal comprehension. Fear of falling is a clinically significant phenomenon in younger adults recovering from severe acquired brain injury. Fear sufficient to cause high degrees of subjective distress was often not evident to observers. Proactive questioning about fear of falling is therefore advisable when working clinically with this group.

  19. Results of falling barrier analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document assesses the consequences if the isolation barrier plate is dropped and falls over on the fuel stored in the water-filled K-East basin. The water slows the rate of fall and some canister bending is expected but only a few rods, if any, would get crushed. The basin criticality calculations will not be affected

  20. Scaling-up an efficacious school-based physical activity intervention: Study protocol for the 'Internet-based Professional Learning to help teachers support Activity in Youth' (iPLAY) cluster randomized controlled trial and scale-up implementation evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Chris; Sanders, Taren; Cohen, Kristen E; Parker, Philip; Noetel, Michael; Hartwig, Tim; Vasconcellos, Diego; Kirwan, Morwenna; Morgan, Philip; Salmon, Jo; Moodie, Marj; McKay, Heather; Bennie, Andrew; Plotnikoff, Ron; Cinelli, Renata L; Greene, David; Peralta, Louisa R; Cliff, Dylan P; Kolt, Gregory S; Gore, Jennifer M; Gao, Lan; Lubans, David R

    2016-08-24

    Despite the health benefits of regular physical activity, most children are insufficiently active. Schools are ideally placed to promote physical activity; however, many do not provide children with sufficient in-school activity or ensure they have the skills and motivation to be active beyond the school setting. The aim of this project is to modify, scale up and evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention previously shown to be efficacious in improving children's physical activity, fundamental movement skills and cardiorespiratory fitness. The 'Internet-based Professional Learning to help teachers support Activity in Youth' (iPLAY) study will focus largely on online delivery to enhance translational capacity. The intervention will be implemented at school and teacher levels, and will include six components: (i) quality physical education and school sport, (ii) classroom movement breaks, (iii) physically active homework, (iv) active playgrounds, (v) community physical activity links and (vi) parent/caregiver engagement. Experienced physical education teachers will deliver professional learning workshops and follow-up, individualized mentoring to primary teachers (i.e., Kindergarten - Year 6). These activities will be supported by online learning and resources. Teachers will then deliver the iPLAY intervention components in their schools. We will evaluate iPLAY in two complementary studies in primary schools across New South Wales (NSW), Australia. A cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT), involving a representative sample of 20 schools within NSW (1:1 allocation at the school level to intervention and attention control conditions), will assess effectiveness and cost-effectiveness at 12 and 24 months. Students' cardiorespiratory fitness will be the primary outcome in this trial. Key secondary outcomes will include students' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (via accelerometers), fundamental movement skill proficiency, enjoyment of physical education and

  1. Catching a Falling Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    -8, or nearly as bright as the first-quarter Moon. Although it is not possible to be sure from which shower this meteor belongs, a possible candidate is the Southern May Ophiuchid shower which appears from a direction just east of the bright star Antares. The shower contributes only one or two meteors per hour but was one of the stronger showers of that night. Telltale emissions ESO PR Photo 22b/04 ESO PR Photo 22b/04 Spectrum of a Meteor (FORS1/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 426 x 400 pix - 91k] [Normal - JPEG: 851 x 800 pix - 232k] [Full Res - JPEG: 2567 x 2413 pix - 2.1M] ESO PR Photo 22c/04 ESO PR Photo 22c/04 Details of the Meteor Spectrum (FORS1/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 1006 x 400 pix - 122k] [Normal - JPEG: 2011 x 800 pix - 236k] [Full Res - JPEG: 3414 x 1358 pix - 957k] Captions: ESO PR Photo 22b/04 shows the spectrum of a bright meteor, as observed serendipitously by the multi-mode FORS 1 instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope during the night of May 12-13, 2002, in front of a photo of the VLT enclosures and with a meteor trail inserted in the sky (montage). The position of the meteor trail on the narrow slit of FORS (not to scale) is also indicated. The lower panel shows the spectrum of the meteor, following removal of the supernova spectrum and before (up) and after (down) removal of the spectrum of the night sky by image processing. Several emission lines from colliding Oxygen and Nitrogen atoms (sharp emissions) and molecules (broad emissions) are visible. ESO PR Photo 22c/04 illustrates details of the extracted VLT meteor spectrum (solid line): the intensity (in arbitrary units) is shown as a function of the wavelength. The dashed line is a theoretical model of the spectrum of air heated to a temperature of 4600 degrees at an altitude of 95 km. "At first, the bright trace across the supernova spectrum was a puzzle, but then I realized that the spectroscopic signature was that of our atmosphere being bombarded," says astronomer Remi Cabanac of the Catholic

  2. HPC Insights, Fall 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Navy DSRC, Stennis Space Center, MS Christine Cuicchi Lynn Yott HPCMPO, Lorton, VA Deborah Schwartz Denise O’Donnell Leah Glick MANAGING EDITOR Rose...Wilfred R. Pinfold, Director, Extreme Scale Programs, Intel Corporation, Intel Labs, Hillsboro, Oregon; and Dr. Thomas P. Gielda, Chief Technology

  3. Momentum, Fall 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Momentum is the quarterly magazine of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech. In this issue: Nano engineering - Scaling up; Coating 3D objects quickly Energy Harvesting - from soldier's backpacks to nuclear monitoring Hyperloop - team readies pod, university to build test track.

  4. Comparação do risco de queda em idosos sedentários e ativos por meio da escala de equilíbrio de Berg Comparison of fall risk between sedentary and active aged by means of the Berg balance scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Martins Pimentel

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available O envelhecimento da população é um fenômeno mundial, do qual o Brasil apresenta um dos mais agudos processos. A prática regular de exercícios por idosos pode melhorar a capacidade física, proporcionar ganho de auto-estima e confiança, contribuindo para diminuição do risco de quedas, comuns em idosos. Este estudo visou comparar o risco de quedas entre idosos sedentários e ativos, verificando como a prática de exercício físico se reflete no desempenho dos sujeitos na escala de Berg. Foram avaliados por esse instrumento 70 idosos, divididos em 2 grupos: sedentários (n=35 e ativos (n=35. Os escores médios na escala de Berg dos grupos sedentário e ativo foram 47,7±5,6 pontos e 53,6±3,7, respectivamente (pPopulation aging is a worldwide phenomenon which is particularly acute in Brazil. Regular physical exercise by the aged may improve physical capacity, provide gains in self-esteem and confidence, and contribute to reducing the number of falls, which are common among the elderly. This study aimed at comparing fall risk between sedentary and active elderly subjects, by assessing how the regular practice of physical exercises is reflected by subjects' performance at the Berg balance scale. Seventy elderly subjects were divided into 2 groups, sedentary (n=35 and active (n=35, and submitted to the Berg test. The sedentary group mean score at the Berg scale was 47.7±5.6, and the active groups', 53.6±3.7 (p<0.0001. The odds ratio analysis showed that fall risk was 15.6 times higher for the sedentary group as compared to the active group (p=0.002. Since the performance of the sedentary group at the Berg scale was worse than the active group's, it may be said that regular practice of physical activities affects such performance, and that physically active subjects present less fall risk than sedentary ones.

  5. Comparison of Self-report and Performance-Based Balance Measures for Predicting Recurrent Falls in People With Parkinson Disease: Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Lorena R S; Valenca, Guilherme T; Negreiros, Nádja N; Pinto, Elen B; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2016-07-01

    Balance confidence and fear of falling are factors associated with recurrent falls in people with Parkinson disease (PD). However, the accuracy for predicting falls on the basis of self-report measures has not been widely investigated. The study objectives were: (1) to compare the accuracy of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) and the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) with that of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), Functional Reach Test (FRT), and Timed "Up & Go" Test (TUG) for predicting recurrent falls in people with PD and (2) to explore the ability of combinations of up to 3 tests to predict recurrent falls. This was a prospective cohort study involving 225 people with PD. Participants were assessed with the ABC, FES-I, BBS, FRT, TUG, and DGI. Participants who reported 2 or more falls in the 12-month follow-up period were classified as recurrent fallers. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were determined, and the Akaike information criterion was used to select the best predictive model. Eighty-four participants (37.3%) were classified as recurrent fallers. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the ABC, FES-I, TUG, FRT, DGI, and BBS were 0.73, 0.74, 0.72, 0.74, 0.76, and 0.79, respectively. Two-test models provided additional discriminating ability compared with individual measures and had Akaike information criterion values similar to those of 3-test models, particularly the combination of the BBS with the FES-I. The lack of an external validation sample was a limitation of this study. The ABC and FES-I demonstrated moderate accuracy in predicting recurrent falls and a predictive ability similar to that of performance-based balance measures, especially the FRT and the TUG. Two-test models showed performance similar to that of 3-test models, suggesting that a combination of 2 measures may improve the ability to predict recurrent falls in people with PD. Specifically

