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Sample records for falciparum enolase stage-specific

  1. Antimalarial drug targets in Plasmodium falciparum predicted by stage-specific metabolic network analysis

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    Huthmacher Carola

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite enormous efforts to combat malaria the disease still afflicts up to half a billion people each year of which more than one million die. Currently no approved vaccine is available and resistances to antimalarials are widely spread. Hence, new antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. Results Here, we present a computational analysis of the metabolism of Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest malaria pathogen. We assembled a compartmentalized metabolic model and predicted life cycle stage specific metabolism with the help of a flux balance approach that integrates gene expression data. Predicted metabolite exchanges between parasite and host were found to be in good accordance with experimental findings when the parasite's metabolic network was embedded into that of its host (erythrocyte. Knock-out simulations identified 307 indispensable metabolic reactions within the parasite. 35 out of 57 experimentally demonstrated essential enzymes were recovered and another 16 enzymes, if additionally the assumption was made that nutrient uptake from the host cell is limited and all reactions catalyzed by the inhibited enzyme are blocked. This predicted set of putative drug targets, shown to be enriched with true targets by a factor of at least 2.75, was further analyzed with respect to homology to human enzymes, functional similarity to therapeutic targets in other organisms and their predicted potency for prophylaxis and disease treatment. Conclusions The results suggest that the set of essential enzymes predicted by our flux balance approach represents a promising starting point for further drug development.

  2. Screening of potential targets in Plasmodium falciparum using stage-specific metabolic network analysis.

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    Dholakia, Neel; Dhandhukia, Pinakin; Roy, Nilanjan

    2015-11-01

    The Apicomplexa parasite Plasmodium is a major cause of death in developing countries which are less equipped to bring new medicines to the market. Currently available drugs used for treatment of malaria are limited either by inadequate efficacy, toxicity and/or increased resistance. Availability of the genome sequence, microarray data and metabolic profile of Plasmodium parasite offers an opportunity for the identification of stage-specific genes important to the organism's lifecycle. In this study, microarray data were analysed for differential expression and overlapped onto metabolic pathways to identify differentially regulated pathways essential for transition to successive erythrocytic stages. The results obtained indicate that S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase/ornithine decarboxylase, a bifunctional enzyme required for polyamine synthesis, is important for the Plasmodium cell growth in the absence of exogenous polyamines. S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase/ornithine decarboxylase is a valuable target for designing therapeutically useful inhibitors. One such inhibitor, [Formula: see text]-difluoromethyl ornithine, is currently in use for the treatment of African sleeping sickness caused by Trypanosoma brucei. Structural studies of ornithine decarboxylase along with known inhibitors and their analogues were carried out to screen drug databases for more effective and less toxic compounds.

  3. Sarcocystis neurona: molecular characterization of enolase domain I region and a comparison to other protozoa.

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    Bolten, K E; Marsh, A E; Reed, S M; Dubey, J P; Toribio, R E; Saville, W J A

    2008-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona causes protozoal myeloencephalitis and has the ability to infect a wide host range in contrast to other Sarcocystis species. In the current study, five S. neurona isolates from a variety of sources, three Sarcocystis falcatula, one Sarcocystis dasypi/S. neurona-like isolate, and one Besnoitia darlingi isolate were used to compare the enolase 2 gene segment containing the domain I region to previously sequenced enolase genes from Neospora caninum, Neospora hughesi, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, and Trypanosoma cruzi; enolase 2 segment containing domain I region is highly conserved amongst these parasites of veterinary and medical importance. Immunohistochemistry results indicates reactivity of T. gondii enolase 1 and 2 antibodies to S. neurona merozoites and metrocytes, but no reactivity of anti-enolase 1 to the S. neurona bradyzoite stage despite reactivity to T. gondii bradyzoites, suggesting expression differences between organisms.

  4. Food vacuole associated enolase in plasmodium undergoes multiple post-translational modifications: evidence for atypical ubiquitination.

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    Saudamini Shevade

    Full Text Available Plasmodium enolase localizes to several sub-cellular compartments viz. cytosol, nucleus, cell membrane, food vacuole (FV and cytoskeleton, without having any organelle targeting signal sequences. This enzyme has been shown to undergo multiple post-translational modifications (PTMs giving rise to several variants that show organelle specific localization. It is likely that these PTMs may be responsible for its diverse distribution and moonlighting functions. While most variants have a MW of ~50 kDa and are likely to arise due to changes in pI, food vacuole (FV associated enolase showed three forms with MW~50, 65 and 75 kDa. Evidence from immuno-precipitation and western analysis indicates that the 65 and 75 kDa forms of FV associated enolase are ubiquitinated. Using mass spectrometry (MS, definitive evidence is obtained for the nature of PTMs in FV associated variants of enolase. Results showed several modifications, viz. ubiquitination at K147, phosphorylation at Y148 and acetylation at K142 and K384. MS data also revealed the conjugation of three ubiquitin (Ub molecules to enolase through K147. Trimeric ubiquitin has a linear peptide linkage between the NH2-terminal methionine of the first ubiquitin (Ub1 and the C-terminal G76 of the second (Ub2. Ub2 and third ubiquitin (Ub3 were linked through an atypical isopeptide linkage between K6 of Ub2 and G76 of Ub3, respectively. Further, the tri-ubiquitinated form was found to be largely associated with hemozoin while the 50 and 65 kDa forms were present in the NP-40 soluble fraction of FV. Mass spectrometry results also showed phosphorylation of S42 in the cytosolic enolase from P. falciparum and T337 in the cytoskeleton associated enolase from P. yoelii. The composition of food vacuolar proteome and likely interactors of enolase are also being reported.

  5. Pathogenic potential of Tannerella forsythia enolase.

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    Lee, J-Y; Jung, Y-J; Jun, H-K; Choi, B-K

    2016-04-01

    Although enolases are cytosolic enzymes involved in the glycolytic pathway, they can also be secreted or expressed on the surface of a variety of eukaryotic cells and bacteria. Surface-exposed enolases of eukaryotes and bacteria can function as plasminogen receptors. Furthermore, antibodies raised against bacterial enolases can react with host enolases, suggesting molecular mimicry between bacterial and host enzymes. In this study, we analyzed an enolase of the major periodontopathogen Tannerella forsythia, which is either secreted or present on the cell surface, via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence, respectively. The T. forsythia enolase retained the enzymatic activity converting 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate and showed plasminogen binding and activating ability, which resulted in the degradation of fibronectin secreted from human gingival fibroblasts. In addition, it induced proinflammatory cytokine production, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-a) in the human THP-1 monocytic cell line. Taken together, our results demonstrate that T. forsythia enolase plays a role in pathogenesis in the host by plasminogen activation and proinflammatory cytokine induction, which has the potential to exaggerate inflammation in periodontitis.

  6. Stage-specific activity of potential antimalarial compounds measured in vitro by flow cytometry in comparison to optical microscopy and hypoxanthine uptake

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    Carmen E Contreras

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of new antimalarial agents using older methods of monitoring sensitivity to antimalarial drugs are laborious and poorly suited to discriminate stage-specific activity. We used flow cytometry to study the effect of established antimalarial compounds, cysteine protease inhibitors, and a quinolone against asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Cultured P. falciparum parasites were treated for 48 h with different drug concentrations and the parasitemia was determined by flow cytometry methods after DNA staining with propidium iodide. P. falciparum erythrocytic life cycle stages were readily distinguished by flow cytometry. Activities of established and new antimalarial compounds measured by flow cytometry were equivalent to results obtained with microscopy and metabolite uptake assays. The antimalarial activity of all compounds was higher against P. falciparum trophozoite stages. Advantages of flow cytometry analysis over traditional assays included higher throughput for data collection, insight into the stage-specificity of antimalarial activity avoiding use of radioactive isotopes.

  7. Entamoeba invadens, encystation process and enolase.

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    Segovia-Gamboa, Norma Cristina; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Medina-Flores, Yolanda; Cázares-Raga, Febe Elena; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia

    2010-06-01

    The reptilian parasite Entamoeba invadens is accepted as a model for the study of the Entamoeba encystation process. Here we describe the production and characterization of a mAb (B4F2), generated against a component of the E. invadens cyst wall. This mAb specifically recognizes a 48-kDa protein present in cytoplasmic vesicles of cells encysting for 24 h. In mature cysts (96 h), the antigen was detected on the cyst surface. By two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis, the B4F2 specific antigen was identified as enolase. Levels of enolase mRNA were increased in encysting cells and the B4F2 mAb was found to inhibit cyst formation. Therefore, these results strongly suggest a new role for enolase in E. invadens encystation, and the B4F2 mAb will be useful tool to study its role in the differentiation process.

  8. Importance of enolase in Giardia lamblia differentiation.

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    Castillo-Romero, Araceli; Davids, Barbara J; Lauwaet, Tineke; Gillin, Frances D

    2012-08-01

    The ability of Giardia to differentiate into cysts which survive in the environment and release the virulent trophozoites after ingestion in the small intestine is essential for transmission and disease. We examined the role of enolase, a glycolytic enzyme, in Giardia differentiation. The sequence of Giardia lamblia enolase (gEno) is most similar to enolases in Homo sapiens and Leishmania mexicana, and shows the conserved catalytic and metal-binding residues. We used an integration vector to stably express wild type and mutant gEno. In trophozoites, wild type gEno localized to the cell membrane, caudal flagella and cytosol. gEno is present on the wall of mature cysts, but not in encystation secretory vesicles (ESV). The expression of gEno with a deletion of residues G167-K169, or mutations H389Q/R390S significantly inhibited excystation while mutation of residue D257K had no effect. These results suggest a role for enolase in regulation of Giardia excystation.

  9. LEVELS OF NEUROSPECIFIC ENOLASE AND ENOLASE-SPECIFIC AUTOANTIBODIES IN BLOOD SERUM OF THE PATIENTS WITH AUTOIMMUNE THYROPATIES

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    N. N. Tsybikov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and various functional states of thyroid gland, and diffuse toxic goiter with pronounced thyrotoxicosis were studied for neurospecific enolase and enolase-specific autoantibodies levels in blood serum. Increased concentrations of neurospecific enolase and specific autoantibodies were revealed in all groups of the patients. A conclusion was drawn that nervous system may be involved into pathological process during development of thyropaties.

  10. Carbon partitioning in green algae (chlorophyta) and the enolase enzyme.

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    Polle, Jürgen E W; Neofotis, Peter; Huang, Andy; Chang, William; Sury, Kiran; Wiech, Eliza M

    2014-08-04

    The exact mechanisms underlying the distribution of fixed carbon within photoautotrophic cells, also referred to as carbon partitioning, and the subcellular localization of many enzymes involved in carbon metabolism are still unknown. In contrast to the majority of investigated green algae, higher plants have multiple isoforms of the glycolytic enolase enzyme, which are differentially regulated in higher plants. Here we report on the number of gene copies coding for the enolase in several genomes of species spanning the major classes of green algae. Our genomic analysis of several green algae revealed the presence of only one gene coding for a glycolytic enolase [EC 4.2.1.11]. Our predicted cytosolic localization would require export of organic carbon from the plastid to provide substrate for the enolase and subsequent re-import of organic carbon back into the plastids. Further, our comparative sequence study of the enolase and its 3D-structure prediction may suggest that the N-terminal extension found in green algal enolases could be involved in regulation of the enolase activity. In summary, we propose that the enolase represents one of the crucial regulatory bottlenecks in carbon partitioning in green algae.

  11. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite.

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    Son, E S; Kim, T S; Nam, H W

    2001-06-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce the expression of GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli by IPTG. The bacterial cell extracts were separated on 10% SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis with patient sera which was confirmed by blood smear examination. When applied with patient sera, 147 (91.9%) out of 160 vivax malaria, 12 (92.3%) out of 13 falciparum malaria, and all 9 vivax/falciparum mixed malaria reacted with at least one antigen, while no reactions occurred with 20 normal uninfected sera. In the case of vivax malaria, CSP-1 reacted with 128 (80.0%) sera, MSP-1 with 102 (63.8%), AMA-1 with 128 (80.0%), SERA with 115 (71.9%), and EXP-1 with 89 (55.6%), respectively. We obtained higher detection rates when using 5 antigens (91.9%) rather than using each antigen solely (55.6-80%), a combination of 2 (76.3-87.5%), 3 (85.6-90.6%), or 4 antigens (89.4-91.3%). This method can be applied to serological diagnosis, mass screening in endemic regions, or safety test in transfusion of prevalent vivax malaria.

  12. Neuron-specific enolase: reference values in cord blood.

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    Kintzel, K; Sonntag, J; Strauss, E; Obladen, M

    1998-04-01

    With foetal sonography prenatal detection of tumours has become more frequent. To evaluate and treat these infants it is necessary to identify the tumour postnatally. Elevated neuron-specific enolase is a biochemical marker of neuroblastoma. Since conditions during birth may influence neuron-specific enolase concentration in foetal serum, specific reference values in cord blood are required. Cord blood samples were taken from 192 healthy term newborns and concentration of neuron-specific enolase was measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Median neuron-specific enolase concentration in the reference group was 8.0 micrograms/l and the 5th-95th percentiles were 4.8-19.4 micrograms/l. No differences between male and female newborns were detected (p = 0.13). Measurement of neuron-specific enolase in cord blood, in comparison with our reference values, offers an early postnatal possibility of confirming the diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

  13. Surface-expressed enolases of Plasmodium and other pathogens

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    Anil Kumar Ghosh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Enolase is the eighth enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, a reaction that generates ATP from phosphoenol pyruvate in cytosolic compartments. Enolase is essential, especially for organisms devoid of the Krebs cycle that depend solely on glycolysis for energy. Interestingly, enolase appears to serve a separate function in some organisms, in that it is also exported to the cell surface via a poorly understood mechanism. In these organisms, surface enolase assists in the invasion of their host cells by binding plasminogen, an abundant plasma protease precursor. Binding is mediated by the interaction between a lysine motif of enolase with Kringle domains of plasminogen. The bound plasminogen is then cleaved by specific proteases to generate active plasmin. Plasmin is a potent serine protease that is thought to function in the degradation of the extracellular matrix surrounding the targeted host cell, thereby facilitating pathogen invasion. Recent work revealed that the malaria parasite Plasmodium also expresses surface enolase, and that this feature may be essential for completion of its life cycle. The therapeutic potential of targeting surface enolases of pathogens is discussed.

  14. Arsenic, cadmium and neuron specific enolase (ENO2, γ-enolase expression in breast cancer

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    Soh Maureen A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron specific enolase (ENO2, γ-enolase has been used as a biomarker to help identify neuroendocrine differentiation in breast cancer. The goal of the present study was to determine if ENO2 expression in the breast epithelial cell is influenced by the environmental pollutants, arsenite and cadmium. Acute and chronic exposure of MCF-10A cells to As+3 and Cd+2 sufficient to allow colony formation in soft agar, was used to determine if ENO2 expression was altered by these pollutants. Results It was shown that both As+3 and Cd+2 exposure caused significant increases in ENO2 expression under conditions of both acute and chronic exposure. In contrast, ENO1, the major glycolytic enolase in non-muscle and neuronal cells, was largely unaffected by exposure to either As+3 or Cd+2. Localization studies showed that ENO2 in the MCF-10A cells transformed by As+3 or Cd+2 had both a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization. In contrast, ENO1 was localized to the cytoplasm. ENO2 localized to the cytoplasm was found to co-localized with ENO1. Conclusion The results are the first to show that ENO2 expression in breast epithelial cells is induced by acute and chronic exposure to As+3 or Cd+2. The findings also suggest a possible link between As+3 and Cd+2 exposure and neuroendocrine differentiation in tumors. Overall, the results suggest that ENO2 might be developed as a biomarker indicating acute and/or chronic environmental exposure of the breast epithelial cell to As+3 and Cd+2.

  15. Immunogenicity and protective potential of a Plasmodium spp. enolase peptide displayed on archaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dutta, Sneha; DasSarma, Priya; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Jarori, Gotam K

    2015-01-01

    .... Since enolases are highly conserved between the host and the parasite, a parasite-specific epitope of enolase was displayed on novel protein nanoparticles produced by a halophilic Archaeon Halobacterium sp...

  16. Modeling Metabolism and Stage-Specific Growth of Plasmodium falciparum HB3 during the Intraerythrocytic Development Cycle

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    2014-01-01

    distinct and radically different morphological stages.3 The malaria parasite invades the host through the bite of an infected mosquito. The infective...synthesis of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate coincided with protein synthesis, tied to its function of donating its formyl moiety to produce formylmethionine

  17. Purification and properties of enolase of human erythrocytes

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    Hoorn, R.K.J.; Flikweert, J.P.; Staal, Gerard E.J.

    1974-01-01

    1. 1. Human erythrocyte enolase (2-phospho-D-glycerate hydrolyase, EC 4.2.1.11) was purified I000-fold. 2. 2. The pH-optimum was at pH 6.5. The molecular weight, estimated by gel filtration, was found to be 95,000 ± 5,000. 3. 3. Electrophoresis on agar-agarose at pH 8.5 and 6.4 showed only one ban

  18. Naegleria fowleri: enolase is expressed during cyst differentiation.

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    Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Segovia-Gamboa, Norma; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Espinosa-Cantellano, Martha; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Cysts of Naegleria fowleri present an external single-layered cyst wall. To date, little information exists on the biochemical components of this cyst wall. Knowledge of the cyst wall composition is important to understand its resistance capacity under adverse environmental conditions. We have used of a monoclonal antibody (B4F2 mAb) that specifically recognizes enolase in the cyst wall of Entamoeba invadens. By Western blot assays this antibody recognized in soluble extracts of N. fowleri cysts a 48-kDa protein with similar molecular weight to the enolase reported in E. invadens cysts. Immunofluorescence with the B4F2 mAb revealed positive cytoplasmic vesicles in encysting amebas, as well as a positive reaction at the cell wall of mature cysts. Immunoelectron microscopy using the same monoclonal antibody confirmed the presence of enolase in the cell wall of N. fowleri cysts and in cytoplasmic vesicular structures. In addition, the B4F2 mAb had a clear inhibitory effect on encystation of N. fowleri.

  19. Ascaris suum enolase is a potential vaccine candidate against ascariasis.

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    Chen, Ning; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Xu, Min-Jun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Xiu-Xiang; Zhang, Yan-Zhong; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Chao; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-05-14

    Ascariasis caused by Ascaris is the most common parasite problem in humans and pigs worldwide. No vaccines are available for the prevention of Ascaris infections. In the present study, the gene encoding Ascaris suum enolase (As-enol-1) was amplified, cloned and sequenced. Amino acid sequence alignment indicated that As-enol-1 was highly conserved between different nematodes and shared the highest identity (87%) with enolase from Anisakis simplex s.l. The recombinant pVAX-Enol was successfully expressed in Marc-145 cells. The ability of the pVAX-Enol for inducing immune protective responses against challenge infection with A. suum L3 was evaluated in Kunming mice. The immune response was evaluated by lymphoproliferative assay, cytokine and antibody measurements, and the reduction rate of recovery larvae. The results showed that the mice immunized with pVAX-Enol developed a high level of specific antibody responses against A. suum, a strong lymphoproliferative response, and significant levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 production, compared with the other groups immunized with empty plasmid or blank controls, respectively. There was a 61.13% reduction (P<0.05) in larvae recovery compared with that in the blank control group. Our data indicated that A. suum enolase is a potential vaccine candidate against A. suum infection.

  20. Induction of Endothelial Cell Apoptosis by Anti-alpha-enolase Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-bo Yang; Wen-jie Zheng; Xuan Zhang; Fu-lin Tang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of anti-alpha-enolase antibody in systemic autoimmune diseases in Chinese patients and its role in endothelial cell apoptosis.Methods The reactivity of anti-alpha-enolase antibody in a variety of autoimmune disorders in Chinese patients was evaluated by dot blot assay. Endothelial cell apoptosis was investigated by in vitro incubation of endothelial cells with IgG purified from anti-alpha-enolase antibody-positive sera, with or without pre-incubation with recombinant alpha-enolase.Results Anti-alpha-enolase antibody was prevalent in different systemic autoimmune diseases with relatively high reactivity in Chinese patients. In vitro incubation of endothelial cells with IgG containing anti-alpha-enolase antibody induced apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Apoptosis was partly inhibited by pre-incubation of the endothelial cells with recombinant alpha-enolase.Conclusions Our data suggest that alpha-enolase is a common auto-antigen recognized by antiendothelial cell antibodies in connective tissue disease. Interaction between alpha-enolase and its autoantibody plays a role in endothelial cell apoptosis. Changes other than cell killing may contribute to the pathogenesis of endothelial damage and microvascular lesions.

  1. Extracellular enolase of Candida albicans is involved in colonization of mammalian intestinal epithelium

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    Richard Cardoso Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Enolase is secreted by C. albicans and is present in its biofilms although its extracellular function is unknown. Here we show that extracellular enolase mediates the colonization of small intestine mucosa by C. albicans. Assays using intestinal mucosa disks show that C. albicans adhesion is inhibited, in a dose dependent mode, either by pretreatment of intestinal epithelium mucosa disks with recombinant C. albicans enolase (70% at 0.5 mg/ml enolase or by pretreatment of C. albicans yeasts with anti-enolase antibodies (48% with 20 µg antiserum. Also using flow cytometry, immunoblots of conditioned media and confocal microscopy we demonstrate that enolase is present in biofilms and that the extracellular enolase is not an artifact due to cell lysis, but must represent functional secretion of a stable form. This is the first direct evidence that C. albicans extracellular enolase mediates colonization on its primary translocation site. Also, because enolase is encoded by a single locus in C. albicans, its dual role peptide, as glycolytic enzyme and extracellular peptide, is a remarkable example of gene sharing in fungi.

  2. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Enolase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus: Evidence for a Thermophilic Origin

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    Oleg A Zadvornyy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Enolase catalyzes the conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate during both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis and is required by all three domains of life. Here, we report the purification and biochemical and structural characterization of enolase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a thermophilic andanoxygenic phototroph affiliated with the green non-sulfur bacteria. The protein was purified as a homodimer with a subunit molecular weight of 46 kDa. The temperature optimum for enolase catalysis was 80°C, close to the measured thermal stability of the protein which was determined to be 75°C, while the pH optimum for enzyme activity was 6.5. The specific activities of purified enolase determined at 25°C and 80°C were 147 and 300 units/mg of protein, respectively. Km values for the 2-phosphoglycerate/phosphoenolpyruvate reaction determined at 25°C and 80°C were 0.16 mM and 0.03 mM, respectively. The Km values for Mg2+ binding at these temperatures were 2.5 mM and 1.9 mM, respectively. When compared to enolase from mesophiles, the biochemical and structural properties of enolase from C. aurantiacus are consistent with this being thermally adapted. This data is consistent with the results of our phylogenetic analysis of enolase, which reveal that enolase has a thermophilic origin.

  3. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Enolase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus: Evidence for a Thermophilic Origin.

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    Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Boyd, Eric S; Posewitz, Matthew C; Zorin, Nikolay A; Peters, John W

    2015-01-01

    Enolase catalyzes the conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate during both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, and is required by all three domains of life. Here, we report the purification and biochemical and structural characterization of enolase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a thermophilic anoxygenic phototroph affiliated with the green non-sulfur bacteria. The protein was purified as a homodimer with a subunit molecular weight of 46 kDa. The temperature optimum for enolase catalysis was 80°C, close to the measured thermal stability of the protein which was determined to be 75°C, while the pH optimum for enzyme activity was 6.5. The specific activities of purified enolase determined at 25 and 80°C were 147 and 300 U mg(-1) of protein, respectively. K m values for the 2-phosphoglycerate/phosphoenolpyruvate reaction determined at 25 and 80°C were 0.16 and 0.03 mM, respectively. The K m values for Mg(2+) binding at these temperatures were 2.5 and 1.9 mM, respectively. When compared to enolase from mesophiles, the biochemical and structural properties of enolase from C. aurantiacus are consistent with this being thermally adapted. These data are consistent with the results of our phylogenetic analysis of enolase, which reveal that enolase has a thermophilic origin.

  4. Molecular characterization of enolase gene from Taenia multiceps.

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    Li, W H; Qu, Z G; Zhang, N Z; Yue, L; Jia, W Z; Luo, J X; Yin, H; Fu, B Q

    2015-10-01

    Taenia multiceps is a cestode parasite with its larval stage, known as Coenurus cerebralis, mainly encysts in the central nervous system of sheep and other livestocks. Enolase is a key glycolytic enzyme and represents multifunction in most organisms. In the present study, a 1617bp full-length cDNA encoding enolase was cloned from T. multiceps and designated as TmENO. A putative encoded protein of 433 amino acid residues that exhibited high similarity to helminth parasites. The recombinant TmENO protein (rTmENO) showed the catalytic and plasminogen-binding characteristics after the TmENO was subcloned and expressed in the pET30a(+) vector. The TmENO gene was transcribed during the adult and larval stages and was also identified in both cyst fluid and as a component of the adult worms and the metacestode by western blot analysis. Taken together, our results will facilitate further structural characterization for TmENO and new potential control strategies for T. multiceps.

  5. The interaction of streptococcal enolase with canine plasminogen: the role of surfaces in complex formation.

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    Vinod Balhara

    Full Text Available The enolase from Streptococcus pyogenes (Str enolase F137L/E363G is a homo-octamer shaped like a donut. Plasminogen (Pgn is a monomeric protein composed of seven discrete separated domains organized into a lock washer. The enolase is known to bind Pgn. In past work we searched for conditions in which the two proteins would bind to one another. The two native proteins in solution would not bind under any of the tried conditions. We found that if the structures were perturbed binding would occur. We stated that only the non-native Str enolase or Pgn would interact such that we could detect binding. We report here the results of a series of dual polarization interferometry (DPI experiments coupled with atomic force microscopy (AFM, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and fluorescence. We show that the critical condition for forming stable complexes of the two native proteins involves Str enolase binding to a surface. Surfaces that attract Str enolase are a sufficient condition for binding Pgn. Under certain conditions, Pgn adsorbed to a surface will bind Str enolase.

  6. The existence and neurobiological significance of neuronal and glial forms of the glycolytic enzyme enolase.

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    Marangos, P J; Schmechel, D; Zis, A P; Goodwin, F K

    1979-08-01

    The isoenzymes of the glycolytic enzyme enolase have been separated and purified. The structural and functional properties of two brain enolases are described. Immunocytochemical techniques have established that one brain enolase is restricted to neuronal cells (neuron-specific enolase, NSE) while the other is localized in glial cells (nonneuronal enolase, NNE). The brain enolases, therefore, represent the first example of functional markers for neuronal and glial cell types in brain. The two enzymes are structurally distinct with the evidence establishing that they are products of separate genes. Functionally, the neuronal enolase has been demonstrated to be uniquely stable to concentrations of chloride salts that rapidly inactivate the glial enzyme. NSE may therefore represent an adaptation of this enzyme that is specifically suited to the neuronal milieu. A specific radioimmunoassay is described for NNE and NSE with the studies reported indicating that neuronal enzyme levels vary considerably when different brain areas are compared, suggesting a relationship between functional activity and levels of NSE. In addition to being a marker for neuronal cells, NSE has also been found to be present in various glands. The cells of the APUD series (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation cells) in the pituitary, adrenal medulla, pineal, thyroid, and pancreas have been shown to contain NSE. NSE is, therefore, also a marker for these neuronlike endocrine cells since they are the only cells other than neurons that contain this protein.

  7. Mefloquine interferes with glycolysis in schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni via inhibition of enolase.

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    Manneck, Theresia; Keiser, Jennifer; Müller, Joachim

    2012-04-01

    The antimalarial drug mefloquine has promising antischistosomal properties killing haematophagous adult schistosomes as well as schistosomula. The mode of action and involved drug targets of mefloquine in Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula are unknown. In order to identify mefloquine-binding proteins and thus potential drug targets, mefloquine affinity chromatography with S. mansoni schistosomula crude extracts was performed. We found one specific mefloquine-binding protein that was identified by mass spectrometry as the glycolytic enzyme enolase (Q27877). Enolase activity assays were performed on schistosomula crude extracts and on the recombinant enolase Q27877 expressed in Escherichia coli. In schistosomula crude extracts enolase activity was inhibited by mefloquine and by the enolase inhibitor sodium fluoride, while activity of the recombinant enolase was not affected. In contrast to enolase from crude extracts, recombinant Q27877 did not bind to mefloquine-agarose. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, we next investigated the metabolic inhibition of mefloquine and 3 known glycolytic inhibitors in Schistosoma spp., namely sodium fluoride, 3-bromopyruvate and menadione on schistosomula in the presence or absence of glucose. We found that in the presence of glucose, schistosomula were less affected by mefloquine, sodium fluoride and 3-bromopyruvate, whereas glucose had no protective effect when schistosomula had been exposed to menadione. These results suggest a potential role of mefloquine as an inhibitor of glycolysis, at least in stages where other targets like haem degradation are not relevant.

  8. "Life Stage-Specific" Variations in Performance in Response to Age Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehman, Jessica A.; Bugental, Daphne Blunt

    2013-01-01

    In a test of life stage-specific responses to age-based stigma, older (n = 54, ages 62-92) and younger (n = 81, ages 17-22) adults were told that a task (Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale-III block design) required either (a) speed/contemporary knowledge (YA; "youth advantage") or (b) life experience/wisdom (OA; "age…

  9. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Eui-Sun; Kim, Tong Soo; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2001-01-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce ...

  10. Bifidobacterial enolase, a cell surface receptor for human plasminogen involved in the interaction with the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Biagi, Elena; Centanni, Manuela; Turroni, Silvia; Vici, Manuela; Musiani, Francesco; Vitali, Beatrice; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2009-10-01

    The interaction with the host plasminogen/plasmin system represents a novel component in the molecular cross-talk between bifidobacteria and human host. Here, we demonstrated that the plasminogen-binding bifidobacterial species B. longum, B. bifidum, B. breve and B. lactis share the key glycolytic enzyme enolase as a surface receptor for human plasminogen. Enolase was visualized on the cell surface of the model strain B. lactis BI07. The His-tagged recombinant protein showed a high affinity for human plasminogen, with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range. By site-directed mutagenesis we demonstrated that the interaction between the B. lactis BI07 enolase and human plasminogen involves an internal plasminogen-binding site homologous to that of pneumococcal enolase. According to our data, the positively charged residues Lys-251 and Lys-255, as well as the negatively charged Glu-252, of the B. lactis BI07 enolase are crucial for plasminogen binding. Acting as a human plasminogen receptor, the bifidobacterial surface enolase is suggested to play an important role in the interaction process with the host.

  11. An analytical method for assessing stage-specific drug activity in Plasmodium vivax malaria: implications for ex vivo drug susceptibility testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas H Kerlin

    Full Text Available The emergence of highly chloroquine (CQ resistant P. vivax in Southeast Asia has created an urgent need for an improved understanding of the mechanisms of drug resistance in these parasites, the development of robust tools for defining the spread of resistance, and the discovery of new antimalarial agents. The ex vivo Schizont Maturation Test (SMT, originally developed for the study of P. falciparum, has been modified for P. vivax. We retrospectively analysed the results from 760 parasite isolates assessed by the modified SMT to investigate the relationship between parasite growth dynamics and parasite susceptibility to antimalarial drugs. Previous observations of the stage-specific activity of CQ against P. vivax were confirmed, and shown to have profound consequences for interpretation of the assay. Using a nonlinear model we show increased duration of the assay and a higher proportion of ring stages in the initial blood sample were associated with decreased effective concentration (EC(50 values of CQ, and identify a threshold where these associations no longer hold. Thus, starting composition of parasites in the SMT and duration of the assay can have a profound effect on the calculated EC(50 for CQ. Our findings indicate that EC(50 values from assays with a duration less than 34 hours do not truly reflect the sensitivity of the parasite to CQ, nor an assay where the proportion of ring stage parasites at the start of the assay does not exceed 66%. Application of this threshold modelling approach suggests that similar issues may occur for susceptibility testing of amodiaquine and mefloquine. The statistical methodology which has been developed also provides a novel means of detecting stage-specific drug activity for new antimalarials.

  12. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  13. Identification and characterization of a liver stage-specific promoter region of the malaria parasite Plasmodium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Helm

    Full Text Available During the blood meal of a Plasmodium-infected mosquito, 10 to 100 parasites are inoculated into the skin and a proportion of these migrate via the bloodstream to the liver where they infect hepatocytes. The Plasmodium liver stage, despite its clinical silence, represents a highly promising target for antimalarial drug and vaccine approaches. Successfully invaded parasites undergo a massive proliferation in hepatocytes, producing thousands of merozoites that are transported into a blood vessel to infect red blood cells. To successfully develop from the liver stage into infective merozoites, a tight regulation of gene expression is needed. Although this is a very interesting aspect in the biology of Plasmodium, little is known about gene regulation in Plasmodium parasites in general and in the liver stage in particular. We have functionally analyzed a novel promoter region of the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei that is exclusively active during the liver stage of the parasite. To prove stage-specific activity of the promoter, GFP and luciferase reporter assays have been successfully established, allowing both qualitative and accurate quantitative analysis. To further characterize the promoter region, the transcription start site was mapped by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5'-RACE. Using promoter truncation experiments and site-directed mutagenesis within potential transcription factor binding sites, we suggest that the minimal promoter contains more than one binding site for the recently identified parasite-specific ApiAP2 transcription factors. The identification of a liver stage-specific promoter in P. berghei confirms that the parasite is able to tightly regulate gene expression during its life cycle. The identified promoter region might now be used to study the biology of the Plasmodium liver stage, which has thus far proven problematic on a molecular level. Stage-specific expression of dominant-negative mutant proteins and

  14. Estimating stage-specific daily survival probabilities of nests when nest age is unknown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, T.R.

    2004-01-01

    Estimation of daily survival probabilities of nests is common in studies of avian populations. Since the introduction of Mayfield's (1961, 1975) estimator, numerous models have been developed to relax Mayfield's assumptions and account for biologically important sources of variation. Stanley (2000) presented a model for estimating stage-specific (e.g. incubation stage, nestling stage) daily survival probabilities of nests that conditions on “nest type” and requires that nests be aged when they are found. Because aging nests typically requires handling the eggs, there may be situations where nests can not or should not be aged and the Stanley (2000) model will be inapplicable. Here, I present a model for estimating stage-specific daily survival probabilities that conditions on nest stage for active nests, thereby obviating the need to age nests when they are found. Specifically, I derive the maximum likelihood function for the model, evaluate the model's performance using Monte Carlo simulations, and provide software for estimating parameters (along with an example). For sample sizes as low as 50 nests, bias was small and confidence interval coverage was close to the nominal rate, especially when a reduced-parameter model was used for estimation.

  15. Screening the stage-specific expression gene from different germ cells of rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾孟春; 娄利霞; 裴开颜; 赵龙梅; 石心泉

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To screen the stage-specific expression genes from rat spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids. Methods: Highly purified spermatogonia were isolated from 9-day-old rats, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids from adult rats by sedimentation velocity at unit gravity, using 2%-4% BSA gradient in DMEM/F12 medium. A mRNA differential display method was used for screening the stage-specific expression gene. Results: Nineteen differentially expressed cDNA fragments were obtained. After excluding the false positive cDNA fragments by dot blot, 13 cDNAs were selected to clone and sequence. To obtain longer cDNAs, six ESTs were used to screen the rat testis λ-zap II cDNA library. Two longer cDNA fragments, designated as LY21 and LM66, were obtained. The analysis with DNAMAN software indicated that LY21 had a long open reading frame coding 372 amino acids while LM66 had no long open reading frame. LY21 were highly homologous with hnRNP H1. To observe the expression patterns of LY21 gene in the testicular cells, we performed in situ hybridization on testis sections from adult rats. The LY21 gene expression was found in the spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes.Conclusion: This study indicated that LY21 gene was associated with spermatogenesis. Further studies will be needed to explore the function of LY21.

  16. Studies on stage-specific immunity against Taenia taeniaeformis metacestodes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøgh, H O; Rickard, M D; Lightowlers, M W

    1988-05-01

    The possible existence of stage-specific immune responses to Taenia taeniaeformis infection was investigated in C3H/He mice vaccinated with antigens prepared from either the oncosphere or metacestode stages. Mice were immunized twice, 2 weeks apart, with antigen in Freund's complete adjuvant. Two weeks after the second immunization they were challenged with 250 T. taeniaeformis eggs and killed day 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45 and 60 after infection. Gross examination of the livers revealed marked differences between oncosphere (TtO) and metacestode (TtM) vaccinated mice. Very few metacestodes were found in the first group but most of those that evaded the initial host attack developed like the cysts found in the control group. In contrast, many degenerating metacestodes were found in the TtM vaccinated group. In a subsequent experiment groups of mice were vaccinated with varying doses of either TtO or TtM to determine whether the qualitative differences observed above were due to antigen dose effects. However, varying antigen doses gave the same results. These data show that vaccination with oncospheres generates an immune response capable of killing invading larvae soon after infection whereas vaccination with TtM results in larvae being killed at a later stage, suggesting that there are stage-specific, host-protective antigens.

  17. Neuronal, non-neuronal and hybrid forms of enolase in brain: structural, immunological and functional comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangos, P J; Zis, A P; Clark, R L; Goodwin, F K

    1978-07-07

    Three forms of the glycolytic enzyme, enolase [2-phospho-D-glycerate hydrolase (E.C. No. 4.2.1.11)] have been prepared from rat whole brain extract. The most acidic enolase form is neuron specific enolase (NSE) which had previously been designated neuron specific protein (NSP). The least acidic form designated non-neuronal enolase (NNE) has been purified and compared structurally, immunologically and functionally to NSE. NNE is a dimer of 86,500 M.W. consistint of two very similar subunits. The data establish that NNE is larger than NSE which has been shown to be composed of two apparently identical 39,000 molecular weight subunits (78,000). NNE is less acidic than NSE having a pI of 5.9 compared to the value of 4.7 for NSE. Structural and immunological analysis establishes that the NNE subunit is distinct from the NSE subunit, and are therfore products of two separate genes. The structural designation of NSE is (gammagamma) and that of NNE (alpha' alpha'). NSE is strictly localized in neurons indicating that the gene coding for the gamma subunit is only expressed in neuronal cells. The intermediate brain enolase form has been partially purified; structural and immunological evidence indicate that it is a hybrid molecule consisting of one NNE subunit and one NSE subunit (alpha'gamma).

  18. Blockage of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillation causes cell death in intraerythrocitic Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Enomoto

    Full Text Available Malaria remains one of the world's most important infectious diseases and is responsible for enormous mortality and morbidity. Resistance to antimalarial drugs is a challenging problem in malaria control. Clinical malaria is associated with the proliferation and development of Plasmodium parasites in human erythrocytes. Especially, the development into the mature forms (trophozoite and schizont of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum causes severe malaria symptoms due to a distinctive property, sequestration which is not shared by any other human malaria. Ca(2+ is well known to be a highly versatile intracellular messenger that regulates many different cellular processes. Cytosolic Ca(2+ increases evoked by extracellular stimuli are often observed in the form of oscillating Ca(2+ spikes (Ca(2+ oscillation in eukaryotic cells. However, in lower eukaryotic and plant cells the physiological roles and the molecular mechanisms of Ca(2+ oscillation are poorly understood. Here, we showed the observation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphospate (IP(3-dependent spontaneous Ca(2+ oscillation in P. falciparum without any exogenous extracellular stimulation by using live cell fluorescence Ca(2+ imaging. Intraerythrocytic P. falciparum exhibited stage-specific Ca(2+ oscillations in ring form and trophozoite stages which were blocked by IP(3 receptor inhibitor, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB. Analyses of parasitaemia and parasite size and electron micrograph of 2-APB-treated P. falciparum revealed that 2-APB severely obstructed the intraerythrocytic maturation, resulting in cell death of the parasites. Furthermore, we confirmed the similar lethal effect of 2-APB on the chloroquine-resistant strain of P. falciparum. To our best knowledge, we for the first time showed the existence of the spontaneous Ca(2+ oscillation in Plasmodium species and clearly demonstrated that IP(3-dependent spontaneous Ca(2+ oscillation in P. falciparum is critical for the development

  19. NEUROSPECIFIC ENOLASE IN DIAGNOSTICS FOR PERINATAL DAMAGE TO THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM IN PREMATURE INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Novopol'tseva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurospecific enolase is an endoenzyme of the central nervous system (CNS present in neurons of the brain and peripheral neuraltissue. This is currently the only known general marker of all differentiated neurons. The article illustrates the results of determining this enzyme in premature infants with fetal infections and assessment of their importance as a marker of damage to CNS in this group of children. A high level of neurospecific enolase in children with infectious and inflammatory diseases is not only the marker of damage to blood-brain barrier, but also reflects the nature of damage (hypoxia, intoxication, inflammation. This parameter in premature infants with various pathologies may serve as a degree of perinatal damage severity, and along with other parameters, determine the performed therapy tactics. Key words: neurospecific enolase, marker of CNS damage, perinatal damage, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:66-70

  20. Eimeria tenella enolase and pyruvate kinase: a likely role in glycolysis and in others functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Marie; Péroval, Marylène; Bourdieu, Christiane; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Péry, Pierre

    2006-12-01

    Two cDNA codings for glycolytic enzymes were cloned from a cDNA library constructed from the schizont stage of the avian parasite Eimeria tenella. Enolase and pyruvate kinase cDNA were fully sequenced and compared with sequences of enzymes from other organisms. Although these enzymes were already detected in the sporozoite stage, their expression was enhanced during the first schizogony in accordance with the anaerobic conditions of this part of the life cycle of the parasite. Under activating conditions, microscopic observations suggest that these glycolytic enzymes were relocalised inside sporozoites and moreover were in part secreted. The enzymes were also localised at the apex of the first generation of merozoites. Enolase was partly observed inside the nucleus of sporozoites and schizonts. Taken together, these results suggest that glycolytic enzymes not only have a function in glycolysis during anaerobic intracellular stages but may also participate in the invasion process and, for enolase, in the control of gene regulation.

  1. Enolase isoforms activities in spermatozoa from men with normospermia and abnormospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Andre; Viallard, Jean-L; Grizard, Genevieve; Boucher, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Total enolase as well as enolase-alphaalpha. (ENO-alphaalpha, ubiquitous) and enolase-S (ENO-S, sperm-specific) activities were measured in total and Percoll-selected sperm from 30 normospermic fertile men and 20 abnormospermic infertile patients. The total enolase activity was significantly higher in total sperm from patients with abnormospermia compared with normospermic patients (11.1 +/- 1.9 vs. 4.8 +/- 0.5 mlU/10(7) sperm P men than from normospermic men (P men. ENO-alphaalpha activity was related to the cell contamination ratio and to the percentage of spermatozoa with abnormal morphology. Furthermore, ENO-alphaalpha was positively correlated with the percentage of immature sperm showing an excess of residual cytoplasm. ENO-S activity was significantly higher in total sperm from normospermic patients than from abnormospermic patients (P men compared with normospermic men (P the cell contamination ratio but was significantly correlated with the percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology. The 2 enolase isoforms seem to reflect 2 opposite aspects of sperm cells quality: ENO-alphaalpha is associated with abnormal spermatozoa, immature spermatozoa, or both; and ENO-S is associated with normal spermatozoa. As an additional index to distinguish normal from abnormal semen, the ENO-S:ENO-alphaalpha ratio was evaluated for total and Percoll-selected sperm in both groups. This ratio seems to be a new, valuable marker of the global sperm quality in a given semen sample, and may represent a predictive index of sperm fertilizing potential.

  2. Stage-specific expression of ankyrin and SOCS box protein-4 (Asb-4) during spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Rhim, Si Youn; Lee, Man Ryul; Kim, Jong Soo; Kim, Hyung Jun; Lee, Dong Ryul; Kim, Kye-Seong

    2008-04-30

    Members of the large family of Asb proteins are ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues; however, the roles of individual Asb and their function in the developmental testes have not been reported. In this report, we isolated a murine Asb4 from mouse testis. Northern blot analysis revealed that mAsb-4 was expressed only in testes and produced in a stage-specific manner during spermatogenesis. It was expressed in murine testes beginning in the fourth week after birth and extending into adulthood. Pachytene spermatocytes had the highest level of expression. Interestingly, the human homologue of mAsb-4, ASB-4 (hASB-4) was also expressed in human testis. These results suggest that ASB-4 plays pivotal roles in mammalian testis development and spermatogenesis.

  3. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1− and SSEA-1+ cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines. PMID:27456773

  4. Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Si; Zhenjiang, Zhou; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the sensitivity of tomato yield and water use efficiency (WUE) to soil water content at different growth stages, the central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was employed in a five-factor-five-level pot experiment under regulated deficit irrigation. Two regression models concerning...... the effects of stage-specific soil water content on tomato yield and WUE were established. The results showed that the lowest available soil water (ASW) content (around 28%) during vegetative growth stage (here denoted θ1) resulted in high yield and WUE. Moderate (around 69% ASW) during blooming and fruit...... of the regression model showed that the maximum yield, 1166 g per plant, was obtained by the combination of θ1 (c. 28% ASW), θ2 (c. 82% ASW), θ3 (c. 92% ASW), θ4 (c. 92% ASW), and θ5 (c. 92% ASW). This result may guide irrigation scheduling to achieve higher tomato yield and WUE based on specific soil water...

  5. Liver-Stage Specific Response among Endemic Populations: Diet and Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalai, Sarat Kumar; Yadav, Naveen; Patidar, Manoj; Patel, Hardik; Singh, Agam Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Developing effective anti-malarial vaccine has been a challenge for long. Various factors including complex life cycle of parasite and lack of knowledge of stage specific critical antigens are some of the reasons. Moreover, inadequate understanding of the immune responses vis-à-vis sterile protection induced naturally by Plasmodia infection has further compounded the problem. It has been shown that people living in endemic areas take years to develop protective immunity to blood stage infection. But hardly anyone believes that immunity to liver-stage infection could be developed. Various experimental model studies using attenuated parasite suggest that liver-stage immunity might exist among endemic populations. This could be induced because of the attenuation of parasite in liver by various compounds present in the diet of endemic populations. PMID:25852693

  6. Alpha-enolase on apical surface of renal tubular epithelial cells serves as a calcium oxalate crystal receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong-Ngern, Kedsarin; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-10-01

    To search for a strategy to prevent kidney stone formation/recurrence, this study addressed the role of α-enolase on apical membrane of renal tubular cells in mediating calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal adhesion. Its presence on apical membrane and in COM crystal-bound fraction was confirmed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. Pretreating MDCK cells with anti-α-enolase antibody, not isotype-controlled IgG, dramatically reduced cell-crystal adhesion. Immunofluorescence staining also confirmed the direct binding of purified α-enolase to COM crystals at {121} > {100} > {010} crystal faces. Coating COM crystals with urinary proteins diminished the crystal binding capacity to cells and purified α-enolase. Moreover, α-enolase selectively bound to COM, not other crystals. Chemico-protein interactions analysis revealed that α-enolase interacted directly with Ca2+ and Mg2+. Incubating the cells with Mg2+ prior to cell-crystal adhesion assay significantly reduced crystal binding on the cell surface, whereas preincubation with EDTA, a divalent cation chelator, completely abolished Mg2+ effect, indicating that COM and Mg2+ competitively bind to α-enolase. Taken together, we successfully confirmed the role of α-enolase as a COM crystal receptor to mediate COM crystal adhesion at apical membrane of renal tubular cells. It may also serve as a target for stone prevention by blocking cell-crystal adhesion and stone nidus formation.

  7. Developmental Stage-Specific Embryonic Induction of HepG2 Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanning; Zong, Yanhong; Xiao, Zhigang; Zhu, Mengxuan; Xiao, Hui; Qi, Jinsheng; Liu, Kun; Wang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Although hepatocellular carcinoma cells can sometimes undergo differentiation in an embryonic microenvironment, the mechanism is poorly understood. The developmental stage-specific embryonic induction of tumor cell differentiation was investigated. Both chick and mouse liver extracts and hepatoblast-enriched cells at different developmental stages were used to treat human hepatoma HepG2 cells, and the effects on the induction of differentiation were evaluated. The nuclear factors controlling differentiation, hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α, HNF-1α, HNF-6 and upstream stimulatory factor-1 (USF-1), and the oncogene Myc and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were measured. HNF-4α RNA interference was used to verify the role of HNF-4α. Embryonic induction effects were further tested in vivo by injecting HepG2 tumor cells into immunodeficient nude mice. The 9-11-days chick liver extracts and 13.5-14.5-days mouse hepatoblast-enriched cells could inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation of HepG2 cells, leading to either death or maturation to hepatocytes. The maturation of surviving HepG2 cells was confirmed by increases in the expressions of HNF-4α, HNF-1α, HNF-6, and USF-1, and decreases in Myc and AFP. The embryonic induction of HepG2 cell maturation could be attenuated by HNF-4α RNA interference. Furthermore, the 13.5-days mouse hepatoblast culture completely eliminated HepG2 tumors with inhibited Myc and induced HNF-4α, confirming this embryonic induction effect in vivo. This study demonstrated that developmental stage-specific embryonic induction of HepG2 cell differentiation might help in understanding embryonic differentiation and oncogenesis.

  8. Neuron-specific enolase in the intestinal wall in Crohn´s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busikova-Malenovska, P; Danis, D; Bencat, M; Galfiova, P; Kopani, M; Labajova, V; El Hassoun, O; Porubsky, J; Galatova, J

    2014-01-01

    The authors described the localization of neuron-specific enolase in the intestinal wall in Crohn´s disease. We have used samples obtained by biopsy from the colon lining of five people affected by Crohn's disease for our examination. We have processed samples using the formol paraffin technique. From paraffin blocks, we have prepared histological sections approximately 5 μm thick. For immunohistochemic examinations, we have revitalised the sections by acquiring the heat-induced epitope. We detected NSE by monoclonal mouse antibodies against human neuron-specific enolase, clone BBS/NC/VI-H14 (DakoCytomation, Denmark) (Fig. 4, Ref. 7).

  9. Transcription of the human beta enolase gene (ENO-3) is regulated by an intronic muscle-specific enhancer that binds myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2 proteins and ubiquitous G-rich-box binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, S; Antona, V; Barbieri, G; Passantino, R; Calì, L; Giallongo, A

    1995-01-01

    To provide evidence for the cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors involved in the complex pattern of tissue- and stage-specific expression of the beta enolase gene, constructs containing fragments of the gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene were used in transient-transfection assays of C2C12 myogenic cells. Deletion analysis revealed the presence of four major regions: two negative regions in the 5'-flanking sequence, a basal promoter region which directs expression at low levels in proliferating and differentiated muscle cells, and a positive region within the first intron that confers cell-type-specific and differentiation-induced expression. This positive regulatory element is located in the 3'-proximal portion of the first intron (nucleotides +504 to +637) and acts as an enhancer irrespective of orientation and position from the homologous beta enolase promoter or the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter, conferring in both cases muscle-specific expression to the linked reporter gene. Deletion of a putative myocyte-specific enhancer factor 1 (MEF-1) binding site, containing a canonical E-box motif, had no effects on muscle-specific transcription, indicating that this site is not required for the activity of the enhancer. Gel mobility shift assays, competition analysis, DNase I footprinting, and mutagenesis studies indicated that this element interacts through an A/T-rich box with a MEF-2 protein(s) and through a G-rich box with a novel ubiquitous factor(s). Mutation of either the G-rich box or the A/T-rich box resulted in a significantly reduced activity of the enhancer in transient-transfection assays. These data indicate that MEF-2 and G-rich-box binding factors are each necessary for tissue-specific expression of the beta enolase gene in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:7565752

  10. Multicolor bioluminescence boosts malaria research: quantitative dual-color assay and single-cell imaging in Plasmodium falciparum parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevenini, Luca; Camarda, Grazia; Michelini, Elisa; Siciliano, Giulia; Calabretta, Maria Maddalena; Bona, Roberta; Kumar, T R Santha; Cara, Andrea; Branchini, Bruce R; Fidock, David A; Roda, Aldo; Alano, Pietro

    2014-09-02

    New reliable and cost-effective antimalarial drug screening assays are urgently needed to identify drugs acting on different stages of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, and particularly those responsible for human-to-mosquito transmission, that is, the P. falciparum gametocytes. Low Z' factors, narrow dynamic ranges, and/or extended assay times are commonly reported in current gametocyte assays measuring gametocyte-expressed fluorescent or luciferase reporters, endogenous ATP levels, activity of gametocyte enzymes, or redox-dependent dye fluorescence. We hereby report on a dual-luciferase gametocyte assay with immature and mature P. falciparum gametocyte stages expressing red and green-emitting luciferases from Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus under the control of the parasite sexual stage-specific pfs16 gene promoter. The assay was validated with reference antimalarial drugs and allowed to quantitatively and simultaneously measure stage-specific drug effects on parasites at different developmental stages. The optimized assay, requiring only 48 h incubation with drugs and using a cost-effective luminogenic substrate, significantly reduces assay cost and time in comparison to state-of-the-art analogous assays. The assay had a Z' factor of 0.71 ± 0.03, and it is suitable for implementation in 96- and 384-well microplate formats. Moreover, the use of a nonlysing D-luciferin substrate significantly improved the reliability of the assay and allowed one to perform, for the first time, P. falciparum bioluminescence imaging at single-cell level.

  11. The identification of a sequence related to apicomplexan enolase from Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A P; Thelen, J J; Lakritz, J; Brown, C R; Marsh, A E

    2004-11-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a neurological disease caused by Sarcocystis neurona, an apicomplexan parasite. S. neurona is also associated with EPM-like diseases in marine and small mammals. The mechanisms of transmission and ability to infect a wide host range remain obscure; therefore, characterization of essential proteins may provide evolutionary information allowing the development of novel chemotherapeutics that target non-mammalian biochemical pathways. In the current study, two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry were combined to characterize and identify an enolase protein from S. neurona based on peptide homology to the Toxoplasma gondii protein. Enolase is thought to be a vestigial, non-photosynthetic protein resulting from an evolutionary endosymbiosis event of an apicomplexan ancestor with green algae. Enolase has also been suggested to play a role in parasite stage conversion for T. gondii. Characterization of this protein in S. neurona and comparison to other protozoans indicate a biochemical similarity of S. neurona enolase to other tissue-cyst forming coccidians that cause encephalitis.

  12. Genetic and proteomic evidences support the localization of yeast enolase in the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Villar, Elena; Monteoliva, Lucía; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2006-01-01

    Although enolase, other glycolytic enzymes, and a variety of cytoplasmic proteins lacking an N-terminal secretion signal have been widely described as located at the cell surface in yeast and in mammalian cells, their presence in this external location is still controversial. Here, we report that...

  13. Increased serum neuron specific enolase concentrations in patients with hyperglycemic cortical ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, JW; De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1998-01-01

    A detrimental effect of hyperglycemia in ischemic brain has been demonstrated in laboratory experiments and it has been found that hyperglycemia in ischemic stroke is a predictor of poor outcome. We determined serum neuron specific enolase (NSE) concentrations in 41 consecutive patients with a cereb

  14. Neurone-specific enolase and N-acetyl-aspartate as potential peripheral markers of ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, H; Jakobs, C; de Jager, AEJ; Cunningham, RT; Korf, J

    1999-01-01

    Background After stroke, brain-specific proteins (including neurone-specific enolase) leak into the blood. The question addressed in the present study was whether N-acetyl-aspartate (amino acid derivative localized in cerebral neurones) could also serve as a peripheral marker of ischaemic damage. N-

  15. Genetic and proteomic evidences support the localization of yeast enolase in the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Villar, Elena; Monteoliva, Lucía; Larsen, Martin Røssel;

    2006-01-01

    Although enolase, other glycolytic enzymes, and a variety of cytoplasmic proteins lacking an N-terminal secretion signal have been widely described as located at the cell surface in yeast and in mammalian cells, their presence in this external location is still controversial. Here, we report that...

  16. Characterization of an iron-regulated alpha-enolase of Bacteroides fragilis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandi, R.; den Blaauwen, T.; Tame, J.R.H.; Oudega, B.R.; Luirink, J.; Otto, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the identification, cloning and molecular characterization of the alpha-enolase P46 of Bacteroides fragilis. The Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium B. fragilis is a member of the commensal flora of the human intestine but is also frequently found in severe intra-abdominal

  17. A Unique Case of Autoimmune Retinopathy Associated with Anti-Alpha-Enolase Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Kurz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We report a case of autoimmune retinopathy associated with anti-alpha-enolase antibodies with unique manifestations. Methods. A case report. Results. A 30-year-old male experienced recurrent, primarily peripheral visual field disturbances and minimal photopsia, with interval symptom resolution. Fundus changes subsequently developed in areas corresponding to the previous visual field symptoms. Electroretinogram showed bilaterally symmetric abnormalities of light-adapted responses and suggested loss of photoreceptor function. Only anti-alpha-enolase antibodies were detected on Western blot. Our patient noted cutaneous symptoms at the time of both episodes of visual symptoms, but not in the interim. Biomicroscopy revealed subtle small reddish spots in areas of the peripheral retina corresponding to the areas of the patient’s visual field where he noted symptoms. To our knowledge these reddish spots have not been reported in autoimmune retinopathy and may clinically support in vitro and in vivo evidence that anti-alpha-enolase antibodies may target photoreceptors. Conclusions. Our patient demonstrates some unique features adding to the known characteristics of autoimmune retinopathy associated with anti-alpha-enolase antibodies. As more cases are reported, further understanding of the features and pathophysiology of this rare condition will hopefully be elucidated.

  18. Neuron-specific enolase in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients with acute ischemic brain disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selaković Vesna M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the dynamics of change of neuron-specific enolase concentration in patients with acute ischemic brain disease in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma. The study included 103 patients, their mean age 58-66 years. The control group consisted of 16 patients, of matching age and sex, with radicular lesions of discal origin, subjected to diagnostic radiculography. Concentration of neuron-specific enolase was measured by a flouroimmunometric method. The results showed that the concentration of neuron-specific enolase in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients with brain ischemic disease within first seven days significantly increased compared to the control. The highest increase of concentration was established in brain infarction, somewhat lower in reversible ischemic attack, and the lowest in transient ischemic attack. Maximal concentration was established on the 3rd-4th day upon the brain infarction. Neuron-specific enolase concentration in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma may be an indicator of pathophysiological processes in the acute phase of brain ischemia and is significant in early diagnostics and therapy of the disease.

  19. Lineage- and developmental stage-specific mechanomodulation of induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Maricela; Luu, Rebeccah J; Ico, Gerardo; Ospina, Alex; Myung, Danielle; Shih, Hung Ping; Nam, Jin

    2017-09-29

    To maximize the translational utility of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the ability to precisely modulate the differentiation of iPSCs to target phenotypes is critical. Although the effects of the physical cell niche on stem cell differentiation are well documented, current approaches to direct step-wise differentiation of iPSCs have been typically limited to the optimization of soluble factors. In this regard, we investigated how temporally varied substrate stiffness affects the step-wise differentiation of iPSCs towards various lineages/phenotypes. Electrospun nanofibrous substrates with different reduced Young's modulus were utilized to subject cells to different mechanical environments during the differentiation process towards representative phenotypes from each of three germ layer derivatives including motor neuron, pancreatic endoderm, and chondrocyte. Phenotype-specific markers of each lineage/stage were utilized to determine differentiation efficiency by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence imaging for gene and protein expression analysis, respectively. The results presented in this proof-of-concept study are the first to systematically demonstrate the significant role of the temporally varied mechanical microenvironment on the differentiation of stem cells. Our results demonstrate that the process of differentiation from pluripotent cells to functional end-phenotypes is mechanoresponsive in a lineage- and differentiation stage-specific manner. Lineage/developmental stage-dependent optimization of electrospun substrate stiffness provides a unique opportunity to enhance differentiation efficiency of iPSCs for their facilitated therapeutic applications.

  20. Role for Ets-2Thr-72 Transcription Factor in Stage-specific Thymocyte Development and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ian B.; Ostrowski, Mike; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2012-01-01

    Interference of Ras signaling deregulates thymocyte development in mouse models. However, the role of Ets-2, a transcription factor that is phosphorylated on a critical threonine residue (Thr-72) by the Ras/MAPK pathway in thymocyte development, has not been defined. Transgenic mice overexpressing a phosphomutant Ets-2 (T72A) in the thymus displayed reduced thymus size associated with a 60–80% reduction in thymocyte populations. The transgenic mice exhibited a 20-fold increase in a c-Kit+ CD4+ CD8+ CD3− population and a 5-fold increase in a unique CD5low population associated with a partial developmental block at the DN2-DN3 stage of thymocytes. Transgenic thymocytes exhibited increased apoptosis, and overexpression of Bcl-2 rescued the hypocellularity and associated thymocyte developmental block in double transgenic mice. The observed defects in these mice are not dependent on Ets-1 expression. These studies implicate for the first time a stage-specific Ets-1-independent regulatory role for Ets-2 in early thymocyte development and survival. PMID:22128184

  1. Stage-specific requirement for cyclin D1 in glial progenitor cells of the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobs, Lionel; Baranek, Constanze; Nestel, Sigrun; Kulik, Akos; Kapfhammer, Josef; Nitsch, Cordula; Atanasoski, Suzana

    2014-05-01

    Despite the vast abundance of glial progenitor cells in the mouse brain parenchyma, little is known about the molecular mechanisms driving their proliferation in the adult. Here we unravel a critical role of the G1 cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 in controlling cell division of glial cells in the cortical grey matter. We detect cyclin D1 expression in Olig2-immunopositive (Olig2+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, as well as in Iba1+ microglia and S100β+ astrocytes in cortices of 3-month-old mice. Analysis of cyclin D1-deficient mice reveals a cell and stage-specific molecular control of cell cycle progression in the various glial lineages. While proliferation of fast dividing Olig2+ cells at early postnatal stages becomes gradually dependent on cyclin D1, this particular G1 regulator is strictly required for the slow divisions of Olig2+/NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitors in the adult cerebral cortex. Further, we find that the population of mature oligodendrocytes is markedly reduced in the absence of cyclin D1, leading to a significant decrease in the number of myelinated axons in both the prefrontal cortex and the corpus callosum of 8-month-old mutant mice. In contrast, the pool of Iba1+ cells is diminished already at postnatal day 3 in the absence of cyclin D1, while the number of S100β+ astrocytes remains unchanged in the mutant.

  2. Schistosome elastases: biological importance, structure, function and stage-specific expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, G; McKerrow, J; Hedstrom, R; Culpepper, J; McGarrigle, L; Agabian, N

    1987-01-01

    Larval schistosomes (Digenea: Trematoda) invade their definitive host by directly penetrating the skin. During the process they secrete a number of macromolecules, ostensibly to facilitate their entry. Among these we have identified and characterized a dominant proteolytic species: a serine protease capable of fragmenting keratin, types IV and VIII collagen, proteoglycan, fibronectin, laminin, and elastin. The enzyme exhibits the specificity characteristic of elastases, has a molecular mass of 30,000 Da and pI of 7.8, and is potently immunogenic in its native form. Specificity of the active site has been analysed, tetrapeptides having large hydrophobic or aromatic amino acids at size P1 serving as best substrates. The amino terminal 20 amino acids of the mature enzyme have been sequenced and the information derived has been used to construct an oligonucleotide (22-mer) complement of its corresponding mRNA. The latter has been used to establish, by Northern analysis, that expression of the enzyme is stage specific (differing in this respect from most schistosome immunogens), and under transcriptional control. Transcripts are encoded by a multigene family. Several cDNAs hybridizing to the oligonucleotide have been isolated, subcloned into bacteriophage M-13, and sequenced by the di-deoxy method. It is our expectation that this line of investigation will lead towards: (i) an anti-infection vaccine; (ii) a means for chemically preventing infection (using enzyme inhibitors), and/or (iii) a rapid diagnostic assay of prepatent infection.

  3. Stage-specific expression of the Leishmania mexicana paraflagellar rod protein PFR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, L L; Santrich, C; LeBowitz, J H

    1996-10-01

    A screen for Leishmania mexicana genes encoding promastigote-specific flagellar proteins resulted in isolation of genes encoding the major components of the paraflagellar rod. One of these, PFR-2, was characterized extensively. PFR-2 genes are present in the genome as a tandem array of three genes designated PFR-2A, PFR-2B, PFR-2C. PFR-2A and PFR-2B are encoded by a 3.1 transcript while PFR-2C is encoded by a 3.8-kb transcript that has a 3' UTR different from that of the 3.1-kb transcript. Both of these mRNAs were 15-fold more abundant in promastigotes than in amastigotes. Two transcripts immediately upstream of the locus were constitutively expressed while two downstream transcripts were fourfold more abundant in promastigotes than in amastigotes. The PFR genes will provide a good model system for analysis of stage-specific gene regulation in Leishmania as well as assist in the characterization of the function and organization of the paraflagellar rod.

  4. The NIMA Kinase Is Required To Execute Stage-Specific Mitotic Functions after Initiation of Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; Lad, Alisha A.

    2014-01-01

    The G2-M transition in Aspergillus nidulans requires the NIMA kinase, the founding member of the Nek kinase family. Inactivation of NIMA results in a late G2 arrest, while overexpression of NIMA is sufficient to promote mitotic events independently of cell cycle phase. Endogenously tagged NIMA-GFP has dynamic mitotic localizations appearing first at the spindle pole body and then at nuclear pore complexes before transitioning to within nuclei and the mitotic spindle and back at the spindle pole bodies at mitotic exit, suggesting that it functions sequentially at these locations. Since NIMA is indispensable for mitotic entry, it has been difficult to determine the requirement of NIMA for subaspects of mitosis. We show here that when NIMA is partially inactivated, although mitosis can be initiated, a proportion of cells fail to successfully generate two daughter nuclei. We further define the mitotic defects to show that normal NIMA function is required for the formation of a bipolar spindle, nuclear pore complex disassembly, completion of chromatin segregation, and the normal structural rearrangements of the nuclear envelope required to generate two nuclei from one. In the remaining population of cells that enter mitosis with inadequate NIMA, two daughter nuclei are generated in a manner dependent on the spindle assembly checkpoint, indicating highly penetrant defects in mitotic progression without sufficient NIMA activity. This study shows that NIMA is required not only for mitotic entry but also sequentially for successful completion of stage-specific mitotic events. PMID:24186954

  5. Analysis of Stage-Specific Gene Expression Profiles in the Uterine Endometrium during Pregnancy in Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mingoo; Seo, Heewon; Choi, Yohan; Yoo, Inkyu; Seo, Minseok; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Heebal; Ka, Hakhyun

    2015-01-01

    The uterine endometrium plays a critical role in regulating the estrous cycle and the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in mammalian species. Many studies have investigated the expression and function of genes in the uterine endometrium, but the global expression pattern of genes and relationships among genes differentially expressed in the uterine endometrium during gestation in pigs remain unclear. Thus, this study investigated global gene expression profiles using microarray in pigs. Diverse transcriptome analyses including clustering, network, and differentially expressed gene (DEG) analyses were performed to detect endometrial gene expression changes during the different gestation stages. In total, 6,991 genes were found to be differentially expressed by comparing genes expressed on day (D) 12 of pregnancy with those on D15, D30, D60, D90 and D114 of pregnancy, and clustering analysis of detected DEGs distinguished 8 clusters. Furthermore, several pregnancy-related hub genes such as ALPPL2, RANBP17, NF1B, SPP1, and CST6 were discovered through network analysis. Finally, detected hub genes were technically validated by quantitative RT-PCR. These results suggest the complex network characteristics involved in uterine endometrial gene expression during pregnancy and indicate that diverse patterns of stage-specific gene expression and network connections may play a critical role in endometrial remodeling and in placental and fetal development to establish and maintenance of pregnancy in pigs.

