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Sample records for fallow deer dama

  1. LONG-TERM INFLUENCE OF HUMAN PRESENCE ON SPATIAL SEXUAL SEGREGATION IN FALLOW DEER (DAMA DAMA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marco Apollonio; Simone Ciuti; Siriano Luccarini

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The present work investigates how a fallow deer (Dama dama) population in central Italy might have been affected from 1984 to 2003 by the increase of human access to the study site, where humans were the main deer predators...

  2. Sida carpinifolia (Malvaceae) poisoning in fallow deer (Dama dama).

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    Pedroso, Pedro M O; Von Hohendorf, Raquel; de Oliveira, Luiz G S; Schmitz, Milene; da Cruz, Cláudio E F; Driemeier, David

    2009-09-01

    A captive fallow deer (Dama dama) in a zoo was spontaneously poisoned after consumption of Sida carpinifolia. The paddock where cervids were kept was severely infested by S. carpinifolia. The deer developed a neurological syndrome characterized by muscular weakness, intention tremors, visual and standing-up deficits, falls, and abnormal behavior and posture. Because a severe mandibular fracture and the consequent deteriorating condition, it was euthanized. Main microscopic findings were swelling and multifocal cytoplasmic vacuolation in the Purkinje cells. The cytoplasm of multiple cells of the cerebellum, especially the Purkinje cells, stained with the lectins Concanavalia ensiformis, Triticum vulgaris, and succinylated Triticum vulgaris. Diagnostic possibilities such as bovine diarrhea virus, rabies, and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy were excluded. The report focuses on the risk of maintaining S. carpinifolia populations in zoo enclosures of wild herbivores.

  3. Conservation and management of fallow deer (Dama dama dama L.)on Lemnos Island, Greece

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    MATTILA, MARIAMA; HADJIGEORGIOU, IOANNIS

    2015-01-01

    A small population of European fallow deer (Dama dama dama L.) was transferred to Myrina, Lemnos Island, Greece, in the early 1970s from the island of Rhodes. Since the Rhodian population may preserve a remarkable proportion of the original genetic diversity, it is necessary to preserve its offspring population. Our objective was to estimate population size, vegetation cover, and key stakeholder attitudes towards deer on the island, based on personal interviews. Following the visual inspectio...

  4. Flight distance in roe deer Capreolus capreolus and fallow deer Dama dama as related to hunting and other factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de H.Y.; Breukelen, van L.; Hootsmans, M.J.M.; Wieren, van S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Flight distances in roe deer Capreolus capreolus and fallow deer Dama dama with respect to a human observer on foot were measured in four nature reserves in the Netherlands: two dune reserves in the western part (the Amsterdam Water Supply Dunes (AWD) and Kennemerduinen (KD)) and two forested areas

  5. Experimental trichinellosis in fallow-deer (Dama dama L.

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    Moretti A.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbivora can play a very important role in spreading trichinellosis, as showed by the massive epidemics in man, caused by the consumption of horse meat in the last years. In this context, the present study has been undertaken to verify, through an experimental infection, the susceptibility, together with other biological parameters, of fallow-deer to Trichinella infection. The four animals, 8-9 months of age and 18-25 Kg body weight, were orally infected with low doses of Trichinella britovi and T. pseudospiralis (2,000 larvae/animal. After day 30 p.i,, the animals were necropsied and, using artificial digestion methods, larval burden of Trichinella in muscle tissues was determined. Histopathological, serological (lgG monoclonal blocking ELISA and biochemical data were assessed during the experiment. The results showed the susceptibility of fallow-deer to T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis infection; under the same inoculum size, the number of larvae/g was higher in group infected with T. britovi. The animals showed a higher immunological response to T. pseudospiralis infection. The results are discussed.

  6. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies associated with vesicular ulcerative and necrotizing lesions of the digestive mucosa in fallow deer (Dama dama L.

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    Regina Diaz

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracytoplasmic epithelial inclusion bodies in the digestive mucosa of fallow deer (Dama dama L. were found to most probably be the result of an unspecific degenerative or post mortal change. There are reasons to believe that this is true also for the inclusion bodies found in reindeer, roe deer and moose.

  7. Strong population structure in a species manipulated by humans since the Neolithic: the European fallow deer (Dama dama dama).

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    Baker, K H; Gray, H W I; Ramovs, V; Mertzanidou, D; Akın Pekşen, Ç; Bilgin, C C; Sykes, N; Hoelzel, A R

    2017-07-01

    Species that have been translocated and otherwise manipulated by humans may show patterns of population structure that reflect those interactions. At the same time, natural processes shape populations, including behavioural characteristics like dispersal potential and breeding system. In Europe, a key factor is the geography and history of climate change through the Pleistocene. During glacial maxima throughout that period, species in Europe with temperate distributions were forced south, becoming distributed among the isolated peninsulas represented by Anatolia, Italy and Iberia. Understanding modern patterns of diversity depends on understanding these historical population dynamics. Traditionally, European fallow deer (Dama dama dama) are thought to have been restricted to refugia in Anatolia and possibly Sicily and the Balkans. However, the distribution of this species was also greatly influenced by human-mediated translocations. We focus on fallow deer to better understand the relative influence of these natural and anthropogenic processes. We compared modern fallow deer putative populations across a broad geographic range using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA loci. The results revealed highly insular populations, depauperate of genetic variation and significantly differentiated from each other. This is consistent with the expectations of drift acting on populations founded by small numbers of individuals, and reflects known founder populations in the north. However, there was also evidence for differentiation among (but not within) physically isolated regions in the south, including Iberia. In those regions we find evidence for a stronger influence from natural processes than may be expected for a species with such strong, known anthropogenic influence.

  8. The identification of Anaplasma spp. isolated from fallow deer (Dama dama) on a free-range farm in eastern Poland.

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    Adaszek, L; Klimiuk, P; Skrzypczak, M; Górna, M; Zietek, J; Winiarczyk, S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of Anaplasma spp. in group of 50 fallow deer (Dama dama) from free-range farm in eastern Poland and determine what species of Anaplasma could infect these animals based on PCR gene sequencing. The PCR technique revealed the presence of 16S RNA Anaplasma spp. genetic material in the blood of 7 out of 50 examined animals. The sequences of the PCR products obtained showed a 100% homology with each other and 100% homology with GU 183908 sequence of A. phagocytophilum, isolated in our earlier study from a horse with clinical form of anaplasmosis. Here, we report the first molecular evidence of Anaplasma spp. among naturally infected fallow deer in eastern Poland.

  9. Glycolytic potential and ultimate muscle pH values in red deer (Cervus elaphus and fallow deer (Dama dama

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    Eva Wiklund

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate pH value of meat (measured at approx. 24 hours post slaughter gives information about the technological quality, i.e. shelf life, colour, water-holding properties and tenderness and is a direct consequence of muscle glycogen (energy levels at slaughter. It may therefore also indicate whether or not the animal has been exposed to stressful energy depleting events prior to slaughter. In the present study, 141 animals (130 red deer (Cervus elaphus and 11 fallow deer (Dama dama were included to investigate the relationship between ultimate pH and residual glycogen concentration in red deer and fallow deer M. longissimus. In addition, the muscle glycogen content and ultimate pH values in three red deer muscles (Mm. triceps brachii, longissimus and biceps femoris were studied. M. triceps brachii had higher ultimate pH and lower glycogen content compared with the other two studied muscles. The frequency of intermediate DFD (5.8≤ pH<6.2 was 5.4% in red deer M. longissimus, compared with 9.1% in fallow deer, while the frequency of DFD (pH≥ 6.2 was much lower in red deer (3.8% than in fallow deer (54.5%. A curvilinear relationship between ultimate pH and total glucose concentration (glycogen and glucose 30 min post slaughter in red deer and fallow deer M. longissimus was found. The relationship between muscle pH and lactic acid concentration however, was indicated to be linear. A significant variation in total glucose concentration at ultimate pH below 5.80 was observed, including values in the range from 18 to 123 mmol/kg wet tissue. It was concluded that further studies are needed to further explore the relationship between muscle glycogen content and technological and sensory quality attributes of meat from different deer species.Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning:Köttets pH-värde (mätt ca 24 timmar efter slakt har stor betydelse för den teknologiska kvaliteten som t. ex. hållbarhet, färg, vattenhållande förmåga och m

  10. Development of the permanent mandibular cheek teeth in fallow deer (Dama dama).

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    Kierdorf, H; Hommelsheim, S; Kierdorf, U

    2012-12-01

    The study describes crown and root formation of the permanent mandibular cheek teeth of fallow deer from a gestational age of 22-23 weeks up to a post-natal age of 33 months. Tooth development was recorded using a scoring scheme based on morphological criteria ranging from crypt formation to completion of root growth. The morphological appearance of the enamel surface during three different stages (secretory-stage enamel, maturation-stage enamel and mature enamel) was described, and the approximate age at termination of the secretory stage of amelogenesis in the deciduous and permanent mandibular cheek teeth was determined. The data enable an age estimation of fallow deer up to 3 years of age and provide a basis for assessing the timing of stress episodes that affect tooth crown formation. This information is useful for the management of the species as well as in bioarchaeological and bioindication studies.

  11. Studies on the parietal region of the cervid skull. II. The parietooccipital region in the skull of the fallow deer (Dama dama L.).

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    Kierdorf, U; Kierdorf, H

    1992-12-01

    In contrast to the situation in roe deer (Kierdorf and Kierdorf, in press) and other cervid species, an os interparietale was missing in the fallow deer cranium. Absence of this skull element in Dama dama is regarded as an apomorphic character state. The area covered by the interparietals in Capreolus was occupied by the parietals in Dama. This condition (loss of interparietals, enlargement of parietals) is in accord with a trend seen in vertebrate evolution, that is, progressive reduction in the number of skull elements concomitant with enlargement of the remaining bones. Synostosis of the parietals in Dama started a few days post partum and was completed at about 7 to 8 months of age. In males, obliteration of the sutura parietooccipitalis commenced in adult life, whereas in females only closure of the central region of this suture was occasionally observed.

  12. Authenticity control of game meat products--a single method to detect and quantify adulteration of fallow deer (Dama dama), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and sika deer (Cervus nippon) by real-time PCR.

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    Druml, Barbara; Grandits, Stephanie; Mayer, Walter; Hochegger, Rupert; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2015-03-01

    This contribution presents a single real-time PCR assay allowing the determination of the deer content (the sum of fallow deer (Dama dama), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and sika deer (Cervus nippon)) in meat products to detect food adulteration. The PCR assay does not show cross-reactivity with 20 animal species and 43 botanical species potentially contained in game meat products. The limit of quantification is 0.5% for fallow deer and red deer and 0.1% for sika deer. The deer content in meat products is determined by relating the concentration obtained with the deer PCR assay to that obtained with a reference system which amplifies mammals and poultry DNA. The analysis of binary meat mixtures with pork, a meat mixture containing equal amounts of fallow deer, red deer and sika deer in pork and a model game sausage showed that the quantification approach is very accurate (systematic error generally <25%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Low frequency groans indicate larger and more dominant fallow deer (Dama dama males.

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    Elisabetta Vannoni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Models of honest advertisement predict that sexually selected calls should signal male quality. In most vertebrates, high quality males have larger body sizes that determine higher social status and in turn higher reproductive success. Previous research has emphasised the importance of vocal tract resonances or formant frequencies of calls as cues to body size in mammals. However, the role of the acoustic features of vocalisations as cues to other quality-related phenotypic characteristics of callers has rarely been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined whether the acoustic structure of fallow deer groans provides reliable information on the quality of the caller, by exploring the relationships between male quality (body size, dominance rank, and mating success and the frequency components of calls (fundamental frequency, formant frequencies, and formant dispersion. We found that body size was not related to the fundamental frequency of groans, whereas larger males produced groans with lower formant frequencies and lower formant dispersion. Groans of high-ranking males were characterised by lower minimum fundamental frequencies and to a lesser extent, by lower formant dispersions. Dominance rank was the factor most strongly related to mating success, with higher-ranking males having higher mating success. The minimum fundamental frequency and the minimum formant dispersion were indirectly related to male mating success (through dominance rank. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study is the first to show that sexually selected vocalisations can signal social dominance in mammals other than primates, and reveals that independent acoustic components encode accurate information on different phenotypic aspects of male quality.

  14. Quality traits of fallow deer (Dama dama dry-cured hams

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    E. Piasentier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Meat processing by drying, after salting or fermentation and before a long ripening period, is an ancient and widespread process, used to preserve meat from spoilage. Among the wide variety of dry meat products made in Europe, the most famous ones are made from pork (Italian and Spanish dry-cured hams, fermented sausages, but other interesting products are obtained from meat of different species: i.e., the “bresaola”, from bovine, horse, goat, etc. (Paleari et al., 2002. Deer meat and meat products are interesting in this picture, since they include the high degree of consumers’ appreciation for dried products and considering the growing interest for food obtained by natural husbandry and technology...

  15. RAPD fingerprinting: use in the analysis of mediterranean populations of European fallow deer, Dama dama Linnaeus, 1758 (Mammalia, Artiodactyla

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    Marco Masseti

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the present paper is to present a preliminary genetic survey of the fallow deer (Dama dama L., 1758 population of the island of Rhodes (Greece in order to verify its genetic variability. Italian population specimens were chosen as a control group because, as can be ascertained from literature, they have a very low level of variability. The analysis was carried out on hair samples obtained from each population. It was performed on a PCR modified method called RAPD which is based on the amplification of genomic DNA by using a single oligonucleotide of random sequence as a primer. The results of the analysis of the Rhodian specimens show clearly the presence of polymorphic individuals, absent in the Italian deer sampled.

  16. EFFECT OF SELENIUM ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY METALS IN TISSUES OF FALLOW DEER (Dama dama L.

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    Neška Vukšić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Hg and As and essential elements (Fe and Se in fallow deer tissues (muscle, kidney, liver, adipose tissue and spleen before the addition of selenium in the food and after that to determine the interaction of selenium with heavy metals in the tissues and the influence of selenium on immunohaematological (CBC and WBC, biochemistry (glucose, urea, CRE, ALB, TGC, KOL, HLD, LDL, Fe, TP, GLOB, IgG indicators and indicators of oxidative stress (SOD, GPx, GSH and vitamin E. The research was conducted on 40 fallow deer that were shot in the hunting season during the two year research. Analysis of habitat included analyses of soil, tree leaves, grasses and fodders. Supplemental nutrition with the addition of selenium (0.5 mg/kg was carried out for 60 days in the second year of the research. During the first year of the experiment there were increased concentrations of Cd and Pb in the tissues of fallow deer whereas concentration of Se was low. After supplementary feeding with the addition of selenium, concentration of heavy metals in the tissues was lower and antioxidant protection was improved. Addition of selenium had no negative impact on other tested parameters.

  17. Polymorphisms and variants in the prion protein sequence of European moose (Alces alces), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and fallow deer (Dama dama) in Scandinavia.

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    Wik, Lotta; Mikko, Sofia; Klingeborn, Mikael; Stéen, Margareta; Simonsson, Magnus; Linné, Tommy

    2012-07-01

    The prion protein (PrP) sequence of European moose, reindeer, roe deer and fallow deer in Scandinavia has high homology to the PrP sequence of North American cervids. Variants in the European moose PrP sequence were found at amino acid position 109 as K or Q. The 109Q variant is unique in the PrP sequence of vertebrates. During the 1980s a wasting syndrome in Swedish moose, Moose Wasting Syndrome (MWS), was described. SNP analysis demonstrated a difference in the observed genotype proportions of the heterozygous Q/K and homozygous Q/Q variants in the MWS animals compared with the healthy animals. In MWS moose the allele frequencies for 109K and 109Q were 0.73 and 0.27, respectively, and for healthy animals 0.69 and 0.31. Both alleles were seen as heterozygotes and homozygotes. In reindeer, PrP sequence variation was demonstrated at codon 176 as D or N and codon 225 as S or Y. The PrP sequences in roe deer and fallow deer were identical with published GenBank sequences.

  18. Colour stability and water-holding capacity of M. longissimus and carcass characteristics in fallow deer (Dama dama grazed on natural pasture or fed barley

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    Eva Wiklund

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of feeding regimen on carcass characteristics, meat colour and water-holding capacity of M. longissimus were studied in 24 female fallow deer (Dama dama. All animals were farm raised; twelve were grazed on pasture and twelve were fed barley and a small amount of hay prior to slaughter. The animals were slaughtered at two occasions (during the Southern Hemisphere spring; after 19 weeks of feeding (n=12; 6 grazing and 6 barley fed animals; group 1 and after 24 weeks of feeding (n=12; 6 grazing and 6 barley fed animals; group 2. The barley/hay-fed deer had significantly higher body condition scores and carcass weights than the pasture raised group. No difference in meat ultimate pH values between the treatment groups was recorded. The meat from the pasture raised deer had significantly longer colour display life after 2 and 3 weeks of refrigerated storage (+ 2.0 ºC in vacuum bags. There was no difference in drip loss between the two treatment groups. However, significantly lower drip losses were found in meat from the animals in group 2 compared with the ones in group 1 (P ≤ 0.001. It was concluded that the feeding regimen of the animals is an important factor that contributes to the variation in quality of fresh chilled deer meat (venison, mainly the colour stability and display life of vacuum packaged meat.Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning: I denna undersökning ingick 24 dovhjortshindar (Dama dama för att studera effekterna av olika typer av foder (bete och korn på slaktkroppskvalitet samt färg och vattenhållande förmåga i köttet (M. longissimus. Alla djur var uppfödda på en hjortfarm, 12 betade gräs och 12 utfodrades med korn och en liten mängd hö före slakt. Djuren slaktades vid två olika tillfällen (under våren på det södra halvklotet; efter 19 veckors utfodring (n=12; 6 betesdjur och 6 kornfodrade djur; grupp 1 och efter 24 veckors utfodring (n=12; 6 betesdjur och 6 kornfodrade djur; grupp 2. De dovhjortar

  19. Characterization of a virulent dog-originated rabies virus affecting more than twenty fallow deer (Dama dama) in Inner Mongolia, China.

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    Zhu, Hongwei; Chen, Xiaoyun; Shao, Xiqun; Ba, Hengxing; Wang, Fengxue; Wang, Hualei; Yang, Yong; Sun, Na; Ren, Jingqiang; Cheng, Shipeng; Wen, Yongjun

    2015-04-01

    Rabies has emerged as a serious problem in the most recent years in northern China. A rabies virus (RABV) isolate, IMDRV-13, was recovered from brain samples of dog-bitten rabid fallow deer (Dama dama) in a farm in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia. We tested the susceptibility of mouse neuroblastoma (MNA) cells and BSR cells as well as that of adult mice to IMDRV-13. The isolate was found to be a virulent isolate with an equivalent pathogenicity index (0.12) and a slight lower neurotropism index (1.07) compared with those of challenge virus standard, CVS-24, which was 0.13 and 1.23, respectively. The complete genome of IMDRV-13 was determined subsequently and found to be 11,924 nucleotides (nt) in length with the same genomic organization as other RABVs. Phylogenetic tree based on complete genome sequences of 43 RABV isolates and strains indicated that IMDRV-13, along with other two isolates in Inner Mongolia, CNM1101C and CNM1104D, clustered within the dog-associated China I clade, which is also the dominant lineage in the current rabies epidemic in China. In addition, sequence analysis of the glycoprotein G identified an amino acid substitution (I338→T338) unique to the IMDRV-13 within antigenic sites III (330-338), this mutation also leads to an additional potential N-glycosylation site (N336), which may represent a useful model to study relationship of N-glycosylation in G protein and specific properties such as pathogenicity or host adaption of RABV.

  20. First report of Leptospira infections in red deer, roe deer, and fallow deer in Poland

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    Żmudzki Jacek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recently in Europe an increase in the population of red deer (Cervus elaphus, roe deer (Capreolus capreolus, and fallow deer (Dama dama has been observed. Research on the prevalence of Leptospira infections in Polish cervids has been performed for the first time.

  1. Preliminary data on the density and structure of a fallow deer (Cervus dama population in the Foreste Casentinesi M. Falterona and Campigna National Park

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    Luciano Cicognani

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a sample area covering 1200 ha located in the northern part of the Foreste Casentinesi National Park a survey was conducted in 1996 and 1997 on the Fallow deer (Cervus dama population. The survey was conducted during the rutting period. The censusing method is an adaptation of the Lincoln Index estimation where the capture, marking and recapture process was replaced by individual observations in "lekking areas". Since the stay of the bucks in a territory is not uniform, due to the high level of variability of the reproductive strategies, the mixing of the bucks improves the reliability of the method. The estimate of the total population was 189, the sex ratio was 1:1 and the yearlings/adults ratio was 1:2.2.

  2. Ecological correlates of seed survival after ingestion by Fallow Deer

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    Mouissie, AM; Van der Veen, CEJ; Veen, GF; Van Diggelen, R

    1. The survival and retention of seeds was studied by feeding known quantities of seeds of 25 species to four captive Fallow Deer (Dama dama L.). To test for ecological correlates, plant species were selected to represent large variation in seed size, seed shape, seed longevity and habitat

  3. Adaptive Levy walks in foraging fallow deer.

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    Stefano Focardi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lévy flights are random walks, the step lengths of which come from probability distributions with heavy power-law tails, such that clusters of short steps are connected by rare long steps. Lévy walks maximise search efficiency of mobile foragers. Recently, several studies raised some concerns about the reliability of the statistical analysis used in previous analyses. Further, it is unclear whether Lévy walks represent adaptive strategies or emergent properties determined by the interaction between foragers and resource distribution. Thus two fundamental questions still need to be addressed: the presence of Lévy walks in the wild and whether or not they represent a form of adaptive behaviour. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 235 paths of solitary and clustered (i.e. foraging in group fallow deer (Dama dama, exploiting the same pasture. We used maximum likelihood estimation for discriminating between a power-tailed distribution and the exponential alternative and rank/frequency plots to discriminate between Lévy walks and composite Brownian walks. We showed that solitary deer perform Lévy searches, while clustered animals did not adopt that strategy. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our demonstration of the presence of Lévy walks is, at our knowledge, the first available which adopts up-to-date statistical methodologies in a terrestrial mammal. Comparing solitary and clustered deer, we concluded that the Lévy walks of solitary deer represent an adaptation maximising encounter rates with forage resources and not an epiphenomenon induced by a peculiar food distribution.

  4. Distribution of lesions in red and fallow deer naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis.

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    Martín-Hernando, M P; Torres, M J; Aznar, J; Negro, J J; Gandía, A; Gortázar, C

    2010-01-01

    Wild deer have an important role in the epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis (bTB). The aims of this study were (1) to compare the pattern of lesions present in wild red (Cervus elaphus) and fallow (Dama dama) deer that were naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis, and (2) to use this information to develop a sampling strategy for the isolation of M. bovis from the lymphoid tissues of the head of these animals. Culture of head lymphoid tissues demonstrated that 28 of 95 red deer and 22 of 100 fallow deer sampled were infected with M. bovis. Approximately 30% of each deer population had no gross lesions. Fallow deer were significantly more likely to have thoracic lesions than red deer. Lesions were observed in the retropharyngeal lymph nodes of 64% of the culture-positive red deer and 43% of the culture positive fallow deer. One third of the red deer, but none of the fallow deer, had well-encapsulated abscess lesions. There were no microscopical differences in the lesions in the lymph nodes of the red and fallow deer. Bacteriological culture from both the tonsil and retropharyngeal lymph nodes increased the rate of isolation of M. bovis by 22% over culture of the retropharyngeal lymph nodes alone in both species. These findings indicate that investigation of wild deer for bTB-compatible lesions should include examination of the medial retropharyngeal, left tracheobronchial, mediastinal, mesenteric and ileocaecal lymph nodes. Sampling for bacteriological culture from head lymphoid tissues should be from the tonsil and the medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes. These protocols may prove useful in bTB surveillance and control in regions where wild deer contribute to the circulation of M. bovis.

  5. Distribution of lesions in red and fallow deer naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    OpenAIRE

    Martín-Hernando, Mari Paz; Torres, María José; Aznar Martín, Javier; Negro, Juan J.; Gandía, A.; Gortázar, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Wild deer have an important role in the epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis (bTB). The aims of this study were (1) to compare the pattern of lesions present in wild red (Cervus elaphus) and fallow (Dama dama) deer that were naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis, and (2) to use this information to develop a sampling strategy for the isolation of M. bovis from the lymphoid tissues of the head of these animals. Culture of head lymphoid tissues demonstrated that 28 of 95 red deer and 22 of ...

  6. Quality of Meat ( from Male Fallow Deer ( Packaged and Stored under Vacuum and Modified Atmosphere Conditions

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    N. Piaskowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of vacuum and modified atmosphere (40% CO2+60% N2, MA packaging on the chemical composition, physicochemical properties and sensory attributes of chill-stored meat from 10 fallow deer (Dama dama bucks at 17 to 18 months of age. The animals were hunter-harvested in the forests of north-eastern Poland. During carcass dressing (48 to 54 h post mortem, both musculus longissimus muscles were cut out. Each muscle was divided into seven sections which were allocated to three groups: 0, A, and B. Samples 0 were immediately subjected to laboratory analyses. Samples A were vacuum-packaged, and samples B were packaged in MA. Packaged samples were stored for 7, 14, and 21 days at 2°C. The results of the present study showed that the evaluated packaging systems had no significant effect on the quality of fallow deer meat during chilled storage. However, vacuum-packaged meat samples were characterised by greater drip loss. Vacuum and MA packaging contributed to preserving the desired physicochemical properties and sensory attributes of meat during 21 days of storage. Regardless of the packaging method used, undesirable changes in the colour, water-holding capacity and juiciness of meat, accompanied by tenderness improvement, were observed during chilled storage.

  7. Mate choice on fallow deer leks.

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    Clutton-Brock, T H; Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, M; Robertson, A

    1989-08-10

    Leks, on which males defend small clustered mating territories, may have evolved because of the unusual opportunities they provide for female choice of mating partners, and several studies of lek-breeding animals have demonstrated correlations between the mating success of males and their phenotype or behaviour. However, these could arise because (1) females select mates on the basis of male phenotypic traits; (2) males interfere with each other's mating attempts; or (3) females show preferences for particular mating territories, and larger or stronger males are more likely to win access to these territories. Here we report that when fallow bucks on a traditional lek were experimentally induced to change their territories, differences in the mating success of bucks persisted, whereas differences in the position of their territories relative to the centre of the lek did not. The observation that bucks rarely interfered with their neighbours' harems and females moved freely between bucks suggests that females choose their mates on the basis of male phenotype rather than territory type or location. In this population, the immediate factor affecting the movements of females between males was the size of a buck's harem.

  8. [Animal welfare-conforming fallow deer farming in Germany--a review].

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    Schäffer, D; von Borell, E

    2002-09-01

    Fallow deer farming for venison production on pasture and fallow land has gained importance in Germany during recent years. As fallow deer farming constitutes a relatively young farming practice, many questions concerning a welfare-conforming and ecologically sound keeping of fallow deer are still open. Based on the recommendations on the keeping of fallow deer in enclosures for the purpose of venison meat production including by-products from 2 November 1979, a critical comparative review considering the current knowledge from research and practical deer farming experience was conducted. Recommendations on measures for breeding management and administration (statistics on farms and stocks, security and control of enclosures, training and experience of stockperson, practical skills for immobilisation and killing) are proposed. The cultivation goals for the care of landscape by fallow deer farming in protected areas need to be defined precisely. Due to infection risk, mixed herds with domesticated ruminants are not recommended. Potential progress can be foreseen in preventive health measures (control of endoparasites) and by appropriate feeding and water supply, considering feeding and drinking place design, feeding behaviour and water needs. The knowledge on handling and immobilisation methods should also be applied to small herd sizes. More research is needed on transportation of fallow deer.

  9. Sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting serum antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in fallow deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, José M; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Abendaño, Naiara; Fitzgerald, Liam E; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramon A; Alonso-Hearn, Marta

    2014-08-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the diagnostic test most commonly used in efforts to control paratuberculosis in domestic ruminants. However, commercial ELISAs have not been validated for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in wild animals. In this study, we compared the sensitivities and specificities of five ELISAs using individual serum samples collected from 41 fallow deer with or without histopathological lesions consistent with paratuberculosis. Two target antigenic preparations were selected, an ethanol-treated protoplasmic preparation obtained from a fallow deer M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolate (ELISAs A and B) and a paratuberculosis protoplasmic antigen (PPA3) (ELISAs C and D). Fallow deer antibodies bound to the immobilized antigens were detected by using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-fallow deer IgG antibody (ELISAs A and C) or HRP-conjugated protein G (ELISAs B and D). A commercially available assay, ELISA-E, which was designed to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in cattle, sheep, and goats, was also tested. Although ELISAs A, C, and E had the same sensitivity (72%), ELISAs A and C were more specific (100%) for detecting fallow deer with lesions consistent with paratuberculosis at necropsy than was the ELISA-E (87.5%). In addition, the ELISA-A was particularly sensitive for detecting fallow deer in the latent stages of infection (62.5%). The antibody responses detected with the ELISA-A correlated with both the severity of enteric lesions and the presence of acid-fast bacteria in gut tissue samples. In summary, our study shows that the ELISA-A can be a cost-effective diagnostic tool for preventing the spread of paratuberculosis among fallow deer populations.

  10. Localization of the orexin system in the gastrointestinal tract of fallow deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Pascucci, Luisa; Mercati, Francesca; Boiti, Cristiano; Ceccarelli, Piero

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry the presence and distribution of the orexin system in the stomach and gut of fallow deer. Abundant orexin A-positive cells were localized in the middle and basal portions of the mucosal glands of the cardial and fundic regions of the stomach. In the same gastric areas, orexin B-positive cells were also found, mainly localized in the basal portion of glands. In the intestinal tract, orexin-containing cells were occasionally found in the duodenal epithelium and in the rectal intestinal glands. Immunoreactivity for orexin receptors, type 1 and 2 (OX1R and OX2R), was not detected in the same stomach regions. OX1R-immunopositivity was observed in the enteric neuron ganglia localized in the submucosal and muscular intestinal layers, while OX2R-immunopositivity was found close in contact with the cytoplasmic membrane of epithelial cells in the small intestine.

  11. Supplementary feeding of farmed fallow deer: effect on milk composition and fawn performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bovolenta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this trial was to study the effect of supplementary feeding offered to farmed fallow deer does on milk characteristics and on male and female fawns performance. During two years, 40 females were divided in two groups and assigned to two homogeneous paddocks of the same pasture: SUP group received 0.5 kg/d per female of supplement that was raised to 0.7 kg/d from the third month of fawns age, while HER group was fed only on herbage. Herbage availability and composition were monitored by exclusion cages. Female performance (body weight, body condition score and milk composition was recorded. Further, during the first year, performance and hematological parameters (non-esterified fatty acids and urea nitrogen were assessed. Fawns were weighed every 45 days until the end of the experiment, when the characteristics of their carcasses were recorded. Supplementary feeding reduced herbage gathering and quality, but allowed a full recovery of body weight and condition of does. The milk provided by the HER does to their female offspring was richer in fat (16.1 vs 14.2 g/100 mL and protein (8.76 vs 8.04 g/100 mL than that furnished to male fawns; the opposite condition happened for SUP does (12.6 vs 13.3 g/100 mL for fat and 8.04 vs 8.35 g/100 mL for protein. At slaughter, SUP fawns showed higher carcass weight (14.10 vs 11.26 kg, greater conformation score (2.1 vs 1.6 points and higher fat score (2.0 vs 1.2 points than HER ones, moreover male fawns presented higher carcass weight than female (13.62 vs 11.74 kg.

  12. Bovine virus diarrhea virus in free-living deer from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S S; Roensholt, L; Bitsch, V

    2000-07-01

    Free-living deer are suggested as a possible source of infection of cattle with bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) virus. To examine this hypothesis blood samples from 476 free-living deer were collected during two different periods and tested for BVD virus and antibody in Denmark. In 1995-96, 207 animals were tested. These included 149 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), 29 fallow deer (Dama dama), 20 red deer (Cervus elaphus) and one sika deer (Cervus sika). For the remaining eight animals no species information was available. In 1998-99, 269 animals were tested including 212 roe deer and 57 red deer. The animals were selected from areas with a relatively high prevalence of cattle herds with a BVD persistent infection status in 1997 and 1998. All 207 samples from 1995-96 were found antibody-negative except two samples from red deer. Only 158 of the 207 samples were tested for virus and were all found negative. Of the 269 samples from 1998-99 all but one were antibody negative. The positive sample was from a red deer. All samples were virus-negative. It appears that BVD infection does not occur in roe deer in Denmark. The presence of antibody in a few red deer from various districts in Jutland probably results from cattle to deer transmission, rather than spread among deer. Hence, the possibility of free-living deer as a source of infection for cattle in Denmark seems to be remote.

  13. Welfare issues of modern deer farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Mattiello

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will start with briefly outlining the recent domestication history of red deer (Cervus elaphus and fallow deer (Dama dama, followed by a description of the present status of modern deer farming. It will then review the main welfare issues of deer farming. The following aspects will be considered: accommodation and housing, management and handling, nutrition (feed and water provision, transport and slaughter, plus a short mention of velvet harvest. As a summary, the following practices can be recommended to ensure animal welfare in modern deer farming: the adoption of suitable housing systems and of adequate management techniques (e.g. specific handling pens and drop-floor cradles or crushes and the respect of specific needs (e.g. provision of protection and shelter from predators as well as from climatic extremes, such as cold winds or direct solar radiation. Handling and yarding operations will be easier when they occur in dim light. Special attention must be paid to the manipulation of the newborns. At the slaughterhouse, facilities must be designed specifically for deer. The presence of well trained stockpersons, with a sound knowledge of deer physiology and behaviour, is also a key-factor for improving welfare levels in deer farms. To achieve these aims, training of the managers and stockpersons and the adoption of specific codes of conducts are highly recommendable.

  14. The taphonomy of fallow deer (Dama dama) skeletons from Denmark and its bearing on the pre-Weichselian occupation of northern Europe by humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeland, Charles P.; Nielsen, Trine Kellberg; Byø, Malene;

    2014-01-01

    material removed as a secure indicator of Neandertal settlement of Denmark during the last interglacial, this lithic material must be viewed with renewed skepticism. While ecological and/or topographic factors may have played an important role in preventing Neandertals from penetrating into peninsular...

  15. Accumulation of polonium 210Po in tissues and organs of deer carvidae from Northern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwarzec, Bogdan; Prucnal, Malgorzata

    2007-01-01

    This study was undertaken to provide information on accumulation of polonium in tissues and organs of deer carvidae in order to assess the potential transport of this element via food-chain to game meat consumers. Livers, kidneys and muscles of large herbivorous animals belonging to three species: roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and fallow deer (Dama dama), collected in Northern Poland, were the subject of the present investigation. Activities of (210)Po were determined by means of alpha spectrometry along with relevant radiochemical procedures. The concentration of (210)Po in analyzed animals decreased in the order kidney > liver > muscle tissue. The average activity concentrations of (210)Po ranged between 0.02 +/- 0.01 Bq. kg(- 1) w.w. in muscles and 7.15 +/- 0.12 Bq. kg(- 1) w.w. in kidneys. Levels of polonium were not influenced by sampling location, sex, age and species of animals.

  16. Fattori influenzanti la distribuzione del Daino (Dama dama in un'area dell'Appennino settentrionale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Merli

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Factors affecting the distribution of fallow deer (Dama dama in an area of the northern Apennines (Italy A wild population of fallow deer (Dama dama, originated in the Seventies from accidental release, has been monitored from 1996 to 2000 in the hilly and mountainous habitat of the Pavia county (Northern Apennines. Sightings and signs of presence on 34 transects (total length of 163.2 km were collected twice a year in spring. The distribution of the species in the study area (732 km² was defined on the basis of a grid of 215 4-km² sample units. The species occupied the 28% and 22% of the study area respectively in 1997 and 2000. The relative abundance of the population, estimated as mean of sightings-signs/km varied from 0.50 (S.E. = 0.27 in 1997 to 0.03 (S.E. = 0.03 in 1998. Discriminant Function and Logistic Regression Analysis were performed to investigate the influence of 23 habitat variables on the distribution of fallow deers in 1997. Both statistical techniques identified the length of the edge between woods and crops as the main variable affecting fallow deer distribution. The analysis also pointed out that the area potentially suitable for the species raised up to 388 km² (53.0% of the study area. Riassunto Una popolazione di Daino presente nella zona collinare e montana della provincia di Pavia (732 km², originatasi da una fuga di animali da un allevamento negli anni 70, è stata monitorata dal 1996 al 2000. Per la definizione della distribuzione è stato predisposto un sistema di 34 transetti (163,2 km in totale percorsi 2 volte l'anno, in primavera, annotando e mappando tutti i segni di presenza e le osservazioni dirette della specie. L'area di studio è quindi stata suddivisa in maglie quadrate di 400 ha ciascuna (Unità di Campionamento, a cui è stata associata, per ogni anno la presenza o l'assenza della specie. La superficie interessata dalla

  17. Localization and characterization of STRO-1 cells in the deer pedicle and regenerating antler.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans J Rolf

    Full Text Available The annual regeneration of deer antlers is a unique developmental event in mammals, which as a rule possess only a very limited capacity to regenerate lost appendages. Studying antler regeneration can therefore provide a deeper insight into the mechanisms that prevent limb regeneration in humans and other mammals, and, with regard to medical treatments, may possibly even show ways how to overcome these limitations. Traditionally, antler regeneration has been characterized as a process involving the formation of a blastema from de-differentiated cells. More recently it has, however, been hypothesized that antler regeneration is a stem cell-based process. Thus far, direct evidence for the presence of stem cells in primary or regenerating antlers was lacking. Here we demonstrate the presence of cells positive for the mesenchymal stem cell marker STRO-1 in the chondrogenic growth zone and the perivascular tissue of the cartilaginous zone in primary and regenerating antlers as well as in the pedicle of fallow deer (Dama dama. In addition, cells positive for the stem cell/progenitor cell markers STRO-1, CD133 and CD271 (LNGFR were isolated from the growth zones of regenerating fallow deer antlers as well as the pedicle periosteum and cultivated for extended periods of time. We found evidence that STRO-1(+ cells isolated from the different locations are able to differentiate in vitro along the osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. Our results support the view that the annual process of antler regeneration might depend on the periodic activation of mesenchymal progenitor cells located in the pedicle periosteum. The findings of the present study indicate that not only limited tissue regeneration, but also extensive appendage regeneration in a postnatal mammal can occur as a stem cell-based process.

  18. Accumulation of polonium 210Po, uranium (234U and 238U and plutonium (238Pu and 239+240Pu in tissues and organs of deer Carvidae from northern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strumińska-Parulska D. I.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Livers, kidneys and muscles of large herbivorous animals: roe deer (Capreolus capreolus, red deer (Cervus elaphus and fallow deer (Dama dama, collected in northern Poland, were the subject of the investigation. Polonium, uranium and plutonium activities were measured using alpha spectrometry along with relevant radiochemical procedures. The average concentrations of 210Po ranged between 0.02±0.01 Bq kg−1 ww in muscles and 7.15±0.12 Bq kg−1 ww in kidneys. The concentration of 238U ranged widely between 2.49±0.18 and 69.37±5.45 mBq kg−1 ww. The average concentrations of 239+240Pu ranged between 0.18±0.04 mBq kg−1 ww in muscle and 2.77±0.60 mBq kg−1 ww in kidneys. Statistical analysis showed that the sampling location, sex, age and species did not influence on the radioisotope activities in the analyzed samples.

  19. Highlights of DAMA/LIBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabei R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The DAMA project develops and uses new/improved low background scintillation detectors to investigate the Dark Matter (DM particle component(s in the galactic halo and rare processes deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS of the I.N.F.N.. Here some highlights of DAMA/LIBRA (Large sodium Iodide Bulk for Rare processes as a unique apparatus in direct DM investigation for its full sensitive mass, target material, intrinsic radio-purity, methodological approach and all the controls performed on the experimental parameters are outlined. The DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles have reached a model-independent evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo exploiting the DM annual modulation signature with highly radio-pure NaI(Tl target. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA–phase2 are summarised and the powerful tools offered by a model independent strategy of DM investigation are pointed out.

  20. Foot-and-mouth disease in British deer: transmission of virus to cattle, sheep and deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, E P; Herniman, K A; Lawman, M J; Sellers, R F

    1975-06-28

    After exposure for two hours to cattle with foot-and-mouth disease, each of the five species of deer found in the British countryside became infected. Clinical disease was typical and severe in the roe and muntjac deer, with some animals dying, less severe in the sika deer and usually subclinical in the fallow and red deer. Each species transmitted disease to its own species and to cattle and sheep. The amounts of virus present in the blood, and in oesophageal/pharyngeal samples and excreted as an aerosol during the course of the infection in the deer were similar to those recorded for the sheep and cattle in the same experiment. The fallow and sika deer commonly carried virus in the pharynx beyond 28 days after exposure; some red deer also became carriers. In epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease in the UK, it is likely that deer would have such intimate contact with farm animals as occurred in this study. The natural behavior of free-living deer in the UK suggests that, although the five species are susceptible to foot-and-mouth disease, they are unlikely to be an important factor in the maintenance and transmission of the virus during an epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease in domestic livestock.

  1. Management of deer for experimental studies with foor-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, E P; McDiarmid, A; Rowe, J J

    1975-06-07

    Red, sika, fallow, roe and muntjac deer adapted to captivity in experimental units designed for working with foot-and-mouth disease. The red, sika and fallow deer readily accepted rolled oats and hay as their staple diet. This diet was replaced for the roe and muntjac deer with flaked maize, calf starter pellets and green browse. Etorphine/acepromazine ans xylazine were found to be suitable sedatives for detailed examination of the tongue and oral cavity of the various species of deer and gave adequate analgesia for the inoculation and collection of virus samples.

  2. Deer Banby

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 Deer Banby is very clever.Many animals like him. Lion and Tiger,are strong.They like to bully other animals.Deer Banby decides to help his friends. One day Lion sees Deer Banby and says."I'm going to eat you!"Deer Banby laughs,"No,you can't.I am as strong as you are."Lion laughs.

  3. The Amtex DAMA Project: The Brookhaven contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Amtex Partnership organized in 1993 as a Technology Transfer Collaboration among members of the integrated textile industry, the DOE National Laboratories, a number of universities, and several research/education/technology transfer organizations (RETTs). Under the Amtex umbrella organization, a number of technology areas were defined and individual projects were launched addressing various aspects of improving the health and competitiveness of the American textile industry. The first and, to date, the largest of these has been the computer-based Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project. Brookhaven National Laboratory became involved in DAMA beginning in March of 1993 and remained an active participant through January of 1995. It was staffed almost exclusively with personnel of the Computing and Communications Division. This document summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Brookhaven team in working with the larger collaboration. Detailed information about the Amtex Partnership, the DAMA Project, and specific BNL contributions are documented elsewhere.

  4. The Amtex DAMA Project: The Brookhaven contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Amtex Partnership organized in 1993 as a Technology Transfer Collaboration among members of the integrated textile industry, the DOE National Laboratories, a number of universities, and several research/education/technology transfer organizations (RETTs). Under the Amtex umbrella organization, a number of technology areas were defined and individual projects were launched addressing various aspects of improving the health and competitiveness of the American textile industry. The first and, to date, the largest of these has been the computer-based Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project. Brookhaven National Laboratory became involved in DAMA beginning in March of 1993 and remained an active participant through January of 1995. It was staffed almost exclusively with personnel of the Computing and Communications Division. This document summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Brookhaven team in working with the larger collaboration. Detailed information about the Amtex Partnership, the DAMA Project, and specific BNL contributions are documented elsewhere.

  5. New results from DAMA/LIBRA

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabei, R; Cappella, F; Cerulli, R; Dai, C J; d'Angelo, A; He, H L; Incicchitti, A; Kuang, H H; Ma, X H; Montecchia, F; Nozzoli, F; Prosperi, D; Sheng, X D; Wang, R G; Ye, Z P

    2010-01-01

    DAMA/LIBRA is running at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the I.N.F.N.. Here the results obtained with a further exposure of 0.34 ton x yr are presented. They refer to two further annual cycles collected one before and one after the first DAMA/LIBRA upgrade occurred on September/October 2008. The cumulative exposure with those previously released by the former DAMA/NaI and by DAMA/LIBRA is now 1.17 ton x yr, corresponding to 13 annual cycles. The data further confirm the model independent evidence of the presence of Dark Matter (DM) particles in the galactic halo on the basis of the DM annual modulation signature (8.9 sigma C.L. for the cumulative exposure). In particular, with the cumulative exposure the modulation amplitude of the single-hit events in the (2 -- 6) keV energy interval measured in NaI(Tl) target is (0.0116 +- 0.0013) cpd/kg/keV; the measured phase is (146 +- 7) days and the measured period is (0.999 +- 0.002) yr, values well in agreement with those expected for the DM particles.

  6. Muon-induced neutrons do not explain the DAMA data

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, J

    2015-01-01

    We present an accurate model of the muon-induced background in the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. Our work challenges proposed mechanisms which seek to explain the observed DAMA signal modulation with muon-induced backgrounds. Muon generation and transport are performed using the MUSIC/MUSUN code, and subsequent interactions in the vicinity of the DAMA detector cavern are simulated with Geant4. We estimate the total muon-induced neutron flux in the detector cavern to be $\\Phi_n^\

  7. Wild deer as potential vectors of anthelmintic-resistant abomasal nematodes between cattle and sheep farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintoan-Uta, C; Morgan, E R; Skuce, P J; Coles, G C

    2014-04-07

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes are among the most important causes of production loss in farmed ruminants, and anthelmintic resistance is emerging globally. We hypothesized that wild deer could potentially act as reservoirs of anthelmintic-resistant GI nematodes between livestock farms. Adult abomasal nematodes and faecal samples were collected from fallow (n = 24), red (n = 14) and roe deer (n = 10) from venison farms and areas of extensive or intensive livestock farming. Principal components analysis of abomasal nematode species composition revealed differences between wild roe deer grazing in the areas of intensive livestock farming, and fallow and red deer in all environments. Alleles for benzimidazole (BZ) resistance were identified in β-tubulin of Haemonchus contortus of roe deer and phenotypic resistance confirmed in vitro by an egg hatch test (EC50 = 0.149 µg ml(-1) ± 0.13 µg ml(-1)) on H. contortus eggs from experimentally infected sheep. This BZ-resistant H. contortus isolate also infected a calf experimentally. We present the first account of in vitro BZ resistance in wild roe deer, but further experiments should firmly establish the presence of phenotypic BZ resistance in vivo. Comprehensive in-field studies should assess whether nematode cross-transmission between deer and livestock occurs and contributes, in any way, to the development of resistance on livestock farms.

  8. Indigenous Fallow Management on Yap Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.V.C. Falanruw; Francis Ruegorong

    2002-01-01

    On Yap Island, indigenous management of the fallow in shifting agriculture has resulted in the development of site-stable taro patch and tree garden agroforestry systems. These systems are relatively sustainable and supportive of household economies , with some surplus for local market sales. however, a broad range of crops whose harvest is complementary to those...

  9. Signals from dark Universe: DAMA/LIBRA at LNGS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Bernabei; P Belli; F Montecchia; F Nozzoli; F Cappella; A d’Angelo; A Incicchitti; D Prosperi; R Cerulli; C J Dai; H L He; X H Ma; X D Sheng; R G Wang; Z P Ye

    2010-08-01

    The DAMA/LIBRA set-up (about 250 kg highly radiopure NaI(Tl) sensitive mass) is running at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the INFN. The first DAMA/LIBRA results point out the presence of a dark matter particle component in the galactic halo, as well as the former DAMA/NaI set-up; cumulatively the data support such evidence at 8.2 CL and satisfy all the peculiarities of the dark matter annual modulation signature.

  10. DAMA annual modulation and mirror Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerulli, R.; Cappella, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Villar, P. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Saragossa (Spain); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc, Canfranc Estacion, Huesca (Spain); Bernabei, R.; Belli, P. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Incicchitti, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Rome (Italy); Addazi, A.; Berezhiani, Z. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Universita di L' Aquila, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Coppito, AQ (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    The DAMA experiment using ultra low background NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators has measured an annual modulation effect in the keV region which satisfies all the peculiarities of an effect induced by Dark Matter particles. In this paper we analyze this annual modulation effect in terms of mirror Dark Matter, an exact duplicate of ordinary matter from parallel hidden sector, which chemical composition is dominated by mirror helium while it can also contain significant fractions of heavier elements as Carbon and Oxygen. Dark mirror atoms are considered to interact with the target nuclei in the detector via Rutherford-like scattering induced by kinetic mixing between mirror and ordinary photons, both being massless. In the present analysis we consider various possible scenarios for the mirror matter chemical composition. For all the scenarios, the relevant ranges for the kinetic mixing parameter have been obtained taking also into account various existing uncertainties in nuclear and particle physics quantities. (orig.)

  11. DAMA annual modulation and mirror Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerulli, R.; Villar, P.; Cappella, F.; Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Incicchitti, A.; Addazi, A.; Berezhiani, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The DAMA experiment using ultra low background NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators has measured an annual modulation effect in the keV region which satisfies all the peculiarities of an effect induced by Dark Matter particles. In this paper we analyze this annual modulation effect in terms of mirror Dark Matter, an exact duplicate of ordinary matter from parallel hidden sector, which chemical composition is dominated by mirror helium while it can also contain significant fractions of heavier elements as Carbon and Oxygen. Dark mirror atoms are considered to interact with the target nuclei in the detector via Rutherford-like scattering induced by kinetic mixing between mirror and ordinary photons, both being massless. In the present analysis we consider various possible scenarios for the mirror matter chemical composition. For all the scenarios, the relevant ranges for the kinetic mixing parameter have been obtained taking also into account various existing uncertainties in nuclear and particle physics quantities.

  12. Serosurvey for antibodies to malignant catarrhal fever-associated viruses in free-living and captive cervids in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, K; Li, H; Müller-Doblies, U

    1998-10-01

    A total of 486 serum samples collected from several species of both free-living and captive cervids in Germany was examined for antibodies against malignant catarrhal fever (MCF)-associated viruses (MCFV) by a competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA). Eleven (2%) of these samples were positive for antibodies against MCFV. Among 157 serum samples collected from 16 different species of captive deer including four (7%) of 54 fallow deer and one (7%) of 14 sika deer (Cervus nippon) were seropositive. Among 329 samples from three species of free-ranging deer, including 253 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), 22 red deer (Cervus elaphus) and 54 fallow deer (Cervus dama), only fallow deer were antibody-positive. Of the 25 fallow deer samples collected between 1990 and 1993, four (16%) were seropositive. Among 29 free-ranging fallow deer samples collected in the hunting period 1996-1997, antibodies to MCFV were detected in two (7%) of these sera. All of these fallow deer samples were collected from a circumscribed area in northern Germany. In the same area a high seroprevalence (72%) to MCFV was observed in domestic sheep (n = 50). Among 20 sheep samples (buffy coat) and 15 fallow deer samples (spleen or lymph nodes) examined for ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) by PCR, all 20 sheep samples examined were OvHV-2 positive, but all of the 15 fallow deer samples, including seven seropositive deer, were OvHV-2 negative.

  13. Replacing fallow by cover crops: economic sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, José Luis; Garrido, Alberto; Quemada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Replacing fallow by cover crops in intensive fertilized systems has been demonstrated as an efficient tool for reducing nitrate leaching. However, despite the evident environmental services provided and the range of agronomic benefits documented in the literature, farmers' adoption of this new technology is still limited because they are either unwilling or unable, although adoption reluctance is frequently rooted in low economic profitability, low water se efficiency or poor knowledge. Economic analyses permit a comparison between the profit that farmers obtain from agricultural products and the cost of adopting specific agricultural techniques. The goal of this study was to evaluate the economic impact of replacing the usual winter fallow with cover crops (barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Vanessa), vetch (Vicia villosa L., cv. Vereda) and rapeseed (Brassica napus L., cv. Licapo)) in irrigated maize systems and variable Mediterranean weather conditions using stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations of key farms' financial performance indicators. The three scenarios studied for each cover crop were: i) just leaving the cover crop residue in the ground, ii) leaving the cover crop residue but reduce following maize fertilization according to the N available from the previous cover crop and iii) selling the cover crop residue for animal feeding. All the scenarios were compared with respect to a typical maize-fallow rotation. With observed data from six different years and in various field trials, looking for different weather conditions, probability distribution functions of maize yield, cover crop biomass production and N fertilizer saving was fitted. Based in statistical sources maize grain price, different forage prices and the cost of fertilizer were fitted to probability distribution functions too. As result, introducing a cover crop involved extra costs with respect to fallow as the initial investment, because new seed, herbicide or extra field operations. Additional

  14. Summer fallow soil management - impact on rainfed winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fucui; Wang, Zhaohui; Dai, Jian;

    2014-01-01

    Summer fallow soil management is an important approach to improve soil and crop management in dryland areas. In the Loess Plateau regions, the annual precipitation is low and varies annually and seasonally, with more than 60% concentrated in the summer months from July to September, which...... is the summer fallow period in the winter wheat-summer fallow cropping system. With bare fallow in summer as a control, a 3-year location-fixed field experiment was conducted in the Loess Plateau to investigate the effects of wheat straw retention (SR), green manure (GM) planting, and their combination on soil...... water retention (WR) during summer fallow, winter wheat yield, and crop water use and nitrogen (N) uptake. The results showed that SR increased soil WR during summer fallow by 20 mm on average compared with the control over 3 experimental years but reduced the grain yield by 8% in the third year...

  15. Deer Wintering Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Deer winter habitat is critical to the long term survival of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Vermont. Being near the northern extreme of the...

  16. DAMA/LIBRA results and perspectives of phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Belli, P., E-mail: pierluigi.belli@roma2.infn.it [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Cappella, F. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Roma “La Sapienza”, I-00185 Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I.N.F.N., Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J. [IHEP, Chinese Academy, P.O. Box 918/3, Beijing 100039 (China); D' Angelo, A. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Roma “La Sapienza”, I-00185 Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, I-00185 Rome (Italy); D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); He, H.L. [IHEP, Chinese Academy, P.O. Box 918/3, Beijing 100039 (China); Incicchitti, A. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Roma “La Sapienza”, I-00185 Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Ma, X.H. [IHEP, Chinese Academy, P.O. Box 918/3, Beijing 100039 (China); Montecchia, F. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Dip. di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Univ. “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); and others

    2014-04-01

    The DAMA/LIBRA experiment, running at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the INFN, has a sensitive mass of about 250 kg highly radiopure NaI(Tl). It is mainly devoted to the investigation of Dark Matter (DM) particles in the Galactic halo by exploiting the model independent DM annual modulation signature. The present DAMA/LIBRA experiment and the former DAMA/NaI one (the first generation experiment having an exposed mass of about 100 kg) have released so far results corresponding to a total exposure of 1.17 ton×year over 13 annual cycles. They provide a model independent evidence of the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo at 8.9σ C.L. After the upgrade at fall 2010 when all the PMTs have been replaced with new ones having higher quantum efficiency, the feasibility to decrease the software energy threshold has been demonstrated and the set-up is running in this new configuration, named DAMA/LIBRA–phase2. The perspectives of DAMA/LIBRA–phase2 will be shortly summarized.

  17. Can muon-induced backgrounds explain the DAMA data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Joel; Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an accurate simulation of the muon-induced background in the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. Muon sampling underground has been performed using the MUSIC/MUSUN codes and subsequent interactions in the rock around the DAMA/LIBRA detector cavern and the experimental setup including shielding, have been simulated with GEANT4.9.6. In total we simulate the equivalent of 20 years of muon data. We have calculated the total muon-induced neutron flux in the DAMA/LIBRA detector cavern as Φμ n = 1.0 × 10-9 cm-2s-1, which is consistent with other simulations. After selecting events which satisfy the DAMA/LIBRA signal criteria, our simulation predicts 3.49 × 10-5 cpd/kg/keV which accounts for less than 0.3% of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation amplitude. We conclude from our work that muon-induced backgrounds are unable to contribute to the observed signal modulation.

  18. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) model for supply chain collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHAPMAN,LEON D.; PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.

    2000-03-13

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise architecture and collaborative model for supply chains. This model will enable improved collaborative business across any supply chain. The DAMA Model for Supply Chain Collaboration is a high-level model for collaboration to achieve Demand Activated Manufacturing. The five major elements of the architecture to support collaboration are (1) activity or process, (2) information, (3) application, (4) data, and (5) infrastructure. These five elements are tied to the application of the DAMA architecture to three phases of collaboration - prepare, pilot, and scale. There are six collaborative activities that may be employed in this model: (1) Develop Business Planning Agreements, (2) Define Products, (3) Forecast and Plan Capacity Commitments, (4) Schedule Product and Product Delivery, (5) Expedite Production and Delivery Exceptions, and (6) Populate Supply Chain Utility. The Supply Chain Utility is a set of applications implemented to support collaborative product definition, forecast visibility, planning, scheduling, and execution. The DAMA architecture and model will be presented along with the process for implementing this DAMA model.

  19. Dark Matter investigation by DAMA at Gran Sasso

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabei, R; d'Angelo, S; Di Marco, A; Montecchia, F; Cappella, F; d'Angelo, A; Incicchitti, A; Caracciolo, V; Castellano, S; Cerulli, R; Dai, C J; He, H L; Ma, X H; Sheng, X D; Wang, R G; Ye, Z P

    2013-01-01

    Experimental observations and theoretical arguments at Galaxy and larger scales have suggested that a large fraction of the Universe is composed by Dark Matter particles. This has motivated the DAMA experimental efforts to investigate the presence of such particles in the galactic halo by exploiting a model independent signature and very highly radiopure set-ups deep underground. Few introductory arguments are summarized before presenting a review of the present model independent positive results obtained by the DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA set-ups at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the INFN. Implications and model dependent comparisons with other different kinds of results will be shortly addressed. Some arguments put forward in literature will be confuted.