  6. Prevalence of fear of falling in older adults, and its associations with clinical, functional and psychosocial factors: the Frailty in Brazilian Older People-Rio de Janeiro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malini, Flávia Moura; Lourenço, Roberto Alves; Lopes, Claudia S

    2016-03-01

    The present study estimated the prevalence of fear of falling in older adults, and its associations with clinical, functional and psychosocial factors. Data from the Research Network Frailty in Brazilian Older People, specifically the Rio de Janeiro Study involving participants aged 65 years and older residing in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were analyzed. Fear of falling was assessed by the Brazilian version of Falls Efficacy Scale-International. The following variables were assessed: history of falls, fracture after fall, number of comorbidities, number of medications, hospitalization in the previous year, use of walking support device, functional dependency in activities of daily living (including instrumental activities), hearing and visual impairments, hand grip strength, walking speed, self-rated health, depressive symptoms, cognitive impairment, living alone, social support, and activity level. Associations were evaluated by multiple logistic regression. Among the 742 participants, 51.9% had a fear of falling, which was more prevalent in women and older participants. Fear of falling was associated with a history of one to two falls (odds ratio [OR] 2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.42-3.36), three or more falls (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.10-6.70), use of seven or more medications (OR 1.70, 95%CI 1.04-2.80), hearing impairment (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.10-2.49), functional dependence in activities of daily living (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.07-2.79), diminished gait speed (OR 1.64 95% CI 1.04-2.58), fair self-rated health (OR 1.89, 95% CI, 1.30-2.74), poor/very poor self-rated health (OR 4.92, 95% CI 1.49-16.27) and depressive symptoms (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.07-2.63). The prevalence of fear of falling was high in this population, and was associated with history of falls, use of seven or more medications, hearing impairment, functional dependency in activities of daily living, diminished walking speed, fair and poor/very poor self-rated health and depressive symptoms. © 2015

  7. The efficacy of a commercial competitive exclusion product on Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens in a 5-week pilot-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneitz, C; Hakkinen, M

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of the commercial competitive exclusion product Broilact against Campylobacter jejuni was evaluated in broiler chickens in a 5-week pilot-scale study. Newly-hatched broiler chicks were brought from a commercial hatchery. After arrival 50 seeder chicks were challenged orally with approximately 10(3) cfu of C. jejuni, wing marked, and placed back in a delivery box and moved to a separate room. The rest of the chicks (contact chicks) were placed in floor pens, 100 chicks per pen. Birds in two pens were treated orally on the day of hatch with the commercial competitive exclusion (CE) product Broilact, and three pens were left untreated. The following day 10 seeder chicks were introduced into the Broilact treated and untreated control pens. One pen was left both untreated and unchallenged (0-control). Each week the ceca of 10 contact chicks and one seeder chick were examined quantitatively for Campylobacter The treatment prevented or significantly reduced the colonization of the challenge organism in the ceca during the two first weeks; the percentage of colonized birds being 0% after the first week and 30% after the second week in the Broilact treated groups but was 100% in the control groups the entire 5-week rearing period. During the third rearing week the proportion of Campylobacter positive birds started to increase in the treated pens, being 80% after the third week and 95 and 90% after the fourth and fifth rearing weeks, respectively. Similarly the average count of Campylobacter in the cecal contents of the Broilact treated chicks started to increase, the difference between the treated and control chicks being 1.4 logs at the end of the rearing period. Although the protective effect was temporary and occurred only during the first two weeks of the rearing period, the results of this study support the earlier observations that CE flora designed to protect chicks from Salmonella may also reduce Campylobacter colonization of broiler chickens. © The

  8. Cowlitz Falls fish passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system

  9. Prediction of falls in older adults with cancer: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overcash, Janine

    2007-03-01

    To determine the extent to which falls occur in older adult patients with cancer; to identify how falls relate to depression, age, functional status, and cognition; and to develop a model for predicting falls. Descriptive, prospective, quantitative. Patients in the Senior Adult Oncology Program at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. 165 patients aged 70 years or older with any diagnosis of cancer, treatment type, and stage. Data were collected during a one-time interview using a comprehensive geriatric assessment consisting of the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) Scale, Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, and a fall assessment. Falls, functional status, depression, cognition, age, and gender. IADL scores were found to be a predictor of falls while controlling for age and ADL status. An IADL score of 22 predicts a 21% risk of a fall. Fall risk increases to 81% at an IADL score of 9. IADL score is a predictor of falls in this older adult population with cancer. ADL scores are not a predictor of falls when IADL is included in the model. Nurses must play a vital role in conducting fall screening and risk assessments for older adults with cancer.

  10. The Association of Cardiovascular Disorders and Falls: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sofie; Bhangu, Jaspreet; de Rooij, Sophia; Daams, Joost; Kenny, Rose Anne; van der Velde, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are recognized as risk factors for falls in older adults. The aim of this systematic review was to identify cardiovascular disorders that are associated with falls, thus providing angles for optimization of fall-preventive care. Systematic review. Medline and Embase. studies addressing persons aged 50 years and older that described cardiovascular risk factors for falls. Key search terms for cardiovascular abnormalities included all synonyms for the following groups: structural cardiac abnormalities, cardiac arrhythmia, blood pressure abnormalities, carotid sinus hypersensitivity (CSH), orthostatic hypotension (OH), vasovagal syncope (VVS), postprandial hypotension (PPH), arterial stiffness, heart failure, and cardiovascular disease. Quality of studies was assed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Eighty-six studies were included. Of studies that used a control group, most consistent associations with falls were observed for low blood pressure (BP) (4/5 studies showing a positive association), heart failure (4/5), and cardiac arrhythmia (4/6). Higher prevalences of CSH (4/6), VVS (2/2), and PPH (3/4) were reported in fallers compared with controls in most studies, but most of these studies failed to show clear association measures. Coronary artery disease (6/10), orthostatic hypotension (9/25), general cardiovascular disease (4/9), and hypertension (7/25) all showed inconsistent associations with falls. Arterial stiffness was identified as an independent predictor for falls in one study, as were several echocardiographic abnormalities. Several cardiovascular associations with falls were identified, including low BP, heart failure, and arrhythmia. These results provide several angles for optimizing fall-preventive care, but further work on standard definitions, as well as the exact contribution of individual risk factors on fall incidence is now important to find potential areas for preventive interventions. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The

  11. Exercises to help prevent falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slowly and easily. DO NOT hold your breath. Balance Exercises You can do some balance exercises during ... fall prevention in the elderly: what about agility? Sports Med . 2016;46:143-149. PMID: 26395115 www. ...

  12. Novel insights in the fecal egg count reduction test for monitoring drug efficacy against soil-transmitted helminths in large-scale treatment programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Levecke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT is recommended to monitor drug efficacy against soil-transmitted helminths (STHs in public health. However, the impact of factors inherent to study design (sample size and detection limit of the fecal egg count (FEC method and host-parasite interactions (mean baseline FEC and aggregation of FEC across host population on the reliability of FECRT is poorly understood.A simulation study was performed in which FECRT was assessed under varying conditions of the aforementioned factors. Classification trees were built to explore critical values for these factors required to obtain conclusive FECRT results. The outcome of this analysis was subsequently validated on five efficacy trials across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Unsatisfactory (<85.0% sensitivity and specificity results to detect reduced efficacy were found if sample sizes were small (<10 or if sample sizes were moderate (10-49 combined with highly aggregated FEC (k<0.25. FECRT remained inconclusive under any evaluated condition for drug efficacies ranging from 87.5% to 92.5% for a reduced-efficacy-threshold of 90% and from 92.5% to 97.5% for a threshold of 95%. The most discriminatory study design required 200 subjects independent of STH status (including subjects who are not excreting eggs. For this sample size, the detection limit of the FEC method and the level of aggregation of the FEC did not affect the interpretation of the FECRT. Only for a threshold of 90%, mean baseline FEC <150 eggs per gram of stool led to a reduced discriminatory power.This study confirms that the interpretation of FECRT is affected by a complex interplay of factors inherent to both study design and host-parasite interactions. The results also highlight that revision of the current World Health Organization guidelines to monitor drug efficacy is indicated. We, therefore, propose novel guidelines to support future monitoring programs.

