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Sample records for faint eclipsing cataclysmic

  1. Observations of Faint Eclipsing Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Çamurdan, Dicle Zengin; Çamurdan, C Muzaffer

    2010-01-01

    We present time-resolved photometry of six faint (V>17mag) cataclysmic variables (CVs); one of them is V849 Oph and the others are identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS J0920+0042, SDSS J1327+6528, SDSS J1227+5139, SDSS J1607.02+3623, SDSS J1457+5148). The optical CCD photometric observations of these objects were performed at the T\\"UB\\.ITAK National Observatory (Turkey) between February 2006 and March 2009. We aimed to detect short time scale orbital variability arisen from hot-spot modulation, flickering structures which occur from rapid fluctuations of material transferring from red star to white dwarf and orbital period changes for selected short-period (P<4h) CVs at quiescence. Results obtained from eclipse timings and light curves morphology related to white dwarf stars, accretion disks and hot-spots are discussed for each system. Analysis of the short time coverage of data, obtained for SDSS J1227+5139 indicates a cyclical period change arisen from magnetic activity on the secondary st...

  2. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  3. ULTRACAM photometry of eclipsing cataclysmic variable stars

    CERN Document Server

    Feline, William James

    2008-01-01

    The accurate determination of the masses of cataclysmic variable stars is critical to our understanding of their origin, evolution and behaviour. Observations of cataclysmic variables also afford an excellent opportunity to constrain theoretical physical models of the accretion discs housed in these systems. In particular, the brightness distributions of the accretion discs of eclipsing systems can be mapped at a spatial resolution unachievable in any other astrophysical situation. This thesis addresses both of these important topics via the analysis of the light curves of six eclipsing dwarf novae, obtained using ULTRACAM, a novel high-speed imaging photometer.

  4. ULTRACAM photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variable OU Vir

    CERN Document Server

    Feline, W J; Marsh, T R; Stevenson, M J; Watson, C A; Brinkworth, C S

    2004-01-01

    We present high-speed, three-colour photometry of the faint eclipsing cataclysmic variable OU Vir. For the first time in OU Vir, separate eclipses of the white dwarf and bright spot have been observed. We use timings of these eclipses to derive a purely photometric model of the system, obtaining a mass ratio of q = 0.175 +/- 0.025, an inclination of i = 79.2 +/- 0.7 degrees and a disc radius of Rd/a = 0.2315 +/- 0.0150. We separate the white dwarf eclipse from the lightcurve and, by fitting a blackbody spectrum to its flux in each passband, obtain a white dwarf temperature of T = 13900 +/- 600 K and a distance of D = 51 +/- 17 pc. Assuming that the primary obeys the Nauenberg (1972) mass-radius relation for white dwarfs and allowing for temperature effects, we also find a primary mass Mw/Msun = 0.89 +/- 0.20, primary radius Rw/Rsun = 0.0097 +/- 0.0031 and orbital separation a/Rsun = 0.74 +/- 0.05.

  5. Hunting For Eclipses: High Speed Observations of Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Liam K; Dhillon, Vik S; Littlefair, Stuart P; Bours, Madelon C P; Breedt, Elme; Butterley, Tim; Chakpor, Anurak; Irawati, Puji; Kerry, Paul; Marsh, Tom R; Parsons, Steven G; Savoury, Chris D J; Wilson, Richard W; Woudt, Patrick A

    2016-01-01

    We present new time-resolved photometry of 74 cataclysmic variables (CVs), 47 of which are eclipsing. 13 of these eclipsing systems are newly discovered. For all 47 eclipsing systems we show high cadence (1-20 seconds) light curves obtained with the high-speed cameras ultracam and ultraspec. We provide new or refined ephemerides, and supply mid-eclipse times for all observed eclipses. We assess the potential for light curve modelling of all 47 eclipsing systems to determine their system parameters, finding 20 systems which appear to be suitable for future study.

  6. IGR J18293-1213 is an eclipsing Cataclysmic Variable

    CERN Document Server

    Clavel, Maïca; Bodaghee, A; Chiu, J -L; Fornasini, F M; Hong, J; Krivonos, R; Ponti, G; Rahoui, F; Stern, D

    2016-01-01

    Studying the population of faint hard X-ray sources along the plane of the Galaxy is challenging because of high-extinction and crowding, which make the identification of individual sources more difficult. IGR J18293-1213 is part of the population of persistent sources which have been discovered by the INTEGRAL satellite. We report on NuSTAR and Swift/XRT observations of this source, performed on 2015 September 11. We detected three eclipsing intervals in the NuSTAR light curve, allowing us to constrain the duration of these eclipses, $\\Delta t = 30.8^{+6.3}_{-0.0}$ min, and the orbital period of the system, $T = 6.92\\pm0.01$ hr. Even though we only report an upper limit on the amplitude of a putative spin modulation, the orbital period and the hard thermal Bremsstrahlung spectrum of IGR J18293-1213 provide strong evidence that this source is a magnetic Cataclysmic Variable (CV). Our NuSTAR and Swift/XRT joint spectral analysis places strong constraints on the white dwarf mass $M_{\\rm wd} = 0.78^{+0.10}_{-0.0...

  7. Hunting for eclipses: high-speed observations of cataclysmic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, L. K.; McAllister, M. J.; Dhillon, V. S.; Littlefair, S. P.; Bours, M. C. P.; Breedt, E.; Butterley, T.; Chakpor, A.; Irawati, P.; Kerry, P.; Marsh, T. R.; Parsons, S. G.; Savoury, C. D. J.; Wilson, R. W.; Woudt, P. A.

    2017-03-01

    We present new time-resolved photometry of 74 cataclysmic variables (CVs), 47 of which are eclipsing. Thirteen of these eclipsing systems are newly discovered. For all 47 eclipsing systems, we show high cadence (1-20 s) light curves obtained with the high-speed cameras ULTRACAM and ULTRASPEC. We provide new or refined ephemerides, and supply mid-eclipse times for all observed eclipses. We assess the potential for light-curve modelling of all 47 eclipsing systems to determine their system parameters, finding 20 systems that appear to be suitable for future study. Systems of particular interest include V713 Cep, in which we observed a temporary switching-off of accretion; and ASASSN-14mv and CSS111019:233313-155744, which both have orbital periods well below the CV period minimum. The short orbital periods and light-curve shapes suggest that they may be double degenerate (AM CVn) systems or CVs with evolved donor stars.

  8. A spectroscopic search for faint secondaries in cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Putte, D V; Hawkins, N A; Martin, J S; Smith, Robert Connon

    2003-01-01

    The secondary in cataclysmic variables (CV's) is usually detected by cross-correlation of the CV spectrum with that of a K or M dwarf template, to produce a radial velocity curve. Although this method has demonstrated its power, it has its limits in the case of noisy spectra, such as are found when the secondary is faint. A method of co-adding spectra, called skew mapping, has been proposed in the past. Gradually, examples of its application are being published. Nonetheless, so far no journal article has described the technique in detail. To answer this need, this paper explores in detail the capabilities of skew mapping when determining the amplitude of the radial velocity for faint secondaries. It demonstrates the method's power over techniques that are more conventional, when the signal-to-noise (s/n) ratio is poor. The paper suggests an approach to assessing the quality of results. This leads in the case of the investigated objects to a first tier of results, where we find K2=127+-23 km/s for SY Cnc, K2=1...

  9. NSV 1907 - A new eclipsing, nova-like cataclysmic variable

    CERN Document Server

    Hümmerich, Stefan; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Dubois, Franky; Ashley, Richard; Gänsicke, Boris T; Vanaverbeke, Siegfried; Bernhard, Klaus; Wils, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    NSV 1907, formerly listed as an irregular variable in variability catalogues, was classified as an Algol-type eclipsing binary in the Catalina Surveys Periodic Variable Star Catalogue. We have identified NSV 1907 as an ultraviolet (UV) bright source using measurements from the GALEX space telescope and detected obvious out-of-eclipse variability in archival photometric data from the Catalina Sky Survey, which instigated a closer examination of the object. A spectrum and extensive multicolour photometric observations were acquired, from which we deduce that NSV 1907 is a deeply eclipsing, nova-like cataclysmic variable. Apart from the orbital variations (deep eclipses with a period of P ~ 6.63 hours), changes in mean brightness and irregular short-term variability (flickering) were observed. The presence of a secondary minimum at phase phi ~ 0.5 was established, which indicates a significant contribution of the companion star to the optical flux of the system. We find possible evidence for sinusoidal variation...

  10. HST/FOS Eclipse Observations of the Nova-like Cataclysmic Variable UX Ursae Majoris

    CERN Document Server

    Knigge, C; Wade, R A; Baptista, R; Horne, K; Hubeny, I; Rutten, R G M

    1998-01-01

    [abridged abstract] We present and analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of the eclipsing nova-like cataclysmic variable UX UMa obtained with the Faint Object Spectrograph. Two eclipses each were observed with the G160L grating (covering the ultraviolet waveband) in August of 1994 and with the PRISM (covering the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared) in November of the same year. The system was 50% brighter in November than in August, which, if due to a change in the accretion rate, indicates a fairly substantial increase in Mdot_acc by >~ 50%. Model disk spectra constructed as ensembles of stellar atmospheres provide poor descriptions of the observed post-eclipse spectra, despite the fact that UX UMa's light should be dominated by the disk at this time. Suitably scaled single temperature model stellar atmospheres with T_eff = 12,500-14,500 K actually provide a better match to both the ultraviolet and optical post-eclipse spectra. Evidently, great care must be taken in attempts to derive accretion rates fr...

  11. NSV 1907 - A new eclipsing, nova-like cataclysmic variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hümmerich, Stefan; Gröbel, Rainer; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Dubois, Franky; Ashley, Richard; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Vanaverbeke, Siegfried; Bernhard, Klaus; Wils, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    NSV 1907, formerly listed as an irregular variable in variability catalogues, was classified as an Algol-type eclipsing binary in the Catalina Surveys Periodic Variable Star Catalogue. We have identified NSV 1907 as an ultraviolet (UV) bright source using measurements from the GALEX space telescope and detected obvious out-of-eclipse variability in archival photometric data from the Catalina Sky Survey, which instigated a closer examination of the object. A spectrum and extensive multicolour photometric observations were acquired, from which we deduce that NSV 1907 is a deeply eclipsing, nova-like cataclysmic variable. Apart from the orbital variations (deep eclipses with a period of P ≈ 6.63 hours), changes in mean brightness and irregular short-term variability (flickering) were observed. The presence of a secondary minimum at phase φ ≈ 0.5 was established, which indicates a significant contribution of the companion star to the optical flux of the system. We find possible evidence for sinusoidal variations with a period of P ≈ 4.2 d, which we interpret as the nodal precession period of the accretion disc. No outbursts or VY Scl-like drops in brightness were detected either by the CSS or during our photometric monitoring. Because of its spectral characteristics and the observed variability pattern, we propose NSV 1907 as a new moderately bright long-period SW Sextantis star. Further photometric and spectroscopic observations are encouraged.

  12. ULTRACAM photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variables XZ Eri and DV UMa

    CERN Document Server

    Feline, W J; Marsh, T R; Brinkworth, C S

    2004-01-01

    We present high-speed, three-colour photometry of the faint eclipsing cataclysmic variables XZ Eri and DV UMa. We determine the system parameters through two techniques: first, timings of the eclipse contact phases of the white dwarf and bright-spot using the derivative of the light curve; and secondly, a parameterized model of the eclipse fitted to the observed light curve by chi-squared minimisation. For both objects, we prefer the latter method, as it is less affected by photon noise and rapid flickering. For XZ Eri we obtain a mass ratio q = 0.1098 +/- 0.0017 and an orbital inclination i = 80.16 +/- 0.09 degrees. For DV UMa we derive figures of q = 0.1506 +/- 0.0009 and i = 84.24 +/- 0.07 degrees. The secondary star in XZ Eri has a very low mass Mr/Msun = 0.0842 +/- 0.0024, placing it close to the upper limit on the mass of a brown dwarf.

  13. 1H 1752 + 081: an eclipsing cataclysmic variable with a small accretion disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Andrew D.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Horne, Keith; Bradt, Hale V.