  20. Investigating Earth shadowing effect with DAMA/LIBRA-phase1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipt. di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipt. di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); D' Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipt. di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Ji' an, Jiangxi (China)

    2015-05-15

    In the present paper the results obtained in the investigation of possible diurnal effects for low-energy single-hit scintillation events of DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 (1.04 ton x year exposure) have been analysed in terms of an effect expected in case of dark matter (DM) candidates inducing nuclear recoils and having high cross-section with ordinary matter, which implies low DM local density in order to fulfill the DAMA/LIBRA DM annual modulation results. This effect is due to the different Earth depths crossed by those DM candidates during the sidereal day. (orig.)

  1. Comparison and overlap of sympatric wild ungulate diet in Cazorla, segura and las Villas Natural Park

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Martínez, T.

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses the trophic relationships and the degree of overlap between the diet of Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica), red deer (Cervus elaphus), fallow deer (Dama dama) and mouflon (Ovis musimon) in the Cazorla, Segura and Las Villas National Park (Southeastern of Spain). Stomach content was used as the basis for diet evaluation. The most heavily consumed plant species by the four herbivores were Quercu...

  2. Aprovechamiento de recursos alimenticios naturales. I. Contribución al estudio de la dieta del gamo (Dama dama) y del muflón

    OpenAIRE

    Molera Aparicio, M.; Rodríguez Berrocal, J.

    1985-01-01

    This work deals with botanical identification of vegetation integrating Dama dama °and Ovis ammom musimum diets, in the National Park Sierra of Cazorla. Seasonal analysis of ruminal contents of 21 Dama dama and 22 Ovis ammom musimum yield the following results: In spring about 95-98 p.100 of it was of, herbacous species, and 2-5 p.100shrubby materials. Summer diet was integrated by: fruits of trees and shrubs (about 1 p.100), herbacous species (90 p.100) and shrubby materials (9 p.100). In au...

  3. DAMA/LIBRA results and perspectives, Bled 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabei, R; d'Angelo, S; Di Marco, A; Montecchia, F; Cappella, F; d'Angelo, A; Incicchitti, A; Caracciolo, V; Castellano, S; Cerulli, R; Dai, C J; He, H L; Ma, X H; Sheng, X D; Wang, R G; Ye, Z P

    2014-01-01

    The DAMA/LIBRA experiment is composed by about 250 kg of highly radiopure NaI(Tl). It is in operation at the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the INFN. The main aim of the experiment is to investigate the Dark Matter (DM) particles in the Galactic halo by exploiting the model independent DM annual modulation signature. The DAMA/LIBRA experiment and the former DAMA/NaI (the first generation experiment having an exposed mass of about 100 kg) have released results corresponding to a total exposure of 1.17 ton $\\times$ yr over 13 annual cycles; they have provided a model independent evidence of the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo at 8.9 $\\sigma$ C.L.. The results of a further annual cycle, concluding the DAMA/LIBRA--phase1, have been released after this Workshop and are not included here. In the fall 2010 an important upgrade of the experiment have been performed. All the PMTs of the NaI(Tl) detectors have been replaced with new ones having higher quantum efficiency with the aim to decr...

  4. New results and perspectives of DAMA/LIBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabei R.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton × yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS of the I.N.F.N. during 7 annual cycles are briefly summarized. The DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles give evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of Dark Matter (DM particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radio-pure NaI(Tl target. The modulation parameters are well in agreement with those expected for DM particles. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA–phase2 are outlined.

  5. The adoption potential of biomass transfer and improved fallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    levels of inorganic fertilizer with improved fallow (IF) species (Mucuna pruriens and Canavalia eniformis) and the biomass transfer (BT) species ... The World Bank (1997) estimated that in 1990, ... losses over time. ...... Unpublished MSc thesis.

  6. Pediatrician’s perspectives on discharge against medical advice (DAMA among pediatric patients: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macrohon Bernadette C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenomenon of discharge against medical advice (DAMA among pediatric patients places pediatricians in a dilemma between respect for the parent’s decision and the desire to provide complete care for the vulnerable child-patient. Little has been written about factors that affect a pediatrician’s decision to allow a parent to discharge his child against medical advice. This qualitative study aims to answer the question of how pediatric residents in a tertiary government hospital perceive and decide on a DAMA request from a parent or primary caregiver. Methods Using a focus group discussion approach, 11 pediatric residents from a government-run tertiary hospital were recruited for the study. The session was digitally recorded and dominant themes were coded and identified. Results There were three prominent themes that arose in the discussion: variability of definitions of DAMA, factors considered before “allowing” the patient to be DAMA, and the implications of a DAMA request on their performance as pediatricians. Definitions vary from one resident to another based on the main reason for DAMA (terminal, cultural, or financial. A conflict was noted in the definition of Home per Request (HPR versus DAMA. Factors that influence a pediatrician to sign out a case as DAMA include: their ability to do something about the reason given for the DAMA request, the condition of the patient when the DAMA request was given, their impression of the kind of care that the parents provide, and their legal liabilities. Pediatric residents generally maintain a positive attitude towards the parents who request for DAMA and in the event of readmission, accept the patient into their care again. The occurrence of a variety of definitions and subcategories for DAMA may cause confusion among the pediatricians and should be clarified. The familiarity with cultural traditions contributes to their ability to handle situations that may lead to DAMA

  7. Fallow practices in West Africa: A comparative importance of phenomenon in Cameroon and Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Nkamleu, Guy Blaise

    1999-01-01

    There is a clear need to understand the characteristics of fallow in order to seek appropriate alternatives. From a simultaneous study done in Cameroon and Nigeria, we assessed the specificity of fallow techniques in both countries and discovered that fallow practices remain important in traditional farming systems. Fallow is specifically applied in food crops and forest fields. There are less common in perennial fields and homegardens. Fallow practices remain the major land use technologies ...

  8. ORR Deer Hunt Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scofield, P.A.; Teasley, N.A.

    1999-09-01

    The primary purpose for the initiation of deer hunts on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was deer population control to reduce collisions with vehicles and maintain a healthy herd and habitat. As of 1997, thirteen annual deer hunts have been conducted on the ORR. The deer hunt monitoring program (DHMP) has two components -- a field screening monitoring program and a confirmatory laboratory analysis program of both retained and randomly selected released deer samples.

  9. A simple explanation for DAMA with moderate channeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldstein, Brian; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Katz, Emanuel [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA, 02215 (United States); Tweedie, Brock, E-mail: bfeldste@buphy.bu.edu, E-mail: fitzpatr@physics.bu.edu, E-mail: amikatz@buphy.bu.edu, E-mail: brock@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    We consider the possibility that the DAMA signal arises from channeled events in simple models where the dark matter interaction with nuclei is suppressed at small momenta. As with the standard WIMP, these models have two parameters (the dark matter mass and the size of the cross-section), without the need to introduce an additional energy threshold type of parameter. We find that they can be consistent with channeling fractions as low as about ∼ 15%, so long as at least ∼ 70% of the nuclear recoil energy for channeled events is deposited electronically. Given that there are reasons not to expect very large channeling fractions, these scenarios make the channeling explanation of DAMA much more compelling.

  10. Two cases of incidental Podostroma cornu-damae poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Nyung; Do, Han Ho; Seo, Jun Seok; Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    Podostroma cornu-damae is a rare, deadly fungus. However, it can be easily mistaken for antler Ganoderma lucidum. In this case report, two patients made tea with the fungus and drank it over a 2-week period. Both patients presented with bicytopenia, and one patient had desquamation of the palms and soles. Both were treated with prophylactic antibiotics and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. One patient was admitted to the intensive care unit and received a platelet transfusion. Both patients were discharged without complications. Podostroma cornu-damae infections caused by intoxication were successfully treated using our treatment strategy, which consisted of prophylactic antibiotics, platelet transfusion, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. We believe this report can guide future treatment. PMID:27752639

  11. On the DAMA and CoGeNT Modulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Kahlhoefer, Felix; March-Russell, John;

    2011-01-01

    DAMA observes an annual modulation in their event rate, as might be expected from dark matter scatterings, while CoGeNT has reported evidence for a similar modulation. The simplest interpretation of these findings in terms of dark matter-nucleus scatterings is excluded by other direct detection...... constraints, while inelasticity enhances the annual modulation fraction of the signal, bringing the CoGeNT and CDMS results into better agreement....

  12. GeV WIMPs scattering off of OH impurities cannot explain the DAMA signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S., E-mail: profumo@ucsc.edu, E-mail: fdasilva@ucsc.edu [Department of Physics and Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    In the presence of OH impurities in the DAMA crystals, GeV-scale WIMPs elastically scattering off of hydrogen nuclei with a spin independent cross section of ∼10{sup −33}cm{sup 2} might explain the annual modulation observed by the DAMA experiment, while being consistent with other direct dark matter searches, as scattering would occur at energies below the energy threshold of other detectors. In this work we examine this possibility and show that, independent of the level of OH impurities in the DAMA crystals, for several reasons this scenario does not provide a viable explanation to the DAMA signal.

  13. Final model independent result of DAMA/LIBRA-phase1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Belli, P. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; D' Angelo, A.; Prosperi, D. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Castellano, S.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); Incicchitti, A. [INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Jiangxi (China)

    2013-12-15

    The results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton x yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N. during 7 annual cycles (i.e. adding a further 0.17 ton x yr exposure) are presented. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 data give evidence for the presence of Dark Matter (DM) particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radio-pure NaI(Tl) target, at 7.5{sigma} C.L. Including also the first generation DAMA/NaI experiment (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton x yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles), the C.L. is 9.3{sigma} and the modulation amplitude of the single-hit events in the (2-6) keV energy interval is: (0.0112{+-}0.0012) cpd/kg/keV; the measured phase is (144{+-}7) days and the measured period is (0.998{+-}0.002) yr, values well in agreement with those expected for DM particles. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. (orig.)

  14. A New Possible Way to Explain DAMA Results

    CERN Document Server

    Va'vra, J

    2014-01-01

    The DAMA experiment clearly observes an oscillatory small signal. The observed signal is a very small energy deposit in the NaI(Tl) crystals, at a level of 2-6 keV, believed to be due to interactions of detector nuclei with the Dark Matter. The observed yearly modulation is in phase with the Earth's motion around the Sun. The DAMA detector is a 250 kg stack of NaI(Tl) detectors located in the Grand Sasso laboratory. So far, it is not well explained by proponents nor confirmed by other major Dark Matter searching experiments. We propose a new simple way to explain the DAMA signal and why nobody else observes it: rather than collisions of a 6-7 GeV/$c^2$ WIMP with a heavy nucleus, such as Na, I or Tl, we propose that the observed signal is due to a collision of a very light $\\sim$1 GeV/$c^2$ WIMP with hydrogen nucleus, where the hydrogen target comes from a small OH-contamination of NaI(Tl) crystals. The light WIMP strikes a hydrogen nucleus, producing a proton of up to $\\sim$5 keV. Such a proton would then cau...

  15. DAMA RESULTS: DARK MATTER IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bernabei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental efforts and theoretical developmens support that most of the Universe is Dark and a large fraction of it should be made of relic particles; many possibilities are open on their nature and interaction types. In particular, the DAMA/LIBRA experiment at Gran Sasso Laboratory (sensitive mass: ~250 kg is mainly devoted to the investigation of Dark Matter (DM particles in the Galactic halo by exploiting the model independent DM annual modulation signature with higly radiopure Na I(Tl targets. DAMA/LIBRA is the succesor of the first generation DAMA/NaI (sensitive mass: ~100 kg; cumulatively the two experiments have released so far the results obtained by analyzing an exposure of 1.17 t yr, collected over 13 annual cycles. The data show a model independent evidence of the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo at 8.9σ confidence level (C.L.. Some of the already achieved results are shortly reminded, the last upgrade occurred at fall 2010 is mentioned and future perspectives are sumarized.

  16. Rabies in Captive Deer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-30

    Dr. Brett Petersen, a medical officer at CDC, discusses rabies in captive deer.  Created: 4/30/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/30/2012.

  17. An Efficient and Examinable Illegal Fallow Fields Detecting Method with Spatio-Temporal Information Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Chu, Tzu-How

    2017-04-01

    To control the rice production and farm usage in Taiwan, Agriculture and Food Agency (AFA) has published a series of policies to subsidize farmers to plant different crops or to practice fallow science 1983. Because of no efficient and examinable mechanism to verify the fallow fields surveyed by township office, illegal fallow fields were still repeated each year. In this research, we used remote sensing images, GIS data of Fields, and application records of fallow fields to establish an illegal fallow fields detecting method in Yulin County in central Taiwan. This method included: 1. collected multi-temporal images from FS-2 or SPOT series with 4 time periods; 2. combined the application records and GIS data of fields to verify the location of fallow fields; 3. conducted ground truth survey and classified images with ISODATA and Maximum Likelihood Classification (MLC); 4. defined the land cover type of fallow fields by zonal statistic; 5. verified accuracy with ground truth; 6. developed potential illegal fallow fields survey method and benefit estimation. We use 190 fallow fields with 127 legal and 63 illegal as ground truth and accuracies of illegal fallow field interpretation in producer and user are 71.43% and 38.46%. If township office surveyed 117 classified illegal fallow fields, 45 of 63 illegal fallow fields will be detected. By using our method, township office can save 38.42% of the manpower to detect illegal fallow fields and receive an examinable 71.43% producer accuracy.

  18. DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 results and perspectives of the phase2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; d'Angelo, A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; He, H. L.; Incicchitti, A.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, X. H.; Montecchia, F.; Sheng, X. D.; Wang, R. G.; Ye, Z. P.

    2016-07-01

    The DAMA/LIBRA experiment (˜ 250 kg of highly radio-pure NaI(Tl)) is running deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N. Here we briefly recall the results obtained in its first phase of measurements (DAMA/LIBRA-phase1; total exposure: 1.04 ton × yr). DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI (cumulative exposure: 1.33 ton × yr) give evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo by exploiting the model-independent DM annual modulation signature. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. At present DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 is running with increased sensitivity.

  19. Evaluation of agricultural ecosystem services in fallowing land based on farmers' participation and model simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu Yen Lan,; Chang Kang-tsung,; Stoorvogel, J.J.; Verburg, P.H.; Sun Chin Hong,

    2012-01-01

    Fallowing with green fertilizer can benefit agricultural ecosystem services (AES). Farmers in Taiwan do not implement fallow practices and plant green fertilizer because the current subsidy level (46,000 NT$ per ha) is too low to manage fallowing. This paper defines the objective of government

  20. Recovery and succession of epiphytes in upper Amazonian fallows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benavides, A.M.; Wolf, J.H.D.; Duivenvoorden, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    The species richness, number of plants, biomass, and species composition of holo- and hemi-epiphytes were recorded in fifty-six 0.04-ha plots, distributed over forest fallows of 2-30 y old and mature forests in lowland Amazonia (Amacayacu National Park, Colombia). A total of 9190 epiphytic plants re

  1. Palabras de la Primera Dama de El Salvador

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Aguirre de Calderón Sol

    1998-01-01

    Este documento incluye las palabras de la Primera Dama de El Salvador Elizabeth de Calderón Sol en la clausura del Foro "Convivencia y seguridad ciudadana en el Istmo Centroamericano y la Isla Española". La conferencia se centra en la violencia doméstica, un tema de particular interés para el gobierno y el instituto salvadoreño para el desarrollo de la mujer que preside. Se presenta el "Programa de saneamiento de la relación familiar", el esfuerzo del gobierno para abordar el problema de la v...

  2. Mesola red deer: physical characteristics, population dynamics and conservation perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mattioli

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biometry, demography and genetics of red deer Cervus elaphus of Mesola Wood (NE Italy, are presented and discussed in relation to the conservation of this population. Modest body size, low stature, oversimplified antlers and a low reproductive performance characterise red deer from Mesola Wood. The mitochondrial genome showed a private haplotype, different from other red deer in Italy and central Europe. The uniqueness of this nucleus and its biogeographic importance make a long-term conservation plan particularly urgent. Management measures such as fallow deer reduction, winter feeding and pasture mowing were tested, giving promising results. The physical condition of the animals improved, calf and adult mortality declined, and a few cases of antlers with bez tine or crown were reported in this study after four decades. Riassunto Il Cervo della Mesola: caratteristiche fisiche, dinamica di popolazione e prospettive di conservazione La biometria, la demografia e la genetica del cervo Cervus elaphus del Gran Bosco della Mesola (Italia nord-orientale, vengono presentate e discusse in relazione alla salvaguardia di questa popolazione. Il cervo della Mesola risulta caratterizzato dalle modeste dimensioni corporee, dalla struttura semplificata dei palchi e da un basso rendimento riproduttivo. L'analisi del genoma mitocondriale ha evidenziato un aplotipo privato, diverso da quello degli altri cervi italiani e centroeuropei. L'unicità di questo nucleo e la sua importanza biogeografica rendono particolarmente urgente un piano di conservazione a lungo termine. Sono stati verificati interventi gestionali quali la riduzione numerica dei daini, il foraggiamento invernale e lo sfalcio delle superfici a pascolo, con risultati promettenti. Le condizioni fisiche degli animali sono migliorate, la mortalità tra i piccoli e gli adulti è diminuita, e sono stati registrati alcuni

  3. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) supply chain collaboration development methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.

    2000-03-15

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise supply chain collaboration development methodology. The goal of this methodology is to enable a supply chain to work more efficiently and competitively. The outcomes of this methodology include: (1) A definitive description and evaluation of the role of business cultures and supporting business organizational structures in either inhibiting or fostering change to a more competitive supply chain; (2) ``As-Is'' and proposed ``To-Be'' supply chain business process models focusing on information flows and decision-making; and (3) Software tools that enable and support a transition to a more competitive supply chain, which results form a business driven rather than technologically driven approach to software design. This methodology development will continue in FY00 as DAMA engages companies in the soft goods industry in supply chain research and implementation of supply chain collaboration.

  4. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) supply chain collaboration development methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.

    2000-03-15

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise supply chain collaboration development methodology. The goal of this methodology is to enable a supply chain to work more efficiently and competitively. The outcomes of this methodology include: (1) A definitive description and evaluation of the role of business cultures and supporting business organizational structures in either inhibiting or fostering change to a more competitive supply chain; (2) ``As-Is'' and proposed ``To-Be'' supply chain business process models focusing on information flows and decision-making; and (3) Software tools that enable and support a transition to a more competitive supply chain, which results form a business driven rather than technologically driven approach to software design. This methodology development will continue in FY00 as DAMA engages companies in the soft goods industry in supply chain research and implementation of supply chain collaboration.

  5. Deer City Legend

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUHUANZHI; LILIKUN

    2003-01-01

    MORE and more commodities,such as clothes,shoes,millinery,lighters and shavers,now bear the “Made in Wenzhou”mark.It woule appear that Wenzhou grooms the whole nation.Lucheng(deer city)District in central Wenzhou is the nucleus of the city's thriving light industry sector.

  6. Comparative water balance study of forest and fallow plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Móricz N

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Increasing pressure on groundwater due to land use change (e.g., afforestation and future climate change will alter the recharge of groundwater aquifers, causing shifts in water table levels and hence influencing the avai­lable groundwater resources. The effect of land use change on groundwater resources has initiated a major scientific debate during the last decades between foresters and experts in water management in Hungary and in several other countries. The aim of this study was to compare water balances of two different vegetation covers, a groundwater dependent oak forest and a nearby fallow area in the Hungarian Lowland. Water balance components for an oak and a fallow plots, exposed to similar weather conditions and with similar soils, were estimated and compared by calibrating the Hydrus 1-D model using mea­sured soil water content and groundwater levels. The difference in the groundwater consumption was analyzed in details during dry and wet growing seasons. Transpiration at the fallow plot was only about two-thirds of that in the oak forest, while groundwater consumption was three times higher in the forest than at the fallow plot throughout the two-year study. During the dry growing season, the proportion of groundwater use from the total transpiration reached up to 90% at the oak plot. According to the model, in the dry growing season in 2007 both vegetation covers relied significantly on groundwater resources, while in 2008 the consumption of groundwater was notably reduced due to the wet weather at both plots.

  7. Blood and serum protein groups of the dama of South-West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knussmann, R; Knussmann, R

    1976-01-01

    The phenotype and gene frequencies of the following polymorphisms are given for the blood samples taken from 448 adults of the South-West African Dama Negro tribe: ABO (with sub-groups), MN, Rh, K, Hp, Gc, Gm(1,2,b), InV(1). The frequencies are discussed in comparison with other African samples and a multivariate comparison between series from south-western Africa is conducted. The Dama prove to be relatively independent.

  8. DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 results and perspectives of the phase2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabei R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton × yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS of the I.N.F.N. during 7 annual cycles are summarized. The DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles give evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of Dark Matter (DM particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radio-pure NaI(Tl target. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. The same data of DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 have also been analyzed searching for possible DM second-order diurnal effect; at present, the DM diurnal modulation amplitude – expected because of the Earth diurnal motion – evaluated on the basis of the DAMA Dark Matter annual modulation results is below the reached experimental sensitivity. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA–phase2 are outlined.

  9. DEER BELIEF AND DEER SACRIFICE AROUND STEPPE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı KAHRAMAN ÇINAR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Turkish people have spreaded on a large area historically. They have left a mark on all the places they reach. The history of Turks begun in Central Asian Steppes. In reaction to the steppe culture, the human communities of Turks are hunter-nomad communities. The hunter-nomad comminuties make a living from stockfarming and apiculture. The deer is one of the essential animals for t he hunter-nomad communities in the daily life. In the steppe, the deer is seen in all area of social life. Further, the deer motives are commonly used in political, military, financial, the most religious areas. The hunter-nomad comminuties benefit by the meat, milk, leather, horns, nails, etc of the deer. In this study, we dwell on the deer with regard to its intended purposes and usage areas according to steppe culture. The references of this study are references are inscriptions, mythologic stories and archeological datas.

  10. Fallow land effects on land-atmosphere interactions in California drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Melton, F. S.; Kueppers, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The recent drought in California increased the area of fallow land, which is cropland not planted or irrigated per normal agricultural practice. The effects of fallow land on land-atmosphere interactions in drought years are not well studied, but theoretically should alter local energy balance and surface climate relative to normal years, which in turn could affect neighboring cropland. We examined these effects using a regional climate model (Weather Research and Forecasting model) coupled with a dynamic crop growth model (Community Land Model) that has an irrigation scheme to study the effects of fallow land in 2014, an extreme drought year in California. In our study, we used satellite-derived maps of cultivated and fallowed acreage, and defined summer fallow land in 2014 as the reduced percentage of cultivated land for each grid cell relative to the 2011 cultivated area (2011 was the most recent year following a winter with average or above average precipitation). Using a sensitivity experiment that kept large-scale climate boundary conditions constant, we found that fallow land resulted in even dryer and warmer weather that worsened the drought impact. Fallow land increased 2-meter air temperature by 0.1- 4 °C with 0-80% fallow land, mainly due to an increase in nighttime temperature. Fallow land warmed the atmosphere up to 850hpa during the day, and after sunset, the warmed atmosphere emitted downward longwave radiation that prevented the surface from rapidly cooling, and therefore resulted in warmer nights. Fallow land reduced near surface relative humidity by 5-30% and increased vapor pressure deficit by 0.5-2 kPa. These drier conditions increased the irrigation water demand in the nearby cropland: crops required 1-25% more irrigation with 10-80% fallow land within the same 10km grid cell. Our study suggests that fallow land has large impacts on land-atmosphere interactions and increases irrigation requirements in nearby cropland.

  11. LasDamas Mock Galaxy Catalogs for SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Cameron; Berlind, A.; Scoccimarro, R.; Wechsler, R.; Busha, M.; Gardner, J.; van den Bosch, F.

    2009-01-01

    The statistical strength of galaxy redshift surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), have ushered us into the era of precision measurements of galaxy clustering. We are now fitting physical models to measured clustering statistics. Galaxy clustering is thus in a position to directly constrain cosmological and galaxy formation theories. This paradigm shift from qualitative to quantitative demands that we understand the statistical and systematic errors in our measurements. Moreover, we must quantify the theoretical uncertainties in our models, which are no longer clearly sub-dominant to observational errors. We address this emerging need with the LasDamas project (LArge Suite of DArk MAtter Simulations) by producing an unprecedented number of independent and realistic mock galaxy catalogs. To date, we have run over 100 independent N-body realizations using a fixed cosmology and initialized using 2nd order Lagrangian perturbation theory. We populate overdensities of dark matter using the halo occupation distribution framework, designed to match both small and large scale clustering of the observed SDSS data. A series of mock galaxy catalogs matching the geometry of the final SDSS release (DR7) are created over a wide luminosity range to correspond to Main and LRG volume-limited samples. We include important observational effects, such as redshift distortions and fiber collisions. These galaxy mocks are publicly available.

  12. Partitioning of simulated rainfall in a kaolinitic soil under improved fallow-maize rotation in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyamadzawo, G.; Nyamugafata, P.; Chikowo, R.; Giller, K.E.

    2003-01-01

    Research on improved fallows has concentrated on soil fertility benefits neglecting possible benefits to soil and water conservation. The effects of improved fallows on rainfall partitioning and associated soil loss were investigated using simulated rainfall on a kaolinitic soil in Zimbabwe.

  13. Replacing fallow with forage triticale in dryland crop rotations increases profitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    A common dryland rotational cropping system in the semi-arid central Great Plains of the U.S. is wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-corn (Zea mays L.)-fallow (WCF). However, the 12-month fallow period following corn production has been shown to be relatively inefficient in storing precipitation during the...

  14. Intensifying a semi-arid dryland crop rotation by replacing fallow with pea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing dryland cropping system intensity in the semi-arid central Great Plains by reducing frequency of fallow can add diversity to cropping systems and decrease erosion potential. However elimination of the periodic fallow phase has been shown to reduce yields of subsequent crops in this region...

  15. Chromolaena odorata fallow in food cropping systems. An agronomic assessment in South-West Ivory Coast.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaats, J.J.P.

    1995-01-01

    In tropical Africa, traditional shifting cultivation can no longer provide sufficient food for the rapidly increasing population, whereas it threatens the remaining forests. An alternative is a fallow system based on the shrub Chromolaena odorata. Food crop cultivation in rotation with this fallow t

  16. Music Is Not Our Enemy, but Noise Should Be Regulated: Thoughts on Shooting/Conflicts Related to Dama Square Dance in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    While Dama square dance is gaining popularity in China, especially with middle-aged and older-adult women--hence the "Dama" (Chinese for "big mamas") moniker--there have been conflicts due to the loud music played for the activity. After a brief explanation of Dama square dance and a description of the context of the conflicts,…

  17. Biodiversity and ecosystem multi-functionality: observed relationships in smallholder fallows in western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Sircely

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that species richness can enhance the ability of plant assemblages to support multiple ecosystem functions. To understand how and when ecosystem services depend on biodiversity, it is valuable to expand beyond experimental grasslands. We examined whether plant diversity improves the capacity of agroecosystems to sustain multiple ecosystem services-production of wood and forage, and two elements of soil formation-in two types of smallholder fallows in western Kenya. In 18 grazed and 21 improved fallows, we estimated biomass and quantified soil organic carbon, soil base cations, sand content, and soil infiltration capacity. For four ecosystem functions (wood biomass, forage biomass, soil base cations, steady infiltration rates linked to the focal ecosystem services, we quantified ecosystem service multi-functionality as (1 the proportion of functions above half-maximum, and (2 mean percentage excess above mean function values, and assessed whether plant diversity or environmental favorability better predicted multi-functionality. In grazed fallows, positive effects of plant diversity best explained the proportion above half-maximum and mean percentage excess, the former also declining with grazing intensity. In improved fallows, the proportion above half-maximum was not associated with soil carbon or plant diversity, while soil carbon predicted mean percentage excess better than diversity. Grazed fallows yielded stronger evidence for diversity effects on multi-functionality, while environmental conditions appeared more influential in improved fallows. The contrast in diversity-multi-functionality relationships among fallow types appears related to differences in management and associated factors including disturbance and species composition. Complementary effects of species with contrasting functional traits on different functions and multi-functional species may have contributed to diversity effects in grazed fallows

  18. Scintillation efficiency measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) below the DAMA/LIBRA energy threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jingke; Calaprice, Frank; Westerdale, Shawn; Froborg, Francis; Suerfu, Burkhant; Alexander, Thomas; Aprahamian, Ani; Back, Henning O; Casarella, Clark; Fang, Xiao; Gupta, Yogesh K; Ianni, Aldo; Lamere, Edward; Lippincott, W Hugh; Liu, Qian; Lyons, Stephanie; Siegl, Kevin; Smith, Mallory; Tan, Wanpeng; Kolk, Bryant Vande

    2015-01-01

    The dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal depends on the NaI(Tl) scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils. Previous measurements for Na recoils have large discrepancies, especially in the DAMA/LIBRA modulation energy region. We report a quenching effect measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) from 3keV$_{\\text{nr}}$ to 52keV$_{\\text{nr}}$, covering the whole DAMA/LIBRA energy region for light WIMP interpretations. By using a low-energy, pulsed neutron beam, a double time-of-flight technique, and pulse-shape discrimination methods, we obtained the most accurate measurement of this kind for NaI(Tl) to date. The results differ significantly from the DAMA reported values at low energies, but fall between the other previous measurements. We present the implications of the new quenching results for the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal.

  19. Scintillation Efficiency Measurement of Na Recoils in NaI(Tl) Below the DAMA/LIBRA Energy Threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jingke [Princeton U.; Shields, Emily [Princeton U.; Calaprice, Frank [Princeton U.; Westerdale, Shawn [Princeton U.; Froborg, Francis [Princeton U.; Suerfu, Burkhant [Princeton U.; Alexander, Thomas [Fermilab; Aprahamian, Ani [Notre Dame U.; Back, Henning O. [Princeton U.; Casarella, Clark [Notre Dame U.; Fang, Xiao [Notre Dame U.; Gupta, Yogesh K. [Notre Dame U.; Ianni, Aldo [Gran Sasso; Lamere, Edward [Notre Dame U.; Lippincott, W. Hugh [Fermilab; Liu, Qian [Notre Dame U.; Lyons, Stephanie [Notre Dame U.; Siegl, Kevin [Notre Dame U.; Smith, Mallory [Notre Dame U.; Tan, Wanpeng [Notre Dame U.; Kolk, Bryant Vande [Notre Dame U.

    2015-07-30

    The dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal depends on the NaI(Tl) scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils. Previous measurements for Na recoils have large discrepancies, especially in the DAMA/LIBRA modulation energy region. We report a quenching effect measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) from 3 to 52 keVnr, covering the whole DAMA/LIBRA energy region for dark matter-Na scattering interpretations. By using a low-energy, pulsed neutron beam, a double time-of-flight technique, and pulse-shape discrimination methods, we obtained the most accurate measurement of this kind for NaI(Tl) to date. The results differ significantly from the DAMA reported values at low energies but fall between the other previous measurements. We present the implications of the new quenching results for the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal.

  20. juego de damas": el espejo roto y la desmitificacion de una imagen

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldo B. de Jaramillo, Luz Mary; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2004-01-01

    "Porque desde niña, como la Margarita de mi cuen­to, mi vida osciló normalmente entre esto y aquello, desplazándose del forte al planfsimo o, si prefieres, navegando a toda vela entre la solemnidad y la joda," "También ella pensaba que en realidad era estu­pendo ser una dama de verdad, porque ahora tenía una noción completamente distinta de antes de lo que era una dama; por eso me gustaba estar entre las damas..." "Filosofía de tocador, cultura de inodoro, ¿qué más da, si todo es lo mismo?" "...

  1. DAMA confronts null searches in the effective theory of dark matter-nucleon interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Catena, Riccardo; Wild, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We examine the dark matter interpretation of the modulation signal reported by the DAMA experiment from the perspective of effective field theories displaying Galilean invariance. We consider the most general effective coupling leading to the elastic scattering of a dark matter particle with a nucleon, and we analyze the compatibility of the DAMA signal with the null results from other direct detection experiments, as well as with the non-observation of a high energy neutrino flux in the direction of the Sun from dark matter annihilation. Assuming the standard halo model, we find a strong tension between the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal and the null result experiments. We also list possible ways-out to this conclusion.

  2. DAMA confronts null searches in the effective theory of dark matter-nucleon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catena, Riccardo [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology,Kemigården 1, Gothenburg (Sweden); Ibarra, Alejandro; Wild, Sebastian [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München,James-Franck-Straße, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-05-17

    We examine the dark matter interpretation of the modulation signal reported by the DAMA experiment from the perspective of effective field theories displaying Galilean invariance. We consider the most general effective coupling leading to the elastic scattering of a dark matter particle with spin 0 or 1/2 off a nucleon, and we analyze the compatibility of the DAMA signal with the null results from other direct detection experiments, as well as with the non-observation of a high energy neutrino flux in the direction of the Sun from dark matter annihilation. To this end, we develop a novel semi-analytical approach for comparing experimental results in the high-dimensional parameter space of the non-relativistic effective theory. Assuming the standard halo model, we find a strong tension between the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal and the null result experiments. We also list possible ways-out of this conclusion.

  3. Rabies in Captive Deer, Pennsylvania, USA, 2007–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Danielle M.; Longenberger, Allison; Simeone, Aliza; Moll, Mària E.; Deasy, Marshall P.; Blanton, Jesse D.; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Since January 2007, a total of 11 rabid deer from 4 deer farms have been identified in 2 neighboring Pennsylvania counties. Vaccination of deer against rabies, decreasing wildlife animal contact with deer, and education of deer farmers may prevent further cases of rabies in captive deer and exposures to humans. PMID:22260956

  4. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We discuss large modulated fractions in the Maxwellian case showing that they imply a departure from the usual cosine time dependence of the expected signal in DAMA. However we explicitly show that the DAMA data is not sensitive to this distortion, both in time and frequency space, even in the extreme case of a 100 % modulated fraction. Moreover the same scenario provides an explanation of the maximum in the energy spectrum of the modulation amplitude detected by DAMA in terms of WIMPs whose minimal incoming speed matches the kinematic threshold for inelastic upscatters. For the elastic case the detection of such maximum suggests an inversion of the modulation phase below the present DAMA energy threshold, while this is not expected for inelastic scattering. This may allow to discriminate between the two scenarios in a future low-threshold analysis of the DAMA data.

  5. Model independent result on possible diurnal effect in DAMA/LIBRA-phase1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipt. di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Belli, P. [INFN, Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; D' Angelo, A.; Prosperi, D. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipt. di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Castellano, S.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Incicchitti, A. [INFN, Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [INFN, Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Jiangxi (China)

    2014-03-15

    The results obtained in the search for possible diurnal effect in the single-hit low energy data collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 (total exposure 1.04 ton x year) deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN are presented. At the present level of sensitivity the presence of any significant diurnal variation and of diurnal time structures in the data can be excluded for both the cases of solar and sidereal time. In particular, the diurnal modulation amplitude expected, because of the Earth diurnal motion, on the basis of the DAMA dark matter annual modulation results is below the present sensitivity. (orig.)

  6. Nulhegan Deer Wintering Area Management Plan 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Within the Nulhegan basin lies the Nulhegan Deer Wintering Area, an approximately 15,000-acre tract of land. In addition to being the largest deer wintering area in...

  7. Shorter Fallow Cycles Affect the Availability of Noncrop Plant Resources in a Shifting Cultivation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Paule. Dalle

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Shifting cultivation systems, one of the most widely distributed forms of agriculture in the tropics, provide not only crops of cultural significance, but also medicinal, edible, ritual, fuel, and forage resources, which contribute to the livelihoods, health, and cultural identity of local people. In many regions across the globe, shifting cultivation systems are undergoing important changes, one of the most pervasive being a shortening of the fallow cycle. Although there has been much attention drawn to declines in crop yields in conjunction with reductions in fallow times, little if any research has focused on the dynamics of noncrop plant resources. In this paper, we use a data set of 26 fields of the same age, i.e., ~1.5 yr, but differing in the length and frequency of past fallow cycles, to examine the impact of shorter fallow periods on the availability of noncrop plant resources. The resources examined are collected in shifting cultivation fields by the Yucatec Maya in Quintana Roo, Mexico. These included firewood, which is cut from remnant trees and stumps spared at the time of felling, and 17 forage species that form part of the weed vegetation. Firewood showed an overall decrease in basal area with shorter fallow cycles, which was mostly related to the smaller diameter of the spared stumps and trees in short-fallow milpas. In contrast, forage species showed a mixed response. Species increasing in abundance in short-fallow milpas tended to be short-lived herbs and shrubs often with weedy habits, whereas those declining in abundance were predominantly pioneer trees and animal-dispersed species. Coppicing tree species showed a neutral response to fallow intensity. Within the cultural and ecological context of our study area, we expect that declines in firewood availability will be most significant for livelihoods because of the high reliance on firewood for local fuel needs and the fact that the main alternative source of firewood, forest

  8. David’s Deer Natural Preserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    China is the ground for championing the survival of David’s deer. In ten years, the number of the endangered deer has increased six times, creating three world records of the number for David’s deer living in the wild, the species’ fertility rate and survival Located in Dafeng County, Jiangsu Province. David’s Deer Natural Preserve covers 1.000 hectares of land Established in 1986 under the sponsorship of the World Nature Fund and he

  9. Les livres des gens à Damas vers 1700

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Pascual

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Les 450 inventaires après décès qui sont la base de ce travail sont consignés dans deux registres de Damas, qui étaient tenus par un juge, le qassâm ' arabi. Son rôle consistait à effectuer le partage légal des successions (mukhallafa, tarika de civils, hommes et femmes, entre les divers héritiers, ou à attribuer l'ensemble de la fortune à l'État, au Trésor dans un certain nombre de cas (1686-1717. Ces actes sont construits selon un modèle relativement uniforme : un préambule donne, notamment, le nom du défunt, ses titres, quelquefois son métier (souvent deviné d'après la nature des biens possédés, son lieu de résidence ou de travail. Dans une deuxième partie, le cadi et ses scribes procèdent à l'énumération chiffrée de l'actif, biens meubles, immeubles, créances de la personne défunte. La troisième partie établit le passif de la succession ; enfin, dans une dernière partie, le montant net du patrimoine est partagé entre les héritiers.Dans la minutieuse description de l'actif des défunts, le juge ne manque pas de mentionner la présence de livres, lorsqu'il les rencontre. Nous nous proposons donc d'évaluer le nombre de maisons damascènes qui contiennent des livres ; de savoir à qui ces ouvrages appartenaient ; de connaître quels types d'ouvrages étaient possédés, dans la mesure où les scribes en ont noté les titres et où nous arrivons à en identifier le contenu. On ne saura jamais, en revanche, si ces livres étaient lus.

  10. Fermionic dark matter through a light pseudoscalar portal: Hints from the DAMA results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2016-08-01

    We study the fermionic dark matter (DM) particle interacting with Standard Model quarks via a light pseudoscalar mediator. We consider separately the scenarios for which the DM-pseudoscalar coupling is C P conserving or C P violating. We show that taking a contact interaction is not suitable, even when the mediator has a mass of the same order of magnitude as the typical momentum transfer at the direct-detection experiments, such that the allowed DAMA region is excluded or considerably modified by the correct relic density requirement. The DAMA result seems to indicate that the C P -violating interaction is dominant at direct searches. We find that, if the proton-to-neutron effective coupling ratio is -60 ˜-40 , the exclusion limits set by SuperCDMS, XENON100, and LUX are highly suppressed, and the DAMA signal can thus be easily reconciled with these null measurements. For this model, the allowed region determined by the DAMA signal and correct relic density can successfully satisfy the conditions required by the thermal equilibrium, big bang nucleosynthesis, and DM self-interactions. The results of future measurements on flavor physics will provide important constraints on the related models. Precise measurements performed by COUPP, PICASSO, SIMPLE, and KIMS should be able to test this model in the near future.

  11. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS) 2015. DAMAS has a long history of almost 20 years. The first DAMAS conference took place in 1995 (Pescara, Italy), followed by a biannual meeting in 1997 (Sheffield, UK), 1999 (Dublin, Ireland), 2001 (Cardiff, UK), 2003 (Southampton, UK), 2005 (Gdansk, Poland), 2007 (Torino, Italy), 2009 (Beijing, China), 2011 (Oxford, UK) and 2013 (Dublin, Ireland). The eleventh edition of DAMAS conference series, DAMAS 2015, is hosted by Ghent University, Belgium, and is held at the congress center Het Pand in Ghent city. Ghent is the capital and the largest city of the East Flanders province of the Flemish region of Belgium. Het Pand is the culture and congress center of Ghent University and is a historical monument. The conference is established as a major international forum for research topics relevant to damage assessment of engineering structures and systems including numerical simulations, signal processing of sensor measurements and theoretical techniques as well as experimental case studies. The presentations of DAMAS 2015 are divided into 6 main sessions, namely 1) Structural Health and Condition Monitoring, 2) Damage in Civil Engineering, 3) Damage in Machineries, 4) Damage in Composite Materials, 5) Sensing and Sensors and 6) Signal Processing. The organising committee is grateful to keynote speakers; Professor Guido De Roeck, Head of Structural Mechanics Division, KULeuven, Belgium, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Structural Health Monitoring: highlights and challenges', Professor Weidong Zhu, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, USA, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Vibration-based Structural Damage Detection: Theory and Applications' and Professor Wieslaw Ostachowicz, Head of the Laboratory of Active Materials and Smart Structures, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Damage Assessment and

  12. Comparison of DAMA/LIBRA and DM ICE Results using Information Theory to Rule out Dark Matter Claims

    CERN Document Server

    Cline, David

    2015-01-01

    We study the details of the DAMA/LIBRA results and compare those with the recent published DM Ice results of ICE Cube. In various recent papers, it was shown that the 40K peak on DAMA/LIBRA data leaves no room for a Dark Matter signal in the bulk of the data. Using Information Theory for the different types of detection environments, we show that annual variation calculations and the DM Ice data reinforce the claims that the DAMA/LIBRA detector is not observing Dark Matter WIMPs.

  13. Woody plant diversity in sacred forests and fallows in Chiang Mai, Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junsongduang, A.; Balslev, Henrik; Jampeetong, Arunothai;

    2014-01-01

    ; old fallow, 5-6 years old). All woody plant species were identified and counted in three transects (20 x 40 m) . Seedlings were inventoried in 12 circular (5 m diam.) plots. The highest species richness of all woody species and seedlings were found in the sacred forests in both villages. The highest......All woody plant and seedling diversity was compared in a Karen and a Lawa hill-tribe village in northern Thailand in four different habitats: sacred forests and fallow fields of three ages derived from rotational shifting cultivation (young fallows, 1–2 years old; medium-age fallow, 3-4 years old...... values of the Shannon-Wiener index for both trees and seedlings were in the sacred forest of the Karen village. There were significant differences in species richness between the four studied habitats surrounding both villages (pplant and seedlings species compositions in the sacred...

  14. Three-Dimensional Application of DAMAS Methodology for Aeroacoustic Noise Source Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    At the 2004 AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustic Conference, a breakthrough in acoustic microphone array technology was reported by the authors. A Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) was developed which decouples the array design and processing influence from the noise being measured, using a simple and robust algorithm. For several prior airframe noise studies, it was shown to permit an unambiguous and accurate determination of acoustic source position and strength. As a follow-on effort, this paper examines the technique for three-dimensional (3D) applications. First, the beamforming ability for arrays, of different size and design, to focus longitudinally and laterally is examined for a range of source positions and frequency. Advantage is found for larger array designs with higher density microphone distributions towards the center. After defining a 3D grid generalized with respect to the array s beamforming characteristics, DAMAS is employed in simulated and experimental noise test cases. It is found that spatial resolution is much less sharp in the longitudinal direction in front of the array compared to side-to-side lateral resolution. 3D DAMAS becomes useful for sufficiently large arrays at sufficiently high frequency. But, such can be a challenge to computational capabilities, with regard to the required expanse and number of grid points. Also, larger arrays can strain basic physical modeling assumptions that DAMAS and all traditional array methodologies use. An important experimental result is that turbulent shear layers can negatively impact attainable beamforming resolution. Still, the usefulness of 3D DAMAS is demonstrated by the measurement of landing gear noise source distributions in a difficult hard-wall wind tunnel environment.

  15. Economic Comparison of the Undercutter and Traditional Tillage Systems for Winter Wheat-Summer Fallow Farming

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Wind erosion and blowing dust are major problems for traditional tillage winter wheat-summer fallow in eastern Washington. Wind erosion reduces soil productivity and dust particulates are a major air quality concern. Conservation tillage summer fallow can reduce wind erosion markedly, but is used by relatively few farmers in the low-precipitation (less than 12 inch/year) region of the Inland Pacific Northwest. Barriers to adoption include the cost of conservation tillage implements and reluct...

  16. Seasonal cultivated and fallow cropland mapping using MODIS-based automated cropland classification algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuoting; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Mueller, Rick; Zakzeski, Audra; Melton, Forrest; Johnson, Lee; Rosevelt, Carolyn; Dwyer, John; Jones, Jeanine; Verdin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing drought occurrences and growing populations demand accurate, routine, and consistent cultivated and fallow cropland products to enable water and food security analysis. The overarching goal of this research was to develop and test automated cropland classification algorithm (ACCA) that provide accurate, consistent, and repeatable information on seasonal cultivated as well as seasonal fallow cropland extents and areas based on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer remote sensing data. Seasonal ACCA development process involves writing series of iterative decision tree codes to separate cultivated and fallow croplands from noncroplands, aiming to accurately mirror reliable reference data sources. A pixel-by-pixel accuracy assessment when compared with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) cropland data showed, on average, a producer's accuracy of 93% and a user's accuracy of 85% across all months. Further, ACCA-derived cropland maps agreed well with the USDA Farm Service Agency crop acreage-reported data for both cultivated and fallow croplands with R-square values over 0.7 and field surveys with an accuracy of ≥95% for cultivated croplands and ≥76% for fallow croplands. Our results demonstrated the ability of ACCA to generate cropland products, such as cultivated and fallow cropland extents and areas, accurately, automatically, and repeatedly throughout the growing season.

  17. Mosquitoes and other aquatic insects in fallow field biotopes and rice paddy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, S Y; Matsuo, T; Takagi, M

    2013-03-01

    Fallow field biotopes that develop from abandoned rice fields are man-made wetlands that provide new habitats for various aquatic animals. Although consideration of such biotopes generally focuses on their positive aspects, this study evaluated the negative aspects of establishing fallow field biotopes with regard to mosquito breeding sites. To determine whether fallow field biotopes become breeding habitats for vector mosquitoes, we evaluated mosquito fauna in fallow field biotopes and adjacent rice fields. We found larvae of Anopheles lesteri, Anopheles sinensis and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (all: Diptera: Culicidae) in the biotopes. Although abundances of mosquito larvae in the biotopes and rice fields were statistically similar, mosquito abundances in rice fields increased dramatically in August when the water level reduced after the rainy season. The abundance and variety of the mosquitoes' natural predators were greater in biotopes than in rice fields because the former are a permanent and stable aquatic environment. A generalized linear mixed model showed a negative effect of predator diversity on mosquito larvae abundance in both habitats. Although fallow field biotopes become breeding habitats for vector mosquitoes, establishing biotopes from fallow fields in order to protect various aquatic animals, including mosquito insect predators, may help to control mosquito breeding. © 2012 The Royal Entomological Society.

  18. Profiling Fallow Land in California's Drought Conditions Using the Cropland Data Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakzeski, A.

    2014-12-01

    Drought conditions caused by soaring temperatures and decreasing amounts of precipitation continue to plague the particularly heavily cultivated areas of California. Research efforts from state and federal government stakeholders are ongoing to track, quantify, and forecast the impact of these changing conditions. For the State of California, beginning in 2007, the US Department of Agriculture's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) annually began using remote sensing techniques to produce a geospatial agricultural land cover classification data product called the Cropland Data Layer (CDL). The CDL is produced using current farmer reported data in conjunction with satellite imagery collected during the summer growing season each year to identify the type and location of multiple categories of land cover across the state. Tracking the impact of drought conditions on agriculture in California can be done by analyzing the land cover category for fallow and idle agricultural land within the CDL. Using multiple years of CDLs, profiles are created to document the different characteristics of fallow land across the agricultural landscape including NDVI measurements, average field sizes, and total acreage amounts in each county. The fallow land profiles also detail the increasing amount of fallow land appearing in what was historically agricultural intensive areas, as well as what types of land cover are being replaced with fallow land instead of being cultivated during the growing season. Understanding the dynamic changes of fallowing land in each county helps researchers quantify the agricultural impact and assist with mitigation efforts caused by the water shortages.

  19. Seasonal cultivated and fallow cropland mapping using MODIS-based automated cropland classification algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuoting; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Mueller, Rick; Zakzeski, Audra; Melton, Forrest; Johnson, Lee; Rosevelt, Carolyn; Dwyer, John; Jones, Jeanine; Verdin, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing drought occurrences and growing populations demand accurate, routine, and consistent cultivated and fallow cropland products to enable water and food security analysis. The overarching goal of this research was to develop and test automated cropland classification algorithm (ACCA) that provide accurate, consistent, and repeatable information on seasonal cultivated as well as seasonal fallow cropland extents and areas based on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer remote sensing data. Seasonal ACCA development process involves writing series of iterative decision tree codes to separate cultivated and fallow croplands from noncroplands, aiming to accurately mirror reliable reference data sources. A pixel-by-pixel accuracy assessment when compared with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) cropland data showed, on average, a producer’s accuracy of 93% and a user’s accuracy of 85% across all months. Further, ACCA-derived cropland maps agreed well with the USDA Farm Service Agency crop acreage-reported data for both cultivated and fallow croplands with R-square values over 0.7 and field surveys with an accuracy of ≥95% for cultivated croplands and ≥76% for fallow croplands. Our results demonstrated the ability of ACCA to generate cropland products, such as cultivated and fallow cropland extents and areas, accurately, automatically, and repeatedly throughout the growing season.

  20. Nitrous oxide emissions in nonflooding period from fallow paddy fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shuhui; Hari K Pant; LU Jun

    2008-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the N2O emissions and dissolved N2O in the leachate during the nonflooding period in nongrowing paddy fields. Three kinds of paddy soils were repacked to soil columns and were supersaturated with water initially and dried gradually in a greenhouse to attain the N2O emissions flux during the incubation. Soils with the texture of silty clay-loam (Q and H) produced cracks during the drying of soil, but soil with the texture of silty loam (X) did not form the cracks. Cracked soils had similar amount of N2O emissions, and the mean N2O flux was 1,280.9 and 1,133.3 μg/(m2·h) from Q and H soil, respectively, during the incubation; whereas the mean N2O flux from noncracked X soil was 426.3 μg/(m2·h), i.e., significantly different from cracked soils. From cracked soils, the diurnal N2O emissions reached two peaks at 14:00 and 2:00, but such emissions peaked only at 2:00 from noncracked soil. The dissolved N2O concentrations in leachates from noncracked soil columns were greater than those from the cracked soil columns, and it indicated that the preferential flow might not affect the amounts of dissolved N2O in leachates during soil cracking. Supersaturated dissolved N2O in the leachate was potential source of N2O emissions. Fallow paddy fields have big risks of N2O emissions during nonflooding periods.

  1. Lysobacter novalis sp. nov., isolated from fallow farmland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hina; Du, Juan; Won, Kyung-Hwa; Yang, Jung-Eun; Akter, Shahina; Kim, Ki-Young; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2015-09-01

    A novel bacterial strain, designated THG-PC7(T), was isolated from fallow farmland soil in Yongin, South Korea. Cells of strain THG-PC7(T) were Gram-stain-negative, dark yellow, aerobic, rod-shaped and had gliding motility. Strain THG-PC7(T) grew optimally at 25-35 °C, at pH 7 and in the absence of NaCl. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis identified strain THG-PC7(T) as belonging to the genus Lysobacter, exhibiting highest sequence similarity with Lysobacter ximonensis KCTC 22336(T) (98.7%) followed by Lysobacter niastensis KACC 11588(T) (95.7%). In DNA-DNA hybridization tests, DNA relatedness between strain THG-PC7(T) and its closest phylogenetic neighbour L. ximonensis was below 25%. The DNA G+C content of the novel isolate was determined to be 62.5 mol%. Flexirubin-type pigments were found to be present. The major cellular fatty acids were determined to be iso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 1ω9c. The major respiratory quinone was identified as ubiquonone-8 (Q8). The predominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified aminophospolipid. On the basis of results from DNA-DNA hybridization and the polyphasic data, strain THG-PC7(T) represents a novel species of the genus Lysobacter, for which the name Lysobacter novalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is THG-PC7(T)( = KACC 18276(T) = CCTCC AB 2014319(T)).

  2. La dictadora en La dama de cristal, de Zelmar Acevedo Díaz (The Dictator in La dama de cristal, by Zelmar Acevedo Díaz)

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Abagail Sampson

    2015-01-01

    El estudio aborda el tema de la dictadora en La dama de cristal (1999), de Zelmar Acevedo Díaz (Argentina, 1951). Se comparan con otras novelas sobre el mismo tema y se examinan coincidencias o disparidades entre la representación literaria femenina y masculina del autoritarismo. La dictadura latinoamericana como fenómeno político ha persistido en América Latina con diferentes matices ideológicos. Gabriel García Márquez en El otoño del patriarca, Mario Vargas Llosa en La fiesta del Chivo o Lu...

  3. Cougar predation and population growth of sympatric mule deer and white-tailed deer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinson H.S; Wielgus R.B; Gwilliam J.C

    2002-01-01

    ...), recruitment, and cause-specific adult ( 1 year old) mortality rate for sympatric mule deer and white-tailed deer in south-central British Columbia to assess population growth for each species...

  4. Sero-genetic studies on the Dama of South West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, G T; Lane, A B; Jenkins, T

    1976-01-01

    The Dama of South West Africa are a Negroid people living as a reproductive isolate in the desert and semi-desert areas of the north-west of the country. Until recent times a large proportion of them were held in bondage by the Khoikhoi (Hottentot) Nama, while the rest lived as hunter-gatherers in the mountains. This study and the work of Knussmann and Knussmann indicate that they are a Negro people, which probably has been cut off over a period from contact with other Negroes. They have received very little genetic contribution from the Khoikhoi or the San (Bushmen). The results of this investigation of 24 blood genetic marker systems in a carefully selected random sample of Dama support these conclusions.

  5. La Dama de Elche tras diez años polémicos

    OpenAIRE

    JOHN F. MOFFITT

    2005-01-01

    Hace diez años, el autor de este artículo publicó en inglés un estudio monográfico sobre el famoso busto de la Dama de Elche; en seguida, su libro se tradujo al castellano. Allí se presentaron al gran público español unas treinta razones, todas distintas pero complementarias entre sí, para apoyar la novedosa tesis del autor que argüía que la tan celebrada Dama de Elche, en vez de ser un ejemplo auténtico de la plástica ibérica, la obra fechada por los arqueólogos españoles hacia 450 a.C., es,...

  6. Model Bera dalam Sistem Agroforestri (Fallow Land Model in Agroforestry Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyono Suryanto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of tree-based agroforestry model gives consequences to the space utilization dominated by trees. Farmers take action on this condition by conniving the fallow land. This research was aimed to know the fallow land model, find the key parameters of fallow land model, and formulating the management of fallow land. The spatial model of agroforestry used in this research were trees along border, alley cropping, alternate rows and mixer. The actual data obtained were tree height, tree diameter, crown diameter, land width, and light intensity; the calculated data were land extent, the percentage of crown cover and crown density. The analysis used to determining the percentage of crown cover to calculate the affective arable land area was zone system. Zonation system maked for four zone : 1 zone 1 interval 0-1 m ; 2 zone 2 interval 1-2 m; zone 3 interval 2-3 m; zone 4 interval 3-4m.Key words: agroforestry, fallow land, silviculture, land cover, resource sharing, crown dynamic

  7. No role for neutrons, muons and solar neutrinos in the DAMA annual modulation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipt. di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Belli, P. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918/3, Beijing (China); D' Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipt. di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918/3, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Ji' an, Jiangxi (China)

    2014-12-01

    This paper summarizes in a simple and intuitive way why the neutrons, the muons and the solar neutrinos cannot give any significant contribution to the DAMA annual modulation results. A number of these elements have already been presented in individual papers; they are recalled here together with few simple considerations which demonstrate the incorrectness of the claim reported in Davis (PRL 113:081302, 2014). (orig.)

  8. Can dark matter - electron scattering explain the DAMA annual modulation consistent with XENON100 constraints?

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2015-01-01

    For many years annually modulating $\\sim$ keV scintillations have been observed in the DAMA/NaI and DAMA/Libra experiments. A dark matter - electron scattering interpretation is now favoured given the stringent constraints on nuclear recoil rates obtained by LUX, SuperCDMS and other experiments. Very recently, the XENON100 experiment has observed a modest annual modulation in their electron recoil events (2.8 $\\sigma$ C.L.) with phase consistent with that of the DAMA experiments. However, they also found a stringent upper limit on the unmodulated rate, which suggests that any dark matter - electron scattering interpretation of these annual modulations must involve a large modulation fraction $\\stackrel{>}{\\sim} 50\\%$. Here we discuss the extent to which these results might be able to be accommodated within multi-component dark matter models featuring light dark matter particles of mass $\\sim$ MeV, focusing on the mirror dark matter case for definiteness. The importance of diurnal variation as a means of testi...