  13. Falls: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and relationship to fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sarah D; Miller, Ram R

    2008-12-01

    Falls are common in the elderly, and frequently result in injury and disability. Most falls result from an interaction between individual characteristics that increase an individual's propensity to fall and acute mediating risk factors that provide the opportunity to fall. Predisposing risk factors include age-associated changes in strength and balance, comorbidities such as osteoarthritis, visual impairment and dementia, psychotropic medications, and certain types of footwear. Fewer studies have focused on acute precipitating factors, but environmental and situational factors are clearly important to fall risk. Approximately 30% of falls result in an injury that requires medical attention, with fractures occurring in approximately 10%. In addition to the risk factors for falls, the fall descent, fall impact, and bone strength are all important determinants of whether a fall will result in a fracture. In recent years, numerous studies have been directed toward the development of effective fall and fall-related fracture prevention interventions.

  14. Risk factors for falls in the institutionalized elder population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Romero

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to determine the risk factorspredictors of falls in institutionalized elderlypeople. Methodology: Analysis of data from alongitudinal cohort study. Subjects: Institutionalizedelderly volunteers residents of a nursinghome in Arbelaez, Colombia enrolled andfollowed for six months (N= 116; mean age: 78years. Main outcome measures: Falls detected via nurses reports and medical records. Independentvariables: Baseline measures of demographics,medical history, drug intake, depression, mentalstate, visual acuity, orthostatic hypotension,body mass index, cardiovascular state, limbdeformities, limb strength, tone, trophism, rageof motion, Romberg, one leg balance test, GetUp and Go test and timed Get Up and Go test.Evaluation of home facilities by the TESS-NHand SCUEQS scales. Results: Over the six monthfollow-up 36% experienced a fall. All noneinjurious falls. The independent significantpredictors of all falls using logistic regression were female gender, history of dizziness and anabnormal one leg balance test. With coefficientB values of 1.029, 2.024 and 1.712, respectively.Conclusion: The female gender, the history ofdizziness and abnormal one-leg balance testappear to be the main and significant predictorsof falls in institutionalized elderly persons.However, no single factor seems to be accurateenough to be relied on as a sole predictor of fallrisk because so many diverse factors are involvedin falling

  15. Free Falling in Stratified Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Try; Vincent, Lionel; Kanso, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Leaves falling in air and discs falling in water are examples of unsteady descents due to complex interaction between gravitational and aerodynamic forces. Understanding these descent modes is relevant to many branches of engineering and science such as estimating the behavior of re-entry space vehicles to studying biomechanics of seed dispersion. For regularly shaped objects falling in homogenous fluids, the motion is relatively well understood. However, less is known about how density stratification of the fluid medium affects the falling behavior. Here, we experimentally investigate the descent of discs in both pure water and in stable linearly stratified fluids for Froude numbers Fr 1 and Reynolds numbers Re between 1000 -2000. We found that stable stratification (1) enhances the radial dispersion of the disc at landing, (2) increases the descent time, (3) decreases the inclination (or nutation) angle, and (4) decreases the fluttering amplitude while falling. We conclude by commenting on how the corresponding information can be used as a predictive model for objects free falling in stratified fluids.

  16. Child Adjustment and Parent Efficacy Scale-Developmental Disability (CAPES-DD): First psychometric evaluation of a new child and parenting assessment tool for children with a developmental disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emser, Theresa S; Mazzucchelli, Trevor G; Christiansen, Hanna; Sanders, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Child Adjustment and Parent Efficacy Scale-Developmental Disability (CAPES-DD), a brief inventory for assessing emotional and behavioral problems of children with developmental disabilities aged 2- to 16-years, as well as caregivers' self-efficacy in managing these problems. A sample of 636 parents participated in the study. Children's ages ranged from 2 to 15. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 21-item, three-factor model of CAPES-DD child adjustment with 13 items describing behavioral (10 items) and emotional (3 items) problems and 8 items describing prosocial behavior. Three additional items were included due to their clinical usefulness and contributed to a Total Problem Score. Factor analyses also supported a 16-item, one factor model of CAPES-DD self-efficacy. Psychometric evaluation of the CAPES-DD revealed scales had satisfactory to very good internal consistency, as well as very good convergent and predictive validity. The instrument is to be in the public domain and free for practitioners and researchers to use. Potential uses of the measure and implications for future validation studies are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Age-dependent physiological changes, medicines and sex-influenced types of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusljic, Snezana; Perera, Sachin; Manias, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Background/Study context: We investigated various parameters related to falls including age-dependent physiological changes, regular medicine use and different types of falls experienced. There is a lack of research investigating the impact of health status, sex, polypharmacy and ageing on different types of falls such as unspecified fall on the same level, mechanical fall on the same level relating to slipping, tripping or loosing balance, fall from a chair, vehicle and fall as a result of syncope, fall from steps or stairs and fall from the height. The study included a random sample of 250 older patients, which comprised 10% of the total number of patients (n = 2,492), admitted to a large-scale academic hospital following a fall. Patients' medicine and illness history, types of falls, liver, renal and sensory function were collected. Univariate analysis was used to examine associations between the type of fall and explanatory variables, followed by multinominal logistic regression analysis. There was a significant association between the type of fall and sex, p = 0.01, and between the type of fall and regular medicine use, p = 0.002. The multinominal logistic regression analysis revealed that the full model, which considered all explanatory variables together, was statistically significant, p falls except 'fall from the height' was female sex followed by the regular medicine use. This study identified predictors for various types of falls in older people; the strongest predictor being a female sex followed by regular medicine use. Based on these findings, the medicine prescribing practice in this older population must be carefully reviewed.

  18. Falls and patient safety for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovitch, Sharon A

    2006-10-01

    The risk of falling increases with age. Falls in the elderly have been found to raise mortality and morbidity rates and are a leading cause of premature admission to long-term care facilities. Attention to known intrinsic and extrinsic factors that predispose to falling is important in community dwelling and institutionalized older adults. New government guidelines for long-term care facilities have helped focus attention on the safety aspect of fall risk and information about the physical and psychological impact of falling is increasing. Implementation of fall prevention protocols, including the use of fall risk assessment tools, may help reduce the incidence of falls and resultant complications.

  19. Epidemiology of falls in older age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Nancye May

    2011-03-01

    Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of population aging. The magnitude of the problem is described in terms of the classification of falls and measurement of outcomes, including fall incidence rates across settings, sociodemographic determinants, international trends, and costs of falls and fall-related injuries. Finally, public health approaches to minimize falls risk and consequent demand on health care resources are suggested.

  20. Fall prevention in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-01-01

    Summary Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment

  1. Ecosystem scale acoustic sensing reveals humpback whale behavior synchronous with herring spawning processes and re-evaluation finds no effect of sonar on humpback song occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in fall 2006.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    Full Text Available We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed north of Georges Bank in a Fall 2006 Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS experiment, vocalizing whales could be instantaneously detected and localized over most of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem in a roughly 400-km diameter area by introducing array gain, of 18 dB, orders of magnitude higher than previously available in acoustic whale sensing. With humpback-whale vocalizations consistently recorded at roughly 2000/day, we show that vocalizing humpbacks (i were overwhelmingly distributed along the northern flank of Georges Bank, coinciding with the peak spawning time and location of Atlantic herring, and (ii their overall vocalization behavior was strongly diurnal, synchronous with the formation of large nocturnal herring shoals, with a call rate roughly ten-times higher at night than during the day. Humpback-whale vocalizations were comprised of (1 highly diurnal non-song calls, suited to hunting and feeding behavior, and (2 songs, which had constant occurrence rate over a diurnal cycle, invariant to diurnal herring shoaling. Before and during OAWRS survey transmissions: (a no vocalizing whales were found at Stellwagen Bank, which had negligible herring populations, and (b a constant humpback-whale song occurrence rate indicates the transmissions had no effect on humpback song. These measurements contradict the conclusions of Risch et al. Our analysis indicates that (a the song occurrence variation reported in Risch et al. is consistent with natural causes other than sonar, (b the reducing change in song reported in Risch et al. occurred days before the sonar survey began, and (c the Risch et al. method lacks the statistical significance to draw the conclusions of Risch et al. because it has a 98-100% false-positive rate

  2. Ecosystem scale acoustic sensing reveals humpback whale behavior synchronous with herring spawning processes and re-evaluation finds no effect of sonar on humpback song occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in fall 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zheng; Jain, Ankita D; Tran, Duong; Yi, Dong Hoon; Wu, Fan; Zorn, Alexander; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2014-01-01