    1994-04-01

    We announce the discovery of an eclipsing nova-like cataclysmic variable (CV) as the optical counterpart to the HEAO 1 X-ray source 1H1752 + 081. This CV has an orbital period of 1.882801 hr, a high equivalent width of H-beta, and an average mv of 16.4 out of the eclipse. A geometric model is constructed from observations of the eclipse ingress and egress in many optical bandpasses. The broad-band emission originates primarily in two regions; the disk/accretion stream 'hot spot' and a compact central component, which may be a spot on the white dwarf surface, the entire white dwarf surface or the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the white dwarf surface. Based on the durations and offsets of the two eclipses we determined the mass ratio q = 2.5 +/- 0.6 and the angle of inclination i = 77 deg +/- 2 deg. If the central component is the entire white dwarf surface the masses of the stars are M1 = 0.80 +/- 0.06 solar masses and M2 = 0.32 +/- 0.06 solar masses. The disk is faint and small (RD = 0.25 +/- 0.05 rL1, where rL1 is the distance from the primary to the L1 point), compared to other eclipsing CVs. The small disk may result from the removal of angular momentum from the accretion disk by the magnetic field of the white dwarf; this CV may be a DQ Her type with a slowly rotating white dwarf. The emission-line velocities do not show the 'Z-wave' expected from the eclipse of a Keplerian accretion disk, nor do they have the correct phasing to originate near the white dwarf. The most likely origin of the line emission is the hot spot. The secondary star is visible at wavelengths greater than or equal to 6000 A during eclipse. We estimate a spectral type approximately M6 which, together with the observed m1 = 16.94 during eclipse, results in a distance estimate of 150 +/- 27 pc.

  14. Photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variable SDSS J152419.33+220920.0

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, R; Hernandez-Santisteban, J V

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We present new photometry of the faint and poorly studied cataclysmic variable SDSS J152419.33+220920.0, analyze its light curve and provide an accurate ephemeris for this system. Methods. Time-resolved CCD differential photometry was carried out using the 1.5m and 0.84m telescopes at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional at San Pedro Martir. Results. From time-resolved photometry of the system obtained during six nights (covering more than twenty primary eclipse cycles in more than three years), we show that this binary presents a strong primary and a weak secondary modulation. Our light curve analysis shows that only two fundamental frequencies are present, corresponding to the orbital period and a modulation with twice this frequency. We determine the accurate ephemeris of the system to be HJD(eclipse)= 2454967.6750(1) + 0.06531866661(1) E. A double-hump orbital period modulation, a standing feature in several bounce-back systems at quiescence, is present at several epochs. However, we found no other...

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Eclipse Observations of the Nova Like Cataclysmic Variable UX Ursae Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knigge, Christian; Long, Knox S.; Wade, Richard A.; Baptista, Raymundo; Horne, Keith; Hubeny, Ivan; Rutten, Rene G. M.

    1998-01-01

    We present and analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of the eclipsing nova-like cataclysmic variable UX UMa obtained with the Faint Object Spectrograph. Two eclipses each were observed with the G160L grating (covering the ultraviolet waveband) in 1994 August and with the PRISM (covering the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared) in November of the same year. The system was about 50% brighter in November than in August, which, if due to a change in the accretion rate, indicates a fairly substantial increase in Mass accretion by about 50%. The eclipse light curves are qualitatively consistent with the gradual occultation of an accretion disk with a radially decreasing temperature distribution. The light curves also exhibit asymmetries about mideclipse that are likely due to a bright spot at the disk edge. Bright-spot spectra have been constructed by differencing the mean spectra observed at pre- and posteclipse orbital phases. These difference spectra contain ultraviolet absorption lines and show the Balmer jump in emission. This suggests that part of the bright spot may be optically thin in the continuum and vertically extended enough to veil the inner disk and/or the outflow from UX UMa in some spectral lines. Model disk spectra constructed as ensembles of stellar atmospheres provide poor descriptions of the observed posteclipse spectra, despite the fact that UX UMa's light should be dominated by the disk at this time. Suitably scaled single temperature model stellar atmospheres with T(sub eff) approximately equals 12,500-14,500 K actually provide a better match to both the ultraviolet and optical posteclipse spectra. Evidently, great care must be taken in attempts to derive accretion rates from comparisons of disk models to observations. One way to reconcile disk models with the observed posteclipse spectra is to postulate the presence of a significant amount of optically thin material in the system. Such an optically thin component might be associated with the

  16. Cataclysmic Variables below the Period Gap: Mass Determinations of 14 Eclipsing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Savoury, C D J; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Gaensicke, B T; Copperwheat, C M; Kerry, P; Hickman, R D G; Parsons, S G

    2011-01-01

    We present high-speed, three-colour photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variables CTCV 1300, CTCV 2354 and SDSS 1152. All three systems are below the observed "period gap" for cataclysmic variables. For each system we determine the system parameters by fitting a parameterised model to the observed eclipse light curve by chi-squared minimisation. We also present an updated analysis of all other eclipsing systems previously analysed by our group. New donor masses are generally between 1 and 2 sigma of those originally published, with the exception of SDSS 1502 and DV UMa. We note that the donor mass of SDSS 1501 has been revised upwards by 0.024Msun. This system was previously identified as having evolved passed the minimum orbital period for cataclysmic variables, but the new mass determination suggests otherwise. Our new analysis confirms that SDSS 1035 and SDSS 1433 have evolved past the period minimum for cataclysmic variables, corroborating our earlier studies. We find that the radii of donor stars are...

  17. The newly discovered eclipsing cataclysmic star 2MASS J16211735 + 4412541 and its peculiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjurkchieva, Diana P.; Popov, Velimir A.; Vasileva, Doroteya L.; Petrov, Nikola I.

    2017-04-01

    We present our observations of the newly discovered, eclipsing cataclysmic star 2MASS J16211735 + 4412541 carried out two weeks after its outburst at the beginning of June 2016. Its main peculiarity is the big increasing of eclipse depth during outburst. We qualitatively modelled the folded light curves at quiescence and outburst in order to explain the reason for increase of the primary luminosity about two hundred times. The light curve fits revealed that such an effect can be reproduced by a flat disc whose radius and temperature are several times bigger than those of the primary at quiescence.

  18. Orbital periods of cataclysmic variables identified by the SDSS. VII. Four new eclipsing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Southworth, John; Gansicke, B T; Pyrzas, S

    2009-01-01

    We present photometry of nine cataclysmic variable stars identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, aimed at measuring the orbital periods of these systems. Four of these objects show deep eclipses, from which we measure their orbital periods. The light curves of three of the eclipsing systems are also analysed using the LCURVE code, and their mass ratios and orbital inclinations determined. SDSS J075059.97+141150.1 has an orbital period of 134.1564 +/- 0.0008 min, making it a useful object with which to investigate the evolutionary processes of cataclysmic variables. SDSS J092444.48+080150.9 has a period of 131.2432 +/- 0.0014 min and is probably magnetic. The white dwarf ingress and egress phases are very deep and short, and there is no clear evidence that this object has an accretion disc. SDSS J115207.00+404947.8 and SDSS J152419.33+220920.1 are nearly identical twins, with periods of 97.5 +/- 0.4 and 93.6 +/- 0.5 min and mass ratios of 0.14 +/- 0.03 and 0.17 +/- 0.03, respectively. Their eclipses have w...

  19. The Eclipsing Cataclysmic Variable Lanning 386: Dwarf Nova, SW Sextantis Star, or Both?

    OpenAIRE

    Brady, S; Thorstensen, J.R.; Koppelman, M. D.; Prieto, J. L.; Garnavich, P. M.; Hirschauer, A.; Florack, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present photometry and spectroscopy of the suspected cataclysmic variable (CV) Lanning 386. We confirm that it is a CV, and observe deep eclipses, from which we determine the orbital period Porb to be 0.1640517 +- 0.0000001 d (= 3.94 h). Photometric monitoring over two observing seasons shows a very active system with frequent outbursts of variable amplitude, up to approx. 2 mag. The spectrum in quiescence is typical of dwarf novae, but in its high state the system shows strong HeII emissi...

  20. On the eclipsing cataclysmic variable star HBHA 4705-03

    CERN Document Server

    Rutkowski, A; Marsh, T R; Eker, Z

    2013-01-01

    We present observations and analysis of a new eclipsing binary HBHA 4705-03. Using decomposition of the light curve into accretion disk and hot spot components, we estimated photometrically the mass ratio of the studied system to be q=0.62 +-0.07. Other fundamental parameters was found with modeling. This approach gave: white dwarf mass M_1 = (0.8 +- 0.2) M_sun, secondary mass M_2=(0.497 +- 0.05) M_sun, orbital radius a=1.418 R_sun, orbital inclination i = (81.58 +- 0.5) deg, accretion disk radius r_d/a = 0.366 +- 0.002, and accretion rate dot{M} = (2.5 +- 2) * 10^{18}[g/s], (3*10^{-8} [M_sun/yr]). Power spectrum analysis revealed ambiguous low-period Quasi Periodic Oscillations centered at the frequencies f_{1}=0.00076 Hz, f_2=0.00048 Hz and f_3=0.00036 Hz. The B-V=0.04 [mag] color corresponds to a dwarf novae during an outburst. The examined light curves suggest that HBHA 4705-03 is a nova-like variable star.

  1. Investigations of a new eclipsing cataclysmic variable HBHA 4705-03

    CERN Document Server

    Yakin, D G; Shimansky, V V; Vlasyuk, V V; Spiridonova, O I

    2012-01-01

    Results of photometric and spectroscopic investigations of the recently discovered eclipsing cataclysmic variable star HBHA 4705-03 are presented. The emission spectra of the system show broad hydrogen and helium emission lines. The bright spots with an approximately zero velocity components are found in the Doppler maps for the hydrogen and ionized helium lines. The disc structure is more prominent in the maps for the neutral helium lines. The masses of the components (M_WD = 0.54 \\pm 0.10 M_sun and M_RD = 0.45 \\pm 0.05 M_sun), and the orbit inclination (i = 71.8 \\pm 0.^7 deg) were estimated using the radial velocity light curve and the eclipse width. The modeling of the light curve allows us to evaluate the bright spot parameters and the mass accretion rate (\\dot M \\approx 2 10^{17} g s^{-1}).

  2. Recovery of 29 Second Oscillations in Hubble Space Telescope Eclipse Observations of the Cataclysmic Variable UX Ursae Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knigge, Christian; Drake, Nick; Long, Knox S.; Wade, Richard A.; Horne, Keith; Baptista, Raymundo

    1998-01-01

    Low-amplitude (approximately 0.5%) 29 s oscillations have been detected in Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph eclipse observations of the nova-like cataclysmic variable UX UMa. These are the same dwarf nova-type oscillations that were originally discovered in this system in 1972. The 29 s oscillations are seen in one pair of eclipse sequences obtained with the FOS/PRISM in 1994 November but not in a similar pair obtained with the FOS/GI60L grating in August of the same year. The oscillations in the PRISM data are sinusoidal to within the small observational errors and undergo an approximately - 360' phase shift during eclipses (i.e., one cycle is lost). The amplitudes are highest at pre-eclipse orbital phases and exhibit a rather gradual eclipse whose shape is roughly similar to, although perhaps slightly narrower than, LTX UMa's overall light curve in the PRISM bandpass (2000-8000 A). Spectra of the oscillations have been constructed from pre-, mid, and post-eclipse data segments of the November observations. The spectra obtained from the out-of-eclipse segments are extremely blue, and only lower limits can be placed on the temperature of the source that dominates the modulated flux at these orbital phases. Lower limits derived from blackbody (stellar atmosphere) model fits to these data are >or equal to 95,000 K (> or equal to 85,000 K); the corresponding upper limits on the projected area of this source are all less than 2% of the white dwarf (WD) surface area. By contrast, oscillation spectra derived from mid- eclipse data segments are much redder. Fits to these spectra yield temperature estimates in the range 20,000 K approximately greater T and T approximately less than 30,000 K for both blackbody and stellar atmosphere models and corresponding projected areas of a few percent of the WD surface area. These estimates are subject to revision if the modulated emission is optically thin. We suggest that the ultimate source of the oscillations is a

  3. ULTRACAM photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variables GY Cnc, IR Com and HT Cas

    CERN Document Server

    Feline, W J; Marsh, T R; Watson, C A; Littlefair, S P

    2005-01-01

    We present high-speed, three-colour photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variables GY Cnc, IR Com and HT Cas. We find that the sharp eclipses in GY Cnc and IR Com are due to eclipses of the white dwarf. There is some evidence for a bright spot on the edge of the accretion disc in GY Cnc, but not in IR Com. Eclipse mapping of HT Cas is presented which shows changes in the structure of the quiescent accretion disc. Observations in 2002 show the accretion disc to be invisible except for the presence of a bright spot at the disc edge. 2003 observations, however, clearly show a bright inner disc and the bright spot to be much fainter than in 2002. Although no outburst was associated with either set of quiescent observations, the system was ~0.6 mJy brighter in 2003, mainly due to the enhanced emission from the inner disc. We propose that these changes are due to variations in the mass transfer rate from the secondary star and through the disc. The disc colours indicate that it is optically thin in both its inne...