  9. Rencontres de Moriond EW 2012: Theorists disprove one claim against DAMA/LIBRA

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    2012-01-01

    Josef Pradler, a theorist from the Perimeter Institute in Canada presented today at the Moriond conference new calculations that could disprove the main criticism of the DAMA oscillation data: the phenomenon cannot be produced by cosmic muons.   For more than 13 annual cycles, the DAMA experiment has been accumulating data in the Gran Sasso laboratory, looking for signs of dark matter. The ~250 kg NaI detector has revealed a 8-sigma modulated signal that stands unchallenged. Lately, though, several people have questioned the results, suggesting that the observed modulation could be due to cosmic muons. Josef Pradler and his colleagues Spencer Chang (University of Oregon) and Itay Yavin (McMaster University and Perimeter Institute) just published a new analysis that shows in fact that the DAMA/LIBRA data is inconsistent with the cosmic muon hypothesis with 99% CL. They compared the amplitude, phase, spectral power and correlation of cosmic muon data taken with the LVD (Large Volume Detector) exp...

  10. EFFECT OF SELECTED DAIRY STARTER CULTURES ON MICROBIOLOGICAL, CHEMICAL AND SENSORY CHARACTERISTICS OF VENISON (Dama dama NITRITE-FREE DRY-CURED SAUSAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parmegiani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the evaluation of the use of selected lactic acid bacteria starter culture of dairy origin in the production of nitrite-free low-acid fermented venison (Dama dama sausage (Salame di daino produced in a small-scale plant in Umbria (Italy, and their effect on microbiological, physico-chemical and sensorial properties of the products. Salame di daino was obtained with two different processes: with and without the addition of selected LAB starter cultures. Microbial counts of safety indicators were lower in salami made with the addition of starter cultures. Pathogens after the first week of ripening were only detected from salami made without the addition of starter cultures. Control salami were paler and harder, whereas those made with the addition of starter cultures slightly saltier, juicier and in general more acceptable. Selected dairy-origin starter (SDS cultures did prevent the growth of safety indicators, greatly reduced the rate of isolation of pathogens and increased the acceptability of full-ripened salami.

  11. La dictadora en La dama de cristal, de Zelmar Acevedo Díaz (The Dictator in La dama de cristal, by Zelmar Acevedo Díaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Abagail Sampson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available El estudio aborda el tema de la dictadora en La dama de cristal (1999, de Zelmar Acevedo Díaz (Argentina, 1951. Se comparan con otras novelas sobre el mismo tema y se examinan coincidencias o disparidades entre la representación literaria femenina y masculina del autoritarismo. La dictadura latinoamericana como fenómeno político ha persistido en América Latina con diferentes matices ideológicos. Gabriel García Márquez en El otoño del patriarca, Mario Vargas Llosa en La fiesta del Chivo o Luis Spota en El tiempo de la ira tratan este hecho para perfilar sus rasgos distintivos. Existe un caso particular en que el autoritarismo lo encarna una mujer. This study focuses on the theme of female dictator in La dama de cristal (1999, by Zelmar Acevedo Díaz (Argentina, 1951. It is compared with other novels on the same theme and an analysis is carried out of coincidences or disparities between the feminine and masculine literary representation of authoritarianism. Latin American dictatorships are a political phenomenon that has persisted in Latin America with different ideological tones. Gabriel García Márquez in El otoño del patriarca; Mario Vargas Llosa in La fiesta del Chivo or Luis Spota in El tiempo de la ira have approached this issue to profile its distinctive features. There is one particular case of a female dictator.

  12. Lions and prions and deer demise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contagious prion diseases--scrapie of sheep and chronic wasting disease of several species in the deer family--give rise to epidemics that seem capable of compromising host population viability. Despite this prospect, the ecological consequences of prion disease epidemics in natural populations have received little consideration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a cohort study design, we found that prion infection dramatically lowered survival of free-ranging adult (>2-year-old mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus: estimated average life expectancy was 5.2 additional years for uninfected deer but only 1.6 additional years for infected deer. Prion infection also increased nearly fourfold the rate of mountain lions (Puma concolor preying on deer, suggesting that epidemics may alter predator-prey dynamics by facilitating hunting success. Despite selective predation, about one fourth of the adult deer we sampled were infected. High prevalence and low survival of infected deer provided a plausible explanation for the marked decline in this deer population since the 1980s. CONCLUSION: Remarkably high infection rates sustained in the face of intense predation show that even seemingly complete ecosystems may offer little resistance to the spread and persistence of contagious prion diseases. Moreover, the depression of infected populations may lead to local imbalances in food webs and nutrient cycling in ecosystems in which deer are important herbivores.

  13. Conservation of nitrate during the fallow; Conservacion del nitrogeno durante el barbecho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Aguilar, M.

    2004-07-01

    We study the possibility to use the waste-water from olive oil mills, or woom to reduce the leaching, of nitrate during the fallow. The blocking in time that practice the woom about the nitrogen of soil we are suggest this study. We make use of woom dilute in water and we study the influence,as soon as the contained potassium, on the nitrogen leaching of two soils, loam and silt-clay loam. The irrigation of soils with woom dilute in water from ten to forty times prior to the autumnal rains to be worth for reducing the leaching of nitrate during the fallow. (Author) 21 refs.

  14. The Effect of Soil Profile Depth on Fallow Efficiency Under Ankara Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fallow efficiencies of shallow and deep soil profiles and to examine the effects of nitrogen fertilization on the grain yields in continuous wheat and fallow-wheat systems in the Ankara Region. The experimental study was conducted at the Beytepe (Lodumlu) Research Institute in two different fields. Soil moisture contents were determined at six depths between 0 and 90 cm in deep soil and four depths between 0 and 40 cm in shallow soil. Continuous wh...

  15. Nutrient stocks of short-term fallows on high base status soils in the humid tropics of Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand nutrient dynamics in tropical farming systems with fallows, it is necessary to assess changes in nutrient stocks in plants, litter and soils. Nutrient stocks (soil, above ground biomass, litter) were assessed of one-year old fallows with Piper aduncum, Gliricidia sepium and Im

  16. Sweet potato yields and nutrient dynamics after short-term fallows in the humid lowlands of Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    Shifting cultivation is common in the humid lowlands of Papua New Guinea but little is known about the effect of different fallows on sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) yield and nutrient flows and pools in these systems. An experiment was conducted in which two woody fallow species (Piper aduncum and

  17. Nutrient stocks of short-term fallows on high base status soils in the humid tropics of Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand nutrient dynamics in tropical farming systems with fallows, it is necessary to assess changes in nutrient stocks in plants, litter and soils. Nutrient stocks (soil, above ground biomass, litter) were assessed of one-year old fallows with Piper aduncum, Gliricidia sepium and

  18. Reproductive Behaviour Of Timor Deer (Rusa Timorensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud Sansudewa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Timor deer (Rusa timorensis is a newly domesticated animal in Indonesia and other countries in the world. It is a potential source of meat and livelihood. Low birth rate is a problem of deer farming in Indonesia. It happens because of low concern for key aspects of behaviors including reproductive behavior. The aim of this review is to give information about reproductive behavior of Timor deer in natural habitat and captivity breeding. Libido and estrous behaviors of Timor deer in captivity breeding were similar with natural habitat. However, male Timor deer in captivity breeding took longer time to approach the females before mating, compared with those in their natural habitat. Aggressive behavior commonly leads mating. Parturition and maternal behavior of hinds are affected by limitation of space, therefore dividing the area of cage which depends on age and physiological status is needed to improve reproductive management.

  19. Six month-duration Tephrosia vogelii Hook.f. and Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.). A.Gray planted-fallows for improving maize production in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutunga, V.; Karanja, N.K.; Gachene, C.K.K.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment including planted Tephrosia vogelii and Tithonia diversifolia fallow species and natural fallow was conducted at Maseno, Kenya, for assessing whether these fallows grown on a nutrient depleted land could produce sufficient green manure in six month period, whether their biomass

  20. Six month-duration Tephrosia vogelii Hook.f. and Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.). A.Gray planted-fallows for improving maize production in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutunga, V.; Karanja, N.K.; Gachene, C.K.K.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment including planted Tephrosia vogelii and Tithonia diversifolia fallow species and natural fallow was conducted at Maseno, Kenya, for assessing whether these fallows grown on a nutrient depleted land could produce sufficient green manure in six month period, whether their biomass retaine

  1. Six month-duration Tephrosia vogelii Hook.f. and Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.). A.Gray planted-fallows for improving maize production in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutunga, V.; Karanja, N.K.; Gachene, C.K.K.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment including planted Tephrosia vogelii and Tithonia diversifolia fallow species and natural fallow was conducted at Maseno, Kenya, for assessing whether these fallows grown on a nutrient depleted land could produce sufficient green manure in six month period, whether their biomass retaine

  2. Secondary succession and indigenous management in semideciduous forest fallows of the Amazon basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toledo, M.; Salick, J.

    2006-01-01

    To the discussion on secondary succession in tropical forests, we bring data on three under-addressed issues: understory as well as overstory changes, continuous as opposed to phase changes, and integration of forest succession with indigenous fallow management and plant uses. Changes in vegetation

  3. A comparison of surface fluxes at the HAPEX-Sahel fallow bush sites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lloyd, C.R.; Bessemoulin, P.; Cropley, F.D.; Culf, A.D.; Dolman, A.J.; Elbers, J.; Moncrieff, J.; Monteny, B.; Verhoef, A.

    1997-01-01

    The variability between surface flux measurements at the fallow sites of the three HAPEX-Sahel supersites is examined over periods of three or four consecutive days. A roving eddy correlation instrument provided a common base for comparison at each supersite. The inhomogeneity of the surface and the

  4. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Northeast China Rice Fields in Fallow Season

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    CH4, N2O and CO2 emissions from northeast Chinese rice fields were measured in the fallow season (November to March) to investigate the effects of freezing-thawing on the emissions. Both CH4 emission from and atmospheric CH4oxidation by the soil occurred, but the flux was small. During the fallow season, rice fields acted as a minor source of atmospheric CH4, which accounted for about 1% of the CH4 emission during the rice growing period. The field was also a substantial source of atmospheric N2O, which ranged between 40 to 77 mg m-2 and accounted for 40%-50% of the annual N2O emission. The largest N2O flux was observed in the thawing period during the fallow season. Laboratory incubation tests showed that the largest N2O flux came from the release of N2O trapped in frozen soil. Tillage and rice straw application (either mulched on the soil surface or incorporated in the soil) stimulated the CH4 and CO2 emissions during the fallow season, but only straw application stimulated N2O emission substantially.

  5. Simple model for daily evaporation from fallow tilled soil under spring conditions in a temperate climate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Stroosnijder, L.

    1986-01-01

    A simple parametric model is presented to estimate daily evaporation from fallow tilled soil under spring conditions in a temperate climate. In this model, cumulative actual evaporation during a drying cycle is directly proportional to the square root of cumulative potential evaporation. The model

  6. La Dama de Elche tras diez años polémicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN F. MOFFITT

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hace diez años, el autor de este artículo publicó en inglés un estudio monográfico sobre el famoso busto de la Dama de Elche; en seguida, su libro se tradujo al castellano. Allí se presentaron al gran público español unas treinta razones, todas distintas pero complementarias entre sí, para apoyar la novedosa tesis del autor que argüía que la tan celebrada Dama de Elche, en vez de ser un ejemplo auténtico de la plástica ibérica, la obra fechada por los arqueólogos españoles hacia 450 a.C., es, por el contrario, una obra creada en el año 1897 d.C. Además de dar un resumen de dichos treinta tesis defendiendo el estatus real de la Dama de Elche como un fraude moderno, el autor da cuenta de sus esfuerzos infatigables durante la última década para inducir a las autoridades españolas a que apliquen ciertos métodos reconocidos de análisis científico al busto ahora discutido, con el propósito de resolver de un modo definitivo la verdadera fecha de su creación: ora «antigua» ora «moderna». Se espera que la publicación del presente artículo obligue a actuar a las autoridades españolas para que se realicen esas necesarias pruebas.

  7. Juan Mayorga's adaptations of Lope: La dama boba in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Molanes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The adaptations made by one of today’s most eminent playwrights, Juan Mayorga, on the texts by Lope de Vega which were represented during the first decade of the 21st century allow us to analyse some of the most relevant aspects in the reception, canonization and theatrical interpretation of 17th century theatre. This study will thus focus on Lope’s La Dama Boba and the adaptation offered by Juan Mayorga for the Compañía Nacional de Teatro Clásico, directed by Helena Pimenta in 2002.

  8. Exploring the mirror matter interpretation of the DAMA experiment: Has the dark matter problem been solved?

    OpenAIRE

    Foot, R.

    2004-01-01

    The self consistency between the impressive DAMA annual modulation signal and the differential energy spectrum is an important test for dark matter candidates.Mirror matter-type dark matter passes this test while other dark matter candidates, including standard (spin-independent) WIMPs and mini-electric charged particle dark matter, do not do so well.We argue that the unique properties of mirror matter-type dark matter seem to be just those required to fully explain the data, suggesting that ...

  9. Fitting the annual modulation in DAMA with neutrons from muons and neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2014-08-22

    The DAMA/LIBRA experiment searches for evidence of dark matter scattering off nuclei. Data from DAMA show 9.2 σ evidence for an annual modulation, consistent with dark matter having a cross section around 2 × 10(-40) cm(2). However, this is excluded by other direct detection experiments. We propose an alternative source of annual modulation in the form of neutrons, which have been liberated from material surrounding the detector by a combination of (8)B solar neutrinos and atmospheric muons. The phase of the muon modulation lags 30 days behind the data; however, we show that adding the modulated neutrino component shifts the phase of the combined signal forward. In addition, we estimate that neutrinos and muons need ∼ 1000 m(3) of scattering material in order to generate enough neutrons to constitute the signal. With current data, our model gives as good a fit as dark matter, and we discuss prospects for future experiments to discriminate between the two.

  10. Generalized spin-dependent WIMP-nucleus interactions and the DAMA modulation effect

    CERN Document Server

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, KookHyun

    2015-01-01

    Guided by non-relativistic Effective Field Theory (EFT) we classify the most general spin-dependent interactions between a fermionic Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) and nuclei, and within this class of models we discuss the viability of an interpretation of the DAMA modulation result in terms of a signal from WIMP elastic scatterings using a halo-independent approach. We find that, although several relativistic EFT's can lead to a spin-dependent cross section, in some cases with an explicit, non-negligible dependence on the WIMP incoming velocity, three main scenarios can be singled out in the non-relativistic limit which approximately encompass them all, and that only differ by their dependence on the transferred momentum. For two of them compatibility between DAMA and other constraints is possible for a WIMP mass below 30 GeV, but only for a WIMP velocity distribution in the halo of our Galaxy which departs from a Maxwellian. This is achieved by combining a suppression of the WIMP effective coupl...

  11. Consistent dark matter interpretation for CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Dan; Collar, J. I.; Hall, Jeter; McKinsey, Dan; Kelso, Christopher M.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we study the recent excess of low-energy events observed by the CoGeNT Collaboration and the annual modulation reported by the DAMA/LIBRA Collaboration, and discuss whether these signals could both be the result of the same elastically scattering dark matter particle. We find that, without channeling but when taking into account uncertainties in the relevant quenching factors, a dark matter candidate with a mass of approximately 7GeV and a cross section with nucleons of σDM-N˜2×10-4pb (2×10-40cm2) could account for both of these observations. We also comment on the events recently observed in the oxygen band of the CRESST experiment and point out that these could potentially be explained by such a particle. Lastly, we compare the region of parameter space favored by DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT to the constraints from XENON10, XENON100, and CDMS (Si) and find that these experiments cannot at this time rule out a dark matter interpretation of these signals.

  12. 2012 deer census data : final totals

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final data from the 2012 deer census survey at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. A combination of census techniques was selected including Mobile...

  13. Inbreeding depression in red deer calves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walling, Craig A; Nussey, Daniel H; Morris, Alison; Clutton-Brock, Tim H; Kruuk, Loeske E B; Pemberton, Josephine M

    2011-01-01

    .... Here we investigated the consequences of variation in inbreeding coefficient for three juvenile traits, birth date, birth weight and first year survival, in a wild population of red deer, considering...

  14. Sambar Deer are Saved - For Now

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Sambar deer on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge are very popular amongst hunters in the Apalachicola, FL area; however, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  15. Parasites, diseases, and health status of sympatric populations of sika deer and white-tailed deer in Maryland and Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, W R; Crow, C B

    1983-10-01

    In July 1981, investigations on parasites, diseases, and herd health status were conducted on sympatric populations of sika deer (Cervus nippon) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (Maryland) and Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge (Virginia) on the Delmarva Peninsula. Five adult deer of each species were collected from each location and subjected to thorough necropsy examinations and laboratory tests. White-tailed deer at both locations harbored protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites typically associated with this species throughout the southeastern United States. In contrast, sika deer at both locations harbored only light burdens of ticks, chiggers, and sarcocysts. Serologic tests for antibodies to seven infectious disease agents revealed evidence of exposure to bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, and parainfluenza3 virus in white-tailed deer, but only BVD virus in sika deer. At both locations the general health status of sika deer was superior to that of white-tailed deer.

  16. Aerial line transect survey to estimate abundance of marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus (Illiger, 1815

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Andriolo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to estimate abundance of marsh deer in the Paraná River basin of this work. The results provided information to support further analysis of the impact of the Porto Primavera flooding lake over population. Sixty-nine animals were recorded by aerial survey using distance sampling methodology. Animals were widely distributed throughout the study area. The uncorrected data resulted in a estimate density of 0.0035 ind/ha and a population size of 636 individuals. Correcting the g for the animals that could be missed the calculated abundance was 896 (CV=0.27 individuals. This methodology was applied with success to survey marsh deer. The result was important to evaluate the marsh deer status in the area, and for future analysis of the impact of the flooding dam.A população de cervo-do-pantanal (Blastocerus dichotomus está drasticamente reduzida no Brasil. O nosso objetivo foi o de estimar a abundância do cervo-do-pantanal na bacia do Rio Paraná e discutir a metodologia aplicada. Os resultados darão suporte para uma análise do impacto do enchimento da represa de Porto Primavera sobre essa população. Sessenta e nove animais foram registrados através de sobrevôo utilizando-se a metodologia de transecção linear com amostragem das distâncias. Os dados não corrigidos resultaram em uma densidade estimada de 0,0035ind/ha e uma população de 636 indivíduos. A correção de g para os animais que não foram vistos apresentou uma densidade de 0,0049 ind/ha e uma abundância de 896 (CV=0,27 indivíduos. A metodologia foi aplicada com sucesso na estimativa de cervo-do-pantanal. Esse resultado é importante para avaliarmos a população do cervo-do-pantanal na área e para futuramente analisarmos o impacto do enchimento da represa.

  17. Quantifying and isolating stable soil organic carbon using long-term bare fallow experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barré, P; Eglin, T; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup;

    2010-01-01

    The stability of soil organic matter (SOM) is a major source of uncertainty in predicting atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. Isolating the stable soil carbon (C) from other, more labile, C fractions in soil is of prime importance for calibrating soil C simulation models......, and gaining insights into the mechanisms that lead to soil C stability. Long-term experiments with continuous bare fallow (vegetation-free) treatments in which the decay of soil C is monitored for decades after all inputs of C have stopped, provide a unique opportunity to assess the quantity of stable soil C....... We analyzed data from six bare fallow experiments of long-duration (>30 yrs), covering a range of soil types and climate conditions, and sited at Askov (Denmark), Grignon and Versailles (France), Kursk (Russia), Rothamsted (UK), and Ultuna (Sweden). A conceptual three pool model dividing soil C...

  18. Music is not our enemy, but noise should be regulated: thoughts on shooting/conflicts related to Dama square dance in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lijun

    2014-09-01

    While Dama square dance is gaining popularity in China, especially with middle-aged and older-adult women-hence the "Dama" (Chinese for "big mamas") moniker-there have been conflicts due to the loud music played for the activity. After a brief explanation of Dama square dance and a description of the context of the conflicts, this commentary shares some thoughts on the issues raised, reviews the negative impact and regulation of noise, and calls for creating more public green space in Chinese cities and for developing a new music delivery system that could eliminate public music noise for group physical activities.

  19. Flora of fallow lands of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Skrzyczyńska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on flora of fallow lands of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion were carried out between 2001 and 2003 in the area of 77 localities, situated in 20 communes. A systematic list of fallow land flora was made and its variation with respect to occurrence frequency, biological spectrum, persistence and belonging to geographic-historical and sociological-ecological groups was analyzed. Flora of fallow lands of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion includes 442 species included in 60 families and 241 botanical genera. The most numerous group comprises very rare, rare and quite frequent species. In the floristic composition of the analysed flora, apophytes (72.2% predominate over anthropophytes (2.8% as well as perennials (61% over ephemerals (39%. Considering the biological spectrum of flora, hemicryptophytes (49% and terophytes (32% predominate over other life forms. Forest and shrub species (18.5% as well as meadow (17% and xerothermic sward plants (17.4% have the largest share in the flora. The abundant occurrence of segetal (15.8% and long-lived ruderal communities (8.1% was also noted. Moreover, the occurrence of 25 species endangered with extinction in fallow land communities of the Południowopodlaska Lowland was noted. They are as follows: Nigella arvensis, Potentilla recta, Platanthera chlorantha, Agrostemma githago, Prunella grandiflora, Populus alba, Silene tatarica, Papaver argemone, Papaver rhoeas, Veronica polita, Hieracium floribundum, Bromus secalinus, Polygonum bistorta, Geum alleppicu, Astragalus arenarius, Centaurium erythraea, Veronica agrestis, Veronica verna, Cirsium rivulare, Allium oleraceum, Hierochloë odorata, Chenopodium polyspermum, Vinca minor, Dipsacus silvestris and Campanula latifolia.

  20. Drought Impacts on Agricultural Production and Land Fallowing in California's Central Valley in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosevelt, Carolyn; Melton, Forrest S.; Johnson, Lee; Guzman, Alberto; Verdin, James P.; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Mueller, Rick; Jones, Jeanine; Willis, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing drought in California substantially reduced surface water supplies for millions of acres of irrigated farmland in California's Central Valley. Rapid assessment of drought impacts on agricultural production can aid water managers in assessing mitigation options, and guide decision making with respect to mitigation of drought impacts. Satellite remote sensing offers an efficient way to provide quantitative assessments of drought impacts on agricultural production and increases in fallow acreage associated with reductions in water supply. A key advantage of satellite-based assessments is that they can provide a measure of land fallowing that is consistent across both space and time. We describe an approach for monthly and seasonal mapping of uncultivated agricultural acreage developed as part of a joint effort by USGS, USDA, NASA, and the California Department of Water Resources to provide timely assessments of land fallowing during drought events. This effort has used the Central Valley of California as a pilot region for development and testing of an operational approach. To provide quantitative measures of uncultivated agricultural acreage from satellite data early in the season, we developed a decision tree algorithm and applied it to time-series data from Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper), ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus), OLI (Operational Land Imager), and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). Our effort has been focused on development of indicators of drought impacts in the March-August timeframe based on measures of crop development patterns relative to a reference period with average or above average rainfall. To assess the accuracy of the algorithms, monthly ground validation surveys were conducted across 650 fields from March-September in 2014 and 2015. We present the algorithm along with updated results from the accuracy assessment, and data and maps of land fallowing in the Central Valley in 2015.

  1. Drought Impacts on Agricultural Production and Land Fallowing in California's Central Valley in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosevelt, C.; Melton, F. S.; Johnson, L.; Guzman, A.; Verdin, J. P.; Thenkabail, P. S.; Mueller, R.; Jones, J.; Willis, P.

    2015-12-01

    The ongoing drought in California substantially reduced surface water supplies for millions of acres of irrigated farmland in California's Central Valley. Rapid assessment of drought impacts on agricultural production can aid water managers in assessing mitigation options, and guide decision making with respect to mitigation of drought impacts. Satellite remote sensing offers an efficient way to provide quantitative assessments of drought impacts on agricultural production and increases in fallow acreage associated with reductions in water supply. A key advantage of satellite-based assessments is that they can provide a measure of land fallowing that is consistent across both space and time. We describe an approach for monthly and seasonal mapping of uncultivated agricultural acreage developed as part of a joint effort by USGS, USDA, NASA, and the California Department of Water Resources to provide timely assessments of land fallowing during drought events. This effort has used the Central Valley of California as a pilot region for development and testing of an operational approach. To provide quantitative measures of uncultivated agricultural acreage from satellite data early in the season, we developed a decision tree algorithm and applied it to timeseries of data from Landsat TM, ETM+, OLI, and MODIS. Our effort has been focused on development of indicators of drought impacts in the March - August timeframe based on measures of crop development patterns relative to a reference period with average or above average rainfall. To assess the accuracy of the algorithms, monthly ground validation surveys were conducted across 650 fields from March - September in 2014 and 2015. We present the algorithm along with updated results from the accuracy assessment, and data and maps of land fallowing in the Central Valley in 2015.

  2. Determinations of Microbiological Activity, Organic Matter and Nitrogen Forms in Soil in the Different Soil Tillage, Fallow-Wheat....

    OpenAIRE

    ADAK, M. Sait

    1998-01-01

    According to experimental results of two crop rotation cycles higher soil microbiological activities (i.e.b-Glucosidase and dehydrogenase activity) were obtained from soil samples of winter lentil plots in comparision to fallow plots. Highest activities of both parameters were found in the upper soil layer of 0-20 cm depth. The observed differences between lentil and fallow disap-peared during the following cropping season. Similar tendencies were also obtained for organic matter, total n...

  3. Health status of mule deer and white-tailed deer herds on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creekmore, T.E.; Franson, J.C.; Sileo, L. [National Wildlife Health Research Center, Madison, WI (United States); Griess, J.M.; Roy, R.R. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, CO (United States); Baker, D.L. [Colorado Division of Wildlife, Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal is a fenced, 6,900-ha Superfund site under remediation by the US Army and the Shell Oil Company. A variety of environmental contaminants including organochlorine pesticides, metals, and nerve-gas-production by-products are in the soil or in the water on the site. The authors evaluated the health of 18 radio-collared deer (13 mule deer [Odocoileus hemionus] and 5 white-tailed deer [O. virginianus]) collected by gunshot. Prior to collection, more than 4,000 locations of the 18 deer were plotted during a period of more than 2 years. Blood samples from the euthanized animals were collected for serologic, hematologic, and contaminant evaluations. Necropsies were preformed and tissues collected for histopathologic examinations and environmental contaminants analyses. Results indicate that the physical conditions of the mule deer were fair/good and of the white-tailed deer were good. Antibody prevalence against epizootic hemorrhagic disease serotype 2 was 85% and bovine virus diarrhea 56%. Two mule deer had severe testicular atrophy, and one of these animals also had antler deformities. Three mule deer had alopecia with dermatitis and hyperkeratosis. Results of heavy metal, and organochlorine pesticide analyses from blood and tissue samples and other analyses will be presented.

  4. Wide exposure to Coxiella burnetii in ruminant and feline species living in a natural environment: zoonoses in a human-livestock-wildlife interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, M G; Caballol, A; Atance, P M

    2017-02-01

    Assessment of the role of wild and domestic hosts as potential reservoirs of misdiagnosed zoonoses, such as Q fever by Coxiella burnetii, is an important public health issue today both for wildlife conservation and management of disease in human-livestock-wildlife interface. This study used ELISA, an indirect antibody, to research (2003-2013) C. burnetii infection in seven free-living wild and domestic ruminant species and in European wildcats (Felis silvestris). The animals studied were 0 European wildcats, 21 Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica), 314 red deer (Cervus elaphus), 556 fallow deer (Dama dama), 211 European mouflon (Ovis aries musimon), eight roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), 407 bovines (Bos taurus) and 3739 sheep (Ovis aries). All the animals shared the same habitat in the Serranía de Cuenca Natural Park (Castile-La Mancha, Spain). The study area is an example of human-domestic-wildlife interface where people and domestic animals live in close proximity to wildlife. Observed C. burnetii seropositive frequencies were: 33·3% European wildcats, 23·8% Spanish ibex, 22·5% domestic sheep 1·5% red deer, 1·4% European mouflon, 0·24% cattle, 0·18% fallow deer and 0% roe deer. The study found a wide C. burnetii prevalence of previous and present exposure in wild and domestic ruminant hosts in the Serranía de Cuenca Natural Park and reports the first evidence of C. burnetii exposure in free-living European wildcats.

  5. Causes of Mortality and Diseases in Farmed Deer in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sieber

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate diseases and causes of mortality in Swiss farmed deer, deer found dead or shot due to diseased condition between March 2003 and December 2004 were requested for a complete postmortem examination. One hundred and sixty-two animals were submitted. Perinatal mortality, necrobacillosis in 3 week to 6 month old deer, and endoparasitosis in 6 month to 2 year old deer were identified as the most important causes of loss, followed by ruminal acidosis, which was diagnosed in 22% of deer older than 1 year. Congenital malformations were observed in 15% of deer less than 6 months old. Reportable infectious diseases known as major problems in deer farming in other countries were rare (yersiniosis, malignant catarrhal fever or not observed (tuberculosis, chronic wasting disease. Overall, the results indicate that the Swiss deer population does not present major health problems of concern for domestic animals.

  6. St. Vincent Island White-Tailed Deer Monitoring Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The white tailed deer herd on St. Vincent Island represents an important part of the island's biotic community. To maintain the integrity of the island's deer...

  7. Population Density Influences Dispersal in Female White-Tailed Deer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clayton L. Lutz; Duane R. Diefenbach; Christopher S. Rosenberry

    2015-01-01

    .... To test this hypothesis, we conducted a meta-analysis of female dispersal rates from 12 populations of white-tailed deer and predicted dispersal rate and distance were positively related to deer density...

  8. Deer Herd Health Check dahomey National Wildlife Refuge 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report contains findings of deer herd health collection on Dahomey NWR in 1997. Deer appear to be in good health with no excess indication of parasite loading.

  9. Bayou Cocodrie NWR Deer Hunt Harvest Data Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data summaries from deer hunts that occur on Bayou Cocodrie NWR. Reports include summarized deer harvest data and basic analysis of these data.

  10. St. Catherine Creek NWR Deer Hunt Harvest Data Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data summaries from deer hunts that occur on St. Catherine Creek NWR. Reports include summarized deer harvest data and basic analysis of these data.

  11. Dark matter with pseudoscalar-mediated interactions explains the DAMA signal and the galactic center excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arina, Chiara; Del Nobile, Eugenio; Panci, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We study a Dirac dark matter particle interacting with ordinary matter via the exchange of a light pseudoscalar, and analyze its impact on both direct and indirect detection experiments. We show that this candidate can accommodate the long-standing DAMA modulated signal and yet be compatible with all exclusion limits at 99(S)% C.L. This result holds for natural choices of the pseudoscalar-quark couplings (e.g., flavor universal), which give rise to a significant enhancement of the dark matter-proton coupling with respect to the coupling to neutrons. We also find that this candidate can accommodate the observed 1-3 GeV gamma-ray excess at the Galactic center and at the same time have the correct relic density today. The model could be tested with measurements of rare meson decays, flavor changing processes, and searches for axionlike particles with mass in the MeV range.

  12. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    CERN Document Server

    Scopel, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We di...

  13. Filosofía para damas hoy: el mundo de Sofía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mataix Loma, Carmen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The author compares one of the philosophical best sellers, Sophia's World, with traditional «literature for Ladies», a very famous genre in the Enlightenment The book supports masculine-feminine duality as well as adult-child and reality- appearance dualities.

    La autora compara uno de los libros de divulgación filosófica de más éxito, El mundo de Sofía, con la tradicional «literatura para damas» desarrollada como género en la Ilustración. El libro mantiene la dualidad masculino-femenino, a la vez que la de adulto- niño y la tradicional filosófica, apariencia-realidad.

  14. Forestry and deer in the pine region of New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Little; G. R. Moorhead; H. A. Somes

    1958-01-01

    Forestry and deer affect each other's welfare. Forestry and other land-use practices, particularly farming, affect deer chiefly by modifying the supplies of available food and protective cover. On the other side, an overabundance of deer can overbrowse and eliminate the most palatable and nutritious food species. If these are trees that could be valuable for...

  15. Supplier Education--Deere & Company Partners with Black Hawk College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Describes the partnership between Deere & Company and Black Hawk College that provided a training program for John Deere suppliers, resulting in a cost-effective approach to upgrading supplier skills and improving Deere product quality. Lists benefits of supplier development and training. (YKH)

  16. SEROPREVALENCE OF NEOSPORA CANINUM AND TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN BLACK TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS COLUMBIANUS) AND MULE DEER (ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS HEMIONUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deer are considered important intermediate hosts for the coccidian parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Antibodies to N. caninum and T. gondii were determined in sera of 42 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) and 43 black tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) from the Wash...

  17. The Assessment of Deer (Cervus elaphus Trophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Cotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The red deer (Cervus elaphus population’s potential for trophy value from the 34 Neagra and 35 Sălard hunting areas on the Northern slope of the Gurghiu Mountains has been analysed and evaluated, based on a number of 42 red deer trophies taken between 2000-2014. The trophies were evaluated using the C.I.C. method, which was adopted at the “Conseil International de la Chasse” in Berlin in 1937. A description of the C.I.C. method and the score for the 42 trophies is included in the study. The result of the analysis shows that 50% of the total number of trophies are high value trophies (gold and silver medal, indicating the remarkable overall quality of the red deer population in the research area.

  18. Vegetative fallows and potential value of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica) in the tropics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwanski, S.A.; Wickens, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    Research into the systems of agriculture based on vegetative fallows should begin from enquiries into the shrubs and trees most efficient in restoring soil productivity and providing essential products. Azadirachta indica, of the semiarid regions is an outstanding example of a species which is not only an efficient soil ameliorant, but also provides products that are highly competitive in price and quality with petroleum-based synthetics. The launching of a research and development programme leading to the exploitation of this tree is proposed. Several projects that could be studied in such a programme are briefly outlined.

  19. Abundancia, diversidad y categoría ecológica de los peces en estero damas y estero palo seco, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Araya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Se trabajó de junio de 1986 a febrero de 1987 en una estación de muestreo en el estero Palo Seco y en dos en el estero Damas (Damas y San Bosco, Pacífico Central, Costa Rica. La temperatura del agua no presentó diferencias significativas entre las estaciones Damas y San Bosco, pero sí entre Damas-Palo Seco y San Bosco-Palo Seco. La salinidad varió significativamente entre las tres estaciones y el pH no mostró diferencias significativas. Se recolectaron representantes de 25 familias, 39 géneros y 54 especies. De las especies, 18 comparten los tres sitios de muestreo, siete se hallaron únicamente en Palo Seco, cinco en Damas y seis en San Bosco. De las especies recolectadas, el 7,41% es compartido entre Palo Seco y Damas; el 3,70% entre Palo Seco y San Bosco y el 22,22% entre Damas y San Bosco. El análisis de similitud determinó que las estaciones Damas y San Bosco comparten un 41,40% de las especies; mientras que Palo Seco solamente presento un 9,9% de especies comunes con el grupo Damas-San Bosco. La mayoría de las especies encontradas fueron de origen marino que utilizan estos dos esteros como área de crianza (42,59% y alimentación (40,74%; mientras que las de agua dulce, estuarinas y visitantes ocasionales están poco representadas. La mayor diversidad se encontró en San Bosco y se detectaron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en los valores de H' entre las estaciones. La mayor similitud de especies se presentó entre las estaciones Damas y San Bosco, lo que sugiere que estas áreas están bajo una mayor influencia de aguas continentales; lo que propicia que los peces estén más ampliamente distribuidos. Se deduce que la ictiofauna de los esteros estudiados es transitoria en los sitios de muestreo y que la misma se distribuye heterogéneamente.

  20. DETECTION OF BARTONELLA SP. IN DEER LOUSE FLIES (LIPOPTENA MAZAMAE) ON GRAY BROCKET DEER (MAZAMA GOUAZOUBIRA) IN THE NEOTROPICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Ugo; Dall'Agnol, Bruno; Michel, Thais; Webster, Anelise; Klafke, Guilherme; Martins, João Ricardo; Kasper, Carlos Benhur; Trigo, Tatiane Campos; Ott, Ricardo; Maria de Assis Jardim, Márcia; Reck, José

    2017-06-01

    Louse flies or deer keds, Lipoptena spp., are widespread in Neotropical cervids, but the vector-borne pathogens of louse flies had only been previously reported in the Northern hemisphere. This is the first report of Bartonella spp. in deer louse flies (Lipoptena mazamae) in the neotropics collected from gray brocket deer ( Mazama gouazoubira ) in Southern Brazil. DNA from Bartonella sp. was detected in all 429 L. mazamae collected from 11 road-killed gray brocket deer. The same sequences of DNA of Bartonella spp. were identified in samples. Gray brocket deer are abundant in Brazil, so Bartonella-infected Lipoptena spp. may be widely distributed in the neotropics.

  1. Six month-duration Tephrosia vogelii Hook. f. and Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl. A. Gray planted-fallows for improving maize production in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gachene C.K.K.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment including planted Tephrosia vogelii and Tithonia diversifolia fallow species and natural fallow was conducted at Maseno, Kenya, for assessing whether these fallows grown on a nutrient depleted land could produce sufficient green manure in six month period, whether their biomass retained on the same plots or transferred to continuously cropped plots with or without added P fertiliser could increase yield of consecutive maize crops and whether it is useful to regularly repeat these fallows on same plots. First fallow was established in randomized complete blocks with three replicates. At harvesting, biomass was recorded, then either incorporated in situ or transferred to continuous cropped plots split with and without added P fertiliser and monitored for the effect in improving consecutive maize crops. The second fallow was managed on this split plot design. The two-planted shrubs fallows produced more than 9 Mg total dry biomass and accumulated 154 to 234 kg N.ha-1, which were significantly higher compared to the production in the natural fallow. The shrubs were also superior to natural fallow for P accumulation (5-22 kg versus 2 kg.ha-1. The aboveground dry biomass harvested from planted T. vogelii and T. diversifolia and either incorporated in situ or transferred into continuously cropped plots increased maize yields by 2.5 folds compared to the unmanured crop, the control. Supplementing the organic materials with an additional 20 kg P inorganic fertilizer increased the 1st maize yield by about 40%. Productivity in the plots with T. vogelii or T. diversifolia aboveground biomass removal was low for the subsequent fallow and maize crops when compared to the performance in plots where biomass was incorporated. To achieve sustained yields of maize in depleted soils requires regular improved fallowing at least one season alternating with one season maize, and additional P inputs.

  2. Effects of Deer Settling Stimulus and Deer Density on Regeneration in a Harvested Southern New England Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Barrett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated deer densities have led to reports of forest regeneration failure and ecological damage. However, there is growing evidence that the biophysical conditions of a forest that make it attractive to deer may be a contributing factor in determining browsing levels. Thus, an understanding of settling stimulus—how attractive an area is to deer in terms of food-independent habitat requirements—is potentially important to manage deer browsing impacts. We tested the settling stimulus hypothesis by evaluating the degree to which thermal settling stimulus and deer density are related to spatial variation in browsing intensity across different forest harvesting strategies over the course of a year. We determined if deer were impacting plant communities and if they resulted in changes in plant cover. We quantified the thermal environment around each harvest and tested to see if it influenced deer density and browsing impact. We found that deer had an impact on the landscape but did not alter plant cover or diminish forest regeneration capacity. Deer density and browse impact had a relationship with thermal settling stimulus for summer and fall months, and deer density had a relationship with browse impact in the winter on woody plants. We conclude that thermal settling stimulus is an important predictor for deer density and browsing impact.

  3. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in wild boars, red deer and roe deer in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witkowski Lucjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in wild life, particularly game animals in Poland. Meat juice collected during the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 hunting seasons from 552 red deer (Cervus elaphus, 367 wild boars (Sus scrofa and 92 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus was tested for T. gondii antibodies using the multi-species ID Screen Toxoplasmosis Indirect kit (IDvet, Montpellier, France. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 24.1% of red deer (95% CI: 20.7%, 27.8%, 37.6% of wild boar (95% CI: 32.8%, 42.7% and 30.4% of roe deer (95% CI: 22.0%, 40.5%. To the authors’ best knowledge, this is the first epidemiological report of T. gondii prevalence in red deer, roe deer and wild boars in Poland. T. gondii is present in wildlife animal tissues and consumption of the game may be a potential source of infection for humans.

  4. Vegetation dynamics in fallow agricultural areas on Przemyśl Foothills (southeastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Barabasz-Krasny

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The studies of fallow lands were undertaken on the Przemyśl hills in the area of Cisowa locality which, till very recently, have been owned by a State Farm (PGR. The objective was to gain insight into the composition and diversification of plant communities on meadows, pastures and fields laid fallow, in context of habitat conditions prevailing after the use had ceased. The study utilised an old cadastral map showing the type of communities by category of use: meadows, pasture, and cultivated fields. The study material consisted of 180 relevés, obtained in the period 1998-2000 using the Braun-Blanquet method. By employing numerical classification, eight plant communities were distinguished, including only two of the association rank: Epilobio-Juncetum effusi, Arrhenatheretum elatioris. The analysis of Ellenberg’s habitat indices proved that all the communities belonged to the half-light vegetation group, occurring mostly on fresh soils, under intermediate moisture-content conditions, more rarely on moist soils which do not dry out. The soil reaction was most often neutral or slightly acidic, and in most of the soils the nitrogen content was in the intermediate range. The two principal trends in the succession of communities in the area, after its farming management has ceased, are: marked increase in species richness resulting from the expansion of species, and the process of overgrowing by woody vegetation.

  5. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization, soil moisture and soil temperature on soil respiration during summer fallow season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Guo, Sheng-Li; Zou, Jun-Liang; Li, Ze; Zhang, Yan-Jun

    2011-11-01

    On the loess plateau, summer fallow season is a hot rainy time with intensive soil microbe activities. To evaluate the response of soil respiration to soil moisture, temperature, and N fertilization during this period is helpful for a deep understanding about the temporal and spatial variability of soil respiration and its impact factors, then a field experiment was conducted in the Changwu State Key Agro-Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, China. The experiment included five N application rates: unfertilized 0 (N0), 45 (N45), 90 (N90), 135(N135), and 180 (N180) kg x hm(-2). The results showed that at the fallow stage, soil respiration rate significantly enhanced from 1.24 to 1.91 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and the average of soil respiration during this period [6.20 g x (m2 x d)(-1)] was close to the growing season [6.95 g x (m2 x d)(-1)]. The bivariate model of soil respiration with soil water and soil temperature was better than the single-variable model, but not so well as the three-factor model when explaining the actual changes of soil respiration. Nitrogen fertilization alone accounted for 8% of the variation soil respiration. Unlike the single-variable model, the results could provide crucial information for further research of multiple factors on soil respiration and its simulation.

  6. The global analysis of DEER data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Suzanne; Beth, Albert H; Hustedt, Eric J

    2012-05-01

    Double Electron-Electron Resonance (DEER) has emerged as a powerful technique for measuring long range distances and distance distributions between paramagnetic centers in biomolecules. This information can then be used to characterize functionally relevant structural and dynamic properties of biological molecules and their macromolecular assemblies. Approaches have been developed for analyzing experimental data from standard four-pulse DEER experiments to extract distance distributions. However, these methods typically use an a priori baseline correction to account for background signals. In the current work an approach is described for direct fitting of the DEER signal using a model for the distance distribution which permits a rigorous error analysis of the fitting parameters. Moreover, this approach does not require a priori background correction of the experimental data and can take into account excluded volume effects on the background signal when necessary. The global analysis of multiple DEER data sets is also demonstrated. Global analysis has the potential to provide new capabilities for extracting distance distributions and additional structural parameters in a wide range of studies.

  7. The Effect of Short Rotation Desmodium distortum Planted Fallow on the Productivity of Ultisols in Centre Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguimgo, BAK.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of short rotation Desmodium distortum planted fallow on maize grain yield and soil properties, an experiment was conducted over four consecutive years (1995-1998 at two locations (Minkoameyos in the humid forest zone and Ntui in the forest-savannah transition zone in Centre Cameroon. The experimental design for each year was made of four replications and three treatments: i Natural Fallow used as control (NF, ii Desmodium Fallow (DF and iii Soybean (Glycine max Rotation (SR. Maize (Zea mays was used as plant test and was planted each year in the first cropping season (March-June followed by each treatment from July to February. The analysis of variance and mean separation (Tukey's HSD were used to evaluate the effects of treatments on maize yield and soil chemical properties at the end of the experiment. No treatment could produce relatively more than the first year of the experiment where maize yields were based on 7-8 year-old natural fallow in both sites. However, in Minkoameyos, there was a significant difference (p= 0.043 between the treatments in the fourth year. Desmodium plots out-yielded both natural fallow and soybean plots. In Ntui, there was a highly significant difference (p= 0.000 among treatments in the third and fourth years. Desmodium plots also outyielded both natural fallow and soybean plots; while natural fallow plots out-yielded soybean plots. The general trend of productivity was ranked as: DF> NF> SR. Apart from the available P that has shown a highly significant difference (p= 0.000 compared to the initial value and to other treatments, no other significant difference was noticed with other soil properties in both sites. However, the general trend is that most soil chemical properties tended to decrease excepted pH water and available phosphorus. The study has shown that, in forest-savannah–transition zone (Ntui, Desmodium distortum had highly significant effect on maize grain yield

  8. Ziya Gökalp'in Manzûmeleri ve Ala Geyik Hakkında About Ziya Gökalp poem and fallow deer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gencay ZAVOTÇU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ziya Gökalp, who witnessed the most troublesome days of the Ottoman Empire, was an intellectual who defended and foregrounded Turkish nationalism and Turkism at the time when other intellectuals were in favour of Islamic Union, Ottomanism, and mandate. Although Gökalp’s idea of Turkish nationalism was ultimately motivated by Pan-Turkism, it was effective in awakening Turkic consciousness. Gökalp’s ideas and views on saving the state and the people from downfall contributed to some of the reforms introduced after the War of Independence. Within this frame, one of the ideas that Gökalp passionately defended was freeing culture and literature from complexity so that they could gain nationalist identity.According to Gökalp, in order for literature to gain nationalist identity, it had to turn to folk culture and literature. The folk people who had been displaced, neglected and ignored for centuries were in fact the primary source and basis of the nation. As long as the authors and poets fed on folk culture, their works could gain nationalist identity; as long as they treated authentic subjects, they could be read and comprehended by large group of people. However, the folk culture for centuries had been scorned and even despised by some Ottoman intellectuals and bureaucrats.In light of these ideas, Gökalp wrote poems such as Asker İle Şair, Halîfe ve Müftü, San’at, Kavim, Meslek Kadını, Askerin Türküsü, Esnâf Destanı, in which he portrayed figures that are responsible, conscious, obedient, thinking and dutiful, and through which he conceptualised right behaviour patterns. Another motivating factor for the composition of these verses must have been the idea that a healthy and civilised society could consist of responsible, conscious and healthy individuals. Gökalp’s verse, Ala Geyik, which was published in 1913, with its simple form and content was the literary reflection of “folk culture’s rebellion against the imitative and cosmopolite elite culture.” In light of Turkism in Language, an idea he highly valued, the fact that Turkish words dominated his string of words, and that he used syllabic meter, revealed how he as an intellectual with his poems and essays contributed to the New Language Movement. Osmanlı Devleti’nin en sıkıntılı günlerine tanık olan Ziya Gökalp, aydınların İslam Birliği, Osmanlıcılık ve manda taraftarı olduğu bir dönemde Türk milliyetçiliğini savunmuş ve Türklük bilincini öne çıkarmış bir fikir adamıdır. Gökalp’in savunduğu Türk milliyetçiliği nihâî olarak Turan Ülküsü gibi bir Türk dünyası hayâli içerse de yüzyıllarca bastırılmış Türklük bilincinin uyanmasını sağlamak açısından etkili olmuştur. Gökalp, devletin ve milletin içinde bulunduğu kötü durumdan kurtulması için önerdiği fikirlerle Ulusal Kurtuluş Savaşı sonrası yapılan yeniliklerin bir kısmına da katkı sağlamıştır. Bu çerçevede, Gökalp’in hararetle savunduğu fikirlerden biri kültür ve edebiyatın karmaşık yapıdan kurtulup millî bir kimliğe bürünmesi olmuştur.Gökalp’e göre edebiyatın millî bir kimlik kazanabilmesi halk kültürüne yönelmesi ve halk edebiyatından beslenmesi ile gerçekleşir. Yüzyıllarca ötelenmiş, ihmal edilmiş ve hak ettiği değeri görememiş olan halk aslında milletin temel gücü ve dayanağı konumundadır. Yazar ve şairler halk kültüründen beslendikleri ölçüde eserleri millî bir hüviyete bürünür, milletin öz değerlerini işledikleri müddetçe geniş halk kesimi tarafından okunup anlaşılabilirler. Oysa, halk kültürü bazı Osmanlı aydın ve bürokratları tarafından yüzyıllarca küçümsenmiş, hatta hakîr görülmüştür.Ziya Gökalp’in bu düşünceler ışığında yazdığı Asker İle Şair, Halîfe ve Müftü, San’at, Kavim, Meslek Kadını, Askerin Türküsü, Esnâf Destanı v.d. sorumluluk sahibi, bilinçli, itaatkâr, düşünen ve görev bilinciyle hareket eden insanı tanımlama ve doğru davranış biçimlerini kavratma amacıyla söylenmiş manzumelerdir. Gökalp’e bu manzumeleri söyleten, diğer nedenlerin yanında sağlıklı ve uygar bir toplumun sorumlu, bilinçli ve sağlıklı fertlerden oluşacağı fikri olmalıdır. Gökalp’in, 1913 yılında yayınlanan Ala Geyik manzumesi kolay anlaşılabilir biçim ve içeriğiyle “taklitçi ve kozmopolit “aydın tabaka kültürü”ne karşı çıkardığı (… halk kültürü”nün edebiyata yansımış bir örneğidir. Çok önemsediği Dilde Türkçülük fikri uyarınca dizelerinin büyük oranda Türkçe kelimelerden oluşması ve hece ile yazılması, bu fikir adamının şiir ve yazılarıyla Yeni Lisan Hareketi’ne sağladığı katkının da bir belgesi niteliğindedir.

  9. Residual effects of fallows on selected soil hydraulic properties in a kaolinitic soil subjected to conventional tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyamadzawo, G.; Nyamugafata, P.; Chikowo, R.; Giller, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Improved fallows have been used to reduce time required for soil fertility regeneration after cropping in low input agricultural systems. In semi-arid areas of Southern Africa, Acacia angustissima and Sesbania sesban are among some of the more widely used improved fallow species. However the residua

  10. El caso de la Dama de Elche: más que una divergencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olmos, Ricardo

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available A recent review of Karen D. Vitelli appeared in American Journal of Archaeology (1995, 775 on John F. Moffitt's Art Forgery. The case of the Lady of Elche, is the reason that make us to write this paper. It is discussed here both method and content of a book showing a scientific intention but inaceptable conclusions. The Lady of Elche deserves a better approach from the light of the new Iberian archaeological research.Una reciente recensión de Karen D. Vitelli aparecida en American Journal of Archaeology (1995, 775 sobre el libro de John F. Moffitt Art Forgery. The case of the Lady of Elche, es el motivo de nuestro escrito. Se discute aquí el método y contenido de un libro con intención científica y conclusiones inaceptables. La Dama de Elche merece una mejor aproximación desde la luz de la nueva investigación de la arqueología ibérica.

  11. The Higgs Sector and CoGeNT/DAMA-Like Dark Matter in Supersymmetric Models

    CERN Document Server

    Gunnion, John F

    2010-01-01

    Recent data from CoGeNT and DAMA are roughly consistent with a very light dark matter particle with $m\\sim 4-10\\gev$ and spin-independent cross section of order $\\sigma_{SI} \\sim (1-3)\\times 10^{-4}\\pb$. An important question is whether these observations are compatible with supersymmetric models obeying $\\Omega h^2\\sim 0.11$ without violating existing collider constraints and precision measurements. In this talk, I review the fact the the Minimal Supersymmetric Model allows insufficient flexibility to achieve such compatibility, basically because of the highly constrained nature of the MSSM Higgs sector in relation to LEP limits on Higgs bosons. I then outline the manner in which the more flexible Higgs sectors of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Model and an Extended Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Model allow large $\\sigma_{SI}$ and $\\Omega h^2\\sim 0.11$ at low LSP mass without violating LEP, Tevatron, BaBar and other experimental limits. The relationship of the required Higgs sectors to the NMSSM ``ideal...

  12. A FD/DAMA network architecture for the first generation land mobile satellite services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, T.-Y.; Wang, C.; Cheng, U.; Dessouky, K.; Rafferty, W.

    1989-01-01

    A frequency division/demand assigned multiple access (FD/DAMA) network architecture for the first-generation land mobile satellite services is presented. Rationales and technical approaches are described. In this architecture, each mobile subscriber must follow a channel access protocol to make a service request to the network management center before transmission for either open-end or closed-end services. Open-end service requests will be processed on a blocked call cleared basis, while closed-end requests will be processed on a first-come-first-served basis. Two channel access protocols are investigated, namely, a recently proposed multiple channel collision resolution scheme which provides a significantly higher useful throughput, and the traditional slotted Aloha scheme. The number of channels allocated for either open-end or closed-end services can be adaptively changed according to aggregated traffic requests. Both theoretical and simulation results are presented. Theoretical results have been verified by simulation on the JPL network testbed.

  13. Country, cover or protection: what shapes the distribution of red deer and roe deer in the Bohemian Forest Ecosystem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Heurich

    Full Text Available The Bohemian Forest Ecosystem encompasses various wildlife management systems. Two large, contiguous national parks (one in Germany and one in the Czech Republic form the centre of the area, are surrounded by private hunting grounds, and hunting regulations in each country differ. Here we aimed at unravelling the influence of management-related and environmental factors on the distribution of red deer (Cervus elaphus and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus in this ecosystem. We used the standing crop method based on counts of pellet groups, with point counts every 100 m along 218 randomly distributed transects. Our analysis, which accounted for overdispersion as well as zero inflation and spatial autocorrelation, corroborated the view that both human management and the physical and biological environment drive ungulate distribution in mountainous areas in Central Europe. In contrast to our expectations, protection by national parks was the least important variable for red deer and the third important out of four variables for roe deer; protection negatively influenced roe deer distribution in both parks and positively influenced red deer distribution in Germany. Country was the most influential variable for both red and roe deer, with higher counts of pellet groups in the Czech Republic than in Germany. Elevation, which indicates increasing environmental harshness, was the second most important variable for both species. Forest cover was the least important variable for roe deer and the third important variable for red deer; the relationship for roe deer was positive and linear, and optimal forest cover for red deer was about 70% within a 500 m radius. Our results have direct implications for the future conservation management of deer in protected areas in Central Europe and show in particular that large non-intervention zones may not cause agglomerations of deer that could lead to conflicts along the border of protected, mountainous areas.

  14. White-tailed deer ecology and management on Fire Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, H.B.

    2005-01-01

    Deer populations have grown dramatically on Fire Island National Seashore (FIlS) since 1983. Trend data reveal a dichotomy in deer dynamics. In the eastern half of the island, deer density appears to have stabilized between 25-35 deer/km2. In the western half of the island, deer densities are 3-4 times as high in residential communities. Concomitant with that increase has been a general decline in physical stature of some animals, visible impacts on island vegetation, especially in the Sunken Forest, and a perceived increase in the frequency of human and deer interactions. Intensive research on FIlS has shown that deer occupy relatively predictable home ranges throughout the year, but can and do move up and down the island. Impacts of deer on vegetation are most dramatic in the Sunken Forest. Most obvious are the effects of browsing on the herb layer of the Sunken Forest. The least obvious, but perhaps more significant impact is the stark lack of regeneration of canopy tree species since about 1970, which coincides with the initiation of the deer population irruption. A number of herbs and shrubs have been greatly reduced in the understory, and their propagules from the soil. Deer do not readily transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease to other organisms, but deer are important hosts for adult ticks which underscores their importance in the transmission pathway of the disease to humans. Deer on FIlS, while occasionally docile, are still wild animals and should be treated as such. Some animals are relatively unafraid of humans due to the absence of predation and a lack of harassment. This in turn has contributed to a longstanding tradition of feeding deer by many residents and visitors, particularly in western portions of the island. Feeding affects both the behavior and population dynamics of deer inhabiting Fire Island. Recent efforts to reduce deer feeding by visitors and residents have been very effective. Ongoing experiments with Porcine Zona Pellucida

  15. Structured hydrological analysis for targeting fallow evaporation to improve water productivity at the irrigation system level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides results of an application of a holistic systematic approach of water accounting using remote sensing and GIS coupled with ground water modeling to evaluate water saving options by tracking non-beneficial evaporation in the Liuyuankou Irrigation System (LIS of China. Groundwater rise is a major issue in the LIS, where groundwater levels have risen alarmingly close to the ground surface (within 1 m near the Yellow River. The lumped water balance analysis showed high fallow evaporation losses and which need to be reduced for improving water productivity.

    The seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETs was estimated by applying the SEBAL algorithm for eighteen NOAA AVHRR-12 images over the year of 1990–1991. This analysis was aided by the unsupervised land use classification applied to two Landsat 5 TM images of the study area. SEBAL results confirmed that a significant amount (116.7 MCM of water can be saved by reducing ETs from fallow land which will result in improved water productivity at the irrigation system. The water accounting indicator (for the analysis period shows that the process fraction per unit of depleted water (PFdepleted is 0.52 for LIS, meaning that 52% of the depleted water is consumed by agricultural crops and 48% is lost through non-process depletion.