  6. Analysis of Stage-Specific Gene Expression Profiles in the Uterine Endometrium during Pregnancy in Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingoo Kim

    Full Text Available The uterine endometrium plays a critical role in regulating the estrous cycle and the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in mammalian species. Many studies have investigated the expression and function of genes in the uterine endometrium, but the global expression pattern of genes and relationships among genes differentially expressed in the uterine endometrium during gestation in pigs remain unclear. Thus, this study investigated global gene expression profiles using microarray in pigs. Diverse transcriptome analyses including clustering, network, and differentially expressed gene (DEG analyses were performed to detect endometrial gene expression changes during the different gestation stages. In total, 6,991 genes were found to be differentially expressed by comparing genes expressed on day (D 12 of pregnancy with those on D15, D30, D60, D90 and D114 of pregnancy, and clustering analysis of detected DEGs distinguished 8 clusters. Furthermore, several pregnancy-related hub genes such as ALPPL2, RANBP17, NF1B, SPP1, and CST6 were discovered through network analysis. Finally, detected hub genes were technically validated by quantitative RT-PCR. These results suggest the complex network characteristics involved in uterine endometrial gene expression during pregnancy and indicate that diverse patterns of stage-specific gene expression and network connections may play a critical role in endometrial remodeling and in placental and fetal development to establish and maintenance of pregnancy in pigs.

  7. Stage-specific roles of FGF2 signaling in human neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabiec, Marta; Hříbková, Hana; Vařecha, Miroslav; Střítecká, Dana; Hampl, Aleš; Dvořák, Petr; Sun, Yuh-Man

    2016-09-01

    This study elucidated the stage-specific roles of FGF2 signaling during neural development using in-vitro human embryonic stem cell-based developmental modeling. We found that the dysregulation of FGF2 signaling prior to the onset of neural induction resulted in the malformation of neural rosettes (a neural tube-like structure), despite cells having undergone neural induction. The aberrant neural rosette formation may be attributed to the misplacement of ZO-1, which is a polarized tight junction protein and shown co-localized with FGF2/FGFR1 in the apical region of neural rosettes, subsequently led to abnormal neurogenesis. Moreover, the FGF2 signaling inhibition at the stage of neural rosettes caused a reduction in cell proliferation, an increase in numbers of cells with cell-cycle exit, and premature neurogenesis. These effects may be mediated by NUMB, to which expression was observed enriched in the apical region of neural rosettes after FGF2 signaling inhibition coinciding with the disappearance of PAX6(+)/Ki67(+) neural stem cells and the emergence of MAP2(+) neurons. Moreover, our results suggested that the hESC-based developmental system reserved a similar neural stem cell niche in vivo.

  8. Stage-specific education/counseling intervention in women with elevated blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Linda K; Fish, Anne F; Frid, David J; Mitchell, G Lynn

    2009-06-01

    Many women with elevated blood pressure who seek exercise opportunities require a flexible program with systematic follow-up. The study framework included motivational readiness (exercise stage of change) from the Transtheoretical Model and self-efficacy theory. This pilot study, which used a one-group repeated measures design, tested the feasibility of a stage-specific education/counseling intervention aimed at improving exercise outcomes in women with elevated blood pressure. Forty women completed a 2.5-hour session including prescription for moderate-vigorous exercise on their own, practice on equipment, maintenance of an exercise diary, and contracting; three follow-up calls (Weeks 1, 2, 3); a visit (Week 4); and a final call (Week 5). After the intervention, 85% of women moved to or remained in the action or maintenance stages of change, the highest levels of readiness; none relapsed. Exercise self-efficacy and benefits increased and barriers decreased (Pexercise performance. The intervention was feasible. Further testing is warranted using larger samples and including a control group.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum malaria associated with ABO blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria associated with ABO blood phenotypes and ... out to investigate the relationship between blood group types and P. falciparum ... of long lasting treated (LLT) mosquito bed nets and the prevalence of infection.

  10. The structure of bradyzoite-specific enolase from Toxoplasma gondii reveals insights into its dual cytoplasmic and nuclear functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, Jiapeng [Northwestern University, 320 E. Superior Street, Morton 7-601, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Mouveaux, Thomas [Université Lille Nord de France, (France); Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F. [Northwestern University, 320 E. Superior Street, Morton 7-601, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Tomavo, Stanislas [Université Lille Nord de France, (France); Ngô, Huân M., E-mail: h-ngo@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, 320 E. Superior Street, Morton 7-601, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); BrainMicro LLC, 21 Pendleton Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The second crystal structure of a parasite protein preferentially enriched in the brain cyst of T. gondii has been solved at 2.75 Å resolution. Bradyzoite enolase 1 is reported to have differential functions as a glycolytic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator in bradyzoites. In addition to catalyzing a central step in glycolysis, enolase assumes a remarkably diverse set of secondary functions in different organisms, including transcription regulation as documented for the oncogene c-Myc promoter-binding protein 1. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii differentially expresses two nuclear-localized, plant-like enolases: enolase 1 (TgENO1) in the latent bradyzoite cyst stage and enolase 2 (TgENO2) in the rapidly replicative tachyzoite stage. A 2.75 Å resolution crystal structure of bradyzoite enolase 1, the second structure to be reported of a bradyzoite-specific protein in Toxoplasma, captures an open conformational state and reveals that distinctive plant-like insertions are located on surface loops. The enolase 1 structure reveals that a unique residue, Glu164, in catalytic loop 2 may account for the lower activity of this cyst-stage isozyme. Recombinant TgENO1 specifically binds to a TTTTCT DNA motif present in the cyst matrix antigen 1 (TgMAG1) gene promoter as demonstrated by gel retardation. Furthermore, direct physical interactions of both nuclear TgENO1 and TgENO2 with the TgMAG1 gene promoter are demonstrated in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Structural and biochemical studies reveal that T. gondii enolase functions are multifaceted, including the coordination of gene regulation in parasitic stage development. Enolase 1 provides a potential lead in the design of drugs against Toxoplasma brain cysts.

  11. Is stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 a marker for human ductal stem/progenitor cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrikanova, Ivka; Kayali, Ayse; Lopez, Ana; Hayek, Alberto

    2012-08-01

    The presence of pancreatic stem cells (PnSCs) has not been firmly demonstrated in the human or animal pancreas. Previous reports have suggested that ductal and acinar structures in the exocrine pancreas can be a potential source of progenitor cells. More recently, immature insulin precursors in the periphery of human islets have been found to self-replicate and differentiate to endocrine cells in vitro. Transplantation of these cells under the kidney capsule improves the diabetic state in mice. The controversy surrounding where PnSCs reside could be resolved if a specific marker were to be found that allowed their identification, purification, and directed differentiation to endocrine cells. We have identified in human pancreas cells positive for the stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 (SSEA4), a stem cell marker. These cells also express ductal, pancreatic progenitor, and stem cell protein markers. Interestingly, some of the SSEA4(+) cells scattered in the ducts do not show a ductal cell phenotype. SSEA4(+)-sorted cells formed aggregate-like spheres in culture and robustly differentiated to pancreatic hormone-expressing cells in conditions of high glucose concentration and B27 supplementation. We hypothesize that SSEA4(+) cells or a subpopulation of those cells residing in the pancreatic ducts may be the elusive PnSCs, and in this case, SSEA4 may represent a potential surface antigen marker for human PnSCs. The discovery of specific markers for the identification and purification of human PnSCs would greatly facilitate studies aimed at the expansion of these cells and the development of targeting tools for their potential induction to insulin-producing cells.

  12. Stage-specific effects of fibroblast growth factor 2 on the differentiation of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagomonyants, Karen; Mina, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Dentinogenesis is a complex and multistep process, which is regulated by various growth factors, including members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family. Both positive and negative effects of FGFs on dentinogenesis have been reported, but the underlying mechanisms of these conflicting results are still unclear. To gain a better insight into the role of FGF2 in dentinogenesis, we used dental pulp cells from various transgenic mice, in which fluorescent protein expression identifies cells at different stages of odontoblast differentiation. Our results showed that the continuous exposure of pulp cells to FGF2 inhibited mineralization and revealed both the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of FGF2 on the expression of markers of dentinogenesis and various transgenes. During the proliferation phase of in vitro growth, FGF2 increased the expression of markers of dentinogenesis and the percentages of dentin matrix protein 1/green fluorescent protein (DMP1-GFP)-positive functional odontoblasts and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)-Cerulean-positive odontoblasts. Additional exposure to FGF2 during the differentiation/mineralization phase of in vitro growth decreased the extent of mineralization and the expression of markers of dentinogenesis and of the DMP1-GFP and DSPP-Cerulean transgenes. Recovery experiments showed that the inhibitory effects of FGF2 on dentinogenesis were related to the blocking of the differentiation of cells into mature odontoblasts. These observations together showed the stage-specific effects of FGF2 on dentinogenesis by dental pulp cells, and they provide critical information for the development of improved treatments for vital pulp therapy and dentin regeneration.

  13. Is Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 4 a Marker for Human Ductal Stem/Progenitor Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Ayse; Lopez, Ana; Hayek, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The presence of pancreatic stem cells (PnSCs) has not been firmly demonstrated in the human or animal pancreas. Previous reports have suggested that ductal and acinar structures in the exocrine pancreas can be a potential source of progenitor cells. More recently, immature insulin precursors in the periphery of human islets have been found to self-replicate and differentiate to endocrine cells in vitro. Transplantation of these cells under the kidney capsule improves the diabetic state in mice. The controversy surrounding where PnSCs reside could be resolved if a specific marker were to be found that allowed their identification, purification, and directed differentiation to endocrine cells. We have identified in human pancreas cells positive for the stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 (SSEA4), a stem cell marker. These cells also express ductal, pancreatic progenitor, and stem cell protein markers. Interestingly, some of the SSEA4+ cells scattered in the ducts do not show a ductal cell phenotype. SSEA4+-sorted cells formed aggregate-like spheres in culture and robustly differentiated to pancreatic hormone-expressing cells in conditions of high glucose concentration and B27 supplementation. We hypothesize that SSEA4+ cells or a subpopulation of those cells residing in the pancreatic ducts may be the elusive PnSCs, and in this case, SSEA4 may represent a potential surface antigen marker for human PnSCs. The discovery of specific markers for the identification and purification of human PnSCs would greatly facilitate studies aimed at the expansion of these cells and the development of targeting tools for their potential induction to insulin-producing cells. PMID:23515456

  14. Tissue and stage-specific distribution of Wolbachia in Brugia malayi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Fischer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most filarial parasite species contain Wolbachia, obligatory bacterial endosymbionts that are crucial for filarial development and reproduction. They are targets for alternative chemotherapy, but their role in the biology of filarial nematodes is not well understood. Light microscopy provides important information on morphology, localization and potential function of these bacteria. Surprisingly, immunohistology and in situ hybridization techniques have not been widely used to monitor Wolbachia distribution during the filarial life cycle. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A monoclonal antibody directed against Wolbachia surface protein and in situ hybridization targeting Wolbachia 16S rRNA were used to monitor Wolbachia during the life cycle of B. malayi. In microfilariae and vector stage larvae only a few cells contain Wolbachia. In contrast, large numbers of Wolbachia were detected in the lateral chords of L4 larvae, but no endobacteria were detected in the genital primordium. In young adult worms (5 weeks p.i., a massive expansion of Wolbachia was observed in the lateral chords adjacent to ovaries or testis, but no endobacteria were detected in the growth zone of the ovaries, uterus, the growth zone of the testis or the vas deferens. Confocal laser scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that numerous Wolbachia are aligned towards the developing ovaries and single endobacteria were detected in the germline. In inseminated females (8 weeks p.i. Wolbachia were observed in the ovaries, embryos and in decreasing numbers in the lateral chords. In young males Wolbachia were found in distinct zones of the testis and in large numbers in the lateral chords in the vicinity of testicular tissue but never in mature spermatids or spermatozoa. CONCLUSIONS: Immunohistology and in situ hybridization show distinct tissue and stage specific distribution patterns for Wolbachia in B. malayi. Extensive multiplication of Wolbachia occurs in the

  15. Immunogenicity and in vitro Protective Efficacy of a Recombinant Multistage Plasmodium falciparum Candidate Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya Ping; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Sacci, John B.; Holloway, Brian P.; Fujioka, Hisashi; Kumar, Nirbhay; Wohlhueter, Robert; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Collins, William E.; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-02-01

    Compared with a single-stage antigen-based vaccine, a multistage and multivalent Plasmodium falciparum vaccine would be more efficacious by inducing "multiple layers" of immunity. We have constructed a synthetic gene that encodes for 12 B cell, 6 T cell proliferative, and 3 cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes derived from 9 stage-specific P. falciparum antigens corresponding to the sporozoite, liver, erythrocytic asexual, and sexual stages. The gene was expressed in the baculovirus system, and a 41-kDa antigen, termed CDC/NIIMALVAC-1, was purified. Immunization in rabbits with the purified protein in the presence of different adjuvants generated antibody responses that recognized vaccine antigen, linear peptides contained in the vaccine, and all stages of P. falciparum. In vitro assays of protection revealed that the vaccine-elicited antibodies strongly inhibited sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cells and growth of blood-stage parasites in the presence of monocytes. These observations demonstrate that a multicomponent, multistage malaria vaccine can induce immune responses that inhibit parasite development at multiple stages. The rationale and approach used in the development of a multicomponent P. falciparum vaccine will be useful in the development of a multispecies human malaria vaccine and vaccines against other infectious diseases.

  16. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: The Enolase in the Methionine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imker,H.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the most abundant enzyme, is the paradigm member of the recently recognized mechanistically diverse RuBisCO superfamily. The RuBisCO reaction is initiated by abstraction of the proton from C3 of the D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate substrate by a carbamate oxygen of carboxylated Lys 201 (spinach enzyme). Heterofunctional homologues of RuBisCO found in species of Bacilli catalyze the tautomerization ('enolization') of 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) in the methionine salvage pathway in which 5-methylthio-D-ribose (MTR) derived from 5'-methylthioadenosine is converted to methionine [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) A functional link between RuBisCO-like protein of Bacillus and photosynthetic RuBisCO, Science 302, 286-290]. The reaction catalyzed by this 'enolase' is accomplished by abstraction of a proton from C1 of the DK-MTP 1-P substrate to form the tautomerized product, a conjugated enol. Because the RuBisCO- and 'enolase'-catalyzed reactions differ in the regiochemistry of proton abstraction but are expected to share stabilization of an enolate anion intermediate by coordination to an active site Mg{sup 2+}, we sought to establish structure-function relationships for the 'enolase' reaction so that the structural basis for the functional diversity could be established. We determined the stereochemical course of the reaction catalyzed by the 'enolases' from Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus kaustophilus. Using stereospecifically deuterated samples of an alternate substrate derived from D-ribose (5-OH group instead of the 5-methylthio group in MTR) as well as of the natural DK-MTP 1-P substrate, we determined that the 'enolase'-catalyzed reaction involves abstraction of the 1-proS proton. We also determined the structure of the activated 'enolase' from G

  17. Uracil-containing DNA in Drosophila: stability, stage-specific accumulation, and developmental involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villő Muha

    Full Text Available Base-excision repair and control of nucleotide pools safe-guard against permanent uracil accumulation in DNA relying on two key enzymes: uracil-DNA glycosylase and dUTPase. Lack of the major uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG gene from the fruit fly genome and dUTPase from fruit fly larvae prompted the hypotheses that i uracil may accumulate in Drosophila genomic DNA where it may be well tolerated, and ii this accumulation may affect development. Here we show that i Drosophila melanogaster tolerates high levels of uracil in DNA; ii such DNA is correctly interpreted in cell culture and embryo; and iii under physiological spatio-temporal control, DNA from fruit fly larvae, pupae, and imago contain greatly elevated levels of uracil (200-2,000 uracil/million bases, quantified using a novel real-time PCR-based assay. Uracil is accumulated in genomic DNA of larval tissues during larval development, whereas DNA from imaginal tissues contains much less uracil. Upon pupation and metamorphosis, uracil content in DNA is significantly decreased. We propose that the observed developmental pattern of uracil-DNA is due to the lack of the key repair enzyme UNG from the Drosophila genome together with down-regulation of dUTPase in larval tissues. In agreement, we show that dUTPase silencing increases the uracil content in DNA of imaginal tissues and induces strong lethality at the early pupal stages, indicating that tolerance of highly uracil-substituted DNA is also stage-specific. Silencing of dUTPase perturbs the physiological pattern of uracil-DNA accumulation in Drosophila and leads to a strongly lethal phenotype in early pupal stages. These findings suggest a novel role of uracil-containing DNA in Drosophila development and metamorphosis and present a novel example for developmental effects of dUTPase silencing in multicellular eukaryotes. Importantly, we also show lack of the UNG gene in all available genomes of other Holometabola insects, indicating a potentially

  18. Release of erythropoietin and neuron-specific enolase after breath holding in competing free divers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Jattu, T; Nielsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Free diving is associated with extreme hypoxia. This study evaluated the combined effect of maximal static breath holding and underwater swimming on plasma biomarkers of tissue hypoxemia: erythropoietin, neuron-specific enolase and S100B, C-reactive protein, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide......, and troponin T. Venous blood samples were obtained from 17 competing free divers before and 3 h after sessions of static apnea and underwater swimming. The heart was evaluated by echocardiography. Static apnea for 293 ± 78 s (mean ± SD) and subsequent 88 ± 21 m underwater swimming increased plasma...... = 0.549), and troponin T (P = 0.125) remained unchanged and, as assessed by echocardiography, the heart was not affected. In competitive free divers, bouts of static and dynamic apnea increase plasma erythropoietin and neuron-specific enolase, suggesting that renal and neural tissue, rather than...

  19. Identification and functional characterization of alpha-enolase from Taenia pisiformis metacestode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Guo, Aijiang; Zhu, Xueliang; You, Yanan; Hou, Junling; Wang, Qiuxia; Luo, Xuenong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-04-01

    Enolase belongs to glycolytic enzymes with moonlighting functions. The role of enolase in Taenia species is still poorly understood. In this study, the full length of cDNA encoding for Taenia pisiformis alpha-enolase (Tpeno) was cloned from larval parasites and soluble recombinant Tpeno protein (rTpeno) was produced. Western blot indicated that both rTpeno and the native protein in excretion-secretion antigens from the larvae were recognized by anti-rTpeno monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The primary structure of Tpeno showed the presence of a highly conserved catalytic site for substrate binding and an enolase signature motif. rTpeno enzymatic activities of catalyzing the reversible dehydration of 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PGA) to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and vice versa were shown to be 30.71 ± 2.15 U/mg (2-PGA to PEP) and 11.29 ± 2.38 U/mg (PEP to 2-PGA), respectively. Far-Western blotting showed that rTpeno could bind to plasminogen, however its binding ability was inhibited by ϵ-aminocaproic acid (ϵACA) in a competitive ELISA test. Plasminogen activation assay showed that plasminogen bound to rTpeno could be converted into active plasmin using host-derived activators. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence indicated that Tpeno was distributed in the bladder wall of the metacestode and the periphery of calcareous corpuscles. In addition, a vaccine trial showed that the enzyme could produce a 36.4% protection rate in vaccinated rabbits against experimental challenges from T. pisiformis eggs. These results suggest that Tpeno with multiple functions may play significant roles in the migration, growth, development and adaptation of T. pisiformis for survival in the host environment.

  20. Antibodies and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Ramasamy, M; Yasawardena, S

    There is considerable interest in using merozoite proteins in a vaccine against falciparum malaria. Observations that antibodies to merozoite surface proteins block invasion are a basis for optimism. This article draws attention to important and varied aspects of how antibodies to Plasmodium

  1. Recurrent rhabdomyolysis due to muscle β-enolase deficiency: very rare or underestimated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Olimpia; Brady, Stefen; Rodolico, Carmelo; Ciranni, Annamaria; Montagnese, Federica; Aguennouz, M'hammed; Kirk, Richard; Allen, Elizabeth; Godfrey, Richard; Romeo, Sara; Murphy, Elaine; Rahman, Shamima; Quinlivan, Ros; Toscano, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Muscle β-enolase deficiency is a very rare inherited metabolic myopathy caused by an enzymatic defect of distal glycolysis. So far, the condition has been described in only one patient with mutations in ENO3 in a compound heterozygous state who presented with exercise intolerance, post-exercise myalgia and mild hyperCKemia but no pigmenturia. We describe two men, one Italian and one Turkish, with consanguineous parents, who complained of several episodes of intense myalgia, cramps, generalized muscle tenderness and dark urine. No other family members reported similar symptoms. In both cases, there was a very mild rise in lactate during a forearm exercise test. Muscle biopsy showed minimal changes with no lipid or glycogen accumulation. Biochemical studies on muscle tissue demonstrated a marked reduction of muscle β-enolase activity (20 and 10% of residual activity, respectively). Molecular genetic analysis of ENO3 gene revealed two novel homozygous missense mutations, (p.Asn151Ser and p.Glu187Lys). Both mutations segregated as expected in the two families. Although quite rare, muscle β-enolase deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with recurrent rhabdomyolysis. It may present also with a more severe phenotype than previously thought.

  2. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Enolase Is a Surface Protein That Binds Plasminogen and Mediates Interaction of Yeast Forms with Host Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Mundodi, Vasanth; Abi-Chacra, Erika A.; Winters, Michael S.; Alderete, John F.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2010-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, is a disseminated, systemic disorder that involves the lungs and other organs. The ability of the pathogen to interact with host components, including extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, is essential to further colonization, invasion, and growth. Previously, enolase (EC 4.2.1.11) was characterized as a fibronectin binding protein in P. brasiliensis. Interaction of surface-bound enolase with plasminogen has been incriminated in tissue invasion for pathogenesis in several pathogens. In this paper, enolase was expressed in Escherichia coli as a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (recombinant P. brasiliensis enolase [rPbEno]). The P. brasiliensis native enolase (PbEno) was detected at the fungus surface and cytoplasm by immunofluorescence with an anti-rPbEno antibody. Immobilized purified rPbEno bound plasminogen in a specific, concentration-dependent fashion. Both native enolase and rPbEno activated conversion of plasminogen to plasmin through tissue plasminogen activator. The association between PbEno and plasminogen was lysine dependent. In competition experiments, purified rPbEno, in its soluble form, inhibited plasminogen binding to fixed P. brasiliensis, suggesting that this interaction required surface-localized PbEno. Plasminogen-coated P. brasiliensis yeast cells were capable of degrading purified fibronectin, providing in vitro evidence for the generation of active plasmin on the fungus surface. Exposure of epithelial cells and phagocytes to enolase was associated with an increased expression of surface sites of adhesion. In fact, the association of P. brasiliensis with epithelial cells and phagocytes was increased in the presence of rPbEno. The expression of PbEno was upregulated in yeast cells derived from mouse-infected tissues. These data indicate that surface-associated PbEno may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. brasiliensis. PMID

  3. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis enolase is a surface protein that binds plasminogen and mediates interaction of yeast forms with host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Fonseca, Fernanda L; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Mundodi, Vasanth; Abi-Chacra, Erika A; Winters, Michael S; Alderete, John F; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2010-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, is a disseminated, systemic disorder that involves the lungs and other organs. The ability of the pathogen to interact with host components, including extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, is essential to further colonization, invasion, and growth. Previously, enolase (EC 4.2.1.11) was characterized as a fibronectin binding protein in P. brasiliensis. Interaction of surface-bound enolase with plasminogen has been incriminated in tissue invasion for pathogenesis in several pathogens. In this paper, enolase was expressed in Escherichia coli as a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (recombinant P. brasiliensis enolase [rPbEno]). The P. brasiliensis native enolase (PbEno) was detected at the fungus surface and cytoplasm by immunofluorescence with an anti-rPbEno antibody. Immobilized purified rPbEno bound plasminogen in a specific, concentration-dependent fashion. Both native enolase and rPbEno activated conversion of plasminogen to plasmin through tissue plasminogen activator. The association between PbEno and plasminogen was lysine dependent. In competition experiments, purified rPbEno, in its soluble form, inhibited plasminogen binding to fixed P. brasiliensis, suggesting that this interaction required surface-localized PbEno. Plasminogen-coated P. brasiliensis yeast cells were capable of degrading purified fibronectin, providing in vitro evidence for the generation of active plasmin on the fungus surface. Exposure of epithelial cells and phagocytes to enolase was associated with an increased expression of surface sites of adhesion. In fact, the association of P. brasiliensis with epithelial cells and phagocytes was increased in the presence of rPbEno. The expression of PbEno was upregulated in yeast cells derived from mouse-infected tissues. These data indicate that surface-associated PbEno may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. brasiliensis.

  4. A new nuclear function of the Entamoeba histolytica glycolytic enzyme enolase: the metabolic regulation of cytosine-5 methyltransferase 2 (Dnmt2 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Tovy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cytosine-5 methyltransferases of the Dnmt2 family function as DNA and tRNA methyltransferases. Insight into the role and biological significance of Dnmt2 is greatly hampered by a lack of knowledge about its protein interactions. In this report, we address the subject of protein interaction by identifying enolase through a yeast two-hybrid screen as a Dnmt2-binding protein. Enolase, which is known to catalyze the conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PG to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP, was shown to have both a cytoplasmatic and a nuclear localization in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We discovered that enolase acts as a Dnmt2 inhibitor. This unexpected inhibitory activity was antagonized by 2-PG, which suggests that glucose metabolism controls the non-glycolytic function of enolase. Interestingly, glucose starvation drives enolase to accumulate within the nucleus, which in turn leads to the formation of additional enolase-E.histolytica DNMT2 homolog (Ehmeth complex, and to a significant reduction of the tRNA(Asp methylation in the parasite. The crucial role of enolase as a Dnmt2 inhibitor was also demonstrated in E.histolytica expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS-fused-enolase. These results establish enolase as the first Dnmt2 interacting protein, and highlight an unexpected role of a glycolytic enzyme in the modulation of Dnmt2 activity.

  5. Telomeric Heterochromatin in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaura Hernandez-Rivas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Until very recently, little was known about the chromatin structure of the telomeres and subtelomeric regions in Plasmodium falciparum. In yeast and Drosophila melanogaster, chromatin structure has long been known to be an important aspect in the regulation and functioning of these regions. Telomeres and subtelomeric regions are enriched in epigenetic marks that are specific to heterochromatin, such as methylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 and lysine 20 of histone H4. In P. falciparum, histone modifications and the presence of both the heterochromatin “writing” (PfSir2, PKMT and “reading” (PfHP1 machinery at telomeric and subtelomeric regions indicate that these regions are likely to have heterochromatic structure that is epigenetically regulated. This structure may be important for telomere functions such as the silencing of the var gene family implicated in the cytoadherence and antigenic variation of these parasites.

  6. Tetany with Plasmodium falciparum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P S; Singh, Neha

    2012-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is a malarial infection with high morbidity and wide spectrum of atypical presentation. Here we report an unusual presentation of malaria as tetany with alteration in calcium,phosphate and magnesium metabolism Hypocalcaemia in malaria can cause prolonged Q-Tc interval which could be arisk factor for quinine cardiotoxicity and sudden death Hence monitoring of serum calcium in severe malarial infection and cautious use of quinine in such patients is very important in management

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of Lactobacillus jensenii enolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Paul T.; Raghunathan, Kannan; Spurbeck, Rachel R.; Arvidson, Cindy G.; Arvidson, Dennis N. (MSU)

    2010-09-02

    Recombinant Lactobacillus jensenii enolase fused to a C-terminal noncleavable His tag was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized by sitting-drop vapor diffusion. A complete data set was collected to 3.25 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 145.31, c = 99.79 {angstrom}. There were two protein subunits in the asymmetric unit, which gave a Matthews coefficient V{sub M} of 2.8 {angstrom}{sup 3} Da{sup -1}, corresponding to 55.2% solvent content.

  8. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: D-Mannonate Dhydratase from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakus,J.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Glasner, M.; Vick, J.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    The d-mannonate dehydratase (ManD) function was assigned to a group of orthologous proteins in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily by screening a library of acid sugars. Structures of the wild type ManD from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans were determined at pH 7.5 in the presence of Mg2+ and also in the presence of Mg2+ and the 2-keto-3-keto-d-gluconate dehydration product; the structure of the catalytically active K271E mutant was determined at pH 5.5 in the presence of the d-mannonate substrate. As previously observed in the structures of other members of the enolase superfamily, ManD contains two domains, an N-terminal a+{beta} capping domain and a ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel domain. The barrel domain contains the ligands for the essential Mg2+, Asp 210, Glu 236, and Glu 262, at the ends of the third, fourth, and fifth {beta}-strands of the barrel domain, respectively. However, the barrel domain lacks both the Lys acid/base catalyst at the end of the second {beta}-strand and the His-Asp dyad acid/base catalyst at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, that are found in many members of the superfamily. Instead, a hydrogen-bonded dyad of Tyr 159 in a loop following the second {beta}-strand and Arg 147 at the end of the second {beta}-strand are positioned to initiate the reaction by abstraction of the 2-proton. Both Tyr 159 and His 212, at the end of the third {beta}-strand, are positioned to facilitate both syn-dehydration and ketonization of the resulting enol intermediate to yield the 2-keto-3-keto-d-gluconate product with the observed retention of configuration. The identities and locations of these acid/base catalysts as well as of cationic amino acid residues that stabilize the enolate anion intermediate define a new structural strategy for catalysis (subgroup) in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily. With these differences, we provide additional evidence that the ligands for the essential Mg2+ are the only

  9. Disruption of the Pfg27 locus by homologous recombination leads to loss of the sexual phenotype in P. falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, C A; Fujioka, H; Aikawa, M; Kumar, N

    1999-06-01

    Transmission of malaria depends upon the differentiation and development of the sexual stages of the parasite. In Plasmodium falciparum, it is a complex, multistage process, involving the expression of a large number of sexual stage-specific proteins. Pfg27 is one such protein, abundantly expressed at the onset of gametocytogenesis. We report successful disruption of the Pfg27 locus using homologous recombination and show that it is essential for the maintenance of the sexual phenotype. Transfectants lacking Pfg27 abort early in sexual development, resulting in vacuolated, highly disarranged, and disintegrating parasites. This suggests a critical role for Pfg27 in the sexual development of the parasite.

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: malaria parasite P. falciparum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available malaria parasite P. falciparum Plasmodium falciparum Plasmodium_falciparum_L.png Plasmodium_falci...parum_NL.png Plasmodium_falciparum_S.png Plasmodium_falciparum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/...taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falciparum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falci...parum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falci...parum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falciparum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=218 ...

  11. Correlation between serum neuron specific enolase and functional neurological outcome in patients of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Sana; Beg, Mujahid; Rizvi, Imran; Islam, Najmul; Ullah, Ekram; Akhtar, Nishat

    2013-10-01

    The use of biomarkers to predict stroke prognosis is gaining particular attention nowadays. Neuron specific enolase (NSE), which is a dimeric isoenzyme of the glycolytic enzyme enolase and is found mainly in the neurons is one such biomarker. This study was carried out on patients of acute ischemic stroke with the aims to determine the correlation between NSE levels on the day of admission with infarct volume, stroke severity, and functional neurological outcome on day 30. Seventy five patients of acute ischemic stroke admitted in the Department of Medicine were included in the study. Levels of NSE were determined on day 1 using the human NSE ELISA kit (Alpha Diagnostic International Texas 78244, USA). Volume of infarct was measured by computed tomography (CT) scan using the preinstalled software Syngo (version A40A) of Siemen's medical solutions (Forchheim, Germany). Stroke severity at admission was assessed using Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and functional neurological outcome was assessed using modified Rankin scale (mRS) on day 30. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software for windows version 15.0 (SPSS). A positive correlation was found between concentration of NSE on day 1 and infarct volume determined by CT scan (r = 0.955, P serve as a useful marker to predict stroke severity and early functional outcome. However, larger studies with serial estimation of NSE are needed to establish these observations more firmly.

  12. Nuclear glycolytic enzyme enolase of Toxoplasma gondii functions as a transcriptional regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mouveaux

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii have complex life cycles within different hosts and their infectivity relies on their capacity to regulate gene expression. However, little is known about the nuclear factors that regulate gene expression in these pathogens. Here, we report that T. gondii enolase TgENO2 is targeted to the nucleus of actively replicating parasites, where it specifically binds to nuclear chromatin in vivo. Using a ChIP-Seq technique, we provide evidence for TgENO2 enrichment at the 5' untranslated gene regions containing the putative promoters of 241 nuclear genes. Ectopic expression of HA-tagged TgENO1 or TgENO2 led to changes in transcript levels of numerous gene targets. Targeted disruption of TgENO1 gene results in a decrease in brain cyst burden of chronically infected mice and in changes in transcript levels of several nuclear genes. Complementation of this knockout mutant with ectopic TgENO1-HA fully restored normal transcript levels. Our findings reveal that enolase functions extend beyond glycolytic activity and include a direct role in coordinating gene regulation in T. gondii.

  13. Stability of the octameric structure affects plasminogen-binding capacity of streptococcal enolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Cork

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen. Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen binding and activation.

  14. A more sensitive radioimmunoassay for neuron-specific enolase suitable for cerebrospinal fluid determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, A M; Marangos, P J; Goodwin, F K

    1981-03-01

    Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and non-neuronal enolase (NNE) have been shown to be highly specific neuronal and glial products respectively and are therefore useful as biochemical markers of the two major cell types in the vertebrate central nervous system. An iodinated radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for human NSE (NSE-H) with approximately 50-fold greater sensitivity than the previously available tritiated assay is described. This assay is capable of detecting 100 pg of NSE-H per assay. NSE levels in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which were previously undetectable with the tritiated RIA are now easily measured and have been shown to be approximately 2 ng/ml of CSF. Furthermore, results obtained with the newly described assay procedure on more concentrated brain tissue extracts are comparable to the tritiated RIA. The iodinated NSE RIA is also shown to be capable of accurately detecting added amounts of NSE in human CSF, indicating the potential clinical usefulness of this assay in determining elevated levels of NSE in CSF.

  15. Transcriptome profiling of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci reveals stage-specific gene expression signatures for thiamethoxam resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, N; Xie, W; Jones, C M; Bass, C; Jiao, X; Yang, X; Liu, B; Li, R; Zhang, Y

    2013-10-01

    Bemisia tabaci has developed high levels of resistance to many insecticides including the neonicotinoids and there is strong evidence that for some compounds resistance is stage-specific. To investigate the molecular basis of B. tabaci resistance to the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam we used a custom whitefly microarray to compare gene expression in the egg, nymph and adult stages of a thiamethoxam-resistant strain (TH-R) with a susceptible strain (TH-S). Gene ontology and bioinformatic analyses revealed that in all life stages many of the differentially expressed transcripts encoded enzymes involved in metabolic processes and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. Several of these are candidate resistance genes and include the cytochrome P450 CYP6CM1, which has been shown to confer resistance to several neonicotinoids previously, a P450 belonging to the Cytochrome P450s 4 family and a glutathione S-transferase (GST) belonging to the sigma class. Finally several ATP-binding cassette transporters of the ABCG subfamily were highly over-expressed in the adult stage of the TH-R strain and may play a role in resistance by active efflux. Here, we evaluated both common and stage-specific gene expression signatures and identified several candidate resistance genes that may underlie B. tabaci resistance to thiamethoxam.

  16. Identification and quantitative analysis of stage-specific carbohydrates in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) zygotic embryo and female gametophyte tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, Gerald S; Buchanan, Mike

    2008-07-01

    Stage-specific analyses of starch and 18 sugars, including pentoses, hexoses, disaccharides, trisaccharides, oligosaccharides and sugar alcohols, were made throughout seed development for zygotic embryo and female gametophyte (FG) tissues of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Tissue was most often analyzed in triplicate from two open-pollinated families grown in different locations and sampled in different years. Carbohydrates were analyzed by enzymatic assay, high performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For all carbohydrates quantified, peak concentrations were higher in embryo tissue than in FG tissue. Significant changes in starch and sugar concentrations occurred over time, with both seed collections showing similar trends in temporal changes. Although concentrations were not always similar, embryo and FG tissues generally showed similar patterns of change in starch and sugar concentrations over time. Total starch concentration was highest during early seed development and decreased as development progressed. The major sugars contributing to osmotic potential during early seed development were D-pinitol, sucrose, fructose and glucose. During mid-seed development, D-pinitol, sucrose, fructose, glucose, melibiose and raffinose provided major contributions to the osmotic environment. During late seed development, sucrose, raffinose, melibiose, stachyose and fructose were the major contributors to osmotic potential. These data suggest stage-specific media composition for each step in the somatic embryogenesis protocol.

  17. Stage-Specific Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Map the Progression of Myeloid Transformation to Transplantable Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotini, Andriana G; Chang, Chan-Jung; Chow, Arthur; Yuan, Han; Ho, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Tiansu; Vora, Shailee; Solovyov, Alexander; Husser, Chrystel; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Perumal, Deepak; Klimek, Virginia M; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Rampal, Raajit K; Silverman, Lewis; Reddy, E Premkumar; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Parekh, Samir; Greenbaum, Benjamin D; Leslie, Christina S; Kharas, Michael G; Papapetrou, Eirini P

    2017-03-02

    Myeloid malignancy is increasingly viewed as a disease spectrum, comprising hematopoietic disorders that extend across a phenotypic continuum ranging from clonal hematopoiesis to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we derived a collection of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines capturing a range of disease stages encompassing preleukemia, low-risk MDS, high-risk MDS, and secondary AML. Upon their differentiation, we found hematopoietic phenotypes of graded severity and/or stage specificity that together delineate a phenotypic roadmap of disease progression culminating in serially transplantable leukemia. We also show that disease stage transitions, both reversal and progression, can be modeled in this system using genetic correction or introduction of mutations via CRISPR/Cas9 and that this iPSC-based approach can be used to uncover disease-stage-specific responses to drugs. Our study therefore provides insight into the cellular events demarcating the initiation and progression of myeloid transformation and a new platform for testing genetic and pharmacological interventions.

  18. PolyA-specific ribonuclease (PARN-1) function in stage-specific mRNA turnover in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Christopher J; Garcia, Stacey A; Milone, Joseph; Bellofatto, Vivian

    2011-09-01

    Deadenylation is often the rate-limiting event in regulating the turnover of cellular mRNAs in eukaryotes. Removal of the poly(A) tail initiates mRNA degradation by one of several decay pathways, including deadenylation-dependent decapping, followed by 5' to 3' exonuclease decay or 3' to 5' exosome-mediated decay. In trypanosomatids, mRNA degradation is important in controlling the expression of differentially expressed genes. Genomic annotation studies have revealed several potential deadenylases. Poly(A)-specific RNase (PARN) is a key deadenylase involved in regulating gene expression in mammals, Xenopus oocytes, and higher plants. Trypanosomatids possess three different PARN genes, PARN-1, -2, and -3, each of which is expressed at the mRNA level in two life-cycle stages of the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Here we show that T. brucei PARN-1 is an active deadenylase. To determine the role of PARN-1 on mRNA stability in vivo, we overexpressed this protein and analyzed perturbations in mRNA steady-state levels as well as mRNA half-life. Interestingly, a subset of mRNAs was affected, including a family of mRNAs that encode stage-specific coat proteins. These data suggest that PARN-1 functions in stage-specific protein production.

  19. Rapid Generation of Marker-Free P. falciparum Fluorescent Reporter Lines Using Modified CRISPR/Cas9 Constructs and Selection Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogollon, Catherin Marin; van Pul, Fiona J. A.; Imai, Takashi; Ramesar, Jai; Chevalley-Maurel, Séverine; de Roo, Guido M.; Veld, Sabrina A. J.; Kroeze, Hans; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M. D.; Janse, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful genome editing technique employed in a wide variety of organisms including recently the human malaria parasite, P. falciparum. Here we report on further improvements to the CRISPR/Cas9 transfection constructs and selection protocol to more rapidly modify the P. falciparum genome and to introduce transgenes into the parasite genome without the inclusion of drug-selectable marker genes. This method was used to stably integrate the gene encoding GFP into the P. falciparum genome under the control of promoters of three different Plasmodium genes (calmodulin, gapdh and hsp70). These genes were selected as they are highly transcribed in blood stages. We show that the three reporter parasite lines generated in this study (GFP@cam, GFP@gapdh and GFP@hsp70) have in vitro blood stage growth kinetics and drug-sensitivity profiles comparable to the parental P. falciparum (NF54) wild-type line. Both asexual and sexual blood stages of the three reporter lines expressed GFP-fluorescence with GFP@hsp70 having the highest fluorescent intensity in schizont stages as shown by flow cytometry analysis of GFP-fluorescence intensity. The improved CRISPR/Cas9 constructs/protocol will aid in the rapid generation of transgenic and modified P. falciparum parasites, including those expressing different reporters proteins under different (stage specific) promoters. PMID:27997583

  20. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loveren, C; Hoogenkamp, M A; Deng, D M; ten Cate, J M

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR were preincubated at pH 7 or 4 with NaF, the amine fluorides Olaflur and Dectaflur and amine chloride controls. After preincubations, enolase and ATPase activities of the cells were assessed. Enolase activity was more inhibited after preincubation at pH 7 with NaF than with Olaflur. Amine chloride stimulated, although not with statistical significance, the enolase activity of both strains. After preincubation at pH 4 the enolases were strongly inactivated, but the fluoride-resistant strain's enolase to a lesser extent. The results suggested that amine acts to protect enolase activity against the detrimental low pH effect. Gene sequencing showed that the enolase genes of the fluoride-resistant and fluoride-sensitive strain were identical. ATPase activity was not reduced after NaF preincubation at either pH 7 or pH 4. The amine fluorides and their chloride controls in the preincubation mixture reduced the ATPase activity significantly at both pH values. In conclusion, our results showed that preincubation with amine fluoride did not inhibit enolase activity more effectively than NaF. The amine part of the molecule may protect enolase activity against preincubations at low pH. ATPase activity was not inhibited by NaF preincubation but was significantly inhibited after preincubation with amine fluorides and amine chlorides. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Modulation of α-enolase post-translational modifications by dengue virus: increased secretion of the basic isoforms in infected hepatic cells.

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    Luiza M Higa

    Full Text Available Hepatic cells are major sites of dengue virus (DENV replication and liver injury constitutes a characteristic of severe forms of dengue. The role of hepatic cells in dengue pathogenesis is not well established, but since hepatocytes are the major source of plasma proteins, changes in protein secretion by these cells during infection might contribute to disease progression. Previously, we showed that DENV infection alters the secretion pattern of hepatic HepG2 cells, with α-enolase appearing as one of the major proteins secreted in higher levels by infected cells. ELISA analysis demonstrated that DENV infection modulates α-enolase secretion in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, but has no effect on its gene expression and on the intracellular content of the protein as assessed by PCR and western blot analyses, respectively. Two-dimensional western blots showed that both intracellular and secreted forms of α-enolase appear as five spots, revealing α-enolase isoforms with similar molecular weights but distinct isoeletric points. Remarkably, quantification of each spot content revealed that DENV infection shifts the isoform distribution pattern of secreted α-enolase towards the basic isoforms, whereas the intracellular protein remains unaltered, suggesting that post-translational modifications might be involved in α-enolase secretion by infected cells. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying α-enolase secretion by hepatic cells and its relationship with the role of liver in dengue pathogenesis. In addition, preliminary results obtained with plasma samples from DENV-infected patients suggest an association between plasma levels of α-enolase and disease severity. Since α-enolase binds plasminogen and modulates its activation, it is plausible to speculate the association of the increase in α-enolase secretion by infected hepatic cells with the haemostatic dysfunction observed in dengue patients including the

  2. Comparison of the antibody responses to Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum antigens in residents of Mandalay, Myanmar

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    Kim Yeon-Joo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the profile of antibodies against several antigens of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in Mandalay, Myanmar. Methods Malaria parasites were identified by microscopic examination. To test the antibodies against P. vivax and P. falciparum in sera, an indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT was performed using asexual blood parasite antigens. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was performed with circumsporozoite protein (CSP, Pvs25 and Pvs28 recombinant proteins of transmission-blocking vaccine candidates for P. vivax, and liver stage specific antigen-1 and -3 (PfLSA-1, PfLSA-3 for P. falciparum. Results Fourteen patients among 112 were found to be infected with P. vivax and 26 with P. falciparum by thick smear examination. Twenty-three patients were found to be infected with P. vivax, 19 with P. falciparum and five with both by thin smear examination. Blood samples were divided into two groups: Group I consisted of patients who were positive for infection by microscopic examination, and Group II consisted of those who showed symptoms, but were negative in microscopic examination. In P. falciparum, IgG against the blood stage antigen in Group I (80.8% was higher than in Group II (70.0%. In P. vivax, IgG against the blood stage antigen in Group I (53.8% was higher than in Group II (41.7%. However, the positivity rate of the PvCSP VK210 subtype in Group II (40.0% was higher than in Group I (23.1%. Similarly for the PvCSP VK247 subtype, Group II (21.7% was higher than that for Group I (9.6%. A similar pattern was observed in the ELISA using Pvs25 and Pvs28: positive rates of Group II were higher than those for Group I. However, those differences were not shown significant in statistics. Conclusions The positive rates for blood stage antigens of P. falciparum were higher in Group I than in Group II, but the positive rates for antigens of other stages (PfLSA-1 and -3

  3. Comparison of the antibody responses to Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum antigens in residents of Mandalay, Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tong-Soo; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Kong, Yoon; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Lin, Khin; Moon, Sung-Ung; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kwon, Myoung-Hee; Sohn, Youngjoo; Kim, Hyuck; Lee, Hyeong-Woo

    2011-08-06

    The aim of this study was to investigate the profile of antibodies against several antigens of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in Mandalay, Myanmar. Malaria parasites were identified by microscopic examination. To test the antibodies against P. vivax and P. falciparum in sera, an indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) was performed using asexual blood parasite antigens. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed with circumsporozoite protein (CSP), Pvs25 and Pvs28 recombinant proteins of transmission-blocking vaccine candidates for P. vivax, and liver stage specific antigen-1 and -3 (PfLSA-1, PfLSA-3) for P. falciparum. Fourteen patients among 112 were found to be infected with P. vivax and 26 with P. falciparum by thick smear examination. Twenty-three patients were found to be infected with P. vivax, 19 with P. falciparum and five with both by thin smear examination. Blood samples were divided into two groups: Group I consisted of patients who were positive for infection by microscopic examination, and Group II consisted of those who showed symptoms, but were negative in microscopic examination. In P. falciparum, IgG against the blood stage antigen in Group I (80.8%) was higher than in Group II (70.0%). In P. vivax, IgG against the blood stage antigen in Group I (53.8%) was higher than in Group II (41.7%). However, the positivity rate of the PvCSP VK210 subtype in Group II (40.0%) was higher than in Group I (23.1%). Similarly for the PvCSP VK247 subtype, Group II (21.7%) was higher than that for Group I (9.6%). A similar pattern was observed in the ELISA using Pvs25 and Pvs28: positive rates of Group II were higher than those for Group I. However, those differences were not shown significant in statistics. The positive rates for blood stage antigens of P. falciparum were higher in Group I than in Group II, but the positive rates for antigens of other stages (PfLSA-1 and -3) showed opposite results. Similar to P. falciparum, the

  4. Stage-specific alternative splicing of the heat-shock transcription factor during the life-cycle of Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, D; Ziv, E; Lantner, F; Lardans, V; Schechter, I

    2004-11-01

    Stage-specific alternative splicing of the heat-shock transcription factor of Schistosoma mansoni (SmHSF) generates isoforms with structural diversity that may modulate the activity of SmHSF at different life-stages, and thus may regulate the expression of different genes at different developmental stages. RT-PCR, cloning and DNA-sequence analyses showed stage-specific alternative splicing inside the DNA-binding domain (DBD) involving introns I1 and I2, and beyond the DBD involving introns I4a and I7. Retention of introns I2 and I4 would inactivate SmHSF since they contain termination codons. Retention of intron I1 would add 11 amino acids inside the DBD and may change the DNA-binding specificity of SmHSF; intron I7 would add 13 amino acids to the effector region of HSF. Retention of introns was more pronounced in cercariae (larval stage living in water) than in adult worms (parasitic form in mammals). The isoforms were expressed in bacteria, but functional evaluation was not feasible, because only the isoform lacking introns was soluble while isoforms with introns were insoluble. However, stage-specific alternative splicing that changed HSF function in vivo was evidenced in intact cercariae. The cercarial SmHSF mRNA was enriched with introns I2 and I4a that contain termination codons. Therefore, translation of the SmHSF mRNA was impaired, and the SmHSF protein was undetectable. Consequently, the HSP70 gene could not be transcribed, and the HSP70 mRNA was missing. Alternative splicing was observed for short DNA segments (33-45 bp) bound by splice signals, located in the coding region. These are not bona fida exons since they are not flanked by introns. Yet, they are not regular introns since they are often found in mature mRNA. Alternative splicing of these DNA segments caused structural diversity that could modulate the function of the gene product.

  5. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of a full-length cDNA for human alpha enolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallongo, A; Feo, S; Moore, R; Croce, C M; Showe, L C

    1986-01-01

    We previously purified a 48-kDa protein (p48) that specifically reacts with an antiserum directed against the 12 carboxyl-terminal amino acids of the c-myc gene product. Using an antiserum directed against the purified p48, we have cloned a cDNA from a human expression library. This cDNA hybrid-selects an mRNA that translates to a 48-kDa protein that specifically reacts with anti-p48 serum. We have isolated a full-length cDNA that encodes p48 and spans 1755 bases. The coding region is 1299 bases long; 94 bases are 5' noncoding and 359 bases are 3' noncoding. The cDNA encodes a 433 amino acid protein that is 67% homologous to yeast enolase and 94% homologous to the rat non-neuronal enolase. The purified protein has been shown to have enolase activity and has been identified to be of the alpha type by isoenzyme analysis. The transcriptional regulation of enolase expression in response to mitogenic stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes and in response to heat shock is also discussed. Images PMID:3529090

  6. Proinflammatory Cytokines, Enolase and S-100 as Early Biochemical Indicators of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Following Perinatal Asphyxia in Newborns

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    Verónica Chaparro-Huerta

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: The role of cytokines after hypoxic-ischemic insult has been determined in studies of transgenic mice that support the use of these molecules as candidate biomarkers. Similarly, S-100 and enolase are considered promising candidates because these markers have been correlated with tissue damage in different experimental models.

  7. Surface displaced alfa-enolase of Lactobacillus plantarum is a fibronectin binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Vastano, Valeria; Siciliano, Rosa Anna; Candela, Marco; Vici, Manuela; Muscariello, Lidia; Marasco, Rosangela; Sacco, Margherita

    2009-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are one of the most important health promoting groups of the human intestinal microbiota. Their protective role within the gut consists in out competing invading pathogens for ecological niches and metabolic substrates. Among the features necessary to provide health benefits, commensal microorganisms must have the ability to adhere to human intestinal cells and consequently to colonize the gut. Studies on mechanisms mediating adhesion of lactobacilli to human intestinal cells showed that factors involved in the interaction vary mostly among different species and strains, mainly regarding interaction between bacterial adhesins and extracellular matrix or mucus proteins. We have investigated the adhesive properties of Lactobacillus plantarum, a member of the human microbiota of healthy individuals. Results We show the identification of a Lactobacillus plantarum LM3 cell surface protein (48 kDa), which specifically binds to human fibronectin (Fn), an extracellular matrix protein. By means of mass spectrometric analysis this protein was identified as the product of the L. plantarum enoA1 gene, coding the EnoA1 alfa-enolase. Surface localization of EnoA1 was proved by immune electron microscopy. In the mutant strain LM3-CC1, carrying the enoA1 null mutation, the 48 kDa adhesin was not anymore detectable neither by anti-enolase Western blot nor by Fn-overlay immunoblotting assay. Moreover, by an adhesion assay we show that LM3-CC1 cells bind to fibronectin-coated surfaces less efficiently than wild type cells, thus demonstrating the significance of the surface displaced EnoA1 protein for the L. plantarum LM3 adhesion to fibronectin. Conclusion Adhesion to host tissues represents a crucial early step in the colonization process of either pathogens or commensal bacteria. We demonstrated the involvement of the L. plantarum Eno A1 alfa-enolase in Fn-binding, by studying LM3 and LM3-CC1 surface

  8. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Rhamnonate Dehydratase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakus,J.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Glaner, M.; Hubbard, B.; Delli, J.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    The l-rhamnonate dehydratase (RhamD) function was assigned to a previously uncharacterized family in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily that is encoded by the genome of Escherichia coli K-12. We screened a library of acid sugars to discover that the enzyme displays a promiscuous substrate specificity: l-rhamnonate (6-deoxy-l-mannonate) has the 'best' kinetic constants, with l-mannonate, l-lyxonate, and d-gulonate dehydrated less efficiently. Crystal structures of the RhamDs from both E. coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 (95% sequence identity) were obtained in the presence of Mg2+; the structure of the RhamD from S. typhimurium was also obtained in the presence of 3-deoxy-l-rhamnonate (obtained by reduction of the product with NaBH4). Like other members of the enolase superfamily, RhamD contains an N-terminal a + {beta} capping domain and a C-terminal ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel (modified TIM-barrel) catalytic domain with the active site located at the interface between the two domains. In contrast to other members, the specificity-determining '20s loop' in the capping domain is extended in length and the '50s loop' is truncated. The ligands for the Mg2+ are Asp 226, Glu 252 and Glu 280 located at the ends of the third, fourth and fifth {beta}-strands, respectively. The active site of RhamD contains a His 329-Asp 302 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, with His 329 positioned to function as the general base responsible for abstraction of the C2 proton of l-rhamnonate to form a Mg2+-stabilized enediolate intermediate. However, the active site does not contain other acid/base catalysts that have been implicated in the reactions catalyzed by other members of the MR subgroup of the enolase superfamily. Based on the structure of the liganded complex, His 329 also is expected to function as the general acid that both facilitates departure of the 3-OH group in a syn-dehydration reaction and

  9. Gene expression profiling in porcine mammary gland during lactation and identification of breed- and developmental-stage-specific genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Zhixi; DONG; Xinjiao; ZHANG; Bing; ZENG; Yanwu; FU; Yan; YU; Jun; HU; Songnian

    2006-01-01

    A total of 28941 ESTs were sequenced from five 5(-directed non-normalized cDNA libraries, which were assembled into 2212 contigs and 5642 singlets using CAP3. These sequences were annotated and clustered into 6857 unique genes, 2072 of which having no functional annotations were considered as novel genes. These genes were further classified into Gene Ontology categories. By comparing the expression profiles, we identified some breed- and developmental-stage-specific gene groups. These genes may be relative to reproductive performance or play important roles in milk synthesis, secretion and mammary involution. The unknown EST sequences and expression profiles at different developmental stages and breeds are very important resources for further research.

  10. Stage-specific localization of transforming growth factor β1 and β3 and their receptors during spermatogenesis in men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-QiangZhang; Xiao-ZhouHe; Jin-ShanZhang; Rui-AnWang; JieZhou; Ruo-JunXu

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the stage-specific localization of transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 and β3 during spermatogenesis in adult human testis, Methods: The localization of TGFβ1 and β3 was investigated by immunohistochemical staining method employing specific polyclonal antibodies. Results: Both TGFβ1 and β3 and their receptors were preponderant in the Leydig cells. TGFβ1 could not be detected in the seminiferous tubules. TGFβ3 and TGFβ-Receptor (R) Ⅰ were mainly seen in the elongated spermatids, while TGFβ-RⅡ in the pachytene spermatocytes and weak in the spermatogonia, spermatids and Sertoli cells. Only TGFβ-RⅡ was detected in the Sertoli cells.TGFβ3, TGFβ-RⅠ and TGFβ-RⅡ showed a staining pattern dependent upon the stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. Conclusion: TGFβ isoforms and their receptors are present in the somatic and germ cells of the adult humantestis, suggesting their involvement in the regulation of spermatogenesis.

  11. Identification of Putative Stage-Specific Grapevine Berry Biomarkers and Omics Data Integration into Networks1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Anita; Di Carli, Mariasole; Guzzo, Flavia; Stocchero, Matteo; Zenoni, Sara; Ferrarini, Alberto; Tononi, Paola; Toffali, Ketti; Desiderio, Angiola; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Pè, M. Enrico; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Delledonne, Massimo; Pezzotti, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) berries at the transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic levels can provide great insight into the molecular events underlying berry development and postharvest drying (withering). However, the large and very different data sets produced by such investigations are difficult to integrate. Here, we report the identification of putative stage-specific biomarkers for berry development and withering and, to our knowledge, the first integrated systems-level study of these processes. Transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data were integrated using two different strategies, one hypothesis free and the other hypothesis driven. A multistep hypothesis-free approach was applied to data from four developmental stages and three withering intervals, with integration achieved using a hierarchical clustering strategy based on the multivariate bidirectional orthogonal projections to latent structures technique. This identified stage-specific functional networks of linked transcripts, proteins, and metabolites, providing important insights into the key molecular processes that determine the quality characteristics of wine. The hypothesis-driven approach was used to integrate data from three withering intervals, starting with subdata sets of transcripts, proteins, and metabolites. We identified transcripts and proteins that were modulated during withering as well as specific classes of metabolites that accumulated at the same time and used these to select subdata sets of variables. The multivariate bidirectional orthogonal projections to latent structures technique was then used to integrate the subdata sets, identifying variables representing selected molecular processes that take place specifically during berry withering. The impact of this holistic approach on our knowledge of grapevine berry development and withering is discussed. PMID:20826702

  12. Systematic Analysis Reveals Elongation Factor 2 and α-Enolase as Novel Interaction Partners of AKT2.

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    Katharina Bottermann

    Full Text Available AKT2 is one of the three isoforms of the protein kinase AKT being involved in the modulation of cellular metabolism. Since protein-protein interactions are one possibility to convey specificity in signal transduction, we performed AKT2-protein interaction analysis to elucidate their relevance for AKT2-dependent cellular functions. We identified heat shock protein 90 kDa (HSP90, Cdc37, heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein (GRP78, tubulin, GAPDH, α-enolase and elongation factor 2 (EF2 as AKT2-interacting proteins by a combination of tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry in HEK293T cells. Quantitative MS-analysis using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC revealed that only HSP90 and Cdc37 interact stably with AKT2, whereas the other proteins interact with low affinity with AKT2. The interactions of AKT2 with α-enolase and EF2 were further analyzed in order to uncover the functional relevance of these newly discovered binding partners. Despite the interaction of AKT2 and α-enolase, which was additionally validated by proximity ligation assay (PLA, no significant impact of AKT on α-enolase activity was detected in activity measurements. AKT stimulation via insulin and/or inhibition with the ATP-competitive inhibitor CCT128930 did not alter enzymatic activity of α-enolase. Interestingly, the direct interaction of AKT2 and EF2 was found to be dynamically regulated in embryonic rat cardiomyocytes. Treatment with the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 before stimulation with several hormones stabilized the complex, whereas stimulation alone led to complex dissociation which was analyzed in situ with PLA. Taken together, these findings point to new aspects of AKT2-mediated signal transduction in protein synthesis and glucose metabolism.

  13. Immunoreactive neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is expressed in testicular carcinoma-in-situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, J L; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Skakkebaek, N E

    1996-01-01

    -seminomas, and a mixed germ cell tumour. As the co-existence of high NSE production and gene amplification of N-myc has been reported in some tumours, including germ cell tumours, the expression of the protein product of N-myc was also examined in this study, but only sporadic cases showed N-myc staining. These results......Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a well-known marker of tumours that have neuroendocrine origin. High levels of NSE have also been described in various types of testicular germ cell neoplasms, particularly in seminomas. To evaluate the presence of NSE in testicular carcinoma-in situ (CIS......), a preinvasive stage of testicular germ cell tumours, a panel of CIS tissue specimens was examined. Fifteen of 18 (83 per cent) CIS samples showed immunohistochemical staining with anti-NSE monoclonal antibody. Immunoreactivity has also been found in overt testicular germ cell tumours, including seminomas, non...

  14. S-100b and neuron-specific enolase in patients with fulminant hepatic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strauss, Gitte Irene; Christiansen, Michael; Møller, Kirsten

    2001-01-01

    Patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) frequently develop cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate circulating S-100b and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels as markers of neurological outcome in patients with FHF. In a subgroup of patients......, the cerebral flux of S-100b and NSE was measured. We included 35 patients with FHF, 6 patients with acute on chronic liver disease (AOCLD), 13 patients with cirrhosis of the liver without hepatic encephalopathy, and 8 healthy subjects. Blood samples were obtained from catheters placed in the radial artery...... and internal jugular bulb. The net cerebral flux of S-100b and NSE was measured, and the effect of short-term hyperventilation, as well as the effect of high-volume plasmapheresis, on circulating levels of these two biomarkers was determined. Blood levels of S-100b were greater in patients with FHF and AOCLD...

  15. Oral Immunization Against Candidiasis Using Lactobacillus casei Displaying Enolase 1 from Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Tafuku, Senji; Aoki, Wataru; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Candidiasis is a common fungal infection that is prevalent in immunocompromised individuals. In this study, an oral vaccine against Candida albicans was developed by using the molecular display approach. Enolase 1 protein (Eno1p) of C. albicans was expressed on the Lactobacillus casei cell surface by using poly-gamma-glutamic acid synthetase complex A from Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring protein. The Eno1p-displaying L. casei cells were used to immunize mice, which were later challenged with a lethal dose of C. albicans. The data indicated that the vaccine elicited a strong IgG response and increased the survival rate of the vaccinated mice. Furthermore, L. casei acted as a potent adjuvant and induced high antibody titers that were comparable to those induced by strong adjuvants such as the cholera toxin. Overall, the molecular display method can be used to rapidly develop vaccines that can be conveniently administered and require minimal processing.

  16. Correlation between serum neuron specific enolase and functional neurological outcome in patients of acute ischemic stroke

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    Sana Zaheer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The use of biomarkers to predict stroke prognosis is gaining particular attention nowadays. Neuron specific enolase (NSE, which is a dimeric isoenzyme of the glycolytic enzyme enolase and is found mainly in the neurons is one such biomarker. Aims: This study was carried out on patients of acute ischemic stroke with the aims to determine the correlation between NSE levels on the day of admission with infarct volume, stroke severity, and functional neurological outcome on day 30. Materials and Methods: Seventy five patients of acute ischemic stroke admitted in the Department of Medicine were included in the study. Levels of NSE were determined on day 1 using the human NSE ELISA kit (Alpha Diagnostic International Texas 78244, USA. Volume of infarct was measured by computed tomography (CT scan using the preinstalled software Syngo (version A40A of Siemen′s medical solutions (Forchheim, Germany. Stroke severity at admission was assessed using Glasgow coma scale (GCS and functional neurological outcome was assessed using modified Rankin scale (mRS on day 30. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software for windows version 15.0 (SPSS. Results: A positive correlation was found between concentration of NSE on day 1 and infarct volume determined by CT scan (r = 0.955, P < 0.001. A strong negative correlation was found between GCS at presentation and concentration of NSE on day 1 (r = −0.806, P < 0.001. There was a positive correlation between NSE levels at day 1 and functional neurological outcome assessed by mRS at day 30 (r = 0.744, P < 0.001. Conclusions: Serum levels of NSE in first few days of ischemic stroke can serve as a useful marker to predict stroke severity and early functional outcome. However, larger studies with serial estimation of NSE are needed to establish these observations more firmly.

  17. A nuclear targeting system in Plasmodium falciparum

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    Kochakarn Theerarat

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The distinct differences in gene control mechanisms acting in the nucleus between Plasmodium falciparum and the human host could lead to new potential drug targets for anti-malarial development. New molecular toolkits are required for dissecting molecular machineries in the P. falciparum nucleus. One valuable tool commonly used in model organisms is protein targeting to specific sub-cellular locations. Targeting proteins to specified locations allows labeling of organelles for microscopy, or testing of how the protein of interest modulates organelle function. In recent years, this approach has been developed for various malaria organelles, such as the mitochondrion and the apicoplast. A tool for targeting a protein of choice to the P. falciparum nucleus using an exogenous nuclear localization sequence is reported here. Methods To develop a nuclear targeting system, a putative nuclear localization sequence was fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP. The nuclear localization sequence from the yeast transcription factor Gal4 was chosen because of its well-defined nuclear localization signal. A series of truncated Gal4 constructs was also created to narrow down the nuclear localization sequence necessary for P. falciparum nuclear import. Transfected parasites were analysed by fluorescent and laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Results The nuclear localization sequence of Gal4 is functional in P. falciparum. It effectively transported GFP into the nucleus, and the first 74 amino acid residues were sufficient for nuclear localization. Conclusions The Gal4 fusion technique enables specific transport of a protein of choice into the P. falciparum nucleus, and thus provides a tool for labeling nuclei without using DNA-staining dyes. The finding also indicates similarities between the nuclear transport mechanisms of yeast and P. falciparum. Since the nuclear transport system has been thoroughly studied in yeast, this could give clues

  18. Landscape and Dynamics of Transcription Initiation in the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

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    Sophie H. Adjalley

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive map of transcription start sites (TSSs across the highly AT-rich genome of P. falciparum would aid progress toward deciphering the molecular mechanisms that underlie the timely regulation of gene expression in this malaria parasite. Using high-throughput sequencing technologies, we generated a comprehensive atlas of transcription initiation events at single-nucleotide resolution during the parasite intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle. This detailed analysis of TSS usage enabled us to define architectural features of plasmodial promoters. We demonstrate that TSS selection and strength are constrained by local nucleotide composition. Furthermore, we provide evidence for coordinate and stage-specific TSS usage from distinct sites within the same transcription unit, thereby producing transcript isoforms, a subset of which are developmentally regulated. This work offers a framework for further investigations into the interactions between genomic sequences and regulatory factors governing the complex transcriptional program of this major human pathogen.