  4. PHL 1445: An eclipsing cataclysmic variable with a substellar donor near the period minimum

    CERN Document Server

    McAllister, M J; Baraffe, I; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Bento, J; Bochinski, J; Bours, M C P; Breedt, E; Copperwheat, C M; Hardy, L K; Kerry, P; Parsons, S G; Rostron, J W; Sahman, D I; Savoury, C D J; Tunnicliffe, R L

    2015-01-01

    We present high-speed, three-colour photometry of the eclipsing dwarf nova PHL 1445, which, with an orbital period of 76.3 min, lies just below the period minimum of ~82 min for cataclysmic variable stars. Averaging four eclipses reveals resolved eclipses of the white dwarf and bright spot. We determined the system parameters by fitting a parameterised eclipse model to the averaged lightcurve. We obtain a mass ratio of q = 0.087 +- 0.006 and inclination i = 85.2 +- 0.9 degrees. The primary and donor masses were found to be Mw = 0.73 +- 0.03 Msun and Md = 0.064 +- 0.005 Msun, respectively. Through multicolour photometry a temperature of the white dwarf of Tw = 13200 +- 700 K and a distance of 220 +- 50 pc were determined. The evolutionary state of PHL 1445 is uncertain. We are able to rule out a significantly evolved donor, but not one that is slightly evolved. Formation with a brown dwarf donor is plausible; though the brown dwarf would need to be no older than 600 Myrs at the start of mass transfer, requirin...

  5. MASTER OT J190519.41+301524.4: New Eclipsing Cataclysmic Variable of VY Scl Type

    CERN Document Server

    Martinelli, F

    2016-01-01

    MASTER OT J190519.41+301524.4 was discovered as an optical transient of 15.7m by the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in March 2014. We report the results of photometric observations of this variable performed at Lajatico Astronomical Center in June-July 2015. The light curve is showing deep V-shaped eclipses with an amplitude of two magnitudes. The orbital period was determined to be 0.129694 d (3.113 h). Based on the archival observations and the shape of the orbital curve we suggest that MASTER OT J190519.41+301524.4 is a new cataclysmic variable of VY Scl type ("anti-nova") with an inclination angle close to 90 deg.

  6. SDSS J105754.25+275947.5: a period-bounce eclipsing cataclysmic variable with the lowest-mass donor yet measured

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, M. J.; Littlefair, S. P.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Bochinski, J.; Bours, M. C. P.; Breedt, E.; Hardy, L. K.; Hermes, J. J.; Kengkriangkrai, S.; Kerry, P.; Parsons, S. G.; Rattanasoon, S.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-speed, multicolour photometry of the faint, eclipsing cataclysmic variable (CV) SDSS J105754.25+275947.5. The light from this system is dominated by the white dwarf. Nonetheless, averaging many eclipses reveals additional features from the eclipse of the bright spot. This enables the fitting of a parametrized eclipse model to these average light curves, allowing the precise measurement of system parameters. We find a mass ratio of q = 0.0546 ± 0.0020 and inclination i = 85.74 ± 0.21°. The white dwarf and donor masses were found to be Mw = 0.800 ± 0.015 M⊙ and Md = 0.0436 ± 0.0020 M⊙, respectively. A temperature Tw = 13300 ± 1100 K and distance d = 367 ± 26 pc of the white dwarf were estimated through fitting model atmosphere predictions to multicolour fluxes. The mass of the white dwarf in SDSS 105754.25+275947.5 is close to the average for CV white dwarfs, while the donor has the lowest mass yet measured in an eclipsing CV. A low-mass donor and an orbital period (90.44 min) significantly longer than the period minimum strongly suggest that this is a bona fide period-bounce system, although formation from a white dwarf/brown dwarf binary cannot be ruled out. Very few period-minimum/period-bounce systems with precise system parameters are currently known, and as a consequence the evolution of CVs in this regime is not yet fully understood.

  7. WZ Sge: An eclipsing cataclysmic variable evolving towards the period minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z.-T.; Qian, S.-B.; Voloshina, Irina; Zhu, L.-Y.

    2017-10-01

    We present the photometric results of the eclipsing cataclysmic variable (CV) WZ Sge near the period minimum (Pmin). Eight new mid-eclipse times were determined and the orbital ephemeris was updated. Our result shows that the orbital period of WZ Sge is decreasing at a rate of P˙ = - 2.72(± 0.23) ×10-13 ss-1 . This secular decrease, coupled with previous detection of its donor, suggest that WZ Sge is a pre-bounce system. Further analysis indicates that the observed period decrease rate is about 1.53 times higher than pure gravitational radiation (GR) driving. We constructed the evolutionary track of WZ Sge, which predicts that Pmin of WZ Sge is ∼ 77.98(± 0.90) min. If the orbital period decreases at the current rate, WZ Sge will evolve past its Pmin after ∼ 25.3 Myr. Based on the period evolution equation we find M˙2 ≃ 4.04(± 0.10) ×10-11M⊙ yr-1 , which is compatible with the current concept of CV evolution at ultrashort orbital periods.

  8. Discovery of a Faint Eclipsing Binary GSC 02265-01456

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. F. Guo; K. Li; S. M. Hu; Y. G. Jiang; D. Y. Gao; X. Chen

    2015-09-01

    When observing the transiting extrasolar planets, we found a new eclipsing binary named GSC 02265-01456. The and c observations were carried out for this binary. The photometric light curves of the two bands were simultaneously analyzed using the W–D code. The solutions show that GSC 02265-01456 is an extremely low mass ratio ( = 0.087) overcontact binary system with a contact degree of = 82.5%. The difference between the two maxima of the light curve can be explained by a dark spot on the primary component.

  9. Orbital periods of cataclysmic variables identified by the SDSS. IX. NTT photometry of eight eclipsing and three magnetic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Southworth, John; Gaensicke, B T; Copperwheat, C M

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of eclipses and the first orbital period measurements for four cataclysmic variables, plus the first orbital period measurements for one known eclipsing and two magnetic systems. SDSS J093537.46+161950.8 exhibits 1-mag deep eclipses with a period of 92.245 min. SDSS J105754.25+275947.5 has short and deep eclipses and an orbital period of 90.44 min. Its light curve has no trace of a bright spot and its spectrum is dominated by the white dwarf component, suggesting a low mass accretion rate and a very low-mass and cool secondary star. CSS J132536+210037 shows 1-mag deep eclipses each separated by 89.821 min. SDSS J075653.11+085831.8 shows 2-mag deep eclipses on a period of 197.154 min. CSS J112634-100210 is an eclipsing dwarf nova identified in the Catalina Real Time Transit Survey, for which we measure a period of 111.523 min. SDSS J092122.84+203857.1 is a magnetic system with an orbital period of 84.240 min; its light curve is a textbook example of cyclotron beaming. A period of 158.72...

  10. On the SW Sex-Type Eclipsing Cataclysmic Variable SDSS0756+0858

    CERN Document Server

    Tovmassian, Gagik; Gonzalez-Buitrago, Diego; Zharikov, Sergey; García-Díaz, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a spectroscopic and photometric study of SDSS J075653.11+085831. X-ray observations were also attempted. We determined the orbital period of this binary system to be 3.29 hours. It is a deep eclipsing system, whose spectra shows mostly single peaked Balmer emission lines and a quite intense He II line. There is also the presence of faint (often double peaked) He I emission lines as well as several absorption lines; Mg I being the most prominent. All these features point towards affiliation of this object to the growing number of SW Sex-type objects. We developed a phenomenological model of a SW Sex system to reproduce the observed photometric and spectral features.

  11. 2MASSJ22560844+5954299: the newly discovered cataclysmic star with the deepest eclipse

    CERN Document Server

    Kjurkchieva, D; Dimitrov, D; Groebel, R; Ibryamov, S; Nikolov, G

    2015-01-01

    Context: The SW Sex stars are assumed to represent a distinguished stage in CV evolution, making it especially important to study them. Aims: We discovered a new cataclysmic star and carried out prolonged and precise photometric observations, as well as medium-resolution spectral observations. Modelling these data allowed us to determine the psysical parameters and to establish its peculiarities. Results: The newly discovered vataclysmic variable 2MASSJ22560844+5954299 shows the deepest eclipse amongst the known nova-like stars. It was reproduced by totally covering a very luminous accretion disk by a red secondary component. The temperature distribution of the disk is flatter than that of steady-state disk. The target is unusual with the combination of a low mass ratio q~1.0 (considerably below the limit q=1.2 of stable mass transfer of CVs) and an M-star secondary. The intensity of the observed three emission lines, H_alpha, He 5875, and He 6678, sharply increases around phase 0.0, accompanied by a Doppler ...

  12. Recovery of 29 s Oscillations in HST/FOS Eclipse Observations of the Cataclysmic Variable UX Ursae Majoris

    CERN Document Server

    Knigge, C; Long, K S; Wade, R A; Horne, K; Baptista, R

    1998-01-01

    [abridged abstract] Low amplitude (~=0.5%) 29-s oscillations have been detected in HST/FOS eclipse observations of the nova-like cataclysmic variable UX UMa. These are the same dwarf nova-type oscillations that were originally discovered in this system by Warner & Nather in 1972. The oscillations are sinusoidal to within the small observational errors and undergo an approximately -360 degree phase shift during eclipses. Their amplitudes are highest at pre-eclipse orbital phases and exhibit a rather gradual eclipse whose shape is roughly similar to UX~UMa's overall light curve. Oscillation spectra derived from pre-eclipse data segments are extremely blue, whereas mid-eclipse oscillation spectra are much redder. We suggest that the ultimate source of the oscillations is a hot, compact region near disk center, but that a significant fraction of the observed, modulated flux is due to reprocessing of the light emitted by this source in the accretion disk atmosphere. The compact source is occulted at orbital ph...

  13. Using Gaussian processes to model light curves in the presence of flickering: the eclipsing cataclysmic variable ASASSN-14ag

    CERN Document Server

    McAllister, M J; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Ashley, R P; Bours, M C P; Breedt, E; Hardy, L K; Hermes, J J; Kengkriangkrai, S; Kerry, P; Rattanasoon, S; Sahman, D I

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cataclysmic variable (CV) stars contain a stochastic noise component in their light curves, commonly referred to as flickering. This can significantly affect the morphology of CV eclipses and increases the difficulty in obtaining accurate system parameters with reliable errors through eclipse modelling. Here we introduce a new approach to eclipse modelling, which models CV flickering with the help of Gaussian processes (GPs). A parameterised eclipse model - with an additional GP component - is simultaneously fit to 8 eclipses of the dwarf nova ASASSN-14ag and system parameters determined. We obtain a mass ratio $q$ = 0.149 $\\pm$ 0.016 and inclination $i$ = 83.4 $^{+0.9}_{-0.6}$ $^{\\circ}$. The white dwarf and donor masses were found to be $M_{w}$ = 0.63 $\\pm$ 0.04 $M_{\\odot}$ and $M_{d}$ = 0.093 $^{+0.015}_{-0.012}$ $M_{\\odot}$, respectively. A white dwarf temperature $T_{w}$ = 14000 $^{+2200}_{-2000}$ K and distance $d$ = 146 $^{+24}_{-20}$ pc were determined through multicolour photometry. W...

  14. Fainting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have heavy periods or people with iron-deficiency anemia for other reasons (like not getting enough iron in their diet) may be more likely to faint. Pregnancy. During pregnancy the body normally undergoes a lot ...

  15. FUSE Observations of the Bright, Eclipsing Nova-like Cataclysmic Variable, UX UMa (FUSE 2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Knox; Froning, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    This was a project to study the disk and wind of the eclipsing nova-like variable UX UMa, in order to better define the wind geometry of the system, including the nature of the transition region between the disk photosphere and the supersonic wind. We proposed to use phase resolved spectroscopy of the system, taking advantage of the fact that UX UMa is an eclipsing system, to isolate different regions of the wind and to use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to simulate the spectra through the eclipse.

  16. Kepler Observations of V447 Lyr: An Eclipsing U Gem Cataclysmic Variable

    CERN Document Server

    Ramsay, Gavin; Howell, Steve B; Wood, Matt A; Still, Martin; Barclay, Thomas; Smale, Alan

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data covering 1.5 years of the dwarf nova V447 Lyr. We detect eclipses of the accretion disk by the mass donating secondary star every 3.74 hrs which is the binary orbital period. V447 Lyr is therefore the first dwarf nova in the Kepler field to show eclipses. We also detect five long outbursts and six short outbursts showing V447 Lyr is a U Gem type dwarf nova. We show that the orbital phase of the mid-eclipse occurs earlier during outbursts compared to quiescence and that the width of the eclipse is greater during outburst. This suggests that the bright spot is more prominent during quiescence and that the disk is larger during outburst than quiescence. This is consistent with an expansion of the outer disk radius due to the presence of high viscosity material associated with the outburst, followed by a contraction in quiescence due to the accretion of low angular momentum material. We note that the long outbursts appear to be triggered by a short outburst, which is ...