    Finally, the groundwater modeling was applied to simulate three land use and water management interventions to assess their effectiveness for both water savings and impact on the groundwater in LIS. MODFLOW's Zone Budget code calculates the groundwater budget of user-specified subregions, the exchange of flows between subregions and also calculates a volumetric water budget for the entire model at the end of each time step. The simulation results showed that fallow evaporation could be reduced between 14.2% (25.51 MCM and 45.3% (81.36 MCM by interventions such as canal lining and ground

  16. Study regarding the quantitative evolution of the game animals populations from 29 Surduc, Forest Domain- Faget, in 2010-2014 period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel Dronca

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Integration of the Romania in the E.U. requires a special attention for to the game populations. The aim of the present paper was to study the quantitative evolution of the game for the 6 species during 2010-2015, on the hunting terrain 29 Surduc, from Forest Domain – Faget, with a total area of 15,500 ha. The study shows that from the 6 species monitored, one was not identified on this hunting terrain, Fallow Deer (Dama dama L. For the other species identified numerical evolution of the population demonstrated that there is a good correlation between the number of individuals and their biogenic capacity. We recommend carefully monitoring of the natural selection and the efficient use of artificial breeding especially for the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus L. specie.

  17. Spatial dynamics of Mastomys natalensis in a field-fallow mosaic in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leirs, Herwig; Verhagen, Ron; Sabuni, Christopher A.

    1997-01-01

    The population dynamics of Mastomys natalensis rats is reported for a 3-year study of monthly CMR-trapping in a small scale maize field-fallow land mosaic in Tanzania. The seasonal evolution of rodent presence was the same in both habitat types and it was not affected by agricultural activities i...

  18. The effect of fallow on Longidorus americanus, a nematode associated with stunting of loblolly pine seedlings in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen W. Fraedrich; Michelle M. Cram; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    2005-01-01

    Stunting of loblolly pine (Pinue taeda L.) seedlings, caused by Longidorus americanus, has been a problem at a Georgia (USA) nursery. Field and growth chamber studies were conducted to determine the survivability of the nematode in a fallow nursery soil. The population density of L. americanus decreased rapidly...

  19. Soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period: influence on soil chemical and physical properties and on sugarcane productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roniram Pereira da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The planting of diversified crops during the sugarcane fallow period can improve the chemical and physical properties and increase the production potential of the soil for the next sugarcane cycle. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the influence of various soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period on soil chemical and physical properties and productivity after the first sugarcane harvest. The experiment was conducted in two areas located in Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil (21º 14' 05'' S, 48º 17' 09'' W with two different soil types, namely: an eutroferric Red Latosol (RLe with high-clay texture (clay content = 680 g kg-1 and an acric Red Latosol (RLa with clayey texture (clay content = 440 g kg-1. A randomized block design with five replications and four treatments (crop sequences was used. The crop sequences during the sugarcane fallow period were soybean/millet/soybean, soybean/sunn hemp/soybean, soybean/fallow/soybean, and soybean. Soil use was found not to affect chemical properties and sugarcane productivity of RLe or RLa. The soybean/millet/soybean sequence improved aggregation in the acric Latosol.

  20. Deer density and disease prevalence influence transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease in White-tailed Deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Michael D.; Richards, Bryan J.; Storm, Daniel J.; Rolley, Robert E.; Shelton, Paul; Nicholas S. Keuler,; Timothy R. Van Deelen,

    2013-01-01

    Host-parasite dynamics and strategies for managing infectious diseases of wildlife depend on the functional relationship between disease transmission rates and host density. However, the disease transmission function is rarely known for free-living wildlife, leading to uncertainty regarding the impacts of diseases on host populations and effective control actions. We evaluated the influence of deer density, landscape features, and soil clay content on transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in young (disease prevalence and density of infected deer, performed better than simple density- and frequency-dependent models. Our results indicate a combination of social structure, non-linear relationships between infectious contact and deer density, and distribution of disease among groups are important factors driving CWD infection in young deer. The landscape covariates % deciduous forest cover and forest edge density also were positively associated with infection rates, but soil clay content had no measurable influences on CWD transmission. Lack of strong density-dependent transmission rates indicates that controlling CWD by reducing deer density will be difficult. The consequences of non-linear disease transmission and aggregation of disease on cervid populations deserves further consideration.

  1. Water Availability for Winter Wheat Affected by Summer Fallow Tillage Practices in Slope Dryland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-bin; YANG Bo; Roger Hartmann; Donald Gabriels; CAI Dian-xiong; JIN Ke; WU Hui-jun; BAI Zhan-guo; ZHANG Can-jun; YAO Yu-qing; LU Jun-jie; WANG Yu-hong

    2003-01-01

    The tillage experiments for winter wheat were conducted on the slope farmland in Luoyang,Henan Province in the semihumid to arid loess plateau areas of North China. Different tillage methods inclu-ding reduced tillage (RT), no-till (NT), 2 crops/year (2C), subsoiling(SS), and conventional tillage (CT)were compared to determine the effects of tillage methods on soil water conservation, water availability, andwheat yields in a search for better farming systems in the areas. The NT and SS showed good effects on waterconservation. The soil water storage increased 12 - 33 mm with NT and 9 - 24 mm with SS at the end of sum-mer fallow periods. The soil evaporation with NT and SS decreased 7 - 8 mm and 34 - 36 mm during the fallowperiods of 1999 and 2001, respectively. Evapotranspiration (ET) with NT and SS increased about 47 mm dur-ing wheat growth periods of 2000 to 2001. Treatment RT and 2C had low water storage and high water lossesduring the fallow periods. The winter wheat yields with conservation tillage practices were improved in the 2ndyear, increased by 3, 5 and 8 % with RT, NT and SS, respectively, compared with CT. The highest wheatyields were obtained with subsoiling, and the maximum economic benefits from no-till. All conservation tillagepractices provided great benefits to saving energy and labors, reducing operation inputs, and increasing eco-nomic returns. No-till and subsoiling have shown promise in increasing water storage, reducing water loss, en-hancing water availability, and saving energy, as well as increasing wheat yield.

  2. Amendment of Tephrosia Improved Fallows with Inorganic Fertilizers Improves Soil Chemical Properties, N Uptake, and Maize Yield in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie G. Munthali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize production in Malawi is limited mainly by low soil N and P. Improved fallows of N-fixing legumes such as Tephrosia and Sesbania offer options for improving soil fertility particularly N supply. The interactions of Tephrosia fallows and inorganic fertilizers on soil properties, N uptake, and maize yields were evaluated at Chitedze Research Station in Malawi. The results indicated that the level of organic matter and pH increased in all the treatments except for the control. Total N remained almost unchanged while available P decreased in all plots amended with T. vogelii but increased in T. candida plots where inorganic P was applied. Exchangeable K increased in all the plots irrespective of the type of amendment. The interaction of N and P fertilizers with T. vogelii fallows significantly increased the grain yield. The treatment that received 45 kg N ha−1 and 20 kg P ha−1 produced significantly higher grain yields (6.8 t ha−1 than all the other treatments except where 68 kg N ha−1 and 30 kg P ha−1 were applied which gave 6.5 t ha−1 of maize grain. T. candida fallows alone or in combination with N and P fertilizers did not significantly affect grain yield. However, T. candida fallows alone can raise maize grain yield by 300% over the no-input control. Based on these results we conclude that high quality residues such as T. candida and T. vogelii can be used as sources of nutrients to improve crop yields and soil fertility in N-limited soils. However, inorganic P fertilizer is needed due to the low soil available P levels.

  3. Motivations of female Black Hills deer hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Covelli Metcalf, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    State fish and wildlife agencies are particularly interested in attracting female participation because of the potential to offset declining participation in hunting. Understanding female hunters’ motivations will be critical for designing effective recruitment and retention programs for women hunters. Although female participation in hunting is increasing, males still outnumber females by about tenfold. Gender differences in deer hunters were explored by comparing ratings of eight motivations (social, nature, excitement, meat, challenge, trophy, extra hunting opportunity, and solitude). Hunter types were defined by hunters’ selection of the most important motivation for why they like Black Hills deer hunting. Overall, females and males were relatively similar in their ratings of the eight motivations, and we found 85% gender similarity in the selection of the most important motivation. Women were slightly more motivated by the food aspect of the hunt while men placed slightly more value on the hunt as a sporting activity.

  4. Deer monitoring at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fledderman, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    To protect public health, all deer and feral hogs harvested at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during controlled hunts are monitored for Cs-137. A new monitoring program has been developed by the Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS). To provide increased confidence in dose data and compliance with regulations, many changes have been made to the deer and hog monitoring program. Using field count information, a computerized database determines Cs-137 concentration and calculates the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) resulting from consumption of the animal. The database then updates each hunter's cumulative CEDE in real time. Also, enhancements to the instrument calibration and quality control portions of the monitoring program were implemented. These include improved monitor calibration, intercomparison of field results from the same animal using different detectors, and regular use of check sources to verify equipment performance. With these program changes, EMS can produce more accurate and verifiable dose data.

  5. Deer monitoring at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fledderman, P.D.

    1992-10-01

    To protect public health, all deer and feral hogs harvested at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during controlled hunts are monitored for Cs-137. A new monitoring program has been developed by the Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS). To provide increased confidence in dose data and compliance with regulations, many changes have been made to the deer and hog monitoring program. Using field count information, a computerized database determines Cs-137 concentration and calculates the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) resulting from consumption of the animal. The database then updates each hunter`s cumulative CEDE in real time. Also, enhancements to the instrument calibration and quality control portions of the monitoring program were implemented. These include improved monitor calibration, intercomparison of field results from the same animal using different detectors, and regular use of check sources to verify equipment performance. With these program changes, EMS can produce more accurate and verifiable dose data.

  6. TB-infected deer are more closely related than non-infected deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchong, Julie A; Scribner, Kim T; Kravchenko, Alexandra N; Winterstein, Scott R

    2007-02-22

    Identifying mechanisms of pathogen transmission is critical to controlling disease. Social organization should influence contacts among individuals and thus the distribution and spread of disease within a population. Molecular genetic markers can be used to elucidate mechanisms of disease transmission in wildlife populations without undertaking detailed observational studies to determine probable contact rates. Estimates of genealogical relationships within a bovine tuberculosis-infected white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population indicated that infected deer were significantly more closely related than non-infected deer suggesting that contact within family groups was a significant mechanism of disease transmission. Results demonstrate that epidemiological models should incorporate aspects of host ecology likely to affect the probability of disease transmission.

  7. Salivary prions in sheep and deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Richt, Jürgen A; Hamir, Amir N; Greenlee, Justin J; Miller, Michael W; Wolfe, Lisa L; Sirochman, Tracey M; Young, Alan J; Glidden, David V; Johnson, Natrina L; Giles, Kurt; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2012-01-01

    Scrapie of sheep and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids are transmissible prion diseases. Milk and placenta have been identified as sources of scrapie prions but do not explain horizontal transmission. In contrast, CWD prions have been reported in saliva, urine and feces, which are thought to be responsible for horizontal transmission. While the titers of CWD prions have been measured in feces, levels in saliva or urine are unknown. Because sheep produce ~17 L/day of saliva, and scrapie prions are present in tongue and salivary glands of infected sheep, we asked if scrapie prions are shed in saliva. We inoculated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing ovine prion protein, Tg(OvPrP) mice, with saliva from seven Cheviot sheep with scrapie. Six of seven samples transmitted prions to Tg(OvPrP) mice with titers of -0.5 to 1.7 log ID₅₀ U/ml. Similarly, inoculation of saliva samples from two mule deer with CWD transmitted prions to Tg(ElkPrP) mice with titers of -1.1 to -0.4 log ID₅₀ U/ml. Assuming similar shedding kinetics for salivary prions as those for fecal prions of deer, we estimated the secreted salivary prion dose over a 10-mo period to be as high as 8.4 log ID₅₀ units for sheep and 7.0 log ID₅₀ units for deer. These estimates are similar to 7.9 log ID₅₀ units of fecal CWD prions for deer. Because saliva is mostly swallowed, salivary prions may reinfect tissues of the gastrointestinal tract and contribute to fecal prion shedding. Salivary prions shed into the environment provide an additional mechanism for horizontal prion transmission.

  8. Experimental Constraints on a Dark Matter Origin for the DAMA Annual Modulation Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Barbeau, Phil; Cerdeno, D. G.; Colaresi, J.; Collar, J. I.; de Lurgio, P.; Drake, G.; Fast, James E.; Greenberg, C.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Marino, Michael G.; Miley, Harry S.; Orrell, John L.; Reyna, D.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Talaga, R. L.; Tench, O.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Wilkerson, J.; Yocum, K. M.

    2008-12-17

    Abstract Follows: C. E. Aalseth,1 P. S. Barbeau,2 D. G. Cerdeño,3 J. Colaresi,4 J. I. Collar,2 P. de Lurgio,5 G. Drake,5 J. E. Fast,1 C. H. Greenberg,2 T. W. Hossbach,1 J. D. Kephart,1 M. G. Marino,7 H. S. Miley,1 J. L. Orrell,1 D. Reyna,6 R. G. H. Robertson,7 R. L. Talaga,5 O. Tench,4 T. D. Van Wechel,7 J. F. Wilkerson,7 and K. M. Yocum4 (CoGeNT Collaboration) 1Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA 2Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA 3Departamento de Física Teórica C-XI & Instituto de Física Teórica UAM-CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid, Spain 4CANBERRA Industries, Meriden, Connecticut 06450, USA 5Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA 6Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550, USA 7Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA Received 7 July 2008; revised 6 August 2008; published 17 December 2008 A claim for evidence of dark matter interactions in the DAMA experiment has been recently reinforced. We employ a new type of germanium detector to conclusively rule out a standard isothermal galactic halo of weakly interacting massive particles as the explanation for the annual modulation effect leading to the claim. Bounds are similarly imposed on a suggestion that dark pseudoscalars might lead to the effect. We describe the sensitivity to light dark matter particles achievable with our device, in particular, to next-to-minimal supersymmetric model candidates.

  9. Methodes d'amas quantiques a temperature finie appliquees au modele de Hubbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plouffe, Dany

    Depuis leur decouverte dans les annees 80, les supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique ont suscite beaucoup d'interet en physique du solide. Comprendre l'origine des phases observees dans ces materiaux, telle la supraconductivite, est l'un des grands defis de la physique theorique du solide des 25 dernieres annees. L'un des mecanismes pressentis pour expliquer ces phenomenes est la forte interaction electron-electron. Le modele de Hubbard est l'un des modeles les plus simples pour tenir compte de ces interactions. Malgre la simplicite apparente de ce modele, certaines de ses caracteristiques, dont son diagramme de phase, ne sont toujours pas bien etablies, et ce malgre plusieurs avancements theoriques dans les dernieres annees. Cette etude se consacre a faire une analyse de methodes numeriques permettant de calculer diverses proprietes du modele de Hubbard en fonction de la temperature. Nous decrivons des methodes (la VCA et la CPT) qui permettent de calculer approximativement la fonction de Green a temperature finie sur un systeme infini a partir de la fonction de Green calculee sur un amas de taille finie. Pour calculer ces fonctions de Green, nous allons utiliser des methodes permettant de reduire considerablement les efforts numeriques necessaires pour les calculs des moyennes thermodynamiques, en reduisant considerablement l'espace des etats a considerer dans ces moyennes. Bien que cette etude vise d'abord a developper des methodes d'amas pour resoudre le modele de Hubbard a temperature finie de facon generale ainsi qu'a etudier les proprietes de base de ce modele, nous allons l'appliquer a des conditions qui s'approchent de supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique. Les methodes presentees dans cette etude permettent de tracer un diagramme de phase pour l'antiferromagnetisme et la supraconductivite qui presentent plusieurs similarites avec celui des supraconducteurs a haute temperature. Mots-cles : modele de Hubbard, thermodynamique

  10. ¿Qué sabemos de las Damas Enfermeras de la Cruz Roja Española?

    OpenAIRE

    Mas Espejo, Marta; Siles González, José; Pulido Mendoza, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: identificar qué se conoce sobre las Damas Enfermeras de la Cruz Roja Española. Método: se llevó a cabo una investigación histórica basada en la revisión bibliográfica. Fuentes documentales: catálogos virtuales de bibliotecas y archivos documentales, bases de datos electrónicas, catálogos de revistas especializadas en historia y otras fuentes de red. Descriptores utilizados: historia Enfermería, historia Cruz Roja Española, enfermeras Cruz Roja, reina Victoria Eugenia de Battenberg, ...

  11. Estimating the consequences of fire exclusion for food crop production, soil fertility, and fallow recovery in shifting cultivation landscapes in the humid tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgrove, Lindsey; Hauser, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    In the Congo Basin, smallholder farmers practice slash-and-burn shifting cultivation. Yet, deliberate burning might no longer be sustainable under reduced fallow scenarios. We synthesized data from the Forest Margins Benchmark Area (FMBA), comprising 1.54 million hectares (ha), in southern Cameroon and assessed the impact of fire exclusion on yield, labor inputs, soil fertility, ecosystem carbon stocks, and fallow recovery indicators in two common field types (plantain and maize) under both current and reduced fallow scenarios. While we could not distinguish between impacts of standard farmer burning practice and fire exclusion treatments for the current fallow scenario, we concluded that fire exclusion would lead to higher yields, higher ecosystem carbon stocks as well as potentially faster fallow recovery under the reduced fallow scenario. While its implementation would increase labor requirements, we estimated increased revenues of 421 and 388 US$ ha(-1) for plantain and maize, respectively. Applied to the FMBA, and assuming a 6-year reduced fallow scenario, fire exclusion in plantain fields would potentially retain 240,464 Mg more ecosystem carbon, comprising topsoil carbon plus tree biomass carbon, than standard farmer practice. Results demonstrate a potential "win-win scenario" where yield benefits, albeit modest, and conservation benefits can be obtained simultaneously. This could be considered as a transitional phase towards higher input use and thus higher yielding systems.

  12. Biomass production and nutrient accumulation by Tephrosia vogelii (Hemsley A. Gray and Tothonia diversifolia Hook F. fallows during the six-month growth period at Maseno, Western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karanja N.K.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Two planted fallows namely, Tephrosia vogelii Hook F. and Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsley A. Gray, a natural fallow and a Zea mays L. crop were grown on N and P depleted soils at Maseno in Kenya during a period of six months. Growth performance and biomass production were assessed. Roots and aerial plant parts grew fast. Most of the shrubs had produced flowers by the 165th day after transplanting. T. vogelii and T. diversifolia yielded more above ground biomass than maize and natural fallow. The amount of roots in the shrub and natural fallows was higher in the topsoil (0-30 cm than in the deep layer (30 45cm. T. vogelii produced the least root biomass compared to the Tithonia and natural fallows. Tephrosia and Tithonia leaves were high in N, K, Ca and Mg, Tephrosia roots in N and K, and Tephrosia stems high in Ca only. All plant parts had low P content. The six month-old fallows of T. vogelii or T. diversifolia accumulated high amount of N, K- and Ca. This biomass and nutrient accumulation may even be higher where rainfall is evenly distributed and sufficient and if initial soil fertility status is not very highly depleted. Tithonia leaves had a higher proton consumption capacity compared to other plant parts or Tephrosia and natural fallow materials.

  13. Molecular detection of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa in cervids and wild boars from Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, André; Parreira, Ricardo; Nunes, Mónica; Casadinho, Afonso; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Campino, Lenea; Maia, Carla

    2016-05-10

    Wildlife can act as reservoir of different tick-borne pathogens, such as bacteria, parasites and viruses. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa with veterinary and zoonotic importance in cervids and wild boars from the Centre and South of Portugal. One hundred and forty one blood samples from free-ranging ungulates including 73 red deer (Cervus elaphus), 65 wild boars (Sus scrofa) and three fallow deer (Dama dama) were tested for the presence of Anaplasma marginale/A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, Anaplasma/Ehrlichia spp., Babesia/Theileria spp., Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato) (s.l.), and Rickettsia spp. DNA by PCR. Anaplasma spp. DNA was detected in 33 (43.4 %) cervids (31 red deer and two fallow deer) and in two (3.1 %) wild boars while Theileria spp. were found in 34 (44.7 %) cervids (32 red deer and two fallow deer) and in three (4.6 %) wild boar blood samples. Sequence analysis of msp4 sequences identified A. marginale, A. ovis, while the analysis of rDNA sequence data disclosed the presence of A. platys and A. phagocytophilum and T. capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3. Anaplasma spp./Theileria spp. mixed infections were found in 17 cervids (22.4 %) and in two wild boars (3.1 %). All samples were negative for Babesia sp., B. burgdorferi (s.l.), Ehrlichia sp. or Rickettsia sp. This is the first detection of Anaplasma marginale, A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, A. platys, Theileria capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3 in cervids and wild boars from Portugal. Further studies concerning the potential pathogenicity of the different species of  Anaplasma and Theileria infecting wild ungulates, the identification of their vector range, and their putative infectivity to domestic livestock and humans should be undertaken.

  14. Season effect on genitalia and epididymal sperm from Iberian red deer, roe deer and Cantabrian chamois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Pastor, Felipe; Guerra, Camino; Kaabi, Mohammed; Garcia-Macias, Vanesa; de Paz, Paulino; Alvarez, M; Herraez, Paz; Anel, Luis

    2005-04-15

    Seasonality deeply affects the physiology and behavior of many species, and must be taken into account when biological resource banks (BRBs) are established. We have studied the effect of seasonality on many reproductive parameters of free-ranging Iberian red deer, roe deer and Cantabrian chamois, living in Spain. Testicles from hunted animals were collected and sent to our laboratory at different times during the year. We recorded the weight and volume of testis, the weight of the epididymis and its separate parts (caput, corpus, and cauda), the weight of the sperm sample collected from the cauda epididymis, and several sperm parameters (sperm concentration, spermatozoa recovered, motility, HOS test reactivity, acrosomal status, and viability). We studied the data according to several periods, defined accordingly to each species. For red deer, we defined rut (mid-September to mid-October), post-rut (mid-October to mid-December), and non-breeding season (February). For roe deer, they were pre-rut (June), rut (July), post-rut (first fortnight of August), and non-breeding season (September). For chamois: non-breeding season (June to mid-September) and breeding season (October-November). The rut/breeding season yielded significantly higher numbers for almost all parameters. However, in the case of red deer, sperm quality was higher in the post-rut. For roe deer, testicular weight was similar in the pre-rut and in the rut, and sperm quality did not differ significantly between these two periods, although we noticed higher values in the rut. In the case of chamois, sperm quality did not differ significantly from the breeding season, but data distribution suggested that in the non-breeding season there are less males with sperm of good quality. On the whole, we find these results of interest for BRB planning. The best season to collect sperm in this species would be the breeding season. However, post-rut in red deer, pre-rut in roe deer, and non-breeding season in

  15. Impact of forested fallows on fertility and mercury content in soils of the Tapajós River region, Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patry, Cynthia; Davidson, Robert; Lucotte, Marc; Béliveau, Annie

    2013-08-01

    Recent research on slash-and-burn agriculture conducted in the Amazonian basin has suggested that soils must be left under forested fallows for at least 10 to 15 years to regain fertility levels comparable to non-disturbed forests in order to allow for short cycle crop cultivation. However, small scale farmers tend nowadays to re-burn secondary forests as soon as after 3 to 5 years, thus could contribute to further reduce soil fertility and could enhance the transfer of mercury (Hg) naturally present in soils of the region towards water courses. The present research project sets out to characterize the impact of forested fallows of differing age and land-use history on soils properties (fertility and Hg contents) in the region of the Tapajós River, an active pioneer front of the Brazilian Amazon. To do this, soil samples in forested fallows of variable age and in control primary forests were retrieved. In general, soil fertility of grouped forested fallows of different ages was similar to that of the primary forests. But when discriminating soils according to their texture, forested fallows on coarse grained soils still had much higher NH4/NO3 ratios, NH4 and Ca contents than primary forests, this even 15 years after burning. The impact of repeated burnings was also assessed. Fallows on coarse grained soils showed an impoverishment for all variables related to fertility when the number of burnings was 5 or more. For fallows on fine grained soils that underwent 5 or more burnings, NO3 contents were low although a cation enrichment was observed. Total soil Hg content was also sensitive to repeated burnings, showing similar losses for forested fallows established on both types of soil. However, Hg linked to coarse particles appeared to migrate back towards fine particles at the surface of coarse grained soils in fallows older than 7 years.

  16. Merogonic stages of Theileria cervi in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jason; Johnson, Eileen M; Allen, Kelly E; Campbell, Gregory A; Rezabek, Grant; Bradway, Daniel S; Pittman, Louis L; Little, Susan E; Panciera, Roger J

    2013-09-01

    In February 2012, 12 farmed mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) were moved from a facility in southwestern Oklahoma to a facility in southeastern Oklahoma that housed 100 farmed white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Between the third and fifth weeks, 9 of the 12 mule deer had died, 4 of which were submitted for necropsy. The deer were heavily infested with Amblyomma americanum (lone star ticks). Hematologic data from 1 deer revealed severe anemia, leukocytosis, and intraerythrocytic hemoparasites consistent with Theileria spp. Microscopically, the liver, lymph nodes, and spleen contained multifocally distributed, enlarged monocytic cells whose cytoplasm was replaced by developing meronts in various stages of merogony. It appears that, upon arrival, the Theileria cervi-naïve mule deer became infested with large numbers of Theileria-infected lone star ticks leading to massive exposure of the mule deer to sporozoites of the protozoan, resulting in an acute hemolytic crisis and fatalities. The merogonic stages of T. cervi are also described. The lack of earlier reports of merogony may be due to the fact that only a single, short-lived, merogonic cycle follows exposure to sporozoites and thus merogonic stages are demonstrable for only a short period. Polymerase chain reaction testing of paraffin-embedded tissue yielded a 507-bp amplicon sequence that was 100% identical with the sequence of T. cervi previously reported from white-tailed deer in Oklahoma and from elk in Wisconsin and Indiana.

  17. The Process of Parents' Decision-Making to Discharge Their Child against Medical Advice (DAMA: A grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi Alireza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Discharge against medical advice (DAMA refers to the phenomenon that patient or the patient’s surrogate decides to leave the hospital before the attending physician confirms the patient is discharged. Children are much more vulnerable to such discharges. This process occurs with different mechanisms that identifying them can be helpful in reducing this phenomenon. We aimed to explore the process of parents' decision-making to discharge their child against medical advice. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 fathers, 10 mothers, 6 nurses and 3 physician assistants and the data were collected to the point of saturation. Grounded theory methodology was adopted for data collection and analysis. The results of qualitative analysis in the field of the parents' decisionmaking on the DAMA revealed 4 main themes: "lack of family-centered care", "disruption of the parenting process", "distrust to the medical team and center" and "psychological strategy of shirk responsibility for child care and treatment ". By providing family-centered care, adopting measures to empowering the families, developing the trust of parents to the health care team and developing a discharge plan from the beginning of children hospitalization with the cooperation of health care team and parents and considering all factors such as child's special health condition and parent's health related perceptions and beliefs, children will not be discharged against medical advice and will experience better outcomes.

  18. Dark matter scattering on electrons: Accurate calculations of atomic excitations and implications for the DAMA and XENON experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Dzuba, Vladimir; Flambaum, Victor; Gribakin, Gleb; Pospelov, Maxim; Stadnik, Yevgeny

    2017-01-01

    Atoms can become ionised during the scattering of a slow, heavy particle off a bound electron. Such an interaction involving leptophilic WIMP dark matter is a potential explanation for the anomalous 9 sigma annual modulation in the DAMA direct detection experiment. We show that due to non-analytic, cusp-like behavior of Coulomb functions close to the nucleus leads to an effective atomic structure enhancement. Crucially, we also show that electron relativistic effects are important. With this in mind, we perform high-accuracy relativistic calculations of atomic ionisation. We scan the parameter space: the DM mass, the mediator mass, and the effective coupling strength, to determine if there is any region that could potentially explain the DAMA signal. While we find that the modulation fraction of all events with energy deposition above 2 keV in NaI can be quite significant, reaching 50%, the relevant parts of the parameter space are excluded by the XENON10 and XENON100 experiments.

  19. What do they eat? Using DNA barcoding to assess diet preferences of deer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløjgaard, Camilla; Ejrnæs, Rasmus

    preferences of deer (red deer and roe deer) in Klelund Deer Park in Denmark. Over one year, we collect feces samples every month from different habitat types (e.g., heath, marsh, meadow, open forests and coniferous plantation) within the park. DNA barcoding can not only tell us which plants are consumed...

  20. Soil uses in the sugarcane fallow period to improve chemical and physical properties of two latosols (oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Fernandes

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane production should be integrated with crop diversification with a view to competitive and sustainable results in economic, social and environmental aspects. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of different soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period on the chemical and physical properties of eutroferric Red Latosol - LVef (Oxisol and Acric Latosol - LVw (Acric Oxisol, in Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil (21º14'05'' S, 48º17'09'' W, 600 m asl. A randomized block design was used with five replications and four treatments, consisting of different soil uses (crops in the sugarcane fallow period: soybean only, soybean/fallow/soybean, soybean/millet/soybean, and soybean/sunn hemp/soybean. After two soybean crops, the LVef chemical properties remained at intermediate to high levels; while those of the LVw, classified as intermediate to high in the beginning, increased to high levels. Thus, the different soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period allowed the maintenance of LVef fertility levels and the improvement of those of the LVw. Two soybean crops increased macroporosity in the 0.0-0.1 m layer of the LVef; reduced soil aggregates in the 0.0-0.1 and 0.1-0.2 m layers of both soils, and reduced aggregate stability in these two layers of the LVw. Planting pearl millet or sunn hemp between the two soybean growing seasons promoted the formation of larger soil aggregates in the surface layer (0.0-0.1 m of the LVw.

  1. [Effects of tillage in fallow period on soil water and nitrogen absorption and translocation by wheat plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ai-Xia; Sun, Min; Zhao, Wei-Feng; Deng, Lian-Feng; Deng, Yan; Gao, Zhi-Qiang

    2013-12-01

    Field test was carried out to study the effect of tillage in fallow period on soil water before sowing and growth stages, and nitrogen (N) absorption, translocation by wheat plant. The current data showed that tillage in fallow period improved the soil water at the depth of 0-300 cm before sowing and growth stages, especially in dry years. Such tillage significantly improved N accumulation in leaf, stem and sheath (SS) at anthesis, grain N accumulation at maturity, N mobilization in SS and the contribution of mobilized N to grain N, amount of mobilized N in leaf, level of N accumulation before anthesis, N transportation from vegetative organs to grains after anthesis, and nitrogen accumulation after anthesis, which in turn enhanced the efficiency of N uptake. Deep tillage at 45 days after harvest had the best effect. Significant correlations were detected between soil water and N accumulation before anthesis as well as N translation from vegetative organs grains after anthesis, particularly in dry years, while the correlation between soil water from sowing to an thesis and nitrogen accumulation amount after anthesis was significant in wet years, but not in dry years. Tillage in fallow period especially deep tillage after raining could benefit soil water preservation, as well as N absorption and translocation by plant.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and soil aggregation as affected by cultivation of various crops during the sugarcane fallow period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Viviane Truber

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Management systems involving crop rotation, ground cover species and reduced soil tillage can improve the soil physical and biological properties and reduce degradation. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effect of various crops grown during the sugarcane fallow period on the production of glomalin and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in two Latosols, as well as their influence on soil aggregation. The experiment was conducted on an eutroferric Red Latosol with high-clay texture (680 g clay kg-1 and an acric Red Latosol with clayey texture (440 g kg-1 clay in Jaboticabal (São Paulo State, Brazil. A randomized block design involving five blocks and four crops [soybean (S, soybean/fallow/soybean (SFS, soybean/millet/soybean (SMS and soybean/sunn hemp/soybean (SHS] was used to this end. Soil samples for analysis were collected in June 2011. No significant differences in total glomalin production were detected between the soils after the different crops. However, total external mycelium length was greater in the soils under SMS and SHS. Also, there were differences in easily extractable glomalin, total glomalin and aggregate stability, which were all greater in the eutroferric Red Latosol than in the acric Red Latosol. None of the cover crops planted in the fallow period of sugarcane improved aggregate stability in either Latosol.

  3. Copper in the sediment and sea surface microlayer near a fallowed, open-net fish farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Ronald H; Smith, Ruth E; Fisher, Clyde V; Fisher, E Brian

    2012-09-01

    Sediment and sea surface microlayer samples near an open-net salmon farm in Nova Scotia, were analysed for copper. Copper is a constituent of the feed and is an active ingredient of anti-foulants. The salmon farm was placed in fallow after 15 years of production. Sampling was pursued over 27 months. Elevated copper concentrations in the sediments indicated the farm site as a source. Bubble flotation due to gas-emitting sediments from eutrophication is a likely process for accumulating copper in the sea surface microlayer at enriched concentrations. Elevated and enriched concentrations in the sea surface microlayer over distance from the farm site led, as a result of wind-drift, to an enlarged farm footprint. The levels of copper in both sediments and sea surface microlayer exceeded guidelines for protection of marine life. Over the 27 months period, copper levels persisted in the sediments and decreased gradually in the sea surface microlayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Control of Xiphinema index populations by fallow plants under greenhouse and field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villate, Laure; Morin, Elisa; Demangeat, Gérard; Van Helden, Maarten; Esmenjaud, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    The dagger nematode Xiphinema index has a high economic impact in vineyards by direct pathogenicity and above all by transmitting the Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV). Agrochemicals have been largely employed to restrict the spread of GFLV by reducing X. index populations but are now banned. As an alternative to nematicides, the use of fallow plants between two successive vine crops was assessed. We selected plant species adapted to vineyard soils and exhibiting negative impact on nematodes and we evaluated their antagonistic effect on X. index in greenhouse using artificially infested soil, and in naturally infested vineyard conditions. The screening was conducted with plants belonging to the families Asteraceae (sunflower, marigold, zinnia, and nyjer), Poaceae (sorghum and rye), Fabaceae (white lupin, white melilot, hairy vetch, and alfalfa), Brassicaceae (rapeseed and camelina), and Boraginaceae (phacelia). In the greenhouse controlled assay, white lupin, nyjer, and marigold significantly reduced X. index populations compared with that of bare soil. The vineyard assay, designed to take into account the aggregative pattern of X. index distribution, revealed that marigold and hairy vetch are good candidates as cover crops to reduce X. index populations in vineyard. Moreover, this original experimental design could be applied to manage other soilborne pathogens.

  5. Can coyotes affect deer populations in Southeastern North America?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilgo, J., C.; Ray, H., Scott; Ruth, Charles; Miller, Karl, V.

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The coyote (Canis latrans) is a recent addition to the fauna of eastern North America, and in many areas coyote populations have been established for only a decade or two. Although coyotes are known predators of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in their historic range, effects this new predator may have on eastern deer populations have received little attention. We speculated that in the southeastern United States, coyotes may be affecting deer recruitment, and we present 5 lines of evidence that suggest this possibility. First, the statewide deer population in South Carolina has declined coincident with the establishment and increase in the coyote population. Second, data sets from the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina indicate a new mortality source affecting the deer population concurrent with the increase in coyotes. Third, an index of deer recruitment at SRS declined during the period of increase in coyotes. Fourth, food habits data from SRS indicate that fawns are an important food item for coyotes during summer. Finally, recent research from Alabama documented significant coyote predation on fawns there. Although this evidence does not establish cause and effect between coyotes and observed declines in deer recruitment, we argue that additional research should proactively address this topic in the region. We identified several important questions on the nature of the deer–coyote relationship in the East.

  6. Profiling helper T cell subset gene expression in deer mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjelle Brian

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus are the most common mammals in North America and are reservoirs for several zoonotic agents, including Sin Nombre virus (SNV, the principal etiologic agent of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in North America. Unlike human HCPS patients, SNV-infected deer mice show no overt pathological symptoms, despite the presence of virus in the lungs. A neutralizing IgG antibody response occurs, but the virus establishes a persistent infection. Limitations of detailed analysis of deer mouse immune responses to SNV are the lack of reagents and methods for evaluating such responses. Results We developed real-time PCR-based detection assays for several immune-related transcription factor and cytokine genes from deer mice that permit the profiling of CD4+ helper T cells, including markers of Th1 cells (T-bet, STAT4, IFNγ, TNF, LT, Th2 cells (GATA-3, STAT6, IL-4, IL-5 and regulatory T cells (Fox-p3, IL-10, TGFβ1. These assays compare the expression of in vitro antigen-stimulated and unstimulated T cells from individual deer mice. Conclusion We developed molecular methods for profiling immune gene expression in deer mice, including a multiplexed real-time PCR assay for assessing expression of several cytokine and transcription factor genes. These assays should be useful for characterizing the immune responses of experimentally- and naturally-infected deer mice.

  7. Traffic mortality of four ungulate species in southern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milla Niemi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ungulate–vehicle collisions are intensively studied in many countries. However, limited knowledge exists on how many animals struck actually die due to collisions and whether differences in traffic mortality occur between species living in the same area. In this study, we estimated a kill rate (the proportion of individuals killed/struck and, in relation to their winter population sizes, the collision and traffic mortality rates for four ungulate species (moose Alces alces, white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus, roe deer Capreolus capreolus, and fallow deer Dama dama. We used an unofficial collision register collected between 2001 and 2012 (a total of 12 years by voluntary hunters from the Hyvinkää Game Management Area (323 km2 located in southern Finland. The population estimates used were based on annual snow track censuses. A total of 497 ungulates were involved in collisions during the study period. Of these, 76% were killed directly or put down afterwards. Roe deer had the highest kill rate; 95% of struck individuals died. White-tailed deer had the highest collision and traffic mortality rates (8.0% and 6.5% of the winter population, respectively, followed by moose (6.5 % and 4.5%, roe deer (3.9% and 3.7%, and fallow deer (3.2% and 2.1%. As we found the collision and traffic mortality rates to be unequal between species, we recommend separately reporting all ungulate species when compiling collision statistics. We additionally suggest that local managers should be aware of ungulate collision and traffic mortality rates in their areas and should use this knowledge when planning annual harvest.

  8. Photoperiod and reproduction in female deer mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitsett, J.M.; Miller, L.L.

    1982-03-01

    Female deer mice were exposed to a short day photoperiod beginning during 1 of 3 stages of life. In the first experiment, exposure to SD during adulthood resulted in a minimal disruption of reproductive condition; many females bore 2 litters after the onset of this treatment. In the second experiment, females reared on SD from weaning matured normally, as measured by vaginal introitus; however, vaginal closure occurred in approximately one-half of these females by 9 weeks of age. In the third experiment, females were born of mothers housed on either an SD or a long day photoperiod, and were continued on the maternal photoperiod until 6 weeks of postnatal age. The SD photoperiod markedly inhibited reproductive maturation as measured by vaginal patency, ovarian weight, and uterine weight. A comparison of reproductive organ weights and vaginal condition provided evidence for the validity of the latter measure as an index of reproductive state. As assayed by the present testing procedure, the sensitivity of the reproductive system to photoperiod decreases as a function of age in female deer mice.

  9. More CH4 is emitted during the fallow than during the growing season in a Mediterranean rice agrosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Eixarch, Maite; Ibàñez, Carles; Alcaraz, Carles; Viñas, Marc; Aranda, Xavier; Saldaña, J. Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Paddy rice fields are an important source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) as they contribute 5 to 20 % of the global anthropogenic CH4 emissions. The Ebre Delta (Catalonia, NE Spain) is one of the most important wetland complexes in the Western Mediterranean with 65 % of its area covered by rice fields. The results herein presented assess the annual pattern of CH4 emissions from paddy rice in Ebre Delta, including the growing and fallow seasons as well as the major environmental variables modulating such emissions. Fifteen rice fields covering the geo-physical variability of the Ebre Delta were selected for GHG monitoring. Common agronomic management was practiced: water direct-seeding, permanent flooding and moderate mineral fertilization during the growing season and straw incorporation, progressive drainage of the fields after the harvest. Fields are left fallow during the winter. GHG were monthly sampled, from May to December in 2015. In each field, three closed chambers were used; from each of these, four gas samples were taken over a 30-minute period. Simultaneously, hydrological regime, soil physic-chemical parameters and plant cover were measured. GHG were analysed by gas chromatography. A Generalized linear model analysis (GLM) was performed to assess the most important influencing factors on CH4 emissions. An information-theoretic approach was used to find the best approximating models. Overall, the CH4 emissions showed a bi-modal pattern, with peaks in July-August and in October. Emissions rates ranged from 2.1 ± 0.5 to 7.5 ± 1.4 mg C-CH4 m-2 h-1 in the growing season (May to September) and from 25.0 ± 5.7 to 20.1 ± 3.3 mg C-CH4 m-2 h-1 at post-harvest (October to December). In total, 314 kg C-CH4 ha-1 were emitted from Ebre Delta rice fields, of which 70 % during post-harvest. Larger off-season emissions were likely induced by straw incorporation. The results of the GLM-IT analysis revealed that during the growing season, soil Eh and water level

  10. Molecular Survey of Anaplasma and Ehrlichia of Red Deer and Sika Deer in Gansu, China in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Chen, Z; Liu, Z; Liu, J; Yang, J; Li, Q; Li, Y; Luo, J; Yin, H

    2016-12-01

    Anaplasma and Ehrlichia are important emerging tick-borne pathogens in both humans and animals. Here, we conducted a molecular surveillance study in Gansu, China to assess the prevalence of Anaplasma and Ehrlichia spp. in red deer and sika deer based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and sequencing of 16S rRNA or msp genes. PCR revealed that the prevalence of Anaplasma ovis, Anaplasma bovis and Anaplasma platys of the Qilian Mountain samples was 32%, 9% and 9%, respectively; the prevalence of Anaplasma ovis, Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma platys was 20%, 15% and 15% among the Long Mountain samples, respectively. Of the Long Mountain samples, two (5%) of the 40 samples were positive for Ehrlichia canis, but all 44 of the Qilian Mountain samples were negative for E. canis, and no other Anaplasma or Ehrlichia spp. were found in the samples. The phylogenetic tree showed that the newly isolated Anaplasma and Ehrlichia spp. could be classified as belonging to four clades, including an A. bovis cluster, A. ovis cluster, A. platys cluster and E. canis cluster. In addition, Bartonella schoenbuchensis was firstly identified in blood samples from red deer in Gansu, China. Our results provide important data to increase the understanding of the epidemiology of anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis of red deer and sika deer and will assist with the implementation of measures to control anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis transmission to red deer, sika deer and other animals in Gansu, China.

  11. Sequence Length Polymorphisms within Cervid AmelogeninX and AmelogeninY Genes: Use in Sex Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson H. Morrill

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sequence length polymorphisms between the amelogeninX and amelogeninY genes have been utilized for the design of rapid PCR sex determination assays for various mammalian species, including four cervid species (Capreolus capreolus, Cervus elaphus, Cervus nippon, and Dama dama. Several of these assays have been shown to be able to determine sex from non-invasively collected samples such as hair roots, feces, or skeletal remains. Such assays can be helpful for both zoo and wildlife biologists for sex determination, and could possibly be further developed to aid in species identification and SNP analyses if sequence information is also available. In order to further study the amelogeninX and amelogeninY gene polymorphisms that exist within cervids, partial sequences from these genes were generated and analyzed in multiple amelogeninX and amelogeninY samples of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni; and single amelogeninX and amelogeninY samples of sika deer (Cervus nippon, fallow deer (Dama dama and axis deer (Axis axis. Within these five species, three sequence length polymorphism regions (two or more nucleotides inserted or deleted between samples were found. The lengths of these polymorphisms were 45, 9, and 9 nucleotides. In addition, a SNP was found in the amelogeninY sequences of the mule deer samples that were analyzed. Lastly, the primers used to amplify the regions of the amelogeninX and amelogeninY sequences were able to determine sex in all five species that were studied.

  12. Humus form development of former arable soils under forest and fallow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkonis, Saulius

    2010-05-01

    Soil humus is a multi-component organic media and most dynamic part of soil, even humus amount itself under natural vegetation is relatively stable and predetermined by climatic conditions and landscape. Soil cultivation including common farming practices - mechanical soil tillage, use of mineral fertilizers (especially nitrogen) and ameliorants aimed to increase crop production. Agricultural soils beside many environmentally unfavorable more or less controlled processes of soil degradation (nutrient leaching, soil erosion) have unstable level and quality of soil humus (qualitative composition). These humus fluctuations are controlled through organic matter development processes - accelerating or inhabitation of mineralization and humification. During last decades economical drivers in Lithuania stimulated land uses changes (LUC) in less-favored farming areas with regions attributing to large proportions of low fertile soils, hilly landscape and ecological vulnerability. Prevailed types of LUC - arable land to grassland, land afforestration or land abandonment prompt agro ecosystems to return to land primeval state (under natural vegetation) and initial humus level through self-regulation. But listed transformations having own process drivers and prevailing soil humus development directions. Experimental field at the Voke branch of LIA was established (in 1995) and studies conducted with the aim to monitor soil properties transformation, to explore variation of soil quality under different stages of renaturalisation. The experiment was designed with four sites (treatments) on former arable land: 1) left as a cropland site (control) (I); 2) transformed to grassland (II); 3) uncultivated or transformed to fallow (III) and 4) pine afforested site (IV). Assuming 10 years of experimental results (1995-2004) it was concluded that transition of agricultural land characterized as complex of factors having strong effect on energy and nutrients turnover, however soil testing

  13. Wildlife management series no. 1: The black-tailed deer in Alaska: An outline of management methods

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes changes in the population of deer in Alaska. The objectives of deer management in Alaska are to promote maximum utilization of our deer herds...

  14. Relationship of Herd Density and Physical Parameters of White-tailed Deer in Northwest Florida Pine Flatwoods

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study assessing the effects of changes in deer density on physical parameters of deer in northwest Florida flatwoods. Biological data from white-tailed deer...

  15. Comparison of the Suitability of Contiguous Fallow-forest Lands for Cassava, Yam, Cocoyam and Sweet Potato Production in Nsukka, Southeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadu Charles L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis compared the suitability of contiguous fallow-forest lands for cassava, yam, cocoyam and sweet potato production in Nsukka, south-eastern Nigeria. The fallow plots were brought into cultivation in 1998 under the IITA-UNN long-term collaborative research. The sole cassava plots were grown to cassava only continuously for five years and then left to fallow. Soil samples were collected from 0-20 cm depth in triplicates using an auger and core sampler from the seven representative fallow plots previously grown to sole cassava from 1998–2003 and under fallow till date as well as the adjacent forest land. The objective was to use the soil qualities as recovered during the fallow period and those from the original adjacent forest to determine their current suitability for the production of the four crops. Using the FAO’s principle of limiting conditions revealed that after 13 yrs of fallow, the plots grown to sole cassava was classified as highly suitable (S1 for sweet potato production but moderately suitable (S2 for cassava, yam and cocoyam production. The remnant forest land was highly suitable for sweet potato production but moderately suitable for cassava, yam and cocoyam production. The dominant soil limitations are organic matter, low cation exchange capacity and exchangeable potassium for both cassava and yam production. The major limitations to cocoyam production are low available phosphorous, base saturation and soil pH. If these constraints are addressed adequately by soil nutrient management programmes all the plots will scale up to S1 class for the four crops.

  16. Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1979: Calendar Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to...

  17. Reproductive biology of the pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olazabal Daniel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus is a South American grazing deer which is in extreme danger of extinction. Very little is known about the biology of the pampas deer. Moreover, most information has not been published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, and is only available in local publications, theses, etc. Therefore, our aim was to update and summarize the available information regarding the reproductive biology of the pampas deer. Moreover, in most sections, we have also included new, unpublished information. Detailed descriptions are provided of the anatomy of both the female and the male reproductive tract, puberty onset, the oestrous cycle and gestational length. Birthing and the early postpartum period are described, as are maternal behaviour and early fawn development, seasonal distribution of births, seasonal changes in male reproduction and antler cycle, reproductive behaviour, semen collection, and cryopreservation. Finally, an overview is given and future directions of research are proposed.

  18. 1984 Deer Harvest Summary for Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memo summarizes the 1984 deer harvest for Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge. Tables summarize numerical findings, including bucks, does, and points.

  19. Targeted CWD surveillance mule deer HD 600 February 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — February 2015 Progress report for Targeted Chronic Wasting Disease Project in Montana Hunting District 600. From February 5-6th, 25 mule deer were captured in...

  20. 1984 Deer Harvest Summary for Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memo summarizes the 1985 deer harvest for Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge. Tables summarize numerical findings, including bucks, does, and points.

  1. FOREST COVER INFLUENCES DISPERSAL DISTANCE OF WHITE-TAILED DEER

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eric S. Long; Duane R. Diefenbach; Christopher S. Rosenberry; Bret D. Wallingford; Marrett D. Grund

    2005-01-01

    ...) in 2 study areas in Pennsylvania. By using a meta-analysis approach, we compared dispersal rates and distances from these populations together with published reports of 10 other nonmigratory populations of white-tailed deer...

  2. Sperm flagellum volume determines freezability in red deer spermatozoa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ros-Santaella, José Luis; Domínguez-Rebolledo, Alvaro Efrén; Garde, José Julián

    2014-01-01

    ... provides sperm motility. Here, for the first time, we determined the volumes of the flagellum structures in fresh epididymal red deer spermatozoa using a stereological method under phase contrast microscopy...

  3. Identification and characterization of deer astroviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smits, Saskia L.; van Leeuwen, Marije; Kuiken, Thijs

    2010-01-01

    The threat of emerging infectious viruses in humans requires a more effective approach regarding virus surveillance. A thorough understanding of virus diversity in wildlife provides epidemiological baseline information about pathogens and may lead to the identification of newly emerging pathogens...... in the future. In this study, diarrhoea samples from an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness in a Danish population of European roe deer were gathered for which no aetiological agent could be identified. Large-scale molecular RNA virus screening, based on host nucleic acid depletion, sequence......-independent amplification and sequencing of partially purified viral RNA, revealed the presence of novel astroviruses, CcAstV-1 and CcAstV-2, in two of ten diarrhoea samples. Whether these viruses were responsible for causing diarrhoea remains to be determined. Phylogenetic analyses on amplified sequences showed...

  4. Melatonin Promotes Superovulation in Sika Deer (Cervus nippon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of melatonin (MT on superovulation and reproductive hormones (melatonin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH and PRL were investigated in female sika deer. Different doses (40 or 80 mg/animal of melatonin were subcutaneously implanted into deer before the breeding season. Exogenous melatonin administration significantly elevated the serum FSH levels at the time of insemination compared with levels in control animals. During superovulation, the serum LH levels in donor sika deer reached their highest values (7.1 ± 2.04 ng/mL at the point of insemination, compared with the baseline levels (4.98 ± 0.07 ng/mL in control animals. This high level of LH was sustained until the day of embryo recovery. In contrast, the serum levels of PRL in the 80 mg of melatonin-treated group were significantly lower than those of control deer. The average number of corpora lutea in melatonin-treated deer was significantly higher than that of the control (p < 0.05. The average number of embryos in the deer treated with 40 mg of melatonin was higher than that of the control; however, this increase did not reach significant difference (p > 0.05, which may be related to the relatively small sample size. In addition, embryonic development in melatonin-treated groups was delayed.

  5. Investigation of anatomical anomalies in Hanford Site mule deer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiller, B.L.; Cadwell, L.L.; Poston, T.M. [and others

    1997-03-01

    Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus), common residents of the Hanford Site, are an important part of the shrub-steppe ecosystem as well as being valued for aesthetics and hunting. Because mule deer have been protected from hunting on the Site for 50 years, the herd has developed unique population characteristics, including a large number of old animals and males with either large or atypically developed antlers, in contrast to other herds in the semi-arid regions of the Northwest. Hanford Site mule deer have been studied since 1991 because of the herd`s unique nature and high degree of public interest. A special study of the mule deer herd was initiated in 1993 after observations were made of a relatively large number of male deer with atypical, velvet-covered antlers. This report specifically describes our analyses of adult male deer found on the Site with atypical antlers. The report includes estimates of population densities and composition; home ranges, habitat uses, and dietary habits; natural and human-induced causes of mortality; and the herd`s overall health and reproductive status.

  6. Will Culling White-Tailed Deer Prevent Lyme Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugeler, K J; Jordan, R A; Schulze, T L; Griffith, K S; Mead, P S

    2016-08-01

    White-tailed deer play an important role in the ecology of Lyme disease. In the United States, where the incidence and geographic range of Lyme disease continue to increase, reduction of white-tailed deer populations has been proposed as a means of preventing human illness. The effectiveness of this politically sensitive prevention method is poorly understood. We summarize and evaluate available evidence regarding the effect of deer reduction on vector tick abundance and human disease incidence. Elimination of deer from islands and other isolated settings can have a substantial impact on the reproduction of blacklegged ticks, while reduction short of complete elimination has yielded mixed results. To date, most studies have been conducted in ecologic situations that are not representative to the vast majority of areas with high human Lyme disease risk. Robust evidence linking deer control to reduced human Lyme disease risk is lacking. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to recommend deer population reduction as a Lyme disease prevention measure, except in specific ecologic circumstances. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Factors Affecting the Winter-Feeding Ecology of Red Deer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Náhlik, A.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of browsing the forest regenerations and the consumption of supplementary given food of red deer were investigated. On a 10,000 ha territory managed by a forest management unit all the regenerations were fenced in due to the high browsing pressure. In the course of the experiment three plots of 0.5 ha-s each regenerated by oak (Querqus robur were left unfenced. On the side of one plot a feeding station was built in which sugar beet slices were given supplementary. On the side of another plot maize fodder was offered, while the third one served as a control. All three plots were surrounded by sandy bands, to be able to count how many deer stepped in weekly the respective plot. During the freeze days deer used significantly less the regeneration plots, and consequently browsed less. The same was found during the snow cover. Although snow was as shallow as 5 cm in average, it caused a change in feeding strategy of deer. Regenerations covered by snow did not offer enough forage anymore, because the hiding of the forbs and grasses. On weeks with snow cover red deer consumed significantly more sugar beet slices, than on weeks without snow. On the days without snow cover the later the week during the winter was, the more sugar beet was consumed. Browsing pressure caused in average by one deer in the neighbouring of the feeding stations was significantly increased by giving supplementary maize or sugar beet slices.

  8. Julia Butler Hansen NWR: Initial Survey Instructions for Columbian White-tailed Deer:Black-tailed Deer Ratio Protocol

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The lower Columbia population of Columbian White-tailed deer CWTD—Odocoileus virginianus leucurus) is an endangered population that has undergone a dramatic...

  9. 2012 mule deer and white-tailed deer census and population density estimate : Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on the 2012 deer census survey at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. Census methods and survey results are discussed. A combination of census...

  10. Differences in Diet between Two Rodent Species, Mastomys natalensis and Gerbilliscus vicinus, in Fallow Land Habitats in Central Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulungu, Loth S.; Massawe, Apia W.; Kennis, Jan

    2011-01-01

    simply reflect availability of food, and when food is limited, different animal species compete. In this study, the diet of two rodent pest species, Mastomys natalensis and Gerbilliscus vicinus, coexisting in fallow land in central Tanzania were studied to assess the degree of diet differentiation among...... them. Dietary niche breadth of G. vicinus was greater than that of M. natalensis in all stages of the maize cropping seasons. The rodent species studied overlapped considerably in the food items consumed ranging from niche overlap (Ojk) of 0.77–0.89. Grains/seeds featured high in the diet of M...

  11. [Effects of rotational tillage during summer fallow on wheat field soil water regime and grain yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xian-qing; Wang, Wei; Han, Qing-fang; Jia, Zhi-kuan; Yan, Bo; Li, Yong-ping; Su, Qin

    2011-10-01

    In 2007-2010, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different rotational tillage practices during summer follow on the soil water regime and grain yield in a winter wheat field in Southern Ningxia arid area. Three treatments were installed, i.e., T1 (no-tillage in first year, subsoiling in second year, and no-tillage in third year), T2 (subsoiling in first year, notillage in second year, and subsoiling in third year), and CT (conventional tillage in the 3 years). Through the three years of the tillage practices, the soil water storage efficiency in treatments T1 and T2 was increased averagely by 15.2% and 26.5%, respectively, as compared to CT. In treatments T1 and T2, the potential rainfall use rate was higher, being 37.8% and 38.5%, respectively, and the rainfall use efficiency was increased averagely by 9.9% and 10.7%, respectively, as compared to CT. Rotational tillage during summer fallow could decrease the soil ineffective evaporation significantly, and save the soil water effectively in wheat growth season. At early growth stage, the water storage in 0-200 cm soil layer in treatments T1 and T2 was increased averagely by 6.8% and 9. 4%, as compared to CT; at jointing, heading, and filling stages, the water storage in 0-200 cm soil layer in treatments T1 and T2 had a significant increase, giving greater contribution to the wheat yield than the control. Different rotational tillage practices increased the water consumption by wheat, but in the meantime, increased the grain yield and water use efficiency. In treatments T1 and T2, the water consumption by wheat through the three years was increased averagely by 5.2% and 6.1%, whereas the grain yield and the water use efficiency were increased averagely by 9.9% and 10.6%, and by 4.5% and 4.3%, respectively, as compared to CT. Correlation analysis showed that in Southern Ningxia arid area, the soil water storage at sowing, jointing, heading, and filling stages, especially at heading stage, could

  12. Winter Pea: Promising New Crop for Washington's Dryland Wheat-Fallow Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F. Schillinger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year tillage-based winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.-summer fallow (WW-SF rotation has been practiced by the vast majority of farmers in the low-precipitation (<300 mm annual rainfed cropping region of east-central Washington and north-central Oregon for 140 years. Until recently, alternative crops (i.e., those other than WW so far tested have not been as economically viable or stable as WW-SF. A 6-year field study was conducted near Ritzville, WA (292 mm avg. annual precipitation to determine the yield and rotation benefits of winter pea (Pisum sativum L. (WP. Two 3-year rotations were evaluated: WP-spring wheat (SW-SF vs. WW-SW-SF. Winter pea yields averaged 2,443 vs. 4,878 kg/ha for WW. No fertilizer was applied to WP whereas 56 kg N and 11 kg S/ha were applied to WW. Winter pea used significantly less soil water than WW. Over the winter months, a lesser percentage of precipitation was stored in the soil following WP compared to WW because: (i very little WP residue remained on the soil surface after harvest compared to WW, and (ii the drier the soil, the more precipitation is stored in the soil over winter. However, soil water content in the spring was still greater following WP vs. WW. Soil residual N in the spring (7 months after the harvest of WP and WW was greater in WP plots despite not applying fertilizer to produce WP. Spring wheat grown after both WP and WW received the identical quantity of N, P, and S fertilizer each year. Average yield of SW was 2,298 and 2,011 kg/ha following WP and WW, respectively (P < 0.01. Adjusted gross economic returns for these two rotation systems were similar. Based partially on the results of this study, numerous farmers in the dry WW-SF region have shown keen interest in WP and acreage planted WP in east-central Washington has grown exponentially since 2013. This paper provides the first report of the potential for WP in the typical WW-SF region of the inland Pacific Northwest (PNW.