  19. Identification of a novel and unique transcription factor in the intraerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Komaki-Yasuda

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of stage-specific gene regulation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are largely unclear, with only a small number of specific regulatory transcription factors (AP2 family having been identified. In particular, the transcription factors that function in the intraerythrocytic stage remain to be elucidated. Previously, as a model case for stage-specific transcription in the P. falciparum intraerythrocytic stage, we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of pf1-cys-prx, a trophozoite/schizont-specific gene, and suggested that some nuclear factors bind specifically to the cis-element of pf1-cys-prx and enhance transcription. In the present study, we purified nuclear factors from parasite nuclear extract by 5 steps of chromatography, and identified a factor termed PREBP. PREBP is not included in the AP2 family, and is a novel protein with four K-homology (KH domains. The KH domain is known to be found in RNA-binding or single-stranded DNA-binding proteins. PREBP is well conserved in Plasmodium species and partially conserved in phylum Apicomplexa. To evaluate the effects of PREBP overexpression, we used a transient overexpression and luciferase assay combined approach. Overexpression of PREBP markedly enhanced luciferase expression under the control of the pf1-cys-prx cis-element. These results provide the first evidence of a novel transcription factor that activates the gene expression in the malaria parasite intraerythrocytic stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the evolution of specific transcription machinery in Plasmodium and other eukaryotes.

  20. An interplay between 2 signaling pathways: Melatonin-cAMP and IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} signaling pathways control intraerythrocytic development of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuyama, Wakako [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Enomoto, Masahiro [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, M5G1L7 Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mossaad, Ehab [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Kawai, Satoru [Laboratory of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, Dokkyo Medical University, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko [Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawazu, Shin-ichiro, E-mail: skawazu@obihiro.ac.jp [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • A melatonin receptor antagonist blocked Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in P. falciparum and inhibited parasite growth. • P. falciparum development is controlled by Ca{sup 2+}- and cAMP-signaling pathways. • The cAMP-signaling pathway at ring form and late trophozoite stages governs parasite growth of P. falciparum. - Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum spends most of its asexual life cycle within human erythrocytes, where proliferation and maturation occur. Development into the mature forms of P. falciparum causes severe symptoms due to its distinctive sequestration capability. However, the physiological roles and the molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways that govern development are poorly understood. Our previous study showed that P. falciparum exhibits stage-specific spontaneous Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in ring and early trophozoites, and the latter was essential for parasite development. In this study, we show that luzindole (LZ), a selective melatonin receptor antagonist, inhibits parasite growth. Analyses of development and morphology of LZ-treated P. falciparum revealed that LZ severely disrupted intraerythrocytic maturation, resulting in parasite death. When LZ was added at ring stage, the parasite could not undergo further development, whereas LZ added at the trophozoite stage inhibited development from early into late schizonts. Live-cell Ca{sup 2+} imaging showed that LZ treatment completely abolished Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the ring forms while having little effect on early trophozoites. Further, the melatonin-induced cAMP increase observed at ring and late trophozoite stage was attenuated by LZ treatment. These suggest that a complex interplay between IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signaling pathways is involved in intraerythrocytic development of P. falciparum.

  1. Guillain-Barré syndrome in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    OpenAIRE

    Wijesundere, A.

    1992-01-01

    A patient with Plasmodium falciparum malaria developed peripheral neuropathy. Clinical, cerebro-spinal fluid examination and nerve conduction studies confirmed Guillain-Barré syndrome, not previously reported in P. falciparum malaria.

  2. Stage-Specific Changes in Plasmodium Metabolism Required for Differentiation and Adaptation to Different Host and Vector Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anubhav; Philip, Nisha; Hughes, Katie R; Georgiou, Konstantina; MacRae, James I; Barrett, Michael P; Creek, Darren J; McConville, Malcolm J; Waters, Andrew P

    2016-12-01

    Malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) encounter markedly different (nutritional) environments during their complex life cycles in the mosquito and human hosts. Adaptation to these different host niches is associated with a dramatic rewiring of metabolism, from a highly glycolytic metabolism in the asexual blood stages to increased dependence on tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism in mosquito stages. Here we have used stable isotope labelling, targeted metabolomics and reverse genetics to map stage-specific changes in Plasmodium berghei carbon metabolism and determine the functional significance of these changes on parasite survival in the blood and mosquito stages. We show that glutamine serves as the predominant input into TCA metabolism in both asexual and sexual blood stages and is important for complete male gametogenesis. Glutamine catabolism, as well as key reactions in intermediary metabolism and CoA synthesis are also essential for ookinete to oocyst transition in the mosquito. These data extend our knowledge of Plasmodium metabolism and point towards possible targets for transmission-blocking intervention strategies. Furthermore, they highlight significant metabolic differences between Plasmodium species which are not easily anticipated based on genomics or transcriptomics studies and underline the importance of integration of metabolomics data with other platforms in order to better inform drug discovery and design.

  3. Stage-specific heat effects: timing and duration of heat waves alter demographic rates of a global insect pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Rudolf, Volker H W; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2015-12-01

    The frequency and duration of periods with high temperatures are expected to increase under global warming. Thus, even short-lived organisms are increasingly likely to experience periods of hot temperatures at some point of their life-cycle. Despite recent progress, it remains unclear how various temperature experiences during the life-cycle of organisms affect demographic traits. We simulated hot days (daily mean temperature of 30 °C) increasingly experienced under field conditions and investigated how the timing and duration of such hot days during the life cycle of Plutella xylostella affects adult traits. We show that hot days experienced during some life stages (but not all) altered adult lifespan, fecundity, and oviposition patterns. Importantly, the effects of hot days were contingent on which stage was affected, and these stage-specific effects were not always additive. Thus, adults that experience different temporal patterns of hot periods (i.e., changes in timing and duration) during their life-cycle often had different demographic rates and reproductive patterns. These results indicate that we cannot predict the effects of current and future climate on natural populations by simply focusing on changes in the mean temperature. Instead, we need to incorporate the temporal patterns of heat events relative to the life-cycle of organisms to describe population dynamics and how they will respond to future climate change.

  4. Stage-Specific Changes in Plasmodium Metabolism Required for Differentiation and Adaptation to Different Host and Vector Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anubhav; Philip, Nisha; Hughes, Katie R.; Georgiou, Konstantina; MacRae, James I.; Barrett, Michael P.; McConville, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) encounter markedly different (nutritional) environments during their complex life cycles in the mosquito and human hosts. Adaptation to these different host niches is associated with a dramatic rewiring of metabolism, from a highly glycolytic metabolism in the asexual blood stages to increased dependence on tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism in mosquito stages. Here we have used stable isotope labelling, targeted metabolomics and reverse genetics to map stage-specific changes in Plasmodium berghei carbon metabolism and determine the functional significance of these changes on parasite survival in the blood and mosquito stages. We show that glutamine serves as the predominant input into TCA metabolism in both asexual and sexual blood stages and is important for complete male gametogenesis. Glutamine catabolism, as well as key reactions in intermediary metabolism and CoA synthesis are also essential for ookinete to oocyst transition in the mosquito. These data extend our knowledge of Plasmodium metabolism and point towards possible targets for transmission-blocking intervention strategies. Furthermore, they highlight significant metabolic differences between Plasmodium species which are not easily anticipated based on genomics or transcriptomics studies and underline the importance of integration of metabolomics data with other platforms in order to better inform drug discovery and design. PMID:28027318

  5. Stage-Specific Fatty Acid Fluxes Play a Regulatory Role in Glycerolipid Metabolism during Seed Development in Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, Bharatula Sri Krishna; Kumar, Sumit; Kaki, Shiva Shanker; Balakrishna, Marrapu; Karuna, Mallampalli Sri Lakshmi; Prasad, Rachapudi Badari Narayana; Sastry, Pidaparty Seshadri; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2015-12-23

    The present study describes the changes in lipid profile as well as fatty acid fluxes during seed development in Jatropha curcas L. Endosperm from 34, 37, and 40 days after anthesis (DAA), incubated with [(14)C]acetate, showed significant synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) at seed maturation. The fatty acid methyl ester profile showed PC from 34 DAA was rich in palmitic acid (16:0), whereas PC from 37 and 40 DAA was rich in oleic acid (18:1n-9). Molecular species analysis of diacylglycerol (DAG) indicated DAG (16:0/18:2n-6) was in abundance at 34 DAA, whereas DAG (18:1n-9/18:2n-6) was significantly high at 40 DAA. Triacylglycerol (TAG) analysis revealed TAG (16:0/18:2n-6/16:0) was abundant at 34 DAA, whereas TAG (18:1n-9/18:2n-6/18:1n-9) formed the majority at 40 DAA. Expression of two types of diacylglycerol acyltransferases varied with seed maturation. These data demonstrate stage-specific distinct pools of PC and DAG synthesis during storage TAG accumulation in Jatropha seed.

  6. Proteome profiling in murine models of multiple sclerosis: identification of stage specific markers and culprits for tissue damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf A Linker

    Full Text Available The identification of new biomarkers is of high interest for the prediction of the disease course and also for the identification of pathomechanisms in multiple sclerosis (MS. To specify markers of the chronic disease phase, we performed proteome profiling during the later phase of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (MOG-EAE, day 35 after immunization as a model disease mimicking many aspects of secondary progressive MS. In comparison to healthy controls, high resolution 2 dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed a number of regulated proteins, among them glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP. Phase specific up-regulation of GFAP in chronic EAE was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Protein levels of GFAP were also increased in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients with specificity for the secondary progressive disease phase. In a next step, proteome profiling of an EAE model with enhanced degenerative mechanisms revealed regulation of alpha-internexin, syntaxin binding protein 1, annexin V and glutamate decarboxylase in the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF knockout mouse. The identification of these proteins implicate an increased apoptosis and enhanced axonal disintegration and correlate well the described pattern of tissue injury in CNTF -/- mice which involve oligodendrocyte (OL apoptosis and axonal injury.In summary, our findings underscore the value of proteome analyses as screening method for stage specific biomarkers and for the identification of new culprits for tissue damage in chronic autoimmune demyelination.

  7. Individual differences in the time course of reward processing: Stage-specific links with depression and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Brittni K; Novak, Keisha D; Lynam, Donald R; Foti, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Reward dysfunction has been implicated in a wide range of psychological disorders, including internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Basic neuroscience research has shown that reward is a multistage process, yet it is unclear how specific stages relate to individual differences in reward sensitivity. The current study utilized event-related potentials elicited during a monetary incentive task to parse sub-stages within anticipatory and consummatory reward processing. Effects of depressive symptoms and trait impulsivity were examined at each sub-stage (N=92). Reward anticipation modulated neural activity across three sub-stages: cue detection (cue-P3), approach behavior (contingent negative variation, CNV), and outcome anticipation (stimulus preceding negativity). Reward delivery modulated activity across two sub-stages: initial evaluation (reward positivity, RewP), and allocation of attention (feedback-P3). Sensation seeking predicted faster reaction times, as well as cue-P3 and RewP amplitudes. Depression and lack of premeditation interacted to predict CNV and RewP amplitudes. Results demonstrate that individual differences in reward functioning are stage-specific.

  8. Stage-specific appearance of cytoplasmic microtubules around the surviving nuclei during the third prezygotic division of Paramecium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiwen WANG; Jinqiang YUAN; Xin GAO; Xianyu YANG

    2012-01-01

    There are six micronuclear divisions during conjugation of Paramecium caudatum: three prezygotic and three postzygotic divisions.Four haploid nuclei are formed during the first two meiotic prezygotic divisions.Usually only one meiotic product is located in the paroral cone (PC) region at the completion of meiosis,which survives and divides mitotically to complete the third prezygotic division to yield a stationary and a migratory pronucleus.The remaining three located outside of the PC degenerate.The migratory pronuclei are then exchanged between two conjugants and fuse with the stationary pronuclei to form synkarya,which undergo three successive divisions (postzygotic divisions).However,little is known about the surviving mechanism of the PC nuclei.In the current study,stage-specific appearance of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) was indicated during the third prezygotic division by immunofluorescence labeling with anti-alpha tubulin antibodies surrounding the surviving nuclei,including the PC nuclei and the two types of prospective pronuclei.This suggested that cMTs were involved in the formation of a physical barrier,whose function may relate to sequestering and protecting the surviving nuclei from the major cytoplasm,where degeneration of extra-meiotic products occurs,another important nuclear event during the third prezygotic division.

  9. Stage-Specific Changes in Plasmodium Metabolism Required for Differentiation and Adaptation to Different Host and Vector Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Srivastava

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp. encounter markedly different (nutritional environments during their complex life cycles in the mosquito and human hosts. Adaptation to these different host niches is associated with a dramatic rewiring of metabolism, from a highly glycolytic metabolism in the asexual blood stages to increased dependence on tricarboxylic acid (TCA metabolism in mosquito stages. Here we have used stable isotope labelling, targeted metabolomics and reverse genetics to map stage-specific changes in Plasmodium berghei carbon metabolism and determine the functional significance of these changes on parasite survival in the blood and mosquito stages. We show that glutamine serves as the predominant input into TCA metabolism in both asexual and sexual blood stages and is important for complete male gametogenesis. Glutamine catabolism, as well as key reactions in intermediary metabolism and CoA synthesis are also essential for ookinete to oocyst transition in the mosquito. These data extend our knowledge of Plasmodium metabolism and point towards possible targets for transmission-blocking intervention strategies. Furthermore, they highlight significant metabolic differences between Plasmodium species which are not easily anticipated based on genomics or transcriptomics studies and underline the importance of integration of metabolomics data with other platforms in order to better inform drug discovery and design.

  10. Stage-Specific Transcriptome and Proteome Analyses of the Filarial Parasite Onchocerca volvulus and Its Wolbachia Endosymbiont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Cotton, James A.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Grote, Alexandra; Harsha, Bhavana; Holroyd, Nancy; Mhashilkar, Amruta; Molina, Douglas M.; Randall, Arlo Z.; Shandling, Adam D.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Ghedin, Elodie; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Onchocerciasis (river blindness) is a neglected tropical disease that has been successfully targeted by mass drug treatment programs in the Americas and small parts of Africa. Achieving the long-term goal of elimination of onchocerciasis, however, requires additional tools, including drugs, vaccines, and biomarkers of infection. Here, we describe the transcriptome and proteome profiles of the major vector and the human host stages (L1, L2, L3, molting L3, L4, adult male, and adult female) of Onchocerca volvulus along with the proteome of each parasitic stage and of its Wolbachia endosymbiont (wOv). In so doing, we have identified stage-specific pathways important to the parasite’s adaptation to its human host during its early development. Further, we generated a protein array that, when screened with well-characterized human samples, identified novel diagnostic biomarkers of O. volvulus infection and new potential vaccine candidates. This immunomic approach not only demonstrates the power of this postgenomic discovery platform but also provides additional tools for onchocerciasis control programs. PMID:27881553

  11. ENOblock, a unique small molecule inhibitor of the non-glycolytic functions of enolase, alleviates the symptoms of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Haaglim; Um, JungIn; Lee, Ji-Hyung; Kim, Woong-Hee; Kang, Wan Seok; Kim, So Hun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Yong-Chul; Ahn, Young-Keun; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R.

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) significantly impacts on human health and patient numbers are predicted to rise. Discovering novel drugs and targets for treating T2DM is a research priority. In this study, we investigated targeting of the glycolysis enzyme, enolase, using the small molecule ENOblock, which binds enolase and modulates its non-glycolytic ‘moonlighting’ functions. In insulin-responsive cells ENOblock induced enolase nuclear translocation, where this enzyme acts as a transcriptional repressor. In a mammalian model of T2DM, ENOblock treatment reduced hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. Liver and kidney tissue of ENOblock-treated mice showed down-regulation of known enolase target genes and reduced enolase enzyme activity. Indicators of secondary diabetic complications, such as tissue apoptosis, inflammatory markers and fibrosis were inhibited by ENOblock treatment. Compared to the well-characterized anti-diabetes drug, rosiglitazone, ENOblock produced greater beneficial effects on lipid homeostasis, fibrosis, inflammatory markers, nephrotoxicity and cardiac hypertrophy. ENOblock treatment was associated with the down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1, which are known to produce anti-diabetic effects. In summary, these findings indicate that ENOblock has potential for therapeutic development to treat T2DM. Previously considered as a ‘boring’ housekeeping gene, these results also implicate enolase as a novel drug target for T2DM. PMID:28272459

  12. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Fuconate Dehydratase from Xanthomonas campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Rakus, J.; Pierce, R.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    Many members of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily have unknown functions. In this report the authors use both genome (operon) context and screening of a library of acid sugars to assign the L-fuconate dehydratase (FucD) function to a member of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the superfamily encoded by the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. ATCC 33913 genome (GI: 21233491). Orthologues of FucD are found in both bacteria and eukaryotes, the latter including the rTS beta protein in Homo sapiens that has been implicated in regulating thymidylate synthase activity. As suggested by sequence alignments and confirmed by high-resolution structures in the presence of active site ligands, FucD and MR share the same active site motif of functional groups: three carboxylate ligands for the essential Mg2+ located at the ends of th third, fourth, and fifth-strands in the (/)7-barrel domain (Asp 248, Glu 274, and Glu 301, respectively), a Lys-x-Lys motif at the end of the second-strand (Lys 218 and Lys 220), a His-Asp dyad at the end of the seventh and sixth-strands (His 351 and Asp 324, respectively), and a Glue at the end of the eighth-strand (Glu 382). The mechanism of the FucD reaction involves initial abstraction of the 2-proton by Lys 220, acid catalysis of the vinylogous-elimination of the 3-OH group by His 351, and stereospecific ketonization of the resulting 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate product. Screening of the library of acid sugars revealed substrate and functional promiscuity: In addition to L-fuconate, FucD also catalyzes the dehydration of L-galactonate, D-arabinonate, D-altronate, L-talonate, and D-ribonate. The dehydrations of L-fuconate, L-galactonate, and D-arabinonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by Lys 220. The dehydrations of L-talonate and D-ribonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by His 351; however, protonation of the enediolate intermediates by the conjugate acid of Lys 220 yields L

  13. Stability for Function Trade-Offs in the Enolase Superfamily 'Catalytic Module'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatani, R.A.; Gonzalez, A.; Shoichet, B.K.; Brinen, L.S.; Babbitt, P.C.; /UC, San Francisco /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-07-12

    Enzyme catalysis reflects a dynamic interplay between charged and polar active site residues that facilitate function, stabilize transition states, and maintain overall protein stability. Previous studies show that substituting neutral for charged residues in the active site often significantly stabilizes a protein, suggesting a stability trade-off for functionality. In the enolase superfamily, a set of conserved active site residues (the ''catalytic module'') has repeatedly been used in nature in the evolution of many different enzymes for the performance of unique overall reactions involving a chemically diverse set of substrates. This catalytic module provides a robust solution for catalysis that delivers the common underlying partial reaction that supports all of the different overall chemical reactions of the superfamily. As this module has been so broadly conserved in the evolution of new functions, we sought to investigate the extent to which it follows the stability-function trade-off. Alanine substitutions were made for individual residues, groups of residues, and the entire catalytic module of o-succinylbenzoate synthase (OSBS), a member of the enolase superfamily from Escherichia coli. Of six individual residue substitutions, four (K131A, D161A, E190A, and D213A) substantially increased protein stability (by 0.46-4.23 kcal/mol), broadly consistent with prediction of a stability-activity trade-off. The residue most conserved across the superfamily, E190, is by far the most destabilizing. When the individual substitutions were combined into groups (as they are structurally and functionally organized), nonadditive stability effects emerged, supporting previous observations that residues within the module interact as two functional groups within a larger catalytic system. Thus, whereas the multiple-mutant enzymes D161A/E190A/D213A and K131A/K133A/D161A/E190A/D213A/K235A (termed 3KDED) are stabilized relative to the wild-type enzyme (by 1

  14. Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and enolase from Echinococcus granulosus: genes, expression patterns and protein interactions of two potential moonlighting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzatto, Karina Rodrigues; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Paredes, Rodolfo; Paludo, Gabriela Prado; da Fonsêca, Marbella Maria; Galanti, Norbel; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2012-09-10

    Glycolytic enzymes, such as fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) and enolase, have been described as complex multifunctional proteins that may perform non-glycolytic moonlighting functions, but little is known about such functions, especially in parasites. We have carried out in silico genomic searches in order to identify FBA and enolase coding sequences in Echinococcus granulosus, the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease. Four FBA genes and 3 enolase genes were found, and their sequences and exon-intron structures were characterized and compared to those of their orthologs in Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of alveolar hydatid disease. To gather evidence of possible non-glycolytic functions, the expression profile of FBA and enolase isoforms detected in the E. granulosus pathogenic larval form (hydatid cyst) (EgFBA1 and EgEno1) was assessed. Using specific antibodies, EgFBA1 and EgEno1 were detected in protoscolex and germinal layer cells, as expected, but they were also found in the hydatid fluid, which contains parasite's excretory-secretory (ES) products. Besides, both proteins were found in protoscolex tegument and in vitro ES products, further suggesting possible non-glycolytic functions in the host-parasite interface. EgFBA1 modeled 3D structure predicted a F-actin binding site, and the ability of EgFBA1 to bind actin was confirmed experimentally, which was taken as an additional evidence of FBA multifunctionality in E. granulosus. Overall, our results represent the first experimental evidences of alternative functions performed by glycolytic enzymes in E. granulosus and provide relevant information for the understanding of their roles in host-parasite interplay.

  15. 3-Halo Chloroquine Derivatives Overcome Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter-Mediated Drug Resistance in P. falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edaye, Sonia; Tazoo, Dagobert; Bohle, D Scott; Georges, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) was shown to cause chloroquine resistance. In this report, we examined the antimalarial potential of novel 3-halo chloroquine derivatives (3-chloro, 3-bromo, and 3-iodo) against chloroquine-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum. All three derivatives inhibited the proliferation of P. falciparum; with 3-iodo chloroquine being most effective. Moreover, 3-iodo chloroquine was highly effective at potentiating and reversing chloroquine toxicity of drug-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum.

  16. Trends in stage-specific incidence rates for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder in the United States: 1988 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Matthew E; Smith, Angela B; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Tyree, Seth; Kim, William Y; Milowsky, Matthew I; Pruthi, Raj S; Millikan, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is notable for a striking heterogeneity of disease-specific risks. Among the approximately 75% of incident cases found to be superficial to the muscularis propria at the time of presentation (non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer), the risk of progression to the lethal phenotype of muscle-invasive disease is strongly associated with stage and grade of disease. Given the suggestion of an increasing percentage of low-risk cases in hospital-based registry data in recent years, the authors hypothesized that population-based data may reveal changes in the stage distribution of early-stage cases. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data were used to examine trends for the stage-specific incidence of bladder cancer between 1988 and 2006, adjusted for age, race, and sex, using Joinpoint and nonparametric tests. The adjusted incidence rate of papillary noninvasive (Ta) predominantly low grade (77%) disease was found to increase from 5.52 to 9.09 per 100,000 population (P < .0001), with an average annual percentage change of +3.3. Over the same period, concomitant, albeit smaller, decreases were observed for flat in situ (Tis) and lamina propria-invasive (T1) disease (2.57 to 1.19 and 6.65 to 4.61 per 100,000 population [both P < .0001]; average annual percent change of -5.0 and -1.6, respectively). The trend was most dramatic among patients in the oldest age strata, suggesting a previously unappreciated cohort phenomenon. The findings of the current study should motivate further epidemiological investigations of differential associations of genetic and environmental factors with different bladder cancer phenotypes as well as further scrutiny of clinical practice guideline recommendations for the growing subgroup of predominantly older patients with lower-risk disease. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  17. microRNA160 dictates stage-specific auxin and cytokinin sensitivities and directs soybean nodule development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Schreier, Spencer John; Damodaran, Suresh; Adhikari, Sajag; Subramanian, Senthil

    2015-10-01

    Legume nodules result from coordinated interactions between the plant and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. The phytohormone cytokinin promotes nodule formation, and recent findings suggest that the phytohormone auxin inhibits nodule formation. Here we show that microRNA160 (miR160) is a key signaling element that determines the auxin/cytokinin balance during nodule development in soybean (Glycine max). miR160 appears to promote auxin activity by suppressing the levels of the ARF10/16/17 family of repressor ARF transcription factors. Using quantitative PCR assays and a fluorescence miRNA sensor, we show that miR160 levels are relatively low early during nodule formation and high in mature nodules. We had previously shown that ectopic expression of miR160 in soybean roots led to a severe reduction in nodule formation, coupled with enhanced sensitivity to auxin and reduced sensitivity to cytokinin. Here we show that exogenous cytokinin restores nodule formation in miR160 over-expressing roots. Therefore, low miR160 levels early during nodule development favor cytokinin activity required for nodule formation. Suppression of miR160 levels using a short tandem target mimic (STTM160) resulted in reduced sensitivity to auxin and enhanced sensitivity to cytokinin. In contrast to miR160 over-expressing roots, STTM160 roots had increased nodule formation, but nodule maturation was significantly delayed. Exogenous auxin partially restored proper nodule formation and maturation in STTM160 roots, suggesting that high miR160 activity later during nodule development favors auxin activity and promotes nodule maturation. Therefore, miR160 dictates developmental stage-specific sensitivities to auxin and cytokinin to direct proper nodule formation and maturation in soybean.

  18. Inhibition of Host Cell Lysosome Spreading by Trypanosoma cruzi Metacyclic Stage-Specific Surface Molecule gp90 Downregulates Parasite Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Paulo Ferreira; Sant'ana, Guilherme Hideki Takahashi; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2017-09-01

    Successful infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, is critically dependent on host cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigote (MT) forms. Two main metacyclic stage-specific surface molecules, gp82 and gp90, play determinant roles in target cell invasion in vitro and in oral T. cruzi infection in mice. The structure and properties of gp82, which is highly conserved among T. cruzi strains, are well known. Information on gp90 is still rather sparse. Here, we attempted to fill that gap. gp90, purified from poorly invasive G strain MT and expressing gp90 at high levels, inhibited HeLa cell lysosome spreading and the gp82-mediated internalization of a highly invasive CL strain MT expressing low levels of a diverse gp90 molecule. A recombinant protein containing the conserved C-terminal domain of gp90 exhibited the same properties as the native G strain gp90: it counteracted the host cell lysosome spreading induced by recombinant gp82 and exhibited an inhibitory effect on HeLa cell invasion by CL strain MT. Assays to identify the gp90 sequence associated with the property of downregulating MT invasion, using synthetic peptides spanning the gp90 C-terminal domain, revealed the sequence GVLYTADKEW. These data, plus the findings that lysosome spreading was induced upon HeLa cell interaction with CL strain MT, but not with G strain MT, and that in mixed infection CL strain MT internalization was inhibited by G strain MT, suggest that the inhibition of target cell lysosome spreading is the mechanism by which the gp90 molecule exerts its downregulatory role. Copyright © 2017 Rodrigues et al.

  19. Interaction between cysteine synthase and serine O-acetyltransferase proteins and their stage specific expression in Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kuljit; Singh, Krishn Pratap; Equbal, Asif; Suman, Shashi S; Zaidi, Amir; Garg, Gaurav; Pandey, Krishna; Das, Pradeep; Ali, Vahab

    2016-12-01

    Leishmania possess a unique trypanothione redox metabolism with undebated roles in protection from oxidative damage and drug resistance. The biosynthesis of trypanothione depends on l-cysteine bioavailability which is regulated by cysteine biosynthesis pathway. The de novo cysteine biosynthesis pathway is comprised of serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS) enzymes which sequentially mediate two consecutive steps of cysteine biosynthesis, and is absent in mammalian host. However, despite the apparent dependency of redox metabolism on cysteine biosynthesis pathway, the role of SAT and CS in redox homeostasis has been unexplored in Leishmania parasites. Herein, we have characterized CS and SAT to investigate their interaction and relative abundance of these proteins in promastigote vs. amastigote growth stages of L. donovani. CS and SAT genes of L. donovani (LdCS and LdSAT) were cloned, expressed, and fusion proteins purified to homogeneity with affinity column chromatography. Purified LdCS contains PLP as cofactor and showed optimum enzymatic activity at pH 7.5. Enzyme kinetics showed that LdCS catalyses the synthesis of cysteine using O-acetylserine and sulfide with a Km of 15.86 mM and 0.17 mM, respectively. Digitonin fractionation and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy showed that LdCS and LdSAT are localized in the cytoplasm of promastigotes. Size exclusion chromatography, co-purification, pull down and immuno-precipitation assays demonstrated a stable complex formation between LdCS and LdSAT proteins. Furthermore, LdCS and LdSAT proteins expression/activity was upregulated in amastigote growth stage of the parasite. Thus, the stage specific differential expression of LdCS and LdSAT suggests that it may have a role in the redox homeostasis of Leishmania.

  20. Differentiation of bone marrow-derived stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 positive pluripotent stem cells into male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Soleimani, Masoud; Nayernia, Karim; Ragerdi Kashani, Iraj

    2017-04-01

    Studies published in recent years have changed the outlook on sterility and germ cell development by producing gametes from stem cells. In present study, a novel approach on differentiation of bone marrow-derived stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 positive (SSEA-1(+) ) pluripotent stem cells into male germ cells has been addressed. SSEA-1(+) stem cells were separated from murine bone marrow using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) system and propagated on a feeder layer cells. To evaluate the pluripotency characteristic of the purified cells, they were differentiated toward cells of three germ layers. Later the SSEA-1(+) stem cells were induced to differentiate along male germ cell lineage with retinoic acid. Flowcytometric analysis of SSEA-1(+) stem cells revealed purity of about 62% which increased to 91% after cultivation over feeder cells. Expression of specific transcripts of Oct4, SSEA-1, Nanog, Dppa3, fragilis, Rex-1, SOX-2, and alkaline-phosphatase and immunofluorescence evaluation of Oct4 and SSEA-1 expression showed the differentiation of purified stem cells toward the cells of three germ layers. Differentiation potential of purified cells was positively evidenced by expression markers specific for primordial germ cells, spermatogonial stem cells and spermatogonia including Mvh, fragilis, Dppa3, Stra8, DAZL, Piwil2, β1, and α6-integrins as well as meiotic-specific marker SYCP3. Our results showed that SSEA-1(+) pluripotent stem cells are able to differentiate into male germ cells. The results of the present study are encouraging enough to merit further investigation, provide a new hope for those suffering from infertility and introduce a novel platform for research on germ cell development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Determination of Growth Stage-Specific Crop Coefficients (Kc of Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L. under Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghai Hong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Crop coefficients (Kc are important for the development of irrigation schedules, but few studies on Kc focus on saline soils. To propose the growth-stage-specific Kc values for sunflowers in saline soils, a two-year micro-plot experiment was conducted in Yichang Experimental Station, Hetao Irrigation District. Four salinity levels including non-salinized (ECe = 3.4–4.1 dS·m–1, low (ECe = 5.5–8.2 dS·m–1, moderate (ECe = 12.1–14.5 dS·m–1, and high (ECe = 18.3–18.5 dS·m–1 levels were arranged in 12 micro-plots. Based on the soil moisture observations, Vensim software was used to establish and develop a physically-based water flow in the soil-plant system (WFSP model. Observations in 2012 were used to calibrate the WFSP model and acceptable accuracy was obtained, especially for soil moisture simulation below 5 cm (R2 > 0.6. The locally-based Kc values (LKc of sunflowers in saline soils were presented according to the WFSP calibration results. To be specific, LKc for initial stages (Kc1 could be expressed as a function of soil salinity (R2 = 0.86, while R2 of LKc for rapid growth (Kc2, middle (Kc3, and mature (Kc4 stages were 0.659, 1.156, and 0.324, respectively. The proposed LKc values were also evaluated by observations in 2013 and the R2 for initial, rapid growth, middle, and mature stages were 0.66, 0.68, 0.56 and 0.58, respectively. It is expected that the LKc would be of great value in irrigation management and provide precise water application values for salt-affected regions.

  2. A stage-specific open reading frame from three-day old adult worms of Trichinella spiralis encodes zinc-finger motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu X.P.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to isolate genes coding for stage-specific antigens of T. spiralis. Such antigens may then be associated with local and systemic immune responses against adult T. spiralis. Recombinant clones were obtained with an adult stage specific probe from a cDNA library of three-day old adult T. spiralis. Several cDNA clones encoding the same peptide were identified and their stage specificity was confirmed by northern blot analysis. Three independent clones were fully sequenced, and the resulting sequence found to code for a 487 amino acid peptide with a deduced molecular weight of ≈ 55 kDa. Sequence analysis showed that the 55 kDa peptide contained putative DNA binding motifs, suggesting that this protein may be involved in transcriptional regulation during the early development of the parasite.

  3. Gametocytogenesis : the puberty of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariey Frédéric

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum has a complex life cycle in which asexual multiplication in the vertebrate host alternates with an obligate sexual reproduction in the anopheline mosquito. Apart from the apparent recombination advantages conferred by sex, P. falciparum has evolved a remarkable biology and adaptive phenotypes to insure its transmission despite the dangers of sex. This review mainly focuses on the current knowledge on commitment to sexual development, gametocytogenesis and the evolutionary significance of various aspects of gametocyte biology. It goes further than pure biology to look at the strategies used to improve successful transmission. Although gametocytes are inevitable stages for transmission and provide a potential target to fight malaria, they have received less attention than the pathogenic asexual stages. There is a need for research on gametocytes, which are a fascinating stage, responsible to a large extent for the success of P. falciparum.

  4. Increased lipid peroxidation and neuron specific enolase in treatment refractory schizophrenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Hernández, V; Ramos-Loyo, J; Luquin, S; Sánchez, L F Cerdán; García-Estrada, J; Navarro-Ruiz, A

    2007-10-01

    It is well-known that increased lipid peroxidation and failure of antioxidant mechanisms leads to neuronal damage in schizophrenic patients. However, this neurodegenerative mechanism has not been studied in treatment refractory schizophrenics (TRS). Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to determine neuronal damage in TRS in comparison to non-refractory schizophrenics (NRS) by means of quantitative analysis of lipid peroxidation and neuron specific enolase (NSE) related to the psychopathology severity. Two groups of paranoid schizophrenics, TRS and NRS, and a group of healthy controls (CO) were assembled (n=13). Lipid peroxidation was analyzed through spectrophotometry for quantification of malonaldehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) serum concentrations. As well, serum NSE was quantified by radioimmunoassay (ELSA). Psychopathology was evaluated using the brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS) and the positive and negative symptoms scale (PANSS). TRS showed significant higher concentrations of lipoperoxides by-products and NSE, than NRS and CO. Clinical scores also revealed a more severe pathology in TRS, than in NRS. Raised lipoperoxidation correlated with higher delusions and emotional withdrawal symptoms, and increased NSE correlated with a lower flow of the conversation and lack of spontaneity. All these results together suggest that TRS patients suffer a greater lipid peroxidation and neuronal damage than NRS, apparently related to worsening of some of the psychiatric symptoms.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid purine metabolite and neuron-specific enolase concentrations after febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, A; Cid, E; Rodríguez-García, J; Camiña, F; Rodríguez-Segade, S; Castro-Gago, M

    2000-10-01

    If febrile seizures cause significant compromise of neuronal metabolism (whether permanent or reversible), this should be reflected in an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and/or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown products. In the present study, AMP, IMP, inosine, adenosine, guanosine, adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and NSE concentrations were determined in the cerebrospinal fluid of 90 children 1 h after febrile seizure (73 simple febrile seizures (SFS); 17 complex febrile seizures (CFS)), and in a control group of 160 children. There was no statistically significant difference between the SFS group and the control group for any of the substances determined, suggesting that SFS neither significantly depletes neuronal ATP concentration, nor significantly increases NSE concentration; thus, SFS do not appear to constitute a threat to neuronal integrity. However, patients with CFS showed significantly lower IMP concentrations and significantly higher adenine concentrations than controls, and significantly higher AMP concentrations than SFS patients; these results suggest that CFS may affect energy metabolism in the brain. However, NSE concentrations were normal in the cerebrospinal fluid of both SFS and CFS patients, suggesting that neither type of seizure causes significant neuronal damage, at least early after the seizure.

  6. Virion-incorporated alpha-enolase suppresses the early stage of HIV-1 reverse transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Iga, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Kengo; Takamune, Nobutoki; Misumi, Shogo

    2017-03-04

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) particles contain not only viral-encoded but also host-encoded proteins. Interestingly, several studies showed that host proteins play a critical role in viral infectivity, replication and/or immunoreactivity in the next target cells. Here, we show that alpha-enolase (ENO1) is incorporated into HIV-1 virions and the virion-incorporated ENO1 prevents the early stage of HIV-1 reverse transcription. We found that viral particles contain two isoforms of ENO1 with different isoelectric points by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Suppression of ENO1 expression by RNA interference in the HIV-1 producer cells decreased ENO1 incorporation into virions without altering the packaging of viral structural proteins and viral production but increased viral infectivity. Although the low-level-ENO1-packaging virus maintained comparable levels of reverse transcriptase activity, viral genomic RNA and tRNA(Lys3) packaging to the control virus, its levels of early cDNA products of reverse transcription were higher than those of the control virus. In contrast, the high-level-ENO1-packaging virus, which was produced from ENO1-overexpressing cells, showed decreased infectivity and the levels of early cDNA products. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel function of ENO1 as a negative regulation factor targeting HIV-1 reverse transcription.

  7. Homology models guide discovery of diverse enzyme specificities among dipeptide epimerases in the enolase superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukk, Tiit; Sakai, Ayano; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Brown, Shoshana D.; Imker, Heidi J.; Song, Ling; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Toro, Rafael; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Patskovsky, Yury; Vetting, Matthew W.; Nair, Satish K.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advance in genome sequencing presents substantial challenges for protein functional assignment, with half or more of new protein sequences inferred from these genomes having uncertain assignments. The assignment of enzyme function in functionally diverse superfamilies represents a particular challenge, which we address through a combination of computational predictions, enzymology, and structural biology. Here we describe the results of a focused investigation of a group of enzymes in the enolase superfamily that are involved in epimerizing dipeptides. The first members of this group to be functionally characterized were Ala-Glu epimerases in Eschericiha coli and Bacillus subtilis, based on the operon context and enzymological studies; these enzymes are presumed to be involved in peptidoglycan recycling. We have subsequently studied more than 65 related enzymes by computational methods, including homology modeling and metabolite docking, which suggested that many would have divergent specificities;, i.e., they are likely to have different (unknown) biological roles. In addition to the Ala-Phe epimerase specificity reported previously, we describe the prediction and experimental verification of: (i) a new group of presumed Ala-Glu epimerases; (ii) several enzymes with specificity for hydrophobic dipeptides, including one from Cytophaga hutchinsonii that epimerizes D-Ala-D-Ala; and (iii) a small group of enzymes that epimerize cationic dipeptides. Crystal structures for certain of these enzymes further elucidate the structural basis of the specificities. The results highlight the potential of computational methods to guide experimental characterization of enzymes in an automated, large-scale fashion. PMID:22392983

  8. Co-purification of arrestin like proteins with alpha-enolase from bovine myocardial tissues and the possible role in heart diseases as an autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirshahi, M., E-mail: massoud.mirshahi@inserm.fr; Le Marchand, S.

    2015-05-08

    Aim: Previously, we reported that visual arrestin co-purified with glycolytic enzymes. The aim of this study was to analyze the co-purification of arrestin like proteins (ALP) in bovine cardiac tissues with enolases. Methods: The soluble extract of bovine myocardial tissues from different regions such as left and right atriums and ventricles of the bovine heart (n = 3) was analyzed by ACA-34 gel filtration, immuno-affinity column, SDS-PAGE, ELISA, western blot and a sandwich immune assay for quantification of ALP and sequence analysis. Results: We observed that; 1) The cardiac muscle contained a 50 kDa ALP at a concentration of 751 pg/mg of soluble protein extract, 2) ALP purified, by immunoaffinity, contained alpha-enolase of 48 kDa confirmed by protein sequence analysis; 3) Cardiomyocyte cells exposed to anti arrestin and anti enolase monoclonal antibodies showed decreased proliferation in vitro, 4) High level of autoantibodies were detected by ELISA (3.57% for arrestin and 9.12% for α-enolase) in serum of patients with infarcted heart disease. Conclusion: We suggest a possible interaction between ALP and alpha-enolases yielding a complex that may be involved in the induction of cardiac autoimmune diseases. - Highlights: • We examine a possible interaction between arrestin like protein and alpha-enolases in cardiomyocyte. • We demonstrated the effect of antibodies against arrestin and enolase on cardiomyocyte cell proliferation. • We suggest that this proteins complex may be involved in the induction of cardiac autoimmune diseases.

  9. RETINOIC ACID INDUCTION OF CLEFT PALATE IN EGF AND TGF-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE: STAGE SPECIFIC INFLUENCES OF GROWTH FACTOR EXPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABBOTT, B. D., LEFFLER, K.E. AND BUCKALEW, A.R, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Retinoic acid induction of cleft palate (CP) in EGF and TGF knockout mice: Stage specific influences of growth factor expression.<...

  10. Plasmodium falciparum Malaria, Southern Algeria, 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Boubidi, Saïd C; Gassen, Ibrahim; Khechache, Yacine; Lamali, Karima; Tchicha, Boualem; Brengues, Cécile; Menegon, Michela; Severini, Carlo; Fontenille, Didier; Harrat, Zoubir

    2010-01-01

    An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria occurred in Tinzaouatine in southern Algeria in 2007. The likely vector, Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, had not been detected in Algeria. Genes for resistance to chloroquine were detected in the parasite. The outbreak shows the potential for an increase in malaria vectors in Algeria.

  11. Congenital Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Washington, DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo, Melissa; Szymanski, Ann Marie; Slovin, Ariella; Wong, Edward C C; DeBiasi, Roberta L

    2017-01-11

    Congenital malaria is rare in the United States, but is an important diagnosis to consider when evaluating febrile infants. Herein, we describe a case of congenital Plasmodium falciparum malaria in a 2-week-old infant born in the United States to a mother who had emigrated from Nigeria 3 months before delivery. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  12. Plasmodium falciparum Malaria, Southern Algeria, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassen, Ibrahim; Khechache, Yacine; Lamali, Karima; Tchicha, Boualem; Brengues, Cécile; Menegon, Michela; Severini, Carlo; Fontenille, Didier; Harrat, Zoubir

    2010-01-01

    An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria occurred in Tinzaouatine in southern Algeria in 2007. The likely vector, Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, had not been detected in Algeria. Genes for resistance to chloroquine were detected in the parasite. The outbreak shows the potential for an increase in malaria vectors in Algeria. PMID:20113565

  13. Plasmodium falciparum Malaria, Southern Algeria, 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Boubidi, Saïd C; Gassen, Ibrahim; Khechache, Yacine; Lamali, Karima; Tchicha, Boualem; Brengues, Cécile; Menegon, Michela; Severini, Carlo; Fontenille, Didier; Harrat, Zoubir

    2010-01-01

    An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria occurred in Tinzaouatine in southern Algeria in 2007. The likely vector, Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, had not been detected in Algeria. Genes for resistance to chloroquine were detected in the parasite. The outbreak shows the potential for an increase in malaria vectors in Algeria.

  14. Integrative omics analysis. A study based on Plasmodium falciparum mRNA and protein data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Technological improvements have shifted the focus from data generation to data analysis. The availability of large amounts of data from transcriptomics, protemics and metabolomics experiments raise new questions concerning suitable integrative analysis methods. We compare three integrative analysis techniques (co-inertia analysis, generalized singular value decomposition and integrative biclustering) by applying them to gene and protein abundance data from the six life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Co-inertia analysis is an analysis method used to visualize and explore gene and protein data. The generalized singular value decomposition has shown its potential in the analysis of two transcriptome data sets. Integrative Biclustering applies biclustering to gene and protein data. Results Using CIA, we visualize the six life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum, as well as GO terms in a 2D plane and interpret the spatial configuration. With GSVD, we decompose the transcriptomic and proteomic data sets into matrices with biologically meaningful interpretations and explore the processes captured by the data sets. IBC identifies groups of genes, proteins, GO Terms and life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum. We show method-specific results as well as a network view of the life cycle stages based on the results common to all three methods. Additionally, by combining the results of the three methods, we create a three-fold validated network of life cycle stage specific GO terms: Sporozoites are associated with transcription and transport; merozoites with entry into host cell as well as biosynthetic and metabolic processes; rings with oxidation-reduction processes; trophozoites with glycolysis and energy production; schizonts with antigenic variation and immune response; gametocyctes with DNA packaging and mitochondrial transport. Furthermore, the network connectivity underlines the separation of the intraerythrocytic cycle from the gametocyte and

  15. The relationship between neuron-specific enolase and prognosis of patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-yang LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between neuron-specific enolase (NSE levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI and the prognosis of TBI patients.  Methods A total of 89 patients with acute TBI were divided into light, medium, heavy and severe TBI groups based on admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score. Serum NSE expression levels were detected in all cases and NSE levels in CSF were detected in 18 cases within 12 h after TBI. The expression levels of serum NSE in 20 normal people, except cases of lung disease and nervous system damage, were detected as a control group. Results Compared with the control group, serum NSE expression levels of patients in each TBI group were elevated (P < 0.05, for all, and the NSE levels in severe and heavy TBI groups were higher than that in medium and light groups (P < 0.05, for all. The serum NSE expression levels of patients with cerebral contusion were higher than that of patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI, P = 0.025, subdural hematoma (P = 0.031 and epidural hematoma (P = 0.021. Serum NSE expression levels were negatively correlated with GCS score (rs = - 0.327, P = 0.024 and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score (rs = - 0.252, P = 0.049. The NSE expression levels of CSF in severe and heavy TBI patients were higher than that of serum (P = 0.039, 0.031.  Conclusions NSE expression changes can be evaluated as an auxiliary indicator in reflecting the degree of acute TBI, typing diagnosis and prognostic evaluation, and NSE levels of CSF is more sensitive than that of serum. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.013

  16. Serum neuron specific enolase - a novel indicator for neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawro, T; Bogucki, A; Krupińska-Kun, M; Maurer, M; Woźniacka, A

    2015-12-01

    Neuropsychiatric (NP) lupus, a common manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is still insufficiently understood, in part, because of the lack of specific biomarkers. Neuron specific enolase (NSE), an important neuronal glycolytic enzyme, shows increased serum levels following acute brain injury, and decreased serum levels in several chronic disorders of the nervous system, including multi infarct dementia, multiple sclerosis and depression. The aim of the study was to evaluate serum NSE levels in SLE patients with and without nervous system involvement, and in healthy controls, and to assess the correlation of NSE serum levels of patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) with clinical parameters. The study comprised 47 SLE patients and 28 controls. SLE activity was assessed using the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM). A neurologist and a psychiatrist examined all patients. NP involvement was diagnosed according to strict NPSLE criteria proposed by Ainiala and coworkers, as modification to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) nomenclature and case definitions. NSE serum levels were determined by use of an immunoassay. Mean NSE serum concentrations in patients with NPSLE were significantly lower than in non-NPSLE patients (6.3 ± 2.6 µg/L vs. 9.7 ± 3.3 µg/L, p < 0.01) and in controls (8.8 ± 3.3 µg/L, p < 0.05). There were significant negative correlations between NSE serum levels and SLE activity (r = -0.42, p < 0.05) and the number of NPSLE manifestations diagnosed (-0.37; p = 0.001). Decreased serum concentrations of NSE may reflect chronic neuronal damage with declined metabolism of the nervous tissue in patients with NPSLE. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Neuron-Specific Enolase Is Elevated in Asymptomatic Carriers of Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kenneth M.; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Lee, Jeong Goo; Da Rosa, Arlon Bastos; Salomao, Solange R.; Berezovsky, Adriana; Belfort, Rubens; Chicani, Filipe; Moraes-Filho, Milton; Sebag, Jerry; Carelli, Valerio; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a biomarker for neuronal stress. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease affecting retinal ganglion cells (RGC). These RGCs and their axons in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and optic nerve head may show subclinical pathology in unaffected mutation carriers, or undergo cell death in affected patients. We hypothesize that increased levels of blood NSE may characterize LHON carriers as a biomarker of ongoing RGC stress. Methods. Serum was obtained from 74 members of a Brazilian pedigree with LHON carrying the homoplasmic 11778/ND4 mitochondrial DNA mutation. Classified by symptoms and psychophysical metrics, 46/74 patients were unaffected mutation “carriers,” 14/74 were “affected,” and 14/74 were “off-pedigree” controls. Serum NSE levels were determined by ELISA specific for the γ subunit of NSE. Results. Serum NSE concentrations in carriers (27.17 ± 39.82 μg/L) were significantly higher than affected (5.66 ± 4.19 μg/L; P = 0.050) and off-pedigree controls (6.20 ± 2.35 μg/L; P = 0.047). Of the 14/46 (30.4 %) carriers with significantly elevated NSE levels (mean = 75.8 ± 42.3 μg/L), 9/14 (64.3%) were male. Furthermore, NSE levels were nearly three times greater in asymptomatic male carriers (40.65 ± 51.21 μg/L) than in asymptomatic female carriers (15.85 ± 22.27 μg/L; P = 0.034). Conclusions. Serum NSE levels are higher in LHON carriers compared with affected and off-pedigree individuals. A subgroup of mostly male carriers had significantly elevated serum NSE levels. Thus, male carriers are at higher risk for LHON-related neuronal stress. PMID:22893673

  18. Cellular adaptive response of distal renal tubular cells to high-oxalate environment highlights surface alpha-enolase as the enhancer of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Fong-Ngern, Kedsarin; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2013-03-27

    Hyperoxaluria is one of etiologic factors of calcium oxalate kidney stone disease. However, response of renal tubular cells to high-oxalate environment remained largely unknown. We applied a gel-based proteomics approach to characterize changes in cellular proteome of MDCK cells induced by 10mM sodium oxalate. A total of 14 proteins were detected as differentially expressed proteins. The oxalate-induced up-regulation of alpha-enolase in whole cell lysate was confirmed by 2-D Western blot analysis. Interaction network analysis revealed that cellular adaptive response under high-oxalate condition involved stress response, energy production, metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Down-regulation of RhoA, which was predicted to be associated with the identified proteins, was confirmed by immunoblotting. In addition, the up-regulation of alpha-enolase on apical surface of renal tubular epithelial cells was also confirmed by immunoblotting of the isolated apical membranes and immunofluorescence study. Interestingly, blockage of alpha-enolase expressed on the cell surface by antibody neutralization significantly reduced the number of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals adhered on the cells. These results strongly suggest that surface alpha-enolase plays an important role as the enhancer of COM crystal binding. The increase of alpha-enolase expressed on the cell surface may aggravate kidney stone formation in patients with hyperoxaluria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbohydrate metabolism of Xylella fastidiosa: Detection of glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and cloning and expression of the enolase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facincani Agda Paula

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the functionality of the glycolytic pathways in the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. To this effect, the enzymes phosphoglucose isomerase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase of the glycolytic pathway, and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway were studied, followed by cloning and expression studies of the enolase gene and determination of its activity. These studies showed that X. fastidiosa does not use the glycolytic pathway to metabolize carbohydrates, which explains the increased duplication time of this phytopatogen. Recombinant enolase was expressed as inclusion bodies and solubilized with urea (most efficient extractor, Triton X-100, and TCA. Enolase extracted from X. fastidiosa and from chicken muscle and liver is irreversibly inactivated by urea. The purification of enolase was partial and resulted in a low yield. No enzymatic activity was detected for either recombinant and native enolases, aldolase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting that X. fastidiosa uses the Entner-Doudoroff pathway to produce pyruvate. Evidence is presented supporting the idea that the regulation of genes and the presence of isoforms with regulation patterns might make it difficult to understand the metabolism of carbohydrates in X. fastidiosa.

  20. Steroid-responsive thalamic lesions accompanying microbleeds in a case of Hashimoto's encephalopathy with autoantibodies against α-enolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Wada, Manabu; Tanji, Haruko; Kurokawa, Katsuro; Kawanami, Toru; Tanji, Kazuyo; Yoneda, Makoto; Kato, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old man receiving antithrombotic therapy developed rapidly progressive amnesia. T2-weighted images of brain MRI revealed hyperintense lesions in the bilateral thalami accompanied by microbleeds. Antithyroglobulin antibodies and autoantibodies against the N-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) were identified in the patient's serum; therefore, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) was suspected. Although the patient's radiological findings improved following steroid therapy, his symptoms did not improve, possibly due to increased thalamic microbleeds. Because anti-NAE antibodies are possibly associated with vasculitis, HE accompanied by anti-NAE antibodies may be exacerbated by microbleeds in patients receiving antithrombotic therapy.

  1. Mosquito Vectors and the Globalization of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Zilversmit, Martine M; Neafsey, Daniel E; Hartl, Daniel L; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2016-11-23

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a devastating public health problem. Recent discoveries have shed light on the origin and evolution of Plasmodium parasites and their interactions with their vertebrate and mosquito hosts. P. falciparum malaria originated in Africa from a single horizontal transfer between an infected gorilla and a human, and became global as the result of human migration. Today, P. falciparum malaria is transmitted worldwide by more than 70 different anopheline mosquito species. Recent studies indicate that the mosquito immune system can be a barrier to malaria transmission and that the P. falciparum Pfs47 gene allows the parasite to evade mosquito immune detection. Here, we review the origin and globalization of P. falciparum and integrate this history with analysis of the biology, evolution, and dispersal of the main mosquito vectors. This new perspective broadens our understanding of P. falciparum population structure and the dispersal of important parasite genetic traits.

  2. Enolase: A Key Player in the Metabolism and a Probable Virulence Factor of Trypanosomatid Parasites—Perspectives for Its Use as a Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisana Avilán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolysis and glyconeogenesis play crucial roles in the ATP supply and synthesis of glycoconjugates, important for the viability and virulence, respectively, of the human-pathogenic stages of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. These pathways are, therefore, candidate targets for antiparasite drugs. The glycolytic/gluconeogenic enzyme enolase is generally highly conserved, with similar overall fold and identical catalytic residues in all organisms. Nonetheless, potentially important differences exist between the trypanosomatid and host enzymes, with three unique, reactive residues close to the active site of the former that might be exploited for the development of new drugs. In addition, enolase is found both in the secretome and in association with the surface of Leishmania spp. where it probably functions as plasminogen receptor, playing a role in the parasite’s invasiveness and virulence, a function possibly also present in the other trypanosomatids. This location and possible function of enolase offer additional perspectives for both drug discovery and vaccination.

  3. Requirement of plasminogen binding to its cell-surface receptor α-enolase for efficient regeneration of normal and dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Àngels Díaz-Ramos

    Full Text Available Adult regenerative myogenesis is central for restoring normal tissue structure and function after muscle damage. In muscle repair after injury, as in severe myopathies, damaged and necrotic fibers are removed by infiltrating inflammatory cells and then replaced by muscle stem cells or satellite cells, which will fuse to form new myofibers. Extracellular proteolysis mediated by uPA-generated plasmin plays a critical role in controlling inflammation and satellite-cell-dependent myogenesis. α-enolase has been described as plasminogen receptor in several cell types, where it acts concentrating plasmin proteolytic activity on the cell surface. In this study, we investigated whether α-enolase plasminogen receptor plays a regulatory role during the muscular repair process. Inhibitors of α-enolase/plasminogen binding: MAb11G1 (a monoclonal antibody against α-enolase and ε-aminocaproic acid, EACA (a lysine analogue inhibited the myogenic abilities of satellite cells-derived myoblasts. Furthermore, knockdown of α-enolase decreased myogenic fusion of myoblasts. Injured wild-type mice and dystrophic mdx mice were also treated with MAb11G1 and EACA. These treatments had negative impacts on muscle repair impairing satellite cell functions in vitro in agreement with blunted growth of new myofibers in vivo. Furthermore, both MAb11G1 and EACA treatments impaired adequate inflammatory cell infiltration and promoted extracellular matrix deposition in vivo, which resulted in persistent degeneration. These results demonstrate the novel requirement of α-enolase for restoring homeostasis of injured muscle tissue, by controlling the pericellular localization of plasmin activity.

  4. Flunarizine and lamotngine propnyiaxis effects on neuron-specific enolase,S-100,and brain-specific creatine kinase in a fetal rat model of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li He; Jingyi Deng; Wendan He

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Calcium antagonists may act as neuroprotectants,diminishing the influx of calcium ions through voltage-sensitive calcium channels. When administered prophylactically,they display neuroprotective effects against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn rats.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the neuroprotective effects of flunarizine(FNZ),lamotrigine (LTG)and the combination of both drugs,on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in fetal rats.DESIGN AND SETTING:This randomized,complete block design was performed at the Department of Pediatrics.Shenzhen Fourth People's Hospital,Guangdong Medical College.MATERIALS:Forty pregnant Wistar rats,at gestational day 20,were selected for the experiment and were randomly divided into FNZ,LTG,FNZ+LTG,and model groups,with 10 rats in each group.METHODS:Rats in the FNZ.LTG,and FNZ+LTG groups received intragastric injections of FNZ (0.5 mg/kg/d),LTG(10 mg/kg/d),and FNZ(0.5 mg/kg/d)+LTG(10 mg/kg/d),respectively.Drugs were administered once a day for 3 days prior to induction of hypoxia-ischemia.Rats in the modeJ group were not administered any drugs.Three hours after the final administration,eight pregnant rats from each group underwent model establishment hypoxia-ischemia brain damage to the fetal rats.Cesareans were performed at 6,12,24,and 48 hours later;and 5 fetal rats were removed from each mother and kept warm.Twe fetuses without model establishment were removed by planned cesarean at the same time and served as controls.A total of 0.3 mL serum was collected from fetal rats at 6,12,24,and 48 hours,respectively,following birth.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Serum protein concentrations of neuron-specific enolase and S-100 were measured by ELISA.Serum concentrations of brain-specific creatine kinase were measured using an electrogenerated chemiluminescence method.RESULTS:Serum concentrations of neuron-specific enolase,S-100,and brain-specific creatine kinase were significantly higher in the hypoxic-ischemic fetal rats.compared with the non

  5. Significance of serum neuron-specific enolase in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    官卫; 杨伊林; 夏为民; 李璐; 龚德生

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the association between serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and the extent of brain damage and the outcome after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: The release patterns of serum NSE in 78 patients after acute TBI were analyzed by using the enzyme linked immunosobent assay. The levels of NSE were compared with Glasgow coma scale, the category of brain injury and the outcome after 6 months of injury. Results: There were different NSE values in patients with minor (12.96 μg/L±2.39 μg/L), moderate (23.44 μg/L±5.33 μg/L) and severe brain injury (42.68 μg/L±4.57 μg/L). After severe TBI, the concentration of NSE in patients with epidural hematomas was 13.38 μg/L±4.01 μg/L, 24.03 μg/L±2.85 μg/L in brain contusion without surgical intervention group, 55.20 μg/L±6.35 μg/L in brain contusion with surgical intervention group, and 83.85 μg/L±15.82 μg/L in diffuse brain swelling group. There were close correlations between NSE values and Glasgow coma scale (r=-0.608, P<0.01) and the extent of brain injury (r=0.75, P<0.01). Patients with poor outcome had significantly higher initial and peak NSE values than those with good outcome (66.40 μg/L±9.46 μg/L, 94.24 μg/L±13.75 μg/L vs 32.16 μg/L±4.21 μg/L, 34.08 μg/L±4.40 μg/L, P<0.01, respectively). Initial NSE values were negatively related to the outcome (r=-0.501, P<0.01). Most patients with poor outcomes had persisting or secondary elevated NSE values. Conclusions: Serum NSE is one of the valuable neurobiochemical markers for assessment of the severity of brain injury and outcome prediction.

  6. Level of serum neuron-specific enolase and brain damage in children with febrile seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lang Chen; Qiaobin Chen; Fang Yang; Zhi Lin; Xinfu Lin; Ying Huang; Xin Zheng; Yu Lin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure (FS) has good prognosis in the majority of cases. But there is an ongoing debate on the relationship between complicated febrile seizure (CFS) and later development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the level of serum neuron-specific enolase (S-NSE) of children with simple febrile seizure (SFS) and complicated febrile seizure and compare with children with non-FS respiratory tract infection. DESIGN: Contrast observation.SETTING: Department of Pediatrics and Department of Laboratory, Fujian Provincial Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-nine patients who were admitted to Department of Pediatrics of Fujian Provincial Hospital from June 2002 to September 2003 with FS were enrolled in this study. There were 28 boys and 21 girls aged from 5 to 72 months. All children were divided into 2 groups based on frequency and duration. Thirty-two children whose FS occurred within 24 hours (lasting shorter than single and twice durations and also shorter than 10 minutes) were regarded as SFS group; meanwhile, 17 children whose FS occurred within 24 hours (lasting longer than single and twice durations and also longer than 10 minutes) were regarded as CFS group. Another 23 patients who were admitted to our hospital with respiratory tract infection in the same period, without the history and positive symptoms/features of neurological dysfunction, were enrolled as control group. There were 13 boys and 10 girls aged from 5 months to 86 months. All parents were told the facts. METHODS: 2 mL venous blood was collected from FS children within 24 hours after the seizures. Meanwhile, 2 mL venous blood was also collected from children in the control group. Level of S-NSE was measured with enzyme immunoassay procedure, and differences among groups were compared with t test. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Level of S-NSE in each group. RESULTS: A total of 49 children in FS group and 23 ones in control group were involved in the

  7. The C. elegans tailless/Tlx homolog nhr-67 regulates a stage-specific program of linker cell migration in male gonadogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Mihoko; Sternberg, Paul W

    2009-12-01

    Cell migration is a common event during organogenesis, yet little is known about how migration is temporally coordinated with organ development. We are investigating stage-specific programs of cell migration using the linker cell (LC), a migratory cell crucial for male gonadogenesis of C. elegans. During the L3 and L4 larval stages of wild-type males, the LC undergoes changes in its position along the migratory route, in transcriptional regulation of the unc-5 netrin receptor and zmp-1 zinc matrix metalloprotease, and in cell morphology. We have identified the tailless homolog nhr-67 as a cell-autonomous, stage-specific regulator of timing in LC migration programs. In nhr-67-deficient animals, each of the L3 and L4 stage changes is either severely delayed or never occurs, yet LC development before the early L3 stage or after the mid-L4 stage occurs with normal timing. We propose that there is a basal migration program utilized throughout LC migration that is modified by stage-specific regulators such as nhr-67.

  8. Screen for stage-specific expression genes between tail bud stage and heartbeat beginning stage in embryogenesis of gynogenetic silver crucian carp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A systemic study was initiated to identify stage-specific expression genes in fish embryogenesis by using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique. In this study, we presented a preliminary result on screen for stage-specific expression genes between tail bud stage (TBS) and heartbeat beginning stage (HBS) in gynogenetic silver crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio). Two SSH plasmid libraries specific for TBS embryos and HBS embryos were constructed, and stage-specific expression genes were screened between the two stages. 1963 TBS positive clones and 2466 HBS positive clones were sampled to PCR amplification, and 1373 TBS and 1809 HBS PCR positive clones were selected to carry out dot blots. 169TBS dot blot positive clones and 272 HBS dot blot positive clones were sequenced. Searching GenBank by using these nucleotide sequences indicated that most of the TBS dot blot positive clones could not be found homologous sequences in the database, while known genes were mainly detected from HBS dot blot positive clones. Of the 79 known genes, 20 were enzymes or kinases involved in important metabolism of embryonic development. Moreover, specific expressions of partial genes were further confirmed by virtual northern blots. This study is the first step for making a large attempt to study temporal and spatial control f gene expression in the gynogenetic fish embryogenesis.

  9. Cellular and molecular characterization of multipolar Map5-expressing cells: a subset of newly generated, stage-specific parenchymal cells in the mammalian central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like cells (mMap5 cells) expressing the microtubule associated protein 5 (Map5), which is known to be present in most neurons. We characterized the morphology, phenotype, regional distribution, proliferative dynamics, and stage-specific marker expression of these cells in the rabbit and mouse CNS, also assessing their existence in other mammalian species. mMap5 cells were never found to co-express the Ng2 antigen. They appear to be a population of glial cells sharing features but also differences with Ng2+progenitor cells. We show that mMap5 cells are newly generated, postmitotic parenchymal elements of the oligodendroglial lineage, thus being a stage-specific population of polydendrocytes. Finally, we report that the number of mMap5 cells, although reduced within the brain of adult/old animals, can increase in neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions.

  10. Desferrioxamine suppresses Plasmodium falciparum in Aotus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S; Rossan, R N; Davidson, D E; Escajadillo, A

    1987-02-01

    Clinical observation has suggested that iron deficiency may be protective in malaria, and we have found that desferrioxamine (DF), an iron-specific chelating agent, inhibited Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro. It was difficult to be confident that DF would be effective in an intact animal, however, because continuous exposure to DF was required in vitro and, in vivo, DF is rapidly excreted. Also, the in vitro effect of DF was overcome by addition of iron to the culture and in vivo there are potentially high local iron concentrations when iron is absorbed from the diet or released from reticuloendothelial cells. We now show that DF given by constant subcutaneous infusion does suppress parasitemia in P. falciparum-infected Aotus monkeys.

  11. RESEARCH PROGRESS ON ENOLASE OF PARASITES%寄生虫烯醇化酶的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宁; 程田; 王平; 李俊鹏; 张延忠; 鲁艺; 王晓炜

    2015-01-01

    烯醇化酶是糖酵解过程中促进磷酸甘油酸和磷酸烯醇式丙酮酸相互转换的重要催化酶,同时也是存在于真核和原核细胞表面的多功能酶。最近研究发现,它能够激活纤溶酶原,参与病原的感染过程,而且也是主要的免疫刺激性蛋白和药物作用靶点。本文综述当前寄生虫烯醇化酶的研究成果,旨在探讨其作为寄生虫病的诊断、潜在候选疫苗及药物靶点的可能性。%Enolase, an important glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the conversion of phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate, was identi-fied as a multifunctional protein on the surface of most eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Recent studies have revealed that this enzyme could activate the plasminogen,involving in the processes of parasite infection. It is also considered to be a major immunostimulatory protein and drug target. This paper reviews the current research results in parasite enolase, and explores its potential for diagnosis, vaccine candidate and drug targets of parasitic diseases.