    We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed north of Georges Bank in a Fall 2006 Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment, vocalizing whales could be instantaneously detected and localized over most of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem in a roughly 400-km diameter area by introducing array gain, of 18 dB, orders of magnitude higher than previously available in acoustic whale sensing. With humpback-whale vocalizations consistently recorded at roughly 2000/day, we show that vocalizing humpbacks (i) were overwhelmingly distributed along the northern flank of Georges Bank, coinciding with the peak spawning time and location of Atlantic herring, and (ii) their overall vocalization behavior was strongly diurnal, synchronous with the formation of large nocturnal herring shoals, with a call rate roughly ten-times higher at night than during the day. Humpback-whale vocalizations were comprised of (1) highly diurnal non-song calls, suited to hunting and feeding behavior, and (2) songs, which had constant occurrence rate over a diurnal cycle, invariant to diurnal herring shoaling. Before and during OAWRS survey transmissions: (a) no vocalizing whales were found at Stellwagen Bank, which had negligible herring populations, and (b) a constant humpback-whale song occurrence rate indicates the transmissions had no effect on humpback song. These measurements contradict the conclusions of Risch et al. Our analysis indicates that (a) the song occurrence variation reported in Risch et al. is consistent with natural causes other than sonar, (b) the reducing change in song reported in Risch et al. occurred days before the sonar survey began, and (c) the Risch et al. method lacks the statistical significance to draw the conclusions of Risch et al. because it has a 98-100% false-positive rate and lacks

  3. Comparison of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment strategies in promotion of infertility self-efficacy scale in infertile women: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Pasha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The infertility is associated with psychological consequence including depression, and lack of self-efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacological and no pharmacological strategies in promotion of self-efficacy of infertile women. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 89 infertile women who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center and were randomized into three groups; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, antidepressant therapy with flouxetine 20 mg daily for 3 month, and a control group. All participants completed Infertility Self-efficacy Inventory (ISE and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI at the beginning and end of the study. Results: The means ISE scores among the CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were 6.1±1.6 vs. 7.2±0.9, 6.4±1.4 vs. 6.9±1.3 and 6.1±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.4 respectively. Both CBT and fluoxetine increased the mean of ISE scores more than control group after intervention (p<0.0001, p=0.033; respectively, but increase in the CBT group was significantly greater than flouxetine group. Finally, there was evidence of high infertility self-efficacy for women exposed to the intervention compared with those in the control group. Also, there was an improvement in depression. Both fluoxetine and CBT decreased significantly the mean of BDI scores more than the control group; decrease in the CBT group was significantly more than that in the fluoxetine group. Conclusion: CBT can serve as an effective psychosocial intervention for promoting self-efficacy of infertile women

  4. Neighborhood Environment and Falls among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklett, Emily Joy; Lohman, Matthew C.; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2017-01-01

    Background: Falls present a major challenge to active aging, but the relationship between neighborhood factors and falls is poorly understood. This study examined the relationship between fall events and neighborhood factors, including neighborhood social cohesion (sense of belonging, trust, friendliness, and helpfulness) and physical environment (vandalism/graffiti, rubbish, vacant/deserted houses, and perceived safety walking home at night). Methods: Data were analyzed from 9259 participants over four biennial waves (2006–2012) of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative sample of adults aged 65 and older in the United States. Results: In models adjusting for demographic and health-related covariates, a one-unit increase in neighborhood social cohesion was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (odds ratio (OR): 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93–0.99) and 6% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90–0.98). A one-unit increase in the physical environment scale was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (OR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93–0.99) and with 5% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91–1.00) in adjusted models. Conclusions: The physical and social neighborhood environment may affect fall risk among community-dwelling older adults. Findings support the ongoing need for evidence-based fall prevention programming in community and clinical settings. PMID:28208598

  5. Memories of falling in elderly patients with dementia: response concordance rate and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Masayo; Moriguchi, Kyoko; Lebowitz, Adam; Asada, Takashi

    2014-12-23

    Although demented elderly patients have impaired memory, memories of falling are not uncommon. We aim to clarify reliability of memories of falling in such patients. Subjects included 62 patients (18 men, 44 women) diagnosed with dementia who resided in long-term care facilities. Mean age was 82.9 ± 7.8 years, mean Mini-Mental State Examination score was 16.4 ± 4.7 points, and mean Functional Independence Measure score was 67.9 ± 18.4 points. Subjects were asked a closed question about whether they were aware of having fallen (i.e. memories of falling) over the past year. Fear of falling was quantified using the visual analogue scale and FACES Pain Rating Scale. Scores were re-measured during retest approximately 10 days later to examine reproducibility of memories and fear of falling. Subjects whom staff had witnessed suffering a fall between baseline and retest session were excluded. Fall memory concordance rate was 0.84, visual analogue scale reproducibility (correlation coefficient) was 0.98, and FACES Pain Rating Scale was 0.86. No differences in Mini-Mental State Examination scores were noted between groups for whom memories of falling were or were not reproducible. No correlation was observed among Mini-Mental State Examination, Functional Independence Measure scores, and intensity of fear of falling. There was a high concordance rate for patients' memories of falling, which suggests that falls were retained as memories. No relationship was observed between memories of falling and degree of cognitive impairment, and severe dementia did not necessarily imply memories of falling were unreliable. The reproducibility of fear of falling suggested the intensity of fear of falling was not easily altered. It was possible memories of falling and fear of falling mutually interacted to reinforce and fixate with each other, leading to the observed phenomenon. Therefore, it appeared memories of falling were retained by patients; this fact can be used in fall

  6. Fall Risk Assessment Through Automatic Combination of Clinical Fall Risk Factors and Body-Worn Sensor Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Barry R; Redmond, Stephen J; Caulfield, Brian

    2017-05-01

    Falls are the leading global cause of accidental death and disability in older adults and are the most common cause of injury and hospitalization. Accurate, early identification of patients at risk of falling, could lead to timely intervention and a reduction in the incidence of fall-related injury and associated costs. We report a statistical method for fall risk assessment using standard clinical fall risk factors (N = 748). We also report a means of improving this method by automatically combining it, with a fall risk assessment algorithm based on inertial sensor data and the timed-up-and-go test. Furthermore, we provide validation data on the sensor-based fall risk assessment method using a statistically independent dataset. Results obtained using cross-validation on a sample of 292 community dwelling older adults suggest that a combined clinical and sensor-based approach yields a classification accuracy of 76.0%, compared to either 73.6% for sensor-based assessment alone, or 68.8% for clinical risk factors alone. Increasing the cohort size by adding an additional 130 subjects from a separate recruitment wave (N = 422), and applying the same model building and validation method, resulted in a decrease in classification performance (68.5% for combined classifier, 66.8% for sensor data alone, and 58.5% for clinical data alone). This suggests that heterogeneity between cohorts may be a major challenge when attempting to develop fall risk assessment algorithms which generalize well. Independent validation of the sensor-based fall risk assessment algorithm on an independent cohort of 22 community dwelling older adults yielded a classification accuracy of 72.7%. Results suggest that the present method compares well to previously reported sensor-based fall risk assessment methods in assessing falls risk. Implementation of objective fall risk assessment methods on a large scale has the potential to improve quality of care and lead to a reduction in associated hospital

  7. [Home falls in infants before walking acquisition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, I; Gurrera, E; Honorat, R; Rekhroukh, H; Casasoprana, A; Grouteau, E

    2013-05-01

    Minor head trauma is frequent among infants and leads to numerous visits to emergency departments for neurological assessment to evaluate the value of cerebral CT scan with the risk for traumatic brain injuries (TBI). To analyze the epidemiological characteristics of nonwalking infants admitted after falling at home and to analyze associated factors for skull fractures and TBI. Between January 2007 and December 2011, all children aged 9 months or younger and admitted after a home fall to the pediatric emergency unit of a tertiary children's hospital were included. The data collected were age, sex, weight and height, body mass index; geographic origin, referral or direct admission, mode of transportation; month, day and time of admission; causes of the fall, alleged fall height, presence of an eyewitness, type of landing surface; Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, application of the head trauma protocol, location and type of injuries, cerebral CT scan results, length of hospital stay, progression, and neglect or abuse situations. DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS: within the study period, 1910 infants were included. Fifty-four percent of children were aged less than 6 months with a slight male prevalence (52%). Falls from parental bed and infant carriers accounted for the most frequent fall circumstances. GCS score on admission was equal to 14 or 15 in 99% of cases. A cerebral CT scan was performed in 34% of children and detected 104 skull fractures and 55 TBI. Infants aged less than 1 month had the highest rate of TBI (8.5%). Eleven percent of patients were hospitalized. A situation of abuse was identified in 51 infants (3%). UNIVARIATE ANALYSIS: Male children and infants aged less than 3 months had a higher risk of skull fractures (P = 0.03 and P = 0.0003, respectively). In the TBI group, children were younger (3.8 ± 2.6 months versus 5.4 ± 2.5 months, P falling from a height greater than 90 cm (OR 3.1 [1.7-5.6], P = 0.0002). Before walking acquisition, children are

  8. The effect of aquatic exercise and education on lowering fall risk in older adults with hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Cathy M; Faulkner, Robert A

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of aquatic exercise and education on fall risk factors in older adults with hip osteoarthritis (OA). Seventy-nine adults, 65 years of age or older with hip OA and at least 1 fall risk factor, were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: aquatics and education (AE; aquatic exercise twice a wk with once-a-wk group education), aquatics only (A; 2 wk aquatic exercise) and control (C; usual activity). Balance, falls efficacy, dual-task function, functional performance (chair stands), and walking performance were measured pre- and postintervention or control period. There was a significant improvement in fall risk factors (full-factorial MANCOVA, baseline values as covariates; p = .038); AE improved in falls efficacy compared with C and in functional performance compared with A and C. The combination of aquatic exercise and education was effective in improving fall risk factors in older adults with arthritis.