  13. La formación de las Damas Enfermeras de la Cruz Roja durante la Guerra Civil Española (1936-1939

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana María Hernández Conesa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: explorar si existieron diferencias en la formación de las Damas Enfermeras Auxiliares Voluntarias de la Cruz Roja durante la Guerra Civil española (1936-1939 en las zonas dominadas por ambos contendientes. Método: investigación documental de corte histórico-pedagógico con revisión crítica de las publicaciones relacionadas con la formación de las Damas Enfermeras de la Cruz Roja de España durante la Guerra Civil española (1936-1939 localizadas en las bases de datos: Biblioteca Nacional de España, Centro Documental de la Memoria Histórica de España, GAZETA®, TESEO®, CISNE®, ENFISPO®, PUBLIMED®, CUIDEN®, DIALNET®, MEDLINE®, ISOC® e IME®. Conclusiones: hasta el año 1938 no se aprecian diferencias en la formación en ambos bandos, a partir de esta fecha el bloque sublevado aumenta la duración y contenidos teórico-prácticos de los estudios de las Damas Enfermeras de la Cruz Roja de España.

  14. Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge Deer Harvest Records from 2011 Season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These harvest data are from Morgan Brake during the 2011 deer season. They measure weight, antler size, prevalence of milk, and number of deer harvested.

  15. Deer Management Assistance Reports at Hillside National Wildlife Refuge for 2011 and 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These harvest forms are from Hillside during the 2011-2012 deer season. They measure weight, antler size, prevalence of milk, and number of deer harvested.

  16. Mathews Brake National Wildlife Refuge Deer Harvest Records from 2011 Season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These harvest data are from Mathews Brake during the 2011 deer season. They measure weight, antler size, prevalence of milk, and number of deer harvested.

  17. Health of mule and white-tailed deer at Rocky Mountain Arsenal : March-April 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer(~ virginianus), reside within the Arsenal. Little information about the health of these animals in relation to...

  18. Environmental Assessment: Public Deer Hunting on the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge (DRAFT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer have been present on Plum Island since before Refuge establishment in 1942. An aerial survey in 1948 revealed at least 15 deer wintering on the...

  19. Wolf, Canis lupus, visits to white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, summer ranges: Optimal foraging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demma, D.J.; Mech, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether Wolf (Canis lupus) visits to individual female White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) summer ranges during 2003 and 2004 in northeastern Minnesota were in accord with optimal-foraging theory. Using GPS collars with 10- to 30-minute location attempts on four Wolves and five female deer, plus eleven VHF-collared female deer in the Wolves' territory, provided new insights into the frequency of Wolf visits to summer ranges of female deer. Wolves made a mean 0.055 visits/day to summer ranges of deer three years and older, significantly more than their 0.032 mean visits/day to ranges of two-year-old deer, which generally produce fewer fawns, and most Wolf visits to ranges of older deer were much longer than those to ranges of younger deer. Because fawns comprise the major part of the Wolf's summer diet, this Wolf behavior accords with optimal-foraging theory.

  20. Environmental Assessment : proposed shotgun slug/blackpowder antlerless deer hunt on Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lee Metcalf NWR, in this assessment, is proposing a gun hunt for the 1988 deer hunting season in an effort to reduce the deer herd on the refuge. A biological...

  1. Study of deer movement on and adjacent to Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We evaluated movements and home ranges of white-tailed deer (WT) and mule deer (MD) on and adjacent to Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in north-central...

  2. Seasonal movements and home ranges of white-tailed deer in north-central South Dakota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grovenburg, T. W; Jenks, J. A; Klaver, R. W; Swanson, C. C; Jacques, C. N; Todey, D

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of movement patterns of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann, 1780)) inhabiting landscapes intensively modified by agricultural systems is important to the present and future understanding of deer ecology...

  3. Spatial and temporal analysis of factors associated with urban deer-vehicle collisions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erin C McCance; Richard K Baydack; David J Walker; Derek N Leask

    2015-01-01

    ...). Deer-vehicle collisions represent a human-wildlife conflict of serious concern, given that they result, most notably, in significant risk to human safety, deer mortality, and costly vehicle damage...

  4. Elk and Deer Management Plan and Environmental Assessment : Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Elk and Deer Management Plan and Environmental Assessment (EDMP/EA) is to develop and evaluate alternative actions for management of elk and deer...

  5. New Genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi Isolated from Sika Deer and Red Deer in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianying Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To examine the occurrence and genotype distribution of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in cervids, 615 fecal samples were collected from red deer (Cervus elaphus and sika deer (Cervus nippon on 10 different farms in Henan and Jilin Province. Enterocytozoon bieneusi was identified and genotyped with a nested PCR analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of the rRNA genes, showing an average infection rate of 35.9% (221/615. In this study, 25 ITS genotypes were identified including seven known genotypes (BEB6, EbpC, EbpA, D, HLJDI, HLJD-IV, and COS-I and 18 novel genotypes (designated JLD-I to JLD-XIV, HND-I to HND-IV. Among these, BEB6 (131/221, 59.3% was the predominant genotype (P < 0.01, followed by HLJDI (18/221, 8.1% and JLD-VIII (16/221, 7.2%. BEB6 has recently been detected in humans and nonhuman primates in China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that BEB6, HLJDI, HLJD-IV, COS-I, and 10 novel genotypes (JLD-VII to JLD-XIV, HND-III to HND-IV clustered in group 2. Genotype D, EbpC, and EbpA, known to cause human microsporidiosis worldwide, clustered in group 1, the members of which have zoonotic potential, together with eight novel genotypes (JLD-I to JLD-VI, HND-I to HND-II. Therefore, deer may play a role in the transmission of E. bieneusi to humans.

  6. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates from sheep and goats show reduced persistence in bovine macrophages than cattle, bison, deer and wild boar strains regardless of genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendaño, Naiara; Sevilla, Iker A; Prieto, José Miguel; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramon A; Alonso-Hearn, Marta

    2013-05-03

    Assessment of the virulence of isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) exhibiting distinct genotypes and isolated from different hosts may help to clarify the degree to which clinical manifestations of the disease in cattle can be attributed to bacterial or to host factors. The objective of this study was to test the ability of 10 isolates of Map representing distinct genotypes and isolated from domestic (cattle, sheep, and goat), and wildlife animal species (fallow deer, deer, wild boar, and bison) to enter and grow in bovine macrophages. The isolates were previously typed using IS1311 PCR followed by restriction endonuclease analysis into types C, S or B. Intracellular growth of the isolates in a bovine macrophage-like cell line (BoMac) and in primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) was evaluated by quantification of CFU numbers in the initial inoculum and inside of the host cells at 2h and 7 d p.i. using an automatic liquid culture system (Bactec MGIT 960). Individual data illustrated that growth was less variable in BoMac than in MDM cells. All the isolates from goat and sheep hosts persisted within BoMac cells in lower CFU numbers than the other tested isolates after 7 days of infection regardless of genotype. In addition, BoMac cells exhibited differential inflammatory, apoptotic and destructive responses when infected with a bovine or an ovine isolate; which correlated with the differential survival of these strains within BoMac cells. Our results indicated that the survival of the tested Map isolates within bovine macrophages is associated with the specific host from which the isolates were initially isolated.

  7. Coyotes, deer, and wildflowers: Diverse evidence points to a trophic cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Waser, NM; Price, MV; Blumstein, DT; Arózqueta, SR; Escobar, BDC; Pickens, R; A. Pistoia

    2014-01-01

    Spatial gradients in human activity, coyote activity, deer activity, and deer herbivory provide an unusual type of evidence for a trophic cascade. Activity of coyotes, which eat young mule deer (fawns), decreased with proximity to a remote biological field station, indicating that these predators avoided an area of high human activity. In contrast, activity of adult female deer (does) and intensity of herbivory on palatable plant species both increased with proximity to the station and were p...

  8. Decreasing deer browsing pressure influenced understory vegetation dynamics over 30 years

    OpenAIRE

    Boulanger, Vincent; Baltzinger, Christophe; Saïd, Sonia; Ballon, Philippe; Picard, Jean-Francois; Dupouey, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Key message Thanks to the concomitant recordings of vegetation and deer browsing sampled first in 1976, then resurveyed in 2006, we show that forest plant communities shifted in response to deer population dynamics, stand management and eutrophication. Context and aims High deer populations alter forest under-story dynamics worldwide. However, no study ever attempted to rank the importance of deer herbivory relatively to other environmental drivers. In the Arc-en-Barrois National Forest (...

  9. Daily dynamics of the number and activity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in fallow and intensely cultivated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emer, N. R.; Semenov, A. M.; Zelenev, V. V.; Zinyakova, N. B.; Kostina, N. V.; Golichenkov, M. V.

    2014-08-01

    The daily dynamics (during 33 days) of the number (colony-forming units (CFU)) of nitrogen-fixing bacteria and of the nitrogen-fixing activity (the acetylene method) were determined in a gray forest soil under a fallow land and under an intensely cultivated field. The daily dynamics of the CFUs determined on the nitrogen-free medium in the samples from both plots had wavelike patterns. The daily values of the actual and potential activities of nitrogen fixation in the samples from the fallow land plot and of the actual activity of nitrogen fixation in the samples from the intensely cultivated soil were low and close to the detection limit. The potential activity of nitrogen fixation in the intensely cultivated soil was significant and also had a wavelike pattern. The harmonic analysis of the daily dynamics of the CFUs and nitrogen fixation showed the statistically significant harmonics of these biological characteristics pointing to the objective and regular character of the wavelike dynamics. The revealed dynamics of the biological characteristics of the soils and the methods of their analysis are important in terms of the comparative study of the biological properties of different soils.

  10. A genetic structure of novel population of Fascioloides magna from Poland, Podkarpackie Province, indicates an expanding second European natural focus of fascioloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhásová, Ľudmila; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Karamon, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    The veterinary important parasite of ruminants, giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna(Trematoda: Fasciolidae), isolated from liver of farmed fallow deer (Dama dama) from Podkarpackie Province (southeastern Poland) was genotypized by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (cox1) and nicotinamide dehydrogenase (nad1) markers. The data on this newly emerged population were compared with mitochondrial haplotypes of recently detected Polish population of F. magna from Lower Silesian Wilderness (southwestern Poland) and with European populations of the parasite from all three natural foci; northern Italy, Czech Republic and the Danube floodplain forests. The flukes from Podkarpackie Province were found to be genetically identical with flukes from Czech Republic and Lower Silesian Wilderness in Poland. It is evident that central and southwestern Czech Republic, recognized as one of the endemic area of F. magna in Europe, has been enlarging and parasite has been invading several novel localities in Poland.

  11. The role of remnant trees in carbon sequestration, vegetation structure and tree diversity of early succession regrowing fallows in eastern Sierra Leone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuni Sanchez, Aida; Lindsell, Jeremy A.

    2017-01-01

    and tree diversity increased significantly with fallow age. Remnant tree presence affected significantly tree diversity, species dominance and above-ground carbon stocks, but not vegetation structure (stem density, basal area). Number of remnant trees and number of species of remnant trees were also...... by encroachment and forest degradation. We studied 99 (20-m-radius) plots aged 2-10 years with and without remnant trees and compared their above-ground carbon stocks, vegetation structure (stem density, basal area) and tree diversity. Above-ground carbon stocks, stem density, basal area, species richness......, this is the first study on early succession regrowing fallows in West Africa....

  12. 9 CFR 81.2 - Identification of deer, elk, and moose in interstate commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-resistant ear tag, or other device approved by APHIS. One of the animal identifications must be an official... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of deer, elk, and moose... ANIMAL PRODUCTS CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN DEER, ELK, AND MOOSE § 81.2 Identification of deer, elk, and...

  13. [Preparation and Determination of Insulin-like Growth Factor I in Deer Antler, Heart and Blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fan-bo; Yin, Jian-yuan; Liu, Jing-yan; Yang, Yu-xia; Sun, Dan-dan; Liu, Ji-hua

    2014-12-01

    To optimize the method for preparation of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I ) in deer antler, and to determine the IGF-I in deer antler, heart and blood. Ultrasonic extraction was used to extract IGF-I from different tissues of deer with ammonia-ammonium acetate buffer, followed by ultrafiltration and solid phase extraction to concentrate and purify the samples. At the same time, ethanol precipitation method was carried out in the purification of IGF-I ultrafiltratein deer antler, a parallel test proceeded and radio immune assay (RIA) was set to determine the IGF-I in deer antler, heart and blood. The IGF-I (60.8 ng/g) in deer antler by solid phase extraction was only existed in 30% methanol aqueous solution which was much higher than that (46.1 ng/g) by ethanol precipitation method. The quantities of IGF-I in deer antler, heart and blood were significantly different, it was 61.9 ng/g in antler and 21.9 ng/mL in blood, while there was no IGF-I tested in deer heart. Solid phase extraction is superior to ethanol precipitation method in preparing IGF-I in deer antler and it is clear that the IGF-I contained in deer antler is significantly higher than that in deer heart and blood, so it is the best choice to take IGF-I from deer antler.

  14. Hunter perceptions and acceptance of alternative deer management regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornicelli, L.; Fulton, D.C.; Grund, M.D.; Fieberg, J.

    2011-01-01

    Wildlife managers are often confronted with a policy paradox where a majority of the public supports an outcome, but there is no agreement on specific management strategies to achieve this outcome. Previous research has also reported a link between regulatory acceptance, hunter satisfaction, and hunter participation rates. Thus, human dimensions research aimed at understanding hunter motivations and behavior is needed for effective management. In 2005, we surveyed Minnesota (USA) deer hunters (n = 6,000; 59% response) to evaluate attitudes regarding alternative deer (Odocoileus virginianus) harvest regulations. We also conducted a series of forced choice experiments in which respondents were asked to select an option from a list of representative regulations that might be adopted to achieve a particular deer management goal. Specifically, we modeled 5 deer population scenarios ranging from low populations with high buck-harvest rates to populations 50% over goal density. Our results indicate that hunters preferred different regulations depending on the population scenario, but generally preferred antler-point restrictions and disliked limiting buck licenses through a lottery. We also found consistency among scenarios, in that a small percentage of respondents indicated they would not hunt if regulations were changed. The results from this study should help wildlife managers design deer harvest regulations that are both acceptable to hunters and achieve management objectives. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  15. Infectious Disease and Grouping Patterns in Mule Deer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Mejía Salazar

    Full Text Available Infectious disease dynamics are determined, to a great extent, by the social structure of the host. We evaluated sociality, or the tendency to form groups, in Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus from a chronic wasting disease (CWD endemic area in Saskatchewan, Canada, to better understand factors that may affect disease transmission. Using group size data collected on 365 radio-collared mule deer (2008-2013, we built a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM to evaluate whether factors such as CWD status, season, habitat and time of day, predicted group occurrence. Then, we built another GLMM to determine factors associated with group size. Finally, we used 3 measures of group size (typical, mean and median group sizes to quantify levels of sociality. We found that mule deer showing clinical signs of CWD were less likely to be reported in groups than clinically healthy deer after accounting for time of day, habitat, and month of observation. Mule deer groups were much more likely to occur in February and March than in July. Mixed-sex groups in early gestation were larger than any other group type in any season. Groups were largest and most likely to occur at dawn and dusk, and in open habitats, such as cropland. We discuss the implication of these results with respect to sociobiology and CWD transmission dynamics.

  16. Melatonin promotes superovulation in sika deer (Cervus nippon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Zhuo, Zhi-Yong; Shi, Wen-Qing; Tan, Dun-Xian; Gao, Chao; Tian, Xiu-Zhi; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Shi-En; Yun, Peng; Liu, Guo-Shi

    2014-07-08

    In this study, the effects of melatonin (MT) on superovulation and reproductive hormones (melatonin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and PRL) were investigated in female sika deer. Different doses (40 or 80 mg/animal) of melatonin were subcutaneously implanted into deer before the breeding season. Exogenous melatonin administration significantly elevated the serum FSH levels at the time of insemination compared with levels in control animals. During superovulation, the serum LH levels in donor sika deer reached their highest values (7.1±2.04 ng/mL) at the point of insemination, compared with the baseline levels (4.98±0.07 ng/mL) in control animals. This high level of LH was sustained until the day of embryo recovery. In contrast, the serum levels of PRL in the 80 mg of melatonin-treated group were significantly lower than those of control deer. The average number of corpora lutea in melatonin-treated deer was significantly higher than that of the control (p0.05), which may be related to the relatively small sample size. In addition, embryonic development in melatonin-treated groups was delayed.

  17. Large-scale model-based assessment of deer-vehicle collision risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothorn, Torsten; Brandl, Roland; Müller, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Ungulates, in particular the Central European roe deer Capreolus capreolus and the North American white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus, are economically and ecologically important. The two species are risk factors for deer-vehicle collisions and as browsers of palatable trees have implications for forest regeneration. However, no large-scale management systems for ungulates have been implemented, mainly because of the high efforts and costs associated with attempts to estimate population sizes of free-living ungulates living in a complex landscape. Attempts to directly estimate population sizes of deer are problematic owing to poor data quality and lack of spatial representation on larger scales. We used data on >74,000 deer-vehicle collisions observed in 2006 and 2009 in Bavaria, Germany, to model the local risk of deer-vehicle collisions and to investigate the relationship between deer-vehicle collisions and both environmental conditions and browsing intensities. An innovative modelling approach for the number of deer-vehicle collisions, which allows nonlinear environment-deer relationships and assessment of spatial heterogeneity, was the basis for estimating the local risk of collisions for specific road types on the scale of Bavarian municipalities. Based on this risk model, we propose a new "deer-vehicle collision index" for deer management. We show that the risk of deer-vehicle collisions is positively correlated to browsing intensity and to harvest numbers. Overall, our results demonstrate that the number of deer-vehicle collisions can be predicted with high precision on the scale of municipalities. In the densely populated and intensively used landscapes of Central Europe and North America, a model-based risk assessment for deer-vehicle collisions provides a cost-efficient instrument for deer management on the landscape scale. The measures derived from our model provide valuable information for planning road protection and defining hunting quota. Open

  18. Une relecture de l’événement : La chute du Royaume arabe de Damas en 1920

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-David Mizrahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La chute du “royaume arabe” de Damas, en juillet 1920, s’inscrit dans une trame événementielle particulièrement serrée, mais dorénavant bien éclairée. L’objet de cet article est de tenter une interprétation de cet événement en privilégiant au contraire les forces profondes à l’œuvre dans la “longue durée”. Dans cette optique, on a d’abord cherché à décoder les mutations de la scène politique syrienne du moment à la lumière des transformations économiques et sociales ayant affecté le Bilâd al-Shâm au cours d’un long xixe siècle ottoman, avant de se projeter dans l’histoire intellectuelle et des représentations, et de voir comment le modèle civilisateur du « Royaume arabe », hérité de l’Europe des Lumières, venait en définitive buter sur un courant radical et populiste du nationalisme arabe.

  19. La dama fantasma y el monstruo del lago: Narración, ciencia y creencias en actuaciones discursivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Inés Palleiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo, examino la dinámica entre ficción e historia, ciencia y creencia, en versiones de dos matrices folklóricas de distintas latitudes: la dama fantasma en sus distintos nombres —desde Rufina Cambacères a Frederike von Grotes y Matilde de Canossa— y el monstruo del lago, conocido como el Nahuelito, en una versión local del monstruo de Loch Ness. Trabajo con relatos registrados en contextos diversos y en soportes diferentes, que incluyen los circuitos mediáticos. Examino en ellos la articulación retórica del mensaje, cuyo contenido semántico se relaciona con creencias colectivas, entendidas como enunciados cuyo valor de verdad depende de un acuerdo intersubjetivo. Analizo la dinámica entre el saber experto de las ciencias y la narrativa de creencias, que intenta dar una respuesta totalizadora a problemas tales como la finitud de la vida o el temor a lo desconocido, para los cuales la ciencia canónica no brinda una respuesta satisfactoria.

  20. Maporal Hantavirus Causes Mild Pathology in Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Amanda; Miedema, Kaitlyn; Fauver, Joseph R.; Rico, Amber; Aboellail, Tawfik; Quackenbush, Sandra L.; Hawkinson, Ann; Schountz, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses can cause two human diseases with many pathological similarities: hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the western hemisphere and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in the eastern hemisphere. Each virus is hosted by specific reservoir species without conspicuous disease. HCPS-causing hantaviruses require animal biosafety level-4 (ABSL-4) containment, which substantially limits experimental research of interactions between the viruses and their reservoir hosts. Maporal virus (MAPV) is a South American hantavirus not known to cause disease in humans, thus it can be manipulated under ABSL-3 conditions. The aim of this study was to develop an ABSL-3 hantavirus infection model using the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), the natural reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), and a virus that is pathogenic in another animal model to examine immune response of a reservoir host species. Deer mice were inoculated with MAPV, and viral RNA was detected in several organs of all deer mice during the 56 day experiment. Infected animals generated both nucleocapsid-specific and neutralizing antibodies. Histopathological lesions were minimal to mild with the peak of the lesions detected at 7–14 days postinfection, mainly in the lungs, heart, and liver. Low to modest levels of cytokine gene expression were detected in spleens and lungs of infected deer mice, and deer mouse primary pulmonary cells generated with endothelial cell growth factors were susceptible to MAPV with viral RNA accumulating in the cellular fraction compared to infected Vero cells. Most features resembled that of SNV infection of deer mice, suggesting this model may be an ABSL-3 surrogate for studying the host response of a New World hantavirus reservoir. PMID:27763552

  1. Maporal Hantavirus Causes Mild Pathology in Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda McGuire

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rodent-borne hantaviruses can cause two human diseases with many pathological similarities: hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in the western hemisphere and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in the eastern hemisphere. Each virus is hosted by specific reservoir species without conspicuous disease. HCPS-causing hantaviruses require animal biosafety level-4 (ABSL-4 containment, which substantially limits experimental research of interactions between the viruses and their reservoir hosts. Maporal virus (MAPV is a South American hantavirus not known to cause disease in humans, thus it can be manipulated under ABSL-3 conditions. The aim of this study was to develop an ABSL-3 hantavirus infection model using the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus, the natural reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus (SNV, and a virus that is pathogenic in another animal model to examine immune response of a reservoir host species. Deer mice were inoculated with MAPV, and viral RNA was detected in several organs of all deer mice during the 56 day experiment. Infected animals generated both nucleocapsid-specific and neutralizing antibodies. Histopathological lesions were minimal to mild with the peak of the lesions detected at 7–14 days postinfection, mainly in the lungs, heart, and liver. Low to modest levels of cytokine gene expression were detected in spleens and lungs of infected deer mice, and deer mouse primary pulmonary cells generated with endothelial cell growth factors were susceptible to MAPV with viral RNA accumulating in the cellular fraction compared to infected Vero cells. Most features resembled that of SNV infection of deer mice, suggesting this model may be an ABSL-3 surrogate for studying the host response of a New World hantavirus reservoir.

  2. Reindeer warble fly larvae found in red deer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nilssen

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available Seven third instar larvae of the reindeer warble fly (Hypoderma (=Oedemagena tarandi were found in a 2-3 year old male red deer {Cervus elaphus shot on 14 November 1985 at Todalen, western Norway. This it, the first report of H. tarandi from red deer. In reindeer third instar larvae are found from February to June, and the unusual date of this record indicates a delayed development of the larvae due to abnormal host reactions. Warble fly larvae, probably H. tarandi, are also reported from moose {Alces alces in northern Norway.

  3. First record in South Asia of deer throat bot fly larvae Pharyngomyia picta (Meigen, 1824) (Diptera: Oesteridae) from Sambar deer (Rusa unicolor), a new host record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, Radhakrishnan; Ajithkumar, K G; Reghu, Ravindran; Kavitha, Rajagopal

    2012-06-01

    The Bot fly larvae, identified to be the third instars of the deer throat bot fly Pharyngomyia picta were recovered from the lumen of trachea and secondary bronchi during the necropsy of a female sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) in Kerala, India. This forms the first report of P. picta from India and the whole of South Asia. Sambar deer is a new host record for the larvae of this fly. Morphological description of the third stage larvae with supporting figures are presented.

  4. Hepatitis E virus antibody prevalence in wildlife in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larska, M; Krzysiak, M K; Jabłoński, A; Kęsik, J; Bednarski, M; Rola, J

    2015-03-01

    Hepatitis E is an important public health problem mostly in developing but occasionally also in industrialized countries. Domestic and wildlife animals are considered reservoirs of the hepatitis E virus (HEV). Since no information on the prevalence of autochthonous HEV infections in human and animal in Poland is available, the aim of the study was to investigate the HEV seroprevalence of different wildlife species as potential virus reservoirs in the country. No HEV antibodies were found in any of the sera collected from the red deer (Cervus elaphus), European bison (Bison bonasus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), elk (Alces alces), fallow deer (Dama dama), sika deer (Cervus nippon), Tatra chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra tatrica) or brown bear (Ursus arctos). HEV-specific antibodies were detected in 44.4% (95% CI 38.3-50.7) serum samples originated only from wild boars. The percentage of seropositive wild boars differed significantly between the provinces and was positively correlated with the wild boar density and rurality of the area. This study showed that HEV circulates among wild boar population in Poland, and this species should be considered as an important reservoir of the virus.

  5. Increase in soil stable carbon isotope ratio relates to loss of organic carbon: results from five long-term bare fallow experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menichetti, Lorenzo; Houot, Sabine; van Oort, Folkert

    2015-01-01

    and covering a latitudinal range of 11°. The bare fallow soils lost 33–65 % of their initial SOC content and showed a mean annual δ13C increase of 0.008–0.024 ‰. The 13C enrichment could be related empirically to SOC losses by a Rayleigh distillation equation. A more complex mechanistic relationship was also...

  6. Earthworm surface casting activity on slash-and-burn cropped land and in undisturbed Chromolaena odorata and young forest fallow in southern Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madong à Birang,; Hauser, S.; Brussaard, L.; Norgrove, L.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of slash-and-burn agriculture on earthworm surface cast deposition was assessed in 4-5 year old Chromolaena odorata (CHR) and young forest (YFOR). fallow (12-15 years) in the humid forest zone of southern Cameroon. In the villages Ngoungoumou (56.8% forest cover), Metet (39.5% forest cove

  7. Higher temperature sensitivity for stable than for labile soil organic carbon--evidence from incubations of long-term bare fallow soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Romain; Barré, Pierre; Moyano, Fernando E; Christensen, Bent T; Bardoux, Gérard; Eglin, Thomas; Girardin, Cyril; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; van Oort, Folkert; Chenu, Claire

    2014-02-01

    The impact of climate change on the stability of soil organic carbon (SOC) remains a major source of uncertainty in predicting future changes in atmospheric CO2 levels. One unsettled issue is whether the mineralization response to temperature depends on SOC mineralization rate. Long-term (>25 years) bare fallow experiments (LTBF) in which the soil is kept free of any vegetation and organic inputs, and their associated archives of soil samples represent a unique research platform to examine this issue as with increasing duration of fallow, the lability of remaining total SOC decreases. We retrieved soils from LTBF experiments situated at Askov (Denmark), Grignon (France), Ultuna (Sweden), and Versailles (France) and sampled at the start of the experiments and after 25, 50, 52, and 79 years of bare fallow, respectively. Soils were incubated at 4, 12, 20, and 35 °C and the evolved CO2 monitored. The apparent activation energy (Ea) of SOC was then calculated for similar loss of CO2 at the different temperatures. The Ea was always higher for samples taken at the end of the bare-fallow period, implying a higher temperature sensitivity of stable C than of labile C. Our results provide strong evidence for a general relationship between temperature sensitivity and SOC stability upon which significant improvements in predictive models could be based.

  8. Inferring white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population dynamics from wildlife collisions in the City of Ottawa

    OpenAIRE

    Widenmaier, Kerri; Fahrig, Lenore

    2005-01-01

    Concerns associated with growing white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers in Ottawa, Ontario have motivated several studies related to the distribution and ecology of deer in the Ottawa-Carleton region. This project infers deer-population trends from deer-vehicle collisions in Ottawa, Ontario, and considers the influence of traffic volume on estimates of population dynamics from deer-vehicle collision data. Traffic volume and collision data for various road segments across suburban ...

  9. What do they eat? Using DNA barcoding to assess diet preferences of deer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløjgaard, Camilla; Ejrnæs, Rasmus

    landscapes open. However, in order to use this tool properly, we need to know more about what the animals eat compared to what is available in different habitats and how access to supplementary fodder influences the grazing effect on the vegetation. Using DNA barcoding of feces, we are investigating the diet...... preferences of deer (red deer and roe deer) in Klelund Deer Park in Denmark. Over one year, we collect feces samples every month from different habitat types (e.g., heath, marsh, meadow, open forests and coniferous plantation) within the park. DNA barcoding can not only tell us which plants are consumed...... but also in which proportions. We intend to uncover the variation in deer diet over a year and among different habitats and how supplementary fodder influences the diet preference. The results will contribute to a better understanding of deer management as well as how deer grazing can be used as a tool...

  10. [Change characteristics of soil moisture and nutrients in rain-fed winter wheat field under different fertilization modes in Southern Shanxi of China during summer fallow period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting-Liang; Xie, Ying-He; Hong, Jian-Ping; Feng, Qian; Sun, Cheng-Hong; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2013-06-01

    In 2009-2011, a field experiment was conducted in a rain-fed winter wheat field in Southern Shanxi of China to study the effects of different fertilization modes on the change characteristics of soil moisture and nitrate-N contents in 0-200 cm layer and of soil available phosphorus (Oslen-P) and potassium contents in 0-40 cm layer during summer fallow period (from June to September). Three fertilization modes were installed, i. e., conventional fertilization (CF), recommended fertilization (RF), and ridge film furrow planting (RFFP) combined with straw mulch. The results showed that the rainfall in summer fallow period could complement the consumed water in 0-200 cm soil layer in dryland wheat field throughout the growth season, and more than 94% of the water storage was in 0-140 cm soil layer, with the fallow efficiency ranged from 6% to 27%. The rainfall in summer fallow period caused the soil nitrate-N moving downward. 357-400 mm rainfall could make the soil nitrate-N leaching down to 100 cm soil layer, with the peak in 20-40 cm soil layer. Straw mulching or plastic film with straw mulch in summer fallow period could effectively increase the Oslen-P and available K contents in 0-40 cm soil layer, and the accumulative increment in three summer fallow periods was 16-45% and 36-49%, respectively. Among the three modes, the binary coverage mode of RFFP plus furrow straw mulching had the best effect in maintaining soil water and fertility. The accumulative water storage and mineral N in 0-200 cm soil layer in three summer fallow periods were up to 215 mm and 90 kg x hm(-2), and the accumulative Oslen-P and available K contents in plough layer were increased by 2.7 mg x kg(-1) and 83 mg x kg(-1), respectively, being significantly higher than those in treatments CF and RF. There were no significant differences in the change characteristics in the soil moisture and nutrients between treatments CF and RF.

  11. 75 FR 43915 - Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... purchasing power on the volatile open electric market. The Action Alternative at White Site 1 would be... Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station AGENCY: Rural Utilities... CFR Part 1794), and the Western Area Power Administration's (Western) NEPA implementing regulations...

  12. Abiotic factors influencing deer browsing in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler A. Campbell; Benjamin R. Laseter; W. Mark Ford; Richard H. Odom; Karl V. Miller

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison of woody browse availability and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) use among clearcut interiors, skidder trail edges, and mature forest and an evaluation of the relative importance of aboitic factors in predicting browsing pressure within regenerating clearcuts in the central Appalachians of West Virginia. We sampled...

  13. Roe deer sera used for TBE surveillance in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, Georg Gerhard; Wetscher, Monika; Baumgartner, Raphaela; Walder, Gernot

    2015-06-01

    A large majority of Austrian citizens are aware of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), consequently reflected by a high vaccination rate of 85%. In return, risk assessment and disease mapping on human cases might be hampered due to high and inhomogeneous vaccination rates and travel habitats of humans. The roe deer was used to obtain a starting point for the integral view on the actual risk of TBE in Austria. The roe deer exhibits several attributes which makes it suitable as an indicator species: the roe deer has a restricted home range and it is known to be a heavy tick carrier. Furthermore it sero-converts after infection with TBE, but no outbreak occurs. Sera from 945 roe deer were obtained from all over Austria and screened with IFAT for the antibodies against TBE. Twenty-two positive samples, 2.4%, and 17 samples at the borderline titre of 1:16 were identified. The majority of the positive samples, 70.6%, were located in known TBE areas based on human cases. Further research is needed to confirm or reject new endemic foci of TBE transmission.

  14. Pathogen specific biomarkers for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective - To develop a noninvasive biomarker based Mycobacterium bovis specific detection system to track infection in domestic and wild animals. Design – Experimental longitudinal study for discovery and cross sectional design for validation Animals - Yearling white-tailed deer fawns (n=8) were ...

  15. Enterocytozoon bieneusi, giardia, and Cryptosporidium infecting white-tailed deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Monica; Fayer, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Despite a white-tailed deer (WTD) population in the United States of approximately 32 million animals extremely little is known of the prevalence and species of the protists that infect these animals. This study was undertaken to determine the presence of potential human protist pathogens in culled WTD in central Maryland. Feces from fawns to adults were examined by molecular methods. The prevalence of Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia was determined by PCR. All PCR-positive specimens were sequenced to determine the species and genotype(s). Of specimens from 80 WTD, 26 (32.5%) contained 17 genotypes of E. bieneusi. Four genotypes were previously reported (I, J, WL4, LW1) and 13 novel genotypes were identified and named DeerEb1-DeerEb13. Genotypes I, J, and LW1 are known to infect humans. Ten (12.5%) specimens contained the Cryptosporidium deer genotype, and one (1.25%) contained Giardia duodenalis Assemblage A. The identification zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblage A as well as four E. bieneusi genotypes previously identified in humans suggest that WTD could play a role in the transmission of those parasites to humans.

  16. Landscape development and mule deer habitat in Central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    James A. Duncan; Theresa Burcsu

    2012-01-01

    This research explored the ecological consequences of rural residential development and different management regimes on a tract of former industrial timberland in central Oregon known as the Bull Springs. Forage quality and habitat suitability models for mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) winter range were joined to the outputs of a spatially explicit...

  17. Sismos, causas y efectos: recuento de los daños del Sismo de Damas, 20 de noviembre del 2004, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez Herrera, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    El artículo contiene información concerniente al origen de los sismos y las principales características que presentó el Sismo de Damas del año 2004. También hace una descripción de los diferentes tipos de daños que se presentaron y el impacto que tuvo en algunas comunidades aledañas al epicentro. Por último, expone los efectos secundarios percibidos, un año después y sus consecuencias, a raíz de las fuertes precipitaciones que provocaron deslizamientos en laderas inestables por el sismo T...

  18. VisionDraughts - um sistema de aprendizagem de jogos de damas baseado em redes neurais, diferenças temporais, algoritmos eficientes de busca em árvores e informações perfeitas contidas em bases de dados

    OpenAIRE

    Caexêta, Gutierrez Soares

    2008-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho é propor um sistema de aprendizagem de damas, Vision-Draughts, baseado nos trabalhos de Neto e Julia (LS-Draughts) e de Mark Lynch (NeuroDraughts). O NeuroDraughts é um bom jogador automático de damas que utiliza a técnica de aprendizagem por diferenças temporais para ajustar os pesos de uma rede neural artificial multi-camadas cujo papel é estimar o quanto um estado do tabuleiro do jogo, representado em sua camada de entrada através do mapeamento NET-FEA...

  19. Pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus courtship and mating behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Piñeyrúa Jéssica T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pampas deer, Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Linnaeus 1758, is a South American grazing deer categorized as "near threatened". However, knowledge about pampas deer behavior including courtship and mating is scarce and incomplete. The aim of this study was to characterize the courtship and mating behavior of the pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus, an endangered species from South America. Methods We performed focal observations of 5 males allocated at the Estación de Cría de Fauna Autóctona Cerro Pan de Azúcar, Uruguay, 4 times a day from 5 to 20 minutes each time on a daily basis from February to May. During that period we recorded all courtship and mating behaviors, as well as quantified the frequency of the specific behaviors shown. As mating were rarely observed, we recorded that behavior when it was observed in the context of other studies performed in the same population during the following 2 years. Results During the observation period we recorded 928 courtships and 5 mating periods. In addition, we recorded 10 more matings performed during other studies, totaling 15. The duration of each mating calculated from the 15 recordings was 3.9 ± 0.4 s, and the total period of female receptivity (from first to last mating acceptance was 8.2 ± 1.1 min. Main observed courtship behaviors in males were “chase” and “ostentation”, while the most observed close to mating were “chinning”, “raised head” and “anogenital sniffing”. The most observed behaviors in females during the mating period were “vulva exhibition” and “move away”. Conclusion This is the first detailed report in pampas deer mating behavior. Estrus lasted only 8 min accepting only 3 short copulations per estrus. However, female behavior during courtship can be characterized as highly proceptive.

  20. Evaluating a strategy to deliver vaccine to white-tailed deer at a landscape level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Justin W.; Blass, Chad R.; Walter, William D.; Anderson, Charles W.; Lavelle, Michael J.; Hall, Wayne H.; VerCauterren, Kurt C.

    2016-01-01

    Effective delivery of vaccines and other pharmaceuticals to wildlife populations is needed when zoonotic diseases pose a risk to public health and natural resources or have considerable economic consequences. The objective of our study was to develop a bait-distribution strategy for potential delivery of oral bovine tuberculosis (bTB) vaccine to white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) where deer are reservoirs for the disease. During 17 February and 2 March 2011, we created a grid of experimental bait stations (n = 64) on Sandhill Wildlife Management Area, Wisconsin, USA, to assess station densities needed to attract and deliver placebo baits to free-ranging white-tailed deer and look for associations among deer density, number of bait stations per deer, and bait consumption. We placed 1 L of commercially available alfalfa cubes at bait stations 652 m apart, and monitored stations with motion-activated cameras for 5 days to document visitation and consumption by deer and nontarget species. Deer discovered 38% of all bait stations within 37 hr, on average (SE = 3.91 hr), and consumed variable amounts of bait at each station. Deer were documented in 94% of all photographs of wildlife at bait stations. We found no correlation between bait consumption and deer density or the number of bait stations per deer. We provide the first information on use of baits by free-ranging deer and nontarget wildlife to eventually vaccinate deer against bTB at a landscape level. The results of this study can further the development of strategies in delivery of pharmaceuticals to free-ranging white-tailed deer.

  1. Genetic diversity among Chinese sika deer (Cervus nippon) populations and relationships between Chinese and Japanese sika deer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sika deer (Cervus nippon) is a cervid endemic to mainland and insular Asia and endangered. We analyzed variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region for four subspecies to understand the genetic diversity, population structure and evolutionary history in China. 335 bp were sequenced and eight haplotypes were identified based on 25 variable sites among the populations. Sika deer in China showed lower genetic diversity, suggesting a small effective population size due to habitat fragmentation, a low number of founder individuals, or the narrow breeding program. AMOVA analysis indicated that there was significant genetic subdivision among the four populations, but no correlation between the genetic and geographic distance. Phylogenetic analyses also revealed that Chinese sika deer may be divided into three genetic clades, but the genetic structure among Chinese populations was inconsistent with subspecies designations and present geographic distribution. Including the sequence data of Japanese sika deer, the results indicated that Chinese populations were more closely related to Southern Japanese populations than to the Northern Japanese one, and the Taiwan population was closer to populations of Northeastern China and Sichuan than to those of Southern China.

  2. Weak population structure in European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus and evidence of introgressive hybridization with Siberian roe deer (C. pygargus in northeastern Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita Olano-Marin

    Full Text Available We investigated contemporary and historical influences on the pattern of genetic diversity of European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus. The study was conducted in northeastern Poland, a zone where vast areas of primeval forests are conserved and where the European roe deer was never driven to extinction. A total of 319 unique samples collected in three sampling areas were genotyped at 16 microsatellites and one fragment (610 bp of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region. Genetic diversity was high, and a low degree of genetic differentiation among sampling areas was observed with both microsatellites and mtDNA. No evidence of genetic differentiation between roe deer inhabiting open fields and forested areas was found, indicating that the ability of the species to exploit these contrasting environments might be the result of its phenotypic plasticity. Half of the studied individuals carried an mtDNA haplotype that did not belong to C. capreolus, but to a related species that does not occur naturally in the area, the Siberian roe deer (C. pygargus. No differentiation between individuals with Siberian and European mtDNA haplotypes was detected at microsatellite loci. Introgression of mtDNA of Siberian roe deer into the genome of European roe deer has recently been detected in eastern Europe. Such introgression might be caused by human-mediated translocations of Siberian roe deer within the range of European roe deer or by natural hybridization between these species in the past.

  3. EFFECT OF FALLOW LAND, CULTIVATED PASTURE AND ABANDONED PASTURE ON SOIL FERTILITY IN TWO DEFORESTED AMAZONIAN REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A DIEZ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of two practices adopted by settlers (abandoned pasture and fallow land on soil fertility of two deforested Amazonian regions (Belém-Pará and Ariquemes-Rondônia was studied. Whenever possible, cultivated pasture, over similar time periods in both cases and in natural forest, were employed as soil fertility reference standards. Nutrient dynamics was studied using the electroultra-filtration technique. In general, deforestation, as practiced in these areas, has a degrading effect on soil fertility. The effect of burning normally leads to a pH rise caused by ash. This usually yields a favorable transitory effect, improving soil fertility conditions, however not sufficient for plant needs, as inferred from the low P and K levels. Cattle excrements, improved the K level for cultivated pastures. Qualitative differences related to N were observed between cultivated pasture and both, fallow land or abandoned pasture. In the first, a certain recovery of available N levels was detected, mainly affecting the EUF-Norg fraction. On the other hand, a regeneration of organic compounds, in the fallow land and the abandoned pasture, closely related to those existing in the natural forest, was verified. This is mainly due to the presence of a higher proportion of NO3-_N and, consequently, a EUF-Norg/EUF-NO3- ratio close to 1.Comparou-se o efeito de duas práticas de manejo, ou seja, o abandono da pastagem e o pousio, sobre a fertilidade do solo de duas regiões desmatadas da Amazônia (Belém-Pará e Ariquemes-Rondônia. Quando possível, pastagens cultivadas por períodos semelhantes e florestas nativas foram usadas como padrões da fertilidade do solo. A dinâmica dos nutrientes foi estuda pela técnica da eletroultrafiltração (EUF. De um modo geral, o desmatamento, como praticado nessas regiões, tem efeito degradador sobre a fertilidade do solo. A queima da biomassa vegetal normalmente leva a um aumento do pH causado pelas cinzas, resultando

  4. Sismos, causas y efectos: recuento de los daños del Sismo de Damas, 20 de noviembre del 2004, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Méndez Herrera, Joanna

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El artículo contiene información concerniente al origen de los sismos y las principales características que presentó el Sismo de Damas del año 2004. También hace una descripción de los diferentes tipos de daños que se presentaron y el impacto que tuvo en algunas comunidades aledañas al epicentro. Por último, expone los efectos secundarios percibidos, un año después y sus consecuencias, a raíz de las fuertes precipitaciones que provocaron deslizamientos en laderas inestables por el sismo The article includes information related to the origin of seisms and the main characteristics of the Damas earthquake, 2004. It also describes the different types of damages presented and the impact in some of the communities close to the epicenter. Lastly, it exposes the secondary effect perceived a year later and its consequences due to the strong precipitations that caused landslides in unstable hillsides after the earthquake

  5. Effects of habitat age and plant species on predatory mites (Acari, Mesostigmata) in grassy arable fallows in Eastern Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissuwa, Janet; Salamon, Jörg-Alfred; Frank, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Density, diversity and assemblage structure of Mesostigmata (cohorts Gamasina and Uropodina) were investigated in nine grassy arable fallows according to a factorial design with age class (2-3, 6-8, 12-15 years) and plant species (legume: Medicago sativa, herb: Taraxacum officinale, grass: Bromus sterilis) as factors. The response of Mesostigmata to habitat age and plant species was explored because this group belongs to the dominant acarine predators playing a crucial role in soil food webs and being important as biological control agents. To our knowledge, this combination of factors has never been studied before for Mesostigmata. A further rarely applied aspect of the present study is the micro-scale approach investigating the Mesostigmata assemblage of the soil associated with single plants. Four plots were randomly chosen at each fallow in May 2008. At each plot plant roots and the adjacent soil of five randomly selected plant individuals per plant species were dug out with steel cylinders for heat extraction of soil fauna and measurement of environmental parameters. In total, 83 mite taxa were identified, with 50 taxa being new to Austria. GLM analysis revealed a significant effect of plant species on mite density, with significantly more mites in B. sterilis than in T. officinale samples, and M. sativa samples being intermediate. This was in contrast to the assumption that the mite density is highest in M. sativa samples due to the propagation of plant quality effects to higher trophic levels. These results were probably caused by a higher amount of fine roots in grass samples leading to high densities of Collembola, which are preferred prey of predatory mites. Mite density did not significantly differ between the three age classes. A canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) showed that the mite assemblage exhibited a weak yet significant separation between plant species, and a highly significant separation between age classes. Accordingly

  6. Isolation and identification of a bovine viral diarrhea virus from sika deer in china

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Nan; Sun Changjiang; Wang Quankai; Du Rui; Wang Shijie; Gao Yugang; Zhang Pengju; Zhang Lianxue

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections continue to cause significantly losses in the deer population. Better isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer may contribute significantly to the development of prophylactic therapeutic, and diagnostic reagents as well as help in prevention and control of BVDV. However, isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer is seldom reported in literature. In this study, we collected some samples according to clinical...

  7. Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in shallow, recently recharged ground water -- Input data set for cropland/pasture/fallow (gwava-s_crpa)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the percent of cropland/pasture/fallow land cover in the conterminous United States. The data set was used as an input data layer for a...

  8. Survival and movement of the Congo forest mouse (Deomys ferrugineus): a comparison of primary rainforest and fallow land in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennis, John; Laurent, Crespin; Amundala, Nicaise Drazo

    2012-01-01

    of habitat on rodent life history both in primary rainforest and fallow land. Survival analyses taking into account trap-happiness effects were conducted using the program MARK. Abundance of D. ferrugineus was generally low within all our study grids, but it was lowest in fallow land compared to primary...... rainforest. Numbers of reproductively active females captured were not different between habitats but were larger during the rainy seasons. Daily movements of females, but not of males, were smaller in fallow land. Capture-mark-recapture analyses showed recapture probabilities to vary highly between grids...... and years. Survival probability in the primary forest was higher than in fallow land with a difference of 0.084 over a period of four weeks. This is possibly linked to the more abundant presence of the main food source (insects and termites); however other explanations are discussed in the text....

  9. Mapping rice-fallow cropland areas for short-season grain legumes intensification in South Asia using MODIS 250 m time-series data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumma, Murali Krishna; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Teluguntla, Pardhasaradhi G.; Rao, Mahesh N.; Mohammed, Irshad A.; Whitbread, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to map rainfed and irrigated rice-fallow cropland areas across South Asia, using MODIS 250 m time-series data and identify where the farming system may be intensified by the inclusion of a short-season crop during the fallow period. Rice-fallow cropland areas are those areas where rice is grown during the kharif growing season (June–October), followed by a fallow during the rabi season (November–February). These cropland areas are not suitable for growing rabi-season rice due to their high water needs, but are suitable for a short -season (≤3 months), low water-consuming grain legumes such as chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), black gram, green gram, and lentils. Intensification (double-cropping) in this manner can improve smallholder farmer’s incomes and soil health via rich nitrogen-fixation legume crops as well as address food security challenges of ballooning populations without having to expand croplands. Several grain legumes, primarily chickpea, are increasingly grown across Asia as a source of income for smallholder farmers and at the same time providing rich and cheap source of protein that can improve the nutritional quality of diets in the region. The suitability of rainfed and irrigated rice-fallow croplands for grain legume cultivation across South Asia were defined by these identifiers: (a) rice crop is grown during the primary (kharif) crop growing season or during the north-west monsoon season (June–October); (b) same croplands are left fallow during the second (rabi) season or during the south-east monsoon season (November–February); and (c) ability to support low water-consuming, short-growing season (≤3 months) grain legumes (chickpea, black gram, green gram, and lentils) during rabi season. Existing irrigated or rainfed crops such as rice or wheat that were grown during kharif were not considered suitable for growing during the rabi season, because the moisture/water demand of these crops is too high. The

  10. Experiments on the ectoparasitic deer ked that often attacks humans; preferences for body parts, colour and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortet, R; Härkönen, L; Hokkanen, P; Härkönen, S; Kaitala, A; Kaunisto, S; Laaksonen, S; Kekäläinen, J; Ylönen, H

    2010-06-01

    The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) can fail in its host search. Host search fails when an individual deer ked irreversibly accepts a host unsuitable for its reproduction (e.g. a human) and drops its wings. In northern Europe, the main host of the deer ked is the moose (Alces alces). The deer ked is increasingly causing serious problems for humans (for example, causing deer ked dermatitis) and is considered a threat for the recreational use of forests. The adult deer ked flies in early and mid-autumn to search for a host. Our aims were: (i) to study whether there are ways to avoid deer ked attacks by wearing particular clothing, and (ii) to evaluate deer ked host choice. Using human targets, we explored the cues the deer ked uses for host selection. We studied which part of the host body deer keds target and if body colour and temperature affect their choice. In our experiments, deer keds landed more on dark and red clothing than on white clothing. Moreover, deer keds mostly attacked the upper body parts and preferred the back side of the body over the front side. Finally, deer keds preferred the warmest areas of the host.

  11. Behavioral patterns of captive alpine musk deer: sex-specific behavior comparisons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin LU; Peishi YAN; Xiuxiang MENG; Jinchao FENG; Hongfa XU; Qisen YANG; Zuojian FENG

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document the behavior of captive alpine musk deer and to determine if daily behavior patterns varied between females and males. From August 2002 to January 2003, focal sampling was used to observe 32 adult captive alpine musk deer (13 female and 19 male) at Xinglongshan Musk Deer Farm (XMDF), Xinglongshan National Nature Reserve, Gansu Province. Results indicated similar behavior patterns for males and females, with only two out of 12 recorded behaviors showing significant sex differences. In comparison to females, males rested for a longer duration and exhibited tail pasting more frequently. This study also provided the first recording of tail pasting by female musk deer.

  12. Comparative Analysis of the Gut Microbiota Composition between Captive and Wild Forest Musk Deer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimeng Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The large and complex gut microbiota in animals has profound effects on feed utilization and metabolism. Currently, gastrointestinal diseases due to dysregulated gut microbiota are considered important factors that limit growth of the captive forest musk deer population. Compared with captive forest musk deer, wild forest musk deer have a wider feeding range with no dietary limitations, and their gut microbiota are in a relatively natural state. However, no reports have compared the gut microbiota between wild and captive forest musk deer. To gain insight into the composition of gut microbiota in forest musk deer under different food-source conditions, we employed high-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing technology to investigate differences in the gut microbiota occurring between captive and wild forest musk deer. Both captive and wild forest musk deer showed similar microbiota at the phylum level, which consisted mainly of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, although significant differences were found in their relative abundances between both groups. α-Diversity results showed that no significant differences occurred in the microbiota between both groups, while β-diversity results showed that significant differences did occur in their microbiota compositions. In summary, our results provide important information for improving feed preparation for captive forest musk deer and implementing projects where captive forest musk deer are released into the wild.

  13. An epidemiological survey of hepatitis E virus in Shika deer, Cervus nippon, in Nara Park, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    萩原, 克郎; 辻, 正義; 川渕, 貴子; 鳥居, 春己; 小林, 朋子; 浅川, 満彦; 石原, 智明

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) infections have been reported in deer as well as in domestic animals; however, the precise epidemiological information regarding HEV infections in the Shika Deer in Nara Park in Japan remains to be investigated. In this study, we examined the anti-HEV antibodies and HEV-RNA in sera from 173 of female sika deer in the park. The reactivity to HEV antigen in the serum samples were low levels. The detection of HEV-RNA in sera from the deer revealed no positive samples by R...

  14. N2O and CH4 emissions from a fallow-wheat rotation with low N input in conservation and conventional tillage under a Mediterranean agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez-Rio, Angela; García-Marco, Sonia; Navas, Mariela; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Tenorio, Jose Luis; Vallejo, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Conservation agriculture that includes no tillage (NT) or minimum tillage (MT) and crop rotation is an effective practice to increase soil organic matter in Mediterranean semiarid agrosystems. But the impact of these agricultural practices on greenhouse gases (GHGs), such as nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), is variable depending mainly on soil structure and short/long-term tillage. The main objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of three tillage systems (NT, MT and conventional tillage (CT)) and land-covers (fallow/wheat) on the emissions of N2O and CH4 in a low N input agricultural system during one year. This was achieved by measuring crop yields, soil mineral N and dissolved organic C contents, and fluxes of N2O and CH4. Total cumulative N2O emissions were not significantly different (P>0.05) among the tillage systems or between fallow and wheat. The only difference was produced in spring, when N2O emissions were significantly higher (Ptillage systems, in spite of the higher DOC content maintained in the topsoil of NT. This could be due to the similar denitrifier densities, targeted by nirK copy numbers at that time. Cumulative CH4 fluxes resulted in small net uptake for all treatments, and no significant differences were found among tillage systems or between fallow and wheat land-covers. These results suggest that under a coarse-textured soil in low N agricultural systems, the impact of tillage on GHG is very low and that the fallow cycle within a crop rotation is not a useful strategy to reduce GHG emissions.

  15. Effect of subsoiling in fallow period on soil water storage and grain protein accumulation of dryland wheat and its regulatory effect by nitrogen application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Sun

    Full Text Available To provide a new way to increase water storage and retention of dryland wheat, a field study was conducted at Wenxi experimental site of Shanxi Agricultural University. The effect of subsoiling in fallow period on soil water storage, accumulation of proline, and formation of grain protein after anthesis were determined. Our results showed that subsoiling in fallow period could increase water storage in the 0-300 cm soil at pre-sowing stage and at anthesis stage with low or medium N application, especially for the 60-160 cm soil. However, the proline content, glutamine synthetase (GS activity, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH activity in flag leaves and grains were all decreased by subsoiling in fallow period. In addition, the content of albumin, gliadin, and total protein in grains were also decreased while globulin content, Glu/Gli, protein yield, and glutelin content were increased. With N application increasing, water storage of soil layers from 20 to 200 cm was decreased at anthesis stage. High N application resulted in the increment of proline content and GS activity in grains. Besides, correlation analysis showed that soil storage in 40-160 cm soil was negatively correlated with proline content in grains; proline content in grains was positively correlated with GS and GDH activity in flag leaves. Contents of albumin, globulin and total protein in grains were positively correlated with proline content in grains and GDH activity in flag leaves. In conclusion, subsoiling in fallow period, together with N application at 150 kg·hm(-2, was beneficial to increase the protein yield and Glu/Gli in grains which improve the quality of wheat.

  16. Higher temperature sensitivity for stable than for labile soil organic carbon - Evidence from incubations of long-term bare fallow soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefèvre, Romain; Barré, Pierre; Moyano, Fernando E.

    2014-01-01

    soils from LTBF experiments situated at Askov (Denmark), Grignon (France), Ultuna (Sweden), and Versailles (France) and sampled at the start of the experiments and after 25, 50, 52, and 79 years of bare fallow, respectively. Soils were incubated at 4, 12, 20, and 35 °C and the evolved CO2 monitored...... for a general relationship between temperature sensitivity and SOC stability upon which significant improvements in predictive models could be based....

  17. Cutaneous fibroma in the roe deer (Capreolus capreolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kureljušić Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromas present very frequent skin neoplasms in different species of wild game of the family Cervidae. Viral etiology of skin neoplasms was proven in certain species of wild game from this family, with the most frequent diagnoses being: fibromas, ossifying fibromas, fibrosarcomas, multiple neurofibromatosis, fibropapillomas, and papillomas. The diagnozed tumor in the roe deer had the histological characteristics of a polimorphous fibroblast, which is not the case with domestic animals. This finding can be considered as a characteristic of fibromas in animals of the family Cervidae. Solitary fibroma or multiple fibroma (fibromatosis does not present a significant cause of deer deaths, but they cause concern among hunters who are in direct contact with them. Although fibromas do not lead to spoilage of game meat, they are esthetically repellent and people are reluctant to consume meat of such game.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A PROXIMAL MACHINE VISION SYSTEM FOR OFF-SEASON WEED MAPPING IN BROADACRE NO-TILLAGE FALLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Weeds are among the most significant and costly environmental threats in Australian agriculture. Weeds compete with crop plants for moisture, nutrients and sunlight and can have a detrimental impact on crop yields and quality if uncontrolled. The distribution, size, density and species of the weeds are often heterogeneous in the cropping land. Instead of uniformly spray the same type of herbicide to the whole farm land, selective spray can reduce the herbicide usage therefore can reduce the serious problems of herbicide resistance, soil damage and food safety. This study describes a weed mapping method which could be used for broadacre no-tillage fallow weed management. The weed maps have the potential to be used as powerful herbicide prescription maps for spot spray. The weed mapping is realized by the machine vision technologies which including image acquisition, image stitching and photomosaic processing. The sampling points are continuous and the interpolation methods are used at the minimum levels. The experiment result shows that this weed mapping method can map weed under limited conditions.