  17. Optical Identification of Multiple Faint X-ray Sources in the Globular Cluster NGC 6752 Evidence for Numerous Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Pooley, D; Homer, L; Verbunt, F; Anderson, S F; Gaensler, B M; Margon, B; Miller, J; Fox, D W; Kaspi, V M; Van der Klis, M

    2002-01-01

    We report on the Chandra ACIS-S3 imaging observation of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We detect 6 X-ray sources within the 10.5" core radius and 13 more within the 115" half-mass radius down to a limiting luminosity of Lx approx 10^{30} erg/s for cluster sources. We reanalyze archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array and make 12 optical identifications and one radio identification. Based on X-ray and optical properties of the identifications, we find 10 likely cataclysmic variables (CVs), 1-3 likely RS CVn or BY Dra systems, and 1 or 2 possible background objects. Of the 7 sources for which no optical identifications were made, we expect that ~2-4 are background objects and that the rest are either CVs or some or all of the 5 millisecond pulsars whose radio positions are not yet accurately known. These and other Chandra results on globular clusters indicate that the dozens of CVs per cluster expected by theoretical arguments are finally being found. The findings ...

  18. Identification of Faint Chandra X-ray Sources in the Core-Collapsed Globular Cluster NGC 6397: Evidence for a Bimodal Cataclysmic Variable Population

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, Haldan N; Couch, Sean M; Anderson, Jay; Cool, Adrienne M; Berg, Maureen van den; Bogdanov, Slavko; Heinke, Craig O; Grindlay, Jonathan E; 10.1088/0004-637X/722/1/20

    2011-01-01

    We have searched for optical identifications for 79 Chandra X-ray sources that lie within the half-mass radius of the nearby, core-collapsed globular cluster NGC 6397, using deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel imaging in H-alpha, R, and B. Photometry of these images allows us to classify candidate counterparts based on color-magnitude diagram location. In addition to recovering nine previously detected cataclysmic variables (CVs), we have identified six additional faint CV candidates, a total of 42 active binaries (ABs), two millisecond pulsars (MSPs), one candidate active galactic nucleus, and one candidate interacting galaxy pair. Of the 79 sources, 69 have a plausible optical counterpart. The 15 likely and possible CVs in NGC 6397 mostly fall into two groups: a brighter group of six for which the optical emission is dominated by contributions from the secondary and accretion disk, and a fainter group of seven for which the white dwarf dominates the optical emission. T...

  19. The winds of cataclysmic variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauche, C.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Lab. for Experimental Astrophysics; Raymond, J.C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-02-16

    The authors present an observational and theoretical review of the winds of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Specifically, they consider the related problems of the geometry and mass-loss rate of the winds of CVs, their ionization state and variability, and the results from studies of eclipsing CVs. Finally, they consider the properties of accretion disk wind models. Some of these models predict substantial angular momentum loss, which could affect both disk structure and binary evolution.

  20. Eclipse Imagery in Mexica Sculpture of Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbrath, S.

    Major monuments of the Mexica (Aztec) style are analyzed in terms of possible eclipse imagery. The cycle of monuments linked to the Coyolxauhqui myth are recognized as possible images of historical lunar eclipses. The Bilimek vessel is identified with an historical solar eclipse in 1508. The Calendar Stone is recognized as an image of world cataclysm that may refer to a solar eclipse at the end of the world. In addition, the codices are studied in terms of visual images of eclipses and a pattern linking solar eclipses to the death of a ruler.

  1. Followup Observations of SDSS and CRTS Candidate Cataclysmic Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Szkody, Paula; Everett, Mark E.; Howell, Steve B.; Landolt, Arlo U.; Bond, Howard E.; Silva, David R.; Vasquez-Soltero, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    We present photometry of 11 and spectroscopy of 35 potential cataclysmic variables from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey and vsnet-alerts. The photometry results include quasi-periodic oscillations during the decline of V1363 Cyg, nightly accretion changes in the likely Polar (AM Herculis binary) SDSS J1344+20, eclipses in SDSS J2141+05 with an orbital period of 76+/-2 min, and possible eclipses in SDSS J2158+09 at an orbital period near 100 min. Time-reso...

  2. Radiation of accretion discs: the eclipses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    1984-05-01

    Light curves have been calculated for eclipses of the accretion disc in a cataclysmic binary. The Roche geometry of the cool component was taken into account and the stellar atmospheres were interpolated to provide the local spectrum of the radiation from the disc. The dependence of the light curve on the parameters of the disc is discussed.

  3. Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Vrielmann, S

    2000-01-01

    The tomographic method "Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping" is a tool to reconstruct spatial distributions of physical parameters (like temperatures and surface densities) in accretion discs of cataclysmic variables. After summarizing the method, we apply it to multi-colour eclipse light curves of various dwarf novae and nova-likes like VZ Scl, IP Peg in outburst, UU Aqr, V2051 Oph and HT Cas in order to derive the temperatures (and surface densities) in the disc, the white dwarf temperature, the disc size, the effective temperatures and the viscosities. The results allows us to establish or refine a physical model for the accretion disc. Our maps of HT Cas and V2051 Oph, for example, indicate that the (quiescent) disc must be structured into a cool, optically thick inner disc sandwiched by hot, optically thin chromospheres. In addition, the disc of HT Cas must be patchy with a covering factor of about 40% caused by magnetic activity in the disc.

  4. [Eclipse retinopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Simon; Høgsbro, Malou

    2014-11-10

    Eclipse retinopathy is a condition with macular damage resulting from viewing of a solar eclipse. This case report illustrates how eclipse retinopathy was diagnosed with a delay of more than 30 years. The report also summarises how solar eclipse can be observed without risk of retinal damage.

  5. Cataclysmic Variables from SDSS III. The Third Year

    CERN Document Server

    Szkody, P; Fraser, O J; Silvestri, N M; Bochanski, J J; Wolfe, M A; Agüeros, M A; Warner, B; Woudt, P; Tramposch, J; Homer, L; Schmidt, G; Knapp, G R; Anderson, S F; Covey, K; Harris, H; Hawley, S; Schneider, D P; Voges, W; Brinkmann, J; Szkody, Paula; Henden, Arne; Fraser, Oliver; Silvestri, Nicole; Bochanski, John; Wolfe, Michael A.; Ag\\"ueros, Marcel; Warner, Brian; Woudt, Patrick; Tramposch, Jonica; Homer, Lee; Schmidt, Gary; Knapp, Gillian R.; Anderson, Scott F.; Covey, Kevin; Harris, Hugh; Hawley, Suzanne; Schneider, Donald P.; Voges, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    This paper continues the series that identifies new cataclysmic variables found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present 36 cataclysmic variables and one possible symbiotic star from Sloan spectra obtained during 2002, of which 34 are new discoveries, 2 are known dwarf novae (BC UMa, KS UMa) and one is a known CV identified from the 2dF survey. The positions, colors and spectra of all 37 systems are presented, along with follow-up spectroscopic/photometric observations of 10 systems. As in the past 2 years of data, the new SDSS systems show a large variety of characteristics based on their inclination and magnetic fields, including 3 eclipsing systems, 4 with prominent He II emission, and 15 systems showing features of the underlying stars.

  6. The Magnetic Cataclysmic Variable LSQ1725-64

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, J T; Dennihy, E; O'Donoghue, D; Clemens, J C; Reichart, D E; Moore, J P; LaCluyze, A P; Haislip, J B; Ivarsen, K V

    2016-01-01

    We present new photometry and spectroscopy of the 94m eclipsing binary LSQ1725-64 that provide insight into the fundamental parameters and evolutionary state of this system. We confirm that LSQ1725-64 is a magnetic cataclysmic variable whose white dwarf has a surface-averaged magnetic field strength of $12.5 \\pm 0.5$ MG measured from Zeeman splitting. The spectral type and colour of the secondary, as well as the eclipse length, are consistent with other secondaries that have not yet evolved through the period minimum expected for cataclysmic variables. We observe two different states of mass transfer and measure the transition between the two to occur over about 45 orbital cycles. In the low state, we observe photometric variations that we hypothesize to arise predominantly from two previously heated magnetic poles of the white dwarf. Our precise eclipse measurements allow us to determine binary parameters of LSQ1725-64 and we find it contains a high mass ($0.97 \\pm 0.03\\ M_{\\odot}$) white dwarf if we assume ...

  7. Terminal Cataclysm Epistemology: A Cataclysm that Never Happened?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    2015-07-01

    The "terminal cataclysm" or "late heavy bombardment," concept of the last 40 years exhibits curious epistemology, with changing definitions and inconsistent evidence. A sharp "spike" in solar system basin formation at 3.9 Ga ago is untenable.

  8. Io Eclipse Montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    New Horizons took this montage of images of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io, glowing in the dark of Jupiter's shadow, as the Pluto-bound spacecraft sped through the Jupiter system on Feb. 27, 2007. (A): In this picture from the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), dark blotches and straight lines are artifacts. The brightest spots (including the volcanoes Pele [P] and East Girru [EG]) are incandescent lava from active volcanoes. The more diffuse glows, and the many faint spots, are from gas in the plumes and atmosphere, glowing due to bombardment by plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere, in a display similar to the Earth's aurorae. (B): The same image with a latitude/longitude grid, showing that the cluster of faint spots is centered near longitude 0 degrees, the point on Io that faces Jupiter. The image also shows the locations of the plumes seen in sunlit images (indicated by red diamonds), which glow with auroral emission in eclipse. (C): Simulated sunlit view of Io with the same geometry, based on sunlit LORRI images. (D): A combination of the sunlit image (in cyan) and the eclipse image (in red), showing that all point-like glows in the eclipse image arise from dark volcanoes in the eclipse image. (E): This infrared image, at a wavelength of 2.3 microns, obtained by New Horizons Linear Etalon Spectral Imaging Array (LEISA) an hour after the LORRI image, showing thermal emission from active volcanoes. Elongation of the hot spots is an artifact. (F): Combined visible albedo (cyan) and LEISA thermal emission (red) image, showing the sources of the volcanic emission. That most of the faint point-like glows near longitude zero, seen in visible light in images A, B, and D, do not appear in the infrared view of volcanic heat radiation, is one reason scientists believe that these glows are due to auroral emission, not heat radiation. This image appears in the Oct. 12, 2007, issue of Science magazine, in a paper by John Spencer, et al.

  9. The lunar eclipse over Merritt Island, Fla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Viewed from Merritt Island, Fla., at 11:25 p.m. EST, the full moon, traveling west to east, is nearly completely in the Earth's shadow, producing a lunar eclipse. Eclipses occur when the Sun, Earth and Moon line up. They are rare because the Moon usually passes above or below the imaginary line connecting Earth and the Sun. The Earth casts a shadow that the Moon can pass through when it does, it is called a lunar eclipse. They can only occur when the moon is 'full.' During a total lunar eclipse the Moon takes on a dark red color because it is being lighted slightly by sunlight passing through the Earth's atmosphere and this light has the blue component preferentially scattered out (this is also why the sky appears blue from the surface of the Earth), leaving faint reddish light to illuminate the Moon during the eclipse.

  10. The Magnetospheric Boundary in Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Hellier, Coel

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic cataclysmic variables (MCVs) present a wealth of observational diagnostics for studying accretion flows interacting with a magnetosphere. Spin-period pulsations from the rotation of the white dwarf are seen in optical light, in the UV and X-ray bands, and in polarimetry, and modelling these can constrain the size and location of the accretion footprints on the white-dwarf surface. Tracing these back along field lines can tell us about the transition region between the stream or disk and the magnetosphere. Further, optical emission lines give us velocity information, while analysis of eclipses gives spatial information. I discuss MCVs (particularly FO Aqr, V405 Aur, XY Ari and EX Hya, but also mentioning PQ Gem, GK Per, V2400 Oph, HT Cam, TX Col, AO Psc, AE Aqr, WZ Sge, V1223 Sgr and DQ Her), reviewing what observations tell us about the disk-magnetosphere boundary. The spin-period variations are caused by a mixture of geometric effects and absorption by the accretion flow, and appear to show that...

  11. A possible giant planet orbiting the cataclysmic variable LX Ser

    CERN Document Server

    Li, K; Zhou, J -L; Wu, D -H; Guo, D -F; Jiang, Y -G; Gao, D -Y; Chen, X; Wang, X -Y

    2016-01-01

    LX Ser is a deeply eclipsing cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of $0.^d 1584325$. Sixty two new eclipse times were determined by our observations and the AAVSO International Data base. Combining all available eclipse times, we analyzed the O-C behavior of LX Ser. We found that the O-C diagram of LX Ser shows a sinusoidal oscillation with a period of 22.8 yr and an amplitude of 0.00035 days. Two mechanisms (i.e., the Applegate mechanism and the light travel time effect) are applied to explain the cyclic modulation. We found that the Applegate mechanism is difficult to explain the cyclic oscillation in the orbital period. Therefore, the cyclic period change is most likely to be caused by the light travel time effect due to the presence of a third body. The mass of the tertiary component was determined to be $M_3\\sim7.5 M_{Jup}$. We supposed that the tertiary companion is plausible a giant planet. The stability of the giant planet was checked, and we found that the multiple system is stable.