  12. Exploring the folate pathway in Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Hyde, John E.

    2005-01-01

    As in centuries past, the main weapon against human malaria infections continues to be intervention with drugs, despite the widespread and increasing frequency of parasite populations that are resistant to one or more of the available compounds. This is a particular problem with the lethal species of parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, which claims some two million lives per year as well as causing enormous social and economic problems. Amongst the antimalarial drugs currently in clinical use, t...

  13. Plasma glutamine levels and falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, G; Planche, T; Agbenyega, T; Bedu-Addo, G; Owusu-Ofori, A; Adebe-Appiah, J; Agranoff, D; Woodrow, C; Castell, L; Elford, B; Krishna, S

    1999-01-01

    Glutamine deficiency is associated with increased rates of sepsis and mortality, which can be prevented by glutamine supplementation. Changes in glutamine concentration were examined in Ghanaian children with acute falciparum malaria and control cases. The mean (SD) plasma glutamine concentration was lower in patients with acute malaria (401 (82) mumol/L, n = 50) than in control patients (623 (67) mumol/L, n = 7; P sepsis and dyserythropoeisis.

  14. Clinical trials of chemotherapy for falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, P; Olliaro, P

    1998-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum remains one of the World's most prevalent and devastating pathogens. Mainly for economic reasons, the parasite's ability to develop resistance to drugs has not been matched by the rate at which new compounds are developed. Even so, there are new drugs (or new combinations of old drugs) currently under investigation, or in the process of development (at the moment): Pyronaridine, a well-tolerated, synthetic drug that may have utility for multi-resistant falciparum malaria in many parts of the world; however,problems remain over the formulation of this drug (which is a major determinant of its bioavailability) and its eventual cost. Chlorproguanil-dapsone (lap dap) is being studied as a possible low-cost'successor' to pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine; the utility of chlorproguanil-dapsone as 'salvage' therapy for clinical cases of pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine failure has yet to be tested in clinical trials. Atovaquone-proguanil (malarone) has utility against multi-resistant parasites; however, it is likely to be expensive (but is currently being provided free-of-charge in certain areas of Africa). Artemether-benflumetol (coartemether) combines the advantages of artemether (a rapid reduction in parasite load) with a second drug that reduces the risk of recrudescence; the cost of this combination is unclear. Rectal artesunate is being studied as an intervention to reduce the proportion of children with falciparum malaria who deteriorate to severe disease; the formulation is appropriate for use in rural health centres.

  15. Expression of a type B RIFIN in Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and gametes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwakalinga Steven B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of Plasmodium falciparum to undergo antigenic variation, by switching expression among protein variants encoded by multigene families, such as var, rif and stevor, is key to the survival of this parasite in the human host. The RIFIN protein family can be divided into A and B types based on the presence or absence of a 25 amino acid motif in the semi-conserved domain. A particular type B RIFIN, PF13_0006, has previously been shown to be strongly transcribed in the asexual and sexual stages of P. falciparum in vitro. Methods Antibodies to recombinant PF13_0006 RIFIN were used in immunofluorescence and confocal imaging of 3D7 parasites throughout the asexual reproduction and sexual development to examine the expression of PF13_0006. Furthermore, reactivity to recombinant PF13_0006 was measured in plasma samples collected from individuals from both East and West African endemic areas. Results The PF13_0006 RIFIN variant appeared expressed by both released merozoites and gametes after emergence. 7.4% and 12.1% of individuals from East and West African endemic areas, respectively, carry plasma antibodies that recognize recombinant PF13_0006, where the antibody responses were more common among older children. Conclusions The stage specificity of PF13_0006 suggests that the diversity of RIFIN variants has evolved to provide multiple specialized functions in different stages of the parasite life cycle. These data also suggest that RIFIN variants antigenically similar to PF13_0006 occur in African parasite populations.

  16. Acute kidney injury in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Koopmans (Liese); M.E. van Wolfswinkel (Marlies); D.A. Hesselink (Dennis); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); R. Koelewijn (Rob); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a known complication of malaria, and is reported to occur in up to 40 % of adult patients with a severe Plasmodium falciparum infection in endemic regions. To gain insight in the incidence and risk factors of AKI in imported P. falciparum malaria,

  17. Acute kidney injury in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Koopmans, L.C. (Liese); M.E. van Wolfswinkel (Marlies); D.A. Hesselink (Dennis); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); R. Koelewijn (Rob); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); P.J. van Genderen (P.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a known complication of malaria, and is reported to occur in up to 40 % of adult patients with a severe Plasmodium falciparum infection in endemic regions. To gain insight in the incidence and risk factors of AKI in imported P. falciparum malaria,

  18. Survival strategies of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Ramya, TNC; Surolia, Namita; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2002-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the protozoan parasite causing falciparum malaria, is undoubtedly highly versatile when it comes to survival and defence strategies. Strategies adopted by the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium range from unique pathways of nutrient uptake to immune evasion strategies and multiple drug resistance. Studying the survival strategies of Plasmodium could help us envisage strategies of tackling one of the worst scourges of mankind.

  19. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Deng, D.M.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR w

  20. Early detection of response in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma by changes in serum concentrations of creatine kinase, neuron specific enolase, calcitonin, ACTH, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, E; Hansen, M; Urdal, P

    1988-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK-BB), neuron specific enolase (NSE), ACTH, calcitonin, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) were measured in serum or plasma before and immediately after initiation of treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCC). Pretherapeutic elevated concentrations of CK...

  1. Evaluation of a Novel Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay To Detect Immunoglobulin G Antibody to Enolase for Serodiagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laín, Ana; Moragues, María D.; Ruiz, Juan Carlos García; Mendoza, Joaquín; Camacho, Ana; del Palacio, Amalia; Pontón, José

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a new test to detect antibodies to Candida albicans recombinant enolase was investigated in 47 immunocompromised and 51 immunocompetent patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the test for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis were 81.0, 83.9, 79.1, and 85.5%, respectively. PMID:17229884

  2. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Deng, D.M.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR

  3. Regulation of gene expression in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba invadens: identification of core promoter elements and promoters with stage-specific expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Dipak; Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen M; Singh, Upinder

    2014-10-01

    Developmental switching between life-cycle stages is a common feature among many pathogenic organisms. Entamoeba histolytica is an important human pathogen and is a leading parasitic cause of death globally. During its life cycle, Entamoeba converts between cysts (essential for disease transmission) and trophozoites (responsible for tissue invasion). Despite being central to its biology, the triggers that are involved in the developmental pathways of this parasite are not well understood. In order to define the transcriptional network associated with stage conversion we used Entamoeba invadens which serves as a model system for Entamoeba developmental biology, and performed RNA sequencing at different developmental time points. In this study RNA-Seq data was utilised to define basal transcriptional control elements as well as to identify promoters which regulate stage-specific gene expression patterns. We discovered that the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of E. invadens genes are short, a median of 20 nucleotides (nt) and 26 nt respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of DNA sequences proximate to the start and stop codons identified two conserved motifs: (i) E. invadens Core Promoter Motif - GAAC-Like (EiCPM-GL) (GAACTACAAA), and (ii) E. invadens 3'-U-Rich Motif (Ei3'-URM) (TTTGTT) in the 5' and 3' flanking regions, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that both motifs specifically bind nuclear protein(s) from E. invadens trophozoites. Additionally, we identified select genes with stage-specific expression patterns and analysed the ability of each gene promoter to drive a luciferase reporter gene during the developmental cycle. This approach confirmed three trophozoite-specific, four encystation-specific and two excystation-specific promoters. This work lays the framework for use of stage-specific promoters to express proteins of interest in a particular life-cycle stage, adding to the molecular toolbox for genetic manipulation of E

  4. Neuron specific enolase demonstration in the diagnosis of a solid-cystic (papillary cystic) tumour of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chott, A; Klöppel, G; Buxbaum, P; Heitz, P U

    1987-01-01

    Immunoreactivity to neuron specific enolase (NSE) was demonstrated in a solid-cystic (papillary cystic) tumour of the human pancreas, employing immunohistochemical methods. Positive staining for NSE was found with two different antisera. In addition, sodium-dodecyl-sulphate-polyacrylamide-gel-electro-phoresis (SDS-PAGE) of tumour homogenate revealed a distinct band reacting with a NSE antiserum. However, we failed to detect any hormonal products or neuroendocrine granules in the tumour. Therefore the authors advise caution in using the enzyme as a differential diagnostic tool, especially in surgical pathology of epithelial pancreatic neoplasms occurring in young females. In individual cases electron microscopy will be necessary since solid-cystic tumours of the pancreas consistently show large intracytoplasmic zymogen-like granules.

  5. Ribosomal protein P2 localizes to the parasite zoite-surface and is a target for invasion inhibitory antibodies in Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsan, Rajagopal; Chopra, Reshma Korde; Khan, Mudassar Ali; Sharma, Shobhona

    2015-02-01

    In the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the conserved ribosomal stalk protein P2 (PfP2) exhibits extra-ribosomal stage-specific oligomerization and trafficking to the host red cell membrane. Antibodies directed against PfP2 arrested cell division. We sought to examine whether P2 from a closely related Apicomplexan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, exhibits similar properties in terms of its oligomeric status as well as such unique host-cell localization. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of recombinant P2 from T. gondii (TgP2) showed a structure similar to that of PfP2, but unlike PfP2, which forms SDS- and DTT-resistant oligomers, TgP2 exhibited only a weak SDS-resistant dimerization. Also, unlike PfP2 localization to the infected erythrocyte surface, TgP2 did not localize to the host membrane in T. gondii infected human foreskin fibroblast cells. However, P2 protein was detected on the free tachyzoite surface, corroborated by localization of epitope-tagged P2 transfected in T. gondii. The presence of P2 on the surface of P. falciparum merozoites was also observed, and specific antibodies raised against the P2 protein blocked both T. gondii and P. falciparum zoite invasion of the host cells. Thus, although certain moonlighting functions of the acidic ribosomal protein P2 are different amongst P. falciparum and T. gondii, the P2 protein localizes to the surface of the invasive zoite form, and appears to constitute a potential target for host cell invasion inhibition in both the Apicomplexan infections.

  6. The Cloning and Characterization of the Enolase2 Gene of Gekko japonicus and Its Polyclonal Antibody Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The enolase2 gene is usually expressed in mature neurons and also named neuron specific enolase (NSE. In the present study, we first obtained the NSE gene cDNA sequence by using the RACE method based on the expressed sequence tag (EST fragment from the cDNA library of Gekko japonicus and identified one transcript of about 2.2 kb in central nervous system of Gekko japonicus by Northern blotting. The open reading frame of NSE is 1305 bp, which encodes a 435 amino-acid protein. We further investigated the multi-tissue expression pattern of NSE by RT-PCR and found that the expression of NSE mRNA was very high in brain, spinal cord and low in heart, while it was not detectable in other tissues. The real-time quantitative PCR was used to investigate the time-dependent change in the expression of the NSE mRNA level after gecko spinal cord transection and found it significantly increased at one day, reaching its highest level three days post-injury and then decreasing at the seventh day of the experiment. The recombinant plasmid of pET-32a-NSE was constructed and induced to express His fused NSE protein. The purified NSE protein was used to immunize rabbits to generate polyclonal antisera. The titer of the antiserum was more than 1:65536 determined by ELISA. Western blotting showed that the prepared antibody could specifically recognize the recombinant and endogenous NSE protein. The result of immunohistochemistry revealed that positive signals were present in neurons of the brain and the spinal cord. This study provided the tools of cDNA and polyclonal antibody for studying NSE function in Gekko japonicus.

  7. Inactive enzymatic mutant proteins (phosphoglycerate mutase and enolase as sugar binders for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri Ashok

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon dioxide fixation bioprocess in reactors necessitates recycling of D-ribulose1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP for continuous operation. A radically new close loop of RuBP regenerating reactor design has been proposed that will harbor enzyme-complexes instead of purified enzymes. These reactors will need binders enabling selective capture and release of sugar and intermediate metabolites enabling specific conversions during regeneration. In the current manuscript we describe properties of proteins that will act as potential binders in RuBP regeneration reactors. Results We demonstrate specific binding of 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA and 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde (3PGAL from sugar mixtures by inactive mutant of yeast enzymes phosphoglycerate mutase and enolase. The reversibility in binding with respect to pH and EDTA has also been shown. No chemical conversion of incubated sugars or sugar intermediate metabolites were found by the inactive enzymatic proteins. The dissociation constants for sugar metabolites are in the micromolar range, both proteins showed lower dissociation constant (Kd for 3-phosphoglycerate (655–796 μM compared to 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde (822–966 μM indicating higher affinity for 3PGA. The proteins did not show binding to glucose, sucrose or fructose within the sensitivity limits of detection. Phosphoglycerate mutase showed slightly lower stability on repeated use than enolase mutants. Conclusions The sugar and their intermediate metabolite binders may have a useful role in RuBP regeneration reactors. The reversibility of binding with respect to changes in physicochemical factors and stability when subjected to repeated changes in these conditions are expected to make the mutant proteins candidates for in-situ removal of sugar intermediate metabolites for forward driving of specific reactions in enzyme-complex reactors.

  8. A T4SS Effector Targets Host Cell Alpha-Enolase Contributing to Brucella abortus Intracellular Lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, María I.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, invades and replicates within cells inside a membrane-bound compartment known as the Brucella containing vacuole (BCV). After trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways, BCVs mature into endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartments permissive for bacterial replication. Brucella Type IV Secretion System (VirB) is a major virulence factor essential for the biogenesis of the replicative organelle. Upon infection, Brucella uses the VirB system to translocate effector proteins from the BCV into the host cell cytoplasm. Although the functions of many translocated proteins remain unknown, some of them have been demonstrated to modulate host cell signaling pathways to favor intracellular survival and replication. BPE123 (BAB2_0123) is a B. abortus VirB-translocated effector protein recently identified by our group whose function is yet unknown. In an attempt to identify host cell proteins interacting with BPE123, a pull-down assay was performed and human alpha-enolase (ENO-1) was identified by LC/MS-MS as a potential interaction partner of BPE123. These results were confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. In bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with B. abortus, ENO-1 associates to BCVs in a BPE123-dependent manner, indicating that interaction with translocated BPE123 is also occurring during the intracellular phase of the bacterium. Furthermore, ENO-1 depletion by siRNA impaired B. abortus intracellular replication in HeLa cells, confirming a role for α-enolase during the infection process. Indeed, ENO-1 activity levels were enhanced upon B. abortus infection of THP-1 macrophagic cells, and this activation is highly dependent on BPE123. Taken together, these results suggest that interaction between BPE123 and host cell ENO-1 contributes to the intracellular lifestyle of B. abortus. PMID:27900285

  9. Stage-specific analysis of plasma protein profiles in ovarian cancer: Difference in-gel electrophoresis analysis of pooled clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Bailey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancer. Non-specific symptoms early in disease and the lack of specific biomarkers hinder early diagnosis. Multi-marker blood screening tests have shown promise for improving identification of early stage disease; however, available tests lack sensitivity, and specificity. Materials and Methods: In this study, pooled deeply-depleted plasma from women with Stage 1, 2 or 3 ovarian cancer and healthy controls were used to compare the 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE protein profiles and identify potential novel markers of ovarian cancer progression. Results/Discussion: Stage-specific variation in biomarker expression was observed. For example, apolipoprotein A1 expression is relatively low in control and Stage 1, but shows a substantial increase in Stage 2 and 3, thus, potential of utility for disease confirmation rather than early detection. A better marker for early stage disease was tropomyosin 4 (TPM4. The expression of TPM4 increased by 2-fold in Stage 2 before returning to "normal" levels in Stage 3 disease. Multiple isoforms were also identified for some proteins and in some cases, displayed stage-specific expression. An interesting example was fibrinogen alpha, for which 8 isoforms were identified. Four displayed a moderate increase at Stage 1 and a substantial increase for Stages 2 and 3 while the other 4 showed only moderate increases. Conclusion: Herein is provided an improved summary of blood protein profiles for women with ovarian cancer stratified by stage.

  10. A multidomain adhesion protein family expressed in Plasmodium falciparum is essential for transmission to the mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradel, Gabriele; Hayton, Karen; Aravind, L; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abrahamsen, Mitchell S; Bonawitz, Annemarie; Mejia, Cesar; Templeton, Thomas J

    2004-06-07

    The recent sequencing of several apicomplexan genomes has provided the opportunity to characterize novel antigens essential for the parasite life cycle that might lead to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic markers. Here we have screened the Plasmodium falciparum genome sequence for genes encoding extracellular multidomain putative adhesive proteins. Three of these identified genes, named PfCCp1, PfCCp2, and PfCCp3, have multiple adhesive modules including a common Limulus coagulation factor C domain also found in two additional Plasmodium genes. Orthologues were identified in the Cryptosporidium parvum genome sequence, indicating an evolutionary conserved function. Transcript and protein expression analysis shows sexual stage-specific expression of PfCCp1, PfCCp2, and PfCCp3, and cellular localization studies revealed plasma membrane-associated expression in mature gametocytes. During gametogenesis, PfCCps are released and localize surrounding complexes of newly emerged microgametes and macrogametes. PfCCp expression markedly decreased after formation of zygotes. To begin to address PfCCp function, the PfCCp2 and PfCCp3 gene loci were disrupted by homologous recombination, resulting in parasites capable of forming oocyst sporozoites but blocked in the salivary gland transition. Our results describe members of a conserved apicomplexan protein family expressed in sexual stage Plasmodium parasites that may represent candidates for subunits of a transmission-blocking vaccine.

  11. Plasmodium Falciparum Versus Plasmodium Vivax: Which Is a Lesser Evil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathod Chirag C, Deshpande Shubhangi V, Rana Himanshu M, Godbole Varsha Y, Patel Amul, Patel Vaibhav, Darad Dimple, Panchal Maulik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: With changing spectrum, different grades of biochemical & haematological changes generally found to be more severe with p. falciparum, now frequently seen with p. vivax. Present study intends to find species specific differences in diseases progression & complications. Methodology: A retrospective study of Malaria-patients admitted at GMERS Medical College & Hospital, Vadodara from january-2011to december-2011 was done. p. falciparum, P. Vivax were diagnosed by demonstrating asexual forms of parasites in peripheral blood smear, haematological & biochemical tests were analyzed. Results: Out of 1093 cases, 781 were slide positive, remaining 312 were treated on clinical-ground .Of 781 cases, 443 (56% p. falciparum, 327 (42% P. Vivax and 11(2% were mixed Infection. Male to female ratio was 1.8:1&0.8:1 in p. falciparum & P. vivax, respectively. Fever, Prodroms, GI symptoms, Liver -dysfunction (51%vs47%, Renal- dysfunction (52%vs48% were equally frequent; whereas Hemolysis, Bleeding tendency, Breathlessness and altered sensorium were more in p. falciparum. Anemia (56%, Thrombocytopenia (60%, Pancytopenia (54%, Hemolysis (65% was more frequent in p. falciparum. Leucopenia (54% was more frequent in p. Vivax. Conclusion: In contrast to earlier studies, which have proven p. falciparum to be more fatal & complicated, it was noted in present study that P. Vivax species was frequent cause of overall slide-positive cases causing complications head to head with p. falciparum. Anemia, Hepato-renal dysfunctions were equally frequent, nonfatal leucopenia more in p. Vivax, while hemolysis and thrombocytopenia was more in p. falciparum. If ignored complications can alter clinical course & be equally fatal in p. vivax malaria. Hence p. vivax can no more be considered as benign infection and can be equally lethal.

  12. The stage-specific in vitro efficacy of a malaria antigen cocktail provides valuable insights into the development of effective multi-stage vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Holger; Boes, Alexander; Kastilan, Robin; Kapelski, Stephanie; Edgue, Güven; Beiss, Veronique; Chubodova, Ivana; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Multicomponent vaccines targeting different stages of Plasmodium falciparum represent a promising, holistic concept towards better malaria vaccines. Additionally, an effective vaccine candidate should demonstrate cross-strain specificity because many antigens are polymorphic, which can reduce vaccine efficacy. A cocktail of recombinant fusion proteins (VAMAX-Mix) featuring three diversity-covering variants of the blood-stage antigen PfAMA1, each combined with the conserved sexual-stage antigen Pfs25 and one of the pre-erythrocytic-stage antigens PfCSP_TSR or PfCelTOS, or the additional blood-stage antigen PfMSP1_19, was produced in Pichia pastoris and used to immunize rabbits. The immune sera and purified IgG were used to perform various assays determining antigen specific titers and in vitro efficacy against different parasite stages and strains. In functional in vitro assays we observed robust inhibition of blood-stage (up to 90%), and sexual-stage parasites (up to 100%) and biased inhibition of pre-erythrocytic parasites (0-40%). Cross-strain blood-stage efficacy was observed in erythrocyte invasion assays using four different P. falciparum strains. The quantification of antigen-specific IgGs allowed the determination of specific IC50 values. The significant difference in antigen-specific IC50 requirements, the direct correlation between antigen-specific IgG and the relative quantitative representation of antigens within the cocktail, provide valuable implementations for future multi-stage, multi-component vaccine designs.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicaemia in a patient with severe Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Høiby, N; Theander, T G

    1987-01-01

    presented with severe form of malaria, progressing rapidly into coma and died within a short time. P. aeruginosa was isolated from his blood taken on the day of admission. His neutrophils were all occupied by P. falciparum. The unusual combination of severe falciparum malaria infection and P. aeruginosa......This report describes a Danish patient with severe Plasmodium falciparum infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicaemia. The patient had been sailing along the coast of West Africa for ten years without taking any antimalaria prophylaxis and without any apparent previous history of malaria. He...

  14. Expression of P. falciparum var genes involves exchange of the histone variant H2A.Z at the promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Petter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum employs antigenic variation to evade the human immune response by switching the expression of different variant surface antigens encoded by the var gene family. Epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications and sub-nuclear compartmentalization contribute to transcriptional regulation in the malaria parasite, in particular to control antigenic variation. Another mechanism of epigenetic control is the exchange of canonical histones with alternative variants to generate functionally specialized chromatin domains. Here we demonstrate that the alternative histone PfH2A.Z is associated with the epigenetic regulation of var genes. In many eukaryotic organisms the histone variant H2A.Z mediates an open chromatin structure at promoters and facilitates diverse levels of regulation, including transcriptional activation. Throughout the asexual, intraerythrocytic lifecycle of P. falciparum we found that the P. falciparum ortholog of H2A.Z (PfH2A.Z colocalizes with histone modifications that are characteristic of transcriptionally-permissive euchromatin, but not with markers of heterochromatin. Consistent with this finding, antibodies to PfH2A.Z co-precipitate the permissive modification H3K4me3. By chromatin-immunoprecipitation we show that PfH2A.Z is enriched in nucleosomes around the transcription start site (TSS in both transcriptionally active and silent stage-specific genes. In var genes, however, PfH2A.Z is enriched at the TSS only during active transcription in ring stage parasites. Thus, in contrast to other genes, temporal var gene regulation involves histone variant exchange at promoter nucleosomes. Sir2 histone deacetylases are important for var gene silencing and their yeast ortholog antagonises H2A.Z function in subtelomeric yeast genes. In immature P. falciparum parasites lacking Sir2A or Sir2B high var transcription levels correlate with enrichment of PfH2A.Z at the TSS. As Sir2A knock out parasites mature the var

  15. Identification of functional enolase genes of the silkworm Bombyx mori from public databases with a combination of dry and wet bench processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Akira; Nakazato, Takeru; Ito, Katsuhiko; Nojima, Yosui; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Kikuo; Bono, Hidemasa; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Sato, Ryoichi; Tabunoki, Hiroko

    2017-01-13

    Various insect species have been added to genomic databases over the years. Thus, researchers can easily obtain online genomic information on invertebrates and insects. However, many incorrectly annotated genes are included in these databases, which can prevent the correct interpretation of subsequent functional analyses. To address this problem, we used a combination of dry and wet bench processes to select functional genes from public databases. Enolase is an important glycolytic enzyme in all organisms. We used a combination of dry and wet bench processes to identify functional enolases in the silkworm Bombyx mori (BmEno). First, we detected five annotated enolases from public databases using a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) search, and then through cDNA cloning, Northern blotting, and RNA-seq analysis, we revealed three functional enolases in B. mori: BmEno1, BmEno2, and BmEnoC. BmEno1 contained a conserved key amino acid residue for metal binding and substrate binding in other species. However, BmEno2 and BmEnoC showed a change in this key amino acid. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BmEno2 and BmEnoC were distinct from BmEno1 and other enolases, and were distributed only in lepidopteran clusters. BmEno1 was expressed in all of the tissues used in our study. In contrast, BmEno2 was mainly expressed in the testis with some expression in the ovary and suboesophageal ganglion. BmEnoC was weakly expressed in the testis. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the mRNA expression of BmEno2 and BmEnoC correlated with testis development; thus, BmEno2 and BmEnoC may be related to lepidopteran-specific spermiogenesis. We identified and characterized three functional enolases from public databases with a combination of dry and wet bench processes in the silkworm B. mori. In addition, we determined that BmEno2 and BmEnoC had species-specific functions. Our strategy could be helpful for the detection of minor genes and functional genes in non-model organisms from public databases.

  16. NF-Y recruits both transcription activator and repressor to modulate tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression of human γ-globin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingguo Zhu

    Full Text Available The human embryonic, fetal and adult β-like globin genes provide a paradigm for tissue- and developmental stage-specific gene regulation. The fetal γ-globin gene is expressed in fetal erythroid cells but is repressed in adult erythroid cells. The molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional switch during erythroid development is not completely understood. Here, we used a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays to dissect the molecular assemblies of the active and the repressed proximal γ-globin promoter complexes in K562 human erythroleukemia cell line and primary human fetal and adult erythroid cells. We found that the proximal γ-globin promoter complex is assembled by a developmentally regulated, general transcription activator NF-Y bound strongly at the tandem CCAAT motifs near the TATA box. NF-Y recruits to neighboring DNA motifs the developmentally regulated, erythroid transcription activator GATA-2 and general repressor BCL11A, which in turn recruit erythroid repressor GATA-1 and general repressor COUP-TFII to form respectively the NF-Y/GATA-2 transcription activator hub and the BCL11A/COUP-TFII/GATA-1 transcription repressor hub. Both the activator and the repressor hubs are present in both the active and the repressed γ-globin promoter complexes in fetal and adult erythroid cells. Through changes in their levels and respective interactions with the co-activators and co-repressors during erythroid development, the activator and the repressor hubs modulate erythroid- and developmental stage-specific transcription of γ-globin gene.

  17. The protection motivation theory within the stages of the transtheoretical model - stage-specific interplay of variables and prediction of exercise stage transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippke, Sonia; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2009-05-01

    Two different theories of health behaviour have been chosen with the aim of theory integration: a continuous theory (protection motivation theory, PMT) and a stage model (transtheoretical model, TTM). This is the first study to test whether the stages of the TTM moderate the interrelation of PMT-variables and the mediation of motivation, as well as PMT-variables' interactions in predicting stage transitions. Hypotheses were tested regarding (1) mean patterns, stage pair-comparisons and nonlinear trends using ANOVAs; (2) prediction-patterns for the different stage groups employing multi-group structural equation modelling (MSEM) and nested model analyses; and (3) stage transitions using binary logistic regression analyses. Adults (N=1,602) were assessed over a 6 month period on their physical activity stages, PMT-variables and subsequent behaviour. (1) Particular mean differences and nonlinear trends in all test variables were found. (2) The PMT adequately fitted the five stage groups. The MSEM revealed that covariances within threat appraisal and coping appraisal were invariant and all other constrains were stage-specific, i.e. stage was a moderator. Except for self-efficacy, motivation fully mediated the relationship between the social-cognitive variables and behaviour. (3) Predicting stage transitions with the PMT-variables underscored the importance of self-efficacy. Only when threat appraisal and coping appraisal were high, stage movement was more likely in the preparation stage. Results emphasize stage-specific differences of the PMT mechanisms, and hence, support the stage construct. The findings may guide further theory building and research integrating different theoretical approaches.

  18. Impact of cervical screening on cervical cancer mortality: estimation using stage-specific results from a nested case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Rebecca; Pesola, Francesca; Castañón, Alejandra; Sasieni, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that screening can prevent cervical cancer, but the magnitude of the impact of regular screening on cervical cancer mortality is unknown. Methods: Population-based case–control study using prospectively recorded cervical screening data, England 1988–2013. Case women had cervical cancer diagnosed during April 2007–March 2013 aged 25–79 years (N=11 619). Two cancer-free controls were individually age matched to each case. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of developing stage-specific cancer for women regularly screened or irregularly screened compared with women not screened in the preceding 15 years. Mortality was estimated from excess deaths within 5 years of diagnosis using stage-specific 5-year relative survival from England with adjustment for age within stage based on SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, USA) data. Results: In women aged 35–64 years, regular screening is associated with a 67% (95% confidence interval (CI): 62–73%) reduction in stage 1A cancer and a 95% (95% CI: 94–97%) reduction in stage 3 or worse cervical cancer: the estimated OR comparing regular (⩽5.5yearly) screening to no (or minimal) screening are 0.18 (95% CI: 0.16–0.19) for cancer incidence and 0.08 (95% CI: 0.07–0.09) for mortality. It is estimated that in England screening currently prevents 70% (95% CI: 66–73%) of cervical cancer deaths (all ages); however, if everyone attended screening regularly, 83% (95% CI: 82–84%) could be prevented. Conclusions: The association between cervical cancer screening and incidence is stronger in more advanced stage cancers, and screening is more effective at preventing death from cancer than preventing cancer itself. PMID:27632376

  19. On Programmed Cell Death in Plasmodium falciparum: Status Quo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Dewaldt; Durand, Pierre Marcel; Coetzer, Thérèsa Louise

    2012-01-01

    Conflicting arguments and results exist regarding the occurrence and phenotype of programmed cell death (PCD) in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Inconsistencies relate mainly to the number and type of PCD markers assessed and the different methodologies used in the studies. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of knowledge and empirical evidence for PCD in the intraerythrocytic stages of P. falciparum. We consider possible reasons for discrepancies in the data and offer suggestions towards more standardised investigation methods in this field. Furthermore, we present genomic evidence for PCD machinery in P. falciparum. We discuss the potential adaptive or nonadaptive role of PCD in the parasite life cycle and its possible exploitation in the development of novel drug targets. Lastly, we pose pertinent unanswered questions concerning the PCD phenomenon in P. falciparum to provide future direction. PMID:22287973

  20. International population movements and regional Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew J. Tatem; David L. Smith; Susan Hanson

    2010-01-01

    ... to areas targeted for elimination. Here, census-based migration data were analyzed with network analysis tools, Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission maps, and global population databases to map globally communities of countries...

  1. Peripheral blood cell signatures of Plasmodium falciparum infection during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibitokou, Samad; Oesterholt, Mayke; Brutus, Laurent;

    2012-01-01

    Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in placental intervillous spaces causes inflammation and pathology. Knowledge of the profiles of immune cells associated with the physiopathology of pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is scarce. We conducted a longitudinal, prospective...

  2. Heterologous Protection against Malaria after Immunization with Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schats, R.; Bijker, E.M.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Graumans, W.; Vegte-Bolmer, M. van de; Lieshout, L. van; Haks, M.C.; Hermsen, C.C.; Scholzen, A.; Visser, L.G.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sterile protection in >90% of volunteers against homologous Plasmodium falciparum infection has been achieved only using the controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) model. This efficient model involves whole parasite immunizations under chloroquine prophylaxis (CPS-immunization),

  3. Automated erythrocytapheresis in severe falciparum malaria : A critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, Jellie A.; Meertens, John H. J. M.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Tulleken, Jaap E.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2006-01-01

    Imported falciparum malaria is increasing in Western countries. In patients with severe disease, exchange transfusion has been added to antimalarial and conventional supportive therapy to increase removal of parasitized erythrocytes, but hemodynamic compromise limits its use; automated erythrocytaph

  4. Spatial and temporal distribution of falciparum malaria in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hualiang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falciparum malaria is the most deadly among the four main types of human malaria. Although great success has been achieved since the launch of the National Malaria Control Programme in 1955, malaria remains a serious public health problem in China. This paper aimed to analyse the geographic distribution, demographic patterns and time trends of falciparum malaria in China. Methods The annual numbers of falciparum malaria cases during 1992–2003 and the individual case reports of each clinical falciparum malaria during 2004–2005 were extracted from communicable disease information systems in China Center for Diseases Control and Prevention. The annual number of cases and the annual incidence were mapped by matching them to corresponding province- and county-level administrative units in a geographic information system. The distribution of falciparum malaria by age, gender and origin of infection was analysed. Time-series analysis was conducted to investigate the relationship between the falciparum malaria in the endemic provinces and the imported falciparum malaria in non-endemic provinces. Results Falciparum malaria was endemic in two provinces of China during 2004–05. Imported malaria was reported in 26 non-endemic provinces. Annual incidence of falciparum malaria was mapped at county level in the two endemic provinces of China: Yunnan and Hainan. The sex ratio (male vs. female for the number of cases in Yunnan was 1.6 in the children of 0–15 years and it reached 5.7 in the adults over 15 years of age. The number of malaria cases in Yunnan was positively correlated with the imported malaria of concurrent months in the non-endemic provinces. Conclusion The endemic area of falciparum malaria in China has remained restricted to two provinces, Yunnan and Hainan. Stable transmission occurs in the bordering region of Yunnan and the hilly-forested south of Hainan. The age and gender distribution in the endemic area is

  5. Detection of neuron specific enolase concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with neurological disorders by means of a sensitive enzyme immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermuyten, K; Lowenthal, A; Karcher, D

    1990-02-28

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of neuron specific enolase (NSE) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was developed. The sensitivity of the ELISA was less than 1 microgram/ml. This sensitivity is comparable with radioimmunoassays which have the disadvantage that radiolabelled products are used. The developed assay was used to measure cerebrospinal fluid neuron specific enolase (CSF-NSE) levels in 1178 patients with neurological disorders to establish its potential usefulness and clinical application. CSF-NSE levels in this group of patients were independent of sex and no correlation with age was found. CSF-NSE was significantly increased in Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, meningeal hemorrhage, thrombosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome and in schizophrenia.

  6. Parasite virulence and disease severity in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    OpenAIRE

    Ribacke, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    Malaria stands out as one of the most important infectious diseases and one of the world s leading causes of death. Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite responsible for the great majority of severe disease syndromes and mortality, and affects mainly children and pregnant women. Despite intensive research efforts, the understanding of P. falciparum virulence is limited. Infections with the parasite cause everything from asymptomatic parasitemia to severe disease and death, a...

  7. Hemoglobinopathies: slicing the Gordian knot of Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steve M; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits--including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia--are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a "natural experiment" to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the "Gordian knot" of host and parasite

  8. Hemoglobinopathies: Slicing the Gordian Knot of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steve M.; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits—including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia—are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a “natural experiment” to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the “Gordian knot” of host and parasite

  9. Insulin reduces the requirement for serum in Plasmodium falciparum culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Tosta

    1984-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin added to Plasmodium falciparum cultures (0.2 IU/ml reduced the requirement for human serum from ten to five percent. This represents an obvious advantage by its serum-sparing effect and by reducing the chances of using contaminated serum in cultures. The growth-promoting ability of insulin was observed eitherin culture- adapted P. falciparum or in newly-isolated samples.

  10. Hemoglobinopathies: slicing the Gordian knot of Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve M Taylor

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits--including hemoglobin S (HbS, hemoglobin C (HbC, and α-thalassemia--are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait. Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a "natural experiment" to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the "Gordian knot" of host and

  11. Chromogranin A as serum marker for neuroendocrine neoplasia: comparison with neuron-specific enolase and the alpha-subunit of glycoprotein hormones

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    textabstractChromogranin A (CgA) is gaining acceptance as a serum marker of neuroendocrine tumors. Its specificity in differentiating between neuroendocrine and nonneuroendocrine tumors, its sensitivity to detect small tumors, and its clinical value, compared with other neuroendocrine markers, have not clearly been defined, however. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical usefulness of CgA as neuroendocrine serum marker. Serum levels of CgA, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a...

  12. [Treatment of fulminant falciparum malaria with erythrapheresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvier, B; Maudan, P; Debue, J F; Joussemet, M; Roué, R

    1988-01-01

    Ten days after his return from Cameroon, a twenty-six year old Frenchman, serving on voluntary service overseas, presented with fulminant falciparum malaria: shock, altered consciousness, haemolytic anaemia, threatening disseminated coagulation (platelets less than 150 X 10(-6).l-1; prothrombin time and Stuart factor less than 50%; fibrinogen less than 1.5 g.l-1). In spite of quinine therapy, parasitaemia increased from 4 to 35% within 24 h. Using an Haemonetics V50, the exchange of one and a half red blood cell masses was carried out with 17 red blood cell packs. Calcium gluconate was used to prevent the hypocalcaemia induced by the anticoagulant solution. The patient's platelets and plasma were completely reinjected. The result was very satisfactory. This kind of exchange, well tolerated clinically and biologically, would seem better than the classical exchange transfusion. When 10% of the red blood cells are infected by Plasmodium falciparum, it is necessary to exchange from one and a half to two blood masses. Lesser exchanges are always associated with important relapses and quinine therapy must be carried on during and after the exchange. Restricting this exchange only to red blood cells enabled the patient to benefit from his own coagulation factors, antibodies and platelets, and consequently to reduce the number of blood donors involved. However, metabolites (especially bilirubin and circulating immune complexes) were not eliminated. Partial plasmapheresis may be associated with erythropheresis using human albumin as plasma substitute. This technique needs to be assessed, in order to optimize immediate efficiency and post-transfusion infectious risk.

  13. Combating multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Aung Myint; Phyo, Aung Pyae; Landier, Jordi; Parker, Daniel M; Nosten, François H

    2017-08-01

    Over the past 50 years, Plasmodium falciparum has developed resistance against all antimalarial drugs used against it: chloroquine, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, quinine, piperaquine and mefloquine. More recently, resistance to the artemisinin derivatives and the resulting failure of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) are threatening all major gains made in malaria control. Each time resistance has developed progressively, with delayed clearance of parasites first emerging only in a few regions, increasing in prevalence and geographic range, and then ultimately resulting in the complete failure of that antimalarial. Drawing from this repeated historical chain of events, this article presents context-specific approaches for combating drug-resistant P. falciparum malaria. The approaches begin with a context of drug-sensitive parasites and focus on the prevention of the emergence of drug resistance. Next, the approaches address a scenario in which resistance has emerged and is increasing in prevalence and geographic extent, with interventions focused on disrupting transmission through vector control, early diagnosis and treatment, and the use of new combination therapies. Elimination is also presented as an approach for addressing the imminent failure of all available antimalarials. The final drug resistance context presented is one in which all available antimalarials have failed; leaving only personal protection and the use of new antimalarials (or new combinations of antimalarials) as a viable strategy for dealing with complete resistance. All effective strategies and contexts require a multipronged, holistic approach. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. The dynamics of natural Plasmodium falciparum infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Felger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural immunity to Plasmodium falciparum has been widely studied, but its effects on parasite dynamics are poorly understood. Acquisition and clearance rates of untreated infections are key elements of the dynamics of malaria, but estimating these parameters is challenging because of frequent super-infection and imperfect detectability of parasites. Consequently, information on effects of host immune status or age on infection dynamics is fragmentary. METHODS: An age-stratified cohort of 347 individuals from Northern Ghana was sampled six times at 2 month intervals. High-throughput capillary electrophoresis was used to genotype the msp-2 locus of all P. falciparum infections detected by PCR. Force of infection (FOI and duration were estimated for each age group using an immigration-death model that allows for imperfect detection of circulating parasites. RESULTS: Allowing for imperfect detection substantially increased estimates of FOI and duration. Effects of naturally acquired immunity on the FOI and duration would be reflected in age dependence in these indices, but in our cohort data FOI tended to increase with age in children. Persistence of individual parasite clones was characteristic of all age-groups. Duration peaked in 5-9 year old children (average duration 319 days, 95% confidence interval 318;320. CONCLUSIONS: The main age-dependence is on parasite densities, with only small age-variations in the FOI and persistence of infections. This supports the hypothesis that acquired immunity controls transmission mainly by limiting blood-stage parasite densities rather than changing rates of acquisition or clearance of infections.

  15. Serial measurement of neuron specific enolase improves prognostication in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia: A prospective study

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    Storm Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron specific enolase (NSE has repeatedly been evaluated for neurological prognostication in patients after cardiac arrest. However, it is unclear whether current guidelines for NSE cutoff levels also apply to cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Thus, we investigated the prognostic significance of absolute NSE levels and NSE kinetics in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Methods In a prospective study of 35 patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, NSE was measured daily for four days following admission. Outcome was assessed at ICU discharge using the CPC score. All patients received hypothermia treatment for 24 hours at 33°C with a surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Results The cutoff for absolute NSE levels in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 72 hours after cardiac arrest was 57 μg/l with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.82 (sensitivity 47%, specificity 100%. The cutoff level for NSE kinetics in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 was an absolute increase of 7.9 μg/l (AUC 0.78, sensitivity 63%, specificity 100% and a relative increase of 33.1% (AUC 0.803, sensitivity 67%, specificity 100% at 48 hours compared to admission. Conclusion In cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia, prognostication of unfavourable outcome by NSE kinetics between admission and 48 hours after resuscitation may be superior to prognostication by absolute NSE levels.

  16. [Distribution of nervous system-specific enolase (NSE) and S-100 protein in the gastrointestinal tract of congenital aganglionosis rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horisawa, M; Isiguro, Y; Ito, T; Kato, K

    1985-02-01

    Immunobiochemical and immunohistochemical studies were performed to find out changes in neural and glial components of the intestine in congenital aganglionosis rats. Nervous system-specific enolase (NSE) was used as a marker of the neural component. S-100 protein was used as a marker of the glial component. NSE and S-100 protein were quantitated by highly sensitive immunoassay. And distribution of NSE and S-100 protein of the intestine was studied by immunohistochemical methods in fetal rats of various gestational age. The results of our studies were followed; Significant decrease in NSE and S-100 protein was found in the aganglionic segment. Although there was no decrease in NSE, significant decrease in S-100 protein was found in the ganglionic segment just proximal to the aganglionic narrow segment. In the studies using rat embryos, NSE positive cells and S-100 protein positive cells were identified in the more caudal intestine with increasing gestational age. In addition, NSE positive cells appeared in the intestine few days earlier than S-100 protein positive cells did. In conclusion, our studies disclosed that there was abnormality of the glial component as well as the neural component in the intestine of Hirschsprung's disease.

  17. Admission plasma levels of the neuronal injury marker neuron-specific enolase are associated with mortality and delirium in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian J; Reilly, John P; Shashaty, Michael G S; Palakshappa, Jessica A; Wysoczanski, Alex; Dunn, Thomas G; Kazi, Altaf; Tommasini, Anna; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Schweickert, William D; Kolson, Dennis L; Christie, Jason D; Meyer, Nuala J

    2016-12-01

    Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) concentrations are prognostic following traumatic and anoxic brain injury and may provide a method to quantify neuronal injury in other populations. We determined the association of admission plasma NSE concentrations with mortality and delirium in critically ill septic patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of 124 patients from a larger sepsis cohort. Plasma NSE was measured in the earliest blood draw at intensive care unit admission. Primary outcomes were 30-day mortality and intensive care unit delirium determined by chart review. Sixty-one patients (49.2%) died within 30 days, and delirium developed in 34 (31.5%) of the 108 patients who survived at least 24 hours and were not persistently comatose. Each doubling of the NSE concentration was associated with a 7.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5-12.0, P= .003) increased risk of 30-day mortality and a 5.2% (95% CI 3.2-7.2, Pdelirium. An NSE concentration >12.5 μg/L was independently associated with a 23.3% (95% CI 6.7-39.9, P= .006) increased risk of 30-day mortality and a 29.3% (95% CI 8.8-49.8, P= .005) increased risk of delirium. Higher plasma NSE concentrations were associated with mortality and delirium in critically ill septic patients, suggesting that NSE may have utility as a marker of neuronal injury in sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutations in gfpt1 and skiv2l2 cause distinct stage-specific defects in larval melanocyte regeneration in zebrafish.

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    Chao-Tsung Yang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of a single cell type regeneration paradigm in the zebrafish provides an opportunity to investigate the genetic mechanisms specific to regeneration processes. We previously demonstrated that regeneration melanocytes arise from cell division of the otherwise quiescent melanocyte precursors following larval melanocyte ablation with a small molecule, MoTP. The ease of ablating melanocytes by MoTP allows us to conduct a forward genetic screen for mechanisms specific to regeneration from such precursors or stem cells. Here, we reported the identification of two mutants, eartha(j23e1 and julie(j24e1 from a melanocyte ablation screen. Both mutants develop normal larval melanocytes, but upon melanocyte ablation, each mutation results in a distinct stage-specific defect in melanocyte regeneration. Positional cloning reveals that the eartha(j23e1 mutation is a nonsense mutation in gfpt1 (glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in glucosamine-6-phosphate biosynthesis. Our analyses reveal that a mutation in gfpt1 specifically affects melanocyte differentiation (marked by melanin production at a late stage during regeneration and that gfpt1 acts cell autonomously in melanocytes to promote ontogenetic melanocyte darkening. We identified that the julie(j24e1 mutation is a splice-site mutation in skiv2l2 (superkiller viralicidic activity 2-like 2, a predicted DEAD-box RNA helicase. Our in situ analysis reveals that the mutation in skiv2l2 causes defects in cell proliferation, suggesting that skiv2l2 plays a role in regulating melanoblast proliferation during early stages of melanocyte regeneration. This finding is consistent with previously described role for cell division during larval melanocyte regeneration. The analyses of these mutants reveal their stage-specific roles in melanocyte regeneration. Interestingly, these mutants identify regeneration-specific functions not only in early stages of the

  19. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia

    2014-01-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated...

  20. Nbn and atm cooperate in a tissue and developmental stage-specific manner to prevent double strand breaks and apoptosis in developing brain and eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M G Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Nibrin (NBN or NBS1 and ATM are key factors for DNA Double Strand Break (DSB signaling and repair. Mutations in NBN or ATM result in Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome and Ataxia telangiectasia. These syndromes share common features such as radiosensitivity, neurological developmental defects and cancer predisposition. However, the functional synergy of Nbn and Atm in different tissues and developmental stages is not yet understood. Here, we show in vivo consequences of conditional inactivation of both genes in neural stem/progenitor cells using Nestin-Cre mice. Genetic inactivation of Atm in the central nervous system of Nbn-deficient mice led to reduced life span and increased DSBs, resulting in increased apoptosis during neural development. Surprisingly, the increase of DSBs and apoptosis was found only in few tissues including cerebellum, ganglionic eminences and lens. In sharp contrast, we showed that apoptosis associated with Nbn deletion was prevented by simultaneous inactivation of Atm in developing retina. Therefore, we propose that Nbn and Atm collaborate to prevent DSB accumulation and apoptosis during development in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific manner.

  1. Stage-Specific Changes in Physiological and Life-History Responses to Elevated Temperature and Pco2 during the Larval Development of the European Lobster Homarus gammarus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Daniel P; Calosi, Piero; Boothroyd, Dominic; Widdicombe, Steve; Spicer, John I

    2015-01-01

    An organism's physiological processes form the link between its life-history traits and the prevailing environmental conditions, especially in species with complex life cycles. Understanding how these processes respond to changing environmental conditions, thereby affecting organismal development, is critical if we are to predict the biological implications of current and future global climate change. However, much of our knowledge is derived from adults or single developmental stages. Consequently, we investigated the metabolic rate, organic content, carapace mineralization, growth, and survival across each larval stage of the European lobster Homarus gammarus, reared under current and predicted future ocean warming and acidification scenarios. Larvae exhibited stage-specific changes in the temperature sensitivity of their metabolic rate. Elevated Pco2 increased C∶N ratios and interacted with elevated temperature to affect carapace mineralization. These changes were linked to concomitant changes in survivorship and growth, from which it was concluded that bottlenecks were evident during H. gammarus larval development in stages I and IV, the transition phases between the embryonic and pelagic larval stages and between the larval and megalopa stages, respectively. We therefore suggest that natural changes in optimum temperature during ontogeny will be key to larvae survival in a future warmer ocean. The interactions of these natural changes with elevated temperature and Pco2 significantly alter physiological condition and body size of the last larval stage before the transition from a planktonic to a benthic life style. Thus, living and growing in warm, hypercapnic waters could compromise larval lobster growth, development, and recruitment.

  2. Linking Oxidative Stress and Magnitude of Compensatory Responses with Life-Stage Specific Differences in Sensitivity of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to Copper or Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Song; Doering, Jon A; Sun, Jianxian; Beitel, Shawn C; Shekh, Kamran; Patterson, Sarah; Crawford, Sarah; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B; Hecker, Markus

    2016-09-06

    Sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to copper (Cu) or cadmium (Cd) has been shown to significantly differ as a function of life-stage. This study investigated oxidative stress, metal homeostasis, and associated compensatory responses as potential mechanisms of this sensitivity pattern in three early life-stages. Sturgeon were most sensitive to Cu at 15 days post hatch (dph), which was accompanied by a significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO). Genes involved with amelioration of oxidative stress were significantly less inducible at this stage than in older, less sensitive fry. At 48 dph, acute lethality of sturgeon exposed to Cd was greatest and body LPO was significantly induced by 3.5-fold at 5 μg Cd/L. Moreover, there was a small but significant increase in antioxidative responses. At 139 dph, sturgeon were most tolerant to Cu and Cd and accumulation of these metals was least. Also, expression of metallothionein (MT) and apoptotic genes were greatest while expression of metal transporters was reduced and concentration of LPO was not different from controls. Our results suggest that life-stage specific sensitivity of white sturgeon to metals is complex, encompassing differences in the ability to mount compensatory responses important for metal homeostasis and combating oxidative stress and concomitant damages.

  3. Novel region within the V kappa gene promoter is responsible for tissue and stage-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes in human lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakowska, A E; Urbanski, S J

    1989-03-01

    Immunoglobulin gene-specific transacting factors have been shown to play a role in lymphoid tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes. The role of these factors in B-cell differentiation and stage-specific expression of these genes is, however, not fully understood. We have used a model of human lymphoid neoplasia to address this question. Different fragments of unrearranged human variable region of immunoglobulin kappa gene (V kappa) were used for cell-free in vitro transcription and DNA mobility shift assays. Previously described enhancement of in vitro transcription that was only seen with nuclear extracts derived from B-cell neoplasms corresponding to the late stages of B-cell differentiation was shown to be dependent on the actions of these factor(s) on the DNA region within the V kappa gene promoter. This region is located within the 920 bp fragment located 210 bp upstream from the coding region and this fragment represents a possible novel DNA region, which plays a role in the stage- and tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes.

  4. Stage-specific immunity to Taenia taeniaeformis infection in mice. A histological study of the course of infection in mice vaccinated with either oncosphere or metacestode antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøgh, H O; Lightowlers, M W; Sullivan, N D; Mitchell, G F; Rickard, M D

    1990-03-01

    The course of Taenia taeniaeformis infection in mice previously vaccinated with antigens prepared from either oncosphere (TtO) or metacestode (TtM) was followed by histological examination of livers from mice killed at various times post-infection (p.i.). Distinctly different immune responses occurred in the two groups. Very few cysts were seen at any stage of infection in TtO-vaccinated mice and most of those which were present appeared histologically similar to cysts in control mice. In TtM-vaccinated mice many cysts were present from early in infection but histologically it was apparent that most were dying from 15 days p.i. because the tegument had lost its integrity, and degranulated polymorphonuclear leucocytes were present inside the parasites. These findings support earlier suggestions that stage-specific antigens are expressed in oncospheres and metacestodes. Parasites developing normally were surrounded by a halo of alcian blue staining amorphous acellular material. This material appeared to act as a barrier to attack by host inflammatory cells, and disappearance of this layer signalled death of the parasite. The possibility that the gut acted as a barrier to delay migration of oncospheres to the liver in vaccinated mice was investigated, but no evidence for this could be found.

  5. High prevalence of drug-resistance mutations in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in southern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Schunk, Mirjam; Kumma, Wondimagegn P.; Barreto Miranda, Isabel; Maha E. Osman; Roewer, Susanne; Alano, Abraham; Loescher, Thomas; Bienzle, Ulrich; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2006-01-01

    Background: In Ethiopia, malaria is caused by both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Drug resistance of P. falciparum to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and chloroquine (CQ) is frequent and intense in some areas. Methods: In 100 patients with uncomplicated malaria from Dilla, southern Ethiopia, P. falciparum dhfr and dhps mutations as well as P. vivax dhfr polymorphisms associated with resistance to SP and P. falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr1 mutations conferring CQ resistance were assesse...

  6. Transportproteiner som drug-targets hos Plasmodium falciparum. Nye perspektiver i behandlingen af malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekvist, Peter; Colding, Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, infects and replicates in human erythrocytes. Through the use of substrate-specific transport proteins, P. falciparum takes up nutrients from the erythrocyte's cytoplasm. The sequencing and publishing of the P. falciparum genome have made it possible...

  7. Oleic acid biosynthesis in Plasmodium falciparum: characterization of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase and investigation as a potential therapeutic target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gratraud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum parasitization of erythrocytes causes a substantial increase in the levels of intracellular fatty acids, notably oleic acid. How parasites acquire this monounsaturated fatty acid has remained enigmatic. Here, we report on the biochemical and enzymatic characterization of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD in P. falciparum. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Metabolic labeling experiments allowed us to demonstrate the production of oleic acid from stearic acid both in lysates of parasites incubated with [(14C]-stearoyl-CoA and in parasite-infected erythrocytes labeled with [(14C]-stearic acid. Optimal SCD activity was detected in schizonts, the stage of maximal membrane synthesis. This activity correlated with a late trophozoite stage-specific induction of PFE0555w transcripts. PFE0555w harbors a typical SCD signature. Similar to mammalian SCDs, this protein was found to be associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, as determined with PFE0555w-GFP tagged transgenic P. falciparum. Importantly, these parasites exhibited increased rates of stearic to oleic acid conversion, providing additional evidence that PFE0555w encodes the plasmodial SCD (PfSCD. These findings prompted us to assess the activity of sterculic acid analogues, known to be specific Delta9-desaturase inhibitors. Methyl sterculate inhibited the synthesis of oleic acid both with parasite lysates and infected erythrocytes, most likely by targeting PfSCD. This compound exhibited significant, rapid and irreversible antimalarial activity against asexual blood stages. This parasiticidal effect was antagonized by oleic acid. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provides evidence that parasite-mediated fatty acid modification is important for blood-stage survival and provides a new strategy to develop a novel antimalarial therapeutic based on the inhibition of PfSCD.

  8. Exploring the folate pathway in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, John E

    2005-06-01

    As in centuries past, the main weapon against human malaria infections continues to be intervention with drugs, despite the widespread and increasing frequency of parasite populations that are resistant to one or more of the available compounds. This is a particular problem with the lethal species of parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, which claims some two million lives per year as well as causing enormous social and economic problems. Amongst the antimalarial drugs currently in clinical use, the antifolates have the best defined molecular targets, namely the enzymes dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), which function in the folate metabolic pathway. The products of this pathway, reduced folate cofactors, are essential for DNA synthesis and the metabolism of certain amino acids. Moreover, their formation and interconversions involve a number of other enzymes that have not as yet been exploited as drug targets. Antifolates are of major importance as they currently represent the only inexpensive regime for combating chloroquine-resistant malaria, and are now first-line drugs in a number of African countries. Aspects of our understanding of this pathway and antifolate drug resistance are reviewed here, with a particular emphasis on approaches to analysing the details of, and balance between, folate biosynthesis by the parasite and salvage of pre-formed folate from exogenous sources.

  9. New synchronization method for Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwangi Jonathan M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum is usually asynchronous during in vitro culture. Although various synchronization methods are available, they are not able to narrow the range of ages of parasites. A newly developed method is described that allows synchronization of parasites to produce cultures with an age range as low as 30 minutes. Methods Trophozoites and schizonts are enriched using Plasmion. The enriched late stage parasites are immobilized as a monolayer onto plastic Petri dishes using concanavalin A. Uninfected erythrocytes are placed onto the monolayer for a limited time period, during which time schizonts on the monolayer rupture and the released merozoites invade the fresh erythrocytes. The overlay is then taken off into a culture flask, resulting in a highly synchronized population of parasites. Results Plasmion treatment results in a 10- to 13-fold enrichment of late stage parasites. The monolayer method results in highly synchronized cultures of parasites where invasion has occurred within a very limited time window, which can be as low as 30 minutes. The method is simple, requiring no specialized equipment and relatively cheap reagents. Conclusions The new method for parasite synchronization results in highly synchronized populations of parasites, which will be useful for studies of the parasite asexual cell cycle.

  10. Artesunate-induced hemoglobinuria in falciparum malaria

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    Avik Karak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old male got admitted with fever of 103°F with chills and rigor for 6 days. He was diagnosed with Plasmodium falciparum infection by peripheral blood smear examination, later confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis. Blood smear showed 2% parasitemia. As the patient was hypotensive, intravenous artesunate was started. Two days later, he reported passing "Coca-Cola"-colored urine. Examination revealed tachycardia, anemia, and mild icterus. Serum free hemoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase was elevated whereas haptoglobin was very low. Urine showed the presence of hemoglobin without red blood cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay was normal. Chloroquine, primaquine, and quinine levels in blood were undetectable. There was no evidence of any coinfection. Artesunate was stopped suspecting a causal relationship. Intravenous quinine was started. The urine showed progressive clearance over 3 days, and the patient recovered. The strong temporal association of initiating artesunate and occurrence of hemoglobinuria suggested the possible etiological implication which is not documented before.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum secretome in erythrocyte and beyond

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    Rani eSoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of deadly malaria disease. It is an intracellular eukaryote and completes its multi-stage life cycle spanning the two hosts viz, mosquito and human. In order to habituate within host environment, parasite conform several strategies to evade host immune responses such as surface antigen polymorphism or modulation of host immune system and it is mediated by secretion of proteins from parasite to the host erythrocyte and beyond, collectively known as, malaria secretome. In this review, we will discuss about the deployment of parasitic secretory protein in mechanism implicated for immune evasion, protein trafficking, providing virulence, changing permeability and cyto-adherence of infected erythrocyte. We will be covering the possibilities of developing malaria secretome as a drug/vaccine target. This gathered information will be worthwhile in depicting a well-organized picture for host-pathogen interplay during the malaria infection and may also provide some clues for development of novel anti-malarial therapies.

  12. Overexpression and cosuppression of xylem-related genes in an early xylem differentiation stage-specific manner by the AtTED4 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Kuninori; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2017-06-30

    Tissue-specific overexpression of useful genes, which we can design according to their cause-and-effect relationships, often gives valuable gain-of-function phenotypes. To develop genetic tools in woody biomass engineering, we produced a collection of Arabidopsis lines that possess chimeric genes of a promoter of an early xylem differentiation stage-specific gene, Arabidopsis Tracheary Element Differentiation-related 4 (AtTED4) and late xylem development-associated genes, many of which are uncharacterized. The AtTED4 promoter directed the expected expression of transgenes in developing vascular tissues from young to mature stage. Of T2 lines examined, 42%, 49% and 9% were judged as lines with the nonrepeat type insertion, the simple repeat type insertion and the other repeat type insertion of transgenes. In 174 T3 lines, overexpression lines were confirmed for 37 genes, whereas only cosuppression lines were produced for eight genes. The AtTED4 promoter activity was high enough to overexpress a wide range of genes over wild-type expression levels, even though the wild-type expression is much higher than AtTED4 expression for several genes. As a typical example, we investigated phenotypes of pAtTED4::At5g60490 plants, in which both overexpression and cosuppression lines were included. Overexpression but not cosuppression lines showed accelerated xylem development, suggesting the positive role of At5g60490 in xylem development. Taken together, this study provides valuable results about behaviours of various genes expressed under an early xylem-specific promoter and about usefulness of their lines as genetic tools in woody biomass engineering. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. MKP1-dependent PTH modulation of bone matrix mineralization in female mice is osteoblast maturation stage specific and involves P-ERK and P-p38 MAPKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Chandrika D; Sampathi, Bharat Reddy; Sharma, Sonali; Datta, Tanuka; Das, Varsha; Abou-Samra, Abdul B; Datta, Nabanita S

    2013-03-01

    Limited information is available on the role of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP1) signaling in osteoblasts. We have recently reported distinct roles for MKP1 during osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, and skeletal responsiveness to parathyroid hormone (PTH). As MKP1 regulates the phosphorylation status of MAPKs, we investigated the involvement of P-ERK and P-p38 MAPKs in MKP1 knockout (KO) early and mature osteoblasts with respect to mineralization and PTH response. Calvarial osteoblasts from 9-14-week-old WT and MKP1 KO male and female mice were examined. Western blot analysis revealed downregulation and sustained expressions of P-ERK and P-p38 with PTH treatment in differentiated osteoblasts derived from KO males and females respectively. Exposure of early osteoblasts to p38 inhibitor, SB203580 (S), markedly inhibited mineralization in WT and KO osteoblasts from both genders as determined by von Kossa assay. In osteoblasts from males, ERK inhibitor U0126 (U), not p38 inhibitor (S), prevented the inhibitory effects of PTH on mineralization in early or mature osteoblasts. In osteoblasts from KO females, PTH sustained mineralization in early osteoblasts and decreased mineralization in mature cells. This effect of PTH was attenuated by S in early osteoblasts and by U in mature KO cells. Changes in matrix Gla protein expression with PTH in KO osteoblasts did not correlate with mineralization, indicative of MKP1-dependent additional mechanisms essential for PTH action on osteoblast mineralization. We conclude that PTH regulation of osteoblast mineralization in female mice is maturation stage specific and involves MKP1 modulation of P-ERK and P-p38 MAPKs.

  14. In Vitro Differentiation of Insulin Secreting Cells from Mouse Bone Marrow Derived Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 1 Positive Stem Cells

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    Morteza Abouzaripour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bone marrow has recently been recognized as a novel source of stem cells for the treatment of wide range of diseases. A number of studies on murine bone marrow have shown a homogenous population of rare stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA-1 positive cells that express markers of pluripotent stem cells. This study focuses on SSEA-1 positive cells isolated from murine bone marrow in an attempt to differentiate them into insulin-secreting cells (ISCs in order to investigate their differentiation potential for future use in cell therapy. Materials and Methods: This study is an experimental research. Mouse SSEA-1 positive cells were isolated by Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS followed by characterization with flow cytometry. Induced SSEA-1 positive cells were differentiated into ISCs with specific differentiation media. In order to evaluate differentiation quality and analysis, dithizone (DTZ staining was use, followed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and insulin secretion assay. Statistical results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: The results achieved in this study reveal that mouse bone marrow contains a population of SSEA-1 positive cells that expresses pluripotent stem cells markers such as SSEA-1, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4 detected by immunocytochemistry and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4 and stem cell antigen-1 (SCA-1 detected by flow cytometric analysis. SSEA-1 positive cells can differentiate into ISCs cell clusters as evidenced by their DTZ positive staining and expression of genes such as Pdx1 (pancreatic transcription factors, Ngn3 (endocrine progenitor marker, Insulin1 and Insulin2 (pancreaticβ-cell markers. Additionally, our results demonstrate expression of PDX1 and GLUT2 protein and insulin secretion in response to a glucose challenge in the differentiated cells. Conclusion: Our study clearly demonstrates the potential of SSEA-1

  15. Expression of stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) defines spontaneous loss of epithelial phenotype in human solid tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramaniyan, Kavitha; Harichandan, Abhishek; Schilbach, Karin; Mack, Andreas F; Bedke, Jens; Stenzl, Arnulf; Kanz, Lothar; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Bühring, Hans-Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) is a glycosphingolipid, which is overexpressed in some cancers and has been linked to disease progression. However, little is known about the functions of SSEA-4 and the characteristics of SSEA-4 expressing tumor cells. Our studies identified SSEA-4 expression on a subpopulation of cells in many solid tumor cell lines but not in leukemic cell lines. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting-sorted SSEA-4(+) prostate cancer cells formed fibroblast-like colonies with limited cell-cell contacts, whereas SSEA-4(-) cells formed cobblestone-like epithelial colonies. Only colonies derived from SSEA-4(+) cells were enriched for pluripotent embryonic stem cell markers. Moreover, major epithelial cell-associated markers Claudin-7, E-cadherin, ESRP1 and GRHL2 were down-regulated in the SSEA-4(+) fraction of DU145 and HCT-116 cells. Similar to cell lines, SSEA-4(+) primary prostate tumor cells also showed down-regulation of epithelial cell-associated markers. In addition, they showed up-regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, SSEA-4(+) cells escape from adhesive colonies spontaneously and form invadopodia-like migratory structures, in which SSEA-4, cortactin as well as active pPI3K, pAkt and pSrc are enriched and colocalized. Finally, SSEA-4(+) cells displayed strong tumorigenic ability and stable knockdown of SSEA-4 synthesis resulted in decreased cellular adhesion to different extracellular matrices. In conclusion, we introduce SSEA-4 as a novel marker to identify heterogeneous, invasive subpopulations of tumor cells. Moreover, increased cell-surface SSEA-4 expression is associated with the loss of cell-cell interactions and the gain of a migratory phenotype, suggesting an important role of SSEA-4 in cancer invasion by influencing cellular adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

  16. Cytological and transcriptional dynamics analysis of host plant revealed stage-specific biological processes related to compatible rice-Ustilaginoidea virens interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinquan Chao

    Full Text Available Rice false smut, a fungal disease caused by Ustilaginoidea virens is becoming a severe detriment to rice production worldwide. However, little is known about the molecular response of rice to attacks by the smut pathogen. In this article, we define the initial infection process as having three stages: initial colonization on the pistil (stage 1, S1, amplification on the anther (stage 2, S2 and sporulation in the anther chambers (stage 3, S3. Based on the transcriptome of rice hosts in response to U. virens in two separate years, we identified 126, 204, and 580 specific regulated genes in their respective stages S1, S2, and S3, respectively, by excluding common expression patterns in other openly biotic/abiotic databases using bioinformatics. As the disease progresses, several stage-specific biological processes (BP terms were distinctively enriched: "Phosphorylation" in stage S1, "PCD" in S2, and "Cell wall biogenesis" in S3, implying a concise signal cascade indicative of the tactics that smut pathogens use to control host rice cells during infection. 113 regulated genes were coexpressed among the three stages. They shared highly conserved promoter cis-element in the promoters in response to the regulation of WRKY and Myb for up-regulation, and ABA and Ca2+ for down regulation, indicating their potentially critical roles in signal transduction during rice-U. virens interaction. We further analyzed seven highly regulated unique genes; four were specific to pollen development, implying that pollen-related genes play critical roles in the establishment of rice susceptibility to U. virens. To my knowledge, this is the first report about probing of molecular response of rice to smut pathogen infection, which will greatly expand our understanding of the molecular events surrounding infection by rice false smut.