  19. Integrated carbon analysis of biomass production on fallow agricultural land and product substitution in Sweden - Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornburg, Veronika; Eggers, Thies; Gustavsson, Leif [Mid Sweden Univ., Oestersund (Sweden). Ecotechnology

    2006-07-15

    An important option in the Swedish context to reduce its net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is the increased use of biomass for energy and material substitution. On fallow agricultural land additional production of biomass would be possible. We analyse biomass production systems based on Norway spruce, hybrid poplar and willow hybrids and the use of this biomass to replace fossil energy and energy intensive material systems. The highest biomass production potential is for willow in southern Sweden. Fertilisation management of spruce could shorten the rotation lengths by about 17%. The fertilised production of Norway spruce with use of harvested timber for construction and use of remaining woody biomass for heat and power production gives the largest reductions of carbon emissions per hectare under the assumptions made. The use of willow for heat and power and of fertilised spruce for a wood product mix lead to the highest fossil primary energy savings in our scenarios. Spruce cultivations can achieve considerable carbon emission reductions in the long term, but willow and poplar might be a good option when fossil energy savings and carbon emission reductions should be achieved in the short term.

  20. Prevalence of leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis: a study of rodents and shrews in cultivated and fallow land, Morogoro rural district, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgode, Georgies F; Katakweba, Abdul S; Mhamphi, Ginethon G; Fwalo, Frank; Bahari, Mohamed; Mdangi, Mashaka; Kilonzo, Bukheti S; Mulungu, Loth S

    2014-07-01

    Leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis are among understudied zoonotic diseases that are also not diagnosed routinely in Tanzania. Humans get leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis through contact with an environment contaminated with Leptospira bacteria and Toxoplasma protozoa from reservoir hosts, which are rodents and cats, respectively. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Leptospira and Toxoplasma infections in rodents and shrews in Mikese area of Morogoro Rural District in eastern Tanzania. A total of 89 rodents and one shrew from cultivated and fallow land were tested for leptospirosis using six Leptospira serovars: Sokoine, Kenya, Canicola, Lora, Hebdomadis and Pomona. Toxoplasmosis was determined in 46 rodents brain smears. The prevalence of leptospirosis was 25.8%, and Leptospira serovar Sokoine was the most prevalent serovar (16.9%). Toxoplasma was detected in one rodent (2.17%) individual while three rodent individuals had Toxoplasma-like parasites hence were considered suspect positive. Findings suggest potential existence of human leptospirosis which needs to be further investigated. Public awareness of leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis should be promoted and their diagnosis considered in patients in health care facilities.

  1. A roe deer from the Pliocene of Hidalgo, central Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Jiménez-Hidalgo; Victor M. Bravo-Cuevas

    2015-01-01

    Mexican Pliocene cervids are very poorly known. We report on new fossil material of the roe deer Capreolus constantini recovered from the Pliocene Atotonilco El Grande Formation of Santa María Amajac, Hidalgo (central Mexico). The specimens were collected from a series of layers of friable to moderately indurated polymictic conglomerate supported by a sandstone-tuffaceous-calcareous matrix. This species was formerly known only from the late Pliocene of Udunga, Russia, thus implying a dispersa...

  2. Gestation length in red deer: genetically determined or environmentally controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, G W

    2007-01-01

    The red deer (Cervus elaphus) of European origin (e.g. subspecies scoticus, hispanicus, hippelaphus) is a medium sized (100-150kg mature hind weight) ruminant that exhibits highly seasonally patterns of autumn conceptions and summer births. Historic data indicate average (+/- s.d.) gestation length of 233-234 (+/- 2-4) days. Recently, however, there has been growing awareness that there is considerably greater variation in gestation length than earlier indicated and that there is a significant element of environmental, and possibly even social, control over the duration of pregnancy in this species. Imposition of variable levels of nutrition over late pregnancy of red deer hinds has been observed to influence fetal growth trajectory and gestation length, with no apparent effect on birth weight. This supports a hypothesis that under conditions of modest feed imbalance, variation in gestation length compensates for variation in fetal growth trajectory to ensure optimisation of birth weight. More recent studies on primiparous (24 month old) red deer hinds have identified surprisingly large variation in gestation length (193-263 days) compared with adult hinds (228-243 days), with earlier conceiving individuals within the primiparous cohort expressing significantly longer gestation than the later conceiving hinds, resulting in a higher level of calving synchrony than expected from known conception dates. This introduces an intriguing hypothesis of social indicative effects on parturition timing to promote within-cohort birth synchrony. Collectively, these data debunk the commonly held notion that gestation length of red deer is genetically fixed within strict limits. A review of the literature points to this as possibly a common phenomenon across a range of non-domesticated ruminant species but this conclusion is not supported by numerous conflicting studies on domestic sheep and cattle.

  3. 绿巨人——JOHN DEERE 9420T和8530

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    机械怪

    2010-01-01

    @@ 这次展示给大家的模型是ERTL金牌系列拖拉机模型--JOHN DEERE 9420T和8530.由于在现实世界中他们都是绿巨人似的大块头,所以ERTL公司以1:32的比例再现这两部JOHN DEERE公司的主力型号.

  4. Incidence of gasrointestinal helminthiasis in captive deers at Nagpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Borghare

    Full Text Available Out of 60 Samples of deer from Maharajbag Zoo, Nagpur, 30 were positive for eggs and larvae of helminthic parasites. The encountered parasitic species were Haemonchus spp., Dicrocoelium spp., Paramphistomum spp., Oesophagostomum spp. and Bunostomum spp. etc. Direct smear method together with sedimentation technique were used for the purpose. [Vet World 2009; 2(9.000: 337-338

  5. SOX9 duplication linked to intersex in deer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Kropatsch

    Full Text Available A complex network of genes determines sex in mammals. Here, we studied a European roe deer with an intersex phenotype that was consistent with a XY genotype with incomplete male-determination. Whole genome sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a triple dose of the SOX9 gene, allowing insights into a new genetic defect in a wild animal.

  6. Relationship of deer and moose populations to previous winters' snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L.D.; McRoberts, R.E.; Peterson, R.O.; Page, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    (1) Linear regression was used to relate snow accumulation during single and consecutive winters with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn:doe ratios, mosse (Alces alces) twinning rates and calf:cow ratios, and annual changes in deer and moose populations. Significant relationships were found between snow accumulation during individual winters and these dependent variables during the following year. However, the strongest relationships were between the dependent variables and the sums of the snow accumulations over the previous three winters. The percentage of the variability explained was 36 to 51. (2) Significant relationships were also found between winter vulnerability of moose calves and the sum of the snow accumulations in the current, and up to seven previous, winters, with about 49% of the variability explained. (3) No relationship was found between wolf numbers and the above dependent variables. (4) These relationships imply that winter influences on maternal nutrition can accumulate for several years and that this cumulative effect strongly determines fecundity and/or calf and fawn survivability. Although wolf (Canis lupus L.) predation is the main direct mortality agent on fawns and calves, wolf density itself appears to be secondary to winter weather in influencing the deer and moose populations.

  7. Predator evasion by white-tailed deer fawns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grovenburg, Troy W.; Monteith, Kevin L.; Klaver, Robert W.; Jenks, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite their importance for understanding predator–prey interactions, factors that affect predator evasion behaviours of offspring of large ungulates are poorly understood. Our objective was to characterize the influence of selection and availability of escape cover and maternal presence on predator evasion by white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, fawns in the northern Great Plains, U.S.A. We observed 45 coyote, Canis latrans, chases of fawns, and we participated in 83 human chases of fawns during 2007–2009, of which, 19 and 42 chases, respectively, ended with capture of the fawn. Evasive techniques used by fawns were similar for human and coyote chases. Likelihood of a white-tailed deer fawn escaping capture, however, was influenced by deer group size and a number of antipredator behaviours, including aggressive defence by females, initial habitat and selection of escape cover, all of which were modified by the presence of parturient females. At the initiation of a chase, fawns in grasslands were more likely to escape, whereas fawns in forested cover, cultivated land or wheat were more likely to be captured by a coyote or human. Fawns fleeing to wetlands and grasslands also were less likely to be captured compared with those choosing forested cover, wheat and cultivated land. Increased probability of capture was associated with greater distance to wetland and grassland habitats and decreased distance to wheat. Use of wetland habitat as a successful antipredator strategy highlights the need for a greater understanding of the importance of habitat complexity in predator avoidance.

  8. 77 FR 1720 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the White-Tailed Deer Management Plan, Rock Creek Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... capture and euthanasia of individual deer. Capture and euthanasia of individual deer would be an approach... numbers. The lethal actions would include both sharpshooting and capture/euthanasia and would be...

  9. 78 FR 46603 - Notice of Availability of a Draft White-Tailed Deer Management Plan, Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... add lethal deer management actions (sharpshooting with firearms or capture and euthanasia of... include the reduction of the deer herd through sharpshooting with firearms or capture and euthanasia and...

  10. Immune phenotype and body condition in roe deer: individuals with high body condition have different, not stronger immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Jégo, Maël; Bonenfant, Christophe; Gibert, Philippe; Rannou, Benoit; Klein, François; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    .... Roe deer living at Chizé, a forest with poor habitat quality, were expected to show lower values for body condition and immune parameters than roe deer at Trois Fontaines, a forest with high habitat quality...

  11. Immune Phenotype and Body Condition in Roe Deer: Individuals with High Body Condition Have Different, Not Stronger Immunity: e45576

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont; Maël Jégo; Christophe Bonenfant; Philippe Gibert; Benoit Rannou; François Klein; Jean-Michel Gaillard

    2012-01-01

    .... Roe deer living at Chizé, a forest with poor habitat quality, were expected to show lower values for body condition and immune parameters than roe deer at Trois Fontaines, a forest with high habitat quality...

  12. Mural folliculitis and alopecia caused by infection with goat-associated malignant catarrhal fever virus in two sika deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Timothy B; Li, Hong; Rosenburg, Stuart R; Norhausen, Robert W; Garner, Michael M

    2002-09-15

    Two sika deer from a zoo in Florida were examined because of chronic hair loss and skin lesions. No common causes of alopecia were identified in either deer. One deer was treated with prednisone, but the condition worsened when the dosage was decreased. Both deer were euthanatized after several months because of continued disease. The predominant histologic lesion in skin specimens was granulomatous mural folliculitis. Serologic testing and sequencing of fragments produced with a consensus polymerase chain reaction assay indicated that both deer were infected with caprine herpesvirus-2, a newly recognized member of the malignant catarrhal fever group of viruses. Disease in these deer was substantially different from that typically seen following infection with ovine herpesvirus-2, the sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever virus. Findings in these deer establish the pathogenicity of caprine herpesvirus-2 in sika deer and illustrate the ability of this group of complex herpesviruses to cause a wide variety of clinical abnormalities in diverse species.

  13. Agricultural Technology--A Real Industry-Education Partnership [and] John Deere Ag Tech in New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Paul J.; Ginsburg, Alan

    1995-01-01

    Bamford describes the partnership between John Deere and colleges in the United States and Canada to train technicians in the latest agricultural technology. Ginsburg discusses the John Deere Agricultural Technology program at State University of New York-Cobleskill. (JOW)

  14. Study regarding the quantitative evolution of the game animals populations from 66 Tolvadia, Forest Domain- Lunca Timisului, in 2008-2012 period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel Dronca

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Integration of the Romania in the E.U., is imposing a special attention to game populations. The aim of the present paper was to study the quantitative evolution of the hunting population for the 13 species during 2008-2012, on the hunting terrain 66 Tolvadia, from Forest Domain – Lunca Timişului, with a total surface of 12,557 ha. The study shows that form the 13 species monitored, 3 were not identified on this hunting terrain Red Deer (Cervus elaphus L., Fallow Deer (Dama dama L, European Pine Marten (Martes martes L.. For the other species identified the population evolution in number demonstrated that there is a god correlation between the number of individuals and its biogenic capacity. Also the study shows that a special attention to natural selection and the efficient use of artificial selection is needed, especially for the following 3 species: Roe Deer (Capreolus Capreolus L., Wild hog (Sus scrofa L. and Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus L..

  15. Health status and relative exposure of mule deer and white-tailed deer to soil contaminants at the rocky mountain arsenal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creekmore, T.E.; Whittaker, D.G.; Roy, R.R.; Franson, J.C.; Baker, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the health of 18 radio-collared deer [13 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and 5 white-tailed deer (O. virginianus)] from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, near Denver, Colorado, USA, a Superfund site contaminated with a variety of materials, including organochlorine pesticides, metals, and nerve gas production by-products. Radio-collared deer were tracked for 1 to 3 years (1989-1992) to identify relative exposure to contaminants based on telemetry locations plotted on grid maps depicting known soil contaminant concentrations. At the end of the study, all animals were in fair or good body condition at the time of necropsy. Mean ages of mule deer and white-tailed deer were 7.4 (range 4-12) and 10.6 years (range 5-17), respectively. At necropsy, tissues were collected from the deer for serology, histopathology, and analysis for eight chlorinated hydrocarbons and two metals. Detectable residues of mercury were found in the kidneys of 10 deer (range 0.055-0.096 ??g/g), dieldrin was found in fat (n = 9) (range 0.02-0.72 ??g/g), liver (n = 4) (range 0.017-0.12 ??g/g), and brain (n = 1, 0.018 ??g/g), and DDE was found in the muscle of one animal (0.02 ??g/g). Relative exposure estimates derived from telemetry and soil contamination data were correlated with tissue levels of dieldrin (p < 0.001) and mercury (p = 0.05). Two mule deer had severe testicular atrophy, and one of these animals also had antler deformities. The prevalence of antibodies against epizootic hemorrhagic disease serotype 2 was 85%.

  16. Large-scale model-based assessment of deer-vehicle collision risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hothorn

    Full Text Available Ungulates, in particular the Central European roe deer Capreolus capreolus and the North American white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus, are economically and ecologically important. The two species are risk factors for deer-vehicle collisions and as browsers of palatable trees have implications for forest regeneration. However, no large-scale management systems for ungulates have been implemented, mainly because of the high efforts and costs associated with attempts to estimate population sizes of free-living ungulates living in a complex landscape. Attempts to directly estimate population sizes of deer are problematic owing to poor data quality and lack of spatial representation on larger scales. We used data on >74,000 deer-vehicle collisions observed in 2006 and 2009 in Bavaria, Germany, to model the local risk of deer-vehicle collisions and to investigate the relationship between deer-vehicle collisions and both environmental conditions and browsing intensities. An innovative modelling approach for the number of deer-vehicle collisions, which allows nonlinear environment-deer relationships and assessment of spatial heterogeneity, was the basis for estimating the local risk of collisions for specific road types on the scale of Bavarian municipalities. Based on this risk model, we propose a new "deer-vehicle collision index" for deer management. We show that the risk of deer-vehicle collisions is positively correlated to browsing intensity and to harvest numbers. Overall, our results demonstrate that the number of deer-vehicle collisions can be predicted with high precision on the scale of municipalities. In the densely populated and intensively used landscapes of Central Europe and North America, a model-based risk assessment for deer-vehicle collisions provides a cost-efficient instrument for deer management on the landscape scale. The measures derived from our model provide valuable information for planning road protection and defining

  17. Chronic wasting disease in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Delwyn P; Barr, Daniel J; Bochsler, Philip N; Hall, S Mark; Gidlewski, Thomas; O'Rourke, Katherine I; Spraker, Terry R; Samuel, Michael D

    2008-09-01

    In September 2002, chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disorder of captive and wild cervids, was diagnosed in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from a captive farm in Wisconsin. The facility was subsequently quarantined, and in January 2006 the remaining 76 deer were depopulated. Sixty animals (79%) were found to be positive by immunohistochemical staining for the abnormal prion protein (PrP(CWD)) in at least one tissue; the prevalence of positive staining was high even in young deer. Although none of the deer displayed clinical signs suggestive of CWD at depopulation, 49 deer had considerable accumulation of the abnormal prion in the medulla at the level of the obex. Extraneural accumulation of the abnormal protein was observed in 59 deer, with accumulation in the retropharyngeal lymph node in 58 of 59 (98%), in the tonsil in 56 of 59 (95%), and in the rectal mucosal lymphoid tissue in 48 of 58 (83%). The retina was positive in 4 deer, all with marked accumulation of prion in the obex. One deer was considered positive for PrP(CWD) in the brain but not in the extraneural tissue, a novel observation in white-tailed deer. The infection rate in captive deer was 20-fold higher than in wild deer. Although weakly related to infection rates in extraneural tissues, prion genotype was strongly linked to progression of prion accumulation in the obex. Antemortem testing by biopsy of recto-anal mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (or other peripheral lymphoid tissue) may be a useful adjunct to tonsil biopsy for surveillance in captive herds at risk for CWD infection.

  18. Environmental Factors Influencing White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus Exposure to Livestock Pathogens in Wisconsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelli Dubay

    Full Text Available White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus are commonly exposed to disease agents that affect livestock but environmental factors that predispose deer to exposure are unknown for many pathogens. We trapped deer during winter months on two study areas (Northern Forest and Eastern Farmland in Wisconsin from 2010 to 2013. Deer were tested for exposure to six serovars of Leptospira interrogans (grippotyphosa, icterohaemorrhagiae, canicola, bratislava, pomona, and hardjo, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBR, and parainfluenza 3 virus (PI3. We used logistic regression to model potential intrinsic (e.g., age, sex and extrinsic (e.g., land type, study site, year, exposure to multiple pathogens variables we considered biologically meaningful to exposure of deer to livestock pathogens. Deer sampled in 2010-2011 did not demonstrate exposure to BVDV, so we did not test for BVDV in subsequent years. Deer had evidence of exposure to PI3 (24.7%, IBR (7.9%, Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona (11.7%, L. i. bratislava (1.0%, L. i. grippotyphosa (2.5% and L. i. hardjo (0.3%. Deer did not demonstrate exposure to L. interrogans serovars canicola and icterohaemorrhagiae. For PI3, we found that capture site and year influenced exposure. Fawns (n = 119 were not exposed to L. i. pomona, but land type was an important predictor of exposure to L. i. pomona for older deer. Our results serve as baseline exposure levels of Wisconsin white-tailed deer to livestock pathogens, and helped to identify important factors that explain deer exposure to livestock pathogens.

  19. Chronic wasting disease in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, D.P.; Barr, D.J.; Bochsler, P.N.; Hall, S.M.; Gidlewski, T.; O'Rourke, K. I.; Spraker, T.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    In September 2002, chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disorder of captive and wild cervids, was diagnosed in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from a captive farm in Wisconsin. The facility was subsequently quarantined, and in January 2006 the remaining 76 deer were depopulated. Sixty animals (79%) were found to be positive by immunohistochemical staining for the abnormal prion protein (PrPCWD) in at least one tissue; the prevalence of positive staining was high even in young deer. Although none of the deer displayed clinical signs suggestive of CWD at depopulation, 49 deer had considerable accumulation of the abnormal prion in the medulla at the level of the obex. Extraneural accumulation of the abnormal protein was observed in 59 deer, with accumulation in the retropharyngeal lymph node in 58 of 59 (98%), in the tonsil in 56 of 59 (95%), and in the rectal mucosal lymphoid tissue in 48 of 58 (83%). The retina was positive in 4 deer, all with marked accumulation of prion in the obex. One deer was considered positive for PrPCWD in the brain but not in the extraneural tissue, a novel observation in white-tailed deer. The infection rate in captive deer was 20-fold higher than in wild deer. Although weakly related to infection rates in extraneural tissues, prion genotype was strongly linked to progression of prion accumulation in the obex. Antemortem testing by biopsy of rectoanal mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (or other peripheral lymphoid tissue) may be a useful adjunct to tonsil biopsy for surveillance in captive herds at risk for CWD infection.

  20. Elk and deer studies related to the Basalt Waste Isolation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, L.E.; McCorquodale, S.M.; Sargeant, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    A study of elk (Cervus elaphus) and deer (Odocoileus hemionus) was conducted in the vicinity of planned site characterization activities for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). Both species are known to be sensitive to disturbance and are considered important species because they are recreationally and/or commercially valuable. The principal objectives of the study were to (1) estimate pre-activity (site characterization) recruitment of deer and elk, (2) characterize deer and elk use of limited habitats critical to their survival (e.g., riparian areas), (3) describe preferential habitat use by deer and elk during critical seasons (i.e., winter and summer), and (4) document pre-activity distributions of seasonal home range centers of deer and elk. Early termination of BWIP prevented some of the objectives from being fully addressed. Fifteen adult elk (11 females and 4 males) and 19 female deer equipped with radio transmitters were studied on the Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve from February through December 1987. More than 1800 relocations of the marked elk and deer were made during aerial and ground tracking sessions. Deer confined their activities to within 2 km of water sources. In contrast, elk used 6-12 times the average area used by deer. As with deer, female elk were closely associated with available water sources during the summer and fall, presumably because of the physiological demands of lactation. However, during the winter, female elk showed no preference for areas near water, as did male elk throughout the study. Riparian areas, which are scarce on the arid Hanford Site, are particularly valuable habitat to both elk and deer because they provide drinking water and succulent forage during the dry summer and early fall months.

  1. Drainage and tillage practices in the winter fallow season mitigate CH4 and N2O emissions from a double-rice field in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangbin; Yu, Haiyang; Fan, Xianfang; Yang, Yuting; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Traditional land management (no tillage, no drainage, NTND) during the winter fallow season results in substantial CH4 and N2O emissions from double-rice fields in China. A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of drainage and tillage during the winter fallow season on CH4 and N2O emissions and to develop mitigation options. The experiment had four treatments: NTND, NTD (drainage but no tillage), TND (tillage but no drainage), and TD (both drainage and tillage). The study was conducted from 2010 to 2014 in a Chinese double-rice field. During winter, total precipitation and mean daily temperature significantly affected CH4 emission. Compared to NTND, drainage and tillage decreased annual CH4 emissions in early- and late-rice seasons by 54 and 33 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Drainage and tillage increased N2O emissions in the winter fallow season but reduced it in early- and late-rice seasons, resulting in no annual change in N2O emission. Global warming potentials of CH4 and N2O emissions were decreased by 1.49 and 0.92 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1, respectively, and were reduced more by combining drainage with tillage, providing a mitigation potential of 1.96 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1. A low total C content and high C / N ratio in rice residues showed that tillage in the winter fallow season reduced CH4 and N2O emissions in both early- and late-rice seasons. Drainage and tillage significantly decreased the abundance of methanogens in paddy soil, and this may explain the decrease of CH4 emissions. Greenhouse gas intensity was significantly decreased by drainage and tillage separately, and the reduction was greater by combining drainage with tillage, resulting in a reduction of 0.17 t CO2 eq. t-1. The results indicate that drainage combined with tillage during the winter fallow season is an effective strategy for mitigating greenhouse gas releases from double-rice fields.

  2. Reproduction, growth, and tissue residues of deer fed dieldrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D.A.; Korschgen, L.J.

    1970-01-01

    Feeding tests were conducted from January, 1966, to January, 1969, to ascertain the effects of daily ingestions of sublethal amounts of dieldrin on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Groups of deer on 0 ppm dieldrin (controls), 5 ppm, and 25 ppm dieldrin were maintained at these respective levels, as were their progeny. Treated food was readily accepted. Dieldrin intoxication was not observed, and 9 of 10 animals of each group survived 3 years of treatment. No differences in conception or in utero mortality were found between groups. Fawns from dieldrin-fed does were smaller at birth and greater post-partum mortality occurred. Fertility of male progeny was not affected. Growth was slower and remained reduced in dieldrin-treated females which were immature when the study began. Hematologic values and serum protein concentrations were not significantly (P > 0.05) related to treatment. Liver/body weight ratios were significantly (P < 0.05) larger for the 25-ppm-dieldrin group. Pituitary glands were smaller and thyroids were larger in dieldrin-fed deer. Weight gains of fawns were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced 2 of 3 years in dieldrin-treated groups. Placental transfer of dieldrin occurred. Whole milk from does fed 25 ppm dieldrin contained residues of 17 ppm. Residue levels in brain, liver, and thigh muscle tissues showed no evidence of increasing with length of treatment, but showed definite relationships to levels of dieldrin in daily diets. Nursing fawns had higher residues in brain tissues than did older deer on 5 ppm a d 25 ppm dieldrin. Highest brain residues (12.60 and 12.10 ppm, wet weight) occurred in fawns only a few days of age at death. Equilibrium between ingestion and storage or excretion of dieldrin occurred prior to 200 days and continued until nearly 1,100 days. There was no evidence of a sharp decline in residues after a long period of continued dosage. Daily ingestion of 100 and 200 ppm of dieldrin proved fatal to yearling male deer at 27

  3. Genetic population structure and relatedness of Colorado mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and incidence of chronic wasting disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic wasting disease is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of farmed and free ranging mule deer, white tailed deer, Rocky Mountain elk, and moose in some areas of the United States. The disease is enzootic in herds of free ranging mule deer in the Rocky Mountain National ...

  4. Inhibition of protease-resistant prion protein formation in a transformed deer cell line infected with chronic wasting disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymond, G.J.; Olsen, E.A.; Lee, K.S.; Raymond, L.D.; Bryant, P.K.; Baron, G.S.; Caughey, W.S.; Kocisko, D.A.; McHolland, L.E.; Favara, C.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Mayer, R.T.; Miller, M.W.; Williams, E.S.; Caughey, B.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (prion disease) of North American cervids, i.e., mule deer, white-tailed deer, and elk (wapiti). To facilitate in vitro studies of CWD, we have developed a transformed deer cell line that is persistently infected wi

  5. Prevalence and genetic diversity of Bartonella species in sika deer (Cervus nippon) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shingo; Kabeya, Hidenori; Yamazaki, Mari; Takeno, Shinako; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Souma, Kousaku; Masuko, Takayoshi; Chomel, Bruno B; Maruyama, Soichi

    2012-12-01

    We report the first description of Bartonella prevalence and genetic diversity in 64 Honshu sika deer (Cervus nippon centralis) and 18 Yezo sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis) in Japan. Overall, Bartonella bacteremia prevalence was 41.5% (34/82). The prevalence in wild deer parasitized with ticks and deer keds was 61.8% (34/55), whereas no isolates were detected in captive deer (0/27) free of ectoparasites. The isolates belonged to 11 genogroups based on a combination of the gltA and rpoB gene sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences of the ftsZ, gltA, ribC, and rpoB genes of 11 representative isolates showed that Japanese sika deer harbor three Bartonella species, including B. capreoli and two novel Bartonella species. All Yezo deer's isolates were identical to B. capreoli B28980 strain isolated from an elk in the USA, based on the sequences of the ftsZ, gltA, and rpoB genes. In contrast, the isolates from Honshu deer showed a higher genetic diversity.

  6. Systemic adenovirus infection associated with high mortality in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Woods, L.W.; Swift, P.K.; Barr, B.C.; Nordhausen, R.W.; Stillian, M.H.; Patton, J.F.; Oliver, M.N.; Jones, K.R.; Maclachlan, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    Seventeen counties in northern California experienced epizootics of high mortality in the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) population during the latter half of 1993. Thirteen deer submitted to the California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System as part of this natural die-off had systemic

  7. 78 FR 44148 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Antietam, Monocacy, Manassas White-tailed Deer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Policy Act of 1969 and consistent with National Park Service law, regulations, and policies, and the... capture and euthanasia to reduce deer populations to the target density and maintain that level. Donation... through the use of sharpshooting with firearms, possible capture, and euthanasia to reduce deer...

  8. Anaplasma odocoilei sp. nov. (family Anaplasmataceae) from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Cynthia M; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Mead, Daniel G; Dugan, Vivien G; Luttrell, M Page; Sahora, Alexandra I; Munderloh, Ulrike G; Davidson, William R; Yabsley, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Recently, an undescribed Anaplasma sp. (also called Ehrlichia-like sp. or WTD agent) was isolated in ISE6 tick cells from captive white-tailed deer. The goal of the current study was to characterize this organism using a combination of experimental infection, morphologic, serologic, and molecular studies. Each of 6 experimentally inoculated white-tailed deer fawns (Odocoileus virginianus) became chronically infected (100+ days) with the Anaplasma sp. by inoculation of either infected whole blood or culture. None of the deer showed evidence of clinical disease, but 3 of the 6 deer evaluated had multiple episodes of transient thrombocytopenia. Light microscopy of Giemsa-stained, thin blood smears revealed tiny, dark, spherical structures in platelets of acutely infected deer. Anaplasma sp. was detected in platelets of inoculated deer by polymerase chain reaction, transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Five of 6 deer developed antibodies reactive to Anaplasma sp. antigen, as detected by indirect fluorescent antibody testing. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, groESL, and gltA sequences confirmed the Anaplasma sp. is related to A. platys. Two attempts to transmit the Anaplasma sp. between deer by feeding Amblyomma americanum, a suspected tick vector, were unsuccessful. Based on its biologic, antigenic, and genetic characteristics, this organism is considered a novel species of Anaplasma, and the name Anaplasma odocoilei sp. nov. is proposed with UMUM76(T) (=CSUR-A1) as the type strain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Natural coinfection of a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population with three Ehrlichia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, S E; Stallknecht, D E; Lockhart, J M; Dawson, J E; Davidson, W R

    1998-10-01

    The ticks Amblyomma americanum and Ixodes scapularis, strongly implicated vectors of Ehrlichia chaffeensis and the human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) agent, respectively, commonly are found on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). As deer can be infected with E. chaffeensis, the HGE agent, and another Ehrlichia-like organism, a deer population parasitized by both tick species in coastal Georgia was tested for evidence of Ehrlichia spp. infection using serologic, molecular, and culture techniques. Antibodies to both E. chaffeensis (geometric mean titer = 111) and Ehrlichia equi, surrogate antigen for the HGE agent, (geometric mean titer = 1,024) were detected by indirect fluorescent antibody testing. Nested polymerase chain reaction employing species-specific primers demonstrated sequence-confirmed 16S rDNA fragments of 3 distinct Ehrlichia spp. in this population: E. chaffeensis (1/5), the HGE agent (3/5), and an Ehrlichia-like organism previously described from white-tailed deer (5/5). Ehrlichia chaffeensis was isolated in culture from the inguinal lymph node of a single deer. An Ehrlichia-type morula was identified in a neutrophil of 1 deer on examination of blood smears. This work provides the first evidence of the HGE agent in a nonhuman host in the southeastern United States and documents infection with both E. chaffeensis and the HGE agent in a single deer population, thereby supporting the importance of white-tailed deer in the natural history of the human ehrlichioses agents.

  10. Behavioral ecology of sika deer in spring in semi-natural area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Behaviors of sika deer in spring were studied by scan sampling, ad libitum sampling, and all-occurrence recording methods during 1998. The results showed that behaviors of sika deer in spring can be classified by seven categories: grazing, ruminating, bedding, moving, standing, drinking, alert, agonistic and other behaviors. Various behavioral models were more regular. Grazing behavior was a kind of mainly behavioral model.

  11. The legacy of deer overabundance: long-term delays in herbaceous understory recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas H. Pendergast; Shane M. Hanlon; Zachary M. Long; Alex Royo; Walter P. Carson

    2016-01-01

    Decades of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann, 1780)) overpopulation have dramatically homogenized forests across much of the eastern United States, creating depauperate forest understory communities. The rate at which these communities recover once deer browsing has been reduced remains an open question. We evaluate overbrowsing...

  12. On the identity of Cervus nigricans Brooke, 1877, with remarks upon other deer from the Philippines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobroruka, L.J.

    1971-01-01

    A great number of papers deal with the deer of the Philippine Islands but in spite of this fact the taxonomy and the nomenclature are still not clear. The first author who recapitulated all known facts about the Philippine deer was Brooke (1877), who also described a new species, Cervus nigricans.

  13. Genetic structuring of Coues white-tailed deer in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy G. Lopez

    2006-01-01

    The manuscripts in this thesis examine different aspects of white-tailed deer. In the first manuscript I used microsatellite DNA markers in the form of multilocus genotype data and microsatellite allele frequencies to examine spatial patterns of genetic relatedness for Coues white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus couesi) in Arizona and New Mexico...

  14. First description of Onchocerca jakutensis (Nematoda: Filarioidea in red deer (Cervus elaphus in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Bosch

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-seven species of the genus Onchocerca (Nematoda; Filarioidea can cause a vector-borne parasitic disease called onchocercosis. Most Onchocerca species infect wild and domestic ungulates or the dog, and one species causes river blindness in humans mainly in tropical Africa. The European red deer (Cervus e. elaphus is host to four species, which are transmitted by blackflies (simuliids or biting midges (ceratopogonids. Two species, Onchocerca flexuosa and Onchocerca jakutensis, produce subcutaneous nodules, whereas Onchocerca skrjabini and Onchocerca garmsi live free in the hypodermal serous membranes. During the hunting season, September 2013, red deer (n = 25, roe deer (Capreolus c. capreolus, n = 6 and chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra, n = 7, all shot in the Grisons Region (Switzerland were investigated for the presence of subcutaneous nodules which were enzymatically digested, and the contained Onchocerca worms were identified to species by light and scanning electron microscopy as well as by PCR/sequencing. In addition, microfilariae from skin samples were collected and genetically characterized. Neither nodules nor microfilariae were discovered in the roe deer and chamois. Adult worms were found in 24% of red deer, and all of them were identified as O. jakutensis. Two morphologically different microfilariae were obtained from five red deer, and genetic analysis of a skin sample of one red deer indicated the presence of another Onchocerca species. This is the first report of O. jakutensis in Switzerland with a prevalence in red deer similar to that in neighbouring Germany.

  15. Egeria, la Dama Peregrina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascual, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años del siglo IV, cuando el imperio romano está a punto de derrumbarse, una mujer hispana de alta alcurnia se pone en camino para conocer y venerar los Santos Lugares, recién «descubiertos» por santa Helena. Atravesando la «Vía Domitia» llega a la capital de la pars orientis del Imperio, Constantinopla, continúa hasta Jerusalén, recorre parajes bíblicos, incluido el Sinai y algunos lugares de Mesopotamia. Va narrando cuanto ve, con deliciosa frescura, en unas cartas dirigidas a las amigas que quedaron en la patria. Su relato, copiado por algún monje en el siglo XI, fue hallado en 1884 en una biblioteca italiana. Tras una investigación prolongada, se pudo poner nombre y rostro a esta matrona piadosa. Egeria, la primera viajera-escritora española de que tengamos noticia.…

  16. THE DARK FACE OF ALEXANDRE HERCULANO: HISTORICAL VIEWS OF THE EVIL IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE SUPERNATURAL IN “A DAMA PÉ DE CABRA”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Márcia Alves Siqueira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Genre which evokes distinct interests in the history and in the literary cri­tic, the noir literature, as it is known the supernatural stories of the XIX century, presents various branches not yet explored. In Portugal, Alexan­dre Herculano consolidates himself as the precursor of historical novels, result of the harmony between his work collecting Portuguese historical sources and his romantic esthetic project. His works, however, reveal a dark side little studied, influenced by the French noir short stories, the English horror ballad, and the German macabre narratives. This work, therefore, proposes to investigate the processes of construction of dark atmosphere in short story “A Dama Pé de Cabra” as well as to investigate how the author conciliates the compression of medieval Evil in a romantic project. 

  17. Firewood yield and profitability of a traditional Daniellia oliveri short-rotation coppice on fallow lands in Benin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avohou, T. Hermane [Laboratory of Applied Ecology, University of Abomey Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou (Benin); Bioversity International, West and Central Africa Office, 08 BP 0932 Cotonou (Benin); Houehounha, Remy; Glele-Kakai, Romain; Assogbadjo, Achille Ephrem; Sinsin, Brice [Laboratory of Applied Ecology, University of Abomey Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou (Benin)

    2011-01-15

    Sub-Saharan Africa has a great diversity of local coppicing species which are exploited in traditional short coppice systems for firewood. Biomass yield and profitability of these systems as well as their responses to silvicultural improvement are little known. This study evaluated the firewood yield and the profitability of a traditional Daniellia oliveri short-rotation coppice on fallow lands in central Benin. Two weed management options were considered: (1) the weedy option, usually practiced by locals, which experienced grass competition and bushfires, and (2) the weed-free option, which consisted in periodic removal of grasses and other species. Destructive measurements and allometric equations were used to estimate biomass yield in 12 plots over 42 months. A cost-benefit analysis model based on the net present value and the benefit-cost ratio was used to compare the profitability of the two management options. Biomass accumulation rate averaged 1.08 {+-} 0.20 tonnes of dry matter ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} (t DM ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}) in weedy conditions. Weed removal improved 3.5 times this rate in weed-free plots (3.83 {+-} 0.47 t DM ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}). After 42 months, total biomass reached 3.67 {+-} 0.65 t DM ha{sup -1} in weedy plots and 11.63 {+-} 0.76 t DM ha{sup -1} in weed-free plots. Most of the biomass ({>=}88%) was marketable in local markets. Coppice exploitation was profitable after 24 months for both management options. Weed removal improved the profits three times. A sensitivity analysis showed that both options were still profitable with up to 25% increase of labour and transport costs, 25% decrease of biomass price and 12% increase of the discount rate. (author)

  18. Molecular detection of Bartonella spp. in deer ked pupae, adult keds and moose blood in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, E M; Pérez Vera, C; Pulliainen, A T; Sironen, T; Aaltonen, K; Kortet, R; Härkönen, L; Härkönen, S; Paakkonen, T; Nieminen, P; Mustonen, A-M; Ylönen, H; Vapalahti, O

    2015-02-01

    The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) is a haematophagous ectoparasite of cervids that harbours haemotrophic Bartonella. A prerequisite for the vector competence of the deer ked is the vertical transmission of the pathogen from the mother to its progeny and transstadial transmission from pupa to winged adult. We screened 1154 pupae and 59 pools of winged adult deer keds from different areas in Finland for Bartonella DNA using PCR. Altogether 13 pupa samples and one winged adult deer ked were positive for the presence of Bartonella DNA. The amplified sequences were closely related to either B. schoenbuchensis or B. bovis. The same lineages were identified in eight blood samples collected from free-ranging moose. This is the first demonstration of Bartonella spp. DNA in a winged adult deer ked and, thus, evidence for potential transstadial transmission of Bartonella spp. in the species.

  19. No evidence of deer mouse involvement in plague (Yersinia pestis) epizootics in prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Stapp, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Plague, the disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, can have devastating impacts on black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies. One suggested mechanism behind sporadic prairie dog die-offs involves an alternative mammal host, such as the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), which often inhabits prairie dog colonies. We examined the flea populations of deer mice to investigate the potential of flea-borne transmission of plague between deer mice and prairie dogs in northern Colorado, where plague is active in prairie dog colonies. Deer mice were predominantly infested with the flea Aetheca wagneri, and were rarely infested with prairie dog fleas, Oropsylla hirsuta. Likelihood of flea infestation increased with average monthly temperature, and flea loads were higher in reproductive animals. These results suggest that the deer mouse is an unlikely maintenance host of plague in this region.

  20. Association mapping of genetic risk factors for chronic wasting disease in wild deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomomi Matsumoto,; Samuel, Michael D.; Trent Bollinger,; Margo Pybus,; David W. Coltman,

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting North American cervids. We assessed the feasibility of association mapping CWD genetic risk factors in wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) using a panel of bovine microsatellite markers from three homologous deer linkage groups predicted to contain candidate genes. These markers had a low cross-species amplification rate (27.9%) and showed weak linkage disequilibrium (<1 cM). Markers near the prion protein and the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) genes were suggestively associated with CWD status in white-tailed deer (P = 0.006) and mule deer (P = 0.02), respectively. This is the first time an association between the NF1 region and CWD has been reported.

  1. The impact of Sika deer on vegetation in Japan: setting management priorities on a national scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Haruka; Yoshikawa, Masato; Oono, Keiichi; Tanaka, Norihisa; Hatase, Yoriko; Murakami, Yuhide

    2014-09-01

    Irreversible shifts in ecosystems caused by large herbivores are becoming widespread around the world. We analyzed data derived from the 2009-2010 Sika Deer Impact Survey, which assessed the geographical distribution of deer impacts on vegetation through a questionnaire, on a scale of 5-km grid-cells. Our aim was to identify areas facing irreversible ecosystem shifts caused by deer overpopulation and in need of management prioritization. Our results demonstrated that the areas with heavy impacts on vegetation were widely distributed across Japan from north to south and from the coastal to the alpine areas. Grid-cells with heavy impacts are especially expanding in the southwestern part of the Pacific side of Japan. The intensity of deer impacts was explained by four factors: (1) the number of 5-km grid-cells with sika deer in neighboring 5 km-grid-cells in 1978 and 2003, (2) the year sika deer were first recorded in a grid-cell, (3) the number of months in which maximum snow depth exceeded 50 cm, and (4) the proportion of urban areas in a particular grid-cell. Based on our model, areas with long-persistent deer populations, short snow periods, and fewer urban areas were predicted to be the most vulnerable to deer impact. Although many areas matching these criteria already have heavy deer impact, there are some areas that remain only slightly impacted. These areas may need to be designated as having high management priority because of the possibility of a rapid intensification of deer impact.

  2. Piroplasmosis in wildlife: Babesia and Theileria affecting free-ranging ungulates and carnivores in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Piroplasmosis are among the most relevant diseases of domestic animals. Babesia is emerging as cause of tick-borne zoonosis worldwide and free-living animals are reservoir hosts of several zoonotic Babesia species. We investigated the epidemiology of Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. in wild ungulates and carnivores from Northern Italy to determine which of these apicomplexan species circulate in wildlife and their prevalence of infection. Methods PCR amplification of the V4 hyper-variable region of the 18S rDNA of Babesia sp./Theileria sp was carried out on spleen samples of 1036 wild animals: Roe deer Capreolus capreolus (n = 462), Red deer Cervus elaphus (n = 52), Alpine Chamois Rupicapra rupicapra (n = 36), Fallow deer Dama dama (n = 17), Wild boar Sus scrofa (n = 257), Red fox Vulpes vulpes (n = 205) and Wolf Canis lupus (n = 7). Selected positive samples were sequenced to determine the species of amplified Babesia/Theileria DNA. Results Babesia/Theileria DNA was found with a mean prevalence of 9.94% (IC95% 8.27-11.91). The only piroplasms found in carnivores was Theileria annae, which was detected in two foxes (0.98%; IC95% 0.27-3.49). Red deer showed the highest prevalence of infection (44.23%; IC95% 31.6-57.66), followed by Alpine chamois (22.22%; IC95% 11.71-38.08), Roe deer (12.55%; IC95% 9.84-15.89), and Wild boar (4.67%; IC95% 2.69-7.98). Genetic analysis identified Babesia capreoli as the most prevalent piroplasmid found in Alpine chamois, Roe deer and Red deer, followed by Babesia bigemina (found in Roe deer, Red deer and Wild boar), and the zoonotic Babesia venatorum (formerly Babesia sp. EU1) isolated from 2 Roe deer. Piroplasmids of the genus Theileria were identified in Wild boar and Red deer. Conclusions The present study offers novel insights into the role of wildlife in Babesia/Theileria epidemiology, as well as relevant information on genetic variability of piroplasmids infecting wild ungulates and

  3. Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-Colchicine Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, Bajarang Vasant; Borogaon, Anubhaw; Panda, Dulal; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin isotypes are found to play an important role in regulating microtubule dynamics. The isotype composition is also thought to contribute in the development of drug resistance as tubulin isotypes show differential binding affinities for various anti-cancer agents. Tubulin isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV show differential binding affinity for colchicine. However, the origin of differential binding affinity is not well understood at the molecular level. Here, we investigate the origin of differential binding affinity of a colchicine analogue N-deacetyl-N-(2-mercaptoacetyl)-colchicine (DAMA-colchicine) for human αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, employing sequence analysis, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and MM-GBSA binding free energy calculations. The sequence analysis study shows that the residue compositions are different in the colchicine binding pocket of αβII and αβIII, whereas no such difference is present in αβIV tubulin isotypes. Further, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations results show that residue differences present at the colchicine binding pocket weaken the bonding interactions and the correct binding of DAMA-colchicine at the interface of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes. Post molecular dynamics simulation analysis suggests that these residue variations affect the structure and dynamics of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes, which in turn affect the binding of DAMA-colchicine. Further, the binding free-energy calculation shows that αβIV tubulin isotype has the highest binding free-energy and αβIII has the lowest binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine. The order of binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine is αβIV ≃ αβII > αβIII. Thus, our computational approaches provide an insight into the effect of residue variations on differential binding of αβII, αβIII and αβIV tubulin isotypes with DAMA-colchicine and may help to design new analogues with higher

  4. Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-Colchicine Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajarang Vasant Kumbhar

    Full Text Available Tubulin isotypes are found to play an important role in regulating microtubule dynamics. The isotype composition is also thought to contribute in the development of drug resistance as tubulin isotypes show differential binding affinities for various anti-cancer agents. Tubulin isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV show differential binding affinity for colchicine. However, the origin of differential binding affinity is not well understood at the molecular level. Here, we investigate the origin of differential binding affinity of a colchicine analogue N-deacetyl-N-(2-mercaptoacetyl-colchicine (DAMA-colchicine for human αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, employing sequence analysis, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and MM-GBSA binding free energy calculations. The sequence analysis study shows that the residue compositions are different in the colchicine binding pocket of αβII and αβIII, whereas no such difference is present in αβIV tubulin isotypes. Further, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations results show that residue differences present at the colchicine binding pocket weaken the bonding interactions and the correct binding of DAMA-colchicine at the interface of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes. Post molecular dynamics simulation analysis suggests that these residue variations affect the structure and dynamics of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes, which in turn affect the binding of DAMA-colchicine. Further, the binding free-energy calculation shows that αβIV tubulin isotype has the highest binding free-energy and αβIII has the lowest binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine. The order of binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine is αβIV ≃ αβII >> αβIII. Thus, our computational approaches provide an insight into the effect of residue variations on differential binding of αβII, αβIII and αβIV tubulin isotypes with DAMA-colchicine and may help to design new

  5. Prevalence and genetic diversity of Rhodococcus equi in wild boars (Sus scrofa), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Lucjan; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Cisek, Agata Anna; Chrobak-Chmiel, Dorota; Kizerwetter-Świda, Magdalena; Czopowicz, Michał; Welz, Mirosław; Kita, Jerzy

    2015-05-22

    Rhodococcus equi is now considered an emerging zoonotic pathogen. Sources and routes of human infection remain unclear but foodborne transmission seems to be the most probable way. Strains of pig or bovine type are most often isolated from human cases and moreover R. equi is present in submaxillary lymph nodes of apparently healthy pigs and wild boars intended for human consumption. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of R. equi in submaxillary lymph nodes in wild boars, roe deer and red deer. Samples were collected from 936 animals and 27 R. equi strains were isolated, from 5.1 % of wild boars (23/452), 0.7 % of red deer (2/272) and 0.9 % of roe deer (2/212). Genetic diversity of all 27 isolates was studied using VspI-PFGE method, resulting in the detection of 25 PFGE patterns and four PFGE clusters. PFGE patterns of the isolates were compared with virulence plasmid types and no concordance was observed. R. equi was present in wild animal tissues and consumption of the game may be a potential source of R. equi infection for humans. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first epidemiological report of R. equi prevalence in tissues of roe deer and red deer. However, risk associated with wild ruminant consumption seems marginal. Investigation of R. equi transmission between animals and humans based exclusively on types of virulence plasmids seems to be insufficient to identify sources of R. equi infection for people.

  6. Rapid antemortem detection of CWD prions in deer saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Davin M; Manca, Matteo; Haley, Nicholas J; Denkers, Nathaniel D; Nalls, Amy V; Mathiason, Candace K; Caughey, Byron; Hoover, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an efficiently transmitted prion disease of cervids, now identified in 22 United States, 2 Canadian provinces and Korea. One hallmark of CWD is the shedding of infectious prions in saliva, as demonstrated by bioassay in deer. It is also clear that the concentration of prions in saliva, blood, urine and feces is much lower than in the nervous system or lymphoid tissues. Rapid in vitro detection of CWD (and other) prions in body fluids and excreta has been problematic due to the sensitivity limits of direct assays (western blotting, ELISA) and the presence of inhibitors in these complex biological materials that hamper detection. Here we use real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC) to demonstrate CWD prions in both diluted and prion-enriched saliva samples from asymptomatic and symptomatic white-tailed deer. CWD prions were detected in 14 of 24 (58.3%) diluted saliva samples from CWD-exposed white-tailed deer, including 9 of 14 asymptomatic animals (64.2%). In addition, a phosphotungstic acid enrichment enhanced the RT-QuIC assay sensitivity, enabling detection in 19 of 24 (79.1%) of the above saliva samples. Bioassay in Tg[CerPrP] mice confirmed the presence of infectious prions in 2 of 2 RT-QuIC-positive saliva samples so examined. The modified RT-QuIC analysis described represents a non-invasive, rapid ante-mortem detection of prions in complex biologic fluids, excreta, or environmental samples as well as a tool for exploring prion trafficking, peripheralization, and dissemination.

  7. Trends of fresh green food for lactating roe deer females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Annette; Stahl, Benjamin; Laube, Julia

    2017-04-01

    Increasing temperatures, changed precipitation patterns as well as more intense and frequent extreme events will alter the phenology of both flora and fauna and shift species distributions. Moreover, farmers respond to climate change by adapting land use and management, and thus the cultural landscape is changing. Therefore, the health and fitness of wild animals will be largely affected by factors directly and indirectly linked to climate change. Familiar examples of mismatch due to loss of temporal synchrony in food webs are known from birds (timing of migration or egg laying in relation to food resources) and insect pollination (timing of first flights in relation to plant flowering). However, also large herbivory mammals may suffer from climate change induced phenological mismatch if they are not able to "surf on the green wave" any more. Taking roe deer (Capreolus capreolus L.) as key example, we studied changes in the spring phenology of potential food plants during the last four decades in southern Germany. Our analysis is based on the phenological observations of the German Meteorological Service as well as on the comprehensive multi-species dataset of a dedicated citizen scientist. Roe deer is sensitive to slight phenological changes of food plants, since only the first fresh green contains maximal protein contents which are needed by the females to suckle their fawns born mid of May till mid of June. We find indications for an increasing number of food plant species available in the lactation period, however probably with a decreasing food quality over the decades. Since females have delayed implantation it may be difficult to well synchronise the postnatal period to the vegetation development. A unique dataset of marked fawns suggests that also the timing of birth has slightly advanced in recent decades. We discuss these changes in the match-mismatch of lactation period of roe deer and spring leaf phenology and their driving factors in detail.

  8. Rapid antemortem detection of CWD prions in deer saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davin M Henderson

    Full Text Available Chronic wasting disease (CWD is an efficiently transmitted prion disease of cervids, now identified in 22 United States, 2 Canadian provinces and Korea. One hallmark of CWD is the shedding of infectious prions in saliva, as demonstrated by bioassay in deer. It is also clear that the concentration of prions in saliva, blood, urine and feces is much lower than in the nervous system or lymphoid tissues. Rapid in vitro detection of CWD (and other prions in body fluids and excreta has been problematic due to the sensitivity limits of direct assays (western blotting, ELISA and the presence of inhibitors in these complex biological materials that hamper detection. Here we use real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC to demonstrate CWD prions in both diluted and prion-enriched saliva samples from asymptomatic and symptomatic white-tailed deer. CWD prions were detected in 14 of 24 (58.3% diluted saliva samples from CWD-exposed white-tailed deer, including 9 of 14 asymptomatic animals (64.2%. In addition, a phosphotungstic acid enrichment enhanced the RT-QuIC assay sensitivity, enabling detection in 19 of 24 (79.1% of the above saliva samples. Bioassay in Tg[CerPrP] mice confirmed the presence of infectious prions in 2 of 2 RT-QuIC-positive saliva samples so examined. The modified RT-QuIC analysis described represents a non-invasive, rapid ante-mortem detection of prions in complex biologic fluids, excreta, or environmental samples as well as a tool for exploring prion trafficking, peripheralization, and dissemination.

  9. Rapid Antemortem Detection of CWD Prions in Deer Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Nicholas J.; Denkers, Nathaniel D.; Nalls, Amy V.; Mathiason, Candace K.; Caughey, Byron; Hoover, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an efficiently transmitted prion disease of cervids, now identified in 22 United States, 2 Canadian provinces and Korea. One hallmark of CWD is the shedding of infectious prions in saliva, as demonstrated by bioassay in deer. It is also clear that the concentration of prions in saliva, blood, urine and feces is much lower than in the nervous system or lymphoid tissues. Rapid in vitro detection of CWD (and other) prions in body fluids and excreta has been problematic due to the sensitivity limits of direct assays (western blotting, ELISA) and the presence of inhibitors in these complex biological materials that hamper detection. Here we use real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC) to demonstrate CWD prions in both diluted and prion-enriched saliva samples from asymptomatic and symptomatic white-tailed deer. CWD prions were detected in 14 of 24 (58.3%) diluted saliva samples from CWD-exposed white-tailed deer, including 9 of 14 asymptomatic animals (64.2%). In addition, a phosphotungstic acid enrichment enhanced the RT-QuIC assay sensitivity, enabling detection in 19 of 24 (79.1%) of the above saliva samples. Bioassay in Tg[CerPrP] mice confirmed the presence of infectious prions in 2 of 2 RT-QuIC-positive saliva samples so examined. The modified RT-QuIC analysis described represents a non-invasive, rapid ante-mortem detection of prions in complex biologic fluids, excreta, or environmental samples as well as a tool for exploring prion trafficking, peripheralization, and dissemination. PMID:24040235

  10. A roe deer from the Pliocene of Hidalgo, central Mexico

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    Eduardo Jiménez-Hidalgo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mexican Pliocene cervids are very poorly known. We report on new fossil material of the roe deer Capreolus constantini recovered from the Pliocene Atotonilco El Grande Formation of Santa María Amajac, Hidalgo (central Mexico. The specimens were collected from a series of layers of friable to moderately indurated polymictic conglomerate supported by a sandstone-tuffaceous-calcareous matrix. This species was formerly known only from the late Pliocene of Udunga, Russia, thus implying a dispersal event to North America around 4.0 Ma. This cervid is one of the very small number of mammals recorded from the poorly sampled Pliocene temperate deposits of Mexico.

  11. Orthopedic conditions of small ruminants. Llama, sheep, goat, and deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneps, A J

    1996-03-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the foot, infectious arthritis, angular limb deformities, patellar luxation, tendon contracture and injuries, and fractures encountered in sheep, goats, llamas, and deer are reviewed. These species share similar orthopedic problems to cattle, but management conditions, particularly for pet animals, may place special demands on the veterinarian treating these disease conditions. The mild temperament and relatively small body size of these animals make them excellent candidates for treatment of orthopedic problems often not amenable to practical treatment in larger or more fractious animals.

  12. Linking Hunter Knowledge with Forest Change to Understand Changing Deer Harvest Opportunities in Intensively Logged Landscapes

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    Todd J. Brinkman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of landscape changes caused by intensive logging on the availability of wild game are important when the harvest of wild game is a critical cultural practice, food source, and recreational activity. We assessed the influence of extensive industrial logging on the availability of wild game by drawing on local knowledge and ecological science to evaluate the relationship between forest change and opportunities to harvest Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. We used data collected through interviews with local deer hunters and GIS analysis of land cover to determine relationships among landscape change, hunter access, and habitat for deer hunting over the last 50 yr. We then used these relationships to predict how harvest opportunities may change in the future. Intensive logging from 1950 into the 1990s provided better access to deer and habitat that facilitated deer hunting. However, successional changes in intensively logged forests in combination with a decline in current logging activity have reduced access to deer and increased undesirable habitat for deer hunting. In this new landscape, harvest opportunities in previously logged landscapes have declined, and hunters identify second-growth forest as one of the least popular habitats for hunting. Given the current state of the logging industry in Alaska, it is unlikely that the logging of the remaining old-growth forests or intensive management of second-growth forests will cause hunter opportunities to rebound to historic levels. Instead, hunter opportunities may continue to decline for at least another human generation, even if the long-term impacts of logging activity and deer harvest on deer numbers are minimal. Adapting hunting strategies to focus on naturally open habitats such as alpine and muskeg that are less influenced by external market forces may require considerably more hunting effort but provide the best option for

  13. Greenhouse gas emissions, soil quality, and crop productivity from a mono-rice cultivation system as influenced by fallow season straw management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Hussain, Saddam; Wu, Lishu; Qin, Ziguo; Li, Xiaokun; Lu, Jianwei; Khan, Fahad; Cao, Weidong; Geng, Mingjian

    2016-01-01

    Straw management during fallow season may influence crop productivity, soil quality, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from rice field. A 3-year field experiment was carried out in central China to examine the influence of different fallow season straw management practices on rice yield, soil properties, and emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from a mono-rice cultivation system. The treatments comprised an unfertilized control (CK), inorganic fertilization (NPK), rice straw burning in situ (NPK + RSB), rice straw mulching (NPK + RSM), and rice straw strip mulching with green manuring (NPK + RSM + GM). The maximum rice yield, soil organic carbon, soil total nitrogen, and available potassium were observed in NPK + RSM + GM treatment. Compared with NPK, the NPK + RSM + GM recorded 9% higher grain yield averaged across 3 years. However, NPK + RSM and NPK + RSB were statistically similar with NPK regarding grain yield. The NPK + RSM and NPK + RSM + GM recorded significantly higher CH4 emission during rice growing season as well as winter fallow; however, the response of N2O emissions was variable. The NPK + RSM and NPK + RSM + GM were statistically similar for annual cumulative CH4 and N2O emissions. The NPK + RSM + GM recorded 103 and 72% higher straw-induced net economic benefits and soil organic carbon sequestration rate, and reduced net global warming potential by 27% as compared with NPK + RSM. Considering the benefits of soil fertility, higher crop productivity, and environmental safety, the NPK + RSM + GM could be the most feasible and sustainable option for mono-rice cultivation system in central China.