  12. A possible giant planet orbiting the cataclysmic variable LX Ser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Hu, Shaoming; Zhou, Jilin; Wu, Donghong; Guo, Difu; Jiang, Yunguo; Gao, Dongyang; Chen, Xu; Wang, Xianyu

    2017-02-01

    LX Ser is a deeply eclipsing cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 0.1584325 d. 62 new eclipse times were determined by our observations and the AAVSO International Data base. Combining all available eclipse times, we analyzed the O - C behavior of LX Ser. We found that the O - C diagram of LX Ser shows a sinusoidal oscillation with a period of 22.8 yr and an amplitude of 0.00035 d. Two mechanisms (i.e., the Applegate mechanism and the light-travel time effect) are applied to explain the cyclic modulation. We found that it is difficult to apply the Applegate mechanism to explain the cyclic oscillation in the orbital period. Therefore, the cyclic period change is most likely to be caused by the light-travel time effect due to the presence of a third body. The mass of the tertiary component was determined to be M3 ∼ 7.5 MJup. We supposed that the tertiary companion is plausibly a giant planet. The stability of the giant planet was checked, and we found that the multiple system is stable.

  13. Cataclysmic Variables from SDSS II. The Second Year

    CERN Document Server

    Szkody, P; Silvestri, N M; Henden, A A; Anderson, S F; Frith, W J; Lawton, B; Owens, E; Raymond, S; Schmidt, G; Wolfe, M; Bochanski, J J; Covey, K; Harris, H; Hawley, S; Knapp, G R; Margon, B; Voges, W; Walkowicz, L; Brinkmann, J; Lamb, D Q; Anderson, Scott F.; Bochanski, John; Covey, Kevin; Fraser, Oliver; Frith, James; Harris, Hugh; Hawley, Suzanne; Henden, Arne; Knapp, Gillian R.; Lawton, Brandon; Margon, Bruce; Owens, Ethan; Raymond, Sean; Schmidt, Gary; Silvestri, Nicole; Szkody, Paula; Voges, Wolfgang; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Wolfe, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The first full year of operation following the commissioning year of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has revealed a wide variety of newly discovered cataclysmic variables. We show the SDSS spectra of forty-two cataclysmic variables observed in 2002, of which thirty-five are new classifications, four are known dwarf novae (CT Hya, RZ Leo, T Leo and BZ UMa), one is a known CV identified from a previous quasar survey (Aqr1) and two are known ROSAT or FIRST discovered CVs (RX J09445+0357, FIRST J102347.6+003841). The SDSS positions, colors and spectra of all forty-two systems are presented. In addition, the results of follow-up studies of several of these objects identify the orbital periods, velocity curves and polarization that provide the system geometry and accretion properties. While most of the SDSS discovered systems are faint (>18th mag) with low accretion rates (as implied from their spectral characteristics), there are also a few bright objects which may have escaped previous surveys due to changes in the ...

  14. Images of accretion discs. 1. The eclipse mapping method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, K.

    1985-03-01

    A method of mapping the surface brightness distributions of accretion discs in eclipsing cataclysmic binaries is described and tested with synthetic eclipse data. Accurate synthetic light curves are computed by numerical simulation of the accretion disc eclipse, and images of the disc are reconstructed by maximum entropy methods. The conventional definition of entropy leads to a distorted image of the disc. A modified form of entropy, sensitive to the aximuthal structure of the image but not to its radial profile, suppresses azimuthal structure but correctly recovers the radial structure of the accretion disc. This eclipse mapping method permits powerful tests of accretion disc theory by deriving the spatial structure of discs from observational data with a minimum of model-dependent assumptions.

  15. Eclipse Mapping: Astrotomography of Accretion Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Baptista, Raymundo

    2015-01-01

    The Eclipse Mapping Method is an indirect imaging technique that transforms the shape of the eclipse light curve into a map of the surface brightness distribution of the occulted regions. Three decades of application of this technique to the investigation of the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs around white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables have enriched our understanding of these accretion devices with a wealth of details such as (but not limited to) moving heating/cooling waves during outbursts in dwarf novae, tidally-induced spiral shocks of emitting gas with sub-Keplerian velocities, elliptical precessing discs associated to superhumps, and measurements of the radial run of the disc viscosity through the mapping of the disc flickering sources. This chapter reviews the principles of the method, discusses its performance, limitations, useful error propagation procedures, as well as highlights a selection of applications aimed at showing the possible scientific problems that ha...

  16. Faint Blue Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Richard S

    1997-01-01

    The physical properties of the faint blue galaxy population are reviewed in the context of observational progress made via deep spectroscopic surveys and Hubble Space Telescope imaging of field galaxies at various limits, and theoretical models for the integrated star formation history of the Universe. Notwithstanding uncertainties in the properties of the local population of galaxies, convincing evidence has emerged from several independent studies for a rapid decline in the volume-averaged star formation rate of field galaxies since a redshift z~1. Together with the small angular sizes and modest mean redshift of the faintest detectable sources, these results can be understood in hierarchical models where the bulk of the star formation occurred at redshifts between z~1-2. The physical processes responsible for the subsequent demise of the faint blue galaxy population remains unclear. Considerable progress will be possible when the evolutionary trends can be monitored in the context of independent physical p...

  17. Cataclysmic Variables From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. VI. the Sixth Year (2005)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szkody, Paula; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Henden, Arne; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /AAVSO, Cambridge; Mannikko, Lee; Mukadam, Anjum; /Washington U., Seattle,; Schmidt, Gary D.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bochanski, John J.; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; /Washington U., Seattle,; Dahab, William E.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Oguri, Masamune; /Princeton U. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Shin,; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; West, Andrew A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2007-06-15

    The 28 cataclysmic variables found in 2005 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented with their coordinates, magnitudes and spectra. Five of these systems are previously known CVs (HH Cnc, SX LMi, QZ Ser, RXJ1554.2+2721 and HS1016+3412) and the rest are new discoveries. Additional spectroscopic, photometric and/or polarimetric observations of 10 systems were carried out, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for seven of the new binaries. The 23 new CVs include one eclipsing system, one new Polar and five systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.

  18. EUVE Observations of Nonmagnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauche, C W

    2001-09-05

    The authors summarize EUVE's contribution to the study of the boundary layer emission of high accretion-rate nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables, especially the dwarf novae SS Cyg, U Gem, VW Hyi, and OY Car in outburst. They discuss the optical and EUV light curves of dwarf nova outbursts, the quasi-coherent oscillations of the EUV flux of SS Cyg, the EUV spectra of dwarf novae, and the future of EUV observations of cataclysmic variables.

  19. RX J0719.2+6557 A new eclipsing polar

    CERN Document Server

    Tovmassian, G H; Zickgraf, F J; Kroll, P; Krautter, J; Thiering, I; Zharykov, S V; Serrano, A

    1997-01-01

    A new magnetic cataclysmic variable is identified as the counterpart of the X-ray source RX J0719.2+6557. The emission lines show radial velocity variations with a period of 98.2 min. This coincides with the period of deep eclipses (up to 4 mag) in the photometric light curve. The phase of the eclipse relative to the spectroscopic phase, and its structure indicates that the dominant source of emission is located on the stream of accreting matter, which is eclipsed by the secondary companion. The emission lines bear evidence of a weaker component, most probably the contribution from the heated side of the secondary star. These features define this object as a probable polar in a high state. NIR spectroscopy revealed some unusual, strong emission features at 8200

  20. White dwarfs in cataclysmic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensicke, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Cataclysmic variables (CVs) provide excellent laboratories to study the effect that the accretion of matter, energy and angular momentum has on the structure of white dwarfs, with important implications on the evolution of these compact binaries, the ignition of thermonuclear surface burning, and potentially their explosion as SNIa. I will provide an overview of our current understanding of CV white dwarfs, with a particular emphasis on the results of a recent large HST program. I will review our knowledge regarding the mass distribution of CV white dwarfs, as well as the secular mean accretion rates that can be inferred from their effective temperatures, and compare those statistics with predictions from CV population models. I will also discuss a sub-set of CVs which underwent thermal-time scale mass transfer, one of the channels that is often discussed as a pathway to SN Ia, and I will illustrate how the study of these "failed SNIa" can contribute to the discussion of SNIa progenitors. Finally, I will discuss the occurrence of non-radial pulsations in white dwarfs, both in CVs and their detached progenitors.

  1. Herschel Observations of Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Thomas E; Tappert, Claus; Hoffman, Douglas I; Campbell, Ryan K

    2012-01-01

    We have used the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe eight cataclysmic variables at 70 and 160 microns. Of these eight objects, only AM Her was detected. We have combined the Herschel results with ground-based, Spitzer, and WISE observations to construct spectral energy distributions for all of the targets. For the two dwarf novae in the sample, SS Cyg and U Gem, we find that their infrared luminosities are completely dominated by their secondary stars. For the two highly magnetic "polars" in our survey, AM Her and EF Eri, we find that their mid-infrared excesses, previously attributed to circumbinary dust emission, can be fully explained by cyclotron emission. The WISE light curves for both sources show large, orbitally modulated variations that are identically phased to their near-IR light curves. We propose that significant emission from the lowest cyclotron harmonics (n

  2. How Faint Can You Go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henden, Arne

    2017-06-01

    For many scientific projects, knowledge of the faint limit of your exposure can be extremely important. In addition, it can be just plain fun to know how faint your equipment can go under varying circumstances. This paper describes the concept and gives some guidance as to how to increase the scientific value of your reports.

  3. Dynamical mass transfer in cataclysmic binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Fulvio; Lamb, D. Q.

    1987-01-01

    When a binary comes into contact and mass transfer begins, orbital angular momentum is stored in the accretion disk until the disk couples tidally to the binary system. Taam and McDermott (1987) have suggested that this leads to unstable dynamical mass transfer in many cataclysmic variables in which mass transfer would otherwise be stable, and that it explains the gap between 2 and 3 h in the orbital period distribution of these systems. Here the consequences of this hypothesis for the evolution of cataclysmic binaries are explored. It is found that systems coming into contact longward of the period gap undergo one or more episodes of dynamical mass transfer.

  4. A magnetic accretion switch in pre-cataclysmic binaries?

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Jeremy J; Takei, Dai; Gaensicke, Boris

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the mass accretion rate implied by published surface abundances of Si and C in the white dwarf component of the 3.62 hr period pre-cataclysmic binary and planet host candidate QS Vir (DA+M2-4). Diffusion timescales for gravitational settling imply $\\dot{M} \\sim 10^{-16}M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ for the 1999 epoch of the observations, which is three orders of magnitude lower than measured from a 2006 {\\it XMM-Newton} observation. This is the first time that large accretion rate variations have been seen in a detached pre-CV. A third body in a 14 yr eccentric orbit suggested in a recent eclipse timing study is too distant to perturb the central binary sufficiently to influence accretion. A hypothetical coronal mass ejection just prior to the {\\it XMM-Newton} observation might explain the higher accretion rate, but the implied size and frequency of such events appear too great. We suggest accretion is most likely modulated by a magnetic cycle on the secondary acting as a wind "accretion switch", a ...

  5. New Southern Cataclysmic Variables: Discoveries from MASTER-SAAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Potter, S. B.; Kniazev, A.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we report on new cataclysmic variables (CVs) discovered by the first local optical transient detection system established at the SAAO Sutherland station, namely MASTER-SAAO. The characteristics of the MASTER-SAAO system are described and the parameters of the survey compared to the Catalina Real Time Survey (CRTS). To date MASTER-SAAO has discovered over 200 (non-Solar System) optical transients with about 75% of these being likely new CVs, most being dwarf novae (DNe). Approximately 50% of the DNe have outburst amplitudes in excess of 4 magnitudes, with some extreme amplitude (> 7 mag), probable WZ Sge systems. The MASTER-SAAO detection limit of B = 19–20 is comparable to the ˜20 magnitude limit of the CRTS (depending on CV colour). Based on the CV detection statistics of CRTS, we believe that MASTER-SAAO is detecting essentially the same CV population as CRTS, for a detection outburst amplitude threshold >2.2 magnitudes. We also present results of the initial follow-up program on CVs discovered by MASTER, including dwarf novae, a bright new VY Scl system and a new eclipsing polar.

  6. The Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David

    1970-01-01

    Instructions for observing the Solar Eclipse on Saturday, March 7, 1970, which will be total along a strip about 85 miles wide along the Atlantic Seaboard. Safety precautions and how to construct a pinhole camera to observe eclipse. (BR)

  7. The Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David

    1970-01-01

    Instructions for observing the Solar Eclipse on Saturday, March 7, 1970, which will be total along a strip about 85 miles wide along the Atlantic Seaboard. Safety precautions and how to construct a pinhole camera to observe eclipse. (BR)

  8. Gaia14aae: the First Fully-Eclipsing AM CVn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. J.; Marsh, T. R.; Steeghs, D. T. H.; Breedt, E.; Campbell, H. C.; Dhillon, V. S.; Hardy, L. K.; Littlefair, S. P.