  17. Plasma autoantibodies against heat shock protein 70, enolase 1 and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 as potential biomarkers for cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucksak Rucksaken

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA is often challenging, leading to poor prognosis. CCA arises via chronic inflammation which may be associated with autoantibodies production. This study aims to identify IgG antibodies directed at self-proteins and tumor-associated antigens. Proteins derived from immortalized cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1 and CCA cell lines (M055, M214 and M139 were separated using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and incubated with pooled plasma of patients with CCA and non-neoplastic controls by immunoblotting. Twenty five immunoreactive spots against all cell lines-derived proteins were observed on stained gels and studied by LC-MS/MS. Among these, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, enolase 1 (ENO1 and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 (RNH1 obtained the highest matching scores and were thus selected for further validation. Western blot revealed immunoreactivity against HSP70 and RNH1 in the majority of CCA cases and weakly in healthy individuals. Further, ELISA showed that plasma HSP70 autoantibody level in CCA was significantly capable to discriminate CCA from healthy individuals with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9158 (cut-off 0.2630, 93.55% sensitivity and 73.91% specificity. Plasma levels of IgG autoantibodies against HSP70 were correlated with progression from healthy individuals to cholangitis to CCA (r = 0.679, P<0.001. In addition, circulating ENO1 and RNH1 autoantibodies levels were also significantly higher in cholangitis and CCA compared to healthy controls (P<0.05. Moreover, the combinations of HSP70, ENO1 or RNH1 autoantibodies positivity rates improved specificity to over 78%. In conclusion, plasma IgG autoantibodies against HSP70, ENO1 and RNH1 may represent new diagnostic markers for CCA.

  18. Herpesvirus-mediated gene delivery into the rat brain: specificity and efficiency of the neuron-specific enolase promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J K; Frim, D M; Isacson, O; Breakefield, X O

    1993-10-01

    1. Herpesvirus infection with genetically engineered vectors is a way to deliver foreign gene products to various cell populations in culture and in vivo. Selective neuronal gene expression can be achieved using the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter regulating expression of a transgene placed in and delivered by a herpesvirus vector. 2. We sought to determine the anatomical specificity and efficiency of herpesvirus-mediated gene transfer into the rat brain following placement of virus particles carrying a transgene (lacZ) under control of the NSE promoter. The virus utilized was thymidine kinase (TK) deficient and therefore replication deficient in the brain. 3. Infusion of 10(6) plaque-forming units of virus into the striatum caused a limited number of striatal neurons to express the lacZ transgene mRNA and protein product 7 days postinfection. In addition, small numbers of neurons expressing the transgene mRNA and protein were found ipsilateral to the viral injection in the frontal cortex, substantia nigra pars compacta, and thalamus. Neurons at these anatomic loci project directly to the striatal injection site. No other cells within the brains of injected animals expressed the lacZ gene. 4. While this herpesvirus NSE vector was capable of introducing novel functional genetic information into postmitotic neurons within defined neuroanatomic constraints, the numbers of neurons expressing detectable levels of beta-galactosidase was minimal. The calculated efficiency of delivery and transgene expression at 7 days postinfection was 1 transgenic neuron per 10(4) virus particles infused. 5. We conclude that NSE probably is not an optimal promoter for use in gene delivery to CNS neurons in herpesvirus vectors and that the efficacy of gene delivery using other neuron-specific promoters placed at various sites in the herpes viral genome needs to be explored.

  19. Plasma Autoantibodies against Heat Shock Protein 70, Enolase 1 and Ribonuclease/Angiogenin Inhibitor 1 as Potential Biomarkers for Cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucksaken, Rucksak; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Pinlaor, Porntip; Khuntikeo, Narong; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Selmi, Carlo; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is often challenging, leading to poor prognosis. CCA arises via chronic inflammation which may be associated with autoantibodies production. This study aims to identify IgG antibodies directed at self-proteins and tumor-associated antigens. Proteins derived from immortalized cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1) and CCA cell lines (M055, M214 and M139) were separated using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and incubated with pooled plasma of patients with CCA and non-neoplastic controls by immunoblotting. Twenty five immunoreactive spots against all cell lines-derived proteins were observed on stained gels and studied by LC-MS/MS. Among these, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), enolase 1 (ENO1) and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 (RNH1) obtained the highest matching scores and were thus selected for further validation. Western blot revealed immunoreactivity against HSP70 and RNH1 in the majority of CCA cases and weakly in healthy individuals. Further, ELISA showed that plasma HSP70 autoantibody level in CCA was significantly capable to discriminate CCA from healthy individuals with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9158 (cut-off 0.2630, 93.55% sensitivity and 73.91% specificity). Plasma levels of IgG autoantibodies against HSP70 were correlated with progression from healthy individuals to cholangitis to CCA (r = 0.679, P<0.001). In addition, circulating ENO1 and RNH1 autoantibodies levels were also significantly higher in cholangitis and CCA compared to healthy controls (P<0.05). Moreover, the combinations of HSP70, ENO1 or RNH1 autoantibodies positivity rates improved specificity to over 78%. In conclusion, plasma IgG autoantibodies against HSP70, ENO1 and RNH1 may represent new diagnostic markers for CCA. PMID:25058392

  20. Complement activation in Ghanaian children with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helegbe, Gideon K; Goka, Bamenla Q; Kurtzhals, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe anaemia (SA), intravascular haemolysis (IVH) and respiratory distress (RD) are severe forms of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, with RD reported to be of prognostic importance in African children with malarial anaemia. Complement factors have been implicated in the mechanism......55)] in children with discrete clinical forms of P. falciparum malaria. The relationship between the findings and clinical parameters including coma, haemoglobin (Hb) levels and RD were investigated. RESULTS: Of the 484 samples tested, 131(27%) were positive in DCT, out of which 115/131 (87.8%) were...... falciparum malaria, possibly through induction of erythrophagocytosis and haemolysis. In contrast to other studies, this study did not find association between levels of the complement...

  1. Plasmodium falciparum: growth response to potassium channel blocking compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Karena L; Kim, Kami; McDonald, Thomas V

    2008-11-01

    Potassium channels are essential for cell survival and regulate the cell membrane potential and electrochemical gradient. During its lifecycle, Plasmodium falciparum parasites must rapidly adapt to dramatically variant ionic conditions within the mosquito mid-gut, the hepatocyte and red blood cell (RBC) cytosols, and the human circulatory system. To probe the participation of K(+) channels in parasite viability, growth response assays were performed in which asexual stage P. falciparum parasites were cultured in the presence of various Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. These data describe the novel anti-malarial effects of bicuculline methiodide and tubocurarine chloride and the novel lack of effect of apamine and verruculogen. Taken together, the data herein imply the presence of K(+) channels, or other parasite-specific targets, in P. falciparum-infected RBCs that are sensitive to blockade with Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds.

  2. [Research Progress on Artemisinin Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-long; Pan, Wei-qing

    2015-12-01

    Artemisinin (ART) is a novel and effective antimalarial drug discovered in China. As recommended by the World Health Organization, the ART-based combination therapies (ACTs) have become the first-line drugs for the treatment of falciparum malaria. ART and its derivatives have contributed greatly to the effective control of malaria globally, leading to yearly decrease of malaria morbidity and mortality. However, there have recently been several reports on the resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to ART in Southeast Asia. This is deemed a serious threat to the global malaria control programs. In this paper, we reviewed recent research progress on ART resistance to P. falciparum, including new tools for resistance measurement, resistance-associated molecular markers, and the origin and spread of the ART-resistant parasite strains.

  3. Loss of cellular immune reactivity during acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Theander, T G; Abu-Zeid, Y A;

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen patients suffering from acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria were studied. All were residents of an area of unstable malaria-transmission in Eastern Sudan. Blood-samples were drawn at diagnosis, and 7 and 30 days later. Blood-samples from thirteen donors, drawn outside the malaria...... convalescence. Five donors examined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) showed no increase in surface expression of IL-2 receptor on peripheral lymphocytes. The data indicate that acute P. falciparum malaria causes a depletion of antigen-reactive T-cells from the peripheral circulation, probably due...

  4. [Erythrocytes infected by Plasmodium falciparum activate human platelets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, B; Peyron, F; Sheick Zadiuddin, I; Kolodié, L; Ambroise-Thomas, P

    1990-01-01

    Blood platelets are involved in Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathology as shown by thrombocytopenia and increased plasma level of two alpha granule proteins: beta thromboglobulin (beta TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF4). In this study we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum parasitized erythrocytes activate directly the secretion of beta TG and PF4 by human platelets. This secretion is related to parasitemia and occurs immediately after contact. Treatment of parasited erythrocytes by trypsin and diffusion chamber experiments suggest that platelet activation is triggered by parasitic substances shed on erythrocyte membrane and released in the culture medium.

  5. Soluble haemoglobin is a marker of recent Plasmodium falciparum infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Bygbjerg, I C; Theander, T G;

    1997-01-01

    . falciparum malaria compared to the levels during acute disease. Thus, both soluble Hb and haptoglobin appear to be markers of recent P. falciparum infections. Very high levels of CRP protein were measured in some of the malaria patients at the day of treatment while lower levels were recorded 7 and 30 days...... after treatment. Soluble Hb levels were associated with malariometric parameters in a similar fashion to haptoglobin. The new Mab-based assay for measuring soluble Hb in the peripheral blood of malaria patients may be useful for future epidemiological studies of malaria....

  6. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, D; Reddy, G R; Dame, J B; Almira, E C; Laipis, P J; Ferl, R J; Yang, T P; Rowe, T C; Schuster, S M

    1994-07-01

    An initiative was undertaken to sequence all genes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in an effort to gain a better understanding at the molecular level of the parasite that inflicts much suffering in the developing world. 550 random complimentary DNA clones were partially sequenced from the intraerythrocytic form of the parasite as one of the approaches to analyze the transcribed sequences of its genome. The sequences, after editing, generated 389 expressed sequence tag sites and over 105 kb of DNA sequences. About 32% of these clones showed significant homology with other genes in the database. These clones represent 340 new Plasmodium falciparum expressed sequence tags.

  7. Loss of cellular immune reactivity during acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Theander, T G; Abu-Zeid, Y A

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen patients suffering from acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria were studied. All were residents of an area of unstable malaria-transmission in Eastern Sudan. Blood-samples were drawn at diagnosis, and 7 and 30 days later. Blood-samples from thirteen donors, drawn outside the malaria...... convalescence. Five donors examined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) showed no increase in surface expression of IL-2 receptor on peripheral lymphocytes. The data indicate that acute P. falciparum malaria causes a depletion of antigen-reactive T-cells from the peripheral circulation, probably due...

  8. Naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2005-01-01

    protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria is acquired following natural exposure to the parasites is beginning to emerge, not least thanks to studies that have combined clinical and epidemiological data with basic immunological research. This framework involves IgG with specificity for clonally variant......Infection by Plasmodium falciparum parasites can lead to substantial protective immunity to malaria, and available evidence suggest that acquisition of protection against some severe malaria syndromes can be fairly rapid. Although these facts have raised hopes that the development of effective...

  9. Sharing of antigens between Plasmodium falciparum and Anopheles albimanus Antígenos compartidos entre Plasmodium falciparum y Anopheles albimanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Wide

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of common antigens between Plasmodium falciparum and Anopheles albimanus was demonstrated. Different groups of rabbits were immunized with: crude extract from female An. albimanus (EAaF, red blood cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum (EPfs, and the SPf66 synthetic malaria vaccine. The rabbit's polyclonal antibodies were evaluated by ELISA, Multiple Antigen Blot Assay (MABA, and immunoblotting. All extracts were immunogenic in rabbits according to these three techniques, when they were evaluated against the homologous antigens. Ten molecules were identified in female mosquitoes and also in P. falciparum antigens by the autologous sera. The electrophoretic pattern by SDS-PAGE was different for the three antigens evaluated. Cross-reactions between An. albimanus and P. falciparum were found by ELISA, MABA, and immunoblotting. Anti-P. falciparum and anti-SPf66 antibodies recognized ten and five components in the EAaF crude extract, respectively. Likewise, immune sera against female An. albimanus identified four molecules in the P. falciparum extract antigen. As far as we know, this is the first work that demonstrates shared antigens between anophelines and malaria parasites. This finding could be useful for diagnosis, vaccines, and the study of physiology of the immune response to malaria.Epítopes de antígenos compartidos entre Plasmodium falciparum y Anopheles albimanus fueron identificados. Diferentes grupos de conejos fueron inmunizados con: extracto crudo de mosquito hembra de An. albimanus (EAaH, glóbulos rojos infectados con P. falciparum (EPfs y la vacuna antimalárica sintética SPf66. Los anticuerpos policlonales producidos en conejos fueron evaluados por ELISA, inmunoensayo simultáneo de múltiples antígenos (MABA e Immunoblotting. Todos los extractos resultaron inmunogénicos cuando se evaluaron por ELISA, MABA e Immunoblotting. Diez moléculas fueron identificadas en los mosquitos hembras y diez en los antígenos de

  10. Non-falciparum malaria infections in pregnant women in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, John; Njie, Fanta; Cairns, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-Plasmodium falciparum malaria infections are found in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa but little is known about their importance in pregnancy. METHODS: Blood samples were collected at first antenatal clinic attendance from 2526 women enrolled in a trial of intermittent screening...... for a non-falciparum malaria infection were investigated and the influence of these infections on the outcome of pregnancy was determined. RESULTS: P. falciparum infection was detected frequently (overall prevalence by PCR: 38.8 %, [95 % CI 37.0, 40.8]), with a prevalence ranging from 10.8 % in The Gambia...... to 56.1 % in Ghana. Non-falciparum malaria infections were found only rarely (overall prevalence 1.39 % [95 % CI 1.00, 1.92]), ranging from 0.17 % in the Gambia to 3.81 % in Mali. Ten non-falciparum mono-infections and 25 mixed falciparum and non-falciparum infections were found. P. malariae...

  11. 凡纳滨对虾新过敏原烯醇化酶的鉴定%Identification of a new shrimp allergen enolase from Litopenaeus vannamei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈思怡; 黄建芳; 孙一帆; 郭成斌; 向军俭

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To identify enolase,47 kD allergen,from Litopenaeus vannamei by Mass spectrometry. Methods: The proteins were extracted from Litopenaeus vannamei tissue with acetone precipitation method. The protein components were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. By using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization time of flight mass spectrometry ( MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) ,the 47 kD allergen from Litopenaeus vannamei was identified as enolase. Results:By SDS-PAGE,we proved that the native protein components from Litopenaeus vannamei were completely. According to the Western blot result more than 14 components could react with the positive serum. MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis results showed that the suspected proteins were enolase. A sensitization frequency was 55%. Conclusion:Enolase was identified as a new allergen of Litopenaeus vannamei.%目的:鉴定凡纳滨对虾分子量为47 kD过敏原的性质。方法:采用丙酮沉淀法提取凡纳滨对虾总蛋白,通过SDS-PAGE、11例虾过敏患者血清IgE的Western blot 分析凡纳滨对虾中过敏原组份,运用基质辅助激光解析串联飞行时间质谱仪( Matrix-Assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry,MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS)鉴定凡纳滨对虾47 kD未知过敏原组分。结果:通过 SDS-PAGE电泳证明所提取的凡纳滨对虾总蛋白组分完全。 Western blot 结果显示,凡纳滨对虾至少有14种与阳性血清反应的组分,其中,55%的虾过敏患者IgE与分子量为47 kD的蛋白分子发生特异性反应,质谱分析结果显示47 kD蛋白为烯醇化酶。结论:烯醇化酶是凡纳滨对虾的一种新的过敏原。

  12. A cross strain Plasmodium falciparum microarray optimized for the transcriptome analysis of Plasmodium falciparum patient derived isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar

    2016-07-20

    Malarial parasite P. falciparum, an apicomplexan protozoan has a 23.3 MB nuclear genome and encodes ~ 5600 transcripts. The genetic diversity of the parasite within and across geographical zones is a challenge to gene expression studies which are essential for understanding of disease process, outcome and developing markers for diagnostics and prognostics. Here, we describe the strategy involved in designing a custom P. falciparum 15K array using the Agilent platform and Genotypic\\'s Right Design methodology to study the transcriptome of Indian field isolates for which genome sequence information is limited. The array contains probes representing genome sequences of two distinct geographical isolates (i.e. 3D7 and HB3) and sub-telomeric var gene sequences of a third isolate (IT4) known to adhere in culture condition. Probes in the array have been selected based on their efficiency to detect transcripts through a 244K array experimentation. Array performance for the 15K array, was evaluated and validated using RNA materials from P. falciparum clinical isolates. A large percentage (91%) of the represented transcripts was detected from Indian P. falciparum patient isolates. Replicated probes and multiple probes representing the same gene showed perfect correlation between them suggesting good probe performance. Additional transcripts could be detected due to inclusion of unique probes representing HB3 strain transcripts. Variant surface antigen (VSA) transcripts were detected by optimized probes representing the VSA genes of three geographically distinct strains. The 15K cross strain P. falciparum array has shown good efficiency in detecting transcripts from P. falciparum parasite samples isolated from patients. The low parasite loads and presence of host RNA makes arrays a preferred platform for gene expression studies over RNA-Seq.

  13. Artemisinin-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhurst, Rick M; Dondorp, Arjen M

    2016-06-01

    For more than five decades, Southeast Asia (SEA) has been fertile ground for the emergence of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. After generating parasites resistant to chloroquine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, quinine, and mefloquine, this region has now spawned parasites resistant to artemisinins, the world's most potent antimalarial drugs. In areas where artemisinin resistance is prevalent, artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs)-the first-line treatments for malaria-are failing fast. This worrisome development threatens to make malaria practically untreatable in SEA, and threatens to compromise global endeavors to eliminate this disease. A recent series of clinical, in vitro, genomics, and transcriptomics studies in SEA have defined in vivo and in vitro phenotypes of artemisinin resistance, identified its causal genetic determinant, explored its molecular mechanism, and assessed its clinical impact. Specifically, these studies have established that artemisinin resistance manifests as slow parasite clearance in patients and increased survival of early-ring-stage parasites in vitro; is caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms in the parasite's K13 gene, is associated with an upregulated "unfolded protein response" pathway that may antagonize the pro-oxidant activity of artemisinins, and selects for partner drug resistance that rapidly leads to ACT failures. In SEA, clinical studies are urgently needed to monitor ACT efficacy where K13 mutations are prevalent, test whether new combinations of currently available drugs cure ACT failures, and advance new antimalarial compounds through preclinical pipelines and into clinical trials. Intensifying these efforts should help to forestall the spread of artemisinin and partner drug resistance from SEA to sub-Saharan Africa, where the world's malaria transmission, morbidity, and mortality rates are highest.

  14. Unique properties of Plasmodium falciparum porphobilinogen deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan Arun; Arumugam, Rajavel; Gopalakrishnan, Bulusu; Jyothsna, Yeleswarapu Sri; Rangarajan, Pundi N; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2008-01-04

    The hybrid pathway for heme biosynthesis in the malarial parasite proposes the involvement of parasite genome-coded enzymes of the pathway localized in different compartments such as apicoplast, mitochondria, and cytosol. However, knowledge on the functionality and localization of many of these enzymes is not available. In this study, we demonstrate that porphobilinogen deaminase encoded by the Plasmodium falciparum genome (PfPBGD) has several unique biochemical properties. Studies carried out with PfPBGD partially purified from parasite membrane fraction, as well as recombinant PfPBGD lacking N-terminal 64 amino acids expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells (DeltaPfPBGD), indicate that both the proteins are catalytically active. Surprisingly, PfPBGD catalyzes the conversion of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen III (UROGEN III), indicating that it also possesses uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) activity, catalyzing the next step. This obviates the necessity to have a separate gene for UROS that has not been so far annotated in the parasite genome. Interestingly, DeltaPfP-BGD gives rise to UROGEN III even after heat treatment, although UROS from other sources is known to be heat-sensitive. Based on the analysis of active site residues, a DeltaPfPBGDL116K mutant enzyme was created and the specific activity of this recombinant mutant enzyme is 5-fold higher than DeltaPfPBGD. More interestingly, DeltaPfPBGDL116K catalyzes the formation of uroporphyrinogen I (UROGEN I) in addition to UROGEN III, indicating that with increased PBGD activity the UROS activity of PBGD may perhaps become rate-limiting, thus leading to non-enzymatic cyclization of preuroporphyrinogen to UROGEN I. PfPBGD is localized to the apicoplast and is catalytically very inefficient compared with the host red cell enzyme.

  15. The prognostic value of serum neuron-specific enolase in traumatic brain injury: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested that neuron-specific enolase (NSE in serum may be a biomarker of traumatic brain injury. However, whether serum NSE levels correlate with outcomes remains unclear. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the prognostic value of serum NSE protein after traumatic brain injury. METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched for relevant studies published up to October 2013. Full-text publications on the relationship of NSE to TBI were included if the studies concerned patients with closed head injury, NSE levels in serum after injury, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS or Extended GOS (GOSE scores or mortality. Study design, inclusion criteria, assay, blood sample collection time, NSE cutoff, sensitivity and specificity of NSE for mortality prediction (if sufficient information was provided to calculate these values, and main outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: Sixteen studies were eligible for the current meta-analysis. In the six studies comparing NSE concentrations between TBI patients who died and those who survived, NSE concentrations correlated with mortality (M.D. 0.28, 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.21 to 0.34; I2 55%. In the eight studies evaluating GOS or GOSE, patients with unfavorable outcomes had significantly higher NSE concentrations than those with favorable outcomes (M.D. 0.24, 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.31; I2 64%. From the studies providing sufficient data, the pooled sensitivity and specificity for mortality were 0.79 and 0.50, and 0.72 and 0.66 for unfavorable neurological prognosis, respectively. The areas under the SROC curve (AUC of NSE concentrations were 0.73 (95% CI, 0.66-0.80 for unfavorable outcome and 0.76 (95% CI, 0.62-0.90 for mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality and unfavorable outcome were significantly associated with greater NSE concentrations. In addition, NSE has moderate discriminatory ability to predict mortality and neurological outcome in TBI patients. The optimal discrimination cutoff

  16. Biguanide-Atovaquone Synergy against Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The synergistic potential of a range of biguanides, their triazine metabolites, tetracyclines, and pyrimethamine in combination with atovaquone has been assessed. All five biguanides tested interacted synergistically with atovaquone against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. All of the other compounds tested were either additive or antagonistic.

  17. Interleukin-10 regulates hepcidin in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Honglei

    2014-02-10

    Background: Acute malarial anemia remains a major public health problem. Hepcidin, the major hormone controlling the availability of iron, is raised during acute and asymptomatic parasitemia. Understanding the role and mechanism of raised hepcidin and so reduced iron availability during infection is critical to establish evidence-based guidelines for management of malaria anemia. Our recent clinical evidence suggests a potential role of IL-10 in the regulation of hepcidin in patients with acute P. falciparum malaria. Methods: We have measured secretion of hepcidin by primary macrophages and the hepatoma cell line HepG2 stimulated with IL-10, IL-6 and Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Findings: We have observed that IL-10 and IL-6 production increased in primary macrophages when these cells were co-cultured with Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. We found that IL-10 induced hepcidin secretion in primary macrophages in a dose-dependent manner but not in HepG2 cells. These effects were mediated through signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3-phosphorylation and completely abrogated by a specific STAT3 inhibitor. Conclusion: IL-10 can directly regulate hepcidin in primary macrophages but not in HepG2 cells. This effect can be modulated by Plasmodium falciparum. The results are consistent with a role for IL-10 in modulating iron metabolism during acute phase of infection. 2014 Huang et al.

  18. A Patient with G6PD Deficiency and Falciparum Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Fagani

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A 20 year old male patient from Afghanistan with a history of G6PD deficiency and clinical manifestations of malaria referred to Bou-Ali Hospital in Tehran, capital of Iran. Giemsa stained thick blood films revealed an infection of Plasmodium falciparum with 33700 parasite/μL of blood. The patient was successfully treated according to malaria treatment guideline.

  19. Antibodies to a recombinant glutamate-rich Plasmodium falciparum protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogh, B; Petersen, E; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    1992-01-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum antigen gene coding for a 220-kD glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) has been cloned, and the 783 C-terminal amino acids of this protein (GLURP489-1271) have been expressed as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The encoded 783 amino acid residues contain two...

  20. Positive blood culture with Plasmodium falciparum : Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, Jutte J. C.; Van Assen, Sander; Mulder, André B.; Kampinga, Greetje A.

    2007-01-01

    An adult traveler presented with fever and malaise after returning from Sierra Leone. Young trophozoites of Plasmodium falciparum were seen in a blood smear, with parasitemia being 10%. Moreover, blood cultures drawn on admission signaled as "positive" after 1 day of incubation, but no bacteria were

  1. Plasmodium falciparum transcriptome analysis reveals pregnancy malaria associated gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuikue Ndam, Nicaise; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Proux, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) causing maternal anemia and low birth weight is among the multiple manifestations of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Infected erythrocytes (iEs) can acquire various adhesive properties that mediate the clinical severity of malaria. Recent advances...

  2. Artemether-lumefantrine treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2015-01-01

    -lumefantrine for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, to define therapeutic day 7 lumefantrine concentrations and identify patient factors that substantially alter these concentrations. A systematic review of PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, ClinicalTrials.gov and conference proceedings identified all relevant studies...

  3. Plasmodium falciparum infection causes proinflammatory priming of human TLR responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCall, M.B.B.; Netea, M.G.; Hermsen, C.C.; Jansen, T.; Jacobs, L.; Golenbock, D.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    TLRs are a major group of pattern recognition receptors that are crucial in initiating innate immune responses and are capable of recognizing Plasmodium ligands. We have investigated TLR responses during acute experimental P. falciparum (P.f.) infection in 15 malaria-naive volunteers. TLR-4 response

  4. Positive blood culture with Plasmodium falciparum: Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, Jutte J. C.; Van Assen, Sander; Mulder, André B.; Kampinga, Greetje A.

    2007-01-01

    An adult traveler presented with fever and malaise after returning from Sierra Leone. Young trophozoites of Plasmodium falciparum were seen in a blood smear, with parasitemia being 10%. Moreover, blood cultures drawn on admission signaled as "positive" after 1 day of incubation, but no bacteria were

  5. Positive blood culture with Plasmodium falciparum : Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, Jutte J. C.; Van Assen, Sander; Mulder, André B.; Kampinga, Greetje A.

    2007-01-01

    An adult traveler presented with fever and malaise after returning from Sierra Leone. Young trophozoites of Plasmodium falciparum were seen in a blood smear, with parasitemia being 10%. Moreover, blood cultures drawn on admission signaled as "positive" after 1 day of incubation, but no bacteria were

  6. The prognostic value of schizontaemia in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van Wolfswinkel (Marlies); M. De Mendonça Melo (Mariana); K. Vliegenthart-Jongbloed (Klaske); R. Koelewijn (Rob); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In Plasmodium falciparum infection, peripheral parasite counts do not always correlate well with the sequestered parasite burden. As erythrocytes parasitized with mature trophozoites and schizonts have a high tendency to adhere to the microvascular endothelium, they are often

  7. The prognostic value of schizontaemia in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van Wolfswinkel (Marlies); M. De Mendonça Melo (Mariana); K. Vliegenthart-Jongbloed (Klaske); R. Koelewijn (Rob); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In Plasmodium falciparum infection, peripheral parasite counts do not always correlate well with the sequestered parasite burden. As erythrocytes parasitized with mature trophozoites and schizonts have a high tendency to adhere to the microvascular endothelium, they are often

  8. The epidemiology of Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes: weapons of mass dispersion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drakeley, C.; Sutherland, C.; Bousema, J.T.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Targett, G.A.T.

    2006-01-01

    Much of the epidemiology of Plasmodium falciparum in Sub-Saharan Africa focuses on the prevalence patterns of asexual parasites in people of different ages, whereas the gametocytes that propagate the disease are often neglected. One expected benefit of the widespread introduction of artemisinin-base

  9. Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Endemicity in Indonesia in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyazar, Iqbal R. F.; Gething, Peter W.; Patil, Anand P.; Rogayah, Hanifah; Kusriastuti, Rita; Wismarini, Desak M.; Tarmizi, Siti N.; Baird, J. Kevin; Hay, Simon I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria control programs require a detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of infection risk to efficiently allocate resources. We used model based geostatistics (MBG) techniques to generate a contemporary map of Plasmodium falciparum malaria risk in Indonesia in 2010. Methods Plasmodium falciparum Annual Parasite Incidence (PfAPI) data (2006–2008) were used to map limits of P. falciparum transmission. A total of 2,581 community blood surveys of P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) were identified (1985–2009). After quality control, 2,516 were included into a national database of age-standardized 2–10 year old PfPR data (PfPR2–10) for endemicity mapping. A Bayesian MBG procedure was used to create a predicted surface of PfPR2–10 endemicity with uncertainty estimates. Population at risk estimates were derived with reference to a 2010 human population count surface. Results We estimate 132.8 million people in Indonesia, lived at risk of P. falciparum transmission in 2010. Of these, 70.3% inhabited areas of unstable transmission and 29.7% in stable transmission. Among those exposed to stable risk, the vast majority were at low risk (93.39%) with the reminder at intermediate (6.6%) and high risk (0.01%). More people in western Indonesia lived in unstable rather than stable transmission zones. In contrast, fewer people in eastern Indonesia lived in unstable versus stable transmission areas. Conclusion While further feasibility assessments will be required, the immediate prospects for sustained control are good across much of the archipelago and medium term plans to transition to the pre-elimination phase are not unrealistic for P. falciparum. Endemicity in areas of Papua will clearly present the greatest challenge. This P. falciparum endemicity map allows malaria control agencies and their partners to comprehensively assess the region-specific prospects for reaching pre-elimination, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of

  10. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS.

  11. Sero-epidemiological evaluation of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, Khadime; Tine, Roger Clément Kouly; Ndiaye, Magatte; Sow, Doudou; Sarr, Aïssatou; Mbuyi, Marie Louise Tshibola; Diouf, Ibrahima; Lô, Amy Colé; Abiola, Annie; Seck, Mame Cheikh; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou; Badiane, Aïda Sadikh; N'Diaye, Jean Louis A; Ndiaye, Daouda; Faye, Oumar; Dieng, Thérèse; Dieng, Yémou; Ndir, Oumar; Gaye, Oumar; Faye, Babacar

    2015-07-16

    In Senegal, a significant decrease of malaria transmission intensity has been noted the last years. Parasitaemia has become lower and, therefore, more difficult to detect by microscopy. In the context of submicroscopic parasitaemia, it has become relevant to rely on relevant malaria surveillance tools to better document malaria epidemiology in such settings. Serological markers have been proposed as an essential tool for malaria surveillance. This study aimed to evaluate the sero-epidemiological situation of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in two sentinel sites in Senegal. Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in Velingara (south Senegal) and Keur Soce (central Senegal) between September and October 2010. Children under 10 years old, living in these areas, were enrolled using two-level, random sampling methods. P. falciparum infection was diagnosed using microscopy. P. falciparum antibodies against circumsporozoite protein (CSP), apical membrane protein (AMA1) and merozoite surface protein 1_42 (MSP1_42) were measured by ELISA method. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was done to assess factors associated with P. falciparum antibodies carriage. A total of 1,865 children under 10 years old were enrolled. The overall falciparum malaria prevalence was 4.99% with high prevalence in Velingara of 10.03% compared to Keur Soce of 0.3%. Symptomatic malaria cases (fever associated with parasitaemia) represented 17.37%. Seroprevalence of anti-AMA1, anti-MSP1_42 and anti-CSP antibody was 38.12, 41.55 and 40.38%, respectively. The seroprevalence was more important in Velingara and increased with age, active malaria infection and area of residence. The use of serological markers can contribute to improved malaria surveillance in areas with declining malaria transmission. This study provided useful baseline information about the sero-epidemiological situation of malaria in Senegal and can contribute to the identification of malaria hot spots in order to concentrate

  12. [From malaria parasite point of view--Plasmodium falciparum evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerka, Agata; Kaczmarek, Radosław; Jaśkiewicz, Ewa

    2015-12-31

    Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Plasmodium, which have arguably exerted the greatest selection pressure on humans in the history of our species. Besides humans, different Plasmodium parasites infect a wide range of animal hosts, from marine invertebrates to primates. On the other hand, individual Plasmodium species show high host specificity. The extraordinary evolution of Plasmodium probably began when a free-living red algae turned parasitic, and culminated with its ability to thrive inside a human red blood cell. Studies on the African apes generated new data on the evolution of malaria parasites in general and the deadliest human-specific species, Plasmodium falciparum, in particular. Initially, it was hypothesized that P. falciparum descended from the chimpanzee malaria parasite P. reichenowi, after the human and the chimp lineage diverged about 6 million years ago. However, a recently identified new species infecting gorillas, unexpectedly showed similarity to P. falciparum and was therefore named P. praefalciparum. That finding spurred an alternative hypothesis, which proposes that P. falciparum descended from its gorilla rather than chimp counterpart. In addition, the gorilla-to-human host shift may have occurred more recently (about 10 thousand years ago) than the theoretical P. falciparum-P. reichenowi split. One of the key aims of the studies on Plasmodium evolution is to elucidate the mechanisms that allow the incessant host shifting and retaining the host specificity, especially in the case of human-specific species. Thorough understanding of these phenomena will be necessary to design effective malaria treatment and prevention strategies.

  13. Congenital Plasmodium falciparum infection in neonates in Muheza District, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimera Sharadhuli I

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although recent reports on congenital malaria suggest that the incidence is increasing, it is difficult to determine whether the clinical disease is due to parasites acquired before delivery or as a result of contamination by maternal blood at birth. Understanding of the method of parasite acquisition is important for estimating the time incidence of congenital malaria and design of preventive measures. The aim of this study was to determine whether the first Plasmodium falciparum malaria disease in infants is due to same parasites present on the placenta at birth. Methods Babies born to mothers with P. falciparum parasites on the placenta detected by PCR were followed up to two years and observed for malaria episodes. Paired placental and infant peripheral blood samples at first malaria episode within first three months of life were genotyped (msp2 to determine genetic relatedness. Selected amplifications from nested PCR were sequenced and compared between pairs. Results Eighteen (19.1% out of 95 infants who were followed up developed clinical malaria within the first three months of age. Eight pairs (60% out of 14 pairs of sequenced placental and cord samples were genetically related while six (40% were genetically unrelated. One pair (14.3% out of seven pairs of sequenced placental and infants samples were genetically related. In addition, infants born from primigravidae mothers were more likely to be infected with P. falciparum (P P. falciparum infection earlier than those from secundigravidae and primigravidae mothers (RR = 1.43. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites present on the placenta as detected by PCR are more likely to result in clinical disease (congenital malaria in the infant during the first three months of life. However, sequencing data seem to question the validity of this likelihood. Therefore, the relationship between placental parasites and first clinical disease need to be confirmed in

  14. Plasmodium falciparum Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric proteins contribute to cytoadherence and anchor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 to the host cell cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberli, Alexander; Zurbrügg, Laura; Rusch, Sebastian;

    2016-01-01

    Adherence of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to host endothelium is conferred through the parasite-derived virulence factor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), the major contributor to malaria severity. PfEMP1 located at knob structures on the erythrocyte surface is...

  15. Chondroitin sulfate A-adhering Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes express functionally important antibody epitopes shared by multiple variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Lea; Dobrilovic, Tina; Magistrado, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to chond......Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes...

  16. Plasma level of neuron specific enolase in patients with acute cerebral infarction: A case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoping Tian; Yang Zhang; Weiping Cheng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The plasma level of neuron specific enolase (NSE) can be used to diagnose and evaluate neuronal injury and predict early prognosis.OBJECTIVE: To observe the dynamic changes in plasma levels of NSE in patients with acute cerebral infarction, and to investigate its correlations with disease severity and prognosis.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This non-randomized, concurrent case-control experiment was performed at the Department of Neurology, First Hospital Affiliated to Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine between May and July 2007.PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen patients with acute cerebral infarction, who received treatment at the Department of Neurology, First Hospital Affiliated to Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine between May and July 2007, were recruited into the patient group. An additional 10 healthy individuals, who received health examinations simultaneously, were included as controls.METHODS: Following admission (within 3 days) and at days 6, 12, and 30 subsequent to acute cerebral infarction attack, 3 mL venous blood was taken from each patient before the morning meal to determine the plasma level of NSE by enzyme-labeled immunosorbent assay. One-time blood extraction was performed in each healthy subject during the health examination for the same purpose as in patients. At 6 and 30 days following acute cerebral infarction attack, CT examination was performed for calculation of cerebral infarction volume according to the Tada formula. Following admission and at 30 days of disease invasion, all patients were scored by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, 13 items).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of NSE plasma level between acute cerebral infarction patients and healthy individuals; correlations of NSE plasma level in acute cerebral infarction patients with cerebral infarction volume, NIHSS score, and prognosis.RESULTS: Following admission and at days 6 and 12 of disease invasion, the plasma level

  17. Prognostic value of ferritin, neuron-specific enolase, lactate dehydrogenase, and urinary and plasmatic catecholamine metabolites in children with neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cangemi G

    2012-11-01

    localized disease without MYCN amplification the significant positive associations between urinary and plasmatic vanillylmandelic acid (VMA/homovanillic acid (HVA ratio and a better prognosis remained significant (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively, as well as, the positive association between high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH values and a worse prognosis (P < 0.001. Moreover, in stage 4 patients without MYCN amplification, neuron-specific enolase levels above 200 ng/mL and LDH levels above 2500 IU/mL maintained their significant association with a worse outcome (P = 0.01 and P = 0.0001, respectively. In conclusion, LDH had an independent prognostic value in patients of all stages without MYCN amplification. Moreover, the urinary and plasmatic VMA/HVA ratio was an independent predictor of prognosis in patients with localized disease without MYCN amplification. Since LDH and catecholamine metabolites are measured in all patients at diagnosis, these findings may be helpful for an easy, cost-effective, patient risk stratification.Keywords: neuroblastoma, markers, prognosis

  18. Purification and determination of the modifying protein responsible for the post-synthetic modification of creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2) and enolase(EC 4.2.1.11)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landeghem, A.A.J. van; Soons, J.B.J.; Wever, R.A.; Mul-Steinbusch, M.W.F.J.; Antonissen-Zijdaa, T.

    1985-01-01

    The purification of a serum protein, responsible for the postsynthetic modification of CK and enolase, is described. A purification of about 1 300-fold could be reached after subsequent chromatography of human serum on DEAE cellulose and Sephacryl S-200 Superfine followed by affinity chromatography

  19. Neuron-Specific Enolase as a Predictor of Death or Poor Neurological Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C and 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stammet, Pascal; Collignon, Olivier; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a widely-used biomarker for prognostication of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest, but the relevance of recommended cutoff values has been questioned due to the lack of a standardized methodology and uncertainties over the influence of temperatu...

  20. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Enolase Gene from Ornamental Bromeliads%观赏凤梨烯醇酶基因的克隆及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴吉林; 刘建新

    2012-01-01

    Enolase catalyze only one-step dehydration reaction in glycolytic pathway, and relate closely to plant stress resistance. Based on EST monoclones of enolase gene obtained from bromeliads full length cD-NA library of ornamental bromeliads,its full length cDNA sequence was obtained by Primer Walking sequencing. The gene,named for GoEnolasel (GenBank accession No. JN896863) .consisted of 1 703 bp cD-NA sequence, 1 335 bp ORF(open reading frame) which encoded a protem with 445 amino acids residues, and a putative protein which was 47. 9 kD at estimated molecular weight,5. 7 at isoelectric point and had a 'TIM-phosphate-binding superfamily' conservative domain. The secondary structure of the protein was composed of alpha helix (44. 49%), random coil (33. 71%), extend strand (13. 71%) and beta turn (8. 09%) by SPOMA analysis. Furthermore, its tertiary structure was also build based on A chain of 2PSN. Through phylogenetic tree analysis,GoEnolasel was gather to a same group with enolase protein in Oryza sativa ,Zea mays and Elaeis guineensis. The research was beneficial to breeding for stress resistance in ornamental bromeliads.%烯醇酶催化着糖酵解途径中的唯一一步脱水反应,与植物的抗逆性有着密切的联系.基于前期从擎天凤梨全长cDNA文库中获得的烯醇酶基因的EST单克隆,进行引物步移测序,获得其全长cDNA序列.序列长1703hp,编码445个氨基酸残基,命名为GoEnolasel(GenBank登录号JN896863),蛋白质理论分子质量为47.9kD,等电点为5.7,包含1个TIM磷酸结合超家族保守区,二级结构主要由α螺旋(44.49%)、随机卷曲(33.71%)、延伸链(13.71%)和β转角(8.09%)组成.系统进化树分析表明,GoEnolasel蛋白与水稻、玉米、油棕等的烯醇酶蛋白聚为一类,它们的亲缘关系最近.

  1. Capture ELISA for IgM antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum glutamate rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Borre, M B; Petersen, E

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta-galactos......This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta...

  2. Trafficking of STEVOR to the Maurer's clefts in Plasmodium falciparum -infected erythrocytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Przyborski, Jude M; Miller, Susanne K; Rohrbach, Petra; Pfahler, Judith M; Crabb, Brendan S; Henrich, Philipp P; Lanzer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins to destinations within its host erythrocyte, including cytosol, surface and membranous profiles of parasite origin termed Maurer's clefts...

  3. The Severity of Plasmodium falciparum infection is associated with transcript levels of var genes encoding endothelial protein C receptor-binding P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mkumbaye, Sixbert I; Wang, Christian W; Lyimo, Eric

    2017-01-01

    By attaching infected erythrocytes to the vascular lining, Plasmodium falciparum parasites leave blood circulation and avoid splenic clearance. This sequestration is central to pathogenesis. Severe malaria is associated with parasites expressing an antigenically distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte...

  4. [Plasmodium falciparum malaria: epidemiology and clinical features at Tarapoto Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, J; Rodriguez, J; Romero, D

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted of the clinical records of 41 patients discharged from a hospital in Tarapoto, Peru, between August 1992 and June 1996 following treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 65 years; 25 were male. The cases were uniformly distributed throughout the year. The duration of illness averaged 11 days. At admission, 40 patients had fever, 36 had shaking chills, 29 had headache, 21 had nausea and vomiting, 21 had hyporexia, 15 had pallor, and 13 had splenomegaly. 3 of the 16 women were pregnant. 7 patients reported a history of malaria. The admission diagnosis was malaria in 33 cases. 31 patients were treated with chloroquine; 18 were subsequently treated with pyrimethamine-sulfadoxin and 1 received doxycycline. No cases of grave illness or death occurred. The increasing presence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Peruvian lowlands should promote review of the adequacy of control programs.

  5. Reduced erythrocyte deformability associated with hypoargininemia during Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Juliana; Buffet, Pierre A; Ciceron, Liliane; Milon, Geneviève; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Safeukui, Innocent

    2014-01-20

    The mechanisms underlying reduced red blood cell (RBC) deformability during Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria remain poorly understood. Here, we explore the possible involvement of the L-arginine and nitric oxide (NO) pathway on RBC deformability in Pf-infected patients and parasite cultures. RBC deformability was reduced during the acute attack (day0) and returned to normal values upon convalescence (day28). Day0 values correlated with plasma L-arginine levels (r = 0.69; p = 0.01) and weakly with parasitemia (r = -0.38; p = 0.006). In vitro, day0 patient's plasma incubated with ring-stage cultures at 41°C reduced RBC deformability, and this effect correlated strongly with plasma L-arginine levels (r = 0.89; p falciparum malaria may altogether impair NO production and reduce RBC deformability, particularly at febrile temperature.

  6. Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum: A process linked to dormancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qin; Kyle, Dennis E; Gatton, Michelle L

    2012-12-01

    Artemisinin (ART) based combination therapy (ACT) is used as the first line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in over 100 countries and is the cornerstone of malaria control and elimination programs in these areas. However, despite the high potency and rapid parasite killing action of ART derivatives there is a high rate of recrudescence associated with ART monotherapy and recrudescence is not uncommon even when ACT is used. Compounding this problem are reports that some parasites in Cambodia, a known foci of drug resistance, have decreased in vivo sensitivity to ART. This raises serious concerns for the development of ART resistance in the field even though no major phenotypic and genotypic changes have yet been identified in these parasites. In this article we review available data on the characteristics of ART, its effects on Plasmodium falciparum parasites and present a hypothesis to explain the high rate of recrudescence associated with this potent class of drugs and the current enigma surrounding ART resistance.

  7. Sickle Cell Trait Protects Against Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billo, Mounkaila A.; Johnson, Eric S.; Doumbia, Seydou O.; Poudiougou, Belco; Sagara, Issaka; Diawara, Sory I.; Diakité, Mahamadou; Diallo, Mouctar; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Tounkara, Anatole; Rice, Janet; James, Mark A.; Krogstad, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Although sickle cell trait protects against severe disease due to Plasmodium falciparum, it has not been clear whether sickle trait also protects against asymptomatic infection (parasitemia). To address this question, the authors identified 171 persistently smear-negative children and 450 asymptomatic persistently smear-positive children in Bancoumana, Mali (June 1996 to June 1998). They then followed both groups for 2 years using a cohort-based strategy. Among the 171 children with persistently negative smears, the median time for conversion to smear-positive was longer for children with sickle trait than for children without (274 vs. 108 days, P sickle trait than for children without (190 vs. 365 days; P = 0.02). These protective effects of sickle trait against asymptomatic P. falciparum infection under conditions of natural transmission were demonstrable using a cohort-based approach but not when the same data were examined using a cross-sectional approach. PMID:23035141

  8. Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro Resistance to Monodesethylamodiaquine, Dakar, Senegal, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Bécaye; Madamet, Marylin; Camara, Cheikhou; Amalvict, Rémy; Fall, Mansour; Nakoulima, Aminata; Diatta, Bakary; Diémé, Yaya; Wade, Boubacar; Pradines, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    We successfully cultured 36 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from blood samples of 44 malaria patients admitted to the Hôpital Principal de Dakar (Dakar, Senegal) during August-December 2014. The prevalence of isolates with in vitro reduced susceptibility was 30.6% for monodesethylamodiaquine, 52.8% for chloroquine, 44.1% for mefloquine, 16.7% for doxycycline, 11.8% for piperaquine, 8.3% for artesunate, 5.9% for pyronaridine, 2.8% for quinine and dihydroartemisinin, and 0.0% for lumefantrine. The prevalence of isolates with reduced in vitro susceptibility to the artemisinin-based combination therapy partner monodesethylamodiaquine increased from 5.6% in 2013 to 30.6% in 2014. Because of the increased prevalence of P. falciparum parasites with impaired in vitro susceptibility to monodesethylamodiaquine, the implementation of in vitro and in vivo surveillance of all artemisinin-based combination therapy partners is warranted.

  9. RIFINs are adhesins implicated in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Suchi; Palmkvist, Mia; Moll, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Rosetting is a virulent Plasmodium falciparum phenomenon associated with severe malaria. Here we demonstrate that P. falciparum–encoded repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) are expressed on the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBCs), where they bind to RBCs—preferentiall......Rosetting is a virulent Plasmodium falciparum phenomenon associated with severe malaria. Here we demonstrate that P. falciparum–encoded repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) are expressed on the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBCs), where they bind to RBCs......—preferentially of blood group A—to form large rosettes and mediate microvascular binding of iRBCs. We suggest that RIFINs have a fundamental role in the development of severe malaria and thereby contribute to the varying global distribution of ABO blood groups in the human population....

  10. Engineered resistance to Plasmodium falciparum development in transgenic Anopheles stephensi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison T Isaacs

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transposon-mediated transformation was used to produce Anopheles stephensi that express single-chain antibodies (scFvs designed to target the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The scFvs, m1C3, m4B7, and m2A10, are derived from mouse monoclonal antibodies that inhibit either ookinete invasion of the midgut or sporozoite invasion of salivary glands. The scFvs that target the parasite surface, m4B7 and m2A10, were fused to an Anopheles gambiae antimicrobial peptide, Cecropin A. Previously-characterized Anopheles cis-acting DNA regulatory elements were included in the transgenes to coordinate scFv production with parasite development. Gene amplification and immunoblot analyses showed promoter-specific increases in transgene expression in blood-fed females. Transgenic mosquito lines expressing each of the scFv genes had significantly lower infection levels than controls when challenged with P. falciparum.

  11. Peptide Inhibition of Topoisomerase IB from Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Roy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of diseases inflicted by protozoan parasites such as Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Plasmodium, which pose a serious threat to human health worldwide, depends on a rather small number of antiparasite drugs, of which many are toxic and/or inefficient. Moreover, the increasing occurrence of drug-resistant parasites emphasizes the need for new and effective antiprotozoan drugs. In the current study, we describe a synthetic peptide, WRWYCRCK, with inhibitory effect on the essential enzyme topoisomerase I from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The peptide inhibits specifically the transition from noncovalent to covalent DNA binding of P. falciparum topoisomerase I, while it does not affect the ligation step of catalysis. A mechanistic explanation for this inhibition is provided by molecular docking analyses. Taken together the presented results suggest that synthetic peptides may represent a new class of potential antiprotozoan drugs.

  12. PENGEMBANGAN BIAKAN IN-VITRO PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM SECARA KONTINU

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    Sekar Tuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To support malaria research on its' serology/immunology, chemotherapy, drug sensitivity aspects etc. especially for falciparum malaria, a large amount of antigen (parasites is needed. These antigen could not be obtained from patients in the field only. Considering this situation, attempts have been made to develop a Plasmodium falciparum continuous culture   in-vitro following a method introduced  by Trager and Jensen (1976. In our laboratory, the parasite grew and multiplied nicely for 60 days. During that period of cultivation, a large amount of parasites (mostly mature trophozoite and schizont stages have been collected for antigen production. Several tubes of mostly young trophozoites stage have been preserved, it can be cultured again in the future or transported to another laboratory for further culture.

  13. Pharmacophore model for pentamidine analogs active against Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athri, Prashanth; Wenzler, Tanja; Tidwell, Richard; Bakunova, Svetlana M; Wilson, W David

    2010-12-01

    Pentamidine and its analogs constitute a class of compounds that are known to be active against Plasmodium falciparum, which causes the most dangerous malarial infection. Malaria is a widespread disease known to affect hundreds of millions of people and presents a perceivable threat of spreading. Hence, there is a need for well-defined scaffolds that lead to new, effective treatment. Here we present a pentamidine-based pharmacophore constructed using GALAHAD that would aid targeted synthesis of leads with enhanced properties, as well as the development of lead scaffolds. The study was supported by high-quality biological in vitro data of 22 compounds against the P. falciparum strains NF54 and K1. The model established reveals the importance of hydrophobic phenyl rings with polar oxygen and amidine substituents and the hydrophobic linking chain for the activity against malaria.

  14. Molecular monitoring of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genton Blaise

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs are recommended for use against uncomplicated malaria in areas of multi-drug resistant malaria, such as sub-Saharan Africa. However, their long-term usefulness in these high transmission areas remains unclear. It has been suggested that documentation of the S769N PfATPase6 mutations may indicate an emergence of artemisinin resistance of Plasmodium falciparum in the field. The present study assessed PfATPase6 mutations (S769N and A623E in 615 asymptomatic P. falciparum infections in Tanzania but no mutant genotype was detected. This observation suggests that resistance to artemisinin has not yet been selected in Tanzania, supporting the Ministry of Health's decision to adopt artemether+lumefantrine as first-line malaria treatment. The findings recommend further studies to assess PfATPase6 mutations in sentinel sites and verify their usefulness in monitoring emergency of ACT resistance.

  15. Surface antigens and virulence in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Normark, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is an intracellular protozoan that may cause severe forms of malaria. It is a major world health hazard and reaps the highest toll among the children and pregnant mothers of the developing world. An Anopheles mosquito vector injects the pathogen when taking a blood meal. After multiplication in cells of the liver, the parasite escapes and infects red blood cells in a cyclic manner and this is when the clinical manifestations of malaria as a disease beco...

  16. Treatment of severe falciparum malaria: quinine versus artesunate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Patel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria is the most important disease of human being. More than 40% of the world’s population is considered to be at risk of exposure of this disease. Malaria infection has been increasing over recent years due to combination of factors including increasing resistance of malarial parasite. Most of the strains of P. falciparum are now resistance to conventional drugs like chloroquine in many areas. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of quinine and artesunate in treatment of P. falciparum malaria. Methods: This is hospital based prospective study, conducted amongst 35 randomly selected patients of severe P. falciparum malaria. Patients with any contraindications of either drug were excluded to avoid bias. Standard statistical tests were applied for qualitative as well as quantitative data. Results: As per the study end point results of difference of mortality in patients receiving either drug was not significant (p > 0.75, but difference in clinical parameters like fever clearance time (p <0.01, parasite clearance time (p < 0.001 and coma resolution time (p < 0.001 were significant among patients receiving artesunate. There were no any significant differences in adverse effects of both the drugs. Mortality was same in both arms taking either drug. Conclusions: Artesunate is as good as quinine in mortality aspect but artesunate is superior in fever clearance time (FCT & parasite clearance time (PCT. Coma resolution time is faster with quinine as compared to artesunate. There are no significant adverse effects of either drug. So artesunate is equivalent or superior for treatment for severe falciparum malaria. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(1.000: 30-36

  17. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes as an essential part of their life cycle. While living inside erythrocytes, the parasite remodels the cell's intracellular organization as well as its outer surface. Late trophozoite-stage parasites and schizonts introduce numerous small protrusions on t...... microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion....

  18. Genes for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Toxin Biosynthesis in Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Delorenzi, Mauro; Sexton, Adrienne; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Speed, Terry; Schofield, Louis

    2002-01-01

    About 2.5 million people die of Plasmodium falciparum malaria every year. Fatalities are associated with systemic and organ-specific inflammation initiated by a parasite toxin. Recent studies show that glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) functions as the dominant parasite toxin in the context of infection. GPIs also serve as membrane anchors for several of the most important surface antigens of parasite invasive stages. GPI anchoring is a complex posttranslational modification produced through...

  19. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB); (NIMR)

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  20. CRISPR-mediated genome editing of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marcus Cs; Fidock, David A

    2014-01-01

    The development of the CRISPR-Cas system is revolutionizing genome editing in a variety of organisms. The system has now been used to manipulate the genome of Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal malaria-causing species. The ability to generate gene deletions or nucleotide substitutions rapidly and economically promises to accelerate the analysis of novel drug targets and to help elucidate the function of specific genes or gene families, while complementing genome-wide association studies.

  1. CRISPR-mediated genome editing of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Marcus CS; David A Fidock

    2014-01-01

    The development of the CRISPR-Cas system is revolutionizing genome editing in a variety of organisms. The system has now been used to manipulate the genome of Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal malaria-causing species. The ability to generate gene deletions or nucleotide substitutions rapidly and economically promises to accelerate the analysis of novel drug targets and to help elucidate the function of specific genes or gene families, while complementing genome-wide association studies.

  2. Artesunate plus pyronaridine for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Bukirwa, Hasifa; Unnikrishnan, B; Kramer, Christine V; Sinclair, David; Nair, Suma; Tharyan, Prathap

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that people with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria are treated using Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT). ACT combines three-days of a short-acting artemisinin derivative with a longer-acting antimalarial which has a different mode of action. Pyronaridine has been reported as an effective antimalarial over two decades of use in parts of Asia, and is currently being evaluated as a partner drug for artesunate. Objective...

  3. Complement activation in Ghanaian children with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofori Michael F

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe anaemia (SA, intravascular haemolysis (IVH and respiratory distress (RD are severe forms of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, with RD reported to be of prognostic importance in African children with malarial anaemia. Complement factors have been implicated in the mechanism leading to excess anaemia in acute P. falciparum infection. Methods The direct Coombs test (DCT and flow cytometry were used to investigate the mean levels of RBC-bound complement fragments (C3d and C3bαβ and the regulatory proteins [complement receptor 1 (CD35 and decay accelerating factor (CD55] in children with discrete clinical forms of P. falciparum malaria. The relationship between the findings and clinical parameters including coma, haemoglobin (Hb levels and RD were investigated. Results Of the 484 samples tested, 131(27% were positive in DCT, out of which 115/131 (87.8% were positive for C3d alone while 16/131 (12.2% were positive for either IgG alone or both. 67.4% of the study population were below 5 years of age and DCT positivity was more common in this age group relative to children who were 5 years or older (Odds ratio, OR = 3.8; 95%CI, 2.2–6.7, p Conclusion These results suggest that complement activation contributed to anaemia in acute childhood P. falciparum malaria, possibly through induction of erythrophagocytosis and haemolysis. In contrast to other studies, this study did not find association between levels of the complement regulatory proteins, CD35 and CD55 and malarial anaemia. These findings suggest that complement activation could also be involved in the pathogenesis of RD but larger studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  4. Hyperglycemia in Severe Falciparum Malaria: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Chianura; Isabella Corinna Errante; Giovanna Travi; Roberto Rossotti; Massimo Puoti

    2012-01-01

    Occasionally, malaria may present with unusual signs and symptoms. We report a case of an uncommon presentation of Plasmodium falciparum infection in a 59-year-old Ethiopian immigrant, which initially presented with hyperglycaemia and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Reports of unusual presentations of malaria are few and cases of severe malaria with hyperglycaemia are rarely described. As hyperglycaemia is associated to most severe malaria and high mortality, our aim is to catch ...

  5. Aislamiento y mantenimiento in vitro de Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Pardave L

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Se aislaron 08 cepas de Plasmodium falciparum a partir de 10 pacientes. Luego fueron adaptadas y mantenidas en cultivo in vitro durante 60 días en eritrocitos humanos grupo O, en medio RPMI 1640 enriquecido con plasma humano grupo O, bajo una atmósfera de 5% de CO2, 5% de O2 y 90% de Nitrógeno y luego preservados a -70ºC.

  6. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Ana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the population structure of Plasmodium species through genetic diversity studies can assist in the design of more effective malaria control strategies, particularly in vaccine development. Central America is an area where malaria is a public health problem, but little is known about the genetic diversity of the parasite’s circulating species. This study aimed to investigate the allelic frequency and molecular diversity of five surface antigens in field isolates from Honduras. Methods Five molecular markers were analysed to determine the genotypes of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum from endemic areas in Honduras. Genetic diversity of ama-1, msp-1 and csp was investigated for P. vivax, and msp-1 and msp-2 for P. falciparum. Allelic frequencies were calculated and sequence analysis performed. Results and conclusion A high genetic diversity was observed within Plasmodium isolates from Honduras. A different number of genotypes were elucidated: 41 (n = 77 for pvama-1; 23 (n = 84 for pvcsp; and 23 (n = 35 for pfmsp-1. Pvcsp sequences showed VK210 as the only subtype present in Honduran isolates. Pvmsp-1 (F2 was the most polymorphic marker for P. vivax isolates while pvama-1 was least variable. All three allelic families described for pfmsp-1 (n = 30 block 2 (K1, MAD20, and RO33, and both allelic families described for the central domain of pfmsp-2 (n = 11 (3D7 and FC27 were detected. However, K1 and 3D7 allelic families were predominant. All markers were randomly distributed across the country and no geographic correlation was found. To date, this is the most complete report on molecular characterization of P. vivax and P. falciparum field isolates in Honduras with regards to genetic diversity. These results indicate that P. vivax and P. falciparum parasite populations are highly diverse in Honduras despite the low level of transmission.

  7. Heterologous Protection against Malaria after Immunization with Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remko Schats

    Full Text Available Sterile protection in >90% of volunteers against homologous Plasmodium falciparum infection has been achieved only using the controlled human malaria infection (CHMI model. This efficient model involves whole parasite immunizations under chloroquine prophylaxis (CPS-immunization, requiring only 30-45 mosquitoes bites infected with P. falciparum-sporozoites. Given the large diversity of P. falciparum parasites, it is essential to assess protection against heterologous parasite strains.In an open-label follow-up study, 16 volunteers previously CPS-immunized and challenged with P. falciparum NF54 (West-Africa in a dose de-escalation and challenge trial were re-challenged with clone NF135.C10 (Cambodia at 14 months after the last immunization (NCT01660854.Two out of thirteen NF54 protected volunteers previously fully protected against NF54 were also fully protected against NF135.C10, while 11/13 showed a delayed patency (median prepatent period of 10.5 days (range 9.0-15.5 versus 8.5 days in 5 malaria-naïve controls (p = 0.0005. Analysis of patency by qPCR indicated a 91 to >99% estimated reduction of liver parasite load in 7/11 partially protected subjects. Three volunteers previously not protected against NF54, were also not protected against NF135.C10.This study shows that CPS-immunization can induce heterologous protection for a period of more than one year, which is a further impetus for clinical development of whole parasite vaccines.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01660854.

  8. Targeting NAD+ metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K O'Hara

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ is an essential metabolite utilized as a redox cofactor and enzyme substrate in numerous cellular processes. Elevated NAD+ levels have been observed in red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, but little is known regarding how the parasite generates NAD+. Here, we employed a mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to confirm that P. falciparum lacks the ability to synthesize NAD+ de novo and is reliant on the uptake of exogenous niacin. We characterized several enzymes in the NAD+ pathway and demonstrate cytoplasmic localization for all except the parasite nicotinamidase, which concentrates in the nucleus. One of these enzymes, the P. falciparum nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (PfNMNAT, is essential for NAD+ metabolism and is highly diverged from the human homolog, but genetically similar to bacterial NMNATs. Our results demonstrate the enzymatic activity of PfNMNAT in vitro and demonstrate its ability to genetically complement the closely related Escherichia coli NMNAT. Due to the similarity of PfNMNAT to the bacterial enzyme, we tested a panel of previously identified bacterial NMNAT inhibitors and synthesized and screened twenty new derivatives, which demonstrate a range of potency against live parasite culture. These results highlight the importance of the parasite NAD+ metabolic pathway and provide both novel therapeutic targets and promising lead antimalarial compounds.

  9. Molecular mechanisms and biological importance of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte rosetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Wahlgren

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosetting, i.e. the spontaneous binding of uninfected to malaria infected erythrocytes and endothelial cytoadherence may hinder the blood flow and lead to serve Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Falciparum isolates obtained from unconscious patients all form rosettes and/or express a significantly higher man rosetting rate than isolates from patients with uncomplicated malaria. Furthermore, sera of patients with cerebral malaria are devoid of anti-rosetting activity while sera from patients with mild disease carry high levels of anti-rosetting antibodies. The presence of anti-rosetting antibodies also seems important for the efficient interaction of rosetting infected rbc and leucocytes. Two parasite derived rosetting ligands of Mr 22k and Mr28K named "rosettins, have been found on the surface of rosetting infected erythrocytes. CD36 has in at least some strains of parasites been found to function as a rosetting receptor on the uninfectederythrocyte. Heparin disrupts rosettes of P. falciparum in vitro and inhibits the sequestration of rosetting cells ex vivo. In conclusion, rosetting seems a crucial factor in the development of cerebral malaria and treatment of patients with anti-rosetting substances might become an effectivew adjunct in the treatment of severe malaria.

  10. The role of Plasmodium falciparum food vacuole plasmepsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Gluzman, Ilya Y; Drew, Mark E; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2005-01-14

    Plasmepsins (PMs) are thought to have an important function in hemoglobin degradation in the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum and have generated interest as antimalarial drug targets. Four paralogous plasmepsins reside in the food vacuole of P. falciparum. Targeted gene disruption by double crossover homologous recombination has been employed to study food vacuole plasmepsin function in cultured parasites. Parasite clones with deletions in each of the individual PM I, PM II, and HAP genes as well as clones with a double PM IV/PM I disruption have been generated. All of these clones lack the corresponding PMs, are viable, and appear morphologically normal. PM II and PM IV/I disruptions have longer doubling times than the 3D7 parental line in rich RPMI medium. This appears to be because of a decreased level of productive progeny rather than an increased cell cycle time. In amino acid-limited medium, all four knockouts exhibit slower growth than the parental strain. Compared with 3D7, knock-out clone sensitivity to aspartic and cysteine protease inhibitors is changed minimally. These results suggest substantial functional redundancy and have important implications for the design of antimalarial drugs. The slow growth phenotype may explain why P. falciparum has maintained four plasmepsin genes with overlapping functions.

  11. Treatment of falciparum malaria in the age of drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanks G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing problem of drug resistance has greatly complicated the treatment for falciparum malaria. Whereaschloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine could once cure most infections, this is no longer true and requiresexamination of alternative regimens. Not all treatment failures are drug resistant and other issues such asexpired antimalarials and patient compliance need to be considered. Continuation of a failing treatment policyafter drug resistance is established suppresses infections rather than curing them, leading to increasedtransmission of malaria, promotion of epidemics and loss of public confidence in malaria control programs.Antifolate drug resistance (i.e. pyrimethamine means that new combinations are urgently needed particularlybecause addition of a single drug to an already failing regimen is rarely effective for very long. Atovaquone/proguanil and mefloquine have been used against multiple drug resistant falciparum malaria with resistance toeach having been documented soon after drug introduction. Drug combinations delay further transmission ofresistant parasites by increasing cure rates and inhibiting formation of gametocytes. Most currentlyrecommended drug combinations for falciparum malaria are variants of artemisinin combination therapy wherea rapidly acting artemisinin compound is combined with a longer half-life drug of a different class. Artemisininsused include dihydroartemisinin, artesunate, artemether and companion drugs include mefloquine, amodiaquine,sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, lumefantrine, piperaquine, pyronaridine, chlorproguanil/dapsone. The standard ofcare must be to cure malaria by killing the last parasite. Combination antimalarial treatment is vital not only tothe successful treatment of individual patients but also for public health control of malaria.