  14. Recession of Tussilago farfara (L. population from the agro coenose as a result of cultivation abandonment. I The effect of fallowing on population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Namura-Ochalska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluates the effect of fallowing on seasonal and multiyear dynamics, as well as on the spatial structure of Tussilago farfara population. In four years turfing and rapid increase in the size of grass populations - those of Agropyron repens (L. PB. and Dactylis glomerata caused the elimination of Tussilago farfara population. The studies have showed that a decrease in the population size resulted from hampering of both vegetative and generative reproduction. The interspecific competition for available space seems to be a crucial factor limiting emergence of new shoots. In the agrocoenose big population size of Tussilago farfara remained throughout the studies.

  15. Solar Radiation Determines Site Occupancy of Coexisting Tropical and Temperate Deer Species Introduced to New Zealand Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert B; Forsyth, David M; Allen, Roy K J; Affeld, Kathrin; MacKenzie, Darryl I

    2015-01-01

    Assemblages of introduced taxa provide an opportunity to understand how abiotic and biotic factors shape habitat use by coexisting species. We tested hypotheses about habitat selection by two deer species recently introduced to New Zealand's temperate rainforests. We hypothesised that, due to different thermoregulatory abilities, rusa deer (Cervus timorensis; a tropical species) would prefer warmer locations in winter than red deer (Cervus elaphus scoticus; a temperate species). Since adult male rusa deer are aggressive in winter (the rut), we also hypothesised that rusa deer and red deer would not use the same winter locations. Finally, we hypothesised that in summer both species would prefer locations with fertile soils that supported more plant species preferred as food. We used a 250 × 250 m grid of 25 remote cameras to collect images in a 100-ha montane study area over two winters and summers. Plant composition, solar radiation, and soil fertility were also determined for each camera location. Multiseason occupancy models revealed that direct solar radiation was the best predictor of occupancy and detection probabilities for rusa deer in winter. Multistate, multiseason occupancy models provided strong evidence that the detection probability of adult male rusa deer was greater in winter and when other rusa deer were present at a location. Red deer mostly vacated the study area in winter. For the one season that had sufficient camera images of both species (summer 2011) to allow two-species occupancy models to be fitted, the detection probability of rusa deer also increased with solar radiation. Detection probability also varied with plant composition for both deer species. We conclude that habitat use by coexisting tropical and temperate deer species in New Zealand likely depends on the interplay between the thermoregulatory and behavioural traits of the deer and the abiotic and biotic features of the habitat.

  16. Solar Radiation Determines Site Occupancy of Coexisting Tropical and Temperate Deer Species Introduced to New Zealand Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B Allen

    Full Text Available Assemblages of introduced taxa provide an opportunity to understand how abiotic and biotic factors shape habitat use by coexisting species. We tested hypotheses about habitat selection by two deer species recently introduced to New Zealand's temperate rainforests. We hypothesised that, due to different thermoregulatory abilities, rusa deer (Cervus timorensis; a tropical species would prefer warmer locations in winter than red deer (Cervus elaphus scoticus; a temperate species. Since adult male rusa deer are aggressive in winter (the rut, we also hypothesised that rusa deer and red deer would not use the same winter locations. Finally, we hypothesised that in summer both species would prefer locations with fertile soils that supported more plant species preferred as food. We used a 250 × 250 m grid of 25 remote cameras to collect images in a 100-ha montane study area over two winters and summers. Plant composition, solar radiation, and soil fertility were also determined for each camera location. Multiseason occupancy models revealed that direct solar radiation was the best predictor of occupancy and detection probabilities for rusa deer in winter. Multistate, multiseason occupancy models provided strong evidence that the detection probability of adult male rusa deer was greater in winter and when other rusa deer were present at a location. Red deer mostly vacated the study area in winter. For the one season that had sufficient camera images of both species (summer 2011 to allow two-species occupancy models to be fitted, the detection probability of rusa deer also increased with solar radiation. Detection probability also varied with plant composition for both deer species. We conclude that habitat use by coexisting tropical and temperate deer species in New Zealand likely depends on the interplay between the thermoregulatory and behavioural traits of the deer and the abiotic and biotic features of the habitat.

  17. Iberian red deer: paraphyletic nature at mtDNA but nuclear markers support its genetic identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Juan; Salinas, María; de Andrés, Damián; Pérez-González, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Red deer populations in the Iberian glacial refugium were the main source for postglacial recolonization and subspecific radiation in north-western Europe. However, the phylogenetic history of Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) and its relationships with northern European populations remain uncertain. Here, we study DNA sequences at the mitochondrial control region along with STR markers for over 680 specimens from all the main red deer populations in Spain and other west European areas. Our results from mitochondrial and genomic DNA show contrasting patterns, likely related to the nature of these types of DNA markers and their specific processes of change over time. The results, taken together, bring support to two distinct, cryptic maternal lineages for Iberian red deer that predated the last glacial maximum and that have maintained geographically well differentiated until present. Haplotype relationships show that only one of them contributed to the northern postglacial recolonization. However, allele frequencies of nuclear markers evidenced one main differentiation between Iberian and northern European subspecies although also supported the structure of both matrilines within Iberia. Thus, our findings reveal a paraphyletic nature for Iberian red deer but also its genetic identity and differentiation with respect to northern subspecies. Finally, we suggest that maintaining the singularity of Iberian red deer requires preventing not only restocking practices with red deer specimens belonging to other European populations but also translocations between both Iberian lineages.

  18. Serosurvey for selected disease agents in white-tailed deer from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, A; Salinas, A; Martinez, F; Cantu, A; Miller, D K

    1999-10-01

    Serum samples from 350 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus texanus) collected in March 1994 from northeastern Mexico were tested for the prevalence of antibody activity against five infectious diseases of ruminants. The prevalence rate was 81% for bluetongue virus (BTV) of all serotypes, 72% for epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), 3% for Borrelia burgdorferi, 69% for Anaplasma marginale, and 0% for Brucella abortus, B. melitensis, and B. ovis. These are diseases that affect domestic ruminants, and deer may act as a reservoir of infection. In addition, if deer are translocated, they may introduce pathogens to formerly disease-free areas. The high seroprevalence of BTV and EHDV cannot be related to the presence of hemorrhagic disease in the deer in this region. This is the first report to indicate the presence of B. burgdorferi infection of deer in Mexico. Despite the high prevalence of A. marginale titers, it is uncertain that deer play a role in the epizootiology of cattle anaplasmosis in the region. Apparently, white-tailed deer are unimportant in the epizootiology of brucellosis of both cattle and goats in northeastern Mexico.

  19. Establishment rate of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes in farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Escárate, D; Pomroy, W E; Scott, I; Wilson, P R; Lopez-Villalobos, N

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the establishment of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in red deer, five red deer and five sheep aged 5-6 months were challenged with a mixed burden of sheep GIN at a rate of 327L3/kg bodyweight. The LSmean (SE) establishment rates (%) for Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Cooperia curticei, Trichostrongylus spp. and Oesophagostomum+Chabertia spp. were 18.6 (0.03), 35.5 (0.04), 30.7 (0.04), 74.9 (0.05), 19.9 (0.06), respectively in sheep and 10.5 (0.03), 1.0 (0.04), 0.1 (0.04), 1.0 (0.05), 4.8 (0.06) respectively, in deer. Establishment rates were significantly different (p<0.05) between hosts for all genera. No Trichostrongylus colubriformis or Trichostrongylus vitrinus were seen in any deer but were present in all sheep. Trichostrongylus axei were seen in both hosts but there were relatively more which established in sheep than in deer (p<0.01). No Chabertia ovina were seen in any deer but were present in four of five sheep in low numbers. The only species of Oesophagostomum seen in either host was Oesophagostomum venulosum. These results suggest that the sheep GIN most likely to infect red deer grazing the same pastures are H. contortus, T. axei and O. venulosum.

  20. First report of hepatitis E virus infection in sika deer in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Qin, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Yuan; Meng, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Jing; Yang, Gui-Lian; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a single stranded RNA, nonenveloped virus, belongs to the genus Hepevirus, in the family of Hepeviridae. In this study, 46 (5.43%) out of the 847 serum samples from sika deer (Cervus nippon) were detected as seropositive with hepatitis E virus (HEV) by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These samples were collected from Inner Mongolia and Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces in China, between October 2012 and October 2013. Seroprevalence of HEV infection in male and female deer was 4.82% and 6.52%, respectively. HEV seroprevalence in sika deer from different geographical locations varied from 3.13% to 6.73%. There was no significant difference in HEV seroprevalence between sika deer collected in autumn (5.65%) and winter (4.85%). This is the first report of HEV seroprevalence in sika deer in China, which will provide foundation information for estimating the effectiveness of future measures to control HEV infection in sika deer in China and assessing the potential risk of humans infected with HEV after consumption of undercooked or raw meat from infected sika deer.

  1. First Report of Hepatitis E Virus Infection in Sika Deer in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xuan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV, a single stranded RNA, nonenveloped virus, belongs to the genus Hepevirus, in the family of Hepeviridae. In this study, 46 (5.43% out of the 847 serum samples from sika deer (Cervus nippon were detected as seropositive with hepatitis E virus (HEV by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. These samples were collected from Inner Mongolia and Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces in China, between October 2012 and October 2013. Seroprevalence of HEV infection in male and female deer was 4.82% and 6.52%, respectively. HEV seroprevalence in sika deer from different geographical locations varied from 3.13% to 6.73%. There was no significant difference in HEV seroprevalence between sika deer collected in autumn (5.65% and winter (4.85%. This is the first report of HEV seroprevalence in sika deer in China, which will provide foundation information for estimating the effectiveness of future measures to control HEV infection in sika deer in China and assessing the potential risk of humans infected with HEV after consumption of undercooked or raw meat from infected sika deer.

  2. Factors affecting deer ked (Lipoptena cervi prevalence and infestation intensity in moose (Alces alces in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madslien Knut

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi, a hematophagous ectoparasite of Cervids, is currently spreading in Scandinavia. In Norway, keds are now invading the south-eastern part of the country and the abundant and widely distributed moose (Alces alces is the definitive host. However, key factors for ked abundance are poorly elucidated. The objectives of our study were to (i determine deer ked infestation prevalence and intensity on moose and (ii evaluate if habitat characteristics and moose population density are determinants of deer ked abundance on moose. Methods In order to identify key factors for deer ked abundance, a total of 350 skin samples from the neck of hunted moose were examined and deer keds counted. Infestation intensity was analyzed in relation to moose age and sex, moose population density and landscape characteristics surrounding the killing site. Results Deer ked infestation prevalence was 100%, but infestation intensity varied from 0.001 to 1.405 keds/cm2. Ked intensity was highest in male yearlings (~1.5 years and positively associated with longitude and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris dominated habitat and negatively associated with bogs and latitude. Moose population density during autumn showed a tendency to be positively associated, while altitude tended to be negatively associated with ked intensity. Conclusions Deer keds exploit the whole moose population within our study area, but are most prevalent in areas dominated by Scots pine. This is probably a reflection of Scots pine being the preferred winter browse for moose in areas with highest moose densities in winter. Ked intensity decreases towards the northwest and partly with increasing altitude, probably explained by the direction of dispersal and reduced temperature, respectively. Abundant deer ked harm humans and domestic animals. Moose management authorities should therefore be aware of the close relationship between moose, deer ked and habitat, using the

  3. Spatiotemporal variation in deer browse and tolerance in a woodland herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendeville, Holly R; Steven, Janet C; Galloway, Laura F

    2015-02-01

    Herbivory can shape the dynamics of plant populations, including effects on survival and reproduction, and is in turn affected by environmental factors that vary in space and time. White-tailed deer are significant herbivores in North America that have been broadly documented to affect plant reproductive success. If variation in the frequency and impact of herbivory by deer correlates with a broad-scale latitudinal gradient, climactic effects may be important for shaping plant-herbivore interactions, Alternatively, a lack of broad-scale gradients would suggest local factors such as plant community composition and deer densities are affecting herbivory. To investigate broad-scale patterns of deer herbivory, we examined the frequency and reproductive consequences of deer browse over three years in 17 populations of Campanulastrum americanum spanning the latitudinal extent of its range. Even though deer are overabundant throughout the range of C. americanum, we found spatiotemporal variation in deer browse frequency (0-0.96, mean 0.46) and its effects on plant reproductive success. The four southernmost populations experienced high levels of herbivory, and were responsible for generating a negative relationship between latitude and herbivory. In general, patterns of variation in the frequency and impact of herbivory across the entire latitudinal gradient pointed to the importance of local rather than broad-scale factors. Within a population, deer consumed larger plants. Across many populations and years, average fitnesses of browsed and uneaten plants were similar, suggesting that plants are tolerant to browse. However, since large plants have greater reproductive success and are more likely to be browsed, tolerance may be influenced by plant size. When plant size was accounted for, most populations did not fully compensate for browsing. There was no relationship between browsing intensity and tolerance, suggesting that browsing may be too variable to consistently

  4. Deer herbivory reduces web-building spider abundance by simplifying forest vegetation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chips, Michael J.; Carson, Walter P.

    2016-01-01

    Indirect ecological effects are a common feature of ecological systems, arising when one species affects interactions among two or more other species. We examined how browsing by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) indirectly affected the abundance and composition of a web-building spider guild through their effects on the structure of the ground and shrub layers of northern hardwood forests. We examined paired plots consisting of deer-free and control plots in the Allegheny Plateau region Pennsylvania and Northern Highlands region of Wisconsin. We recorded the abundance of seven types of webs, each corresponding to a family of web-building spiders. We quantified vegetation structure and habitat suitability for the spiders by computing a web scaffold availability index (WSAI) at 0.5 m and 1.0 m above the ground. At Northern Highlands sites, we recorded prey availability. Spider webs were twice as abundant in deer-free plots compared to control plots, while WSAI was 7–12 times greater in deerfree plots. Prey availability was lower in deer-free plots. With the exception of funnel web-builders, all spider web types were significantly more abundant in deer-free plots. Both deer exclusion and the geographic region of plots were significant predictors of spider community structure. In closed canopy forests with high browsing pressure, the low density of tree saplings and shrubs provides few locations for web-building spiders to anchor webs. Recruitment of these spiders may become coupled with forest disturbance events that increase tree and shrub recruitment. By modifying habitat structure, deer appear to indirectly modify arthropod food web interactions. As deer populations have increased in eastern North America over the past several decades, the effects of deer on web-building spiders may be widespread. PMID:27703868

  5. Deer herbivory reduces web-building spider abundance by simplifying forest vegetation structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Elizabeth J; Chips, Michael J; Carson, Walter P; Rooney, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    Indirect ecological effects are a common feature of ecological systems, arising when one species affects interactions among two or more other species. We examined how browsing by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) indirectly affected the abundance and composition of a web-building spider guild through their effects on the structure of the ground and shrub layers of northern hardwood forests. We examined paired plots consisting of deer-free and control plots in the Allegheny Plateau region Pennsylvania and Northern Highlands region of Wisconsin. We recorded the abundance of seven types of webs, each corresponding to a family of web-building spiders. We quantified vegetation structure and habitat suitability for the spiders by computing a web scaffold availability index (WSAI) at 0.5 m and 1.0 m above the ground. At Northern Highlands sites, we recorded prey availability. Spider webs were twice as abundant in deer-free plots compared to control plots, while WSAI was 7-12 times greater in deerfree plots. Prey availability was lower in deer-free plots. With the exception of funnel web-builders, all spider web types were significantly more abundant in deer-free plots. Both deer exclusion and the geographic region of plots were significant predictors of spider community structure. In closed canopy forests with high browsing pressure, the low density of tree saplings and shrubs provides few locations for web-building spiders to anchor webs. Recruitment of these spiders may become coupled with forest disturbance events that increase tree and shrub recruitment. By modifying habitat structure, deer appear to indirectly modify arthropod food web interactions. As deer populations have increased in eastern North America over the past several decades, the effects of deer on web-building spiders may be widespread.

  6. Deer herbivory reduces web-building spider abundance by simplifying forest vegetation structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J. Roberson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Indirect ecological effects are a common feature of ecological systems, arising when one species affects interactions among two or more other species. We examined how browsing by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus indirectly affected the abundance and composition of a web-building spider guild through their effects on the structure of the ground and shrub layers of northern hardwood forests. We examined paired plots consisting of deer-free and control plots in the Allegheny Plateau region Pennsylvania and Northern Highlands region of Wisconsin. We recorded the abundance of seven types of webs, each corresponding to a family of web-building spiders. We quantified vegetation structure and habitat suitability for the spiders by computing a web scaffold availability index (WSAI at 0.5 m and 1.0 m above the ground. At Northern Highlands sites, we recorded prey availability. Spider webs were twice as abundant in deer-free plots compared to control plots, while WSAI was 7–12 times greater in deerfree plots. Prey availability was lower in deer-free plots. With the exception of funnel web-builders, all spider web types were significantly more abundant in deer-free plots. Both deer exclusion and the geographic region of plots were significant predictors of spider community structure. In closed canopy forests with high browsing pressure, the low density of tree saplings and shrubs provides few locations for web-building spiders to anchor webs. Recruitment of these spiders may become coupled with forest disturbance events that increase tree and shrub recruitment. By modifying habitat structure, deer appear to indirectly modify arthropod food web interactions. As deer populations have increased in eastern North America over the past several decades, the effects of deer on web-building spiders may be widespread.

  7. Does small-perimeter fencing inhibit mule deer or pronghorn use of water developments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, R.T.; Bissonette, J.A.; Flinders, J.T.; Robinson, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Wildlife water development can be an important habitat management strategy in western North America for many species, including both pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In many areas, water developments are fenced (often with small-perimeter fencing) to exclude domestic livestock and feral horses. Small-perimeter exclosures could limit wild ungulate use of fenced water sources, as exclosures present a barrier pronghorn and mule deer must negotiate to gain access to fenced drinking water. To evaluate the hypothesis that exclosures limit wild ungulate access to water sources, we compared use (photo counts) of fenced versus unfenced water sources for both pronghorn and mule deer between June and October 2002-2008 in western Utah. We used model selection to identify an adequate distribution and best approximating model. We selected a zero-inflated negative binomial distribution for both pronghorn and mule deer photo counts. Both pronghorn and mule deer photo counts were positively associated with sampling time and average daily maximum temperature in top models. A fence effect was present in top models for both pronghorn and mule deer, but mule deer response to small-perimeter fencing was much more pronounced than pronghorn response. For mule deer, we estimated that presence of a fence around water developments reduced photo counts by a factor of 0.25. We suggest eliminating fencing of water developments whenever possible or fencing a big enough area around water sources to avoid inhibiting mule deer. More generally, our results provide additional evidence that water development design and placement influence wildlife use. Failure to account for species-specific preferences will limit effectiveness of management actions and could compromise research results. Copyright ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  8. Feasibility of vertebral internal fixation using deer and sheep as animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guo-min; LI You-qiong; XU Chuan-jie; ZHU Xiao-min; LIU Yi

    2010-01-01

    Backgroud Studies on new vertebral internal fixations of animals are very important prior to clinical application. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of vertebral internal fixation on morphologic and biomechanical properties using deer and sheep as animal models and comparing to human data.Methods Thirty sets of fresh Sika deer lumbar, 30 sets of fresh sheep lumbar, and 20 sets of fresh lumbar from male cadavers were used. We examined the morphology of the centra and pedicles of the three groups, and determined the cancellous bone density and biomechanical properties in all groups.Results There were marked differences in all parameters measured between the different species. The sizes of the upper, middle, and lower transverse diameter were largest in the human, followed by the deer, then the sheep. The index of centrum transverse diameters and sagittal diameters were less than 0.8 (a triangle), and the deer was more similar to the human. The heights of the right vertebral pedicles and the anterior disc heights (IDH) were largest in the human, followed by the deer, then the sheep. The apparent density, elastic modulus, and ultimate load were largest in the sheep, followed by the deer, then the human. The range of motion (ROM) of functional lumbar units (FLUs) with a combined flexion-extension moment was largest in the human, followed by the deer then the sheep. Conclusions The deer lumbar is more similar to that of human in anatomical form and biomechanics than the sheep lumbar. As such, deer is more appropriate as an animal model for use in vertebral internal fixation studies.

  9. Viral, parasitic and prion diseases of farmed deer and bison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, J C; Mackintosh, C; Griffin, F

    2002-08-01

    The most important viral disease of farmed deer and bison is malignant catarrhal fever. The other herpesviruses which have been isolated from these species are briefly described. Other viral agents that are recognised in these animals, including adenovirus, parapox, foot and mouth disease, bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, bovine virus diarrhoea, rotavirus and coronavirus, are also discussed. Ectoparasites of importance in this group in various parts of the world include a variety of ticks, as well as lice, keds, Oestridae, mange mites and fire ants. Helminth parasites include liver flukes (Fascioloides and Fasciola), gastrointestinal nematodes of the family Trichostrongylidae, pulmonary lungworms of the genus Dictyocaulus and extra-pulmonary lungworms of the family Protostrongylidae. Chronic wasting disease is principally important in North America, where the disease occurs in wild cervids in a limited area and has been reported in farmed deer in a small number of states in the United States of America and one province in Canada. These diseases are summarised in terms of their classification, epidemiology, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis, treatment and control.

  10. Movement and habitat use of Sika and White-tailed Deer on Assateague Island national seashore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Duane R.; Christensen, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    This research project was conducted to describe habitat use of sika deer (Cervus nippon) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and possibly attribute the effects of ungulate herbivory to specific deer species, if spatial separation in habitat use could be identified. Sturm (2007) conducted an exclosure study to document the effect of feral horse (Equus caballus) herbivory, deer herbivory, and horse and deer herbivory combined on plant communities. Sturm (2007) found that ungulate herbivory reduced plant species richness, evenness, and diversity in the maritime forest and affected species composition in all habitats studied. Sturm (2007) also found that herbivory on some species could be directly attributable to either horse or deer. However, the effects of sika and white-tailed deer herbivory could not be separated via an exclosure study design because of the difficulty of passively excluding one deer species but not the other. We captured white-tailed deer and sika deer in January–March of 2006 and 2007 throughout the Maryland portion of Assateague Island. Deer were fitted with radio-collars and their survival and locations monitored via ground telemetry. Up to four locations were acquired per deer each week during early (May–June) and late (August–September) growth periods for vegetation on the island. Also, we estimated deer locations during a dormant vegetation period (November– December 2006). We used these data to estimate survival and harvest rates, document movements, and model habitat use. We captured and fitted 50 deer with radio-collars over the course of the study. Of these 50 deer, 36 were sika and 14 were white-tailed deer. Of the 36 sika deer, 10 were harvested, three were likely killed by hunters but not recovered, and one died of natural causes while giving birth. Of the 14 white-tailed deer, three were harvested, one was illegally killed, and two were censored because of study-related mortality. Annual survival was 0.48 (95% CI

  11. Tracking of white-tailed deer migration by Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.; Frame, P.F.

    2004-01-01

    Based on global positioning system (GPS) radiocollars in northeastern Minnesota, deer migrated 23-45 km in spring during 31-356 h, deviating a maximum 1.6-4.0 km perpendicular from a straight line of travel between their seasonal ranges. They migrated a minimum of 2.1-18.6 km/day over 11-56 h during 2-14 periods of travel. Minimum travel during 1-h intervals averaged 1.5 km/h. Deer paused 1-12 times, averaging 24 h/pause. Deer migrated similar distances in autumn with comparable rates and patterns of travel.

  12. Prevalence of infectious agents in free-ranging white-tailed deer in northeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Antonio; Ortega-S, J Alfonso; Mosqueda, Juan; Garcia-Vazquez, Zeferino; Henke, Scott E; George, John E

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of antibodies against brucellosis, leptospirosis, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in northeastern Mexico. Deer (n=521) were captured from helicopter using a netgun on 15 ranches covering 62,114 ha in the states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas during spring 2004. The prevalence of antibodies against Leptospira, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, BVDV, and brucellosis were 5.6, 41.1, 63.5, and 0%, respectively, indicating that white-tailed deer and cattle may share disease agents when cohabiting in northeastern Mexico.

  13. EAR AND TAIL LESIONS ON CAPTIVE WHITE-TAILED DEER FAWNS (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS): A CASE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Treena L; Demarais, Stephen; Cooley, Jim; Fleming, Sherrill; Michel, Eric S; Flinn, Emily

    2016-06-01

    During the 2008-2011 time period, undiagnosed lesions were observed in 21 of 150 white-tailed deer fawns (Odocoileus virginianus) that were part of a captive deer herd at Mississippi State University. Clinical findings in healthy and diseased fawns from 0 to 90 days of age included bite and scratch marks followed by moderate to severe ear and tail necrosis. Gross necropsy findings of necrotizing ulcerative dermatitis correlated with histopathologic findings that included focally severe multifocal vasculitis, vascular necrosis, and thrombosis. This article is a clinical description of these previously unreported lesions associated with tissue necrosis in young captive white-tailed deer.

  14. Effects of controlled dog hunting on movements of female white-tailed deer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Angelo, Gino, J.; Kilgo, John, C.; Comer, Christopher, E.; Drennan, Cory, D.; Osborn, David, A.; Miller, Karl, V.

    2003-12-31

    D'Angelo, Gino, J., John C. Kilgo, Christopher E. Comer, Cory D. Drennan, David A. Osborn, and Karl V. Miller. 2003. Effects of controlled dog hunting on movements of female white-tailed deer. In: Proceedings of the Annu. Conf. Southeast. Assoc. Fish and Wildl. Agencies. 57:317-325. This article explores the relationship between controlled dog hunting and the movements of female white tailed deer at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina. The data suggests that short term, controlled dog hunting has little long-term effect on adult, female white-tailed deer movement on the Savannah River Site.

  15. Gross anatomy of the stomach of the pampas deer, Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Perez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The macroscopic anatomy of the stomach of the adult pampas deer, Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Linnaeus, 1758, a cervid species considered to ingest high quantities of grass in its natural diet, was described. Fourteen deceased adult pampas deer of both sexes from a captive breeding station were used for this study. There were no differences in the absolute or relative size from the different compartments of the stomach in relation to gender. Compared to measurements in other ruminants, pampas deer appeared anatomically capable of feeding on a variety of diets as an 'intermediate feeder'.

  16. 卓越的JOHN DEERE永远的JOHN DEERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅成建

    2005-01-01

    @@ "JOHN DEERE"代表着我们的承诺,"JOHN DEERE"代表着美好的体验."JOHN DEERE"代表着我们的声誉,我们的高标准,以及推动我们公司发展的所有价值观念.创立企业的品牌形象是我们每一位成员的神圣职责的永远的追求.

  17. The diversity of diatom assemblages developed on fallow soil in Pogórska Wola near Tarnów (southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga Stanek-Tarkowska

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the species diversity of diatoms growing on fallow fields on loose sand. The study site was located in the western part of Pogórska Wola near Tarnów (southern Poland. Samples were collected from fallow land once a month from April to December 2011. 57 diatom taxa from 19 different genera were found. The most numerous genera were Fragilaria (8 and Luticola (7. The highest species richness was observed in December, November and July, while the highest values of species diversity (Shannon–Wiener index were recorded between August and October. Four taxa – Pinnularia borealis Ehrenb. var. borealis, Stauroneis borrichii (Petersen Lund, Hantzschia amphioxys (Ehrenb. Grunow, and Luticola nivalis (Ehrenb. D.G. Mann, were found to be the dominant species. Neutral species (a pH of about 7 dominated in all months (from April to December, reaching an over 90% share in the assemblage. In terms of nitrogen content, nitrogen-autotrophic taxa, tolerating an elevated concentration of organically bound nitrogen, occurred most abundantly, as was indicated by the low content of nitrogen in the soil.

  18. Windthrow and fallow-forest successions impacts in soil carbon stocks and GHG fluxes spatial variability and dynamics in the Central Russia' reserve spruce ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Ivanov, Alexey; Komarova, Tatyana; Valentini, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    High spatial and temporal variability is mutual feature for most forest soils that is especially obvious in case of their carbon stocks and GHG fluxes. This phenomenon is generally well-known but not so often becomes the object of special precision investigation in detail and small scales so there are still serious gaps in its principal factors understanding due to their high bioclimatic, regional, landscape, tree species and temporal variability. Southern taiga is one of the most environmentally important world zonal forest ecosystems due to its still comparatively intensive carbon biogeochemical cycle and huge area in the northern Eurasia with strong anthropogenic impacts by Western & Central European and Southern & Eastern Asian regions. Central Forest Biospheric Reserve (Tver region, 360 km to North-West from Moscow) is the principal southern-taiga reserve in the European territory of Russia. Since start of its research activity in 1939 the reserve became the regional center of mature spruce ecosystem structure and dynamics investigation. In 1970-1980-s there have been done complex investigations of windthrow soil patterns and fallow-forest successions. Since middle of 1990-s the ecosystem-level GHG fluxes have been observed by eddy covariance method. Since 2012 the detailed year-round monitoring is running in the southern-taiga zonal station of the regional system RusFluxNet with especial attention on the soil carbon stocks and GHG fluxes spatial variability and dynamics due to windthrow and fallow-forest successions (in frame of RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266). Soil carbon dynamics is investigated in decades-hundred-year chronosequences of dominated parcels and different-size windthrow soil cover patterns, including direct investigation during last 33 years with detailed mapping, soil profile morphometrics and bulk density, morphogenetic and statistical analysis of mass data. Morphogenetic analysis of microrelief, soil profile

  19. Survival and movement of the Congo forest mouse (Deomys ferrugineus): a comparison of primary rainforest and fallow land in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennis, John; Laurent, Crespin; Amundala, Nicaise Drazo

    2012-01-01

    rainforest. Numbers of reproductively active females captured were not different between habitats but were larger during the rainy seasons. Daily movements of females, but not of males, were smaller in fallow land. Capture-mark-recapture analyses showed recapture probabilities to vary highly between grids...... and years. Survival probability in the primary forest was higher than in fallow land with a difference of 0.084 over a period of four weeks. This is possibly linked to the more abundant presence of the main food source (insects and termites); however other explanations are discussed in the text....

  20. Space-time Bayesian survival modeling of chronic wasting disease in deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hae-Ryoung; Lawson, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    The primary objectives of this study are to describe the spatial and temporal variation in disease prevalence of chronic wasting disease (CWD), to assess the effect of demographic factors such as age and sex on disease prevalence and to model the disease clustering effects over space and time. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical survival model where latent parameters capture temporal and spatial trends in disease incidence, incorporating several individual covariates and random effects. The model is applied to a data set which consists of 65085 harvested deer in Wisconsin from 2002 to 2006. We found significant sex effects, spatial effects, temporal effects and spatio-temporal interacted effects in CWD infection in deer in Wisconsin. The risk of infection for male deer was significantly higher than that of female deer, and CWD has been significantly different over space, time, and space and time based on the harvest samples.

  1. Southeastern Cooperative wildlife disease study: Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge deer herd health checks

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Enclosed are our reports on the deer herd health checks we conducted on the Duck River and Big Sandy Units, Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge, Humphrey and Henry...

  2. [Southeastern Cooperative wildlife disease study: Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge deer herd health checks

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Enclosed are the reports on the deer herd health checks conducted on the Big Sandy and Duck River Units of Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge, Henry and Humphrey...

  3. National Key Deer Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 7 of 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at National Key Deer Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography, cadastral...

  4. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Deer and Hog Hunt Program 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Refuge hunting for the 1998 season included white-tailed deer and feral hogs only. The State of Virginia's Department of Game & Inland Fisheries (VDGIF)...

  5. Julia Butler Hansen NWR: Initial Survey Instructions for Columbian White-tailed Deer Body Condition Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Refuge actively manages deer habitat through pasture enhancement, tree planting, and cattle grazing, however, we have few tools to directly measure the effects...

  6. Factors in the Mass Mortality of a Herd of Sika Deer Cervus Nippon

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The recovery plan for Sika Deer discusses the current status of the species, habitat requirements and limiting factors, recovery objectives and criteria, actions...

  7. 80 FR 9279 - Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge, Canyon, Payette, Owyhee, and Washington Counties, ID, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-20

    ...-2013-N279; 1265-0000-10137-S3] Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge, Canyon, Payette, Owyhee, and..., 1010 Dearborn St, Caldwell, ID 83605. [ssquf] Homedale Public Library, 125 W Owyhee Ave, Homedale,...

  8. Detected CWD in wild deer and elk outside the established area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map shows chronic wasting disease (CWD) in wild deer and elk outside established game management units where CWD has been previously detected.

  9. Wolf reintroduction to Scotland: public attitudes and consequences for red deer management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erlend B Nilsen; E.J Milner-Gulland; Lee Schofield; Atle Mysterud; Nils Chr Stenseth; Tim Coulson

    2007-01-01

    ). Red deer are themselves a contentious component of the Scottish landscape. They support a trophy hunting industry but are thought to be close to carrying capacity, and are believed to have a considerable economic and ecological impact...

  10. 2015 Deer Spotlight Survey Report at Loess Bluffs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In past years white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) browsing has caused considerable damage to the under-story of the bottomland forest areas located on the...

  11. Snake River Islands Wilderness proposal : Snake River sector : Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document describes the Snake River Islands in the Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge which have been studied pursuant to the Wilderness Act of 1964 to determine...

  12. Columbian White-Tailed Deer National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map depicts lands owned and/or administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Julia Butler Hansen Refuge For The Columbian White-tailed Deer.

  13. Problems of habitat management for deer and elk in the northern forests

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This article discusses wildlife habitat problems and research needs in the northern Rocky Mountains and is focused primarily on habitats of deer and elk. The article...

  14. Julia Butler Hansen NWR: Initial Survey Instructions for Columbian White-tailed Deer FLIR Efficacy Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Recovery of the lower Columbia population of Columbian White-tailed Deer (CWTD) relies on specific population goals. As such, monitoring programs cannot be based on...

  15. Colorado Plateau Rapid Ecoregion Assessment Conservation Elements - Terrestrial Species: Mule Deer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — This map shows the potential current distribution of mule deer, in the context of current and near-term terrestrial intactness and long-term potential for climate...

  16. 2014 Deer Spotlight Survey Report For Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers have increased greatly throughout Missouri over the past century due to the abundant habitat and conservation...

  17. Amendment #3 : Hunting and Fishing Plan : Mingo National Wildlife Refuge : Historic Weapons Deer Hunt

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This amendment to the Mingo NWR Hunting and Fishing Plan opens an additional 5,000 acres in the southwest portion of the Refuge to a historic weapons deer hunt.

  18. Analysis of 2007-2014 Ouray National Wildlife Refuge deer and elk survey data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A population survey for deer and elk on Ouray National Wildlife Refuge was established in 2007 and conducted through 2014. The purpose of the survey was to establish...

  19. Outreach Plan : Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Special Deer & Turkey Hunting Opportunities

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a plan for special deer and turkey hunting opportunities at Crane Meadows NWR. Goals, strategies, messages, and key dates relevant to this plan are outlined.

  20. Negative density-dependent emigration of males in an increasing red deer population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leif Egil Loe; Atle Mysterud; Vebjørn Veiberg; Rolf Langvatn

    2009-01-01

    ...), possibly caused by increasing saturation of deer in areas surrounding the marking sites. Our study highlights that pattern of density dependence in dispersal rates may differ markedly between sexes in highly polygynous species...

  1. Environmental Action Memorandum : [Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge White-tailed Deer Hunting Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Action Memorandum for the proposed Ottawa NWR White-tailed Deer Hunting Plan states that the plan is found not to have significant environmental...

  2. White-Tailed Deer Research on Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge 1989-90

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The report covers the program to monitor the status of deer on Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge since 1985. This program is run by the Fisheries and Wildlife...

  3. Deer Harvest Records for Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge from 1997 to 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These Deer Harvest Records show raw data for muzzleloader hunts collected from check in stations at Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge from 1997-2001

  4. Home range and habitat use of reintroduced Javan Deer in Panaitan Island, Ujung Kulon National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pairah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Javan deer which inhabit Panaitan Island (± 175 Km2 were reintroduced from Peucang Island (± 4.5 Km2 during 1978–1982 (3 males: 13 females. The information of home range and habitat use of these animals were needed for wildlife habitat management especially in the small island habitat. We measured the home range size and habitat use of Javan deer in Peucang Island and Panaitan Island and compared them. The home range size was measured using Minimum Convex Polygon and then the polygon of home ranges were used to measure the habitat use. The results showed that in general the home range size in all age class of Javan deer between both islands did not differ significantly, only subadult males in Peucang Island which have a larger home range size than subadult males in Panaitan Island. Javan deer in Panaitan Island have found suitable conditions.

  5. The Trail Inventory of Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  6. Water quality of Lower Deer Creek, Harford County, MD, home of the federally endangered Maryland darter

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Maryland darter (Etheostoma sellare) is one of the rarest fish in the world, existing in one riffle of Deer Creek, Harford County. There have been several...

  7. Rusa alfredi papillomavirus 1 - a novel deltapapillomavirus inducing endemic papillomatosis in the endangered Visayan spotted deer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fux, Robert; Langenmayer, Martin C; Jörgens, Dirk; Schubert, Christina; Heckel, Jens-Ove; Sutter, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel papillomavirus - Rusa alfredi papillomavirus 1 (RalPV1) - which causes endemic fibropapillomatosis in the European conservation breeding population of the highly endangered Visayan spotted deer (Rusa alfredi...

  8. Modeling routes of chronic wasting disease transmission: environmental prion persistence promotes deer population decline and extinction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Almberg, Emily S; Cross, Paul C; Johnson, Christopher J; Heisey, Dennis M; Richards, Bryan J

    2011-01-01

    ... of environmental prion persistence may affect epidemics of CWD and populations of North American deer. Existing data from Colorado, Wyoming, and Wisconsin's CWD epidemics were used to define plausible short-term outcomes and associated parameter spaces...

  9. National Key Deer Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 3 of 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at National Key Deer Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography, cadastral...

  10. Deer Harvest Records for Hillside National Wildlife Refuge from 1995 to 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These Deer Harvest Records show raw data collected from check in stations at Hillside National Wildlife Refuge from 1995-1999 and 2005-2007.

  11. Presence of Hepatitis E Virus in a RED Deer (Cervus elaphus) Population in Central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolo, I; Ponterio, E; Angeloni, G; Morandi, F; Ostanello, F; Nicoloso, S; Ruggeri, F M

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis E is an acute human disease caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV). In addition to humans, HEV has been detected in several animal species and is recognized as a zoonotic pathogen. Pigs, wild boar and deer can be reservoir. In this study, we evaluated HEV prevalence in a free-living red deer (Cervus elaphus) population in central Italy by detecting virus-specific antibodies and RNA in sera. A total of 35 of 251 red deer sera were positive for anti-HEV IgG. HEV RNA was detected in 10 of 91 sera examined. Two genomic fragments targeted by diagnostic PCRs in the capsid region were sequenced, both matching with genotype 3 HEV. Overall results confirmed the occurrence of HEV infection in deer also in Italy.

  12. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge deer hunt : Gatehouse guidelines during hunt

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines the gatehouse guidelines for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge during the 1993 deer hunt. Key responsibilities include: checking in each...

  13. Mismatch between birth date and vegetation phenology slows the demography of roe deer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plard, Floriane; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Coulson, Tim; Hewison, A J Mark; Delorme, Daniel; Warnant, Claude; Bonenfant, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    .... To track peak resource availability, large herbivores like roe deer, with a widespread distribution across Europe, should also modify their life-history schedule in response to changes in vegetation phenology over time...

  14. Factors Affecting Maternal Care in an Income Breeder, the European Roe Deer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reidar Andersen; Jean-Michel Gaillard; John D. C. Linnell; Patrick Duncan

    2000-01-01

    ...), which rely heavily on body reserves to raise their young. Roe deer, in contrast, are close to the income breeder end of the capital-income breeder continuum, and show high levels of maternal care. 2...

  15. Population dynamics of Norwegian red deer: density–dependence and climatic variation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M.C. Forchhammer; N.C. Stenseth; E. Post; R. Landvatn

    1998-01-01

    We present a model on plant—deer—climate interactions developed for improving our understanding of the temporal dynamics of deer abundance and, in particular, how intrinsic (density–dependent) and extrinsic (plants, climate...

  16. Temporal and Spatial Development of Red Deer Harvesting in Europe: Biological and Cultural Factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jos M. Milner; Christophe Bonenfant; Atle Mysterud; Jean-Michel Gaillard; Sándor Csányi; Nils Chr. Stenseth

    2006-01-01

    1. Deer numbers have increased dramatically throughout Europe and North America over the last century, but empirical analyses of variation in harvesting and the influence of biological and cultural factors are lacking. 2...

  17. Environmental Assessment for Public Deer Hunting at James River National Wildlife Refuge 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An excessively high deer population will conflict with any forest management program conducted at James River National Wildlife Refuge. To accomplish the objective...

  18. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for National Key Deer Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for National Key Deer Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was conducted to...

  19. Deer Population Health Evaluation for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge from Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The letter and enclosed report discusses the health evaluation of 5 deer taken randomly from Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge population. Herd health appears...

  20. Comparison and overlap of sympatric wild ungulate diet in Cazorla, segura and las Villas Natural Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Martínez, T.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the trophic relationships and the degree of overlap between the diet of Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica, red deer (Cervus elaphus, fallow deer (Dama dama and mouflon (Ovis musimon in the Cazorla, Segura and Las Villas National Park (Southeastern of Spain. Stomach content was used as the basis for diet evaluation. The most heavily consumed plant species by the four herbivores were Quercus rotundifolia, Phillyrea latifolia, Rosmarinus officinalis, Oryzopsis paradoxa and Festuca arundinacea. Spanish ibex and red deer were the ungulates with the most similar diet (53.7% overlap, both were browsers and consumed large amounts of woody matter. Fallow deer and mouflon had similar feeding habits, both are grazers and have a high intake of grasses. There were very low levels of overlap between the ibex and red deer diet with that of fallow deer and mouflon, respectively. Mouflon was the largest forbs consumer, fallow deer consumed most camephytes and red deer consumed most trees and shrubs. None of the four ungulates had absolutely definitive diets that could class them strictly as browsers or grazers, however certain trends suggested that ibex and red deer primarily behave as browsers while fallow deer and mouflon are grazers, although this was not a strict division.

    [fr]
    Nous avons étudié le degré de superposition entre la diète du bouquetin (Capra pyrenaica, cerf (Cervus elaphus, daim (Dama dama et mouflon (Ovis musimon dans le Parc National de Cazorla, Segura et Las Villas (SE de l'Espagne. Pour l'évaluation de la diète, nous nous sommes basés sur les contenus stomachaux. Les espèces les plus consommées par les quatre herbivores étaient Quercus rotundifolia, Phillyrea latifolia, Rosmarinus officinalis, Oryzopsis paradoxa et Festuca arundinacea. Le bouquetin et le cerf montraient la diète la plus semblable (53,77o de

  1. Life in the Fast Lane: Road Crossing Behavior of Mule Deer in a Wildland-Urban Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Biggs, James [Northern New Mexico College; Bennett, Kathryn D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bare, Carey [Bare and Associates, LLC; Sherwood, Sherri R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-04

    In 2009, approximately 260,000 animal-vehicle collisions were reported in the United States, resulting in 12,000 human injuries and 173 human fatalities. Research has focused on identifying factors associated with high densities of animal-vehicle collisions, including variables such as traffic speed and volume, road design, topographic features, vegetative cover, and local deer or elk (Cervus elaphus) abundance. The purposes of this study were to document how often and where mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) crossed roads in a western United States wildland-urban interface area, and to relate deer road-crossing behavior to deer-vehicle collision locations. Seven adult mule deer (four males [M] and three females [F]) were captured and collared with GPS-enabled collars during December 2001 and January 2002. Five of the seven deployed collars were recovered. None of the roads in the study area appeared to act as a substantial barrier to deer passage. Deer home ranges straddled highways and primary, secondary, and tertiary arterial roads. Deer crossed all types of roads. The average number of times deer crossed road during 24 hours of monitoring ranged from 2.1 to 7.0. Deer in the Los Alamos townsite avoided crossing roads during day and before sunset. Deer-vehicle accidents occurred at 350 percent of the level expected after sunset. All other time periods had fewer accidents than expected. The distribution of accidents across time periods was not similar to the distribution of road crossings across time periods for any deer. Within Los Alamos County there was a clear trend for deer-vehicle collisions to occur on roads with speed limits > 35 mph. Deer in the townsite frequently crossed roads with lower speed limits; therefore, the reason for the paucity of accidents along these roads was evidently the ability of drivers to detect deer (or the ability of deer to detect vehicles) and respond before an accident occurred. There was a significant but not strong correlation

  2. Prion protein polymorphisms in white-tailed deer influence susceptibility to chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chad; Johnson, Jody; Vanderloo, Joshua P; Keane, Delwyn; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2006-07-01

    The primary sequence of the prion protein affects susceptibility to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases, in mice, sheep and humans. The Prnp gene sequence of free-ranging, Wisconsin white-tailed deer was determined and the Prnp genotypes of chronic wasting disease (CWD)-positive and CWD-negative deer were compared. Six amino acid changes were identified, two of which were located in pseudogenes. Two alleles, a Q-->K polymorphism at codon 226 and a single octapeptide repeat insertion into the pseudogene, have not been reported previously. The predominant alleles--wild-type (Q95, G96 and Q226) and a G96S polymorphism--comprised almost 98% of the Prnp alleles in the Wisconsin white-tailed deer population. Comparison of the allelic frequencies in the CWD-positive and CWD-negative deer suggested that G96S and a Q95H polymorphism were linked to a reduced susceptibility to CWD. The G96S allele did not, however, provide complete resistance, as a CWD-positive G96S/G96S deer was identified. The G96S allele was also linked to slower progression of the disease in CWD-positive deer based on the deposition of PrP(CWD) in the obex region of the medulla oblongata. Although the reduced susceptibility of deer with at least one copy of the Q95H or G96S allele is insufficient to serve as a genetic barrier, the presence of these alleles may modulate the impact of CWD on white-tailed deer populations.

  3. Wild boar and red deer display high prevalences of tuberculosis-like lesions in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Joaquín; Höfle, Ursula; Garrido, Joseba M; Fernández-De-Mera, Isabel G; Juste, Ramón; Barral, Marta; Gortazar, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We describe the distribution of tuberculosis-like lesions (TBL) in wild boar (Sus scrofa) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Spain. Animals with TBL were confirmed in 84.21% of mixed populations (n=57) of red deer and wild boar and in 75% of populations of wild boar alone (n=8) in central and southern Spain (core area). The prevalence of TBL declined towards the periphery of this region. In the core area, the prevalence ranged up to 100% in local populations of wild boar (mean estate prevalence 42.51%) and up to 50% in red deer (mean estate prevalence 13.70%). We carried out exploratory statistical analyses to describe the epidemiology of TBL in both species throughout the core area. Prevalence of TBL increased with age in both species. Wild boar and red deer mean TBL prevalence at the estate level were positively associated, and lesion scores were consistently higher in wild boars than in red deer. The wild boar prevalence of TBL in wild boar did not differ between populations that were or were not cohabiting with red deer. Amongst the wild boars with TBL, 61.19% presented generalized lesions, and the proportion of generalized cases was similar between sex and age classes. In red deer, 57.14% of TBL-positive individuals presented generalized lesions, and the percentage of generalized cases increased with age class, but did not differ between the sexes. These results highlight the potential importance of wild boar and red deer in the maintenance of tuberculosis in south central Spain.

  4. Ecology of mule deer on the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site, Colorado

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlach, Thomas P.

    1987-01-01

    Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) population dynamics, movements, and habitat use were studied on the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site in southeastern Colorado during January 1983- December 1984. Thirty-eight adults and 28 fawns were radio collared, and 35 adults were color collared or ear tagged. Population estimates were 365 and 370 deer for 1983 and 1984, respectively. The sex ratio (yearling and adult) was 60 males: 100 females. Adult female pregnancy rate was 95%; the mean litter ...

  5. White-tailed deer response to vehicle approach: evidence of unclear and present danger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley F Blackwell

    Full Text Available The fundamental causes of animal-vehicle collisions are unclear, particularly at the level of animal detection of approaching vehicles and decision-making. Deer-vehicle collisions (DVCs are especially costly in terms of animal mortality, property damage, and safety. Over one year, we exposed free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus to vehicle approach under low ambient light conditions, from varying start distances, and vehicle speeds from 20 km/h to approximately 90 km/h. We modeled flight response by deer to an approaching vehicle and tested four hypotheses: 1 flight-initiation distance (FID would correlate positively with start distance (indicating a spatial margin of safety; 2 deer would react to vehicle speed using a temporal margin of safety; 3 individuals reacting at greater FIDs would be more likely to cross the path of the vehicle; and 4 crossings would correlate positively with start distance, approach speed, and distance to concealing/refuge cover. We examined deer responses by quantiles. Median FID was 40% of start distance, irrespective of start distance or approach speed. Converting FID to time-to-collision (TTC, median TTC was 4.6 s, but uncorrelated with start distance or approach speed. The likelihood of deer crossing in front of the vehicle was not associated with greater FIDs or other explanatory variables. Because deer flight response to vehicle approach was highly variable, DVCs should be more likely with increasing vehicle speeds because of lower TTCs for a given distance. For road sections characterized by frequent DVCs, we recommend estimating TTC relative to vehicle speed and candidate line-of-sight distances adjusted downward by (1-P, where P represents our findings for the proportion of start distance by which >75% of deer had initiated flight. Where road design or conservation goals limit effectiveness of line-of-sight maintenance, we suggest incorporation of roadway obstacles that force drivers to slow

  6. Molecular genealogy tools for white-tailed deer with chronic wasting disease

    OpenAIRE

    Holly B Ernest; Hoar, Bruce R; Well, Jay A.; O’Rourke, Katherine I

    2010-01-01

    Molecular genetic data provide powerful tools for genealogy reconstruction to reveal mechanisms underlying disease ecology. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) congregate in matriarchal groups; kin-related close social spacing may be a factor in the spread of infectious diseases. Spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disorder of deer and their cervid relatives, is presumed to be associated with direct contact between individuals and by exposure to shared food and water sourc...

  7. Deer herbivory reduces web-building spider abundance by simplifying forest vegetation structure

    OpenAIRE

    Roberson, Elizabeth J.; Chips, Michael J.; Walter P. Carson; Thomas P. Rooney

    2016-01-01

    Indirect ecological effects are a common feature of ecological systems, arising when one species affects interactions among two or more other species. We examined how browsing by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) indirectly affected the abundance and composition of a web-building spider guild through their effects on the structure of the ground and shrub layers of northern hardwood forests. We examined paired plots consisting of deer-free and control plots in the Allegheny Plateau re...

  8. White-tailed deer are susceptible to the agent of sheep scrapie by intracerebral inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Justin J; Smith, Jodi D; Kunkle, Robert A

    2011-10-11

    Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. The purpose of this experiment was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer to the agent of scrapie after intracerebral inoculation and to compare clinical signs and lesions to those reported for chronic wasting disease (CWD). Deer (n = 5) were inoculated with 1 mL of a 10% (wt/vol) brain homogenate derived from a sheep clinically affected with scrapie. A non-inoculated deer was maintained as a negative control. Deer were observed daily for clinical signs of disease and euthanized and necropsied when unequivocal signs of scrapie were noted. One animal died 7 months post inoculation (pi) due to intercurrent disease. Examinations of brain tissue for the presence of the disease-associated abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)) by western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were negative whereas IHC of lymphoid tissues was positive. Deer necropsied at 15-22 months pi were positive for scrapie by IHC and WB. Deer necropsied after 20 months pi had clinical signs of depression and progressive weight loss. Tissues with PrP(Sc) immunoreactivity included brain (at levels of cerebrum, hippocampus, colliculus, cerebellum, and brainstem), trigeminal ganglion, neurohypophysis, retina, spinal cord, and various lymphoid tissues including tonsil, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and spleen. This work demonstrates for the first time that white-tailed deer are susceptible to sheep scrapie by intracerebral inoculation. To further test the susceptibility of white-tailed deer to scrapie these experiments will be repeated with a more natural route of inoculation.

  9. Natural diet and food habitat use of the Tarim red deer, Cervus elaphus yarkandensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Jianfang; YANG Weikang; GAO Xingyi

    2006-01-01

    In order to determine the natural diet and food habitat use of Tarim red deer (Cervus elaphus yarkandensis), a study was carried out in Qiemo, Xinjiang, China from October 2000 to June 2001. Direct observation combined with faecal analysis method was used to determine the natural diet of red deer. 15 different species of plant were identified as food items. Among them, 13 species of plants were identified in winter diet and 9 species in summer. Red deer consumed a wider range of species in winter because of their nutrient requirement as well as the shortage of food and the scarcity of high-quality forage in the study area. Phragmites communis, Glycyrrhiza inflata and populus diversifolia were frequently present in the deer's diet whenever in winter and summer. Among them, Phragmites communis was the most abundant plant in the area and was included in the deer's diet. Observation on food selection frequency of captive Tarim red deer showed that Populus diversifolia was the first preferred species. However, this food was limited in the study area. Five food habitat types were found in the study area according to plant association: (1)Phragmites communis-Tamarix ramosissima association, (2) Tamarix ramosissima-Halostachys caspica association, (3) Tamarix ramosissima-Phragmites communis association, (4) Populus diversifoliaPhragmites communis association, (5) Burned area.Among them, Phragmites communis-Tamarix ramosissima association (reed meadow and reed marsh)was preferred to other types within the study area whenever in summer and winter. Dense reed cover could reduce the chance of detection from predator and obstruct attack from predator. Furthermore, under the cover of the reed, Tarim red deer was protected from direct solar radiation during the hours of www. scichina.com www.springerlink.com hot day in summer. The reed meadow and marsh was preferred, presumably because the red deer could minimize their movements while searching for food, water and cover.

  10. Creating an urban deer-vehicle accident management plan using information from a town's GIS project

    OpenAIRE

    Premo, Dean B.; Rogers, Elizabeth I.

    2001-01-01

    Funding Source and Budget: Town of Amherst, New York. $60,000 Project Period: October 2000-September 2001 The Town of Amherst, New York is an urban/suburban community near Buffalo that has experienced considerable development in the past 10 years (1991-2000). In the same time period, the Town has experienced a noticeable increase in deer vehicle accidents. Given the Town's landscape, interactions of deer and people seem highly likely to continue. In addition to commercial uses and residential...

  11. Susceptible conditions for debarking by deer in subalpine coniferous forests in central Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hayato Iijima; Takuo Nagaike

    2016-01-01

    Background:Recently, deer have expanded their distribution to higher altitude ranges including subalpine forests. However, culling deer and construction of deer fence in subalpine forests are difficult because of steep slopes and complex topography. Thus it is necessary to clarify the factors which are associated with debarking by deer for the effective protection of subalpine forests. In this study, we examined which factors are associated with debarking by sika deer (Cervus nippon) in subalpine coniferous forests. Methods:We conducted our survey in Minami-Alps National Park, central Japan. We established 24 10 m × 40 m plots and surveyed the occurrence of debarking on saplings>30 cm in height and3 cm in DBH, as well as sapling density within each plot. Minimum distances to nearest grassland of plots were calculated (tentatively assuming grassland would attract deer and would cause high debarking pressure in the surrounding subalpine forests). Results:The mean percentage of debarked live saplings was higher than that of live trees. The mean percentage of debarked saplings which had already died was 81.6 %. Debarking of saplings increased with lower elevation, taller sapling size, and marginally increased near grassland. Sapling density was lower in plots with low basal area of conspecific trees near grassland and differed among species. Sapling density marginally decreased with decreasing elevation and increasing stand tree density. Debarking of trees was positively related to small DBH and low elevation, and marginally increased near grassland and differed among species. Conclusions:Our results suggest that tall saplings in subalpine forests of low elevation or near subalpine grassland were susceptible to debarking by deer and monitoring of these areas may permit the early detection of the impacts of deer in subalpine coniferous forests.

  12. Contrasting responses of web-building spiders to deer browsing among habitats and feeding guilds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Mayura; Baba, Yuki G; Yanagi, Yosuke; Terada, Saeko; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2008-08-01

    We examined web-building spider species richness and abundance in forests across a deer density gradient to determine the effects of sika deer browsing on spiders among habitats and feeding guilds. Deer decreased the abundance of web-building spiders in understory vegetation but increased their abundance in the litter layer. Deer seemed to affect web-building spiders in the understory vegetation by reducing the number of sites for webs because vegetation complexity was positively correlated with spider density and negatively correlated with deer density. In contrast, the presence of vegetation just above the litter layer decreased the spider density, and deer exerted a negative effect on this vegetation, possibly resulting in an indirect positive effect on spider density. The vegetation just above the litter layer may be unsuitable as a scaffold for building webs if it is too flexible to serve as a reliable web support, and may even hinder spiders from building webs on litter. Alternatively, the negative effect of this vegetation on spiders in the litter may be as a result of reduced local prey availability under the leaves because of the reduced accessibility of aerial insects. The response to deer browsing on web-building spiders that inhabit the understory vegetation varied with feeding guild. Deer tended to affect web-invading spiders, which inhabit the webs of other spiders and steal prey, more heavily than other web-building spiders, probably because of the accumulated effects of habitat fragmentation through the trophic levels. Thus, the treatment of a particular higher-order taxon as a homogeneous group could result in misleading conclusions about the effects of mammalian herbivores.