    2017-03-01

    AM CVns are a class of cataclysmic variables consisting of a white dwarf accreting H-deficient matter from a donor star. With periods of 5 to 65 minutes, AM CVns include the shortest period binaries containing white dwarfs. AM CVns are believed to form by one of three formation channels which can in principle be distinguished by the nature of the donor star, but are difficult to constrain observationally. Gaia14aae was one of the first transients discovered by the Gaia Science Alerts project. It eclipses on a period of 50 minutes, and is the only known AM CVn in which the white dwarf is fully eclipsed. This makes it an attractive system for parameter studies. We present an update on our attempts to measure these properties, using high-speed multi-colour photometry. Preliminary results suggest that the donor star is not as degenerate as predicted by models of white dwarf donors.

  9. Photometric study of selected cataclysmic variables II. Time-series photometry of nine systems

    CERN Document Server

    Papadaki, C; Stanishev, V; Boumis, P; Akras, S; Sterken, C

    2008-01-01

    We present time-series photometry of nine cataclysmic variables: EI UMa, V844Her, V751 Cyg, V516 Cyg, GZ Cnc, TY Psc, V1315 Aql, ASAS J002511+1217.12, V1315 Aql and LN UMa. The observations were conducted at various observatories, covering 170 hours and comprising 7,850 data points in total. For the majority of targets we confirm previously reported periodicities and for some of them we give, for the first time, their spectroscopic orbital periods. For those dwarf-nova systems which we observed during both quiescence and outburst, the increase in brightness was followed by a decrease in the amount of flickering. Quasi-periodic oscillations have either been discovered, or were confirmed. For the eclipsing system V1315 Aql we have covered 9 eclipses, and obtained a refined orbital ephemeris. We find that, during its long baseline of observations, no change in the orbital period of this system has occurred. V1315 Aql also shows eclipses of variable depth.

  10. Cataclysmic Variables and a Candidate Helium White Dwarf in the Globular Cluster NGC 6397

    CERN Document Server

    Edmonds, P D; Cool, A M; Cohn, H N; Lugger, P M; Bailyn, C D; Edmonds, Peter D.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Cool, Adrienne M.; Cohn, Haldan N.; Lugger, Phyllis N.; Bailyn, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    We have used HST/FOS to study faint UV stars in the core of the nearby globular cluster NGC 6397. We confirm the presence of a 4th cataclysmic variable (CV) in NGC 6397 (CV 4), and we use the photometry of Cool et al. (1998) to present evidence that CVs 1--4 all have faint disks and probably low accretion rates. By combining these results with new UV spectra of CV 1 and the published spectra of Grindlay et al. (1995) we present new evidence that CVs 1--3 may be DQ Her systems, and we show that CV 4 may either be a dwarf nova or another magnetic system. Another possibility is that the CVs could be old novae in hibernation between nova eruptions. We also present the first spectrum of a member of a new class of UV bright stars in NGC 6397. These faint, hot stars do not vary, unlike the CVs, and are thus denoted as ``non-flickerers'' (NFs). Like the CVs, their spatial concentration is strongly concentrated toward the cluster center. Using stellar atmosphere models we have determined log g = 6.25, and T_eff = 17,5...

  11. Eclipse Mapping: Astrotomography of Accretion Discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Raymundo

    The Eclipse Mapping Method is an indirect imaging technique that transforms the shape of the eclipse light curve into a map of the surface brightness distribution of the occulted regions. Three decades of application of this technique to the investigation of the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs around white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables have enriched our understanding of these accretion devices with a wealth of details such as (but not limited to) moving heating/cooling waves during outbursts in dwarf novae, tidally-induced spiral shocks of emitting gas with sub-Keplerian velocities, elliptical precessing discs associated to superhumps, and measurements of the radial run of the disc viscosity through the mapping of the disc flickering sources. This chapter reviews the principles of the method, discusses its performance, limitations, useful error propagation procedures, as well as highlights a selection of applications aimed at showing the possible scientific problems that have been and may be addresses with it.

  12. Some Weaker Forms of Fuzzy Faintly Open Mappings

    OpenAIRE

    Hakeem A. Othman

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to introduce and investigate some weak forms of fuzzy open mappings, namely fuzzy faintly semi open (fuzzy faintly semi closed), fuzzy faintly preopen (fuzzy faintly preclosed), fuzzy faintly $\\alpha$-open (fuzzy faintly $\\alpha$-closed), fuzzy faintly semi preopen (fuzzy faintly semi preclosed) and fuzzy faintly $sp$- open (fuzzy faintly $sp$- closed) mappings and their fundamental properties are obtained. Moreover, their relationship with other types of fuzzy open (clo...

  13. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  14. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Bazin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  15. A Trip to the Cataclysmic Binary Zoo: Detailed Follow-up of 35 Recently Discovered Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensen, John R.; Alper, Erek H.; Weil, Kathryn E.

    2016-12-01

    We report follow-up studies of 35 recently discovered cataclysmic variables (CVs), 32 of which were found in large, automated synoptic sky surveys. The objects were selected for observational tractability. For 34 of the objects, we present mean spectra and spectroscopic orbital periods, and for one more we give an eclipse-based period. Thirty-two of the period determinations are new, and three of these refine published estimates based on superhump periods. The remaining three of our determinations confirm previously published periods. Twenty of the stars are confirmed or suspected dwarf novae with periods shorter than 3 hr, but we also find three apparent polars (AM Her stars) and six systems with P\\gt 5 {hr}. Five of these systems have secondary stars visible in their spectra, from which we estimate distances when possible. The orbital period distribution of this sample is very similar to that of previously discovered CVs.

  16. XMM-Newton and Optical Observations of Cataclysmic Variables from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Eric J.; Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum; Henden, Arne; Dillon, William; Schmidt, Gary D.

    2009-03-01

    We report on XMM-Newton and optical results for six cataclysmic variables that were selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra because they showed strong He II emission lines, indicative of being candidates for containing white dwarfs with strong magnetic fields. While high X-ray background rates prevented optimum results, we are able to confirm SDSS J233325.92+152222.1 as an intermediate polar from its strong pulse signature at 21 minutes and its obscured hard X-ray spectrum. Ground-based circular polarization and photometric observations were also able to confirm SDSS J142256.31 - 022108.1 as a polar with a period near 4 hr. Photometry of SDSS J083751.00+383012.5 and SDSS J093214.82+495054.7 solidifies the orbital period of the former as 3.18 hr and confirms the latter as a high-inclination system with deep eclipses.

  17. Spectroscopic Orbital Periods for 29 Cataclysmic Variables from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Thorstensen, John R; Peters, Christopher S; Skinner, Julie N; Southworth, John; Gaensicke, Boris T

    2015-01-01

    We report follow-up spectroscopy of 29 cataclysmic variables from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), 22 of which were discovered by SDSS and seven other previously known systems that were recovered in SDSS. The periods for 16 of these objects were included in the tabulation by Gaensicke et al. (2009). While most of the systems have periods less than 2 hours, only one has a period in the 80-86 minute 'spike' found by Gaensicke et al. (2009), and 11 have periods longer than 3 hours, indicating that the present sample is skewed toward longer-period, higher-luminosity objects. Seven of the objects have spectra resembling dwarf novae, but have apparently never been observed in outburst, suggesting that many cataclysmics with relatively low variability amplitude remain to be discovered. Some of the objects are notable. SDSS J07568+0858 and SDSS J08129+1911 were previously known to have deep eclipses; in addition to spectroscopy, we use archival data from the CRTTS to refine their periods. We give a parallax-based...

  18. Detection of accretion X-rays from QS Vir: cataclysmic or a lot of hot air?

    CERN Document Server

    Matranga, Marco; Kashyap, Vinay; Steeghs, Danny

    2012-01-01

    An XMM-Newton observation of the nearby "pre-cataclysmic" short-period (P_orb = 3.62 hr) binary QS Vir (EC 13471-1258) revealed regular narrow X-ray eclipses when the white dwarf passed behind its M2-4 dwarf companion. The X-ray emission provides a clear signature of mass transfer and accretion onto the white dwarf. The low-resolution XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are consistent with a cooling flow model and indicate an accretion rate of Mdot= 1.7\\times10^-13M\\odot/yr. At 48 pc distant, QS Vir is then the second nearest accreting cataclysmic variable known, with one of the lowest accretion rates found to date for a non-magnetic system. To feed this accretion through a wind would require a wind mass loss rate of Mdot ~ 2 \\times 10^-12M\\odot/yr if the accretion efficiency is of the order of 10%. Consideration of likely mass loss rates for M dwarfs suggests this is improbably high and pure wind accretion unlikely. A lack of accretion disk signatures also presents some difficulties for direct Roche lobe overflow. We sp...

  19. Emission line tomography of the short period cataclysmic variables CC Scl and V2051 Oph

    CERN Document Server

    Longa-Peña, P; Marsh, T

    2014-01-01

    We present time-series spectroscopy of two short period cataclysmic variables, CC Scl and V2051 Oph, to test the efficiency of Doppler tomography-based methods in constraining orbital parameters of evolved cataclysmic variables. We find that the Ca~II triplet lines offer superior diagnostics, revealing emission components from the mass donors and sharp images of the accretion discs. Furthermore, we use Monte-Carlo methods to estimate the uncertainties from ensembles of Doppler maps. We compare our new methods against traditional radial velocity methods and show that they offer a valid route towards system parameter determination. Our analysis of CC Scl suggests a low mass ratio of $q=0.08\\pm0.03$ with a primary velocity of $K_1=37\\pm14$ km/s. This mass ratio is in between the pre- and post-period minimum status, however our $K_1$ solution favours a post-period minimum system. Our derived parameters for V2051 Oph ($q= 0.16\\pm 0.03$, $K_1=97\\pm10$ km/s) are in agreement with the eclipse solution ($q=0.19\\pm0.03...

  20. Spectral eclipse mapping of the accretion disk in the nova-like variable UX Ursae Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, R. G. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Horne, K.; Kuulkers, E.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze narrow-band eclipse light curves of the nova-like cataclysmic variable UX UMa, obtained from low-resolution spectra spanning lambda lambda 3600-9800 A . The light curves for narrow bands in the continuum as well as those for individual spectral lines are treated independently, and are used to construct images of the accretion disk's brightness distribution using the maximum-entropy eclipse-mapping technique. Particular attention is paid to the propagation of statistical uncertainties in the data and to how the analysis may introduce systematic errors in the final result. From the many narrrow band images we have reconstructed the spectra from isolated parts of the accretion disk. These spectra reveal that the inner disk radiates a continuum spectrum which peaks in the near UV and has the hydrogen Balmer lines in absorption (with the exception of H-alpha), whereas the outer disk is much fainter, has a much redder spectrum, and has Balmer emission lines. Our analysis reveals the presence of an uneclipsed component of the total light, whose spectrum is very red and has Balmer lines in emission. This unexpected feature of the eclipse mapping technique offers a new tool for an independent assessment of the secondary star's spectrum in eclipsing cataclysmic variables.

  1. Maven for Eclipse

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    If you want to learn about Maven and use it from within Eclipse to develop Java projects, this is the book for you. Prior experience in developing Java projects and using the Eclipse IDE is presumed. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced developer, this book will get you up and running quickly, with a hands-on approach.

  2. Mass transfer cycles in cataclysmic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A. R.; Frank, J.; Kolb, U.; Ritter, H.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that in cataclysmic variables the mass transfer rate must fluctuate about the evolutionary mean on timescales too long to be directly observable. We show that limit-cycle behavior can occur if the radius change of the secondary star is sensitive to the instantaneous mass transfer rate. The only reasonable way in which such a dependence can arise is through irradiation of this star by the accreting component. The system oscillates between high states, in which irradiation causes slow expansion of the secondary and drives an elevated transfer rate, and low states, in which this star contracts.

  3. Cataclysmic Variables: Eight Breakthroughs in Eight Years

    CERN Document Server

    Knigge, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The last few years have seen tremendous progress in our understanding of cataclysmic variable stars. As a result, we are finally developing a much clearer picture of their evolution as binary systems, the physics of the accretion processes powering them, and their relation to other compact accreting objects. In this review, I will highlight some of the most exciting recent breakthroughs. Several of these have opened up completely new avenues of research that will probably lead to additional major advances over the next decade.