  12. [Drug sensitivity of falciparum malaria imported into France in 1995].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longuet, C; Ramiliarisoa, O; Thor, R; Bouchaud, O; Basco, L K; Doury, J C; Le Bras, J

    1997-01-01

    The National Reference Centre for Malaria Chemosusceptibility (CNRCP) and the Tropical Medicine Institute of the Health Department for the Army (IMTSSA) monitor the chemosusceptibility of falciparum malaria introduced in France. In 1995, 353 isolates of P. falciparum are sent to the CNRCP and IMTSSA from malaria cases presenting in 49 civil and military hospitals distributed all over the french country. The patients are mostly Africans living in France and have mainly stayed in West Africa. Half of them did not take any chemoprophylaxis and a quarter took only chloroquine more or less regularly. The curative treatment, when known, is halofantrine alone in 52% of cases and quinine alone in 28% of cases. Three halofantrine failures are reported including 1 incorrect regimen and 4 quinine failures including 3 incorrect regimens. In 1995, in vitro resistance of P. falciparum isolates imported in France to the chemoprophylactic and therapeutic drugs is not worsening. In vitro quinine resistance is rare (1/108), mefloquine resistance (2/20) and halofantrine resistance (12/211) are limited, cycloguanil resistance (42/185) is stable and chloroquine resistance (84/230) is even decreasing (less selective pressure in Africa?).

  13. Identification of the in vivo function of the high-efficiency D-mannonate dehydratase in Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 from the enolase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelecki, Daniel J; Graff, Dylan C; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2014-07-01

    The d-mannonate dehydratase (ManD) subgroup of the enolase superfamily contains members with varying catalytic activities (high-efficiency, low-efficiency, or no activity) that dehydrate d-mannonate and/or d-gluconate to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate [Wichelecki, D. J., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 2722-2731]. Despite extensive in vitro characterization, the in vivo physiological role of a ManD has yet to be established. In this study, we report the in vivo functional characterization of a high-efficiency ManD from Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 (UniProt entry B8GZZ7) by in vivo discovery of its essential role in d-glucuronate metabolism. This in vivo functional annotation may be extended to ~50 additional proteins.

  14. Early detection of response in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma by changes in serum concentrations of creatine kinase, neuron specific enolase, calcitonin, ACTH, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, E; Hansen, M; Urdal, P;

    1988-01-01

    determined within 4-8 weeks. The results indicate that serum CK-BB and NSE are potential markers for SCC at the time of diagnosis and that changes in the concentrations during the first course of cytostatic therapy are promising as biochemical tests for early detection of response to chemotherapy.......Creatine kinase (CK-BB), neuron specific enolase (NSE), ACTH, calcitonin, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) were measured in serum or plasma before and immediately after initiation of treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCC). Pretherapeutic elevated concentrations of CK...... stage patients and 71% in limited stage patients. Frequent initial monitoring of the substances showed an increase in the concentrations of pretherapeutic elevated CK-BB and NSE on day 1 or 2 followed by a sharp decrease within 1 week. These changes were correlated to objective clinical response...

  15. Acute sleep deprivation increases serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Christian; Cedernaes, Jonathan; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Nilsson, Emil K; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Vågesjö, Evelina; Massena, Sara; Pettersson, Ulrika; Christoffersson, Gustaf; Phillipson, Mia; Broman, Jan-Erik; Lannfelt, Lars; Zetterberg, Henrik; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether total sleep deprivation (TSD) affects circulating concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in humans. These factors are usually found in the cytoplasm of neurons and glia cells. Increasing concentrations of these factors in blood may be therefore indicative for either neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or both. In addition, amyloid β (Aβ) peptides 1-42 and 1-40 were measured in plasma to calculate their ratio. A reduced plasma ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 is considered an indirect measure of increased deposition of Aβ 1-42 peptide in the brain. Subjects participated in two conditions (including either 8-h of nocturnal sleep [22:30-06:30] or TSD). Fasting blood samples were drawn before and after sleep interventions (19:30 and 07:30, respectively). Sleep laboratory. 15 healthy young men. TSD increased morning serum levels of NSE (P = 0.002) and S-100B (P = 0.02) by approximately 20%, compared with values obtained after a night of sleep. In contrast, the ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 did not differ between the sleep interventions. Future studies in which both serum and cerebrospinal fluid are sampled after sleep loss should elucidate whether the increase in serum neuron-specific enolase and S100 calcium binding protein B is primarily caused by neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or is just a consequence of increased gene expression in non-neuronal cells, such as leukocytes.

  16. A comparison of intraspecific patterns of DNA sequence variation in mitochondrial DNA, alpha-enolase, and MHC class II B loci in auklets (Charadriiformes: Alcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Hollie E; Friesen, Vicki L

    2003-12-01

    Patterns of DNA sequence variation can be used to learn about mechanisms of organismal evolution, but only if mechanisms of sequence evolution are well understood. Although theories of molecular evolution are well developed, few empirical studies have addressed patterns and mechanisms of sequence evolution in nuclear genes within species. In the present study, we compared DNA sequences among three loci with different evolutionary constraints to determine the influences of effective population size, balancing selection, and linkage on intraspecific patterns of sequence variation. Specifically, we assessed the degree and nature of polymorphism in a 307-base pair (bp) fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, intron VIII of the gene for alpha-enolase (a presumably neutral nuclear gene), and an approximately 600-bp fragment of an MHC class II B gene, including 155 bp of the hypervariable peptide binding region (a nuclear locus thought to be under balancing selection) for least and crested auklets (Aethia pusilla and A. cristatella; Charadriiformes: Alcidae). Transspecies polymorphism was found in both alpha-enolase and the MHC but not cytochrome b and, given estimates of effective population size, probably represents retained ancestral variation. Biases in nucleotide composition suggested that mutational bias, tRNA availability, and the secondary structure of mRNA and/or DNA may influence base usage. Several lines of evidence indicated that balancing selection may be acting on the MHC II B exon 2. However, no evidence of balancing selection was observed in the intron and exon sequences immediately downstream of MHC II B exon 2.

  17. Functional and Structural Characterization of a Novel HLA-DRB1*04:01-Restricted α-enolase T Cell Epitope in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gerstner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to citrullinated proteins, common in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA patients, are strongly associated to a specific set of HLA-DR alleles including HLA-DRB1*04:01, *04:04 and *01:01. Here, we first demonstrate that autoantibody levels towards the dominant citrullinated B cell epitope from α-enolase are significantly elevated in HLA-DRB1*04:01-positive RA patients. Furthermore, we identified α-enolase-derived T cell epitopes and demonstrated that native and citrullinated versions of several peptides bind with different affinities to HLA-DRB1*04:01, *04:04 and *01:01. The citrulline residues in the eight identified peptides are distributed throughout the entire length of the presented epitopes and more specifically, localized at peptide positions p-2, p2, p4, p6, p7, p10 and p11. Importantly, in contrast to its native version peptide 26 (TSKGLFRAAVPSGAS, the HLA-DRB1*04:01-restricted citrullinated peptide Cit26 (TSKGLFCitAAVPSGAS elicited significant functional T cell responses in primary cells from RA patients. Comparative analysis of the crystal structures of HLA-DRB1*04:01 in complex with peptide 26 or Cit26 demonstrated that the post-translational modification did not alter the conformation of the peptide. And since citrullination is the only structural difference between the two complexes this indicates that the neo-antigen Cit26 is recognized by T cells with high specificity to the citrulline residue.

  18. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: Stereochemically Distinct Mechanisms in Two Families of cis,cis-Muconate Lactonizing Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, A.; Fedorov, A; Fedorov, E; Schnoes, A; Glasner, M; Burley, S; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Gerlt, J

    2009-01-01

    The mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily is a paradigm for elucidating Nature's strategies for divergent evolution of enzyme function. Each of the different reactions catalyzed by members of the superfamily is initiated by abstraction of the a-proton of a carboxylate substrate that is coordinated to an essential Mg2+. The muconate lactonizing enzyme (MLE) from Pseudomonas putida, a member of a family that catalyzes the syn-cycloisomerization of cis,cis-muconate to (4S)-muconolactone in the e-ketoadipate pathway, has provided critical insights into the structural bases for evolution of function within the superfamily. A second, divergent family of homologous MLEs that catalyzes anti-cycloisomerization has been identified. Structures of members of both families liganded with the common (4S)-muconolactone product (syn, Pseudomonas fluorescens, gi 70731221; anti, Mycobacterium smegmatis, gi 118470554) document that the conserved Lys at the end of the second e-strand in the (e/a)7e-barrel domain serves as the acid catalyst in both reactions. The different stereochemical courses (syn and anti) result from different structural strategies for determining substrate specificity: although the distal carboxylate group of the cis,cis-muconate substrate attacks the same face of the proximal double bond, opposite faces of the resulting enolate anion intermediate are presented to the conserved Lys acid catalyst. The discovery of two families of homologous, but stereochemically distinct, MLEs likely provides an example of 'pseudoconvergent' evolution of the same function from different homologous progenitors within the enolase superfamily, in which different spatial arrangements of active site functional groups and substrate specificity determinants support catalysis of the same reaction.

  19. Malária por Plasmodium falciparum: estudos proteômicos Plasmodium falciparum malaria: proteomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Siqueira-Batista

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A despeito dos avanços no tratamento e das campanhas de prevenção e de controle da malária nos distintos continentes nos quais a moléstia grassa, a entidade mórbida permanece com significativa relevância no mundo contemporâneo. O Plasmodium falciparum é o grande responsável pela malária grave, caracterizada por distúrbios em diferentes órgãos e sistemas, com possibilidade de evolução ao óbito. Embora incipientes, os estudos proteômicos na malária têm trazido boas perspectivas para melhor compreensão dos aspectos biológicos do Plasmodium, assim como dos mecanismos fisiopatológicos, diagnósticos, terapêuticos e profiláticos da enfermidade. Desse modo, o objetivo do presente artigo é apresentar uma breve revisão das aplicações da análise proteômica na malária por P. falciparum.Despite advances in treatment and campaigns for prevention and control of malaria on the various continents where it is still rampant, this disease remains significantly relevant to the contemporary world. Plasmodium falciparum is the organism that is mainly responsible for severe malaria, which is characterized by disturbances in different organs and systems, with possibly fatal outcomes. Although incipient, proteomic studies of malaria have yielded favorable prospects for elucidating the biological aspects of Plasmodium as well as the pathophysiological, diagnostic, prophylactic, and therapeutic mechanisms of the disease. Thus, the aim of the present article is to present a brief review of the applications of proteomic analysis in P. falciparum malaria.

  20. In silico multiple-targets identification for heme detoxification in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaiphinit, Suthat; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Lursinsap, Chidchanok; Plaimas, Kitiporn

    2016-01-01

    Detoxification of hemoglobin byproducts or free heme is an essential step and considered potential targets for anti-malaria drug development. However, most of anti-malaria drugs are no longer effective due to the emergence and spread of the drug resistant malaria parasites. Therefore, it is an urgent need to identify potential new targets and even for target combinations for effective malaria drug design. In this work, we reconstructed the metabolic networks of Plasmodium falciparum and human red blood cells for the simulation of steady mass and flux flows of the parasite's metabolites under the blood environment by flux balance analysis (FBA). The integrated model, namely iPF-RBC-713, was then adjusted into two stage-specific metabolic models, which first was for the pathological stage metabolic model of the parasite when invaded the red blood cell without any treatment and second was for the treatment stage of the parasite when a drug acted by inhibiting the hemozoin formation and caused high production rate of heme toxicity. The process of identifying target combinations consisted of two main steps. Firstly, the optimal fluxes of reactions in both the pathological and treatment stages were computed and compared to determine the change of fluxes. Corresponding enzymes of the reactions with zero fluxes in the treatment stage but non-zero fluxes in the pathological stage were predicted as a preliminary list of potential targets in inhibiting heme detoxification. Secondly, the combinations of all possible targets listed in the first step were examined to search for the best promising target combinations resulting in more effective inhibition of the detoxification to kill the malaria parasites. Finally, twenty-three enzymes were identified as a preliminary list of candidate targets which mostly were in pyruvate metabolism and citrate cycle. The optimal set of multiple targets for blocking the detoxification was a set of heme ligase, adenosine transporter, myo

  1. Immunoglobulin G antibody reactivity to a group A Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 and protection from em>P. falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magistrado, Pamela A; Lusingu, John; Vestergaard, Lasse S;

    2007-01-01

    Variant surface antigens (VSA) on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of malaria and are key targets for acquired immunity. The best-characterized VSA belong to the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family. In areas...... where P. falciparum is endemic, parasites causing severe malaria and malaria in young children with limited immunity tend to express semiconserved PfEMP1 molecules encoded by group A var genes. Here we investigated antibody responses of Tanzanians who were 0 to 19 years old to PF11_0008, a group A PfEMP...

  2. Caspar controls resistance to Plasmodium falciparum in diverse anopheline species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey S Garver

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses mounted by the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae are largely regulated by the Toll and Imd (immune deficiency pathways via the NF-kappaB transcription factors Rel1 and Rel2, which are controlled by the negative regulators Cactus and Caspar, respectively. Rel1- and Rel2-dependent transcription in A. gambiae has been shown to be particularly critical to the mosquito's ability to manage infection with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei. Using RNA interference to deplete the negative regulators of these pathways, we found that Rel2 controls resistance of A. gambiae to the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, whereas Rel 1 activation reduced infection levels. The universal relevance of this defense system across Anopheles species was established by showing that caspar silencing also prevents the development of P. falciparum in the major malaria vectors of Asia and South America, A. stephensi and A. albimanus, respectively. Parallel studies suggest that while Imd pathway activation is most effective against P. falciparum, the Toll pathway is most efficient against P. berghei, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the human pathogen and its rodent model. High throughput gene expression analyses identified a plethora of genes regulated by the activation of the two Rel factors and revealed that the Toll pathway played a more diverse role in mosquito biology than the Imd pathway, which was more immunity-specific. Further analyses of key anti-Plasmodium factors suggest they may be responsible for the Imd pathway-mediated resistance phenotype. Additionally, we found that the fitness cost caused by Rel2 activation through caspar gene silencing was undetectable in sugar-fed, blood-fed, and P. falciparum-infected female A. gambiae, while activation of the Toll pathway's Rel1 had a major impact. This study describes for the first time a single gene that influences an immune mechanism that is able to abort

  3. Caspar controls resistance to Plasmodium falciparum in diverse anopheline species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, Lindsey S; Dong, Yuemei; Dimopoulos, George

    2009-03-01

    Immune responses mounted by the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae are largely regulated by the Toll and Imd (immune deficiency) pathways via the NF-kappaB transcription factors Rel1 and Rel2, which are controlled by the negative regulators Cactus and Caspar, respectively. Rel1- and Rel2-dependent transcription in A. gambiae has been shown to be particularly critical to the mosquito's ability to manage infection with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei. Using RNA interference to deplete the negative regulators of these pathways, we found that Rel2 controls resistance of A. gambiae to the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, whereas Rel 1 activation reduced infection levels. The universal relevance of this defense system across Anopheles species was established by showing that caspar silencing also prevents the development of P. falciparum in the major malaria vectors of Asia and South America, A. stephensi and A. albimanus, respectively. Parallel studies suggest that while Imd pathway activation is most effective against P. falciparum, the Toll pathway is most efficient against P. berghei, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the human pathogen and its rodent model. High throughput gene expression analyses identified a plethora of genes regulated by the activation of the two Rel factors and revealed that the Toll pathway played a more diverse role in mosquito biology than the Imd pathway, which was more immunity-specific. Further analyses of key anti-Plasmodium factors suggest they may be responsible for the Imd pathway-mediated resistance phenotype. Additionally, we found that the fitness cost caused by Rel2 activation through caspar gene silencing was undetectable in sugar-fed, blood-fed, and P. falciparum-infected female A. gambiae, while activation of the Toll pathway's Rel1 had a major impact. This study describes for the first time a single gene that influences an immune mechanism that is able to abort development of P. falciparum

  4. A new world malaria map: Plasmodium falciparum endemicity in 2010

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    Gething Peter W

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmission intensity affects almost all aspects of malaria epidemiology and the impact of malaria on human populations. Maps of transmission intensity are necessary to identify populations at different levels of risk and to evaluate objectively options for disease control. To remain relevant operationally, such maps must be updated frequently. Following the first global effort to map Plasmodium falciparum malaria endemicity in 2007, this paper describes the generation of a new world map for the year 2010. This analysis is extended to provide the first global estimates of two other metrics of transmission intensity for P. falciparum that underpin contemporary questions in malaria control: the entomological inoculation rate (PfEIR and the basic reproductive number (PfR. Methods Annual parasite incidence data for 13,449 administrative units in 43 endemic countries were sourced to define the spatial limits of P. falciparum transmission in 2010 and 22,212 P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR surveys were used in a model-based geostatistical (MBG prediction to create a continuous contemporary surface of malaria endemicity within these limits. A suite of transmission models were developed that link PfPR to PfEIR and PfR and these were fitted to field data. These models were combined with the PfPR map to create new global predictions of PfEIR and PfR. All output maps included measured uncertainty. Results An estimated 1.13 and 1.44 billion people worldwide were at risk of unstable and stable P. falciparum malaria, respectively. The majority of the endemic world was predicted with a median PfEIR of less than one and a median PfRc of less than two. Values of either metric exceeding 10 were almost exclusive to Africa. The uncertainty described in both PfEIR and PfR was substantial in regions of intense transmission. Conclusions The year 2010 has a particular significance as an evaluation milestone for malaria global health policy. The

  5. Evaluating the prognosis and degree of brain injury by combined S-100 protein and neuron specific enolase determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xihua Wang; Xinding Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Background:S-100 and neuron specific enolase(NSE)possess the characteristics of specific distribution in brain and relative stable content.Some studies suggest that combined detection of the both is of very importance for evaluating the degree of brain injury.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of S-100 protein and NSE levels at different time points after acute brain injury,and evaluate the values of combined detection detection of the both for different injury degrees,pathological changes and prognosis.DESIGN: Case-control observation SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery,Second Affiliated Hospital,Lanzhou University.PARTICIPANTS:Thirty-four inpatients with brain injury,19 males and 15 females,aged 15 to 73 years.who received treatment between September 2005 and May 2006 in the Department of Neurosurgery. Second Affiliated Hospital,Lanzhou University,were recruited.The patients were admitted to hospital at 24 hours after brain injury.After admission,skull CT confirmed that they suffered from brain injury.Following Glasgow coma score(GCS)on admission,the patients were assigned into 3 groups:severe group(GCS 3 to 8 points,n=15).moderate group(GCS 9 to 12 points,n=8)and mild group(GCS 13 to 15 points,n=11).Following Glasgow outcome scale(GOS)at 3 months after brain injury,the patients were assigned into good outcome group (GOS 4 to 5 points,good recovery and moderate disability included,n=19)and poor outcome group(GOS 1 to 3 points,severe disability,vegetative state and death,n=15).Ten subjects who received health examination concurrently were chosen as normal control group,including 6 males and 4 females,aged(45.4±14.3)years.In our laboratory,the normal level of NSE was≤15.2 ng/L,and that of S100 was≤0.105 μg/L.METHODS:①Blood samples of control group were collected when the subjects received health examination Blood samples of patients with brain injury were collected at 24 hours,3,7 and 14 days after injury.According to the instructions of NSE and S-100 kits

  6. Whole-Genome Scans Provide Evidence of Adaptive Evolution in Malawian Plasmodium falciparum Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocholla, Harold; Preston, Mark D; Mipando, Mwapatsa

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Selection by host immunity and antimalarial drugs has driven extensive adaptive evolution in Plasmodium falciparum and continues to produce ever-changing landscapes of genetic variation. METHODS:  We performed whole-genome sequencing of 69 P. falciparum isolates from Malawi and used ...

  7. Lack of Evidence for Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Malaria, Leogane, Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Ami; Zhong, Kathleen; Kain, Kevin C

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Haiti is considered chloroquine susceptible, although resistance transporter alleles associated with chloroquine resistance were recently detected. Among 49 patients with falciparum malaria, we found neither parasites carrying haplotypes associated with chloroquine resistance nor instances of chloroquine treatment failure. Continued vigilance to detect emergence of chloroquine resistance is needed. PMID:22932030

  8. Genetic loci associated with delayed clearance of Plasmodium falciparum following artemisinin treatment in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    Genetic loci associated with delayed clearance of Plasmodium falciparum following artemisinin treatment in Southeast Asia Shannon Takala-Harrisona...resistant Plasmodium falcipa- rum malaria in western Cambodia could threaten prospects for malaria elimination. Identification of the genetic basis of...molecular markers Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are the lead-ing treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria (1), and their use with

  9. PfSETvs methylation of histone H3K36 represses virulence genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Lubin; Mu, Jianbing; Zhang, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    The variant antigen Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), which is expressed on the surface of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells, is a critical virulence factor for malaria. Each parasite has 60 antigenically distinct var genes that each code for a different PfEMP1...

  10. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Elimination in Hainan Province, 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ding-Wei; Du, Jian-Wei; Wang, Guang-Ze; Li, Yu-Chun; He, Chang-Hua; Xue, Rui-De; Wang, Shan-Qing; Hu, Xi-Min

    2015-12-01

    In Hainan Province, China, great achievements in elimination of falciparum malaria have been made since 2010. There have been no locally acquired falciparum malaria cases since that time. The cost-effectiveness of elimination of falciparum malaria has been analyzed in Hainan Province. There were 4,422 falciparum malaria cases reported from 2002 to 2012, more cases occurred in males than in females. From 2002 to 2012, a total of 98.5 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were reported because of falciparum malaria. Populations in the age ranges of 15-25 and 30-44 years had higher incidences and DALYs than other age groups. From 2002 to 2012, malaria-related costs for salaries of staff, funds from the provincial government, national government, and the GFATM were US$3.02, US$2.24, US$1.44, and US$5.08 million, respectively. An estimated 9,504 falciparum malaria cases were averted during the period 2003-2012. The estimated cost per falciparum malaria case averted was US$116.5. The falciparum malaria elimination program in Hainan was highly effective and successful. However, funding for maintenance is still needed because of imported cases. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Lymphocyte response to purified Plasmodium falciparum antigens during and after malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C; Jepsen, S; Theander, T G

    1986-01-01

    The peripheral blood lymphocyte response to affinity purified soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens from in vitro cultures was studied in seven patients with acute falciparum malaria, on eight occasions, and in 15 persons having had malaria, at various times post infection, on 24 occasions. During...

  12. Lack of evidence for chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria, Leogane, Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Ami; Zhong, Kathleen; Kain, Kevin C; Schwartz, Eli

    2012-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Haiti is considered chloroquine susceptible, although resistance transporter alleles associated with chloroquine resistance were recently detected. Among 49 patients with falciparum malaria, we found neither parasites carrying haplotypes associated with chloroquine resistance nor instances of chloroquine treatment failure. Continued vigilance to detect emergence of chloroquine resistance is needed.

  13. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Elimination in Hainan Province, 2002–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ding-Wei; Du, Jian-Wei; Wang, Guang-Ze; Li, Yu-Chun; He, Chang-Hua; Xue, Rui-De; Wang, Shan-Qing; Hu, Xi-Min

    2015-01-01

    In Hainan Province, China, great achievements in elimination of falciparum malaria have been made since 2010. There have been no locally acquired falciparum malaria cases since that time. The cost-effectiveness of elimination of falciparum malaria has been analyzed in Hainan Province. There were 4,422 falciparum malaria cases reported from 2002 to 2012, more cases occurred in males than in females. From 2002 to 2012, a total of 98.5 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were reported because of falciparum malaria. Populations in the age ranges of 15–25 and 30–44 years had higher incidences and DALYs than other age groups. From 2002 to 2012, malaria-related costs for salaries of staff, funds from the provincial government, national government, and the GFATM were US$3.02, US$2.24, US$1.44, and US$5.08 million, respectively. An estimated 9,504 falciparum malaria cases were averted during the period 2003–2012. The estimated cost per falciparum malaria case averted was US$116.5. The falciparum malaria elimination program in Hainan was highly effective and successful. However, funding for maintenance is still needed because of imported cases. PMID:26438030

  14. Chloroquine- and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-resistant falciparum malaria in vivo - a pilot study in rural Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, HM; Kager, J; Koetsier, DW; van der Werf, TS

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chloroquine (CQ) and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) are the predominantly used antimalarials in Zambia and other parts of East Africa, but increasing resistance of P. falciparum is a major concern. METHODS Seventy consecutive patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were enrolled.

  15. Cord blood dendritic cell subsets in African newborns exposed to Plasmodium falciparum in utero.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breitling, L.P.; Fendel, R.; Mordmueller, B.; Adegnika, A.A.; Kremsner, P.G.; Luty, A.J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Placental Plasmodium falciparum infection affects birth outcomes and sensitizes fetal lymphocytes to parasite antigens. We assessed the influence of maternal P. falciparum infection on fetal myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), analyzing the cord blood of offspring o

  16. Possible treatment failure of artemether-lumefantrine in an Italian traveler with uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernestina Carla Repetto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin-combination therapies (ACTs are recommended for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in endemic areas with multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum. We report a case of possible artemether-lumefantrine failure in an Italian traveler with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria imported from Democratic Republic of Congo.

  17. Analyzing Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 gene expression by a next generation sequencing based method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob S.; Petersen, Bent; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine;

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for most cases of severe malaria and causes >1 million deaths every year. The particular virulence of this Plasmodium species is highly associated with the expression of certain members of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1(PfEMP1) family...

  18. Falciparum malaria and climate change in the northwest frontier province of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, M J; Dye, C; van der Kaay, H J

    1996-08-01

    Following a striking increase in the severity of autumnal outbreaks of Plasmodium falciparum during the last decade in the Northwest Frontier Province (NWFP) of Pakistan, the role of climatologic variables was investigated. A multivariate analysis showed that during the transmission season of P. falciparum, the amount of rainfall in September and October, the temperature in November and December, and the humidity in December were all correlated (r2 = 0.82) with two measures of P. falciparum, the falciparum rate (percent of slides examined positive for P. falciparum) since 1981 and the annual P. falciparum proportion (percent of all malaria infections diagnosed as P. falciparum) since 1978. Climatologic records since 1876 show an increase in mean November and December temperatures by 2 degrees C and 1.5 degrees C, respectively, and in October rainfall. Mean humidity in December has also been increasing since 1950. These climatologic changes in the area appear to have made conditions for transmission of P. falciparum more favorable, and may account for the increase in incidence observed in the NWFP in recent years.

  19. Possible clinical failure of artemether-lumefantrine in an italian traveler with uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Ernestina C; Traverso, Antonio; Giacomazzi, Claudio G

    2011-01-01

    Artemisinin-combination therapies (ACTs) are recommended for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in endemic areas with multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum. We report a case of possible artemether-lumefantrine clinical failure in an Italian traveler with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria imported from Democratic Republic of Congo.

  20. Genetics of refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum in the mosquito Anopheles stephensi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldmann, A.M.; Gemert, Geert-Jan van; Vegte-Bolmer, Marga G. van de; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    1998-01-01

    We previously selected a line of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles stephensi refractory (resistant) to the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, using in vitro infections with P. falciparum gametocytes. This report presents data on the genetic background of refractoriness. The results of

  1. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  2. Possible Clinical Failure of Artemether-Lumefantrine in an Italian Traveler with Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Ernestina C.; Traverso, Antonio; Giacomazzi, Claudio G.

    2011-01-01

    Artemisinin-combination therapies (ACTs) are recommended for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in endemic areas with multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum. We report a case of possible artemether-lumefantrine clinical failure in an Italian traveler with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria imported from Democratic Republic of Congo. PMID:22084655

  3. Efficacy of chloroquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia Torres, Rosa Elena; Banegas, Engels Ilich; Mendoza, Meisy; Diaz, Cesar; Bucheli, Sandra Tamara Mancero; Fontecha, Gustavo A; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Goldman, Ira; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Zambrano, Jose Orlinder Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is officially used for the primary treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Honduras. In this study, the therapeutic efficacy of CQ for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in the municipality of Puerto Lempira, Gracias a Dios, Honduras was evaluated using the Pan American Health Organization-World Health Organization protocol with a follow-up of 28 days. Sixty-eight patients from 6 months to 60 years of age microscopically diagnosed with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria were included in the final analysis. All patients who were treated with CQ (25 mg/kg over 3 days) cleared parasitemia by day 3 and acquired no new P. falciparum infection within 28 days of follow-up. All the parasite samples sequenced for CQ resistance mutations (pfcrt) showed only the CQ-sensitive genotype (CVMNK). This finding shows that CQ remains highly efficacious for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Gracias a Dios, Honduras.

  4. Predictors of Plasmodium falciparum malaria incidence in Chano Mille, South Ethiopia: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loha, Eskindir; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2012-09-01

    We assessed potential effects of local meteorological and environmental conditions, indoor residual spraying with insecticides, insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) use at individual and community levels, and individual factors on Plasmodium falciparum malaria incidence in a village in south Ethiopia. A cohort of 8,121 people was followed for 101 weeks with active and passive surveillance. Among 317 microscopically confirmed P. falciparum malaria episodes, 29.3% occurred among temporary residents. The incidence density was 3.6/10,000 person-weeks of observation. We observed higher malaria incidence among males, children 5-14 years of age, ITNs non-users, the poor, and people who lived closer to vector breeding places. Rainfall increased and indoor residual spraying with Deltamethrin reduced falciparum incidence. Although ITNs prevented falciparum malaria for the users, we did not find that free mass ITNs distribution reduced falciparum malaria on a village level.

  5. Refrigeration provides a simple means to synchronize in vitro cultures of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lili; Hao, Mingming; Wu, Lanou; Zhao, Zhen; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Li, Xiaomei; He, Yongshu; Sun, Ling; Feng, Guohua; Xiang, Zheng; Cui, Liwang; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2014-05-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is usually asynchronous during in vitro culture. Highly synchronized cultures of P. falciparum are routinely used in malaria research. Here, we describe a simple synchronization procedure for P. falciparum asexual erythrocytic culture, which involves storage at 4°C for 8-24 h followed by routine culture. When cultures with 27-60% of ring stage were synchronized using this procedure, 70-93% ring stages were obtained after 48 h of culture and relative growth synchrony remained for at least two erythrocytic cycles. To test the suitability of this procedure for subsequent work, drug sensitivity assays were performed using four laboratory strains and four freshly adapted clinical P. falciparum isolates. Parasites synchronized by sorbitol treatment or refrigeration showed similar dose-response curves and comparable IC50 values to four antimalarial drugs. The refrigeration synchronization method is simple, inexpensive, time-saving, and should be especially useful when large numbers of P. falciparum culture are handled.

  6. A World Malaria Map: Plasmodium falciparum Endemicity in 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Simon I; Guerra, Carlos A; Gething, Peter W; Patil, Anand P; Tatem, Andrew J; Noor, Abdisalan M; Kabaria, Caroline W; Manh, Bui H; Elyazar, Iqbal R. F; Brooker, Simon; Smith, David L; Moyeed, Rana A; Snow, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Background Efficient allocation of resources to intervene against malaria requires a detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of malaria risk. It is exactly 40 y since the last global map of malaria endemicity was published. This paper describes the generation of a new world map of Plasmodium falciparum malaria endemicity for the year 2007. Methods and Findings A total of 8,938 P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) surveys were identified using a variety of exhaustive search strategies. Of these, 7,953 passed strict data fidelity tests for inclusion into a global database of PfPR data, age-standardized to 2–10 y for endemicity mapping. A model-based geostatistical procedure was used to create a continuous surface of malaria endemicity within previously defined stable spatial limits of P. falciparum transmission. These procedures were implemented within a Bayesian statistical framework so that the uncertainty of these predictions could be evaluated robustly. The uncertainty was expressed as the probability of predicting correctly one of three endemicity classes; previously stratified to be an informative guide for malaria control. Population at risk estimates, adjusted for the transmission modifying effects of urbanization in Africa, were then derived with reference to human population surfaces in 2007. Of the 1.38 billion people at risk of stable P. falciparum malaria, 0.69 billion were found in Central and South East Asia (CSE Asia), 0.66 billion in Africa, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia (Africa+), and 0.04 billion in the Americas. All those exposed to stable risk in the Americas were in the lowest endemicity class (PfPR2−10 ≤ 5%). The vast majority (88%) of those living under stable risk in CSE Asia were also in this low endemicity class; a small remainder (11%) were in the intermediate endemicity class (PfPR2−10 > 5 to < 40%); and the remaining fraction (1%) in high endemicity (PfPR2−10 ≥ 40%) areas. High endemicity was widespread in the

  7. Correlation between 'H' blood group antigen and Plasmodium falciparum invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Vrushali; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-06-01

    The ABO blood group system is the most important blood group system in clinical practice. The relationship between Plasmodium falciparum and ABO blood groups has been studied for many years. This study was undertaken to investigate the abilities of different blood group erythrocytes to support in vitro growth of P. falciparum parasites. P. falciparum parasites of four different strains (3D7, 7G8, Dd2 and RKL9) were co-cultured with erythrocytes of blood group 'A', 'B', 'O' (n = 10 for each) and 'O(h)' (Bombay group) (n = 7) for 5 days. Statistically significant differences were observed on the fourth day among the mean percent parasitemias of 'O', non-'O' ('A' and 'B') and 'O(h)' group cultures. The parasitemias of four strains ranged from 12.23 to 14.66, 11.68 to 13.24, 16.89 to 22.3, and 7.37 to 11.27 % in 'A', 'B', 'O' and Bombay group cultures, respectively. As the expression of H antigen decreased from 'O' blood group to 'A' and 'B' and then to Bombay blood group, parasite invasion (percent parasitemia) also decreased significantly (p group erythrocytes were virtually converted to Bombay group-like erythrocytes by the treatment of anti-H lectins extracted from Ulex europaeus seeds. Mean percent parasitemia of lectin-treated cultures on the fourth day was significantly lower (p Bombay group erythrocyte cultures, thus further strengthening the hypothesis.

  8. Serological evidence of discrete spatial clusters of Plasmodium falciparum parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejon, Philip; Turner, Louise; Lavstsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Malaria transmission may be considered to be homogenous with well-mixed parasite populations (as in the classic Ross/Macdonald models). Marked fine-scale heterogeneity of transmission has been observed in the field (i.e., over a few kilometres), but there are relatively few data on the degree of ...... of mixing. Since the Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) is highly polymorphic, the host's serological responses may be used to infer exposure to parasite sub-populations....

  9. Refractory pancytopenia and megaloblastic anemia due to falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Varun; Maheshwari, Anu; Rath, Bimbadhar; Kumar, Praveen; Basu, Srikanta

    2011-08-01

    Anemia is a common complication in malarial infection. Direct destruction and ineffective erythropoesis does not adequately explain the cause of anemia in malaria. We present a case with refractory megaloblastic anemia with asymptomatic falciparum malaria. We hypothesize that promoter variants in the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene might be the cause of severe refractory megaloblastic anemia and pancytopenia in our patient. Malaria should always be kept in mind as a cause of anemia especially in endemic areas even if the child is asymptomatic or there is no demonstrable parasite on routine smear examination.

  10. Reduced susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to artesunate in southern Myanmar.

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    Myat P Kyaw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins, the first line treatment for malaria worldwide, has been reported in western Cambodia. Resistance is characterized by significantly delayed clearance of parasites following artemisinin treatment. Artemisinin resistance has not previously been reported in Myanmar, which has the highest falciparum malaria burden among Southeast Asian countries. METHODS: A non-randomized, single-arm, open-label clinical trial of artesunate monotherapy (4 mg/kg daily for seven days was conducted in adults with acute blood-smear positive P. falciparum malaria in Kawthaung, southern Myanmar. Parasite density was measured every 12 hours until two consecutive negative smears were obtained. Participants were followed weekly at the study clinic for three additional weeks. Co-primary endpoints included parasite clearance time (the time required for complete clearance of initial parasitemia, parasite clearance half-life (the time required for parasitemia to decrease by 50% based on the linear portion of the parasite clearance slope, and detectable parasitemia 72 hours after commencement of artesunate treatment. Drug pharmacokinetics were measured to rule out delayed clearance due to suboptimal drug levels. RESULTS: The median (range parasite clearance half-life and time were 4.8 (2.1-9.7 and 60 (24-96 hours, respectively. The frequency distributions of parasite clearance half-life and time were bimodal, with very slow parasite clearance characteristic of the slowest-clearing Cambodian parasites (half-life longer than 6.2 hours in approximately 1/3 of infections. Fourteen of 52 participants (26.9% had a measurable parasitemia 72 hours after initiating artesunate treatment. Parasite clearance was not associated with drug pharmacokinetics. CONCLUSIONS: A subset of P. falciparum infections in southern Myanmar displayed markedly delayed clearance following artemisinin treatment, suggesting either emergence of

  11. Reduced Susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to Artesunate in Southern Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyaw, Myat P.; Nyunt, Myat H.; Chit, Khin; Aye, Moe M.; Aye, Kyin H.; Aye, Moe M.; Tarning, Joel; Imwong, Mallika; Jacob, Christopher G.; Rasmussen, Charlotte; Perin, Jamie; Ringwald, Pascal; Nyunt, Myaing M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins, the first line treatment for malaria worldwide, has been reported in western Cambodia. Resistance is characterized by significantly delayed clearance of parasites following artemisinin treatment. Artemisinin resistance has not previously been reported in Myanmar, which has the highest falciparum malaria burden among Southeast Asian countries. Methods A non-randomized, single-arm, open-label clinical trial of artesunate monotherapy (4 mg/kg daily for seven days) was conducted in adults with acute blood-smear positive P. falciparum malaria in Kawthaung, southern Myanmar. Parasite density was measured every 12 hours until two consecutive negative smears were obtained. Participants were followed weekly at the study clinic for three additional weeks. Co-primary endpoints included parasite clearance time (the time required for complete clearance of initial parasitemia), parasite clearance half-life (the time required for parasitemia to decrease by 50% based on the linear portion of the parasite clearance slope), and detectable parasitemia 72 hours after commencement of artesunate treatment. Drug pharmacokinetics were measured to rule out delayed clearance due to suboptimal drug levels. Results The median (range) parasite clearance half-life and time were 4.8 (2.1–9.7) and 60 (24–96) hours, respectively. The frequency distributions of parasite clearance half-life and time were bimodal, with very slow parasite clearance characteristic of the slowest-clearing Cambodian parasites (half-life longer than 6.2 hours) in approximately 1/3 of infections. Fourteen of 52 participants (26.9%) had a measurable parasitemia 72 hours after initiating artesunate treatment. Parasite clearance was not associated with drug pharmacokinetics. Conclusions A subset of P. falciparum infections in southern Myanmar displayed markedly delayed clearance following artemisinin treatment, suggesting either emergence of artemisinin

  12. Liver changes in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria: histopathology, apoptosis and nuclear factor kappa B expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver involvement in severe Plasmodium falciparum infection is commonly a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among humans. The clinical presentation of jaundice often reflects a certain degree of liver damage. This study investigated the liver pathology of severe P. falciparum malaria as well as the regulation and occurrence of apoptosis in cellular components of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver tissues. Methods The liver tissues used in the study came from patients who died from P. falciparum malaria with hyperbilirubinaemia (total bilirubin (TB) ≥ 51.3 μmol/L or 3 mg/dl) (12 cases), P. falciparum malaria without hyperbilirubinaemia (TB falciparum malaria were associated with higher TB level. Significant correlations were found between NF-κB p65 expression and apoptosis in Kupffer cells and lymphocytes in the portal tracts. Conclusions Hyperplastic Kupffer cells and portal tract inflammation are two main features found in the liver tissues of severe P. falciparum malaria cases. In addition, NF-κB is associated with Kupffer cells and lymphocyte apoptosis in severe P. falciparum malaria. PMID:24636003

  13. Competitive endothelial adhesion between Plasmodium falciparum isolates under physiological flow conditions

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    Molyneux Malcolm

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequestration of parasitized red blood cells in the microvasculature of major organs involves a sequence of events that is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of severe falciparum malaria. Plasmodium falciparum infections are commonly composed of multiple subpopulations of parasites with varied adhesive properties. A key question is: do these subpopulations compete for adhesion to endothelium? This study investigated whether, in a laboratory model of cytoadherence, there is competition in binding to endothelium between pRBC infected with P. falciparum of variant adhesive phenotypes, particularly under flow conditions. Methods Four different P. falciparum isolates, of known adherence phenotypes, were matched in pairs, mixed in different proportions and allowed to bind to cultured human endothelium. Using in vitro competitive static and flow-based adhesion assays, that allow simultaneous testing of the adhesive properties of two different parasite lines, adherence levels of paired P. falciparum isolates were quantified and analysed using either non-parametric Wilcoxon's paired signed rank test or Student paired test. Results Study findings show that P. falciparum parasite lines show marked differences in the efficiency of adhesion to endothelium. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum variants will compete for adhesion to endothelia and variants can be ranked by their efficiency of binding. These findings suggest that variants from a mixed infection will not show uniform cytoadherence and so may vary in their ability to cause disease.

  14. Schistosoma haematobium and Plasmodium falciparum co-infection with protection against Plasmodium falciparum ma-laria in Nigerian children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nmorsi OPG; Isaac C; Ukwandu NCD; Ekundayo AO; Ekozien MI

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Malaria remains the single leading killer of children in sub -Sahara Africa and Schistosomiasis is considered to be second to malaria in global importance.Co -infection of malaria and urinary schistosomiasis has been reported to exacerbate disease morbidity such as anaemia.In different part of the globe,the co -in-fection between malaria and schistosomiasis provides some protections on the infected persons.The protective effect of this co -infection elucidated immunologically using cytokines is lacking in our locality.Methods:U-rine and blood samples obtained from the 160 volunteers were subjected to standard parasitological techniques for diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis and malaria respectively.Blood samples collected from these volunteers comprising 80 children with schistosomiasis and malaria and the 80 children who had malaria only were subjec-ted to cytokines concentration determination using commercial standard enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kits (Abcam,UK).Results:Eighty participants with co -infection had a mean malarial parasitaemia of 662 ±201.1 μL while the 80 participants with only P.falciparum malaria had a mean malarial parasiteamia of 5943 ±3270.7μL.Also the volunteers had mean haemoglobin of 11.2 g/dL for co -infected individuals and 5.7 g/dL for participants with single infection of malaria.The serum cytokine levels of the children with S. haematobium and P.falciparum and only P.falciparum infection are as follows;interleukin -4 (16.6 pg/mL versus 5.2 pg/mL),IL -5 (501.3 pg/mL versus 357.5 pg/mL);IL -8 (2 550 pg/mL versus 309 pg/mL),IL -10 (273 pg/mL versus 290 pg/mL),TNF -α(25 pg/mL versus 290 pg/mL)and IFN -γ(21.9 pg/mL versus 2.5 pg/mL).The TNF -α/IL -10 ratio is 7 for the children with co -infection while those with only P.falciparum malaria infection had a TNF -α/IL -10 ratio of 0.9.Conclusion:We con-clude that the elevated IL -4,IL -5,IL -8 and IFN -γconcentration induced by schistosomiasis altered the Th1 /Th 2

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Infection May Lead to Slower Emergence of P. falciparum in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollomo, Benjamin; Mezui-Me-Ndong, Jérome; Noulin, Florian; Lachard, Isabelle; Ndong-Atome, Guy-Roger; Makuwa, Maria; Roques, Pierre; Branger, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Mazier, Dominique; Bisser, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Background Areas endemic for Plasmodium falciparum, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) overlap in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. HBV and HCV infections develop in the liver, where takes place the first development stage of P. falciparum before its further spread in blood. The complex mechanisms involved in the development of hepatitis may potentially influence the development of the liver stage of malaria parasites. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of these interactions could provide new pathophysiological insights for treatment strategies in Malaria. Methodology We studied a cohort of 319 individuals living in a village where the three infections are prevalent. The patients were initially given a curative antimalarial treatment and were then monitored for the emergence of asexual P. falciparum forms in blood, fortnightly for one year, by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction. Principal Findings At inclusion, 65 (20.4%) subjects had detectable malaria parasites in blood, 36 (11.3%) were HBV chronic carriers, and 61 (18.9%) were HCV chronic carriers. During follow-up, asexual P. falciparum forms were detected in the blood of 203 patients. The median time to P. falciparum emergence in blood was respectively 140 and 120 days in HBV- and HBV+ individuals, and 135 and 224 days in HCV- and HCV+ individuals. HCV carriage was associated with delayed emergence of asexual P. falciparum forms in blood relative to patients without HCV infection. Conclusions This pilot study represents first tentative evidence of a potential epidemiological interaction between HBV, HCV and P. falciparum infections. Age is an important confounding factor in this setting however multivariate analysis points to an interaction between P. falciparum and HCV at the hepatic level with a slower emergence of P. falciparum in HCV chronic carriers. More in depth analysis are necessary to unravel the basis of hepatic interactions between these two pathogens, which could help in

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection may lead to slower emergence of P. falciparum in blood.

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    Odile Ouwe-Missi-Oukem-Boyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Areas endemic for Plasmodium falciparum, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV overlap in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. HBV and HCV infections develop in the liver, where takes place the first development stage of P. falciparum before its further spread in blood. The complex mechanisms involved in the development of hepatitis may potentially influence the development of the liver stage of malaria parasites. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of these interactions could provide new pathophysiological insights for treatment strategies in Malaria. METHODOLOGY: We studied a cohort of 319 individuals living in a village where the three infections are prevalent. The patients were initially given a curative antimalarial treatment and were then monitored for the emergence of asexual P. falciparum forms in blood, fortnightly for one year, by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At inclusion, 65 (20.4% subjects had detectable malaria parasites in blood, 36 (11.3% were HBV chronic carriers, and 61 (18.9% were HCV chronic carriers. During follow-up, asexual P. falciparum forms were detected in the blood of 203 patients. The median time to P. falciparum emergence in blood was respectively 140 and 120 days in HBV- and HBV+ individuals, and 135 and 224 days in HCV- and HCV+ individuals. HCV carriage was associated with delayed emergence of asexual P. falciparum forms in blood relative to patients without HCV infection. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study represents first tentative evidence of a potential epidemiological interaction between HBV, HCV and P. falciparum infections. Age is an important confounding factor in this setting however multivariate analysis points to an interaction between P. falciparum and HCV at the hepatic level with a slower emergence of P. falciparum in HCV chronic carriers. More in depth analysis are necessary to unravel the basis of hepatic interactions between these two pathogens

  17. Glycerol inhibits water permeation through Plasmodium falciparum aquaglyceroporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liao Y

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum aquaglyceroporin (PfAQP) is a multifunctional membrane protein in the plasma membrane of P. falciparum, the parasite that causes the most severe form of malaria. The current literature has established the science of PfAQP's structure, functions, and hydrogen-bonding interactions but left unanswered the following fundamental question: does glycerol modulate water permeation through aquaglyceroporin that conducts both glycerol and water? This paper provides an affirmative answer to this question of essential importance to the protein's functions. On the basis of the chemical-potential profile of glycerol from the extracellular bulk region, throughout PfAQP's conducting channel, to the cytoplasmic bulk region, this study shows the existence of a bound state of glycerol inside aquaglyceroporin's permeation pore, from which the dissociation constant is approximately 14μM. A glycerol molecule occupying the bound state occludes the conducting pore through which permeating molecules line up in single file by hydrogen-bonding with one another and with the luminal residues of aquaglyceroporin. In this way, glycerol inhibits permeation of water and other permeants through aquaglyceroporin. The biological implications of this theory are discussed and shown to agree with the existent in vitro data. It turns out that the structure of aquaglyceroporin is perfect for the van der Waals interactions between the protein and glycerol to cause the existence of the bound state deep inside the conducting pore and, thus to play an unexpected but significant role in aquaglyceroporin's functions.

  18. Molecular Aspects of Plasmodium falciparum Infection during Pregnancy

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    Nicaise Tuikue Ndam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoadherence of Plasmodium-falciparum-parasitized red blood cells (PRBCs to host receptors is the key phenomenon in the pathological process of the malaria disease. Some of these interactions can originate poor outcomes responsible for 1 to 3 million annual deaths mostly occurring among children in sub-Saharan Africa. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM represents an important exception of the disease occurring at adulthood in malaria endemic settings. Consequences of this are shared between the mother (maternal anemia and the baby (low birth weight and infant mortality. Demonstrating that parasites causing PAM express specific variant surface antigens (VSAPAM, including the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 variant VAR2CSA, that are targets for protective immunity has strengthened the possibility for the development of PAM-specific vaccine. In this paper, we review the molecular basis of malaria pathogenesis attributable to the erythrocyte stages of the parasites, and findings supporting potential anti-PAM vaccine components evidenced in PAM.

  19. Serum enzymes activities in Plasmodium falciparum infection in Southern Pakistan

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    Koay Yen Chin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH,aspartate aminotranferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase(ALT, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were assessed todetermine the liver functions of patients infected withPlasmodium falciparum. The enzyme activities were assessedin 60 malarial patients and a control group of 44 people.Materials and Methods: The data for the study was collectedfrom the survey conducted from Liaquat University of medicaland health sciences Hospital, Hyderabad, Pakaistan. Sample of60 patients aged between 20 and 50 years were collected. Acontrol group of 44 healthy individual adults was also assessedfor comparative purposes. All the malaria patients who visitedthe OPD during the study period enrolled in the study.Results: The LDH activity in male patients was found to be674.89 ± 33.354 IU/L. This is above the control LDH activity of296.59 ± 14.476 IU/L. Similarly, in female patients, the serumLDH activity of 580.25 ± 24.507 IU/L is over twice the controlfemale serum LDH activity of 302.18 ± 18.082 IU/L. Furtherone-way anova test was performed to find any significance ininfected and control male and female.Conclusion: Hepatic dysfunction was found to be associated toP. falciparum malaria infection.

  20. Targeting glycolysis in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, David D; Penkler, Gerald P; du Toit, Francois; Snoep, Jacky L

    2016-02-01

    Glycolysis is the main pathway for ATP production in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and essential for its survival. Following a sensitivity analysis of a detailed kinetic model for glycolysis in the parasite, the glucose transport reaction was identified as the step whose activity needed to be inhibited to the least extent to result in a 50% reduction in glycolytic flux. In a subsequent inhibitor titration with cytochalasin B, we confirmed the model analysis experimentally and measured a flux control coefficient of 0.3 for the glucose transporter. In addition to the glucose transporter, the glucokinase and phosphofructokinase had high flux control coefficients, while for the ATPase a small negative flux control coefficient was predicted. In a broader comparative analysis of glycolytic models, we identified a weakness in the P. falciparum pathway design with respect to stability towards perturbations in the ATP demand. The mathematical model described here has been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database and can be accessed at http://jjj.bio.vu.nl/database/vanniekerk1. The SEEK-study including the experimental data set is available at DOI 10.15490/seek.1. 56 (http://dx.doi.org/10.15490/seek.1. 56). © 2015 FEBS.

  1. Atorvastatin prevents Plasmodium falciparum cytoadherence and endothelial damage

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    Soubrier Florent

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cell (PRBC to human endothelial cells (EC induces inflammatory processes, coagulation cascades, oxidative stress and apoptosis. These pathological processes are suspected to be responsible for the blood-brain-barrier and other organs' endothelial dysfunctions observed in fatal cases of malaria. Atorvastatin, a drug that belongs to the lowering cholesterol molecule family of statins, has been shown to ameliorate endothelial functions and is widely used in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Methods The effect of this compound on PRBC induced endothelial impairments was assessed using endothelial co-culture models. Results Atorvastatin pre-treatment of EC was found to reduce the expression of adhesion molecules and P. falciparum cytoadherence, to protect cells against PRBC-induced apoptosis and to enhance endothelial monolayer integrity during co-incubation with parasites. Conclusions These results might suggest a potential interest use of atorvastatin as a protective treatment to interfere with the pathophysiological cascades leading to severe malaria.

  2. Polymorphism of Plasmodium Falciparum Dihydrofolate Reductase and Dihydropteroate Synthase Genes among Pregnant Women with Falciparum Malaria in Banjar District, South Kalimantan Province, Indonesia

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    Sukmawati Basuki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women are highly vulnerable to malaria infection in its endemic areas, particularly infection by Plasmodium falciparum that can cause premature, low birth weight, severe anemia in pregnant women, and death. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment for pregnant (IPTp is used for malaria control in pregnancy recommended by the World Health Organization that has already been implemented in Africa. The P. falciparum resistance to SP has been reported in several malarial endemic areas, and mutations in the genes of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydrofolate Reductase (Pfdhfr and Dihydropteroate Synthase (Pfdhps are shown to be associated with parasite resistance to SP treatment. Genetic analysis of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes in pregnant women infected with P. falciparum has not yet been examined in Indonesia. The cross-sectional study was conducted at two subdistricts, Sungai Pinang and Peramasan, in Banjar district of South Kalimantan Province, where 127 pregnant women were recruited from 2008 to April 2010. Two important mutations in Pfdhfr gene (amino acid positions at N51 and S108 and three in Pfdhps gene (A437, K540 and A581 were analyzed by nested PCR-RFLP method. All of the seven pregnant women samples infected with P. falciparum presented PfDHFR 108N and PfDHPS 437G mutations. One of the samples had the additional mutation at PfDHPS 540, in which Lys is substituted by Glu. These results suggested that P. falciparum might present only some resistance to SP at Sungai Pinang and Peramasan subdistricts, Banjar District, South Kalimantan province, Indonesia. Although there were limited number of samples, this study showed only few mutations of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes in P. falciparum at Banjar district, South Kalimantan Province, that suggests SP might be effective for IPTp in this area. Thus, further analysis of the other mutation sites in Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes and in vivo efficacy study of SP with more sufficient

  3. Induction of cell death on Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood stages by Solanum nudum steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Mary Luz; Vommaro, Rossiane; Zalis, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    . The Mitochondria presented no morphological alterations and the nuclei showed no abnormal chromatin condensation. By the use of S. nudum compounds, cell death in P. falciparum was evident by a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA fragmentation and cytoplasmic acidification. The asexual blood stages......-87 μM. However, their mode of action is unknown. Steroids regulate important cellular functions including cell growth, differentiation and death. Thus, the aim of this work was to determine the effects of S. nudum compounds on P. falciparum asexual blood stages and their association with cell death. We...... of P. falciparum showed some apoptotic-like and autophagic-like cell death characteristics induced by SNs treatment....

  4. The use of activated protein C in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, L G; Austin, D L H

    2007-06-01

    A 56-year-old man presented to a peripheral hospital in New Zealand with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria with cerebral involvement and subsequently developed multi-system organ failure. Activated protein C was used in an attempt to stop the cascade of events into multi-organ failure. Severe infection with P. falciparum is life-threatening and appears to activate a hypercoagulable state similar to that of severe sepsis. Activated protein C is currently used in the treatment of severe sepsis and may provide a new adjuvant therapy for severe P. falciparum malaria.

  5. Structure of the catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum ARF GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB)

    2012-03-26

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP) from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined and refined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected utilizing the Zn{sup 2+} ion bound at the zinc-finger domain and were used to solve the structure. The overall structure of the domain is similar to those of mammalian ARFGAPs. However, several amino-acid residues in the area where GAP interacts with ARF1 differ in P. falciparum ARFGAP. Moreover, a number of residues that form the dimer interface in the crystal structure are unique in P. falciparum ARFGAP.

  6. Fatal Plasmodium falciparum, Clostridium perfringens, and Candida spp. Coinfections in a Traveler to Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genrich, Gillian L.; Bhatnagar, Julu; Paddock, Christopher D.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2009-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common causes of febrile illness in travelers. Coinfections with bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens may not be suspected unless a patient fails to respond to malaria treatment. Using novel immunohistochemical and molecular techniques, Plasmodium falciparum, Clostridium perfringens, and Candida spp. coinfections were confirmed in a German traveler to Haiti. Plasmodium falciparum-induced ischemia may have increased this patient's susceptibility to C. perfringens and disseminated candidiasis leading to his death. When a patient presents with P. falciparum and shock and is unresponsive to malaria treatment, secondary infections should be suspected to initiate appropriate treatment. PMID:20339463

  7. [Is Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for tropical malaria, resistant to fansidar?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, B; Keller, H; Frossard, E; Stürchler, D

    1980-03-01

    A world-wide increase of malaria infections is observed. Malaria is imported into Switzerland mainly by tourists and recently by refugees from South East Asia. The strains of P. falciparum resistant to treatment are of increasing importance. A patient with P. falciparum infection from Cambodia is reported, who suffered from three episodes of malaria recrudescence within ten weeks, in spite of adequate therapy with quinine and Fansidar. The definition, the significance and the geographical distribution of resistances and the possible cause for a P. falciparum recrudescence are discussed. For the treatment of repeating recrudescence quinine and Fansidar are recommended, followed by a suppressive Fansidar prophylaxy for 4--8 weeks.

  8. Tamarindus indica extract alters release of alpha enolase, apolipoprotein A-I, transthyretin and Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta from HepG2 cells.

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    Ursula Rho Wan Chong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol lowering effects of Tamarindus indica extract have been previously described. We have also shown that the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp altered the expression of lipid-associated genes including ABCG5 and APOAI in HepG2 cells. In the present study, effects of the same extract on the release of proteins from the cells were investigated using the proteomics approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: When culture media of HepG2 cells grown in the absence and presence of the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp were subjected to 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the expression of seven proteins was found to be significantly different (p<0.03125. Five of the spots were subsequently identified as alpha enolase (ENO1, transthyretin (TTR, apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I; two isoforms, and rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta (GDI-2. A functional network of lipid metabolism, molecular transport and small molecule biochemistry that interconnects the three latter proteins with the interactomes was identified using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis software. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp altered the release of ENO1, ApoA-I, TTR and GDI-2 from HepG2 cells. Our results provide support on the effect of T. indica extract on cellular lipid metabolism, particularly that of cholesterol.

  9. Serum concentrations of two biochemical markers of brain tissue damage S-100B and neurone specific enolase are increased in elite female soccer players after a competitive game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålnacke, B-M; Ohlsson, A; Tegner, Y; Sojka, P

    2006-04-01

    It is a matter of debate whether or not ordinary heading of the ball in soccer causes injury to brain tissue. To analyse concentrations of the biochemical markers of brain tissue damage S-100B and neurone specific enolase (NSE) in serum of female elite soccer players in association with a competitive game. Venous blood samples were obtained from 44 female soccer players before and after a competitive game for analysis. The number of headers and trauma events (falls, collisions, etc) was assessed from videotape recordings for each player. Concentrations of both brain damage markers were increased after the game (S-100B, 0.18 (0.11) v 0.11 (0.05) microg/l (p = 0.000); NSE, 10.14 (1.74) v 9.05 (1.59) microg/l (p = 0.001)). There was a significant correlation between changes in S-100B concentrations and both the number of headers (r = 0.430, p = 0.004) and the number of other trauma events (r = 0.517, p < 0.001). The concentrations of both S-100B and NSE were increased by game associated activities and events. The increases in S-100B concentration were significantly related to the number of headers and other trauma events, which indicates that both these factors may have contributed to these increases.

  10. Neuron-specific enolase, but not S100B or myelin basic protein, increases in peripheral blood corresponding to lesion volume after cortical impact in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costine, Beth A; Quebeda-Clerkin, Patricia B; Dodge, Carter P; Harris, Brent T; Hillier, Simon C; Duhaime, Ann-Christine

    2012-11-20

    A peripheral indicator of the presence and magnitude of brain injury has been a sought-after tool by clinicians. We measured neuron-specific enolase (NSE), myelin basic protein (MBP), and S100B, prior to and after scaled cortical impact in immature pigs, to determine if these purported markers increase after injury, correlate with the resulting lesion volume, and if these relationships vary with maturation. Scaled cortical impact resulted in increased lesion volume with increasing age. Concentrations of NSE, but not S100B or MBP, increased after injury in all age groups. The high variability of S100B concentrations prior to injury may have precluded detection of an increase due to injury. Total serum markers were estimated, accounting for the allometric growth of blood volume, and resulted in a positive correlation of both NSE and S100B with lesion volume. Even with allometric scaling of blood volume and a uniform mechanism of injury, NSE had only a fair to poor predictive value. In a clinical setting, where the types of injuries are varied, more investigation is required to yield a panel of serum markers that can reliably predict the extent of injury. Allometric scaling may improve estimation of serum marker release in pediatric populations.

  11. Increased chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase in rats with chronic nonbacterial prostatitis induced by 17-beta estradiol combined with castration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Song; Hao, Zong-Yao; Zhang, Li; Chen, Xian-Guo; Zhou, Jun; Zang, Yi-Fei; Tai, Sheng; Liang, Chao-Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Although chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNBP) is a common diagnosis in middle-aged men, the etiology of this disease remains poorly understood. Neuroendocrine cells play an important role in the neuroendocrine regulation of the prostate, and chromogranin A (CgA) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) are regarded as classic markers of neuroendocrine cells. This study aimed to determine CgA and NSE levels in a CNBP rat model to evaluate the role of neuroendocrine cells in the pathogenesis of CNBP. For developing a CNBP rat model, we examined the ability of 17-beta estradiol and surgical castration alone or in combination to induce CNBP. Histologic inflammation of the prostate was assessed in CNBP-induced rats by hematoxylin-eosin staining, whereas CgA and NSE protein levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Our results showed that 17-beta estradiol combined with castration successfully induced CNBP and that CgA and NSE levels were increased in the prostate of CNBP rats as compared to those without CNBP. These findings indicate that the neuroendocrine regulation mediated by neuroendocrine cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of CNBP. PMID:25120776

  12. A wireless point-of-care testing system for the detection of neuron-specific enolase with microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yan; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Yang; Luo, Jinping; Xu, Huiren; Xu, Shengwei; Cai, Xinxia

    2017-09-15

    Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) had clinical significance on diagnosis, staging, monitoring effect and judging prognosis of small cell lung cancer. Thus, there had a growing demand for the on-site testing of NSE. Here, a wireless point-of-care testing (POCT) system with electrochemical measurement for NSE detection was developed and verified. The wireless POCT system consisted of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs), electrochemical detector and Android's smartphone. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) measurement was adopted by means of electrochemical detector which including a potentiostat and current-to-voltage converter. μPADs were modified with nanocomposites synthesized by Amino functional graphene, thionine and gold nanoparticles (NH2-G/Thi/AuNPs) as immunosensors for NSE detection. Combined with μPADs, the performance of the wireless POCT system was evaluated. The peak currents showed good linear relationship of the logarithm of NSE concentration ranging from 1 to 500ngmL(-1) with the limit of detection (LOD) of 10pgmL(-1). The detection results were automatically stored in EEPROM memory and could be displayed on Android's smartphone through Bluetooth in real time. The detection results were comparable to those measured by a commercial electrochemical workstation. The wireless POCT system had the potential for on-site testing of other tumor markers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 表达期特异性双荧光蛋白的转基因弓形虫的构建%Construction of transgenic Toxoplasma gondii expressing dual-fluoresecent stage-specific proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦雷; 张厚双; 蔺智兵; 周勇志; 曹杰; 周金林

    2011-01-01

    The conversion from tachyzoite to bradyzoite in Toxoplasma gondii accompany the expression of stage-specific proteins and this experiment aimed at constructing the dual-fluorescent stage-specific parasite. In this experiment, the tachyzoite-specified SAG1 promoter promoted the EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) gene while the bradyzoite-spec-ified BAG1 promoter promoted the RFP (Red Fluorescent Protein) gene in order to construct the dual-fluorescent expression vector. Then,the vector was transformed to the parasites by electroporation. The results were confirmed by pyrimethimine screening and fluorescence. The PCR assay detected the EGFP gene and RFP gene from the genome of the dual-fluorescent parasites. It was concluded that the Toxoplasma gondii expressing dual-fluoresecent stage-specific proteins were constructed in this experiment.%目的 构建速殖子期特异表达绿色荧光和缓殖子期特异表达红色荧光的转基因弓形虫.方法 利用速殖子期特异性表达的SAG1基因启动子启动绿色荧光蛋白(EGFP)基因,利用缓殖子期特异性表达的BAG1基因启动子启动红色荧光蛋白( RFP)基因,构建期特异性表达双荧光的质粒,通过电转化将质粒转化进弓形虫体内进行表达.结果 经过息疟定抗性筛选得到阳性重组子,经荧光观察观察到了在速殖子时期表达的绿色荧光虫体和经缓殖子诱导后表达红色荧光的缓殖子虫体;通过PCR检测也检测到了EGFP和RFP基因.结论 本试验成功构建表达期特异性双荧光蛋白的转基因弓形虫.