  9. Executive functioning, concern about falling and quadriceps strength mediate the relationship between impaired gait adaptability and fall risk in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Maria Joana D; Lord, Stephen R; Brodie, Matthew A; Schoene, Daniel; Pelicioni, Paulo H S; Sturnieks, Daina L; Menant, Jasmine C

    2018-01-01

    Reduced ability to adapt gait, particularly under challenging conditions, may be an important reason why older adults have an increased risk of falling. This study aimed to identify cognitive, psychological and physical mediators of the relationship between impaired gait adaptability and fall risk in older adults. Fifty healthy older adults (mean±SD: 74±7years) were categorised as high or low fall risk, based on past falls and their performance in the Physiological Profile Assessment. High and low-risk groups were then compared in the gait adaptability test, i.e. an assessment of the ability to adapt gait in response to obstacles and stepping targets under single and dual task conditions. Quadriceps strength, concern about falling and executive function were also measured. The older adults who made errors on the gait adaptability test were 4.76 (95%CI=1.08-20.91) times more likely to be at high risk of falling. Furthermore, each standard deviation reduction in gait speed while approaching the targets/obstacle increased the odds of being at high risk of falling approximately three fold: single task - OR=3.10,95%CI=1.43-6.73; dual task - 3.42,95%CI=1.56-7.52. Executive functioning, concern about falling and quadriceps strength substantially mediated the relationship between the gait adaptability measures and fall risk status. Impaired gait adaptability is associated with high risk of falls in older adults. Reduced executive function, increased concern about falling and weaker quadriceps strength contribute significantly to this relationship. Training gait adaptability directly, as well as addressing the above mediators through cognitive, behavioural and physical training may maximise fall prevention efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychological correlates of fear of falling: Findings from the German Aging Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, André; Bock, Jens-Oliver; König, Hans-Helmut

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify general psychological factors related to fear of falling. Data drawn from national probability sampling of the German population aged ≥40 years were used (German Aging Survey; n = 7779). The fear of falling and the psychological factors of loneliness, life satisfaction, positive affect, negative affect, optimism, self-efficacy, self-esteem, self-regulation and perceived stress were collected in self-administered questionnaires. Multiple logistic regression models controlling for sociodemographic, lifestyle and health-related variables were used to determine the psychological correlates of fear of falling. The prevalence of fear of falling was 18% for all individuals. All psychological factors showed strong bivariate associations with fear of falling. In the multiple regression analyses, higher levels of loneliness, lower life satisfaction, lower positive affect and higher negative affect, as well as lower levels of optimism, self-efficacy, self-esteem, self-regulation and more perceived stress, were associated with increased fear of falling after controlling for sociodemographic factors, various lifestyle factors and morbidity. The psychological factors considered in the present study are important for characterizing people with fear of falling. Because effective interventions to treat the fear of falling are available, our study might help to address this target group more accurately. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 396-406. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. Web-based system for assessing risk factors for falls in community-dwelling elderly people using the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    OpenAIRE

    Pecchia, Leandro; Bath, Peter A.; Pendleton, Neil; Bracale, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    Falls occur frequently among older people and represent the most common cause of injury-related morbidity and mortality in later life. Preventing falls is an important way to reduce injuries, hospitalizations, and injury-related morbidity and mortality among older people. The research literature has identified hundreds of risk factors for falls among elderly people. Prioritizing risk factors for falls is useful for designing effective and efficacious prevention programs.\\ud The aim of this st...

  12. Falls and gait disturbances in Huntington's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Knol, M.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Kremer, B.P.; Roos, R.A.C.; Munneke, M.

    2008-01-01

    Falls are common in patients with Huntington's disease, but the incidence, falling circumstances and contributing factors have never been examined. We recorded falls in 45 early to midstage Huntington's disease patients, both retrospectively (12 months) and prospectively (3 months). Fall rates were

  13. Falling: should one blame the heart?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30% of people aged 65 and older suffer a fall each year; one in five of these falls will lead to significant injury. As the world’s ageing population increases, healthcare costs associated with falls are only expected to rise. It is estimated that over a third of falls may be

  14. Falls in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An observational cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roig, Marc; Eng, Janice J; MacIntyre, Donna L

    2011-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To investigate incidence, risk factors and impact of falls on health related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). DESIGN: Observational cohort study. METHODS: Patients completed these questionnaires at baseline and at 6-months......: Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ), Activities Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale and a form to record demographic data, medications, co-morbidities, oxygen use, acute exacerbations, fall history and assistive device use. Physical activity was measured...... with the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) only at baseline. Fall incidence was monitored through monthly fall diaries. Patients were categorized as non-fallers (0 falls) or fallers (=1 falls). RESULTS: Data from 101 patients with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 46.4 ± 21.6% predicted were...

  15. Home-based exercise program and fall-risk reduction in older adults with multiple sclerosis: phase 1 randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Finlayson, Marcia; McAuley, Edward; Morrison, Steve; Motl, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    To determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of a home-based exercise intervention targeting fall risk in older adults with multiple sclerosis. A randomized controlled pilot trial. A home-based exercise program. Participants were randomly allocated to either a home-based exercise intervention group (n = 13) or a waiting list control group (n = 14). The exercise group completed exercises targeting lower muscle strength and balance three times a week for 12 weeks. The control group continued normal activity. Fall risk (Physiological Profile Assessment scores), balance (Berg Balance Scale), and walking testing prior to and immediately following the 12-week intervention. Each outcome measure was placed in an analysis of covariance with group as the between-subject factor and baseline values as the covariate. Effect sizes were calculated. Twelve participants from the control group and ten from the exercise group completed the study. There were no related adverse events. Fall risk was found to decrease in the exercise group following the intervention (1.1 SD 1.0 vs. 0.6 SD 0.6) while there was an increase in fall risk in the control group (1.9 SD 1.5 vs. 2.2 SD 1.9). Effect sizes for most outcomes were large (η(2) > 0.15). Home-based exercise was found to be feasible, safe, and effective for reducing physiological fall risk in older adults with multiple sclerosis. Our findings support the implementation of a larger trial to reduce fall risk in persons with multiple sclerosis.

  16. Patient centered fall risk awareness perspectives: clinical correlates and fall risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Background While objective measures to assess risk of falls in older adults have been established; the value of patient self-reports in the context of falls is not known. Objectives To identify clinical correlates of patient centered fall risk awareness, and their validity for predicting falls. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting and Participants 316 non-demented and ambulatory community-dwelling older adults (mean age 78 years, 55% women). Measurements Fall risk awareness was assessed with a two-item questionnaire, which asked participants about overall likelihood and personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. Incident falls were recorded over study follow-up. Results Fifty-three participants (16.8%) responded positively to the first fall risk awareness question about being likely to have a fall in the next 12 months, and 100 (31.6%) reported being at personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. There was only fair correlation (kappa 0.370) between responses on the two questions. Prior falls and depressive symptoms were associated with positive responses on both fall risk awareness questions. Age and other established fall risk factors were not associated with responses on both fall risk awareness questions. The fall risk awareness questionnaire did not predict incident falls or injurious falls. Conclusion Fall risk awareness is low in older adults. While patient centered fall risk awareness is not predictive of falls, subjective risk perceptions should be considered when designing fall preventive strategies as they may influence participation and behaviors. PMID:27801936

  17. Posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults hospitalized for fall injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Nimali; Sparks, Martha A; Kato, Kaori; Wyka, Katarzyna; Wilbur, Kaitlyn; Chiaramonte, Gabrielle; Barie, Philip S; Lachs, Mark S; O'Dell, Michael; Evans, Arthur; Bruce, Martha L; Difede, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Although unintentional falls may pose a threat of death or injury, few studies have investigated their psychological impact on older adults. This study sought to gather data on early posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults in the hospital setting after a fall. Participants in this study were 100 adults age 65 years or older admitted to a large urban hospital in New York City because of a fall. Men and women were represented approximately equally in the sample; most were interviewed within days of the fall event. The study's bedside interview included the Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Scale, which inquires about the presence and severity of 17 trauma-related symptoms. Twenty-seven participants reported substantial posttraumatic stress symptoms (moderate or higher severity). Exploratory bivariate analyses suggested an association between posttraumatic stress symptom severity and female gender, lower level of education, unemployment, number of medical conditions, and back/chest injury. A significant percentage of older patients hospitalized after a fall suffer substantial posttraumatic stress. Future investigations are needed to assess the association between the psychiatric impact of a fall and short-term inpatient outcomes as well as longer-term functional outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Falls prevention for the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Lühmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention.Research questions: The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years, living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Methods: Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT, the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed.Results: Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the