  4. Nationwide Eclipse Ballooning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman Des Jardins, Angela; Berk Knighton, W.; Larimer, Randal; Mayer-Gawlik, Shane; Fowler, Jennifer; Harmon, Christina; Koehler, Christopher; Guzik, Gregory; Flaten, James; Nolby, Caitlin; Granger, Douglas; Stewart, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the Nationwide Eclipse Ballooning Project is to make the most of the 2017 rare eclipse event in four main areas: public engagement, workforce development, partnership development, and science. The Project is focused on two efforts, both student-led: online live video of the eclipse from the edge of space and the study of the atmospheric response to the eclipse. These efforts, however, involving more than 60 teams across the US, are challenging in many ways. Therefore, the Project is leveraging the NASA Space Grant and NOAA atmospheric science communities to make it a success. The first and primary topic of this poster is the NASA Space Grant supported online live video effort. College and high school students on 48 teams from 31 states will conduct high altitude balloon flights from 15-20 locations across the 8/21/2017 total eclipse path, sending live video and images from near space to a national website. Video and images of a total solar eclipse from near space are fascinating and rare. It’s never been done live and certainly not in a network of coverage across a continent. In addition to the live video to the web, these teams are engaged in several other science experiments as secondary payloads. We also briefly highlight the eclipse atmospheric science effort, where about a dozen teams will launch over one hundred radiosondes from across the 2017 path, recording an unprecedented atmospheric data sample. Collected data will include temperature, density, wind, humidity, and ozone measurements.

  5. CXOGBS J174954.5-294335: a new deeply eclipsing intermediate polar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher B.; Torres, M. A. P.; Hynes, R. I.; Jonker, P. G.; Heinke, C.; Maccarone, T.; Britt, C. T.; Steeghs, D.; Wevers, T.; Wu, J.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of a photometric and spectroscopic analysis of the Galactic Bulge Survey X-ray source CXOGBS J174954.5-294335 (hereafter, referred to as CX19). CX19 is a long period, eclipsing intermediate polar-type cataclysmic variable with broad, single-peaked Balmer and Paschen emission lines along with He II λ4686 and Bowen blend emission features. With coverage of one full and two partial eclipses and archival photometry, we determine the ephemeris for CX19 to be HJD(eclipse) = 2455691.8581(5) + 0.358704(2) × N. We also recovered the white dwarf spin period of Pspin = 503.32(3) s that gives a Pspin/Porb = 0.016(6), comparable to several confirmed, long-period intermediate polars. CX19 also shows a clear X-ray eclipse in the 0.3-8.0 keV range observed with Chandra. Two optical outbursts were observed lasting between 6 and 8 h (lower limits) reaching ∼1.3 mag in amplitude. The outbursts, both in duration and magnitude, the accretion disc-dominated spectra and hard X-ray emission are reminiscent of the intermediate polar V1223 Sgr sharing many of the same characteristics. If we assume a main-sequence companion, we estimate the donor to be an early G-type star and find a minimum distance of d ≈ 2.1 kpc and a 0.5-10.0 keV X-ray luminosity upper limit of 2.0 × 1033 erg s-1. Such an X-ray luminosity is consistent with a white dwarf accretor in a magnetic cataclysmic variable system. To date, CX19 is only the second deeply eclipsing intermediate polar with X-ray eclipses and the first that is optically accessible.

  6. Faint Dwarfs in Nearby Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Speller, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to $\\Delta m_r \\equiv ({m}_{r,\\, {\\rm sat}} -\\, {m}_{r,\\, {\\rm main}}) \\sim 6$-$8$, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs, and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down...

  7. Doppler Tomography and Photometry of the Cataclysmic Variable 1RXS J064434.5+334451

    CERN Document Server

    Santisteban, J V Hernández; Michel, R; Costero, R

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations of the cataclysmic variable 1RXS J064434.5+334451. We have calibrated the spectra for slit losses using the simultaneous photometry allowing to construct reliable Doppler images from H$\\alpha$ and HeII 4686 emission lines. We have improved the ephemeris of the object based on new photometric eclipse timings, obtaining $HJD = 2453403.759533 + 0.26937446E$. Some eclipses present a clear internal structure which we attribute to a central HeII emission region surrounding the white dwarf, a finding supported by the Doppler tomography. This indicates that the system has a large inclination angle $i=78 \\pm 2^{\\circ}$. We have also analysed the radial velocity curve from the emission lines to measure its semi--amplitude, $K_1$, from H$\\alpha$ and HeII 4686 and derive the masses of the components: $M_1=0.82\\pm0.06$ M$_{\\odot}$, $M_2=0.78\\pm0.04$ M$_{\\odot}$ and their separation $a=2.01\\pm0.06$ $R_{\\odot}$. The Doppler tomography and other observe...

  8. The faint young Sun problem

    CERN Document Server

    Feulner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    For more than four decades, scientists have been trying to find an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in paleoclimatology, the `faint young Sun problem'. For the early Earth, models of stellar evolution predict a solar energy input to the climate system which is about 25% lower than today. This would result in a completely frozen world over the first two billion years in the history of our planet, if all other parameters controlling Earth's climate had been the same. Yet there is ample evidence for the presence of liquid surface water and even life in the Archean (3.8 to 2.5 billion years before present), so some effect (or effects) must have been compensating for the faint young Sun. A wide range of possible solutions have been suggested and explored during the last four decades, with most studies focusing on higher concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, methane or ammonia. All of these solutions present considerable difficulties, however, so the faint young Sun prob...

  9. Atmospheric changes from solar eclipses

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, Karen; Gray, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atmospheric changes associated with 44 solar eclipses, beginning with the first quantitative results available, from 1834 (earlier qualitative, accounts also exist). Eclipse meteorology attracted relatively few publications until the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980, with the 11 August 1999 eclipse producing the most papers. Eclipses passing over populated areas such as Europe, China and India now regularly attract scientific attention, whereas atmospheric measurements of eclipses at remote locations remain rare. Many measurements and models have been used to exploit the uniquely predictable solar forcing provided by an eclipse. In this paper we compile the available publications and review a sub-set of them chosen on the basis of importance and novelty. Beyond the obvious reduction in incoming solar radiation, atmospheric cooling from eclipses can induce dynamical changes. Observations and meteorological modelling provide evidence for the generation of a local eclipse circulation ...

  10. On the ephemeris of the eclipsing polar HU Aquarii

    CERN Document Server

    Schwope, A D

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic cataclysmic variable HU Aquarii displayed pronounced quasi-periodic modulations of its eclipse timing. These were interpreted in terms of the light-travel time (LTT) effect caused by a circumbinary planet or planetary system. We report new photometric observations that revealed another precise eclipse timing for the October 2013 epoch, the first obtained in a high accretion state after many years in low or intermediate states. The eclipse was observed to occur earlier by 95.3 +- 2.0 s or 62.8 +- 2.0 s than expected for an assumed linear or quadratic ephemeris, respectively. The implied apparent strong evolution of the orbital period calls for a revision of the current planetary model or the planetary parameters. The object deserves further monitoring to uncover the true nature of the observed variability and to constrain the properties of the proposed planet or planetary system. The new observations prove that advanced amateur equipment can successfully be used in the growing field of planet sear...

  11. Atmospheric changes from solar eclipses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, K L; Scott, C J; Gray, S L

    2016-09-28

    This article reviews atmospheric changes associated with 44 solar eclipses, beginning with the first quantitative results available, from 1834 (earlier qualitative accounts also exist). Eclipse meteorology attracted relatively few publications until the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980, with the 11 August 1999 eclipse producing the most papers. Eclipses passing over populated areas such as Europe, China and India now regularly attract scientific attention, whereas atmospheric measurements of eclipses at remote locations remain rare. Many measurements and models have been used to exploit the uniquely predictable solar forcing provided by an eclipse. In this paper, we compile the available publications and review a subset of them chosen on the basis of importance and novelty. Beyond the obvious reduction in incoming solar radiation, atmospheric cooling from eclipses can induce dynamical changes. Observations and meteorological modelling provide evidence for the generation of a local eclipse circulation that may be the origin of the 'eclipse wind'. Gravity waves set up by the eclipse can, in principle, be detected as atmospheric pressure fluctuations, though theoretical predictions are limited, and many of the data are inconclusive. Eclipse events providing important early insights into the ionization of the upper atmosphere are also briefly reviewed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  12. Novalike Cataclysmic Variables in the Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Hoard, D W; Howell, Steve B; Wachter, Stefanie; Brinkworth, Carolyn S; Knigge, Christian; Drew, J E; Szkody, Paula; Kafka, S; Belle, Kunegunda; Ciardi, David R; Froning, Cynthia S; van Belle, Gerard T; Pretorius, M L

    2014-01-01

    Novalike cataclysmic variables have persistently high mass transfer rates and prominent steady state accretion disks. We present an analysis of infrared observations of twelve novalikes obtained from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All Sky Survey. The presence of an infrared excess at >3-5 microns over the expectation of a theoretical steady state accretion disk is ubiquitous in our sample. The strength of the infrared excess is not correlated with orbital period, but shows a statistically significant correlation (but shallow trend) with system inclination that might be partially (but not completely) linked to the increasing view of the cooler outer accretion disk and disk rim at higher inclinations. We discuss the possible origin of the infrared excess in terms of emission from bremsstrahlung or circumbinary dust, with either mechanism facilitated by the mass outflows (e.g., disk wind/corona, accretion stream overflow, and so on) present...

  13. Accretion and Outflow in Interacting Binary Systems FUSE Observations of the Novalike Cataclysmic Variable, UX Ursae Majoris

    CERN Document Server

    Froning, C S; Knigge, C

    2003-01-01

    We present far-ultraviolet (905 -- 1182 A), time-series spectroscopy of the eclipsing, novalike cataclysmic variable, UX UMa, acquired with FUSE. The time-averaged spectrum is complex and is dominated by overlapping spectral features. The most prominent features are emission lines of CIII, NIII}, NIV, and OVI. They are broad (FWHM >= 1800 km/s) and double-peaked with a central absorption at zero velocity. During eclipse, the spectrum is simpler: the emission lines remain bright, but the absorption components of the lines and the weaker features between the emission lines disappear entirely, leaving a flat continuum. This behavior is also evident in GHRS (1149 -- 1660 A) spectra that we retrieved from the HST archive. The FUV spectra show flickering on time scales of several minutes. The flickering is seen primarily in the continuum and/or the weaker lines rather than in the prominent emission lines. The orbital light curve has a dip in the FUV flux between orbital phases 0.45 -- 0.65, similar to a pre-eclipse...

  14. Counting pairs of faint galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, D; Richer, H B; Woods, David; Fahlman, Gregory G; Richer, Harvey B

    1995-01-01

    The number of close pairs of galaxies observed to faint magnitude limits, when compared to nearby samples, determines the interaction or merger rate as a function of redshift. The prevalence of mergers at intermediate redshifts is fundamental to understanding how galaxies evolve and the relative population of galaxy types. Mergers have been used to explain the excess of galaxies in faint blue counts above the numbers expected from no-evolution models. Using deep CFHT (I\\leq24) imaging of a ``blank'' field we find a pair fraction which is consistent with the galaxies in our sample being randomly distributed with no significant excess of ``physical'' close pairs. This is contrary to the pair fraction of 34\\%\\pm9\\% found by Burkey {\\it et al.} for similar magnitude limits and using an identical approach to the pair analysis. Various reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Colors and morphologies of our close pairs are consistent with the bulk of them being random superpositions although, as indicators of int...

  15. Eclipses and the Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

    2000-12-01

    Like returns of Halley's comet the Olympic games occur periodically, though not as regularly in antiquity. Dates were also imprecise due to the chaotic calendars in use. Reported sightings of comets and eclipses can be used with game dates to help fix ancient events. However some reported darkening of the sun, e.g., after Julius Caesar's murder in 44 BC, was due to volcanic eruptions. A red comet, visible in daylight, first appeared during the games that year. It was also seen from China and Korea (Pang, Sciences 31, 30). Phlegon's ``Olympiads" (2nd century) says that Christ's crucifixion was in the 4th year of the 202nd Olympiad (AD 29-33), when a total solar eclipse occurred in the 6th hour. Only the Nov. 24, AD 29 eclipse over Asia Minor can match that, and Joel's prophecy (Acts 2, 14-21) that ``the sun will be turned to darkness and moon to blood." However it conflicts with ``the first day of Passover," as recorded by Mathew, Mark and Luke, i.e., full moon in early spring. Humphreys and Waddington (Nature 306, 743) have suggested meteorological darkening and the April 3, AD 33 lunar eclipse instead. Schaefer has questioned the eclipse's visibility from Jerusalem (31.46N, 35.14E). The six computations he cited gave dissimilar answers due to the imprecise rates of the secular lunar acceleration, and lengthening of the day used (Q.Jl.R.astr.Soc. 31, 53). Lunar laser ranging has since fixed the former at -26"/cen2. Analysis of ancient Chinese solar eclipse records, e.g., the April 21, 899 BC and April 4, AD 368 ``double dawns" over Zheng, has given us a delta T (in sec) = 30t2, where t is centuries before 1800 (Pang, Yau and Chou, in ``Dynamics of Ice Age Earth: A Modern Perspective," 1998). Our computations show that the moon rose over Jerusalem, with 1/3 still in the umbra and the rest in penumbra. Holdover meteorological darkening with long absorption air mass could have help reddened the moon also. Finally the first ``eclipse season" (the Aug. 21 lunar, and

  16. Eclipse A Brief Introduction of 2008 Solar Eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 solar total eclipse starts from North of Canada,passes through Greenland,Arctic,Novosibirsk and North of China.This is the first solar total eclipse in China in the 21st centary.Date and time:August 1,2008,11:00 UT Eclipse site in China:Altay,Hami (Xinjiang),Jiuquan,Lanzhou (Gansu), Xi’an(Shanxi)

  17. Eclipsing Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C C

    2004-01-01

    The first eclipsing binary pulsar, PSR B1957+20, was discovered in 1987. Since then, 13 other eclipsing low-mass binary pulsars have been found, 12 of these are in globular clusters. In this paper we list the known eclipsing binary pulsars and their properties, with special attention to the eclipsing systems in 47 Tuc. We find that there are two fundamentally different groups of eclipsing binary pulsars; separated by their companion masses. The less massive systems (M_c ~ 0.02 M_sun) are a product of predictable stellar evolution in binary pulsars. The systems with more massive companions (M_c ~ 0.2 M_sun) were formed by exchange encounters in globular clusters, and for that reason are exclusive to those environments. This class of systems can be used to learn about the neutron star recycling fraction in the globular clusters actively forming pulsars. We suggest that most of these binary systems are undetectable at radio wavelengths.