  14. Stage-specific gene expression during spermatogenesis in the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis), a fish with semi-cystic type of spermatogenesis, as assessed by laser capture microdissection and absolute quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Juez, Rubén; Viñas, Jordi; Mechaly, Alejandro S; Planas, Josep V; Piferrer, Francesc

    2013-07-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process where hormonal signals regulate the interaction of different cell types in a tight spatial and temporal fashion. The Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a marine flatfish that, in contrast to many fish, exhibits a semi-cystic, asynchronous pattern of spermatogenesis progression. This pattern is characterized by the release of spermatids into the tubule lumen, where they transform into spermatozoa. In this study, we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate cells from cysts containing spermatogonia, spermatocytes, spermatids or spermatozoa in order to investigate developmental patterns of gene expression. Furthermore, we also analyzed the stage-specific expression of the same set of genes throughout spermatogenesis (early-mid, late and maturing spermatogenic stages) in tissue fragments of the Senegalese sole testis. Genes analyzed by absolute qPCR in cysts isolated by LCM and stage-specific testis samples included genes involved in steroid synthesis and action (3β-hsd, 17β-hsd, 20β-hsd, star, star-like, progesterone receptor), gonadotropin action (fshr, lhr), the kisspeptin system (kiss2, kiss2r) and other genes important for the production of mature gametes (zona pellucida 2.2, claudin and clusterin). Our results show that, in general, steroidogenesis-related genes tended to increase with spermatogenesis progression and that 3β-hsd and 20β-hsd were expressed in germ cells but 17β-hsd was not. Our results also show that fshr is expressed in most testicular cell types, including germ cells. In contrast, lhr is expressed only in late spermatogenesis and is not expressed in any of the germ cell types examined, indicating that, in contrast to fshr, lhr may be primarily expressed in non-germinal cells (e.g. Leydig cells). Furthermore, kisspeptin and its receptor were expressed in all germ cell types examined and, as expected, gamete maturation-related genes were more expressed in mature stages. These results

  15. Protein-based signatures of functional evolution in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kate B; Sinha, Ipsita; Bustamante, Leyla Y; Day, Nicholas Pj; White, Nicholas J; Woodrow, Charles J

    2011-09-14

    It has been known for over a decade that Plasmodium falciparum proteins are enriched in non-globular domains of unknown function. The potential for these regions of protein sequence to undergo high levels of genetic drift provides a fundamental challenge to attempts to identify the molecular basis of adaptive change in malaria parasites. Evolutionary comparisons were undertaken using a set of forty P. falciparum metabolic enzyme genes, both within the hominid malaria clade (P. reichenowi) and across the genus (P. chabaudi). All genes contained coding elements highly conserved across the genus, but there were also a large number of regions of weakly or non-aligning coding sequence. These displayed remarkable levels of non-synonymous fixed differences within the hominid malaria clade indicating near complete release from purifying selection (dN/dS ratio at residues non-aligning across genus: 0.64, dN/dS ratio at residues identical across genus: 0.03). Regions of low conservation also possessed high levels of hydrophilicity, a marker of non-globularity. The propensity for such regions to act as potent sources of non-synonymous genetic drift within extant P. falciparum isolates was confirmed at chromosomal regions containing genes known to mediate drug resistance in field isolates, where 150 of 153 amino acid variants were located in poorly conserved regions. In contrast, all 22 amino acid variants associated with drug resistance were restricted to highly conserved regions. Additional mutations associated with laboratory-selected drug resistance, such as those in PfATPase4 selected by spiroindolone, were similarly restricted while mutations in another calcium ATPase (PfSERCA, a gene proposed to mediate artemisinin resistance) that reach significant frequencies in field isolates were located exclusively in poorly conserved regions consistent with genetic drift. Coding sequences of malaria parasites contain prospectively definable domains subject to neutral or nearly

  16. Protein-based signatures of functional evolution in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Nicholas PJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been known for over a decade that Plasmodium falciparum proteins are enriched in non-globular domains of unknown function. The potential for these regions of protein sequence to undergo high levels of genetic drift provides a fundamental challenge to attempts to identify the molecular basis of adaptive change in malaria parasites. Results Evolutionary comparisons were undertaken using a set of forty P. falciparum metabolic enzyme genes, both within the hominid malaria clade (P. reichenowi and across the genus (P. chabaudi. All genes contained coding elements highly conserved across the genus, but there were also a large number of regions of weakly or non-aligning coding sequence. These displayed remarkable levels of non-synonymous fixed differences within the hominid malaria clade indicating near complete release from purifying selection (dN/dS ratio at residues non-aligning across genus: 0.64, dN/dS ratio at residues identical across genus: 0.03. Regions of low conservation also possessed high levels of hydrophilicity, a marker of non-globularity. The propensity for such regions to act as potent sources of non-synonymous genetic drift within extant P. falciparum isolates was confirmed at chromosomal regions containing genes known to mediate drug resistance in field isolates, where 150 of 153 amino acid variants were located in poorly conserved regions. In contrast, all 22 amino acid variants associated with drug resistance were restricted to highly conserved regions. Additional mutations associated with laboratory-selected drug resistance, such as those in PfATPase4 selected by spiroindolone, were similarly restricted while mutations in another calcium ATPase (PfSERCA, a gene proposed to mediate artemisinin resistance that reach significant frequencies in field isolates were located exclusively in poorly conserved regions consistent with genetic drift. Conclusion Coding sequences of malaria parasites contain

  17. Exitoso cultivo in vitro de gametocitos de Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blair

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Los estadios sexuales de Plasmodium falciparum han sido menos estudiados que los estadios asexuales. Al parecer, esto se debe a la carencia de cultivos estandarizados in vitro y a la dificultad de reconocer sus estadios de desarrollo. Estos hechos no permiten el estudio de aspectos biológicos, aspectos metabólicos, expresión de genes y síntesis de proteínas durante los estadios sexuales, temas de interés en la investigación de nuevos medicamentos antipalúdicos, principalmente los aislados de plantas, y la identificación de un potencial blanco contra Plasmodium. Objetivos. Establecer un cultivo in vitro de gametocitos, con la identificación de sus cinco estadios de desarrollo, y asegurar su continua producción. Materiales y métodos. El cultivo in vitro de gametocitos se realizó a partir de la cepa NF54 de P. falciparum en medio RPMI, con determinación de la parasitemia asexual y sexual, adición de glóbulos rojos A-Rh+ sólo el primer día de cultivo y cambio diario del medio con adición de mezcla de gases (90% N2, 5% O2; 5% CO2, asegurándose que el cultivo se mantuviera a 37 °C. Cuando la parasitemia asexual estuvo entre 3% y 5%, se comenzó a agregar el doble de volumen de medio. Resultados. Se obtuvieron gametocitos en estadios I, II y III a partir del día 11 de cultivo y estadios IV y V a partir del día 14 de cultivo. Conclusiones. Se estandarizó un cultivo in vitro para estadios sexuales de P. falciparum que puede usarse para futuros estudios de evaluación de compuestos, naturales o sintéticos, que actúen sobre los gametocitos, lo cual podría permitir el desarrollo de nuevas estrategias de control contra el paludismo.

  18. Protease-associated cellular networks in malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilburn Timothy G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria continues to be one of the most severe global infectious diseases, responsible for 1-2 million deaths yearly. The rapid evolution and spread of drug resistance in parasites has led to an urgent need for the development of novel antimalarial targets. Proteases are a group of enzymes that play essential roles in parasite growth and invasion. The possibility of designing specific inhibitors for proteases makes them promising drug targets. Previously, combining a comparative genomics approach and a machine learning approach, we identified the complement of proteases (degradome in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its sibling species 123, providing a catalog of targets for functional characterization and rational inhibitor design. Network analysis represents another route to revealing the role of proteins in the biology of parasites and we use this approach here to expand our understanding of the systems involving the proteases of P. falciparum. Results We investigated the roles of proteases in the parasite life cycle by constructing a network using protein-protein association data from the STRING database 4, and analyzing these data, in conjunction with the data from protein-protein interaction assays using the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H system 5, blood stage microarray experiments 678, proteomics 9101112, literature text mining, and sequence homology analysis. Seventy-seven (77 out of 124 predicted proteases were associated with at least one other protein, constituting 2,431 protein-protein interactions (PPIs. These proteases appear to play diverse roles in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, invasion and infection. Their degrees of connectivity (i.e., connections to other proteins, range from one to 143. The largest protease-associated sub-network is the ubiquitin-proteasome system which is crucial for protein recycling and stress response. Proteases are also implicated in heat shock response, signal peptide

  19. The remarkable journey of adaptation of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite to New World anopheline mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2014-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum originated in Africa, dispersed around the world as a result of human migration and had to adapt to several different indigenous anopheline mosquitoes. Anophelines from the New World are evolutionary distant form African ones and this probably resulted in a more stringent selection of Plasmodium as it adapted to these vectors. It is thought that Plasmodium has been genetically selected by some anopheline species through unknown mechanisms. The mosquito immune system can greatly limit infection and P. falciparum evolved a strategy to evade these responses, at least in part mediated by Pfs47, a highly polymorphic gene. We propose that adaptation of P. falciparum to new vectors may require evasion of their immune system. Parasites with a Pfs47 haplotype compatible with the indigenous mosquito vector would be able to survive and be transmitted. The mosquito antiplasmodial response could be an important determinant of P. falciparum population structure and could affect malaria transmission in the Americas.

  20. The remarkable journey of adaptation of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite to New World anopheline mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Molina-Cruz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum originated in Africa, dispersed around the world as a result of human migration and had to adapt to several different indigenous anopheline mosquitoes. Anophelines from the New World are evolutionary distant form African ones and this probably resulted in a more stringent selection of Plasmodium as it adapted to these vectors. It is thought that Plasmodium has been genetically selected by some anopheline species through unknown mechanisms. The mosquito immune system can greatly limit infection and P. falciparum evolved a strategy to evade these responses, at least in part mediated by Pfs47, a highly polymorphic gene. We propose that adaptation of P. falciparum to new vectors may require evasion of their immune system. Parasites with a Pfs47 haplotype compatible with the indigenous mosquito vector would be able to survive and be transmitted. The mosquito antiplasmodial response could be an important determinant of P. falciparum population structure and could affect malaria transmission in the Americas.

  1. [Stain hybridization method with pRepHind probe for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleón Borodowsky, I

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted on the parasitemia detection level and the specificity of the pRepHind DNA probe for diagnosing Plasmodium falciparum by the stain hybridization method. The parasitemia detection level was studied by using dilutions of a P. falciparum in vitro culture, adjusted by direct microscopic examination to 1; 0.1; 0.01; 0.001; 0.0001 and 0.00001% of parasited red cells. Specificity was increased by using DNA extractions from P. Yoelii, P. berghei and human leucocytes. The results showed that the method was able to detect 0.0001% of parasitemia starting from DNA extractions of 100 L infected red cells. The pRepHind probe only detected specifically DNA from P. falciparum. It is concluded that the method is suitable for being used in the diagnosis of infection due to P. falciparum.

  2. Binding of Plasmodium falciparum to CD36 can be shielded by the glycocalyx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Wang, Christian William; Kurtzhals, Jorgen Anders Lindholm

    2017-01-01

    Background: Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes sequester in the microcirculation due to interaction between surface-expressed parasite proteins and endothelial receptors. Endothelial cells are covered in a carbohydrate-rich glycocalyx that shields against undesired leukocyte adhesion...

  3. Loading of erythrocyte membrane with pentacyclic triterpenes inhibits Plasmodium falciparum invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Hanne L; Staalsø, Trine; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    Lupeol and betulinic acid inhibit the proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum parasites by inhibition of the invasion of merozoites into erythrocytes. This conclusion is based on experiments employing parasite cultures synchronized by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Identical inhibitory effects were...

  4. Longevity and composition of cellular immune responses following experimental Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teirlinck, A.C.; McCall, M.B.B.; Roestenberg, M.; Scholzen, A.; Woestenenk, R.M.; Mast, Q. de; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Hermsen, C.C.; Luty, A.J.F.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular responses to Plasmodium falciparum parasites, in particular interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) production, play an important role in anti-malarial immunity. However, clinical immunity to malaria develops slowly amongst naturally exposed populations, the dynamics of cellular responses in relation

  5. Drug resistance to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine in Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Mlimba, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mbugi, E.V.; Mutayoba, B.M.; Malisa, A.L.; Balthazary, S.T.; Nyambo, T.B.; Mshinda, H.

    2006-01-01

    Background - Sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) has been and is currently used for treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in many African countries. Nevertheless, the response of parasites to SP treatment has shown significant variation between individuals. Methods - The genes for

  6. Transcriptomic evidence for modulation of host inflammatory responses during febrile Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, T.M.; Jones, M.B.; Ongoiba, A.; Bijker, E.M.; Schats, R.; Venepally, P.; Skinner, J.; Doumbo, S.; Quinten, E.; Visser, L.G.; Whalen, E.; Presnell, S.; O'Connell, E.M.; Kayentao, K.; Doumbo, O.K.; Chaussabel, D.; Lorenzi, H.; Nutman, T.B.; Ottenhoff, T.H.; Haks, M.C.; Traore, B.; Kirkness, E.F.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Crompton, P.D.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying molecular predictors and mechanisms of malaria disease is important for understanding how Plasmodium falciparum malaria is controlled. Transcriptomic studies in humans have so far been limited to retrospective analysis of blood samples from clinical cases. In this prospective,

  7. Reducing Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission in Africa: a model-based evaluation of intervention strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffin, Jamie T; Hollingsworth, T Deirdre; Okell, Lucy C; Churcher, Thomas S; White, Michael; Hinsley, Wes; Bousema, Teun; Drakeley, Chris J; Ferguson, Neil M; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Ghani, Azra C

    2010-01-01

    .... We developed an individual-based simulation model for Plasmodium falciparum transmission in an African context incorporating the three major vector species (Anopheles gambiae s.s., An. arabiensis, and An. funestus...

  8. Plasma concentration of parasite DNA as a measure of disease severity in falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imwong, M.; Woodrow, C.; Hendriksen, I.C.E.; Veenemans, J.; Verhoef, J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    In endemic areas malaria parasitemia is common in apparently healthy children and severe malaria is commonly misdiagnosed in patients with incidental parasitemia. We assessed the performance of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentration measurement in distinguishing uncomplicated from severe malaria in

  9. Targeting a Novel Plasmodium falciparum Purine Recycling Pathway with Specific Immucillins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, L; Shi, W; Lewandowicz, A; Singh, V; Mwakingwe, A; Birck, M R; Taylor Ringia, E A; Bench, G; Madrid, D C; Tyler, P C; Evans, G B; Furneaux, R H; Schramm, V L; Kim, K

    2004-05-19

    Plasmodium falciparum is unable to synthesize purine bases and relies upon purine salvage and purine recycling to meet its purine needs. We report that purines formed as products of the polyamine pathway are recycled in a novel pathway in which 5'-methylthioinosine is generated by adenosine deaminase. The action of P. falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a convergent step of purine salvage, converting both 5'-methylthioinosine and inosine to hypoxanthine. We used accelerator mass spectrometry to verify that 5'-methylthioinosine is an active nucleic acid precursor in P. falciparum. Prior studies have shown that inhibitors of purine salvage enzymes kill malaria, but potent malaria-specific inhibitors of these enzymes have not previously been described. 5'-methylthio-Immucillin-H, a transition state analogue inhibitor that is selective for malarial over human purine nucleoside phosphorylase, kills P. falciparum in culture. Immucillins are currently in clinical trials for other indications and may have application as antimalarials.

  10. Genetic ablation of a Maurer's cleft protein prevents assembly of the Plasmodium falciparum virulence complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dixon, Matthew W. A; Kenny, Shannon; McMillan, Paul J; Hanssen, Eric; Trenholme, Katharine R; Gardiner, Donald L; Tilley, Leann

    2011-01-01

    .... falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein‐1 (PfEMP1). Membranous structures called Maurer's clefts are established in the erythrocyte cytoplasm and function as sorting compartments for proteins en route to the RBC membrane, including the knob...

  11. Functional characterization of a SUMO deconjugating protease of Plasmodium falciparum using newly identified small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Elizabeth L; Albrow, Victoria E; Leader, Brittany A; Békés, Miklós; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Fonović, Urša Pečar; Shen, Aimee; Drag, Marcin; Xiao, Junpeng; Deu, Edgar; Campbell, Amy J; Powers, James C; Salvesen, Guy S; Bogyo, Matthew

    2011-06-24

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is implicated in the regulation of numerous biological processes including transcription, protein localization, and cell cycle control. Protein modification by SUMO is found in Plasmodium falciparum; however, its role in the regulation of the parasite life cycle is poorly understood. Here we describe functional studies of a SUMO-specific protease (SENP) of P. falciparum, PfSENP1 (PFL1635w). Expression of the catalytic domain of PfSENP1 and biochemical profiling using a positional scanning substrate library demonstrated that this protease has unique cleavage sequence preference relative to the human SENPs. In addition, we describe a class of small molecule inhibitors of this protease. The most potent lead compound inhibited both recombinant PfSENP1 activity and P. falciparum replication in infected human blood. These studies provide valuable new tools for the study of SUMOylation in P. falciparum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasmodium falciparum population dynamics in a cohort of pregnant women in Senegal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guitard, Juliette; Andersen, Pernille; Ermont, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pregnant women acquire protective antibodies that cross-react with geographically diverse placental Plasmodium falciparum isolates, suggesting that surface molecules expressed on infected erythrocytes by pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) parasites have conserved epitopes and, that de...

  13. Short report: polymorphisms in the chloroquine resistance transporter gene in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Lombok, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Yoshinaga, Kazumi; Suryanatha, Aan; Suarsana, Nyoman; Kanbara, Hiroji

    2004-07-01

    The polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) and P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) genes, which are associated with chloroquine resistance, were examined in 48 P. falciparum isolates from uncomplicated malaria patients from the West Lombok District in Indonesia. The point mutation N86Y in pfmdr1 was present in 35.4% of the isolates and mutation K76T in pfcrt was found in all but one of the samples studied. Identified pfcrt haplotypes were mainly identical to the Papua New Guinea type S(agt)VMNT (42 of 48, 87.5%), and a few isolates had the Southeast Asia type CVIET (5 of 48, 10.4%). Moreover, one P. falciparum isolate harbored the K76N mutation, giving rise to the haplotype CVMNN, which was not previously reported in field isolates. Our findings suggest that chloroquine resistance in this area might have the same origin as in Papua New Guinea.

  14. Distribution of two species of malaria, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, on Lombok Island, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yoshiro; Dachlan, Yoes Prijatna; Soedarto; Hidajati, Sri; Yotopranoto, Subagyo; Kusmartisnawati; Subekti, Sri; Ideham, Bariah; Tsuda, Yoshio; Kawabata, Masato; Takagi, Masahiro; Looareesuwan, Somchai

    2003-09-01

    Medical and entomological surveys were conducted to determine the risk factors of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax infections on Lombok Island, Indonesia, to find the risk factors and the main mosquito vectors for each malaria. Multivariate longitudinal analysis demonstrated two significant risk factors for infection with P. falciparum: disappearance of P. vivax parasitemia (p<0.001) and a specific study site (p<0.001). In contrast, younger age (p=0.024) and the interpolated virtual density of An. subpictus (p=0.041) were significantly associated with increased risk of infection with P. vivax. Thus, it seems that the distribution of P. vivax was determined largely by the presence of An. subpictus, whilst that of P. falciparum was influenced by antagonism with P. vivax. This result shows the importance of following-up treated P. vivax patients to identify recrudescence of P. falciparum in this area.

  15. Evidence for stage-specific modulation of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and miRNA processing components in zygotic embryo and female gametophyte of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Thomas J; Wartell, Roger M; Cairney, John; Pullman, Gerald S

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to regulate plant development, but have not been studied in gymnosperm seed tissues. The presence and characteristics of several miRNAs were examined in zygotic embryos (ZEs) and female gametophytes (FGs) of Pinus taeda (loblolly pine). Evidence for miRNAs was obtained using northern analyses and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) mediated with poly(A) polymerase. Partial sequences of two miRNAs were verified. Three regions of putative mRNA targets were analyzed by qRT-PCR to monitor the occurrence of stage-dependent miRNA-mediated cleavage. Five miRNAs were identified in ZEs and FGs along with partial sequences of Pta-miR166 and Pta-miR167. Both miRNAs showed differing degrees of tissue-specific and stage-specific modulation. Analysis of HB15L mRNA (a potential Pta-miR166 target) suggested miRNA-guided cleavage in ZEs and FGs. Analysis of ARF8L mRNA (a potential Pta-miR167 target) implied cleavage in ZEs but not in FGs. Argonaute9-like mRNA (ptAGO9L) showed stage-specific modulation of expression in ZEs that appeared to be inverted in the corresponding FGs. MicroRNAs and argonaute genes varied spatiotemporally during seed development. The peak levels of Pta-miR166 in FGs and ptAGO9L in embryos occurred at stage 9.1, a critical transition point during embryo development and a point where somatic embryo maturation often stops. MicroRNAs identified in FG tissue may play a role in embryogenesis.

  16. Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and the infected placenta: a two-way pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, F.T.M.; Avril, M.; Nogueira,P.A.; Gysin, J

    2006-01-01

    Malaria is undoubtedly the world's most devastating parasitic disease, affecting 300 to 500 million people every year. Some cases of Plasmodium falciparum infection progress to the deadly forms of the disease responsible for 1 to 3 million deaths annually. P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes adhere to host receptors in the deep microvasculature of several organs. The cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to placental syncytiotrophoblast receptors leads to pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM). T...

  17. Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and the infected placenta: a two-way pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,F.T.M.; Avril, M.; Nogueira, P. A; Gysin, J.

    2006-01-01

    Malaria is undoubtedly the world's most devastating parasitic disease, affecting 300 to 500 million people every year. Some cases of Plasmodium falciparum infection progress to the deadly forms of the disease responsible for 1 to 3 million deaths annually. P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes adhere to host receptors in the deep microvasculature of several organs. The cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to placental syncytiotrophoblast receptors leads to pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM). T...

  18. Site-Specific Editing of the Plasmodium falciparum Genome Using Engineered Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Straimer, Judith; Lee, Marcus CS; Lee, Andrew H.; Zeitler, Bryan; Williams, April E.; Pearl, Jocelynn R.; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Llinás, Manuel; Urnov, Fyodor D; David A Fidock

    2012-01-01

    Malaria afflicts over 200 million people worldwide and its most lethal etiologic agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is evolving to resist even the latest-generation therapeutics. Efficient tools for genome-directed investigations of P. falciparum pathogenesis, including drug resistance mechanisms, are clearly required. Here we report rapid and targeted genetic engineering of this parasite, using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that produce a double-strand break in a user-defined locus and trigger hom...

  19. Complement binding to erythrocytes is associated with macrophage activation and reduced haemoglobin in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goka, B Q; Kwarko, H; Kurtzhals, J A

    2001-01-01

    We have examined IgG and complement factor C3d deposition on erythrocytes by means of the direct Coombs' test (DAT) and looked for an association with the anaemia seen in falciparum malaria in children living in an area of hyperendemic malaria transmission (in Ghana). In one study (in 1997), 53 out....... The studies support the role of complement activation and erythrophagocytosis in the pathogenesis of anaemia in falciparum malaria in African children....

  20. Geographical and temporal conservation of antibody recognition of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten A; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Lusingu, John

    2004-01-01

    The slow acquisition of protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria probably reflects the extensive diversity of important antigens. The variant surface antigens (VSA) that mediate parasite adhesion to a range of host molecules are regarded as important targets of acquired protective immunity......, is geographically and temporally conserved raises hopes for the feasibility of developing VSA-based vaccines specifically designed to accelerate naturally acquired immunity, thereby enhancing protection against severe and life-threatening P. falciparum malaria....

  1. Tracking Origins and Spread of Sulfadoxine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum dhps Alleles in Thailand▿

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Md Tauqeer; Vinayak, Sumiti; Congpuong, Kanungnit; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Satimai, Wichai; Slutsker, Laurence; Escalante, Ananias A.; Barnwell, John W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2010-01-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum have been a major impediment for the control of malaria worldwide. Earlier studies have shown that similar to chloroquine (CQ) resistance, high levels of pyrimethamine resistance in P. falciparum originated independently 4 to 5 times globally, including one origin at the Thailand-Cambodia border. In this study we describe the origins and spread of sulfadoxine-resistance-conferring dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) alleles in Thail...

  2. Case report of Plasmodium falciparum malaria presenting as wide complex tachycardia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil Kumar; Diwan SK; Mahajan SN; Shilpa Bawankule; Chetan Mahure

    2011-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is a multisystem disorder and may have diversity of clinical presentations. We are presenting a case report of patients of falciparum malaria who presented to us with palpitation and fever. On electrocardiogram he had wide complex tachycardia. This case reiterates the need to think of malaria in any case with symptoms of fever with chills, even with various unusual presentations like palpitation due to wide complex tachycardia, especially in endemic country like India.

  3. A Replicating Adenovirus Capsid Display Recombinant Elicits Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Karen, Kasey A.; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A.; Xie, Jane; Zavala,Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodie...

  4. Implication of a Plasmodium falciparum gene in the switch between asexual reproduction and gametocytogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Donald L; Dixon, Matthew W A; Spielmann, Tobias; Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Hawthorne, Paula L; Ortega, Maria R; Kemp, David J; Trenholme, Katharine R

    2005-04-01

    Gametocytogenesis is fundamental for transmission of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum from the human host to the mosquito vector, yet very little is understood about what triggers the switch between asexual reproduction and gametocytogenesis. Arresting the progression through the sexual cycle would block transmission of this disease. Here we identify a novel gene in P. falciparum that when genetically silenced reduces gametocyte production by a factor of 6, and when complemented up-regulates gametocyte-specific gene transcription.

  5. Differential antibody response of Gambian donors to soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Riley, E M; Allen, S J

    1991-01-01

    A seroepidemiological and clinical study was performed in an area of West Africa (The Gambia) where Plasmodium falciparum is endemic with seasonal transmission. Plasma samples were tested by intermediate gel immunoelectrophoresis for antibodies against 7 soluble P. falciparum antigens. There were...... who had had a documented attack of clinical malaria or parasitaemia. There was no difference in antibody profiles to soluble antigens between children with sickle cell trait and children with normal haemoglobin....

  6. Analysis of malaria parasite phenotypes using experimental genetic crosses of Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C; Mwangi, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    We review the principles of linkage analysis of experimental genetic crosses and their application to Plasmodium falciparum. Three experimental genetic crosses have been performed using the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. Linkage analysis of the progeny of these crosses has been used to identify parasite genes important in phenotypes such as drug resistance, parasite growth and virulence, and transmission to mosquitoes. The construction and analysis of genetic maps has been used to char...

  7. Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum glutamate rich protein; purification and use in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Borre, Mette; Jepsen, S

    1991-01-01

    A method for purification of a recombinant Plasmodium falciparum protein produced in E. coli and its use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is described. The cloned gene fragment encodes GLURP,489-1271 the carboxy-terminal 783 amino acid residue portion of a 1271 amino acid residue P...... of the immunogenicity of a possible future P. falciparum vaccine utilizing epitopes from GLURP....

  8. Plasmodium Falciparum: Adhesion Phenotype of Infected Erythrocytes Using Classical and Mini-Column Cytoadherence Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kalantari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytoadherence of Plasmodium falciparum- infected erythrocytes to host cells is an impor­tant trait for parasite survival and has a major role in pathology of malaria disease. Infections with P. falciparum usually consist of several subpopulations of parasites with different adhesive proper­ties. This study aimed to compare relative sizes of various binding subpopulations of different P. falciparum isolates. It also investigated the adhesive phenotype of a laboratory P. falciparum line, A4, using different binding techniques.Methods: Seven different P. falciparum isolates (ITG, A4, 3D7 and four field isolates were cultivated to late trophozoite and schizont and then cytoadherence to cell differentiation 36 (CD36, intercellu­lar cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule (V-CAM and E-selectin were examined. The relative binding sizes of parasite subpopulations to human receptors were meas­ured by mini-column cytoadherence method. The adhesion phenotype of P. falciparum-A4 line was evaluated by in vitro static, flow-based and mini-column binding assays.Results: The relative binding size of ITG, A4 and 3D7 clones to a column made with CHO/ICAM-1 was 68%, 54% and 0%, respectively. The relative binding sizes of these lines to CHO/CD36 were 59.7%, 28.7% and 0%, respectively. Different field isolates had variable sizes of respective CD36 and ICAM1-binding subpopulations. A4 line had five different subpopulations each with different binding sizes.Conclusion: This study provided further evidence that P. falciparum isolates have different binding subpopulations sizes in an infection. Furthermore, measurement of ICAM-1 or CD36 binding subpopula­tions may practical to study the cytoadherence phenotypes of P. falciparum field isolates at the molecular level.

  9. Anti-phospholipid antibodies in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Morris-Jones, S D; Hviid, L;

    1993-01-01

    Plasma levels of antibodies against phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cardiolipin (CL) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in patients from malaria endemic area of Sudan and The Gambia. Some Sudanese adults produced IgM antibodies against all three types...... of phospholipids (PL) during an acute Plasmodium falciparum infection. The anti-PL antibody titre returned to preinfection levels in most of the donors 30 days after the disease episode. IgG titres against PI, PC and CL were low. In Gambian children with malaria, IgM antibody titres against PI and PC were...... significantly higher in those with severe malaria than in those with mild malaria. These results show that a proportion of malaria patients produce anti-PL antibodies during infection and that titres of these antibodies are associated with the severity of disease....

  10. Falciparum malaria: sticking up, standing out and out-standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, B; Coppel, R; Wahlgren, M

    2000-10-01

    Cytoadherence is believed to be fundamental for the survival of Plasmodium falciparum in vivo and, uniquely, is a major determinant of the virulence of this parasite. Despite the widely professed importance of cytoadhesion in the development of severe disease, there are a number of aspects of this highly complex process that remain poorly understood. Recent progress in the understanding of cytoadhesive phenomena was discussed extensively at the Molecular Approaches to Malaria conference, Lorne, Australia, 2-5 February 2000. Here, Brian Cooke, Mats Wahlgren and Ross Coppel consider just how far we have progressed during the past 30 years and highlight what is still missing in our understanding of the mechanisms and clinical relevance of this apparently vital process.

  11. Origins and spread of pfdhfr mutant alleles in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Toshihiro

    2010-06-01

    The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum parasite resistant to sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine (SP) poses a serious public health problem. Resistance is caused by point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps), the two key enzymes in the folate biosynthetic pathway. The use of microsatellite markers flanking pfdhfr has recently shown that the invasion of limited resistant lineages may explain the widespread SP resistance in many endemic regions. In Africa, however, multiple indigenous origins of pfdhfr triple mutants have been demonstrated. More new independent lineages and routes of geographical spread of resistance may be found by further molecular evolutionary analyses using samples from various endemic regions. Here, I review recent studies about the history of SP usage and the evolution and spread of resistant lineages while addressing the technical issue of microsatellite analysis.

  12. Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sibao; Dos-Santos, André L A; Huang, Wei; Liu, Kun Connie; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Wei, Ge; Agre, Peter; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2017-09-29

    The huge burden of malaria in developing countries urgently demands the development of novel approaches to fight this deadly disease. Although engineered symbiotic bacteria have been shown to render mosquitoes resistant to the parasite, the challenge remains to effectively introduce such bacteria into mosquito populations. We describe a Serratia bacterium strain (AS1) isolated from Anopheles ovaries that stably colonizes the mosquito midgut, female ovaries, and male accessory glands and spreads rapidly throughout mosquito populations. Serratia AS1 was genetically engineered for secretion of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins, and the recombinant strains inhibit development of Plasmodium falciparum in mosquitoes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. Oral clindamycin in the treatment of acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, N P; Saniel, M C; Estoque, M H; Talao, F A; Bustos, D G; Palogan, L P; Gabriel, A I

    1990-09-01

    Clinical trials on oral clindamycin as an antimalarial in hospitalized patients and residents of endemic communities were conducted in the Philippines between May 1984 and December 1985. Seven and 9 qualified subjects in hospital were treated with 300 mg (regimen A) and 600 mg (regimen B) respectively, twice daily for 5 days. Eighteen patients seen at a rural health unit were given the lower dosage. On the basis of the 28-day extended in vivo test of WHO, P. falciparum in all but one patient showed susceptibility to the drug as a blood schizontocide hence, the clinical cure of malaria. Side effects were few and self-limiting. Ten other patients on regimen A were cured within the 7- and/or 28-day extended test period. Clindamycin per se is currently one of the few alternatives in the treatment of clinically moderate drug-resistant malaria.

  14. Mitosis in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Noel; Mahajan, Babita; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is caused by intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites belonging to Plasmodium spp. (phylum Apicomplexa) that produce significant morbidity and mortality, mostly in developing countries. Plasmodium parasites have a complex life cycle that includes multiple stages in anopheline mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts. During the life cycle, the parasites undergo several cycles of extreme population growth within a brief span, and this is critical for their continued transmission and a contributing factor for their pathogenesis in the host. As with other eukaryotes, successful mitosis is an essential requirement for Plasmodium reproduction; however, some aspects of Plasmodium mitosis are quite distinct and not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of the architecture and key events of mitosis in Plasmodium falciparum and related parasites and compare them with the traditional mitotic events described for other eukaryotes. PMID:21317311

  15. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes as an essential part of their life cycle. While living inside erythrocytes, the parasite remodels the cell's intracellular organization as well as its outer surface. Late trophozoite-stage parasites and schizonts introduce numerous small protrusions on the erythrocyte surface, called knobs. Current methods for studying these knobs include atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy. Standard electron microscopy methods rely on chemical fixation and dehydration modifying cell size. Here, a novel method is presented using rapid freezing and scanning electron microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Polymorphism of the merozoite surface protein-1 block 2 region in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Salem O; Ndiaye, Magatte; OuldAbdallahi, Mohamed; Lekweiry, Khadijetou M; Bogreau, Hervé; Konaté, Lassana; Faye, Babacar; Gaye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Mohamed Salem O Boukhary, Ali O

    2014-01-23

    The genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in various parts of the world. However, limited data are available from Mauritania. The present study examined and compared the genetic diversity of P. falciparum isolates in Mauritania. Plasmodium falciparum isolates blood samples were collected from 113 patients attending health facilities in Nouakchott and Hodh El Gharbi regions. K1, Mad20 and RO33 allelic family of msp-1 gene were determined by nested PCR amplification. K1 family was the predominant allelic type carried alone or in association with Ro33 and Mad20 types (90%; 102/113). Out of the 113 P. falciparum samples, 93(82.3%) harboured more than one parasite genotype. The overall multiplicity of infection was 3.2 genotypes per infection. There was no significant correlation between multiplicity of infection and age of patients. A significant increase of multiplicity of infection was correlated with parasite densities. The polymorphism of P. falciparum populations from Mauritania was high. Infection with multiple P. falciparum clones was observed, as well as a high multiplicity of infection reflecting both the high endemicity level and malaria transmission in Mauritania.

  17. J-dot targeting of an exported HSP40 in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Wiebke; Külzer, Simone; Engels, Sonja; Zhang, Qi; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Rug, Melanie; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M

    2016-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports a large number of proteins to its host cell, the mature human erythrocyte, where they are involved in host cell modification. Amongst the proteins trafficked to the host cell, many are heat shock protein (HSP)40 homologues. We previously demonstrated that at least two exported PfHSP40s (referred to as PFE55 and PFA660) localise to mobile structures in the P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte (Kulzer et al., 2010), termed J-dots. The complete molecular content of these structures has not yet been completely resolved, however it is known that they also contain an exported HSP70, PfHSP70x, and are potentially involved in transport of the major cytoadherance ligand, PfEMP1, through the host cell. To understand more about the nature of the association of exported HSP40s with J-dots, here we have studied the signal requirements for recruitment of the proteins to these structures. By expressing various exported GFP chimeras, we can demonstrate that the predicted substrate binding domain is necessary and sufficient for J-dot targeting. This targeting only occurs in human erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum, as it is not conserved when expressing a P. falciparum HSP40 in Plasmodium berghei-infected murine red blood cells, suggesting that J-dots are P. falciparum-specific. This data reveals a new mechanism for targeting of exported proteins to intracellular structures in the P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase Inhibition Leads to a Major Decrease in Phosphatidylethanolamine Causing Parasite Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Denton, Helen; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Entrena, Antonio; Izquierdo, Luis; Smith, Terry K.; Conejo-García, Ana; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by different species of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum being the deadliest. Increasing parasitic resistance to existing antimalarials makes the necessity of novel avenues to treat this disease an urgent priority. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are attractive drug targets to treat malaria as their selective inhibition leads to an arrest of the parasite’s growth and cures malaria in a mouse model. We present here a detailed study that reveals a mode of action for two P. falciparum choline kinase inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. The compounds present distinct binding modes to the choline/ethanolamine-binding site of P. falciparum choline kinase, reflecting different types of inhibition. Strikingly, these compounds primarily inhibit the ethanolamine kinase activity of the P. falciparum choline kinase, leading to a severe decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine levels within P. falciparum, which explains the resulting growth phenotype and the parasites death. These studies provide an understanding of the mode of action, and act as a springboard for continued antimalarial development efforts selectively targeting P. falciparum choline kinase. PMID:27616047

  19. Biochemical and structural characterization of Plasmodium falciparum glutamate dehydrogenase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocher, Kathleen; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Kehr, Sebastian; Fischer, Marina; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDHs) play key roles in cellular redox, amino acid, and energy metabolism, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological interventions. Here we studied the functional network provided by the three known glutamate dehydrogenases of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The recombinant production of the previously described PfGDH1 as hexahistidyl-tagged proteins was optimized. Additionally, PfGDH2 was cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized. Like PfGDH1, PfGDH2 is an NADP(H)-dependent enzyme with a specific activity comparable to PfGDH1 but with slightly higher K(m) values for its substrates. The three-dimensional structure of hexameric PfGDH2 was solved to 3.1 Å resolution. The overall structure shows high similarity with PfGDH1 but with significant differences occurring at the subunit interface. As in mammalian GDH1, in PfGDH2 the subunit-subunit interactions are mainly assisted by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, whereas in PfGDH1 these contacts are mediated by networks of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. In accordance with this, the known bovine GDH inhibitors hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol were more effective on PfGDH2 than on PfGDH1. Subcellular localization was determined for all three plasmodial GDHs by fusion with the green fluorescent protein. Based on our data, PfGDH1 and PfGDH3 are cytosolic proteins whereas PfGDH2 clearly localizes to the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle specific for apicomplexan parasites. This study provides new insights into the structure and function of GDH isoenzymes of P. falciparum, which represent potential targets for the development of novel antimalarial drugs.

  20. The prognostic value of schizontaemia in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In Plasmodium falciparum infection, peripheral parasite counts do not always correlate well with the sequestered parasite burden. As erythrocytes parasitized with mature trophozoites and schizonts have a high tendency to adhere to the microvascular endothelium, they are often absent in peripheral blood samples. The appearance of schizonts in peripheral blood smears is thought to be a marker of high sequestered parasite burden and severe disease. In the present study, the value of schizontaemia as an early marker for severe disease in non-immune individuals with imported malaria was evaluated. Methods All patients in the Rotterdam Malaria Cohort diagnosed with P. falciparum malaria between 1 January 1999 and 1 January 2012 were included. Thick and thin blood films were examined for the presence of schizontaemia. The occurrence of WHO defined severe malaria was the primary endpoint. The diagnostic performance of schizontaemia was compared with previously evaluated biomarkers C-reactive protein and lactate. Results Schizonts were present on admission in 49 of 401 (12.2%) patients. Patients with schizontaemia were more likely to present with severe malaria, a more complicated course and had longer duration of admission in hospital. Schizontaemia had a specificity of 0.95, a sensitivity of 0.53, a negative predictive value of 0.92 and a positive predictive value of 0.67 for severe malaria. The presence of schizonts was an independent predictor for severe malaria. Conclusion Absence of schizonts was found to be a specific marker for exclusion of severe malaria. Presence of schizonts on admission was associated with a high positive predictive value for severe malaria. This may be of help to identify patients who are at risk of a more severe course than would be expected when considering peripheral parasitaemia alone. PMID:22929647

  1. Volatile organic compounds associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Ricardo; Coronado, Lorena M; Garrido, Anette C; Durant-Archibold, Armando A; Spadafora, Carmenza

    2017-05-02

    In order to identify new ways to prevent transmission of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, efforts have been made to understand how insects are attracted to humans. Vector-host interaction studies have shown that several volatile compounds play an important role in attracting mosquitoes to human targets. A headspace solid-phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HSPME GC-MS) analysis of the volatile organic composition of extracellular vesicles (EVs) and supernatants of ultracentrifugation (SNUs) was carried out in Plasmodium falciparum-infected cultures with high and low parasitemias. A list of 18 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was obtained from the EVs of both infected and uninfected RBCs with 1,2,3-Propanetriol, diacetate (diacetin) increased in the infected EVs, regardless of the parasitemia of the culture. The supernatant analysis, however, gave off 56 VOCs, with pentane 2,2,4-trimethyl being present in all the SNUs of uninfected erythrocytes but absent from the parasite-infected ones. Standing out in this study was hexanal, a reported insect attractant, which was the only VOC present in all samples from SNUs from infected erythrocytes and absent from uninfected ones, suggesting that it originates during parasite infection. The hexanal compound, reportedly a low-level component found in healthy human samples such as breath and plasma, had not been found in previous analyses of P. falciparum-infected patients or cultures. This compound has been reported as an Anopheles gambiae attractant in plants. While the compound could be produced during infection by the malaria parasite in human erythrocytes, the A. gambiae attraction could be used by the parasite as a strategy for transmission.

  2. Molecular characterisation of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum from Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil José

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing levels of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine (CQ in Thailand have led to the use of alternative antimalarials, which are at present also becoming ineffective. In this context, any strategies that help improve the surveillance of drug resistance, become crucial in overcoming the problem. Methods In the present study, we have established the in vitro sensitivity to CQ, mefloquine (MF, quinine (QUIN and amodiaquine (AMQ of 52 P. falciparum isolates collected in Thailand, and assessed the prevalence of four putative genetic polymorphisms of drug resistance, pfcrt K76T, pfmdr1 N86Y, pfmdr1 D1042N and pfmdr1 Y1246D, by PCR-RFLP. Results The percentage of isolates resistant to CQ, MF, and AMQ was 96% (50/52, 62% (32/52, and 58% (18/31, respectively, while all parasites were found to be sensitive to QUIN. In addition, 41 (79% of the isolates assayed were resistant simultaneously to more than one drug; 25 to CQ and MF, 9 to CQ and AMQ, and 7 to all three drugs, CQ, MF and AMQ. There were two significant associations between drug sensitivity and presence of particular molecular markers, i CQ resistance / pfcrt 76T (P = 0.001, and ii MF resistance / pfmdr1 86N (P Conclusions i In Thailand, the high levels of CQ pressure have led to strong selection of the pfcrt 76T polymorphism and ii pfmdr1 86N appears to be a good predictor of in vitro MF resistance.

  3. Origin and evolution of sulfadoxine resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiti Vinayak

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Thailand-Cambodia border is the epicenter for drug-resistant falciparum malaria. Previous studies have shown that chloroquine (CQ and pyrimethamine resistance originated in this region and eventually spread to other Asian countries and Africa. However, there is a dearth in understanding the origin and evolution of dhps alleles associated with sulfadoxine resistance. The present study was designed to reveal the origin(s of sulfadoxine resistance in Cambodia and its evolutionary relationship to African and South American dhps alleles. We sequenced 234 Cambodian Plasmodium falciparum isolates for the dhps codons S436A/F, A437G, K540E, A581G and A613S/T implicated in sulfadoxine resistance. We also genotyped 10 microsatellite loci around dhps to determine the genetic backgrounds of various alleles and compared them with the backgrounds of alleles prevalent in Africa and South America. In addition to previously known highly-resistant triple mutant dhps alleles SGEGA and AGEAA (codons 436, 437, 540, 581, 613 are sequentially indicated, a large proportion of the isolates (19.3% contained a 540N mutation in association with 437G/581G yielding a previously unreported triple mutant allele, SGNGA. Microsatellite data strongly suggest the strength of selection was greater on triple mutant dhps alleles followed by the double and single mutants. We provide evidence for at least three independent origins for the double mutants, one each for the SGKGA, AGKAA and SGEAA alleles. Our data suggest that the triple mutant allele SGEGA and the novel allele SGNGA have common origin on the SGKGA background, whereas the AGEAA triple mutant was derived from AGKAA on multiple, albeit limited, genetic backgrounds. The SGEAA did not share haplotypes with any of the triple mutants. Comparative analysis of the microsatellite haplotypes flanking dhps alleles from Cambodia, Kenya, Cameroon and Venezuela revealed an independent origin of sulfadoxine resistant alleles in each

  4. Origin and evolution of sulfadoxine resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayak, Sumiti; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; McCollum, Andrea M; Sem, Rithy; Shah, Naman K; Lim, Pharath; Muth, Sinuon; Rogers, William O; Fandeur, Thierry; Barnwell, John W; Escalante, Ananias A; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Ariey, Frederick; Meshnick, Steven R; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2010-03-26

    The Thailand-Cambodia border is the epicenter for drug-resistant falciparum malaria. Previous studies have shown that chloroquine (CQ) and pyrimethamine resistance originated in this region and eventually spread to other Asian countries and Africa. However, there is a dearth in understanding the origin and evolution of dhps alleles associated with sulfadoxine resistance. The present study was designed to reveal the origin(s) of sulfadoxine resistance in Cambodia and its evolutionary relationship to African and South American dhps alleles. We sequenced 234 Cambodian Plasmodium falciparum isolates for the dhps codons S436A/F, A437G, K540E, A581G and A613S/T implicated in sulfadoxine resistance. We also genotyped 10 microsatellite loci around dhps to determine the genetic backgrounds of various alleles and compared them with the backgrounds of alleles prevalent in Africa and South America. In addition to previously known highly-resistant triple mutant dhps alleles SGEGA and AGEAA (codons 436, 437, 540, 581, 613 are sequentially indicated), a large proportion of the isolates (19.3%) contained a 540N mutation in association with 437G/581G yielding a previously unreported triple mutant allele, SGNGA. Microsatellite data strongly suggest the strength of selection was greater on triple mutant dhps alleles followed by the double and single mutants. We provide evidence for at least three independent origins for the double mutants, one each for the SGKGA, AGKAA and SGEAA alleles. Our data suggest that the triple mutant allele SGEGA and the novel allele SGNGA have common origin on the SGKGA background, whereas the AGEAA triple mutant was derived from AGKAA on multiple, albeit limited, genetic backgrounds. The SGEAA did not share haplotypes with any of the triple mutants. Comparative analysis of the microsatellite haplotypes flanking dhps alleles from Cambodia, Kenya, Cameroon and Venezuela revealed an independent origin of sulfadoxine resistant alleles in each of these regions.

  5. Spatial prediction of Plasmodium falciparum prevalence in Somalia

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    Shewchuk Tanya

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maps of malaria distribution are vital for optimal allocation of resources for anti-malarial activities. There is a lack of reliable contemporary malaria maps in endemic countries in sub-Saharan Africa. This problem is particularly acute in low malaria transmission countries such as those located in the horn of Africa. Methods Data from a national malaria cluster sample survey in 2005 and routine cluster surveys in 2007 were assembled for Somalia. Rapid diagnostic tests were used to examine the presence of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in finger-prick blood samples obtained from individuals across all age-groups. Bayesian geostatistical models, with environmental and survey covariates, were used to predict continuous maps of malaria prevalence across Somalia and to define the uncertainty associated with the predictions. Results For analyses the country was divided into north and south. In the north, the month of survey, distance to water, precipitation and temperature had no significant association with P. falciparum prevalence when spatial correlation was taken into account. In contrast, all the covariates, except distance to water, were significantly associated with parasite prevalence in the south. The inclusion of covariates improved model fit for the south but not for the north. Model precision was highest in the south. The majority of the country had a predicted prevalence of Conclusion The maps showed that malaria transmission in Somalia varied from hypo- to meso-endemic. However, even after including the selected covariates in the model, there still remained a considerable amount of unexplained spatial variation in parasite prevalence, indicating effects of other factors not captured in the study. Nonetheless the maps presented here provide the best contemporary information on malaria prevalence in Somalia.

  6. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum infection in pregnant women in Gabon

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    Kendjo Eric

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In areas where malaria is endemic, pregnancy is associated with increased susceptibility to malaria. It is generally agreed that this risk ends with delivery and decreases with the number of pregnancies. Our study aimed to demonstrate relationships between malarial parasitaemia and age, gravidity and anaemia in pregnant women in Libreville, the capital city of Gabon. Methods Peripheral blood was collected from 311 primigravidae and women in their second pregnancy. Thick blood smears were checked, as were the results of haemoglobin electrophoresis. We also looked for the presence of anaemia, fever, and checked whether the volunteers had had chemoprophylaxis. The study was performed in Gabon where malaria transmission is intense and perennial. Results A total of 177 women (57% had microscopic parasitaemia; 139 (64%of them were primigravidae, 38 (40% in their second pregnancy and 180 (64% were teenagers. The parasites densities were also higher in primigravidae and teenagers. The prevalence of anaemia was 71% and was associated with microscopic Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia: women with moderate or severe anaemia had higher parasite prevalences and densities. However, the sickle cell trait, fever and the use of chemoprophylaxis did not have a significant association with the presence of P. falciparum. Conclusions These results suggest that the prevalence of malaria and the prevalence of anaemia, whether associated with malaria or not, are higher in pregnant women in Gabon. Primigravidae and young pregnant women are the most susceptible to infection. It is, therefore, urgent to design an effective regimen of malaria prophylaxis for this high risk population.

  7. A molecular mechanism of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

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    Mbengue, Alassane; Bhattacharjee, Souvik; Pandharkar, Trupti; Liu, Haining; Estiu, Guillermina; Stahelin, Robert V; Rizk, Shahir S; Njimoh, Dieudonne L; Ryan, Yana; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Nguon, Chea; Ghorbal, Mehdi; Lopez-Rubio, Jose-Juan; Pfrender, Michael; Emrich, Scott; Mohandas, Narla; Dondorp, Arjen M; Wiest, Olaf; Haldar, Kasturi

    2015-04-30

    Artemisinins are the cornerstone of anti-malarial drugs. Emergence and spread of resistance to them raises risk of wiping out recent gains achieved in reducing worldwide malaria burden and threatens future malaria control and elimination on a global level. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed parasite genetic loci associated with artemisinin resistance. However, there is no consensus on biochemical targets of artemisinin. Whether and how these targets interact with genes identified by GWAS, remains unknown. Here we provide biochemical and cellular evidence that artemisinins are potent inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PfPI3K), revealing an unexpected mechanism of action. In resistant clinical strains, increased PfPI3K was associated with the C580Y mutation in P. falciparum Kelch13 (PfKelch13), a primary marker of artemisinin resistance. Polyubiquitination of PfPI3K and its binding to PfKelch13 were reduced by the PfKelch13 mutation, which limited proteolysis of PfPI3K and thus increased levels of the kinase, as well as its lipid product phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). We find PI3P levels to be predictive of artemisinin resistance in both clinical and engineered laboratory parasites as well as across non-isogenic strains. Elevated PI3P induced artemisinin resistance in absence of PfKelch13 mutations, but remained responsive to regulation by PfKelch13. Evidence is presented for PI3P-dependent signalling in which transgenic expression of an additional kinase confers resistance. Together these data present PI3P as the key mediator of artemisinin resistance and the sole PfPI3K as an important target for malaria elimination.

  8. Genetic evidence for contribution of human dispersal to the genetic diversity of EBA-175 in Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Yasukochi, Yoshiki; Naka, Izumi; Patarapotikul, Jintana; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Ohashi, Jun

    2015-08-01

    The 175-kDa erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175) of Plasmodium falciparum plays a crucial role in merozoite invasion into human erythrocytes. EBA-175 is believed to have been under diversifying selection; however, there have been no studies investigating the effect of dispersal of humans out of Africa on the genetic variation of EBA-175 in P. falciparum. The PCR-direct sequencing was performed for a part of the eba-175 gene (regions II and III) using DNA samples obtained from Thai patients infected with P. falciparum. The divergence times for the P. falciparum eba-175 alleles were estimated assuming that P. falciparum/Plasmodium reichenowi divergence occurred 6 million years ago (MYA). To examine the possibility of diversifying selection, nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution rates for Plasmodium species were also estimated. A total of 32 eba-175 alleles were identified from 131 Thai P. falciparum isolates. Their estimated divergence time was 0.13-0.14 MYA, before the exodus of humans from Africa. A phylogenetic tree for a large sequence dataset of P. falciparum eba-175 alleles from across the world showed the presence of a basal Asian-specific cluster for all P. falciparum sequences. A markedly more nonsynonymous substitutions than synonymous substitutions in region II in P. falciparum was also detected, but not within Plasmodium species parasitizing African apes, suggesting that diversifying selection has acted specifically on P. falciparum eba-175. Plasmodium falciparum eba-175 genetic diversity appeared to increase following the exodus of Asian ancestors from Africa. Diversifying selection may have played an important role in the diversification of eba-175 allelic lineages. The present results suggest that the dispersals of humans out of Africa influenced significantly the molecular evolution of P. falciparum EBA-175.

  9. Two cases of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Netherlands without recent travel to a malaria-endemic country.

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    Arends, Joop E; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Kraaij-Dirkzwager, Marleen M; Kaan, Jan A; Fanoy, Ewout B; Haas, Pieter-Jan; Scholte, Ernst-Jan; Kortbeek, Laetitia M; Sankatsing, Sanjay U C

    2013-09-01

    Recently, two patients of African origin were given a diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria without recent travel to a malaria-endemic country. This observation highlights the importance for clinicians to consider tropical malaria in patients with fever. Possible transmission routes of P. falciparum to these patients will be discussed. From a public health perspective, international collaboration is crucial when potential cases of European autochthonous P. falciparum malaria in Europe re considered.

  10. Kinetics of B Cell responses to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in Ghanaian women naturally exposed to malaria parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ampomah, Paulina; Stevenson, Liz; Ofori, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Naturally acquired protective immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria takes years to develop. It relies mainly on Abs, particularly IgG specific for Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) proteins on the infected erythrocyte surface. It is only partially understood why...... confirmed earlier reports of high atypical memory B cell frequencies among residents of P. falciparum-endemic areas, and indicated an additional effect of pregnancy. Our study provides new knowledge regarding immunity to P. falciparum malaria and underpins efforts to develop PfEMP1-based vaccines against...

  11. El Niño and variations in the prevalence of Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum in Vanuatu.

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    Gilbert, M; Brindle, R

    2009-12-01

    Malaria, both Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax, is a major cause of morbidity in Vanuatu. As P. vivax is more prevalent in seasonal climates and P. falciparum in areas of more consistent rainfall, it is postulated that there will be a correlation between the ratio of vivax:falciparum and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which affects sea surface temperatures and rainfall. With changes in global climate, the frequency, duration and strength of the ENSO are expected to alter, influencing the pattern of malaria. The data showed no obvious correlation between ENSO and either cases of malaria or the vivax:falciparum ratio.

  12. Serum Neuron-Specific Enolase, Biogenic Amino-Acids and Neurobehavioral Function in Lead-Exposed Workers from Lead-Acid Battery Manufacturing Process

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    K Ravibabu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interaction between serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE, biogenic amino-acids and neurobehavioral function with blood lead levels in workers exposed to lead form lead-acid battery manufacturing process was not studied. Objective: To evaluate serum NSE and biogenic amino-acids (dopamine and serotonin levels, and neurobehavioral performance among workers exposed to lead from lead-acid storage battery plant, and its relation with blood lead levels (BLLs. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we performed biochemical and neurobehavioral function tests on 146 workers exposed to lead from lead-acid battery manufacturing process. BLLs were assessed by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Serum NSE, dopamine and serotonin were measured by ELISA. Neurobehavioral functions were assessed by CDC-recommended tests—simple reaction time (SRT, symbol digit substitution test (SDST, and serial digit learning test (SDLT. Results: There was a significant correlation (r 0.199, p<0.05 between SDST and BLL. SDLT and SRT had also a significant positive correlation (r 0.238, p<0.01. NSE had a negative correlation (r –0.194, p<0.05 with serotonin level. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that both SRT and SDST had positive significant associations with BLL. SRT also had a positive significant association with age. Conclusion: Serum NSE cannot be used as a marker for BLL. The only domain of neurobehavioral function tests that is affected by increased BLL in workers of lead-acid battery manufacturing process is that of the “attention and perception” (SDST.

  13. Serum concentrations of two biochemical markers of brain tissue damage S‐100B and neurone specific enolase are increased in elite female soccer players after a competitive game

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    Stålnacke, B‐M; Ohlsson, A; Tegner, Y; Sojka, P

    2006-01-01

    Background It is a matter of debate whether or not ordinary heading of the ball in soccer causes injury to brain tissue. Objective To analyse concentrations of the biochemical markers of brain tissue damage S‐100B and neurone specific enolase (NSE) in serum of female elite soccer players in association with a competitive game. Methods Venous blood samples were obtained from 44 female soccer players before and after a competitive game for analysis. The number of headers and trauma events (falls, collisions, etc) was assessed from videotape recordings for each player. Results Concentrations of both brain damage markers were increased after the game (S‐100B, 0.18 (0.11) v 0.11 (0.05) μg/l (p  =  0.000); NSE, 10.14 (1.74) v 9.05 (1.59) μg/l (p  =  0.001)). There was a significant correlation between changes in S‐100B concentrations and both the number of headers (r  =  0.430, p  =  0.004) and the number of other trauma events (r  =  0.517, p<0.001). Conclusion The concentrations of both S‐100B and NSE were increased by game associated activities and events. The increases in S‐100B concentration were significantly related to the number of headers and other trauma events, which indicates that both these factors may have contributed to these increases. PMID:16556784

  14. Immediate S-100B and neuron-specific enolase plasma measurements for rapid evaluation of primary brain damage in alcohol-intoxicated, minor head-injured patients.

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    Mussack, Thomas; Biberthaler, Peter; Kanz, Karl Georg; Heckl, Ute; Gruber, Rudolf; Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Mutschler, Wolf; Jochum, Marianne

    2002-11-01

    The neuroproteins S-100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) released into the circulation are suggested to be reliable markers for primary brain damage. However, safe identification of relevant post-traumatic complications after minor head injury (MHI) is often hampered by acute intoxication of the patients. The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic validity of immediate plasma measurements of S-100B and NSE in comparison with neurological examinations and cerebral computed tomography (CCT) findings in alcohol-intoxicated MHI patients. One hundered thrity-nine MHI individuals were enrolled in this prospective study during Munich's Oktoberfest 2000. Plasma levels of S-100B and NSE as well as serum alcohol and glucose values were determined by fully automated assays immediately after admission. The results were compared with Glasgow Coma Scale score, a brief neurological examination, and the CCT findings. Without being influenced by alcohol, median S-100B levels of the CCT+ group were significantly increased compared with those of the CCT- group (P < 0.001). NSE, alcohol, and glucose levels showed no significant group differences. As calculated by the ROC analysis, a cutoff value of 0.21 ng/mL with an area under the curve of 0.864 clearly differentiates between CCT+ and CCT- patients at a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 50.0%, and a positive likelihood ratio of 2.0. Although acute alcohol intoxication did not confound plasma measurements of S-100B and NSE, only S-100B levels below the cutoff level of 0.21 ng/mL seem to indicate absence of primary brain damage. Thus, in addition to routine neurological examinations, S-100B measurements immediately after admission might help to reduce CCT scans in alcohol-intoxicated patients early after MHI.

  15. Clinical findings of a probable case of MM2-cortical-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with antibodies to anti-N-terminus of α-enolase.

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    Hayashi, Yuichi; Yamada, Megumi; Kimura, Akio; Asano, Takahiko; Satoh, Katsuya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoneda, Maokoto; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2017-10-02

    We report the case of a 76-year-old woman presenting with 47-month history of progressive dementia and cortical blindness with no family history. Antibodies against thyroid glands and the N-terminus of α-enolase (NAE) were detected in her serum. Neurological examination revealed progressive dementia, frontal signs, visual disturbance, and exaggerated bilateral tendon reflexes in both legs. Diffusion MRI showed cortical hyper-intensities in the bilateral occipital and parietal, and the left frontal and temporal cortices. (99m)Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer-single photon emission computed tomography indicated decreased regional cerebral blood flow throughout the bilateral parietal lobes and partially in the left frontal and temporal lobes. PRNP gene analysis showed no mutations with methionine homozygosity at codon 129 in peripheral blood. Cerebrospinal fluid examination, including 14-3-3 and total tau protein detection, revealed normal levels; however, prion proteins were amplified by the real-time quaking-induced conversion method. Hashimoto's encephalopathy was excluded on the basis of unresponsiveness to corticosteroids. The symptoms progressed slowly. Periodic sharp-wave complexes were observed on electroencephalogram 36 months after the onset of symptoms; the patient reached a state of akinetic mutism at 47 months. This was a probable case of MM2-cortical-type sCJD with anti-NAE antibodies based on the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria for sCJD, genetic information, and the slowly progressive course. However, this case did not meet with the probable WHO diagnostic criteria until 3 years after symptom onset, highlighting the difficulty of diagnosing a living case of the MM2-type of sCJD. Therefore, establishment of clinical diagnostic criteria for MM2-type of sCJD is required.

  16. Development of an integrated procedure for the detection of central nervous tissue in meat products using cholesterol and neuron-specific enolase as markers.

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    Lücker, E; Eigenbrodt, E; Wenisch, S; Failing, K; Leiser, R; Bülte, M

    1999-03-01

    The emergence of a new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease during the bovine spongiform encephalopathy epidemic has focused attention on the use of tissue from the central nervous system (CNS) in food. So far, the banning of CNS tissue could not be effectively controlled because procedures for detection were missing. With regard to preventive health protection and labeling law enforcement, we have developed an integrated procedure for the detection of CNS tissue in meat products. Herein, we show that antigenic characteristics of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) quantitatively survive technological treatment including severe homogenization and pressure heating. Using both poly- and monoclonal antibodies against NSE in the Western blot, bovine and porcine brain could be detected in sausages, albeit with varying sensitivity (1 to 4%). Sensitivity was increased after reduction of fat content (30 to 40%) of the samples by means of a soxhlet extraction. This made possible the detection of brain addition as low as 0.25% when using monoclonal antibodies. Immunohistology showed distribution of CNS tissue in heat-treated meat products to be homogeneous. Immunoreaction was not found to be bound to morphologically intact histological or cytological structures; however, it proved to be highly specific. The quantification of cholesterol provides a low-cost screening method for the rapid identification of meat products, suspicious with regard to CNS tissue addition. Cholesterol content increased by 26 mg per 100 g of fresh substance for each percentage of brain added to internally produced reference material. Using three different approaches (internal reference material, raw material, and field samples), a provisional cutoff point of normal cholesterol content was calculated for emulsion-type cooked sausages to be 115 mg/100 g (P < 0.05).

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of neural tissue markers (neuron-specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein, S100 protein) in ameloblastic fibrodentinoma: a comparative study with ameloblastic fibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Y; Sato, H; Satoh, M; Nakamura, S I; Yamamoto, H

    2000-08-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of three cases of ameloblastic fibrodentinoma (AFD) were studied by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method using antibodies against neuron-specific enolase (NSE), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100 protein and the results were compared with those in ameloblastic fibroma (AF). A striking histopathological characteristic of AFD was the formation of abortive dentin with various degrees of maturation at the epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interface. Central cells of enamel organ-like epithelia with various stages of abortive dentin induction in AFD were generally positive for NSE. Dental lamina-like epithelial cells also showed positive staining in some areas. No cells were positive for NSE in AF. Positive staining for GFAP was observed in the juxta-epithelial mesenchymal tissue of the formation stage of immature dentin with various numbers of entrapped cells in AFD, but GFAP staining was negative in other mesenchymal and epithelial tissues at other stages. In AF, no GFAP-positive cells were found. There were a few S100 protein-positive cells found in the foci of epithelial components in both AFD and AF. Mesenchymal cells showing a dendritic or spindle shape were positive for S100 protein in some areas of AFD and AF. Although such cells in the mesenchymal component of pigmented AFD were more numerous than in non-pigmented AFD and AF, their distribution pattern in the former condition was basically similar to that in the latter. Although the present results, obtained from conventional immunohistochemical procedures, do not directly reflect the expression of neural crest-derived cells in the dentinogenesis of AFD, such results do not disprove the possibility of the expression of neural proteins probably related to neural crest-derived cells in dentinogenesis under certain pathologic conditions in odontogenic mixed tumors. Such a phenomenon may also occur during dentinogenesis in other odontogenic mixed tumors and

  18. The Serum Changes of Neuron-Specific Enolase and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 in Patients With Diffuse Axonal Injury Following Progesterone Administration: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokhi, Nader; Soltani, Zahra; Khaksari, Mohammad; Karamouzian, Saeid; Mofid, Behshad; Asadikaram, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Improvement of neurologic outcome in progesterone-administered patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) has been found in a recent study. Also, there has been interest in the importance of serum parameters as predictors of outcome in traumatic brain injury. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the effect of progesterone administration on serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in clinical DAI. Patients and Methods In this study, the serum levels of ICAM-1 and NSE of 32 male DAI patients (18 - 60 years of age, a Glasgow coma scale of 12 or less, and admitted within 4 hours after injury) who were randomized for a controlled phase II trial of progesterone were analyzed. The analysis was performed between the control and progesterone groups at admission time, and 24 hours and six days after DAI, respectively. Results A reduction in the serum level of ICAM-1 was noticed in the progesterone group 24 hours after the injury (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the serum level of NSE between the study groups during evaluation. At 24 hours after the injury, the level of ICAM-1 in the control group was higher than that at admission time (P < 0.05). The lowest level of NSE in the two groups was seen six days after DAI (P < 0.01). Conclusions In summary, progesterone administration reduced serum ICAM-1, and whereby may attenuate blood brain barrier disruption, the latter needs further investigation for confirmation. PMID:27800469

  19. Cardiac, renal, and neurological benefits of preoperative levosimendan administration in patients with right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery: evaluation with two biomarkers neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and neuronal enolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Orriach, José Luis; Ariza-Villanueva, Daniel; Florez-Vela, Ana; Garrido-Sánchez, Lourdes; Moreno-Cortés, María Isabel; Galán-Ortega, Manuel; Ramírez-Fernández, Alicia; Alcaide Torres, Juan; Fernandez, Concepción Santiago; Navarro Arce, Isabel; Melero-Tejedor, José María; Rubio-Navarro, Manuel; Cruz-Mañas, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate if the preoperative administration of levosimendan in patients with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, and high perioperative risk would improve cardiac function and would also have a protective effect on renal and neurological functions, assessed using two biomarkers neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (N-GAL) and neuronal enolase. Methods This is an observational study. Twenty-seven high-risk cardiac patients with RV dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension, scheduled for cardiac valve surgery, were prospectively followed after preoperative administration of levosimendan. Levosimendan was administered preoperatively on the day before surgery. All patients were considered high risk of cardiac and perioperative renal complications. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography, renal function by urinary N-GAL levels, and the acute kidney injury scale. Neuronal damage was assessed by neuron-specific enolase levels. Results After surgery, no significant variations were found in mean and SE levels of N-GAL (14.31 [28.34] ng/mL vs 13.41 [38.24] ng/mL), neuron-specific enolase (5.40 [0.41] ng/mL vs 4.32 [0.61] ng/mL), or mean ± SD creatinine (1.06±0.24 mg/dL vs 1.25±0.37 mg/dL at 48 hours). RV dilatation decreased from 4.23±0.7 mm to 3.45±0.6 mm and pulmonary artery pressure from 58±18 mmHg to 42±19 mmHg at 48 hours. Conclusion Preoperative administration of levosimendan has shown a protective role against cardiac, renal, and neurological damage in patients with a high risk of multiple organ dysfunctions undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27143905

  20. Effects of sevuparin on rosette formation and cytoadherence of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiwaew, Somporn; Sritabal, Juntima; Piaraksa, Nattaporn; Keayarsa, Srisuda; Ruengweerayut, Ronnatrai; Utaisin, Chirapong; Sila, Patima; Niramis, Rangsan; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Pongponratn, Emsri; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Leitgeb, Anna M.; Wahlgren, Mats; Lee, Sue J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Chotivanich, Kesinee

    2017-01-01

    In severe falciparum malaria cytoadherence of parasitised red blood cells (PRBCs) to vascular endothelium (causing sequestration) and to uninfected red cells (causing rosette formation) contribute to microcirculatory flow obstruction in vital organs. Heparin can reverse the underlying ligand-receptor interactions, but may increase the bleeding risks. As a heparin-derived polysaccharide, sevuparin has been designed to retain anti-adhesive properties, while the antithrombin-binding domains have been eliminated, substantially diminishing its anticoagulant activity. Sevuparin has been evaluated recently in patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, and is currently investigated in a clinical trial for sickle cell disease. The effects of sevuparin on rosette formation and cytoadherence of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Thailand were investigated. Trophozoite stages of P. falciparum-infected RBCs (Pf-iRBCs) were cultured from 49 patients with malaria. Pf-iRBCs were treated with sevuparin at 37°C and assessed in rosetting and in cytoadhesion assays with human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) under static and flow conditions. The proportion of Pf-iRBCs forming rosettes ranged from 6.5% to 26.0% (median = 12.2%). Rosetting was dose dependently disrupted by sevuparin (50% disruption by 250 μg/mL). Overall 57% of P. falciparum isolates bound to HDMECs under static conditions; median (interquartile range) Pf-iRBC binding was 8.5 (3.0–38.0) Pf-iRBCs/1000 HDMECs. Sevuparin in concentrations ≥ 100 μg/mL inhibited cytoadherence. Sevuparin disrupts P. falciparum rosette formation in a dose dependent manner and inhibits cytoadherence to endothelial cells. The data support assessment of sevuparin as an adjunctive treatment to the standard therapy in severe falciparum malaria. PMID:28249043

  1. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

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    Choveaux David L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369, containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds.