  19. Falls prevention for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Katrin; Bremer, Martina; Schramm, Susanne; Lühmann, Dagmar; Raspe, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention. The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years), living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT), the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed. Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the inclusion criteria. However, to a variable degree the validity of their

  20. Single-center, noninterventional clinical trial to assess the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of a dimeticone-based medical device in facilitating the removal of scales after topical application in patients with psoriasis corporis or psoriasis capitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengge UR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulrich R Hengge,1 Kristina Röschmann,2 Henning Candler3 1Skin Center, Düsseldorf, 2Department of Clinical Research, 3Department of Medical Affairs, G. Pohl‑Boskamp GmbH & Co. KG, Hohenlockstedt, Germany Introduction: Psoriasis is a frequent inflammatory skin disease affecting ~2%–3% of the population in western countries. Scaling of the psoriatic lesions is the most impairing symptom in patients with psoriasis. In contrast to conventional keratolytic treatment concepts containing salicylic acid or urea, a dimeticone-based medical device (Loyon® removes scales in a physical way without any pharmacological effect.Objective: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of a dimeticone-based medical device in removal of scales in patients with psoriasis corporis/capitis under real-life conditions.Methods: Forty patients with psoriasis capitis or corporis were included and received once-daily treatments for 7 days. Clinical assessment of the psoriasis area severity index score (psoriasis corporis and the psoriasis scalp severity index score (psoriasis capitis was performed and evaluated at baseline, after 3 and 7 days of treatment. Baseline scaling scores and redness scores were calculated for two target lesions of the scalp or the body on a 5-point scale each.Results: For the primary efficacy variable scaling score, a statistically significant decrease was observed after treatment, with a relative reduction in scaling of 36.8% after 7 days of treatment within patients affected by psoriasis capitis. Treatment success was achieved in 76.8% of patients with psoriasis capitis, and time to treatment success was evaluated to be 4.14 days for these patients and 4.33 days for patients suffering from psoriasis corporis.Conclusion: In conclusion, this trial demonstrated that the dimeticone-based medical device is a safe, well-tolerated, practicable, and efficient keratolytic compound, which can be well implemented in and recommended for standard therapy

  1. Maternal Self-Efficacy of Pregnant Indonesian Teens: Development and Validation of an Indonesian Version of the Young Adult Maternal Confidence Scale and Measurement of Its Validity and Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardani, Desy Ayu; Rachmawati, Imami Nur; Gayatri, Dewi

    Pregnant teens often feel uncertain in the last trimester about their ability to take care of their baby. At this time, maternal confidence in the ability to care for the baby is an important step in the preparation for becoming a mother. The purpose of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of an Indonesian version of the Young Adult Maternal Confidence Scale (YAMCS) as an instrument to measure maternal self-efficacy of pregnant teens in the last trimester. The study consisted of 90 pregnant teens, age of respondents less than 19 years and living in 1 of 3 sub-districts: Cilember, Sukamanah and Megamendung, Bogor Regency. West Java. All the participants completed a questionnaire based on the YAMCS to assess maternal self-efficacy. The YAMCS consists of 3 dimensions (perception of ability, uncertainty, and mothering behaviors) and 10 items. All items of the YAMCS had corrected item-total item correlation more than 0.3 and had 0.859 Cronbach's α scores. Based on the findings of this study, this questionnaire is a valid and reliable measure of maternal self-efficacy of pregnant teens in Indonesia. Health workers can use the questionnaire to assess the confidence of pregnant women, especially that of adolescents, in caring for their baby and being a good mother.

  2. Falls: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Relationship to Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Sarah D.; Miller, Ram

    2008-01-01

    Falls are common in the elderly, and frequently result in injury, disability, and institutionalization. Although the causes of falls are complex, most falls result from an interaction between individual characteristics that increase an individual's propensity to fall and acute mediating risk factors that provide the opportunity to fall. Predisposing risk factors include age-associated changes in strength and balance, age-associated comorbidities such as osteoarthritis, visual impairment and d...

  3. Relevance of balance measurement tools and balance training for fall prevention in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Noohu, Majumi M.; Dey, Aparajit B.; Hussain, Mohammed E.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately one in three older people fall each year owing to gait/balance disorder/weakness, the second leading cause of falls in older adults. This review evaluates the capability of different balance measurement tools to predict falls in the elderly, which are used routinely for assessing balance impairment. Balance measurement tools reviewed are the Timed Up and Go test, Berg Balance Scale, Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment, Functional Reach Test, Clinical Test of Sensory...

  4. The "Aachen fall prevention App" - a Smartphone application app for the self-assessment of elderly patients at risk for ground level falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Peter; Mertens, Alexander; Bröhl, Christina; Theis, Sabine; Seinsch, Tobias; Wille, Matthias; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Knobe, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Fall incidents are a major problem for patients and healthcare. The "Aachen Fall Prevention App" (AFPA) represents the first mobile Health (mHealth) application (app) empowering older patients (persons 50+ years) to self-assess and monitor their individual fall risk. Self-assessment is based on the "Aachen Fall Prevention Scale," which consists of three steps. First, patients answer ten standardized yes-no questions (positive criterion ≥ 5 "Yes" responses). Second, a ten-second test of free standing without compensatory movement is performed (positive criterion: compensatory movement). Finally, during the third step, patients rate their subjective fall risk on a 10-point Likert scale, based on the results of steps one and two. The purpose of this app is (1) to offer a low-threshold service through which individuals can independently monitor their individual fall risk and (2) to collect data about how a patient-centered mHealth app for fall risk assessment is used in the field. The results represent the first year of an ongoing field study. From December 2015 to December 2016, 197 persons downloaded the AFPA (iOS ™ and Android ™ ; free of charge). N  = 111 of these persons voluntarily shared their data and thereby participated in the field study. Data from a final number of n  = 79 persons were analyzed due to exclusion criteria (age, missing objective fall risk, missing self-assessment). The objective fall risk and the self-assessed subjective risk measured by the AFPA showed a significant positive relationship. The "Aachen Fall Prevention App" (AFPA) is an mHealth app released for iOS and Android. This field study revealed the AFPA as a promising tool to raise older adults' awareness of their individual fall risk by means of a low-threshold patient-driven fall risk assessment tool.

  5. Development and feasibility of falls prevention advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harten-Krouwel, Diny; Schuurmans, Marieke; Emmelot-Vonk, Mariëlle; Pel-Littel, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the feasibility of nursing falls prevention advice and factors influencing feasibility. The frequency and seriousness of falls in hospitalised patients are underestimated, and such falls should be preventable because of the presence of professionals. A best practice-based falls prevention advice was developed to decrease the incidence of secondary falls and the incidence of primary falls in the long term and to increase the knowledge of nurses about falls prevention and the seriousness of falls. A descriptive, explorative study. Feasibility of the advice for 30 patients was assessed 82 times (theoretically, three times per patient) by observation and by interviewing nurses, patients and their families. The falls prevention advice was used in 48% of the assessments. There was a difference in use between interventions. Interventions that required more knowledge, communication and extra activities were implemented the least. The absence of materials and knowledge about falls prevention were important determinants of the non-implementation of certain interventions. Before falls prevention advice is implemented, it is important to educate nurses about falls, communication skills and implementation of the advice. The falls prevention advice might help nurses to prevent falls and increase their knowledge about falls prevention. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Nuclear fall-out shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    An underground nuclear fall-out shelter has a plastics shell which, apart from service and access openings, is waterproof and provided, if desired, with a concrete roof. The shelter has an access opening, an air system, lighting, water storage, sanitation and sewage facilities. (author)

  7. NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret…

  8. Fall prevention in older persons

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    psychotropic medications, an exercise programme to improve balance and strength, and home modifications. Early studies of multifactorial interventions, such as those by Tinetti et al. in the US and Close et al. in the UK,[7,10] showed that they could reduce falls risk by 30 - 40%. More recent studies, however, have tended to ...

  9. The Fall of a Sparrow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 1. The Fall of a Sparrow The Life of Sálim Ali. Kartik Shanker. Book Review Volume 2 Issue 1 January 1997 pp 74-76. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/01/0074-0076 ...