  13. Hepatic minerals of white-tailed and mule deer in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, T.J.; Jenks, J.A.; Leslie, David M.; Neiger, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Because there is a paucity of information on the mineral requirements of free-ranging deer, data are needed from clinically healthy deer to provide a basis for the diagnosis of mineral deficiencies. To our knowledge, no reports are available on baseline hepatic mineral concentrations from sympatric white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) using different habitats in the Northern Great Plains. We assessed variation in hepatic minerals of female white-tailed deer (n=42) and mule deer (n=41). Deer were collected in February and August 2002 and 2003 from study areas in Custer and Pennington Counties, South Dakota, in and adjacent to a wildfire burn. Hepatic samples were tested for levels (parts per million; ppm) of aluminum (Al), antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), calcium (Ca), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), selenium (Se), sodium (Na), sulfur (S), thalium (T1), and zinc (Zn). We predicted that variability in element concentrations would occur between burned and unburned habitat due to changes in plant communities and thereby forage availability. We determined that Zn, Cu, and Ba values differed (P???0.05) between habitats. Because of the nutritional demands of gestation and lactation, we hypothesized that elemental concentrations would vary depending on reproductive status; Cd, Cu, Ca, P, Mn, Mo, Na, and Zn values differed (P???0.05) by reproductive status. We also hypothesized that, due to variation in feeding strategies and morphology between deer species, hepatic elemental concentrations would reflect dietary differences; Ca, Cu, K, Co, Mo, Se, and Zn differed (P???0.05) between species. Further research is needed to determine causes of variation in hepatic mineral levels due to habitat, reproductive status, and species. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  14. Of elephants and blind men: Deer management in the U.S. National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, W.F.; Underwood, H.B.

    1999-01-01

    Overabundant populations of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are becoming common in the eastern United States. Faced with burgeoning deer populations in eastern parks, the National Park Service (NPS) formulated policy based on its long experience with ungulate management in western parks. That the NPS failed to find a management solution acceptable to its many constituencies was inevitable. Like blind men touching different parts of an elephant and disagreeing about its form, those engaged in the debate about deer management in parks are viewing different parts of the ecological system. None has seen the entire system, and consequently, there is neither common agreement on the nature of the problem nor on the solutions. We explore the quandary of deer management in eastern parks by addressing three questions: (1) Can the National Park Service reconcile its management goals with those of its neighbors? (2) Can thresholds be identified for determining when to intervene in natural processes? (3) Is there a scientific foundation for proceeding with effective management of deer? We argue that reconciling the NPS management with that of state conservation agencies is not possible because management policy guides these agencies in opposite directions: the NPS is charged with limiting human impact on ecological processes, and state agencies are charged with exerting human control over population abundance. Questions about thresholds and a scientific basis for management arise from concern that irrupting deer populations are a manifestation of disrupted natural processes. Several population growth paradigms are at the heart of this ecological question. The science provides no consensus about which of these paradigms are appropriate to deer in eastern ecosystems. Thus, it is premature to expect science to identify if or when natural processes have been disrupted. While the NPS cannot effectively achieve its goals without better science, neither can it wait for

  15. Habitat selection by Eld's deer following relocation to a patchy landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Pan

    Full Text Available An emerging issue in wildlife conservation is the re-establishment of viable populations of endangered species in suitable habitats. Here, we studied habitat selection by a population of Hainan Eld's deer (Cervus eldi relocated to a patchy landscape of farmland and forest. Hainan Eld's deer were pushed to the brink of extinction in the 1970s, but their population expanded rapidly from 26 to more than 1000 individuals by 2003 through effective reserve protection. As part of a wider relocation and population management strategy, 131 deer were removed from the reserve and reintroduced into a farmland-forest landscape in 2005. Habitat use under a context of human disturbance was surveyed by monitoring 19 radio-collared animals. The majority of deer locations (77% were within 0.6-2 km of villages. Annual home ranges of these collared deer averaged 725 ha (SD 436, which was 55% of the size of the reserve from which they had originated. The annual home ranges contained 54% shrub-grassland, 26% forest and 15% farmland. The relocated deer population selected landscape comprising slash-and-burn agriculture and forest, and avoided both intensively farmed areas and areas containing only forest. Within the selected landscape, deer preferred swiddens and shrub-grasslands. Forests above 300 m in elevation were avoided, whereas forests below 300 m in elevation were overrepresented during the dry season and randomly used during the wet season. Our findings show that reintroduced deer can utilize disturbed habitats, and further demonstrate that subsistence agroforest ecosystems have the capacity to sustain endangered ungulates.

  16. Wolf reintroduction to Scotland: public attitudes and consequences for red deer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Erlend B; Milner-Gulland, E J; Schofield, Lee; Mysterud, Atle; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Coulson, Tim

    2007-04-07

    Reintroductions are important tools for the conservation of individual species, but recently more attention has been paid to the restoration of ecosystem function, and to the importance of carrying out a full risk assessment prior to any reintroduction programme. In much of the Highlands of Scotland, wolves (Canis lupus) were eradicated by 1769, but there are currently proposals for them to be reintroduced. Their main wild prey if reintroduced would be red deer (Cervus elaphus). Red deer are themselves a contentious component of the Scottish landscape. They support a trophy hunting industry but are thought to be close to carrying capacity, and are believed to have a considerable economic and ecological impact. High deer densities hamper attempts to reforest, reduce bird densities and compete with livestock for grazing. Here, we examine the probable consequences for the red deer population of reintroducing wolves into the Scottish Highlands using a structured Markov predator-prey model. Our simulations suggest that reintroducing wolves is likely to generate conservation benefits by lowering deer densities. It would also free deer estates from the financial burden of costly hind culls, which are required in order to achieve the Deer Commission for Scotland's target deer densities. However, a reintroduced wolf population would also carry costs, particularly through increased livestock mortality. We investigated perceptions of the costs and benefits of wolf reintroductions among rural and urban communities in Scotland and found that the public are generally positive to the idea. Farmers hold more negative attitudes, but far less negative than the organizations that represent them.

  17. Evaluation of 25-Percent ATJ Fuel Blends in the John Deere 4045HF 280 Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    advertising or product endorsement purposes. Contracted Author As the author(s) is(are) not a Government employee(s), this document was only...ABSTRACT A 25% blend of Alcohol to Jet (ATJ) and JP8 fuel was evaluated in the mechanically fuel injected John Deere 4045HF280 engine. Pre and post...TERMS Alcohol to Jet (ATJ), JP8, Alternative Fuels, Stanadyne, Rotary Fuel Injection Pump, John Deere 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  18. Impacts of white-tailed deer on red trillium (Trillium recurvatum): defining a threshold for deer browsing pressure at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Grundel, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Overabundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have been a concern for land managers in eastern North America because of their impacts on native forest ecosystems. Managers have sought native plant species to serve as phytoindicators of deer impacts to supplement deer surveys. We analyzed experimental data about red trillium (Trillium recurvatum), large flowered trillium (T. grandiflorum), nodding trillium (T. cernuum), and declined trillium (T. flexipes) growth in paired exclosure (fenced) plots and control (unfenced) plots from 2002 to 2010 at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The latter two species lacked replication, so statistical analysis was not possible. All red trillium plants were surveyed for height-to-leaf, effects of browsing, and presence of flowers. Data from individuals in 2009 demonstrated a sigmoidal relationship between height-to-leaf and probability of flowering. The relationship on moraine soils was shifted to taller plants compared to those on sand substrates, with respectively 50 percent flowering at 18 and 16 cm and 33 percent flowering at 16 and 14 cm height-to-leaf. On a plot basis, the proportion of plants flowering was influenced by height to leaf, duration of protection, and deviation in rainfall. The proportion of plants flowering increased ninefold in exclosures (28 percent) compared to control plots (3 percent) over the 8 years of protection. The mean height-to-leaf was a function of the interaction between treatment and duration, as well as red trillium density. Changes in height-to-leaf in control plots from year to year were significantly influenced by an interaction between change in deer density and change in snowfall depth. There was a significant negative correlation between change in deer density and snowfall depth. Plants in the exclosures increased in height at a rate of 1.5 cm yr−1 whereas control plants decreased in height by 0.9 cm yr−1. In all, 78 percent of the control plots lacked flowering

  19. A Paleozoological Perspective on White-Tailed Deer ( Odocoileus virginianus texana) Population Density and Body Size in Central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, Steve; Kennedy, James H.; Cornelius, John D.

    2007-04-01

    Archaeological and paleontological datasets are used in conservation to add time-depth to ecology. In central Texas, several top carnivores including prehistoric Native American hunters have been extirpated or have had their historic ranges restricted, which has resulted in pest-level white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus texana) populations in some areas. Differences in body size of deer between prehistory and modernity are expected, given that a lack of predation likely has increased intraspecific competition for forage among deer, resulting in smaller body size today. In fact, modern deer from settings without harvest pressure are significantly smaller than those from harvested areas and from prehistoric deer. From a natural history perspective, this research highlights potential evolutionary causes and effects of top-predator removal on deer populations and related components of biological communities in central Texas.

  20. Changes in distribution area of Korean musk deer (Moschus moschiferus parvipes) from 1950s to 1999 in South Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the literature reviews and questionnaire, field survey on the species, feces, and tracks in non-snow season and snow season of Korean musk deer from February to December of 1999 in South Korea (Cultural Properties Administration 1999), the authors summarized the change of distribution area and number of Korean musk deer from 1950s to 1999. The results showed that the distribution area of Korean musk deer (Moschus moschiferus parvipes) was sharply decreased from 1950s to 1999 in South Korea. Due to the road and forest road construction in the habitat of Korean musk deer, the musk deer habitats were fragmented and lost. And the illegal capture for economic benefits was the main reason of decreases in number of individuals and habitats of this species. Forest roads in high elevation area were also used as the passages for illegal captures. For the conservation and protection of Korean musk deer, strict regulation of illegal capture is urgently needed.

  1. Cryopreservation of roe deer abomasal nematodes for morphological identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldo, Paola; Pascotto, Ernesto

    2014-02-01

    Conventional methods to preserve adult nematodes for taxonomic purposes involve the use of fixative or clearing solutions (alcohol, formaldehyde, AFA and lactophenol), which cause morphological alterations and are toxic. The aim of this study is to propose an alternative method based on glycerol-cryopreservation of nematodes for their subsequent identification. Adults of trichostrongylid nematodes from the abomasum of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus Linnaeus) were glycerol-cryopreserved and compared with those fixed in formaldehyde, fresh and frozen without cryoprotectans. Morphology, transparency and elasticity of the anterior and posterior portion of male nematodes were compared, especially the caudal cuticular bursa and genital accessories. The method presented is quick and easy to use, and the quality of nematode specimens is better than that of nematodes fixed by previously used fixatives. Moreover, glycerol cryopreserved nematodes can be stored for a long time at -20 degrees C in perfect condition and they could be suitable for further analyses, such as histological or ultrastructural examinations.

  2. a Uav-Based ROE Deer Fawn Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a UAV based remote sensing system for the detection of fawns in the meadows. There is a high demand because during pasture mowing many wild animals, especially roe deer fawns are killed by mowing machines. The system was tested in several real situations especially with differing weather and iluminating conditions. Its primary sensor is a lightweight thermal infrared camera. The images are captured onboard of the flight system and also transmitted as analog video stream to the ground station, where the user can follow the camera live stream on a monitor for manual animal detection. Beside a high detection rate a fast workflow is another very important objective for this application. Therefore a waypoint planning software was developed that accelerates the workflow. At adequate illuminating and weather conditions the presented UAV-based fawn detection via thermal imaging is a comfortable, fast and reliable method.

  3. A bivalent scale for measuring crowding among deer hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Chase, Loren

    2014-01-01

    One factor that may influence satisfaction in outdoor recreation is crowding, which historically has been defined as a negative evaluation of the density of other participants. While this definition is suitable for most scenarios, there are circumstances where encounters with others in the area are evaluated positively and thus contribute to the satisfaction of the participant. To adequately describe this phenomenon we suggest a more inclusive measurement of crowding that allows for both positive and negative evaluations of participant density to more accurately explore the relationship between crowding and satisfaction. We identified a sub-group of deer hunters who negatively evaluated the low density of other hunters, which reduced their satisfaction with their overall hunting experience. The methodology for measuring crowding in recreation research may have an important effect in identifying the relationship crowding has with other relevant variables as well as management implications.

  4. Tolerance to deer herbivory and resistance to insect herbivores in the common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, A; Johnson, M T J

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of plant defence in response to herbivory will depend on the fitness effects of damage, availability of genetic variation and potential ecological and genetic constraints on defence. Here, we examine the potential for evolution of tolerance to deer herbivory in Oenothera biennis while simultaneously considering resistance to natural insect herbivores. We examined (i) the effects of deer damage on fitness, (ii) the presence of genetic variation in tolerance and resistance, (iii) selection on tolerance, (iv) genetic correlations with resistance that could constrain evolution of tolerance and (v) plant traits that might predict defence. In a field experiment, we simulated deer damage occurring early and late in the season, recorded arthropod abundances, flowering phenology and measured growth rate and lifetime reproduction. Our study showed that deer herbivory has a negative effect on fitness, with effects being more pronounced for late-season damage. Selection acted to increase tolerance to deer damage, yet there was low and nonsignificant genetic variation in this trait. In contrast, there was substantial genetic variation in resistance to insect herbivores. Resistance was genetically uncorrelated with tolerance, whereas positive genetic correlations in resistance to insect herbivores suggest there exists diffuse selection on resistance traits. In addition, growth rate and flowering time did not predict variation in tolerance, but flowering phenology was genetically correlated with resistance. Our results suggest that deer damage has the potential to exert selection because browsing reduces plant fitness, but limited standing genetic variation in tolerance is expected to constrain adaptive evolution in O. biennis.

  5. Hair-loss epizootic in moose (Alces alces) associated with massive deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madslien, Knut; Ytrehus, Bjørnar; Vikøren, Turid; Malmsten, Jonas; Isaksen, Ketil; Hygen, Hans Olav; Solberg, Erling J

    2011-10-01

    Deer keds (Lipoptena cervi) are blood-sucking flies in the family Hippoboscidae; moose (Alces alces) are their main host in Scandinavia. There are no detailed reports of the negative impacts of deer keds on moose. In 2006 and 2007, hunters in southeastern Norway and midwestern Sweden found several moose cadavers with severe alopecia; numerous moose had extensive hair loss. Between February 2006 and June 2007, materials from 23 moose were submitted for laboratory examination and large numbers of deer keds were found in the coat of most animals. The body condition of the moose varied but was poor in animals with severe alopecia. The findings of enormous numbers of deer keds in the coat of the majority of the affected animals and a consistent histologic image (acute to chronic, multifocal to coalescing, eosinophilic to lymphocytic dermatitis), concurrent with the absence of any other lesions, trace element deficiencies, or dermal infections which are known to cause alopecia, suggest that the hair-loss epizootic was linked to massive infestations with deer keds. The emergence of this hair-loss syndrome implies that the dynamics between parasite and host have been disrupted by a currently unknown environmental or ecological factor. A high moose density, combined with extraordinarily mild weather June 2006-June 2007 and a particularly long period with the absence of night-frost in autumn of 2006, may have been ideal for deer ked development, survival, and optimal host acquisition.

  6. Bartonella infections in deer keds (Lipoptena cervi) and moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duodu, Samuel; Madslien, Knut; Hjelm, Eva; Molin, Ylva; Paziewska-Harris, Anna; Harris, Philip D; Colquhoun, Duncan J; Ytrehus, Bjørnar

    2013-01-01

    Infections with Bartonella spp. have been recognized as emerging zoonotic diseases in humans. Large knowledge gaps exist, however, relating to reservoirs, vectors, and transmission of these bacteria. We describe identification by culture, PCR, and housekeeping gene sequencing of Bartonella spp. in fed, wingless deer keds (Lipoptena cervi), deer ked pupae, and blood samples collected from moose, Alces alces, sampled within the deer ked distribution range in Norway. Direct sequencing from moose blood sampled in a deer ked-free area also indicated Bartonella infection but at a much lower prevalence. The sequencing data suggested the presence of mixed infections involving two species of Bartonella within the deer ked range, while moose outside the range appeared to be infected with a single species. Bartonella were not detected or cultured from unfed winged deer keds. The results may indicate that long-term bacteremia in the moose represents a reservoir of infection and that L. cervi acts as a vector for the spread of infection of Bartonella spp. Further research is needed to evaluate the role of L. cervi in the transmission of Bartonella to animals and humans and the possible pathogenicity of these bacteria for humans and animals.

  7. Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) from northwestern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, Francisco J; Panadero, Rosario; Vázquez, Luis; López, Ceferino M; Díaz, Pablo; Vázquez, Esther; Díez-Baños, Pablo; Morrondo, Patrocinio; Fernández, Gonzalo

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, the seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in roe deer in relation to different parameters in northwestern Spain was investigated. A total of 154 roe deer hunted between April 2007 and October 2008 from different localities of Galicia (northwest Spain) were examined. From each animal, a blood sample and all attached ticks found were collected. All the specimens for tick stages (larva, nymph, and adult) were speciated based on reference keys. Antibodies against B. burgdorferi were detected by indirect immunofluorescence (titer > or = 1:64). The percentage of roe deer seropositive for B. burgdorferi was 68.8% (106/ 154), of which 88.7% (94/106) were parasitized by ticks. Ixodes ricinus was the only species identified and was detected in 83.1% of roe deer with a mean (standard deviation [SD]) intensity of 46 +/- 47 ticks. Individual host characteristics such as age or sex did not have any effect on the prevalence of B. burgdorferi, but significant seasonal variation was observed, with higher prevalences in April-July than in August-October. Antibodies against B. burgdorferi were related to the presence of ticks. When analyzing all the factors together, the total number of ticks parasitizing roe deer was found as the most influential factor on B. burgdorferi prevalence. The results of this study have shown that roe deer in the northwest of Spain are highly exposed to B. burgdorferi and that exposure is related to the presence of I. ricinus.

  8. Vehicle Collisions Cause Differential Age and Sex-Specific Mortality in Mule Deer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D. Olson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As roads continue to be built and expanded, it is important that managers understand the effects that vehicle-related mortality can have on the population dynamics of wildlife. Our objective was to examine the frequency of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus vehicle collisions to determine if different demographic groups showed differential susceptibility to mortality when compared with their proportion in the population. We also compared vehicle collision rates of mule deer, elk (Cervus canadensis, and moose (Alces alces to determine their relative vulnerability to vehicle collisions. We found that 65% of mule deer involved in vehicle collisions were female; of those, 40% were adult does ≥2 yrs. When we compared the proportion of bucks, does, and fawns killed in vehicle collisions to surveys of live deer, we found that bucks were killed at rate of 2.1–3.0 times their proportion in the population. Additionally, when we compared vehicle collision rates for 2010 and 2011, we found that mule deer were 7.4–8.7 times more likely to be involved in collisions than elk and 1.2–2.0 times more likely than moose. However, we were unable to detect a negative correlation (P=0.55 between mule deer abundance and increasing traffic volume.

  9. DEFECATION RATE IN CAPTIVE DEER IN “LOS CAPOMOS”, MUNICIPALITY OF El FUERTE, SINALOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Gibrán Ochoa-Álvarez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable use of white-tailed deer in Mexico can only be performed in Management Units for the Conservation of Wildlife (UMA , for its acronym in Spanish , based on a management plan for legal operation. Among the methods for population estimate harvest rates, highlights fecal count groups, depending on the frequency at which a deer excretes daily, and whose values are estimated from captive specimens and tolerant observer, but considering subspecies and different from the northern Sinaloa conditions. Using these rates of defecation can lead to overharvesting. This research was conducted in the farmed deer of the indigenous ejido (Mayo-Yoreme ethnic group called “Los Capomos”, in the municipality of El Fuerte, Sinaloa, between October 2011 and May 2012, to estimate the rate of defecation counts from fecal groups, obtained from a confined deer population and in apparent equilibrium with its environment through adjustments to the model of Eberhardt and Van Etten. It was found that the lowest rate published defecation (12.7 deer fecal groups per day, the estimated population accounted for half of the known population, which would prevent excessive use of native deer in the wild. However, the pattern of random grouping of excreta in confinement, makes it advisable that it be used in conditions of freedom, since it presupposes the mathematical model used aggregate grouping patterns.

  10. Transmission studies with Sarcocystis idahoensis of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and gopher snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, B

    1980-04-01

    Transmission studies with Sarcocystis idahoensis of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and gopher snakes (pituophis melanoleucus) were conducted to determine host specificity of various stages of the parasite. Sporocysts were not passed by four dogs or four cats fed infected skeletal muscle from deer mice. Seven white mice (Mus musculus) and 34 white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) were negative for sarcocysts and liver meronts following oral inoculation with S. idahoensis sporocysts; however, excystation of sporocysts occurred in two white-footed mice killed four hours post inoculation (PI). A gopher snake orally inoculated with sporocysts remained negative for coccidia for two months PI. Three deer mice orally inoculated and three intraperitoneally (IP) inoculated with tachyzoites from liver meronts developed sarcocysts in their skeletal muscles similar to those seen in deer mice orally inoculated with sporocysts. Liver meronts were not found. Ten deer mice orally inoculated and 10 deer mice inoculated IP with bradyzoites from S. idahoensis sarcocysts remained negative for sarcocysts and liver meronts at necropsy 17 days PI.

  11. Ecology and management of white-tailed deer in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShea, William J

    2012-02-01

    Due to chronic high densities and preferential browsing, white-tailed deer have significant impacts on woody and herbaceous plants. These impacts have ramifications for animals that share resources and across trophic levels. High deer densities result from an absence of predators or high plant productivity, often due to human habitat modifications, and from the desires of stakeholders that set deer management goals based on cultural, rather than biological, carrying capacity. Success at maintaining forest ecosystems require regulating deer below biological carrying capacity, as measured by ecological impacts. Control methods limit reproduction through modifications in habitat productivity or increase mortality through increasing predators or hunting. Hunting is the primary deer management tool and relies on active participation of citizens. Hunters are capable of reducing deer densities but struggle with creating densities sufficiently low to ensure the persistence of rare species. Alternative management models may be necessary to achieve densities sufficiently below biological carrying capacity. Regardless of the population control adopted, success should be measured by ecological benchmarks and not solely by cultural acceptance.

  12. Decreasing prevalence of brucellosis in red deer through efforts to control disease in livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, E.; Cross, P.C.; Beneria, M.; Ficapal, A.; Curia, J.; Marco, X.; Lavin, S.; Marco, I.

    2011-01-01

    When a pathogen infects a number of different hosts, the process of determining the relative importance of each host species to the persistence of the pathogen is often complex. Removal of a host species is a potential but rarely possible way of discovering the importance of that species to the dynamics of the disease. This study presents the results of a 12-year programme aimed at controlling brucellosis in cattle, sheep and goats and the cascading impacts on brucellosis in a sympatric population of red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the Boumort National Game Reserve (BNGR; NE Spain). From February 1998 to December 2009, local veterinary agencies tested over 36 180 individual blood samples from cattle, 296 482 from sheep and goats and 1047 from red deer in the study area. All seropositive livestock were removed annually. From 2006 to 2009 brucellosis was not detected in cattle and in 2009 only one of 97 red deer tested was found to be positive. The surveillance and removal of positive domestic animals coincided with a significant decrease in the prevalence of brucellosis in red deer. Our results suggest that red deer may not be able to maintain brucellosis in this region independently of cattle, sheep or goats, and that continued efforts to control disease in livestock may lead to the eventual eradication of brucellosis in red deer in the area.

  13. Decreasing prevalence of brucellosis in red deer through efforts to control disease in livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, E; Cross, P C; Beneria, M; Ficapal, A; Curia, J; Marco, X; Lavín, S; Marco, I

    2011-10-01

    When a pathogen infects a number of different hosts, the process of determining the relative importance of each host species to the persistence of the pathogen is often complex. Removal of a host species is a potential but rarely possible way of discovering the importance of that species to the dynamics of the disease. This study presents the results of a 12-year programme aimed at controlling brucellosis in cattle, sheep and goats and the cascading impacts on brucellosis in a sympatric population of red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the Boumort National Game Reserve (BNGR; NE Spain). From February 1998 to December 2009, local veterinary agencies tested over 36 180 individual blood samples from cattle, 296 482 from sheep and goats and 1047 from red deer in the study area. All seropositive livestock were removed annually. From 2006 to 2009 brucellosis was not detected in cattle and in 2009 only one of 97 red deer tested was found to be positive. The surveillance and removal of positive domestic animals coincided with a significant decrease in the prevalence of brucellosis in red deer. Our results suggest that red deer may not be able to maintain brucellosis in this region independently of cattle, sheep or goats, and that continued efforts to control disease in livestock may lead to the eventual eradication of brucellosis in red deer in the area.

  14. Response of mule deer to habitat modification near natural gas development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Van Dyke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus are known to shift habitat use in response to environmental modifications, including those associated with energy development. Their specific behavioral responses, however, and capacities to habituate to particular aspects of energy development have not been effectively studied. We examined mule deer response to habitat alteration near natural gas wells in Las Animas County, Colorado, USA in 2008—2010, an area experiencing development for extraction of natural gas. We created 10-1 ha openings in forests adjacent to 10 wells by removing standing trees in 2008, with concomitant establishment of 10 1-ha control sites adjacent to the same wells. On each site, we estimated deer use, indexed by pellet density, before and after tree removal. Concurrently, we measured plant production, cover, nutritional quality, species composition and biomass removed by deer and other large herbivores. Species richness and diversity and graminoid and forb cover and biomass increased on cut sites following tree removal. Use increased following tree removal on cut and control sites, but was greater on cut sites in 2010. Herbivores removed negligible quantities of vegetation on control sites in both years, suggesting that control sites may have been used primarily for concealment. Mule deer demonstrated the behavioral capacity to habituate to habitat modifications and other environmental changes associated with development for the extraction of energy. Managing forage and habitat availability appears to have the potential to affect the type of response and degree of habituation by mule deer to such development.

  15. Beliefs and attitudes toward lethal management of deer in Cuyahoga Valley National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, D.C.; Skerl, K.; Shank, E.M.; Lime, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    We used the theory of reasoned action to help understand attitudes and beliefs about lethal management of deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP), Ohio. We used a mail-back survey to collect data from Ohio residents in the surrounding 9-county area. Two strata were defined: residents action to reduce deer populations was unacceptable (near 75%??4.5%, far 72%??5.1%). Beliefs about outcomes of lethal control and evaluation of those outcomes proved to be strong predictors of the acceptability of lethal control of deer in CVNP. Lethal control was more acceptable if it was done to prevent severe consequences for humans (e.g., spread of disease, car collisions) or the natural environment (e.g., maintain a healthy deer herd) than to prevent negative aesthetic impacts or personal property damage. Results from the study can be used to assist managers at CVNP as they make decisions regarding alternatives for deer management in the park and to inform others managing abundant deer populations of socially relevant impacts of management actions.

  16. An epizootic of hemorrhagic disease in white-tailed deer in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, J; Hansen, L P; Stallknecht, D E

    2000-07-01

    As part of a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) survival study in Missouri (USA) we were actively monitoring 97 radio-collared deer when 8 (8%) died. This mortality, which occurred from 20 August to 23 September 1996, consisted of five adult females, two yearling females and one yearling male. Based on the seasonality of this mortality and the isolation of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotype 2 from one of these animals, we believe that these losses resulted from an epizootic of hemorrhagic disease. The remains of five unmarked deer that may have died from HD also were found on the study area during this same period. During the fall following this mortality, we tested serum from 96 deer taken by hunters in the immediate area. Fifteen (16%) were positive for EHDV or bluetongue virus (BTV) antibodies as determined by agar gel immunodiffusion tests. Serum neutralization test results indicated that previous infections were caused by EHDV virus serotype 2. Based on these data, and assuming that there was no prior exposure to EHDV serotype 2 in this population, the exposure rate for this epizootic was 24% of which 8% died. We noted hoof interruptions in only two of the 96 deer sampled. During this mortality event, the Missouri Department of Conservation received no reports of dead deer, and without the radio-monitored animals the event would have been undetected.

  17. Body condition, diet and ecosystem function of red deer (Cervus elaphus in a fenced nature reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Fløjgaard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Body condition, as a sign of animal welfare, is of management concern in rewilding projects where fenced animals are subject to winter starvation, which may conflict with animal welfare legislation. Investigating the relationship between body condition, age, sex, diet quality and diet composition is therefore relevant to increase understanding of herbivores' ecosystem function and to inform management. In this study, we focused on red deer, Cervus elaphus, in a fenced nature reserve in Denmark, where the deer are managed as ecosystem engineers to contribute to biodiversity conservation. We measured body mass and body size of 91 culled red deer, and determined diet composition using DNA metabarcoding and diet quality using fecal nitrogen on 246 fecal samples. We found that body condition was predicted by age and diet composition, but not diet quality. We also found that individuals of different body condition had different diets, i.e., the fecal samples of red deer in poorer body condition contained significantly more Ericaceae sequences than red deer in good body condition. This may imply that certain functions of red deer in ecosystems, such as regeneration of heather by grazing, may depend on variation in body condition within the population. Our findings call for the need to consider the consequences of management practices, including culling or supplemental feeding, on the outcomes of habitat restoration, and more broadly underline the importance of preserving the overall breath of herbivore ecosystem functions for effective biodiversity conservation.

  18. Cesium-137 in deer: Savannah River Plant vs. southeastern coastal plain herds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, J.R.; Rabon, E.W.; Dicks, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    The /sup 137/Cs content in deer killed during programmed hunts at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) has averaged 9.0 pCi/g. This value, based on measurements of 13,907 deer taken over 14 years (1965 to 1978), similar to the value obtained for 552 deer from other southeastern Coastal Plain locations, indicating the /sup 137/Cs content is due to fallout from the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons rather than from SRP operations. The computerized SRP data base for each harvested deer includes age, sex, weight, cesium content, kill location, date, and the hunter's name. Analysis of these data enables the estimation of population dose from ingestion of the edible meat. Consumption of all edible meat from deer killed at SRP from 1965 to 1978 gives a whole body population dose of 196 man-rem from /sup 137/Cs. Assuming an annual consumption rate of 20 kg gives an average individual whole body dose of 13 mrem, about 10% of local annual background level. The radiation dose from /sup 40/K of natural potassium content of deer is comparable to the radiation dose from /sup 137/Cs.

  19. Seminal plasma improves cryopreservation of Iberian red deer epididymal sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Anel, Luis; Guerra, Camino; Alvarez, Mercedes; Soler, Ana J; Garde, J Julián; Chamorro, César; de Paz, Paulino

    2006-11-01

    We tested the protective action of seminal plasma on epididymal spermatozoa from Iberian red deer, especially considering cryopreservation, as a means for germplasm banking improvement. We obtained seminal plasma by centrifuging electroejaculated semen, and part of it was thermically inactivated (denatured plasma; 55 degrees C 30 min). Epididymal samples (always at 5 degrees C) were obtained from genitalia harvested after regulated hunting, and pooled for each assay (five in total). We tested three seminal plasma treatments (mixing seminal plasma with samples 2:1): no plasma, untreated plasma and denatured plasma; and four incubation treatments: 32 degrees C 15 min, 5 degrees C 15 min, 5 degrees C 2h and 5 degrees C 6h. After each incubation, samples were diluted 1:1 with extender: Tes-Tris-Fructose, 10% egg yolk, 4% glycerol; equilibrated for 2h at 5 degrees C, extended down to 10(8) spz./mL and frozen. Sperm quality was evaluated before 1:1 dilution, before freezing and after thawing the samples, assessing motility (CASA) and viability (percentage of viable and acrosome-intact spermatozoa; PI/PNA-FITC and fluorescent microscopy). Plasma treatment, both untreated and denatured, rendered higher viability before freezing and higher results for most parameters after thawing. The improvement was irrespective of incubation treatment, except for viability, which rendered slightly different results for untreated and denatured plasma. This may be due to the presence of thermolabile components. We still have to determine the underlying mechanisms involved in this protection. These results might help to improve the design of cryopreservation extenders for red deer epididymal sperm.

  20. Maternal investment and reproductive success in Chinese water deer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christiane MAUGET; Robert MAUGET

    2009-01-01

    Among cervids, maternal investment, estimated as the amount of resources and care allocated to the offspring, was expected to be related to species body size. Therefore, maternal investment in a herd of captive Chinese water deer Hydropotes inermis, a relatively small species of cervid, was investigated over 3 years. Except during the lactation period, reproductive females spent about 2-fold more time resting than feeding. During lactation, the amount of time spent feeding increased highly (25.3 min/h during lactation vs 17.3 min/h during the gestation period). Females spent less than 30% of time in communal behaviours with offspring. They did not reject alien fawns during this care period. Frequency and duration of suckling events decreased exponentially from the second week onwards. More than 10% of suckling bouts were non-filial. Prenatal investment leads to a mean litter mass (about 12% of maternal mass) higher than in most cervid species. Postnatal investment in fawns represents a daily mass gain of ca. 85 g/d during the first 2 weeks, without any sexual difference. Female production, timing and synchrony of births and survival of fawns characterized reproductive success. Seventy percent of mature females gave birth, with a mean of 1.9 offspring per female. The sex ratio was even. Births were synchronous, 80% of births occurring in 25 days. In this herd, 0.74 fawn per female was successfully weaned and 0.56 fawn per female survived through their first year. Based on these results we conclude that reproductive strategy of Chinese water deer was efficient and characterized by mother-offspring relationships typical of hiders and high levels of pre- and postnatal investments. This strategy seems typical of small species of cervids without marked sexual dimorphism.[Current Zoology 55(2):102-110,2009].

  1. A serologic survey of viral infections in captive ungulates in Turkish zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilbağ, Kadir; Alpay, Gizem; Karakuzulu, Hatice

    2011-03-01

    Zoos and zoologic gardens make optimal environments for interspecies transmission of viral infections. There are seven zoos and several small zoologic collections in Turkey. This study aimed to determine the current status of viral infections in captive ungulates living in these environments. Blood samples were taken from 163 captive animals from two zoos. There were 39 Cameroon sheep (Ovis ammon f aries), 11 Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia), 57 pygmy goats (Capra hircus), 9 Angora goats (Capra hircus), 21 mountain goats (Capra aegagrus-aegagrus), 7 llamas (Lama glama), 8 Persian goitred gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa subgutturosa), 7 Caspian red deer (Cervus elaphus maral), 2 fallow deer (Dama dama), and 2 camels (Camelus dromedarius). Antibodies against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), bovine adenoviruses (BAV-1 and -3), parainfluenzavirus 3 (PI-3), and bluetongue viruses (BTV-4 and -9) were investigated using the virus neutralization test, and malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) antibodies were screened by ELISA. All animals were negative for BVDV and BHV-1 antibodies. Seroprevalence of BAV-1, BAV-3, PI-3, BRSV, BT-4, BT-9, and MCF were detected as follows: 46.6%, 60.1%, 0.6%, 7.3%, 1.8%, 1.2%, and 51.6%, respectively. Seroprevalence of BAVs and MCF were more common than all other viruses (P zoo animals are at risk for BTV in endemic regions.

  2. Bovine Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) in Wildlife in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranaz, Alicia; de Juan, Lucía; Montero, Natalia; Sánchez, Celia; Galka, Margarita; Delso, Consuelo; Álvarez, Julio; Romero, Beatriz; Bezos, Javier; Vela, Ana I.; Briones, Victor; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis infection in wildlife and feral species is a potential source of infection for livestock and a threat to protected and endangered species. The aim of this study was to identify Spanish wild animal species infected with M. bovis through bacteriological culture and spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping) of isolates for epidemiological purposes. This study included samples from red deer (Cervus elaphus), fallow deer (Dama dama), wild boar (Sus scrofa), Iberian lynx (Lynx pardina), hare (Lepus europaeus), and cattle (Bos taurus). They were collected in several geographical areas that were selected for their unique ecological value and/or known relationships between wildlife and livestock. In the areas included in this survey, M. bovis strains with the same spoligotyping pattern were found infecting several wild species and livestock, which indicates an epidemiological link. A locally predominant spoligotype was found in these areas. Better understanding of the transmission and distribution of disease in these populations will permit more precise targeting of control measures. PMID:15184440

  3. Isolation of Ehrlichia chaffeensis from wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) confirms their role as natural reservoir hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, J M; Davidson, W R; Stallknecht, D E; Dawson, J E; Howerth, E W

    1997-07-01

    Field and experimental studies have implicated white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) as probable reservoir hosts for Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the causative agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, but natural infection in deer has not been confirmed through isolation of E. chaffeensis. Thirty-five white-tailed deer collected from three Amblyomma americanum-infested populations in Georgia were examined for evidence of E. chaffeensis infection by serologic, molecular, cell culture, and xenodiagnostic methods. Twenty-seven deer (77%) had E. chaffeensis-reactive indirect fluorescent-antibody assay titers of > or = 1:64; and the blood, spleens, or lymph nodes of seven (20%) deer were positive in a nested PCR assay with E. chaffeensis-specific primers. E. chaffeensis was isolated in DH82 cell cultures from the blood of five (14%) deer, including two deer that were PCR negative. Combination of culture and PCR results indicated that six (17%) deer were probably rickettsemic and that nine (26%) were probably infected. Restriction digestion of PCR products amplified from deer tissues and cell culture isolates resulted in a banding pattern consistent with the E. chaffeensis 16S rRNA gene sequence. The sequences of all PCR products from deer tissues or cell culture isolates were identical to the sequence of the Arkansas type strain of E. chaffeensis. Xenodiagnosis with C3H mice inoculated intraperitoneally with deer blood, spleen, or lymph node suspensions was unsuccessful. When viewed in the context of previous studies, these findings provide strong evidence that E. chaffeensis is maintained in nature primarily by a tick vector-vertebrate reservoir system consisting of lone star ticks and white-tailed deer.

  4. Host and Environmental Factors Modulate the Exposure of Free-Ranging and Farmed Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) to Coxiella burnetii

    OpenAIRE

    González-Barrio, David; Velasco Ávila , Ana Luisa; Boadella, Mariana; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Barasona, José Ángel; Santos, João P. V.; Queirós, João; García-Pérez, Ana L; Barral, Marta; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The control of multihost pathogens, such as Coxiella burnetii, should rely on accurate information about the roles played by the main hosts. We aimed to determine the involvement of the red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the ecology of C. burnetii. We predicted that red deer populations from broad geographic areas within a European context would be exposed to C. burnetii, and therefore, we hypothesized that a series of factors would modulate the exposure of red deer to C. burnetii. To test this hyp...

  5. El silencio en la educación de la mujer a la luz de La dama boba de Lope de Vega

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Nogués Bruno

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available En los siglos XVI y XVII existieron tratados doctrinales dirigidos a un público femenino. Éstos recopilaban reglas de comportamiento para las mujeres, cuya principal ambición era el matrimonio. El discurso moral que predomina en estos tratados elogia la modestia, la obediencia, la dulzura y el silencio como cualidades dominantes en la mujer. El mandato de silencio tenía de su parte las ideas aristotélicas sobre los humores, junto con el discurso de la Biblia en las Cartas de San Pablo. Una mujer que aspirara a ser una buena esposa tendría que seguir terminantemente lo que los moralistas esperaban en ese entonces de ella. En La dama boba, Lope presenta una escena común en la época: dos muchachas en edad casadera y la preocupación de su padre por casarlas. En este texto, el modelo de la buena mujer, para la que el silencio es una virtud necesaria es poco a poco tejido entre risas, lecciones, galanterías y una peculiar escuela de amor

  6. Effect of herd management on the contamination of night holding areas (correos) and infections with gastrointestinal nematodes of N'Dama cattle in The Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, J; Komma, A; Pfister, K

    1995-05-01

    The densities of infective nematode larvae (L3/m2) in the night holding places (locally called "correos") of 2 traditionally kept N'Dama herds were estimated at weekly intervals throughout an entire rainy season. Herd 1 moved correos every 3 weeks whereas herd 2 remained in the same area for most of the rainy season. Removal to a new correo was invariably accompanied by a drastic drop of L3/m2. Conversely, L3/m2 increased rapidly up to values of more than 1,000 when the herds used the same night holding place for more than 3 weeks. Calves kept in herds with frequent changes of the correo showed significantly lower nematode egg counts and higher growth rates during the rainy season, combined with a reduced weight loss during the following dry season. The results of this study indicate that a regular frequent change of the correo is an effective method of reducing nematode infection risk and increasing calf growth and that this might be a sustainable part of an integrated strategic programme to control gastrointestinal nematode infections wherever correos are used.

  7. 海南坡鹿的起源、进化及保护%The origin and phylogenetics of Hainan Eld's deer and implications for Eld's deer conservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琼; 曾治高; 孙丽风; 宋延龄

    2009-01-01

    Eld's deer (Cervus eldi) , a highly endangered cervid, includes three subspecies (C. e. eldi, C. e. siamensis and C. e, thamin) that distribute in Southeast Asia and one separated population of C. e. siamensii occurs in Hainan Island of China named Hainan Eld's deer. The endangered subspecies C. e. siamensis has been extinct in wild in Thailand over several dec-ades. Recently, a conservation program has been launched in Thailand to establish wild population of C. e. siamensis from cap-tive breeding deer in the zoo. Hainan Eld' s deer has been considered as supplement resource for the reestablish deer population. In this study, we analyzed variation in the mitochondria! DNA (mtDNA) D-loop sequences of 35 Eld's deer samples, including two Eld's deer subspecies (C e. siamensis and C. e. thamin) and Hainan Eld's deer to address the following questions: (1) where did the Hainan Eld's deer originate from; (2) the relationship between Hainan Eld's deer and subspecies C. e. siamen-sis , and (3) the genetic diversity of Hainan Eld' s deer population. Four haplotypes were observed in all samples, all the sam-ples of Hainan Eld's deer shared an identical haplotype. We constructed phylogenetic trees by Maximum likelihood (ML) , max-imum parsimony ( MP) , Neighbour-Joining ( NJ ) and Bayesian method using the results of this study with sequences data provid-ed by GenBank together. The Hainan Eld's deer and C. e. siamensis were clustered together by MP and NJ method, however, some genetic differentiation was detected between the Hainan Eld' s deer and C. e. siamensii. The average genetic distance is 0.026 between the Hainan Eld's deer and 6". e. siamensii. Our results suggest that Eld's deer could distribute via land bridge from the South-easten Asian mainland to the Hainan Island during the Pleistocene (0. 69 Mya) when the sea level of Beibu Gulf seacoast went down in glacier age. Our results indicate a long-term historical isolation of Hainan Eld's deer population from its

  8. WildSense: Monitoring Interactions among Wild Deer in Harsh Outdoor Environments Using a Delay-Tolerant WSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junho Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biologists and ecologists often monitor the spread of disease among deer in the wild by using tracking systems that record their movement patterns, locations, and interaction behavior. The existing commercial systems for monitoring wild deer utilize collars with GPS sensors, deployed on captured and rereleased deer. The GPS sensors record location data every few hours, enabling researchers to approximate the interaction behavior of tracked deer with their GPS locations. However, the coarse granularity of periodically recorded GPS location data provides only limited precision for determining deer interaction behavior. We have designed a novel system to monitor wild deer interaction behavior more precisely in harsh wilderness environments. Our system combines the functionalities of both GPS and RF-radio sensors with low-cost and minimal-resource motes. We designed and built our system to be able to operate robustly for a period of up to several months for continual tracking and monitoring of the locations and interaction behaviors of wild deer in harsh environments. We successfully deployed six deer collars on six wild deer that were captured and rereleased in the Soapstone Prairie Natural Area of northern Colorado over a one-month period. In this paper, we describe how we designed and built this system and evaluate its successful operation in a wilderness area.

  9. The cross-ecosystem impact of deer on an endangered submerged macrophyte, Ranunculus nipponicus var. submersus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hino Takafumi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophytes are a critical component of freshwater ecosystems and are often eaten by cervids. However, the impact of cervids on macrophytes is not well known. In this study, we investigated the effect of sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis on the endangered macrophyte Ranunculus nipponicus var. submersus in a spring stream in southwestern Hokkaido, Japan. We monitored the frequency of stream habitat use by deer by using sensor cameras in photography mode for four seasons. We also monitored deer feeding behavior on R. nipponicus var. submersus using sensor cameras in movie mode. To quantitatively evaluate the impact of deer on R. nipponicus var. submersus, we conducted a field experiment in which deer were excluded from part of the stream. We selected 10 pairs of adjacent patches of R. nipponicus var. submersus and set up exclosures covering one patch in each pair. We assessed the frequency of deer feeding and trampling on the control patches using the sensor cameras in photography mode and measured the mean macrophyte stem length in the exclosure and control patches every month for four seasons. To compare abiotic conditions between the exclosure and control patches, we investigated canopy openness, water depth, water temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, current velocity, and water quality at each patch during the growing season. The frequency of deer in the stream habitat was higher from spring to summer than in other seasons. Direct evidence of deer feeding behavior on R. nipponicus var. submersus was recorded using the sensor cameras. Deer often fed on and trampled on the control patches, particularly from spring to summer. The R. nipponicus var. submersus stem length was longer in the exclosure patches than in control patches (P 0.189. Stem growth of R. nipponicus var. submersus differed among seasons (P <0.001, and was low from winter to spring. In addition, exclosure and seasonality significantly affected stem length (P <0.001, and the

  10. Large impact of Eurasian lynx predation on roe deer population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Andrén

    Full Text Available The effects of predation on ungulate populations depend on several factors. One of the most important factors is the proportion of predation that is additive or compensatory respectively to other mortality in the prey, i.e., the relative effect of top-down and bottom-up processes. We estimated Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx kill rate on roe deer (Capreolus capreolus using radio-collared lynx. Kill rate was strongly affected by lynx social status. For males it was 4.85 ± 1.30 S.E. roe deer per 30 days, for females with kittens 6.23 ± 0.83 S.E. and for solitary females 2.71 ± 0.47 S.E. We found very weak support for effects of prey density (both for Type I (linear and Type II (non-linear functional responses and of season (winter, summer on lynx kill rate. Additionally, we analysed the growth rate in a roe deer population from 1985 to 2005 in an area, which lynx naturally re-colonized in 1996. The annual roe deer growth rate was lower after lynx re-colonized the study area, but it was also negatively influenced by roe deer density. Before lynx colonized the area roe deer growth rate was λ = 1.079 (± 0.061 S.E., while after lynx re-colonization it was λ = 0.94 (± 0.051 S.E.. Thus, the growth rate in the roe deer population decreased by Δλ = 0.14 (± 0.080 S.E. after lynx re-colonized the study area, which corresponded to the estimated lynx predation rate on roe deer (0.11 ± 0.042 S.E., suggesting that lynx predation was mainly additive to other mortality in roe deer. To conclude, this study suggests that lynx predation together with density dependent factors both influence the roe deer population dynamics. Thus, both top-down and bottom-up processes operated at the same time in this predator-prey system.

  11. Influence of level of nutrition during late pregnancy on reproductive productivity of red deer (2) Adult hinds gestating wapitixred deer crossbred calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, G W; Scott, I C; O'Neill, K T; Littlejohn, R P

    2005-04-01

    The present study aimed to relate feed intake of red deer hinds in the later stages of gestating wapitixred deer crossbred foetuses on dam body condition, gestation length, birth weight and calf growth. Multiparous hinds (N=18) conceiving at known dates to either wapiti (n=12) or red deer (n=6) sires were housed in individual pens from days 150-220 of pregnancy, during which time they were offered either ad libitum access to pelletised rations (n=6 crossbred-bearing hinds [HH] and n=6 red deer-bearing hinds [RH]) or a restricted offer (n=6 crossbred-bearing hinds [HL]) set at 70% of the average ad libitum intake of HH hind in the previous week. Hinds were returned to pasture at day 220 and calving was closely monitored. Liveweights, body condition score (BCS), and lactation score (LS) of hinds were recorded weekly from day 130 of pregnancy until calves were weaned at 12 weeks of age. Calves were tagged and weighed at birth, and subsequently weighed at 7 and 12 weeks of age. HH and RH hinds exhibited similar patterns and levels of MEI/kg0.75, which peaked at 7.8 MJME/kg0.75 at day 220. HL hinds peaked at approximately 5 MJME/kg0.75 and showed significantly lower rates of liveweight gain during pregnancy. Interestingly, both crossbred-bearing groups initiated mammary development in advance of the RH hinds. While there were significant effects of foetal genotype on mean gestation length (239 days versus 234 days for crossbred versus red deer) and mean birth weight (14.5 kg versus 10 kg), the nutritional contrast for gestation length of crossbred-bearing hinds (i.e. HH versus HL) was not significant but approached significance for birth weight (14.5 kg versus 11.9 kg; P=0.06). Regression analysis revealed weak relationships between changes in hind liveweight and gestation length (P>0.05) but a significant relationship with birth weight (Pgestation length and birth weight. Crossbred calves reared by HH hinds were 30% heavier at 7 and 12 weeks of age than the red deer

  12. Effect of warming and nitrogen addition on evapotranspiration and water use efficiency in a wheat-soybean/fallow rotation from 2010 to 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Liting; Hu, Chunsheng; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind;

    2016-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) and water use efficiency (WUE) are critical indexes in water flux cycles of croplands, being affected by climate change. However, field studies addressing influence of experimental warming on ET and WUE in semi-arid cropland are highly deficient. A two-factor experiment......, including soil temperature [ambient (C) and increased average 1.5 °C (T) at 5 cm soil depth] and nitrogen fertilizer (N) [without (N0) and with 315 kg N ha−1 input (N1)], was conducted from 2010 to 2014 in North China Plain to measure ET and WUE of wheat-soybean/fallow rotation. In the N1 treatment, warming...... with increasing soil temperature is likely due to the increased vapour pressure deficit (VPD). The study highlights the interactions between climate warming and N addition on hydrological cycles during wheat growth, contributing the understanding of how fertilized semi-arid cropland respond to climate change....

  13. Bacterial Community Structure in a Mollisol Under Long-Term Natural Restoration, Cropping, and Bare Fallow History Estimated by PCR-DGGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guang-Hua; JIN Jian; LIU Jun-Jie; CHEN Xue-Li; LIU Ju-Dong; LIU Xiao-Bing

    2009-01-01

    Soil microbial biomass and community structures are commonly used as indicators for soil quality and fertility.A investigation was performed to study the effects of long-term natural restoration,cropping,and bare fallow managements on the soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structures in depths of 0-10,20-30,and 40-50 cm in a black soil (Mollisol).Microbial biomass was estimated from chloroform fumigation-extraction,and bacterial community structures were determined by analysis of 16S rDNA using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCRDGGE).Experimental results showed that microbial biomass significantly declined with soil depth in the managements of restoration and cropping,but not in the bare fallow.DGGE profiles indicated that the band number in top 0-10 cm soils was less than that in depth of 20-30 or 40-50 cm.These suggested that the microbial population was high but the bacterial community structure was simple in the topsoil.Cluster and principle component analysis based on DGGE banding patterns showed that the bacterial community structure was affected by soil depth more primarily than by managements,and the succession of bacterial community as increase of soil depth has a similar tendency in the three managements.Fourteen predominating DGGE bands were excised and sequenced,in which 6 bands were identified as the taxa of Verrucomicrobia,2 bands as Actinobacteria,2 bands as α-Proteobacteria,and the other 4 bands as δ-Proteobacteria,Acidobacteria,Nitrospira,and unclassified bacteria.In addition,the sequences of 11 DGGE bands were closely related to uncultured bacteria.Thus,the bacterial community structure in black soil was stable,and the predominating bacterial groups were uncultured.

  14. Population status and management of mule and white-tailed deer [at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, FY95-FY97

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary report of the population status and management of white-tailed deer and mule deer at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge for fiscal years...

  15. Using Mark-recapture Distance Sampling to Estimate Sitka Black-tailed Deer Densities in Non-forested Habitats of Kodiak Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Management goals for Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis) at Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge are to minimize deer impacts to native flora and...

  16. Contaminants in white-tailed deer tissue from the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge Morris and Somerset Counties, New Jersey: Results of 1988 sampling and analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) tissues were sampled during the December, 1988, public deer hunt at the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (GSNWR) to...

  17. Use of Distance Sampling to Estimate Sitka Black-tailed Deer Abundances in Non-forested Habitats of Kodiak Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Maximizing Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis) harvestopportunities on Kodiak Island, and minimizing deer impacts on native flora andfauna, are...

  18. Parasitism of the deer ked, Lipoptena cervi, on the moose, Alces alces, in eastern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paakkonen, T; Mustonen, A-M; Roininen, H; Niemelä, P; Ruusila, V; Nieminen, P

    2010-12-01

    The deer ked, Lipoptena cervi L. (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), is an ectoparasitic fly that spread to Finland in the early 1960s from the southeast across the Soviet border. It is currently a common parasite of the moose, Alces alces (Artiodactyla: Cervidae), in the southern part of the country and its area of distribution is gradually spreading to Finnish Lapland, where it will come into contact with another potential cervid host, the semi-domesticated reindeer, Rangifer tarandus tarandus. The aim of this study was to determine the intensity of deer ked parasitism on the moose in eastern Finland. Whole skins of 23 moose were examined for the presence of deer keds, which were extracted and their total numbers estimated. The intensity of deer ked parasitism was correlated to the age, sex, skin area and anatomical region of the host. Bulls had the highest total number of keds (10616 ± 1375) and the highest deer ked density (35.7 ± 4.4 keds/dm(2) of skin). Cows had a higher total number of keds than calves (3549 ± 587 vs. 1730 ± 191), but ked densities on cows and calves were roughly equal (11.8 ± 1.7 vs. 9.4 ± 1.1 keds/dm(2) of skin). The density of keds was highest on the anterior back, followed by the posterior back, front limbs, abdomen, head and hind limbs. The sex ratio of deer keds was close to equal (male : female, 1.0 : 1.1). After they had consumed blood, male keds were heavier than females. As the total numbers and densities of deer keds were higher than reported previously on moose or for any other louse fly species, the effects of parasitism on the health of the host species should be determined.

  19. Wild red deer (Cervus elaphus L. grazing may seriously reduce forage production in mountain meadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Ramanzin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at estimating the impact of red deer grazing on the productivity of meadows located in Pian Cansiglio, north-eastern Italian Pre-Alps. These meadows (383 ha; average elevation 1000 m asl are managed for hay/silage production (1-2 cuts per season and are included in a protected area that hosts a high density of deer (around 30 heads/100 ha. In 2008 and 2010, dry matter (DM production and loss due to deer grazing were estimated with exclusion cages (1 m2; 48 exclusion cages in 2008 and 52 in 2010. Night counts with spotlights were conducted to index deer use of meadows plots. DM production inside the cages was fairly good for the area (first and second cut: 5079 - 2193 Kg DM/ha in 2008, and 4200 - 2615 Kg DM/ha in 2010. DM production outside the cages was significantly lower (first and second cut in 2008: 4314-1389 Kg DM/ha, and in 2010: 3376-2052 Kg DM/ha. Therefore, the magnitude of losses was of 15-20% in the first and 25-40% in the second cut. DM losses in the different meadow plots were positively correlated with index of deer use, which in some plots was as high as 7-8 heads/ha. Deer grazing reduced also crude protein (CP content of forage (15.6±4.4% DM inside exclusion cages and 13.8±3.5% DM outside, with losses being greater where CP content was higher. This study demonstrates that high densities of grazing deer may seriously impact on forage production and quality.

  20. An assessment of zoonotic and production limiting pathogens in rusa deer (Cervus timorensis rusa) from Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jori, F; Godfroid, J; Michel, A L; Potts, A D; Jaumally, M R; Sauzier, J; Roger, M

    2014-08-01

    A population of approximately 70,000 rusa deer (Cervus timorensis russa) represents the most important mammal species reared for food on the island of Mauritius, being the main source of red meat for the local population. However, very limited information is available on the circulation of pathogens affecting the productivity and health of this species. To produce baseline data on the circulation of infectious pathogens in rusa deer under production, a serological survey and/or direct pathogen detection for six selected infectious diseases was undertaken in 2007 in a sample of 53% of the herds reared in semi-free-ranging conditions in hunting estates. Seropositive results were recorded for Johne's disease with an indirect ELISA test (1.7%, n = 351), heartwater with an immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) (95.5%, n = 178) and leptospirosis with a Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT) (25.9%, n = 363). Significant associations were found between seroprevalence to some of the leptospiral serogroups detected (Tarassovi, Pomona, Sejroe and Mini) and age of the animals, animal density or location of the estates (being more prevalent in hotter and more humid areas). In addition, Mycobacterium bovis and M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis were confirmed in two deer carcasses by culture and PCR, respectively. No antibodies against Brucella spp. nor Rift Valley Fever virus were detected with the use of respective indirect ELISA's. The results obtained suggest that the population of rusa deer from Mauritius is exposed to a wide range of pathogens which may affect their productivity. In addition, the results highlight the potential public health risks incurred by deer industry workers and consumers. This survey fills an important gap in knowledge regarding the health of tropical deer meat in Mauritius and justifies the need to implement more regular surveys of selected pathogens in the deer population.