  2. Falciparum malaria in the north of Laos: the occurrence and implications of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) gene haplotype SVMNT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Alifrangis, Michael; Stohrer, Jörg M;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Pfcrt-gene encodes a transmembrane protein located in the Plasmodium falciparum digestive vacuole. Chloroquine resistant (CQR) strains of African and Southeast Asian origin carry the Pfcrt-haplotype (c72-76) CVIET, whereas most South American and Papua New Guinean CQR stains carry...

  3. H2A.Z demarcates intergenic regions of the plasmodium falciparum epigenome that are dynamically marked by H3K9ac and H3K4me3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richárd Bártfai

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms and their enzymes are promising targets for malaria therapeutic intervention; however, the epigenetic component of gene expression in P. falciparum is poorly understood. Dynamic or stable association of epigenetic marks with genomic features provides important clues about their function and helps to understand how histone variants/modifications are used for indexing the Plasmodium epigenome. We describe a novel, linear amplification method for next-generation sequencing (NGS that allows unbiased analysis of the extremely AT-rich Plasmodium genome. We used this method for high resolution, genome-wide analysis of a histone H2A variant, H2A.Z and two histone H3 marks throughout parasite intraerythrocytic development. Unlike in other organisms, H2A.Z is a constant, ubiquitous feature of euchromatic intergenic regions throughout the intraerythrocytic cycle. The almost perfect colocalisation of H2A.Z with H3K9ac and H3K4me3 suggests that these marks are preferentially deposited on H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes. By performing RNA-seq on 8 time-points, we show that acetylation of H3K9 at promoter regions correlates very well with the transcriptional status whereas H3K4me3 appears to have stage-specific regulation, being low at early stages, peaking at trophozoite stage, but does not closely follow changes in gene expression. Our improved NGS library preparation procedure provides a foundation to exploit the malaria epigenome in detail. Furthermore, our findings place H2A.Z at the cradle of P. falciparum epigenetic regulation by stably defining intergenic regions and providing a platform for dynamic assembly of epigenetic and other transcription related complexes.

  4. Dynamic subcellular localization of isoforms of the folate pathway enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT through the erythrocytic cycle of Plasmodium falciparum

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    Mitchell Sarah L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The folate pathway enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT converts serine to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate and is essential for the acquisition of one-carbon units for subsequent transfer reactions. 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate is used by thymidylate synthase to convert dUMP to dTMP for DNA synthesis. In Plasmodium falciparum an enzymatically functional SHMT (PfSHMTc and a related, apparently inactive isoform (PfSHMTm are found, encoded by different genes. Here, patterns of localization of the two isoforms during the parasite erythrocytic cycle are investigated. Methods Polyclonal antibodies were raised to PfSHMTc and PfSHMTm, and, together with specific markers for the mitochondrion and apicoplast, were employed in quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy of blood-stage parasites. Results As well as the expected cytoplasmic occupancy of PfSHMTc during all stages, localization into the mitochondrion and apicoplast occurred in a stage-specific manner. Although early trophozoites lacked visible organellar PfSHMTc, a significant percentage of parasites showed such fluorescence during the mid-to-late trophozoite and schizont stages. In the case of the mitochondrion, the majority of parasites in these stages at any given time showed no marked PfSHMTc fluorescence, suggesting that its occupancy of this organelle is of limited duration. PfSHMTm showed a distinctly more pronounced mitochondrial location through most of the erythrocytic cycle and GFP-tagging of its N-terminal region confirmed the predicted presence of a mitochondrial signal sequence. Within the apicoplast, a majority of mitotic schizonts showed a marked concentration of PfSHMTc, whose localization in this organelle was less restricted than for the mitochondrion and persisted from the late trophozoite to the post-mitotic stages. PfSHMTm showed a broadly similar distribution across the cycle, but with a distinctive punctate accumulation towards

  5. Artesunate plus pyronaridine for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

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    Bukirwa, Hasifa; Unnikrishnan, B; Kramer, Christine V; Sinclair, David; Nair, Suma; Tharyan, Prathap

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that people with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria are treated using Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT). ACT combines three-days of a short-acting artemisinin derivative with a longer-acting antimalarial which has a different mode of action. Pyronaridine has been reported as an effective antimalarial over two decades of use in parts of Asia, and is currently being evaluated as a partner drug for artesunate. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of artesunate-pyronaridine compared to alternative ACTs for treating people with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; ClinicalTrials.gov; the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); and the WHO International Clinical Trials Search Portal up to 16 January 2014. We searched reference lists and conference abstracts, and contacted experts for information about ongoing and unpublished trials. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials of artesunate-pyronaridine versus other ACTs in adults and children with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. For the safety analysis, we also included adverse events data from trials comparing any treatment regimen containing pyronaridine with regimens not containing pyronaridine. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias, and extracted data. We combined dichotomous data using risk ratios (RR) and continuous data using mean differences (MD), and presented all results with a 95% confidence interval (CI). We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. Main results We included six randomized controlled trials enrolling 3718 children and adults. Artesunate-pyronaridine versus artemether-lumefantrine In two multicentre trials, enrolling

  6. Life stage-specific effects of the fungicide pyrimethanil and temperature on the snail Physella acuta (Draparnaud, 1805) disclose the pitfalls for the aquatic risk assessment under global climate change.

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    Seeland, Anne; Albrand, Jennifer; Oehlmann, Jörg; Müller, Ruth

    2013-03-01

    It can be suggested that the combined stress of pesticide pollution and suboptimal temperature influences the sensitivity of life stages of aquatic invertebrates differently. The embryo, juvenile, half- and full-life-cycle toxicity tests performed with the snail Physella acuta at different concentrations (0.06-0.5 or 1.0 mg L(-1)) of the model fungicide pyrimethanil at 15, 20 and 25 °C revealed, that pyrimethanil caused concentration-dependent effects at all test temperatures. Interestingly, the ecotoxicity of pyrimethanil was higher at lower (suboptimal) temperature for embryo hatching and F(1) reproduction, but its ecotoxicity for juvenile growth and F(0) reproduction increased with increasing temperature. The life-stage specific temperature-dependent ecotoxicity of pyrimethanil and the high fungicide susceptibility of the invasive snail clearly demonstrate the complexity of pesticide-temperature interactions and the challenge to draw conclusions for the risk of pesticides under the impact of global climate change.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric proteins contribute to cytoadherence and anchor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 to the host cell cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberli, Alexander; Zurbrügg, Laura; Rusch, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Adherence of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to host endothelium is conferred through the parasite-derived virulence factor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), the major contributor to malaria severity. PfEMP1 located at knob structures on the erythrocyte surface is...

  8. Monitoring PfMDR1 transport in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiling, Sarah J; Rohrbach, Petra

    2015-07-15

    The Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance 1 transporter, PfMDR1, contains five amino acid polymorphisms that are suggested to be involved in altered drug transport from the parasite's cytosol into the digestive vacuole (DV). Transport of a substrate into another intracellular compartment influences drug availability at its site of action, therefore making the parasite more susceptible or resistant to a drug. Fluo-4 is a known fluorescent substrate that can be used as a molecular tool to investigate transport dynamics of PfMDR1 in many parasite strains. Six P. falciparum strains with varying PfMDR1 mutations were loaded with Fluo-4 AM. Accumulation of the fluorophore in the DV was measured using confocal microscopy. The role of a key amino acid mutation was verified using selected parasite clones with point mutations at PfMDR1 amino acid position 1042. Equal expression of PfMDR1 was confirmed by Western blot. Fluo-4 was transported by PfMDR1 into the DV of most drug-sensitive and -resistant parasites. Asparagine at PfMDR1 amino acid position 1042 was crucial for Fluo-4 transport, while the N1042D substitution abolished Fluo-4 transport. Competition studies of Fluo-4 with chloroquine, quinine and mefloquine were performed on parasites harbouring asparagine at position 1042. A distinct Fluo-4 transport inhibition pattern for each tested anti-malarial drug was observed in parasite strains of different genetic background. This study demonstrates that Fluo-4 can be used to investigate PfMDR1 transport dynamics in both drug-sensitive and -resistant parasites. Furthermore, direct evidence of altered Fluo-4 transport in PfMDR1 is linked to a single amino acid mutation in the substrate binding pocket. This system offers a great tool to investigate the role of substrate transport by PfMDR1 and the mutations necessary to support transport, which would lead to new insights for the development of novel anti-malarial drugs.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of Plasmodium falciparum in Thailand, a low transmission country

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    Sitthi-amorn Chitr

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population structure of the causative agents of human malaria, Plasmodium sp., including the most serious agent Plasmodium falciparum, depends on the local epidemiological and demographic situations, such as the incidence of infected people, the vector transmission intensity and migration of inhabitants (i.e. exchange between sites. Analysing the structure of P. falciparum populations at a large scale, such as continents, or with markers that are subject to non-neutral selection, can lead to a masking and misunderstanding of the effective process of transmission. Thus, knowledge of the genetic structure and organization of P. falciparum populations in a particular area with neutral genetic markers is needed to understand which epidemiological factors should be targeted for disease control. Limited reports are available on the population genetic diversity and structure of P. falciparum in Thailand, and this is of particular concern at the Thai-Myanmar and Thai-Cambodian borders, where there is a reported high resistance to anti-malarial drugs, for example mefloquine, with little understanding of its potential gene flow. Methods The diversity and genetic differentiation of P. falciparum populations were analysed using 12 polymorphic apparently neutral microsatellite loci distributed on eight of the 14 different chromosomes. Samples were collected from seven provinces in the western, eastern and southern parts of Thailand. Results A strong difference in the nuclear genetic structure was observed between most of the assayed populations. The genetic diversity was comparable to the intermediate level observed in low P. falciparum transmission areas (average HS = 0.65 ± 0.17, where the lowest is observed in South America and the highest in Africa. However, uniquely the Yala province, had only a single multilocus genotype present in all samples, leading to a strong geographic differentiation when compared to the other Thai

  10. Trend and manifestations of falciparum malaria in a tertiary care hospital of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saya, Rama Prakasha; Saya, Ganesh Kumar; Debabrata, Goswami

    2016-01-01

    The recent focus is on the increase in the burden of falciparum cases with a varied spectrum of presentation and outcome, especially in developing countries like India. This study was undertaken to analyze the trend and manifestations of falciparum malaria in a tertiary care hospital. This descriptive study was carried out at the Gauhati Government Medical College and Hospital from June 2006 to May 2007. The data were collected on demographic and time characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings, the outcome of disease and expressed in proportion or percentages. Out of the 100 cases, around 2(nd)/3(rd) (63%) of cases were in the age group of 15-30 years and the mean age was found to be 29.51 years. About 66% of them were males. Clinical presentations included pain abdomen (42, 42%), nausea and vomiting (35, 35%), jaundice (34, 34%), oliguria (24, 24%), altered sensorium (24, 24%), breathing difficulty (10, 10%), and seizures (5, 5%). Number of cases and mortality were more with a peak in the month of May and September. Manifestations of severe falciparum malaria included hepatopathy (38%), renal failure (28%), shock (9%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (7%), hypoglycemia (3%), and severe anemia (1%). Eighty-two cases (82%) recovered and 18 cases (18%) expired. Falciparum malaria is more among younger adult age group and males. Complications and mortality are also more due to falciparum malaria.

  11. Biomarkers of Plasmodium falciparum infection during pregnancy in women living in northeastern Tanzania.

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    Stéphanie Boström

    Full Text Available In pregnant women, Plasmodium falciparum infections are an important cause of maternal morbidity as well as fetal and neonatal mortality. Erythrocytes infected by these malaria-causing parasites accumulate through adhesive interactions in placental intervillous spaces, thus evading detection in peripheral blood smears. Sequestered infected erythrocytes induce inflammation, offering the possibility of detecting inflammatory mediators in peripheral blood that could act as biomarkers of placental infection. In a longitudinal, prospective study in Tanzania, we quantified a range of different cytokines, chemokines and angiogenic factors in peripheral plasma samples, taken on multiple sequential occasions during pregnancy up to and including delivery, from P. falciparum-infected women and matched uninfected controls. The results show that during healthy, uninfected pregnancies the levels of most of the panel of molecules we measured were largely unchanged except at delivery. In women with P. falciparum, however, both comparative and longitudinal assessments consistently showed that the levels of IL-10 and IP-10 increased significantly whilst that of RANTES decreased significantly, regardless of gestational age at the time the infection was detected. ROC curve analysis indicated that a combination of increased IL-10 and IP-10 levels and decreased RANTES levels might be predictive of P. falciparum infections. In conclusion, our data suggest that host biomarkers in peripheral blood may represent useful diagnostic markers of P. falciparum infection during pregnancy, but placental histology results would need to be included to verify these findings.

  12. [Sensitivity in vitro of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine, pyronaridine, artesunate and piperaquine in south Yunnan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H L; Yang, P F; Liu, D Q; Liu, R J; Dong, Y; Zhang, C Y; Cao, D Q; He, H

    1992-01-01

    The sensitivity of P. falciparum to chloroquine, pyronaridine, artesunate and piperaquine (CQ, PD, AT, PQ) was assayed using in vitro microtechnique in south Yunnan in 1990. The resistance rates were 98.7% (75/76), 27.6% (16/58), 13.8% (9/65) and 97.7% (43/44) respectively, and ID50 were 125.0, 19.0, 4.7 and 243.3 nmol/L, respectively. The resistance rate against CQ showed no change as compared to the rates against CQ 5 and 9 years ago; but the ID50 was lower. CQ-resistant P. falciparum showed a marked cross-resistance to PQ, but not to PD and AT. AT-resistant P. falciparum exhibited cross-resistance to the above-mentioned three drugs. PD-resistant P. falciparum showed no cross resistance to AT, but showed cross resistance to CQ and PQ. In comparison with chloroquine-coated plates, the plates coated with pyronaridine, artesunate or piperaquine gave similar results as the former, which were shown by the rise in schizont inhibition rates along with the rise in drug concentration. It indicates that pyronaridine-, artesunate-, and piperaquine-coated plates can be used in the assay of sensitivity of P. falciparum to the three drugs.

  13. Promoter regions of Plasmodium vivax are poorly or not recognized by Plasmodium falciparum

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    del Portillo Hernando A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterologous promoter analysis in Plasmodium has revealed the existence of conserved cis regulatory elements as promoters from different species can drive expression of reporter genes in heterologous transfection assays. Here, the functional characterization of different Plasmodium vivax promoters in Plasmodium falciparum using luciferase as the reporter gene is presented. Methods Luciferase reporter plasmids harboring the upstream regions of the msp1, dhfr, and vir3 genes as well as the full-length intergenic regions of the vir23/24 and ef-1α genes of P. vivax were constructed and transiently transfected in P. falciparum. Results Only the constructs with the full-length intergenic regions of the vir23/24 and ef-1α genes were recognized by the P. falciparum transcription machinery albeit to values approximately two orders of magnitude lower than those reported by luc plasmids harbouring promoter regions from P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei. A bioinformatics approach allowed the identification of a motif (GCATAT in the ef-1α intergenic region that is conserved in five Plasmodium species but is degenerate (GCANAN in P. vivax. Mutations of this motif in the P. berghei ef-1α promoter region decreased reporter expression indicating it is active in gene expression in Plasmodium. Conclusion Together, this data indicates that promoter regions of P. vivax are poorly or not recognized by the P. falciparum transcription machinery suggesting the existence of P. vivax-specific transcription regulatory elements.

  14. RELATIONSHIP OF HEPATIC AND RENAL DYSFUNCTION WITH HAEMORRHEOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM MALARIA

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    Valluri Satya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The clinical pattern of malaria has changed worldwide including India in last decade. Earlier cerebral malaria was the predominant manifestation of severe malaria, whereas now the combination of jaundice and renal failure are more common. Severe haemorrhage is seen in upto 5% of patients with severe malaria. Studies on renal and hepatic dys function in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are a plenty, but there is a paucity of studies correlating haemorrheological abnormalities with hepatic and renal dysfunction in Plasmodium falciparum malaria. METHODS : 100 patients of malaria with positive periph eral blood smear for plasmodium falciparum , out of which 50 cases with AKI and Hepatic failure during the period January 2012 - June 2013. I n department of general medicine, Government General Hospital, Kakinada. GROUP A : Comprising 50 consecutive adult pat ients of all age groups and both genders who had jaundice or renal failure or both at the time of admission. GROUP B: comprising 50 consecutive cases of plasmodium falciparum malaria and had no complications. RESULTS: In group A patients all parameters are significantly raised as compared to group B patients. CONCLUSION: 10% of patients had clinically overt bleeding manifestations, this indicates subclinical haemorrheological dysfunction in patients suffering from falciparum malaria with hepatic and renal d ysfunction, high incidence of subclinical DIC, evidenced by prolonged aPTT (56%, low total platelet count (58%, and PT (20%. An observational, screening, analytical prospective study. 100 cases of PF positive complicated and uncomplicated cases during t he period - January 2012 - June 2013

  15. Understanding the biology of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast; an excellent target for antimalarial drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Arnish

    2016-08-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening tropical disease, caused by the intracellular parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The World Health Organization counts malaria as one of the top ten causes of worldwide death. The unavailability of a successful malaria vaccine and the ever-increasing instances of drug resistance in the malaria parasite demand the discovery of new targets within P. falciparum for the development of next generation antimalarials. Fortunately, all apicomplexan parasites, including P. falciparum harbor a relict, non-photosynthetic plastid known as the apicoplast. The apicoplast is a semi-autonomous organelle within P. falciparum containing a 35kb circular genome. Despite a genome of its own, majority of the apicoplast proteins are encoded by the parasite nucleus and imported into the apicoplast. The organelle has been shown to be essential to P. falciparum survival and the loss the apicoplast manifests as a 'delayed death' response in the parasite. The apicoplast has evolved out of cyanobacteria in a complex, two step endosymbiotic event. As a result the architecture and the gene expression machinery of the apicoplast is quite bacteria-like and is susceptible to a wide range of antibiotics such as fosmidomycin, tetracycline, azithromycin, clindamycin and triclosan. The biosynthetic pathways for isoprenoids, fatty acids and heme operate within the malaria apicoplast, making the organelle an excellent target for drug development. The review focuses on the evolution, biology and the essentiality of the apicoplast within the malaria parasite and discusses some of the recent achievements towards the design and discovery of apicoplast targeted antimalarial compounds.

  16. The immuno-epidemiology of pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a variant surface antigen-specific perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L

    2004-01-01

    Women living in areas of intense P. falciparum transmission have acquired substantial protective immunity to malaria when they reach childbearing age. Nevertheless, pregnancies in such areas are associated with substantial malaria-related morbidity and mortality, particularly among women of low p...... understanding of how protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria operates and is acquired, have provided important insights into this enigma....

  17. Plasmodium falciparum malaria in infants under 5 kg: retrospective surveillance of hospital records in five sub-saharan African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alao, Maroufou J; Gbadoé, Adama D; Meremikwu, Martin; Tshefu, Antoinette; Tiono, Alfred B; Cousin, Marc; Hamed, Kamal

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the disease burden, clinical features, treatment and outcomes of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in neonates and infants weighing Plasmodium falciparum malaria exists in this subpopulation. Further epidemiological data are needed to estimate malaria morbidity and mortality in young infants. Moreover, clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of artemisinin-based combination therapies in this subpopulation is warranted.

  18. Naturally acquired antibodies to the glutamate-rich protein are associated with protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodoo, D; Theisen, M; Kurtzhals, J A

    2000-01-01

    of the Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein (GLURP). The data show that levels of the GLURP-specific IgG that occurs in the nonrepeat region of the antigen are significantly correlated with clinical protection from P. falciparum malaria, after correction for the confounding effect of age. Furthermore...

  19. Plasmodium falciparum avoids change in erythrocytic surface expression of phagocytosis markers during inhibition of nitric oxide synthase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Kohnke, Hannes; Maretty, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. It may be produced by a parasite NO synthase (NOS) or by nitrate reduction. The parasite's benefit of NO accumulation is not understood. We investigated if inhibiting the P. falciparum NOS with specific and unspecific N...

  20. Genome-wide discovery and verification of novel structured RNAs in Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Carret, Celine; Kyes, Sue;

    2008-01-01

    We undertook a genome-wide search for novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We used the RNAz program to predict structures in the noncoding regions of the P. falciparum 3D7 genome that were conserved with at least one of seven other Plasmodium spp. genome seq...

  1. Invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by Plasmodium falciparum can be inhibited by monoclonal antibody directed against an S antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, A; Cooper, J; Ingram, L; Anders, R F; Brown, G V

    1985-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been produced which binds to the heat stable S antigen present in the FCQ-27/PNG isolate of Plasmodium falciparum. This monoclonal antibody also inhibits the invasion in vitro of erythrocytes by malarial merozoites thus demonstrating that the S antigens of Plasmodium falciparum may be a target of protective immune responses.

  2. Association between anti-Porphyromonas gingivalis or anti-α-enolase antibody and severity of periodontitis or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity in RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Youn; Choi, In Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Eun Bong; Lee, Yong-Moo; Song, Yeong Wook

    2015-08-12

    Periodontitis (PD) has been reported to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that is recognized as one of the major pathogenic organisms in PD and is the only bacterium known to express peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD). Antibody against human α-enolase (ENO1) is one of the autoantibodies in RA. ENO1 is a highly conserved protein, and could be a candidate molecule for molecular mimicry between bacterial and human proteins. In the present study, we measured serum antibody against P. gingivalis and human ENO1 in patients with RA and investigated their association with the severity of PD or disease activity of RA. Two hundred, forty-eight patients with RA and 85 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated by rheumatologic and periodontal examinations. The serum levels of anti-P. gingivalis and anti-ENO1 antibodies were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patients with RA had significantly higher levels of anti-P. gingivalis and anti-ENO1 antibody titers than the controls (p = 0.002 and 0.0001, respectively). Anti-P. gingivalis antibody titers significantly correlated with anti-ENO1 antibody titers in RA patients (r = 0.30, p < 0.0001). There were significant correlations between anti-P. gingivalis antibody titers and the gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP) and clinical attachment level (CAL) (p = 0.038, 0.004, 0.004 and 0.002, respectively) in RA. Anti-P. gingivalis antibody titers were not correlated with disease activity score 28 (DAS28) or anti-CCP titer. However, anti-ENO1 antibody titers were significantly correlated not only with the periodontal indices, such as PPD, BOP, and CAL (p = 0.013, 0.023 and 0.017, respectively), but also RA clinical characteristics, such as DAS28, anti-CCP titer, and ESR (p = 0.009, 0.015 and 0.001, respectively). Anti-P. gingivalis and anti-ENO1 antibody

  3. Chromogranin A as serum marker for neuroendocrine neoplasia: comparison with neuron-specific enolase and the alpha-subunit of glycoprotein hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobels, F R; Kwekkeboom, D J; Coopmans, W; Schoenmakers, C H; Lindemans, J; De Herder, W W; Krenning, E P; Bouillon, R; Lamberts, S W

    1997-08-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is gaining acceptance as a serum marker of neuroendocrine tumors. Its specificity in differentiating between neuroendocrine and nonneuroendocrine tumors, its sensitivity to detect small tumors, and its clinical value, compared with other neuroendocrine markers, have not clearly been defined, however. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical usefulness of CgA as neuroendocrine serum marker. Serum levels of CgA, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and the alpha-subunit of glycoprotein hormones (alpha-SU) were determined in 211 patients with neuroendocrine tumors and 180 control subjects with nonendocrine tumors. The concentrations of CgA, NSE, and alpha-SU were elevated in 50%, 43%, and 24% of patients with neuroendocrine tumors, respectively. Serum CgA was most frequently increased in subjects with gastrinomas (100%), pheochromocytomas (89%), carcinoid tumors (80%), nonfunctioning tumors of the endocrine pancreas (69%), and medullary thyroid carcinomas (50%). The highest levels were observed in subjects with carcinoid tumors. NSE was most frequently elevated in patients with small cell lung carcinoma (74%), and alpha-SU was most frequently elevated in patients with carcinoid tumors (39%). Most subjects with elevated alpha-SU levels also had elevated CgA concentrations. A significant positive relationship was demonstrated between the tumor load and serum CgA levels (P NSE, and alpha-SU were present in, respectively, 7%, 35%, and 15% of control subjects. Markedly elevated serum levels of CgA, exceeding 300 micrograms/L, were observed in only 2% of control patients (n = 3) compared to 40% of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (n = 76). We conclude that CgA is the best general neuroendocrine serum marker available. It has the highest specificity for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors compared to the other neuroendocrine markers, NSE and alpha-SU. Elevated levels are strongly correlated with tumor volume; therefore, small tumors may

  4. Alpha-enolase (ENO1 controls alpha v/beta 3 integrin expression and regulates pancreatic cancer adhesion, invasion, and metastasis

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    Moitza Principe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA cells, the glycolytic enzyme alpha-enolase (ENO1 also acts as a plasminogen receptor and promotes invasion and metastasis formation. Moreover, ENO1 silencing in PDA cells induces oxidative stress, senescence and profoundly modifies PDA cell metabolism. Although anti-ENO1 antibody inhibits PDA cell migration and invasion, little is known about the role of ENO1 in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. We therefore investigated the effect of ENO1 silencing on the modulation of cell morphology, adhesion to matrix substrates, cell invasiveness, and metastatic ability. Methods The membrane and cytoskeleton modifications that occurred in ENO1-silenced (shENO1 PDA cells were investigated by a combination of confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The effect of ENO1 silencing was then evaluated by phenotypic and functional experiments to identify the role of ENO1 in adhesion, migration, and invasion, as well as in senescence and apoptosis. The experimental results were then validated in a mouse model. Results We observed a significant increase in the roughness of the cell membrane due to ENO1 silencing, a feature associated with an impaired ability to migrate and invade, along with a significant downregulation of proteins involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, including alpha v/beta 3 integrin in shENO1 PDA cells. These changes impaired the ability of shENO1 cells to adhere to Collagen I and IV and Fibronectin and caused an increase in RGD-independent adhesion to vitronectin (VN via urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. Binding of uPAR to VN triggers integrin-mediated signals, which result in ERK1-2 and RAC activation, accumulation of ROS, and senescence. In shENO1 cancer cells, the use of an anti-uPAR antibody caused significant reduction of ROS production and senescence. Overall, a decrease of in vitro and in vivo cell

  5. Fluctuations of serum neuron specific enolase and protein S-100B concentrations in relation to the use of shunt during carotid endarterectomy.

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    Marko Dragas

    Full Text Available To evaluate the changes in serum neuron specific enolase and protein S-100B, after carotid endarterectomy performed using the conventional technique with routine shunting and patch closure, or eversion technique without the use of shunt.Prospective non-randomized study included 43 patients with severe (>80% carotid stenosis undergoing carotid endarterectomy in regional anesthesia. Patients were divided into two groups: conventional endarterectomy with routine use of shunt and Dacron patch (csCEA group and eversion endarterectomy without the use of shunt (eCEA group. Protein S-100B and NSE concentrations were measured from peripheral blood before carotid clamping, after declamping and 24 hours after surgery.Neurologic examination and brain CT findings on the first postoperative day did not differ from preoperative controls in any patients. In csCEA group, NSE concentrations decreased after declamping (P<0.01, and 24 hours after surgery (P<0.01, while in the eCEA group NSE values slightly increased (P=ns, accounting for a significant difference between groups on the first postoperative day (P=0.006. In both groups S-100B concentrations significantly increased after declamping (P<0.05, returning to near pre-clamp values 24 hours after surgery (P=ns. Sub-group analysis revealed significant decline of serum NSE concentrations in asymptomatic patients shunted during surgery after declamping (P<0.05 and 24 hours after surgery (P<0.01, while no significant changes were noted in non-shunted patients (P=ns. Decrease of NSE serum levels was also found in symptomatic patients operated with the use of shunt on the first postoperative day (P<0.05. Significant increase in NSE serum levels was recorded in non-shunted symptomatic patients 24 hours after surgery (P<0.05.Variations of NSE concentrations seemed to be influenced by cerebral perfusion alterations, while protein S-100B values were unaffected by shunting strategy. Routine shunting during surgery for

  6. Neuron-specific enolase expression in a rat model of radiation-induced brain injury following vascular endothelial growth factor-modified neural stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songhua Xiao; Chaohui Duan; Qingyu Shen; Yigang Xing; Ying Peng; Enxiang Tao; Jun Liu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous studies have shown that transplantation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-modified neural stem cells (NSC) provides better outcomes,compared with neural stem cells,in the treatment of brain damage.OBJECTIVE:To compare the effects of VEGF-modified NSC transplantation and NSC transplantation on radiation-induced brain injury,and to determine neuron-specific enolase (NSE) expression in the brain.DESIGN,TIME,AND SETTING:The randomized,controlled study was performed at the Linbaixin Experimental Center,Second Affiliated Hospital,Sun Yat-sen University,China from November 2007 to October 2008.MATERIALS:VEGF-medified C17.2 NSCs were supplied by Harvard Medical School,USA.Streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase-complex kit (Boster,China) and 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (Fluka,USA) were used in this study.METHODS:A total of 84 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to a blank control group (n=20),model group (n=20),NSC group (n=20),and a VEGF-modified NSC group (n=24).Rat models of radiation-induced brain injury were established in the model,NSC,and VEGF-modified NSC groups.At 1 week following model induction,10 μL (5×10~4 cells/μL) VEGF-modified NSCs or NSCs were respectively infused into the striatum and cerebral cortex of rats from the VEGF-modified NSC and NSC groups.A total of 10 μL saline was injected into rats from the blank control and model groups.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:NSE expression in the brain was detected by immunohistochemistry following VEGF-modified NSC transplantation.RESULTS:NSE expression was significantly decreased in the brains of radiation-induced brain injury rats (P<0.05).The number of NSE-positive neurons significantly increased in the NSC and VEGF-modified NSC groups,compared with the model group (P<0.05).NSE expression significantly increased in the VEGF-modified NSC group,compared with the NSC group,at 6 weeks following transplantation (P<0.05).CONCLUSION:VEGF-modified NSC

  7. Expression and biochemical characterization of Plasmodium falciparum DNA ligase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buguliskis, Jeffrey S; Casta, Louis J; Butz, Charles E; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Taraschi, Theodore F

    2007-10-01

    We report that Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) encodes a 912 amino acid ATP-dependent DNA ligase. Protein sequence analysis of Pf DNA ligase I indicates a strong sequence similarity, particularly in the C-terminal region, to DNA ligase I homologues. The activity of recombinant Pf DNA ligase I (PfLigI) was investigated using protein expressed in HEK293 cells. The PfLigI gene product is approximately 94kDa and catalyzes phosphodiester bond formation on a singly nicked DNA substrate. The enzyme is most active at alkaline pH (8.5) and with Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) and ATP as cofactors. Kinetic studies of PfLigI revealed that the enzyme has similar substrate affinity (K(m) 2.6nM) as compared to human DNA ligase I and k(cat) (2.3x10(-3)s(-1)) and k(cat)/K(m) (8.8x10(5)M(-1)s(-1)) which are similar to other ATP-dependent DNA ligases. PfLigI was able to join RNA-DNA substrates only when the RNA sequence was upstream of the nick, confirming that it is DNA ligase I and has no associated DNA ligase III like activity.

  8. On the mechanism of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

    KAUST Repository

    Chinappi, Mauro

    2010-11-19

    Resistance to chloroquine of malaria strains is known to be associated with a parasite protein named PfCRT, the mutated form of which is able to reduce chloroquine accumulation in the digestive vacuole of the pathogen. Whether the protein mediates extrusion of the drug acting as a channel or as a carrier and which is the protonation state of its chloroquine substrate is the subject of a scientific debate. We present here an analytical approach that explores which combination of hypotheses on the mechanism of transport and the protonation state of chloroquine are consistent with available equilibrium experimental data. We show that the available experimental data are not, by themselves, sufficient to conclude whether the protein acts as a channel or as a transporter, which explains the origin of their different interpretation by different authors. Interestingly, though, each of the two models is only consistent with a subset of hypotheses on the protonation state of the transported molecule. The combination of these results with a sequence and structure analysis of PfCRT, which strongly suggests that the molecule is a carrier, indicates that the transported species is either or both the mono and di-protonated forms of chloroquine. We believe that our results, besides shedding light on the mechanism of chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum, have implications for the development of novel therapies against resistant malaria strains and demonstrate the usefulness of an approach combining systems biology strategies with structural bioinformatics and experimental data.

  9. The periodicity of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillet, María-Eugenia; El Souki, Mayida; Laguna, Francisco; León, José Rafael

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the periodicity of Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum incidence in time-series of malaria data (1990-2010) from three endemic regions in Venezuela. In particular, we determined whether disease epidemics were related to local climate variability and regional climate anomalies such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Malaria periodicity was found to exhibit unique features in each studied region. Significant multi-annual cycles of 2- to about 6-year periods were identified. The inter-annual variability of malaria cases was coherent with that of SSTs (ENSO), mainly at temporal scales within the 3-6 year periods. Additionally, malaria cases were intensified approximately 1 year after an El Niño event, a pattern that highlights the role of climate inter-annual variability in the epidemic patterns. Rainfall mediated the effect of ENSO on malaria locally. Particularly, rains from the last phase of the season had a critical role in the temporal dynamics of Plasmodium. The malaria-climate relationship was complex and transient, varying in strength with the region and species. By identifying temporal cycles of malaria we have made a first step in predicting high-risk years in Venezuela. Our findings emphasize the importance of analyzing high-resolution spatial-temporal data to better understand malaria transmission dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (`K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

  11. Polycyclic amines as chloroquine resistance modulating agents in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Jacques; Kapp, Erika; Taylor, Dale; Smith, Peter J; Malan, Sarel F

    2016-02-15

    Pentacycloundecylamines (PCUs) and adamantane amines, such as NGP1-01 (1) and amantadine, have shown significant channel blocking activities. They are postulated to act as chemosensitizers and circumvent the resistance of the plasmodia parasite against chloroquine (CQ) by inhibiting the p-glycoprotein efflux pump and enabling the accumulation of CQ inside the parasite digestive vacuole. Twelve polycyclic amines containing either a PCU or adamantane amine moiety conjugated to different aromatic functionalities through various tethered linkers were selected based on their channel blocking abilities and evaluated as potential chemosensitizers. Compounds 2, 4, 5 and 10 showed significant voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocking ability (IC50=0.27-35 μM) and were able to alter the CQ IC50 in differing degrees (45-81%) in the multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum Dd2 isolate. Among them, the PCU-dansyl amine compound (4) displayed the best potential to act as a chemosensitizer against the Dd2 strain at a 1 μM concentration (RMI=0.19) while displaying moderate antiplasmodial activity (Dd2 IC50=6.25 μM) and low in vitro cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line (CHO, IC50=119 μM). Compounds 2 and 10 also showed some promising chemosensitizing abilities (RMI=0.36 and 0.35 respectively). A direct correlation was found between the VGCC blocking ability of these polycyclic amines and their capacity to act as CQ resistance modulating agents.

  12. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte invasion: combining function with immune evasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin J Wright

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available All the symptoms and pathology of malaria are caused by the intraerythrocytic stages of the Plasmodium parasite life cycle. Because Plasmodium parasites cannot replicate outside a host cell, their ability to recognize and invade erythrocytes is an essential step for both parasite survival and malaria pathogenesis. This makes invasion a conceptually attractive vaccine target, especially because it is one of the few stages when the parasite is directly exposed to the host humoral immune system. This apparent vulnerability, however, has been countered by the parasite, which has evolved sophisticated molecular mechanisms to evade the host immune response so that parasites asymptomatically replicate within immune individuals. These mechanisms include the expansion of parasite invasion ligands, resulting in multiple and apparently redundant invasion "pathways", highly polymorphic parasite surface proteins that are immunologically distinct, and parasite proteins which are poorly immunogenic. These formidable defences have so far thwarted attempts to develop an effective blood-stage vaccine, leading many to question whether there really is an exploitable chink in the parasite's immune evasion defences. Here, we review recent advances in the molecular understanding of the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion field, discuss some of the challenges that have so far prevented the development of blood-stage vaccines, and conclude that the parasite invasion ligand RH5 represents an essential pinch point that might be vulnerable to vaccination.

  13. Analysis of Breath Specimens for Biomarkers of Plasmodium falciparum Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, Amalia Z; McCarthy, James S; Wang, Rosalind X; Saliba, Kevin J; Bravo, Florence G; Cassells, Julie; Padovan, Benjamin; Trowell, Stephen C

    2015-10-01

    Currently, the majority of diagnoses of malaria rely on a combination of the patient's clinical presentation and the visualization of parasites on a stained blood film. Breath offers an attractive alternative to blood as the basis for simple, noninvasive diagnosis of infectious diseases. In this study, breath samples were collected from individuals during controlled malaria to determine whether specific malaria-associated volatiles could be detected in breath. We identified 9 compounds whose concentrations varied significantly over the course of malaria: carbon dioxide, isoprene, acetone, benzene, cyclohexanone, and 4 thioethers. The latter group, consisting of allyl methyl sulfide, 1-methylthio-propane, (Z)-1-methylthio-1-propene, and (E)-1-methylthio-1-propene, had not previously been associated with any disease or condition. Before the availability of antimalarial drug treatment, there was evidence of concurrent 48-hour cyclical changes in the levels of both thioethers and parasitemia. When thioether concentrations were subjected to a phase shift of 24 hours, a direct correlation between the parasitemia and volatile levels was revealed. Volatile levels declined monotonically approximately 6.5 hours after initial drug treatment, correlating with clearance of parasitemia. No thioethers were detected in in vitro cultures of Plasmodium falciparum. The metabolic origin of the thioethers is not known, but results suggest that interplay between host and parasite metabolic pathways is involved in the production of these thioethers.

  14. Influence of host iron status on Plasmodium falciparum infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha A. Clark

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency affects one quarter of the world’s population and causes significant morbidity, including detrimental effects on immune function and cognitive development. Accordingly, the World Health Organization recommends routine iron supplementation in children and adults in areas with high prevalence of iron deficiency. However, a large body of clinical and epidemiological evidence has accumulated which clearly demonstrates that host iron deficiency is protective against falciparum malaria and that host iron supplementation may increase the risk of malaria. Although many effective antimalarial treatments and preventive measures are available, malaria remains a significant public health problem, in part because the mechanisms of malaria pathogenesis remain obscured by the complexities in the relationships between parasite virulence factors, host susceptibility traits, and the immune responses that modulate disease. Here we review (i the clinical and epidemiological data that describes the relationship between host iron status and malaria infection and (ii the progress being made to understand the biological basis for these clinical and epidemiological observations.

  15. The homeostasis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob M A Mauritz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The asexual reproduction cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for severe malaria, occurs within red blood cells. A merozoite invades a red cell in the circulation, develops and multiplies, and after about 48 hours ruptures the host cell, releasing 15-32 merozoites ready to invade new red blood cells. During this cycle, the parasite increases the host cell permeability so much that when similar permeabilization was simulated on uninfected red cells, lysis occurred before approximately 48 h. So how could infected cells, with a growing parasite inside, prevent lysis before the parasite has completed its developmental cycle? A mathematical model of the homeostasis of infected red cells suggested that it is the wasteful consumption of host cell hemoglobin that prevents early lysis by the progressive reduction in the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host (the colloid-osmotic hypothesis. However, two critical model predictions, that infected cells would swell to near prelytic sphericity and that the hemoglobin concentration would become progressively reduced, remained controversial. In this paper, we are able for the first time to correlate model predictions with recent experimental data in the literature and explore the fine details of the homeostasis of infected red blood cells during five model-defined periods of parasite development. The conclusions suggest that infected red cells do reach proximity to lytic rupture regardless of their actual volume, thus requiring a progressive reduction in their hemoglobin concentration to prevent premature lysis.

  16. Role and Regulation of Glutathione Metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylke Müller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria in humans is caused by one of five species of obligate intracellular protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. P. falciparum causes the most severe disease and is responsible for 600,000 deaths annually, primarily in Sub-Saharan Africa. It has long been suggested that during their development, malaria parasites are exposed to environmental and metabolic stresses. One strategy to drug discovery was to increase these stresses by interfering with the parasites’ antioxidant and redox systems, which may be a valuable approach to disease intervention. Plasmodium possesses two redox systems—the thioredoxin and the glutathione system—with overlapping but also distinct functions. Glutathione is the most abundant low molecular weight redox active thiol in the parasites existing primarily in its reduced form representing an excellent thiol redox buffer. This allows for an efficient maintenance of the intracellular reducing environment of the parasite cytoplasm and its organelles. This review will highlight the mechanisms that are responsible for sustaining an adequate concentration of glutathione and maintaining its redox state in Plasmodium. It will provide a summary of the functions of the tripeptide and will discuss the potential of glutathione metabolism for drug discovery against human malaria parasites.

  17. Interactive transcriptome analysis of malaria patients and infecting Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Junya; Natori, Anna; Tolba, Mohammed E M; Mongan, Arthur E; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Katayama, Toshiaki; Kawashima, Shuichi; Makalowski, Wojciech; Maeda, Ryuichiro; Eshita, Yuki; Tuda, Josef; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms of parasitism in vivo, it is essential to elucidate how the transcriptomes of the human hosts and the infecting parasites affect one another. Here we report the RNA-seq analysis of 116 Indonesian patients infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). We extracted RNAs from their peripheral blood as a mixture of host and parasite transcripts and mapped the RNA-seq tags to the human and Pf reference genomes to separate the respective tags. We were thus able to simultaneously analyze expression patterns in both humans and parasites. We identified human and parasite genes and pathways that correlated with various clinical data, which may serve as primary targets for drug developments. Of particular importance, we revealed characteristic expression changes in the human innate immune response pathway genes including TLR2 and TICAM2 that correlated with the severity of the malaria infection. We also found a group of transcription regulatory factors, JUND, for example, and signaling molecules, TNFAIP3, for example, that were strongly correlated in the expression patterns of humans and parasites. We also identified several genetic variations in important anti-malaria drug resistance-related genes. Furthermore, we identified the genetic variations which are potentially associated with severe malaria symptoms both in humans and parasites. The newly generated data should collectively lay a unique foundation for understanding variable behaviors of the field malaria parasites, which are far more complex than those observed under laboratory conditions.

  18. Rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosing uncomplicated non-falciparum or Plasmodium vivax malaria in endemic countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Katharine; Kirkham, Amanda J; Olliaro, Piero L; Deeks, Jonathan J; Donegan, Sarah; Garner, Paul; Takwoingi, Yemisi

    2014-01-01

    Background In settings where both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection cause malaria, rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) need to distinguish which species is causing the patients' symptoms, as different treatments are required. Older RDTs incorporated two test lines to distinguish malaria due to P. falciparum, from malaria due to any other Plasmodium species (non-falciparum). These RDTs can be classified according to which antibodies they use: Type 2 RDTs use HRP-2 (for P. falciparum) and aldolase (all species); Type 3 RDTs use HRP-2 (for P. falciparum) and pLDH (all species); Type 4 use pLDH (fromP. falciparum) and pLDH (all species). More recently, RDTs have been developed to distinguish P. vivax parasitaemia by utilizing a pLDH antibody specific to P. vivax. Objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of RDTs for detecting non-falciparum or P. vivax parasitaemia in people living in malaria-endemic areas who present to ambulatory healthcare facilities with symptoms suggestive of malaria, and to identify which types and brands of commercial test best detect non-falciparum and P. vivax malaria. Search methods We undertook a comprehensive search of the following databases up to 31 December 2013: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE; MEDION; Science Citation Index; Web of Knowledge; African Index Medicus; LILACS; and IndMED. Selection criteria Studies comparing RDTs with a reference standard (microscopy or polymerase chain reaction) in blood samples from a random or consecutive series of patients attending ambulatory health facilities with symptoms suggestive of malaria in non-falciparum endemic areas. Data collection and analysis For each study, two review authors independently extracted a standard set of data using a tailored data extraction form. We grouped comparisons by type of RDT (defined by the combinations of antibodies used), and combined in meta-analysis where appropriate. Average sensitivities and

  19. Soluble products of inflammatory reactions are not induced in children with asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; McKay, V; N'Jie, R;

    1996-01-01

    A proportion of children with Plasmodium falciparum infection have a high parasitaemia without accompanying fever, indicative of different clinical thresholds of parasitaemia. Higher levels of IL-10, IL-1Ra and sIL-4R but not sIL-2R were found in children with P. falciparum malaria, compared...... with levels in children with asymptomatic P. falciparum infections and in healthy children. Concentrations of IL-10 and IL-1Ra were correlated with levels of parasitaemia, but the association of cytokine levels with disease was independent of the association with parasitaemia. Children may tolerate a high...... parasitaemia by neutralizing the parasite-derived toxins. When studying potential anti-toxic molecules we found that children with symptomatic infections had lower concentrations of a phospholipid-binding molecule, beta 2-glycoprotein I (beta 2-GPI), compared with children with asymptomatic infections...

  20. Crystal Structure Analyses of the Fosmidomycin-Target Enzyme from Plasmodium Falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Tomonobu; Kusakabe, Yoshio; Tanaka, Nobutada

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for the death of more than a million people each year. Fosmidomycin has proved to be efficient in the treatment of P. falciparum malaria through the inhibition of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), an enzyme of the non-mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, which is absent in humans. Crystal structure analyses of P. falciparum DXR (PfDXR) revealed that (i) an intrinsic flexibility of the PfDXR molecule accounts for the induced-fit movement to accommodate the bound inhibitor in the active site, and (ii) a cis arrangement of the oxygen atoms of the hydroxamate group of the bound inhibitor is essential for tight binding of the inhibitor to the active site metal. We believe that our study will serve as a useful guide to develop more potent PfDXR inhibitors.

  1. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazelton, Keith Z. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Ho, Meng-Chaio [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cassera, Maria B. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Clinch, Keith [Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Crump, Douglas R. [Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Rosario Jr., Irving [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Merino, Emilio F. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Almo, Steve C. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Tyler, Peter C. [Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Schramm, Vern L. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  2. Increased plasma levels of soluble IL-2R are associated with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Morris-Jones, S; Theander, T G;

    1994-01-01

    Plasma samples from children with mild and severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria and from children with unrelated diseases were collected to investigate whether the clinical outcome of infection was associated with plasma factors which reflected the activity of different cells of the immune system....... Children with severe P. falciparum malaria had significantly higher plasma levels of soluble IL-2R than children with mild malaria. Plasma levels of IL-2R and levels of parasitaemia were significantly correlated. Neither parasitaemia nor plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6......, lymphotoxin (LT), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IL-4, soluble IL-4R or soluble CD8 differed significantly between the two groups of children with malaria. High plasma levels of soluble CD8 were associated with failure of lymphocytes to produce IFN-gamma in vitro following stimulation with P. falciparum...

  3. Cellulose filtration of blood from malaria patients for improving ex vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mkumbaye, Sixbert I; Minja, Daniel T R; Jespersen, Jakob S;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Establishing in vitro Plasmodium falciparum culture lines from patient parasite isolates can offer deeper understanding of geographic variations of drug sensitivity and mechanisms of malaria pathogenesis and immunity. Cellulose column filtration of blood is an inexpensive, rapid...... and effective method for the removal of host factors, such as leucocytes and platelets, significantly improving the purification of parasite DNA in a blood sample. METHODS: In this study, the effect of cellulose column filtration of venous blood on the initial in vitro growth of P. falciparum parasite isolates....... falciparum merozoite surface protein 2 genotyping was performed using nested PCR on extracted genomic DNA, and the var gene transcript levels were investigated, using quantitative PCR on extracted RNA, at admission and 4 days of culture. RESULTS: The cellulose-filtered parasites grew to higher parasitaemia...

  4. Evidence of endothelial inflammation, T cell activation, and T cell reallocation in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhassan, I M; Hviid, L; Satti, G

    1994-01-01

    To explain the observation that acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria is associated with a transient inability of peripheral blood cells to respond to antigenic stimulation in vitro, we have postulated the disease-induced reallocation of peripheral lymphocytes, possibly by adhesion to inflamed...... endothelium. We measured plasma levels of soluble markers of endothelial inflammation and T cell activation in 32 patients suffering from acute, uncomplication P. falciparum malaria, as well as in 10 healthy, aparasitemic control donors. All donors were residents of a malaria-endemic area of Eastern State...... with the control donors. In addition, we found a disease-induced depletion of T cells with high expression of the LFA-1 antigen, particularly in the CD4+ subset. The results obtained provide further support for the hypothesis of T cell reallocation to inflamed endothelium in acute P. falciparum malaria....

  5. Malaria-induced acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ofori, Michael F; Dodoo, Daniel; Staalsoe, Trine

    2002-01-01

    antibody responses to other parasite isolates are relatively unaffected. However, the detailed kinetics of this VSA antibody acquisition are unknown and hence were the aim of this study. We show that P. falciparum malaria in Ghanaian children generally caused a rapid and sustained increase in variant...... donors (the malaria patient). The data from this first detailed longitudinal study of acquisition of VSA antibodies support the hypothesis that naturally acquired protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria is mediated, at least in part, by VSA-specific antibodies.......In areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, protective immunity is acquired during childhood in parallel with acquisition of agglutinating antibodies to parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed on parasitized red blood cells. In a semi-immune child in such an area...

  6. Development and evaluation of a multiplex screening assay for Plasmodium falciparum exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Micha Phill Grønholm; Röser, Dennis; Christiansen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    . falciparum malaria was calculated by comparing travelers with clinical malaria (n=52) and non-exposed blood donors (n=119). The index was evaluated on blood donors with suspected malaria exposure (n=249) and compared to the diagnostic performance of IFAT. At a specificity of 95.8 %, the MPA discrimination...... from the MPA exhibits similar diagnostic performance as IFAT for detection of P. falciparum malaria. Combining the antibody response against multiple antigens in a discrimination index increased the sensitivity of the MPA and reduced the readout to a single value....... performance of a multiplex assay for detection of antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum in donor blood using IFAT as a comparator. A multiplex assay (MPA) containing the antigens GLURP-R0, GLURP-R2, MSP3, MSP1 hybrid and AMA1 was constructed using xMAP® technology. A discrimination index for exposure to P...

  7. Plasmodium falciparum malaria importation from Africa to China and its mortality: an analysis of driving factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shengjie; Wardrop, Nicola A.; Huang, Zhuojie; Bosco, Claudio; Sun, Junling; Bird, Tomas; Wesolowski, Amy; Zhou, Sheng; Zhang, Qian; Zheng, Canjun; Li, Zhongjie; Tatem, Andrew J.; Yu, Hongjie

    2016-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria importation from Africa to China is rising with increasing Chinese overseas investment and international travel. Identifying networks and drivers of this phenomenon as well as the contributors to high case-fatality rate is a growing public health concern to enable efficient response. From 2011-2015, 8653 P. falciparum cases leading to 98 deaths (11.3 per 1000 cases) were imported from 41 sub-Saharan countries into China, with most cases (91.3%) occurring in labour-related Chinese travellers. Four strongly connected groupings of origin African countries with destination Chinese provinces were identified, and the number of imported cases was significantly associated with the volume of air passengers to China (P = 0.006), parasite prevalence in Africa (P falciparum malaria importation to China can serve to refine malaria elimination strategies and the management of cases, and high risk groups and regions should be targeted.

  8. No seasonal accumulation of resistant P. falciparum when high-dose chloroquine is used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursing, Johan; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rodrigues, Amabelia

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Potentially chloroquine resistant P. falciparum, identified by the 76T haplotype in the chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt 76T), are highly prevalent throughout Africa. In Guinea-Bissau, normal and double dose chloroquine have respective efficacies of 34% and 78% against P...... increase of pfcrt 76T if the high doses of CQ commonly used are effective. METHODS AND FINDINGS: P. falciparum parasite density, age, sex, the proportion of chloroquine resistance associated haplotypes pfcrt 76T and P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 86Y were assessed in 988 samples collected from...... children between 2002 and 2007. There was no seasonal accumulation of any allele. During the high and low transmission periods the pfcrt 76T proportions were 24% (95% CI, 21-27%) and 26% (95% CI, 20-33%). There was no significant change of pfcrt 76T (OR 1.05, 95% CI; 0.94-1.16 p = 0.39) or pfmdr1 86Y (OR 0...

  9. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asrar Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets.

  10. Host iron status and iron supplementation mediate susceptibility to erythrocytic stage Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Martha A; Goheen, Morgan M; Fulford, Anthony; Prentice, Andrew M; Elnagheeb, Marwa A; Patel, Jaymin; Fisher, Nancy; Taylor, Steve M; Kasthuri, Raj S; Cerami, Carla

    2014-07-25

    Iron deficiency and malaria have similar global distributions, and frequently co-exist in pregnant women and young children. Where both conditions are prevalent, iron supplementation is complicated by observations that iron deficiency anaemia protects against falciparum malaria, and that iron supplements increase susceptibility to clinically significant malaria, but the mechanisms remain obscure. Here, using an in vitro parasite culture system with erythrocytes from iron-deficient and replete human donors, we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum infects iron-deficient erythrocytes less efficiently. In addition, owing to merozoite preference for young erythrocytes, iron supplementation of iron-deficient individuals reverses the protective effects of iron deficiency. Our results provide experimental validation of field observations reporting protective effects of iron deficiency and harmful effects of iron administration on human malaria susceptibility. Because recovery from anaemia requires transient reticulocytosis, our findings imply that in malarious regions iron supplementation should be accompanied by effective measures to prevent falciparum malaria.

  11. HUBUNGAN SENSISTIVITAS PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM TERHADAP KOMBINASI PIRIMETAMIN/SULFADOKSIN DAN KLOROKUIN SECARA IN VITRO

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    Sahat Ompusunggu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro sensitivity test was conducted to study the sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum against chloroquine and pyrimethamine/sulphadoxine combination. The relationship between sensitivity of the parasite to the two drugs was also studied. A total of 72 patients from five localities were examined during 1984-1985. Test against chloroquine was conduc­ted according to WHO method, while against pyrimethamine/sulphadoxine combination, a modified method of Nguyen Dinh and Payne and Eastham and Rieckmann was used. The results showed that there is no relationship between the sensitivity of P. falciparum against pyrimethamine/ sulphadoxine combination and chloroquine. It can be concluded that in case of chloroquine resistant P. falciparum, pyrimethamine/sulphadoxine combination could be applied as an alternative chemotherapy.

  12. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas Salhøj

    2014-01-01

    -wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum......-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers...... of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens....

  13. Distinct patterns of cytokine regulation in discrete clinical forms of Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akanmori, B D; Kurtzhals, J A; Goka, B Q;

    2000-01-01

    The pathogenesis of two of the most severe complications of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, cerebral malaria (CM) and severe malarial anaemia (SA) both appear to involve dysregulation of the immune system. We have measured plasma levels of TNF and its two receptors in Ghanaian children with strictly...... defined cerebral malaria (CM), severe malarial anaemia (SA), or uncomplicated malaria (UM) in two independent studies in an area of seasonal, hyperendemic transmission of P. falciparum. Levels of TNF, soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNF-R1) and 2 (sTNF-R2) were found to be significantly higher in CM than...... in the other clinical categories of P. falciparum malaria patients. Levels of both receptors depended on clinical category, whereas only sTNF-R1 levels were significantly dependent on parasitemia. Detailed analysis of the interrelationship between these variables resolved this pattern further, and identified...

  14. Detection of antibodies to variant antigens on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, T; Giha, H A; Dodoo, D;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Naturally induced antibodies binding to surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes can be detected by direct agglutination of infected erythrocytes or by indirect immunofluorescence on intact, unfixed, infected erythrocytes. Agglutinating antibodies have previously...... been shown to recognise Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). This protein is inserted by the parasite into the host cell membrane and mediates the adhesion to the venular endothelium of the host organism in vivo. METHODS: Erythrocytes infected at high parasitaemias...... with ethidium-bromide-labelled mature forms of P. falciparum parasites were sequentially exposed to immune plasma, goat anti-human immunoglobulin (Ig) G, and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated rabbit anti-goat Ig. Plasma antibodies recognising antigens exposed on the surface of parasitised erythrocytes were...

  15. An automated method for determining the cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to immobilized cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Boisen, Ida M; Efunshile, Akinwale;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum exports antigens to the surface of infected erythrocytes causing cytoadhesion to the host vasculature. This is central in malaria pathogenesis but in vitro studies of cytoadhesion rely mainly on manual counting methods. The current study aimed at developing...... an automated high-throughput method for this purpose utilizing the pseudoperoxidase activity of intra-erythrocytic haemoglobin. METHODS: Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were grown to confluence in chamber slides and microtiter plates. Cytoadhesion of co-cultured P. falciparum, selected for binding to CHO...... using: i) binding of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to CHO cells over-expressing chondroitin sulfate A and ii) CHO cells transfected with CD36. Binding of infected erythrocytes including field isolates to primary endothelial cells was also performed. Data was analysed using linear regression...

  16. Genetically Determined Response to Artemisinin Treatment in Western Kenyan Plasmodium falciparum Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebon, Lorna J.; Ngalah, Bidii S.; Ingasia, Luicer A.; Juma, Dennis W.; Muiruri, Peninah; Cheruiyot, Jelagat; Opot, Benjamin; Mbuba, Emmanuel; Imbuga, Mabel; Akala, Hoseah M.; Bulimo, Wallace; Andagalu, Ben; Kamau, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Genetically determined artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum has been described in Southeast Asia. The relevance of recently described Kelch 13-propeller mutations for artemisinin resistance in Sub-Saharan Africa parasites is still unknown. Southeast Asia parasites have low genetic diversity compared to Sub-Saharan Africa, where parasites are highly genetically diverse. This study attempted to elucidate whether genetics provides a basis for discovering molecular markers in response to artemisinin drug treatment in P. falciparum in Kenya. The genetic diversity of parasites collected pre- and post- introduction of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) in western Kenya was determined. A panel of 12 microsatellites and 91 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the P. falciparum genome were genotyped. Parasite clearance rates were obtained for the post-ACT parasites. The 12 microsatellites were highly polymorphic with post-ACT parasites being significantly more diverse compared to pre-ACT (p resistance in Kenya. PMID:27611315

  17. The historical evolution and stage-specific characteristics of college physical education in the United States%美国大学体育的历史沿革及阶段性特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    边宇; 刘明; 吕红芳

    2013-01-01

    By generalizing, analyzing and systemizing literature data about the history of physical education in the United States, the authors concluded that the historical evolution of college physical education in the United States can be divided into three stages, namely, formation stage, localization stage and diversification stage. The character-istics of the formation stage were scientized, diversified, and de-religion;the characteristic of the localization stage was the legalization of “Americanized” fundamental appeals, systemized philosophical foundations and sports competitions;the characteristics of the diversification stage were repeated and government dominated. The source of power for the historical evolution of college physical education in the United States was the changing of physical education ideology;the overall trend of stage-specific characteristics was the evolution from instrumental values to ontological values.%  通过对美国体育史文献的归纳、分析与整理,认为美国大学体育的历史沿革可分为形成、本土化和多元化3个阶段。形成阶段的特征是科学化、多样化和去宗教化;本土化阶段的特征是“美国化”根本诉求、系统化的哲学基础和体育竞赛的法制化;多元化阶段的特征是反复化和政府化。美国大学体育历史沿革的动力来源是体育思想的转变,阶段性特征的整体趋势是从工具价值到本体价值的演进。

  18. Maternal-foetal transfer of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax antibodies in a low transmission setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnaud, Sarah C.; McGready, Rose; Herten-Crabb, Asha; Powell, Rosanna; Guy, Andrew; Langer, Christine; Richards, Jack S.; Gilson, Paul R.; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Narum, David L.; Pimanpanarak, Mupawjay; Simpson, Julie A.; Beeson, James G.; Nosten, François; Fowkes, Freya J. I.

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy immunolglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are transferred from mother to neonate across the placenta. Studies in high transmission areas have shown transfer of P. falciparum-specific IgG, but the extent and factors influencing maternal-foetal transfer in low transmission areas co-endemic for both P. falciparum and P. vivax are unknown. Pregnant women were screened weekly for Plasmodium infection. Mother-neonate paired serum samples at delivery were tested for IgG to antigens from P. falciparum, P. vivax and other infectious diseases. Antibodies to malarial and non-malarial antigens were highly correlated between maternal and neonatal samples (median [range] spearman ρ = 0.78 [0.57–0.93]), although Plasmodium spp. antibodies tended to be lower in neonates than mothers. Estimated gestational age at last P. falciparum infection, but not P. vivax infection, was positively associated with antibody levels in the neonate (P. falciparum merozoite, spearman ρ median [range] 0.42 [0.33–0.66], PfVAR2CSA 0.69; P. vivax ρ = 0.19 [0.09–0.3]). Maternal-foetal transfer of anti-malarial IgG to Plasmodium spp. antigens occurs in low transmission settings. P. vivax IgG acquisition is not associated with recent exposure unlike P. falciparum IgG, suggesting a difference in acquisition of antibodies. IgG transfer is greatest in the final weeks of pregnancy which has implications for the timing of future malaria vaccination strategies in pregnant women. PMID:26861682

  19. Evaluation of chloroquine therapy for vivax and falciparum malaria in southern Sumatra, western Indonesia

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    Laihad Ferdinand

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine was used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax in Indonesia before the initial launch of artemisinin combination therapy in 2004. A study to evaluate efficacies of chloroquine against P. falciparum and P. vivax was undertaken at Lampung in southern Sumatra, western Indonesia in 2002. Methods Patients infected by P. falciparum or P. vivax were treated with 25 mg/kg chloroquine base in three daily doses over 48 hr. Finger prick blood was collected on Days 0, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after starting drug administration. Whole blood chloroquine and its desethyl metabolite were measured on Days-0, -3 and -28, or on the day of recurrent parasitaemia. Results 42 patients infected by P. falciparum were enrolled, and 38 fullfilled criteria for per protocol analysis. Only six of 38 (16% showed a response consistent with senstivity to chloroquine. 25 of 32 failures were confirmed resistant by demonstrating chloroquine levels on day of recurrence exceeding the minimally effective concentration (200 ng/mL whole blood. The 28-day cumulative incidence of resistance in P. falciparum was 68% (95% CI: 0.5260 - 0.8306. Thirty one patients infected by P. vivax were enrolled, and 23 were evaluable for per protocol analysis. 15 out of 23 (65% subjects had persistent or recurrent parasitaemia. Measurement of chloroquine levels confirmed all treatment failures prior to Day-15 as resistant. Beyond Day-15, 4 of 7 recurrences also had drug levels above 100 ng/mL and were classified as resistant. The 28-day cumulative incidence of chloroquine resistance in P. vivax was 43% (95% CI: 0.2715 - 0.6384. Conclusion These findings confirm persistantly high levels of resistance to chloroquine by P. falciparum in southern Sumatra, and suggest that high-grade and frequent resistance to chloroquine by P. vivax may be spreading westward in the Indonesia archipelago.

  20. Temporal association of acute hepatitis A and Plasmodium falciparum malaria in children.

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    Peter Klein Klouwenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In sub-Saharan Africa, Plasmodium falciparum and hepatitis A (HAV infections are common, especially in children. Co-infections with these two pathogens may therefore occur, but it is unknown if temporal clustering exists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the pattern of co-infection of P. falciparum malaria and acute HAV in Kenyan children under the age of 5 years in a cohort of children presenting with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. HAV status was determined during a 3-month follow-up period. DISCUSSION: Among 222 cases of uncomplicated malaria, 10 patients were anti-HAV IgM positive. The incidence of HAV infections during P. falciparum malaria was 1.7 (95% CI 0.81-3.1 infections/person-year while the cumulative incidence of HAV over the 3-month follow-up period was 0.27 (95% CI 0.14-0.50 infections/person-year. Children with or without HAV co-infections had similar mean P. falciparum asexual parasite densities at presentation (31,000/µL vs. 34,000/µL, respectively, largely exceeding the pyrogenic threshold of 2,500 parasites/µL in this population and minimizing risk of over-diagnosis of malaria as an explanation. CONCLUSION: The observed temporal association between acute HAV and P. falciparum malaria suggests that co-infections of these two hepatotrophic human pathogens may result from changes in host susceptibility. Testing this hypothesis will require larger prospective studies.