  10. Trapping fall armyworm in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is a noctuid pest of row and vegetable crops throughout the Americas. It has recently invaded Africa and has been identified from almost all sub-Saharan countries. There is a strong expectation of significant damage to African maize crop yield and a high likel...

  11. Falling-sphere radioactive viscometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, R. de.

    1987-01-01

    In this work the falling sphere viscometric method was studies experimentally using a sphere tagged with 198 Au radiosotopo, the objective being the demosntration of the advantages of this technique in relation to the traditional method. The utilisation of the falling radioactive sphere permits the point-point monitoring of sphere position as a function of count rate. The fall tube wall and end effects were determined by this technique. Tests were performed with spheres of different diameters in four tubes. The application of this technique demosntrated the wall and end effects in sphere speed. The case of sphere fall in the steady slow regime allowed the determination of the terminal velocity, showing the increase of botton end effect as the sphere approaches the tube base. In the case the transient slow regime, the sphere was initially in a state of respose near the top surface. The data obtained show the influence of the free surface and wall on the sphere acceleration. These experimental data were applied to the Basset equation on order to verify the behaviour of the terms in this equation. (author) [pt

  12. Person-Centered Fall Risk Awareness Perspectives: Clinical Correlates and Fall Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe

    2016-12-01

    To identify clinical correlates of person-centered fall risk awareness and their validity for predicting falls. Prospective cohort study. Community. Ambulatory community-dwelling older adults without dementia (N = 316; mean age 78, 55% female). Fall risk awareness was assessed using a two-item questionnaire that asked participants about overall likelihood of someone in their age group having a fall and their own personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. Incident falls were recorded over study follow-up. Fifty-three participants (16.8%) responded positively to the first fall risk awareness question about being likely to have a fall in the next 12 months, and 100 (31.6%) reported being at personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. There was only fair correlation (κ = 0.370) between responses on the two questions. Prior falls and depressive symptoms were associated with positive responses on both fall risk awareness questions. Age and other established fall risk factors were not associated with responses on either fall risk awareness question. The fall risk awareness questionnaire did not predict incident falls or injurious falls. Fall risk awareness is low in older adults. Although person-centered fall risk awareness is not predictive of falls, subjective risk perceptions should be considered when designing fall preventive strategies because they may influence participation and behaviors. © 2016, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. The effects of high frequency subthalamic stimulation on balance performance and fear of falling in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarnlo Gun-Britt

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Balance impairment is one of the most distressing symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD even with pharmacological treatment (levodopa. A complementary treatment is high frequency stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN. Whether STN stimulation improves postural control is under debate. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of STN stimulation alone on balance performance as assessed with clinical performance tests, subjective ratings of fear of falling and posturography. Methods Ten patients (median age 66, range 59–69 years with bilateral STN stimulation for a minimum of one year, had their anti-PD medications withdrawn overnight. Assessments were done both with the STN stimulation turned OFF and ON (start randomized. In both test conditions, the following were assessed: motor symptoms (descriptive purposes, clinical performance tests, fear of falling ratings, and posturography with and without vibratory proprioceptive disturbance. Results STN stimulation alone significantly (p = 0.002 increased the scores of the Berg balance scale, and the median increase was 6 points. The results of all timed performance tests, except for sharpened Romberg, were significantly (p ≤ 0.016 improved. The patients rated their fear of falling as less severe, and the total score of the Falls-Efficacy Scale(S increased (p = 0.002 in median with 54 points. All patients completed posturography when the STN stimulation was turned ON, but three patients were unable to do so when it was turned OFF. The seven patients with complete data showed no statistical significant difference (p values ≥ 0.109 in torque variance values when comparing the two test situations. This applied both during quiet stance and during the periods with vibratory stimulation, and it was irrespective of visual input and sway direction. Conclusion In this sample, STN stimulation alone significantly improved the results of the clinical performance tests that mimic

  14. Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Assess Parental Self-Efficacy for Influencing Children's Dietary, Physical Activity, Sedentary, and Screen Time Behaviors in Disadvantaged Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Åsa; Bohman, Benjamin; Nyberg, Gisela; Schäfer Elinder, Liselotte

    2018-02-01

    According to social cognitive theory, self-efficacy is central to behavior change. Consequently, parental self-efficacy (PSE) for influencing children's dietary, physical activity (PA), sedentary, and screen time behaviors is important for child obesity prevention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of an instrument to measure PSE regarding these behaviors in disadvantaged areas. Parents ( n = 229) of whom 47% had completed secondary school or less, and who participated in the Healthy School Start trial, responded to a 15-item PSE instrument. Children's diet and screen time were measured through parent reports. PA and sedentary behaviors were measured using accelerometers. Construct validity was assessed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), criterion validity by correlations with child behaviors, and internal consistency by Cronbach's alpha. The EFA yielded three factors: (a) PSE for promoting PA; (b) PSE for limiting intake of unhealthy foods, unhealthy drinks, and screen time; and (c) PSE for promoting intake of fruits and vegetables, all with acceptable to good internal consistency (α = .77-.81). Significant correlations ( p children's dietary ( r s = -.19 to -.29) and screen time ( r = -.29) behaviors and Factor 2, and dietary behaviors and Factor 3 ( r s = .20-.39) but not regarding PA and sedentary behaviors and Factor 1. The instrument demonstrated good construct validity and acceptable to good internal consistency regarding all but PA behaviors. It may be useful for assessing PSE in child obesity prevention interventions in disadvantaged settings after some refinement.

  15. Toothbrushing efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosema, N.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis will explore the most meaningful aspects which are considered to be of interest regarding the efficacy of toothbrushes. One could discuss efficacy by means of plaque removal as well as by means of the effect on gingival inflammation. Plaque removal may be considered as a surrogate effect

  16. Watch Out for Falling Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    The path taken by the falling fragment in the June 2011 event. [Adapted from Petralia et al. 2016]Sometimes plasma emitted from the Sun doesnt escape into space, but instead comes crashing back down to the solar surface. What can observations and models of this process tell us about how the plasma falls and the local conditions on the Sun?Fallback from a FlareOn 7 June 2011, an M-class flare erupted from the solar surface. As the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly looked on, plasma fragments from the flare arced away from the Sun and then fell back to the surface.Some fragments fell back where the Suns magnetic field was weak, returning directly to the surface. But others fell within active regions, where they crashed into the Suns magnetic field lines, brightening the channels and funneling along them through the dense corona and back to the Suns surface.The authors model of the falling blobs at several different times in their simulation. The blobs get disrupted when they encounter the field lines, and are then funneled along the channels to the solar surface. [Adapted from Petralia et al. 2016]This sort of flare and fall-back event is a common occurrence with the Sun, and SDOs observations of the June 2011 event present an excellent opportunity to understand the process better. A team of scientists led by Antonino Petralia (University of Palermo, Italy and INAF-OAPA) modeled this event in an effort to learn more about how the falling plasma interacts with strong magnetic fields above the solar surface.Magnetic Fields as GuidesPetralia and collaborators used three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical modeling to attempt to reproduce the observations of this event. They simulated blobs of plasma as they fall back to the solar surface and interact with magnetic field lines over a range of different conditions.The team found that only simulations that assume a relatively strong magnetic field resulted in the blobs funneling along a channel to the

  17. Clinical prediction of fall risk and white matter abnormalities: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective: To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as deter...

  18. Translation and validation of the breast feeding self efficacy scale into the Kiswahili language in resource restricted setting in Thika – Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M Mituki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF is one of the most cost‐effective, health‐ promoting, and disease‐preventing intervention and has been referred to as the cornerstone of child survival. Many mothers however discontinue EBF before the end of six months recommended by World Health Organization (WHO some due to psychosocial issues. Breast feeding self‐efficacy scale‐short form (BSES‐SF, has been used to establish mothers’ self‐efficacy towards breastfeeding by computing breast feeding self‐efficacy (BSE scores. These scores have been used globally to predict EBF duration. Internationally accepted tools can be used to compare data across countries. Such tools however need to be translated into local languages for different countries and set‐ups. Objectives The aim of the study was to translate and validate the English BSES‐SF into Kiswahili the national laguage in Kenya. Methods The study was a pilot study within the main cluster randomized longitudinal study. Pregnant women at 37 weeks gestation were randomly placed into, intervention (n=21 and comparison (n=21 groups. The BSES‐SF questionnaire was used to collect data on BSE at baseline and another questionnaire used to collect socio‐ economic data. Mothers in the intervention were educated on the importance of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF and skills required while those in the comparison group went through usual care provided at the health facility. Nutrition education was tailored to promoting maternal BSE. Results The translated BSES‐SF was found to be easy to understand, it showed good consistency and semantic validity. Predictive validity was demonstrated through significant mean differences between the groups. The intervention group had higher EBF rates at 6 weeks post‐partum (χ2=6.170, p=0.013. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the Kiswahili version of the BSES‐SF was 0.91 with a mean score of 60.95 (SD ±10.36, an item mean of 4.354. Conclusion

  19. The correlation between white matter hyperintensity and balance disorder and fall risk: An observational, prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Chao Shen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The presence of an association between white matter hyperintensity (WMH and the risk of falls in older people is uncertain, with little supporting prospective evidence available at present. We aimed to determine whether WMH was associated with dysfunctions of balance and gait, and other sensorimotor factors leading to falls, and the independent factors related to falls in older Chinese people. The protective effect of exercise against falls was also addressed. Methods: In a representative sample of hospital-based individuals aged 50 years and older in China, the patients' history of falls, magnetic resonance imaging data, scores on the 9-item Berg Balance Scale (BBS-9 test and timed up-and-go test (TUGT, and sensorimotor measures of computerized dynamic posturography (CDP were analyzed. Incident falls were recorded prospectively over a 12-month period. Using regression modeling, the association between the risk of falls and baseline WMH was estimated. Results: Only individuals with severe WMH were at an increased risk of falls, and CDP was more sensitive than BBS-9 in detecting WMH-related balance and gait dysfunction. However, WMH was not an independent predictor of falls. Taller height and overweight or obese body habitus were identified as novel protective factors for falls. Female, fall history, and increased TUGT score were identified as independent risk factors for falls in older Chinese people. Conclusion: Although WMH was associated with an increased risk of falls, it was not an independent predictor. Keywords: White matter hyperintensity, Balance disorder, Gait disorder, Fall risk

  20. Sensorbased fall detection and fall prediction of senior citizens in their domestic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Feldwieser, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Falls in old age are associated with a reduction of autonomy and mobility and are one the main threads to the health of older adults. Physical and mental consequences of falls are a large financial burden to the healthcare system. Automatic fall detection devices could call of medical help in case of a fall and fall prevention programmers could specifically address the deficits of persons at risk of falling. Currently it is difficult and expensive to correctly identify perso...

  1. Falling Magnets and Electromagnetic Braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbreath, Christopher; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2009-03-01

    The slow fall of a rare earth magnet through a copper pipe is a striking example of electromagnetic braking; this remarkable phenomenon has been the subject of a number of scientific paper s [1, 2]. In a pipe having radius R and wall thickness D, the terminal velocity of the falling magnet is proportional to (R̂4)/D. It is interesting to ask what happens in the limit as D becomes very large. We report our experimental observations and theoretical predictions of the dependence of the terminal velocity on pipe radius R for large D. [1] Y. Levin, F.L. da Silveira, and F.B. Rizzato, ``Electromagnetic braking: A simple quantitative model''. American Journal of Physics, 74(9): p. 815-817 (2006). [2] J.A. Pelesko, M. Cesky, and S. Huertas, Lenz's law and dimensional analysis. American Journal of Physics, 3(1): p. 37-39. 2005.

  2. The effectiveness of a multidisciplinary QI activity for accidental fall prevention: Staff compliance is critical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohde Sachiko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accidental falls among inpatients are a substantial cause of hospital injury. A number of successful experimental studies on fall prevention have shown the importance and efficacy of multifactorial intervention, though success rates vary. However, the importance of staff compliance with these effective, but often time-consuming, multifactorial interventions has not been fully investigated in a routine clinical setting. The purpose of this observational study was to describe the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary quality improvement (QI activity for accidental fall prevention, with particular focus on staff compliance in a non-experimental clinical setting. Methods This observational study was conducted from July 2004 through December 2010 at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. The QI activity for in-patient falls prevention consisted of: 1 the fall risk assessment tool, 2 an intervention protocol to prevent in-patient falls, 3 specific environmental safety interventions, 4 staff education, and 5 multidisciplinary healthcare staff compliance monitoring and feedback mechanisms. Results The overall fall rate was 2.13 falls per 1000 patient days (350/164331 in 2004 versus 1.53 falls per 1000 patient days (263/172325 in 2010, representing a significant decrease (p = 0.039. In the first 6 months, compliance with use of the falling risk assessment tool at admission was 91.5% in 2007 (3998/4368, increasing to 97.6% in 2010 (10564/10828. The staff compliance rate of implementing an appropriate intervention plan was 85.9% in 2007, increasing to 95.3% in 2010. Conclusion In our study we observed a substantial decrease in patient fall rates and an increase of staff compliance with a newly implemented falls prevention program. A systematized QI approach that closely involves, encourages, and educates healthcare staff at multiple levels is effective.

  3. Design, delivery, and outcomes from an interprofessional fall prevention course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauenhauer, Jason A; Glose, Susan; Watt, Celia

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development, delivery, and outcomes from an interprofessional evidence-based falls management course for undergraduate and graduate students. The 3-credit elective course was developed by a gerontological social work and nursing faculty member in partnership with community-based housing and case management organizations. Creation of the course was in response to a mandate by the Health Resources and Services Administration, funding source for federal Geriatric Education Centers, to train interprofessional students using an evidence-based approach while tying the outcomes to improved health measures in the target population. Therefore, this article describes student competencies pre- and postcourse completion and outcomes of community-dwelling older adults completing a Matter of Balance (MOB) program delivered by these students. A total of 16 students completed the course which included delivery of the MOB program to 41 older adults. Results indicate statistically significant improvements in student outcomes from a pre/post falls knowledge test. For older adult participants, many screened positively for fall risk factors pre-post MOB participation showed statistically significant improvements in falls efficacy, control, management, and overall mobility. Opportunities and challenges associated with course delivery are also described.

  4. Effects of a six-week Pilates intervention on balance and fear of falling in women aged over 65 with chronic low-back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Díaz, David; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; De la Torre-Cruz, Manuel J; Casuso, Rafael A; de Guevara, Nicolás Mendoza Ladrón; Hita-Contreras, Fidel

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effects of six weeks of Pilates regarding functional balance, fear of falling and pain in community living women older than 65 years old with chronic low-back pain. A single blind controlled randomized trial of six weeks of Pilates in addition to physiotherapy treatment (n=50) vs. physiotherapy treatment alone (n=47) was conducted on 97 community living women (71.14 ± 3.30 years) with chronic low-back pain (CLBP). Main outcome measures were fear of falling (FoF), assessed by the Falls Efficacy Scale-international; functional mobility and balance, measured with the Timed up and Go Test; and pain, evaluated using the numeric rating scale. Only the Pilates group showed improvement in FoF (ES; d=.68) and functional mobility and balance (ES; d=1.12) after treatment, and also had better results in pain (ES; d=1.46) than the physiotherapy-only group. Six weeks of Pilates exercises may be effective in fall prevention through the improvement of FoF, functional balance, and pain in Spanish women over 65 years old with CLBP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A best practice fall prevention exercise program to improve balance, strength / power, and psychosocial health in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Yves J; Kressig, Reto W; Lacroix, Andre; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Pfenninger, Barbara; Granacher, Urs

    2013-10-09

    With increasing age neuromuscular deficits (e.g., sarcopenia) may result in impaired physical performance and an increased risk for falls. Prominent intrinsic fall-risk factors are age-related decreases in balance and strength / power performance as well as cognitive decline. Additional studies are needed to develop specifically tailored exercise programs for older adults that can easily be implemented into clinical practice. Thus, the objective of the present trial is to assess the effects of a fall prevention program that was developed by an interdisciplinary expert panel on measures of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognition, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy in healthy older adults. Additionally, the time-related effects of detraining are tested. Healthy old people (n = 54) between the age of 65 to 80 years will participate in this trial. The testing protocol comprises tests for the assessment of static / dynamic steady-state balance (i.e., Sharpened Romberg Test, instrumented gait analysis), proactive balance (i.e., Functional Reach Test; Timed Up and Go Test), reactive balance (i.e., perturbation test during bipedal stance; Push and Release Test), strength (i.e., hand grip strength test; Chair Stand Test), and power (i.e., Stair Climb Power Test; countermovement jump). Further, body composition will be analysed using a bioelectrical impedance analysis system. In addition, questionnaires for the assessment of psychosocial (i.e., World Health Organisation Quality of Life Assessment-Bref), cognitive (i.e., Mini Mental State Examination), and fall risk determinants (i.e., Fall Efficacy Scale - International) will be included in the study protocol. Participants will be randomized into two intervention groups or the control / waiting group. After baseline measures, participants in the intervention groups will conduct a 12-week balance and strength / power exercise intervention 3 times per week, with each training session lasting 30 min