  18. SPECTRAL ECLIPSE TIMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian [Department of Physics, NYU Abu Dhabi P.O. Box 129188 Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 (United States); Deming, Drake [NASA Astrobiology Institute Virtual Planet Laboratory (United States)

    2015-12-10

    We utilize multi-dimensional simulations of varying equatorial jet strength to predict wavelength-dependent variations in the eclipse times of gas-giant planets. A displaced hot spot introduces an asymmetry in the secondary eclipse light curve that manifests itself as a measured offset in the timing of the center of eclipse. A multi-wavelength observation of secondary eclipse, one probing the timing of barycentric eclipse at short wavelengths and another probing at longer wavelengths, will reveal the longitudinal displacement of the hot spot and break the degeneracy between this effect and that associated with the asymmetry due to an eccentric orbit. The effect of time offsets was first explored in the IRAC wavebands by Williams et al. Here we improve upon their methodology, extend to a broad range of wavelengths, and demonstrate our technique on a series of multi-dimensional radiative-hydrodynamical simulations of HD 209458b with varying equatorial jet strength and hot-spot displacement. Simulations with the largest hot-spot displacement result in timing offsets of up to 100 s in the infrared. Though we utilize a particular radiative hydrodynamical model to demonstrate this effect, the technique is model independent. This technique should allow a much larger survey of hot-spot displacements with the James Webb Space Telescope than currently accessible with time-intensive phase curves, hopefully shedding light on the physical mechanisms associated with thermal energy advection in irradiated gas giants.

  19. Eclipsing Binary Update, No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    Contents: 1. Wrong again! The elusive period of DHK 41. 2. Stars observed and not observed. 3. Eclipsing binary chart information. 4. Eclipsing binary news and notes. 5. A note on SS Arietis. 6. Featured star: TX Ursae Majoris.

  20. Eclipsing binaries in open clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southworth, John; Clausen, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August......Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August...

  1. SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITAL PERIODS FOR 29 CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorstensen, John R.; Taylor, Cynthia J.; Peters, Christopher S.; Skinner, Julie N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Dartmouth College Hanover, NH 03755-3528 (United States); Southworth, John [Astrophysics Group Keele University Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Gänsicke, Boris T. [Department of Physics University of Warwick Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    We report follow-up spectroscopy of 29 cataclysmic variables from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), 22 of which were discovered by SDSS and seven of which are previously known systems that were recovered in SDSS. The periods for 16 of these objects were included in the tabulation by Gänsicke et al. While most of the systems have periods less than 2 hr, only one has a period in the 80–86 minutes “spike” found by Gänsicke et al., and 11 have periods longer than 3 hr, indicating that the present sample is skewed toward longer-period, higher-luminosity objects. Seven of the objects have spectra resembling dwarf novae, but have apparently never been observed in outburst, suggesting that many cataclysmics with relatively low variability amplitude remain to be discovered. Some of the objects are notable. SDSS J07568+0858 and SDSS J08129+1911 were previously known to have deep eclipses; in addition to spectroscopy, we use archival data from the Catalina Real Time Transient Survey to refine their periods. We give a parallax-based distance of 195 (+54, −39) pc for LV Cnc (SDSS J09197+0857), which at P{sub orb} = 81 m has the shortest orbital period in our sample. SDSS J08091+3814 shows both the spectroscopic phase offset and phase-dependent absorption found in SW Sextantis stars. The average spectra of SDSS J08055+0720 and SDSS J16191+1351 show contributions from K-type secondaries, and SDSS J080440+0239 shows a contribution from an early M star. We use these to constrain the distances. SDSS J09459+2922 has characteristics typical of a magnetic system. SDSS11324+6249 may be a novalike variable, and if so, its orbital period (99 minutes) is unusually short for that subclass.

  2. Short-period cataclysmic variables at Observatorio Astronomico Nacional IA UNAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharikov, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present results of time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of faint (∼17-19 mag) Cataclysmic Variable stars with periods around the minimum orbital period (∼80 min). In this work we concentrated to our results of study of CVs systems which have evolved beyond the period minimum (so-called bounce-back systems). Using various instruments attached to 2.1m, 1.5m and 0.84m telescopes of OAN SPM of IA UNAM we explored conditions and structure of accretion disks in those short-period Cataclysmic Variables. We showed that the accretion disk in a system with an extremely low mass ratio (≤0.05) grows in the size reaching 2:1 resonance radius and is relatively cool. The disk in such systems also becomes largely optically thin in the continuum, contributing to the total flux less than the stellar components of the system. In contrast, the viscosity and the temperature in spiral arms formed at the outer edge of the disk are higher and their contribution in continuum plays an increasingly important role. We model such disks and generate light curves which successfully simulate the observed double-humped light curves in the quiescence. Thanks to support of our programs by the Time Allocation Commission of OAN SPM, the perfect astroclimate in the observatory, and the phase-locked method of spectroscopic observations, the significant progress in the study of bounce-back systems using a small size telescope was reached.

  3. Totality eclipses of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Littmann, Mark; Willcox, Ken

    2008-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. - ;A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is the best guide and reference book on solar eclipses ever written. It explains: how to observe them; how to photograph and videotape them; why they occur; their history and mythology; and future eclipses - when and where to see them. Totality also tells the remarkable story of how eclipses shocked scientists, revealed the workings of the Sun, and made Einstein famous. And the book shares the experiences and advice of many veteran eclipse observers. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is profusely ill...

  4. High-resolution imaging of the Pluto-Charon system with the Faint Object Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Adorf, H.-M.; Corrain, G.; Gemmo, A.; Greenfield, P.; Hainaut, O.; Hook, R. N.; Tholen, D. J.; Blades, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Images of the Pluto-Charon system were obtained with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) after the refurbishment of the telescope. The images are of superb quality, allowing the determination of radii, fluxes, and albedos. Attempts were made to improve the resolution of the already diffraction limited images by image restoration. These yielded indications of surface albedo distributions qualitatively consistent with models derived from observations of Pluto-Charon mutual eclipses.

  5. Revisiting the proposed planetary system orbiting the eclipsing polar HU Aquarii

    CERN Document Server

    Wittenmyer, Robert A; Marshall, J P; Butters, O W; Tinney, C G

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been proposed, on the basis of eclipse-timing data, that the eclipsing polar cataclysmic variable HU Aquarii is host to at least two giant planets. However, that result has been called into question based upon the dynamical stability of the proposed planets. In this work, we present a detailed re-analysis of all eclipse timing data available for the HU Aquarii system, making use of standard techniques used to fit orbits to radial-velocity data. We find that the eclipse timings can be used to obtain a two-planet solution that does not require the presence of additional bodies within the system. We then perform a highly detailed dynamical analysis of the proposed planetary system. We show that the improved orbital parameters we have derived correspond to planets that are dynamically unstable on unfeasibly short timescales (of order 10^4 years or less). Given these results, we discuss briefly how the observed signal might in fact be the result of the intrinsic properties of the eclipsing polar, r...

  6. Spectrally resolved eclipse maps of the accretion disk in UX Ursae Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Rene G. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Horne, Keith; Kuulkers, E.; Van Paradijs, J.

    1993-01-01

    An effort is made to observationally constrain accretion disks on the basis of light curves from the eclipsing cataclysmic variable UX Ursae Majoris, reconstructing the spectral energy distribution across the face of an accretion disk. The spectral resolution obtained suffices to reveal not only the radial dependence of absorption and emission line features within the disk, but also the spectral details of the bright spot that is formed where the accretion stream from the secondary star collides with the disk. The importance of such constraints for theoretical models is noted.

  7. Globular Clusters for Faint Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    The origin of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) has posed a long-standing mystery for astronomers. New observations of several of these faint giants with the Hubble Space Telescope are now lending support to one theory.Faint-Galaxy MysteryHubble images of Dragonfly 44 (top) and DFX1 (bottom). The right panels show the data with greater contrast and extended objects masked. [van Dokkum et al. 2017]UDGs large, extremely faint spheroidal objects were first discovered in the Virgo galaxy cluster roughly three decades ago. Modern telescope capabilities have resulted in many more discoveries of similar faint galaxies in recent years, suggesting that they are a much more common phenomenon than we originally thought.Despite the many observations, UDGs still pose a number of unanswered questions. Chief among them: what are UDGs? Why are these objects the size of normal galaxies, yet so dim? There are two primary models that explain UDGs:UDGs were originally small galaxies, hence their low luminosity. Tidal interactions then puffed them up to the large size we observe today.UDGs are effectively failed galaxies. They formed the same way as normal galaxies of their large size, but something truncated their star formation early, preventing them from gaining the brightness that we would expect for galaxies of their size.Now a team of scientists led by Pieter van Dokkum (Yale University) has made some intriguing observations with Hubble that lend weight to one of these models.Globulars observed in 16 Coma-cluster UDGs by Hubble. The top right panel shows the galaxy identifications. The top left panel shows the derived number of globular clusters in each galaxy. [van Dokkum et al. 2017]Globulars GaloreVan Dokkum and collaborators imaged two UDGs with Hubble: Dragonfly 44 and DFX1, both located in the Coma galaxy cluster. These faint galaxies are both smooth and elongated, with no obvious irregular features, spiral arms, star-forming regions, or other indications of tidal interactions

  8. A Trip to the Cataclysmic Binary Zoo: Detailed Follow-Up of 35 Recently-Discovered Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thorstensen, John R; Weil, Kathryn E

    2016-01-01

    We report follow-up studies of 35 recently-discovered cataclysmic variables (CVs), 32 of which were found in large, automated synoptic sky surveys. The objects were selected for observational tractability. For 34 of the objects we present mean spectra and spectroscopic orbital periods, and for one more we give an eclipse-based period. Thirty-two of the period determinations are new, and three of these refine published estimates based on superhump periods. The remaining three of our determinations confirm previously published periods. Twenty of the stars are confirmed or suspected dwarf novae with periods shorter than 3 hours, but we also find three apparent polars (AM Her stars), and six systems with P > 5 h, five of which have secondary stars visible in their spectra, from which we estimate distances when possible. The orbital period distribution of this sample is very similar to that of previously discovered CVs.

  9. History of the Terminal Cataclysm Concept: A Cataclysm That Never Happened?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.

    2014-11-01

    The “terminal cataclysm” (or “late heavy bombardment”) concept of the last 40 years exhibits curious epistemology, with changing definitions and inconsistent evidence.Pre-Apollo evidence showed that the impact rate prior to ~3.5 Ga ago averaged ~150x the post-mare rate [1]. In 1973-4, Tera et al. [2,3] introduced the term “terminal cataclysm,” widespread metamorphism ~3.9 Ga ago, possibly caused by the Imbrium impact [3, p.15], or more likely by “formation of several major basins [in a] short time interval (less than 0.2AE)” [3, p.18]. In 1990, Ryder [4] reported a strong spike in ages for Apollo impact melt rocks ~3.8-4.0 Ga ago, and proposed this as proof that a Moon-wide cataclysmic bombardment occurred at that time, with no earlier cratering. Three inconsistencies soon appeared. (1) In 2002, Cohen et al. [5, also 2002 & 2005] dated lunar meteorite clasts (aiming at non-Apollo lunar regions) and found no spike or anomaly at 3.9 Ga. (Yet they inferred “support for the lunar cataclysm hypothesis.”) (2) The Nice model in early 2000s predicted many planetesimals scattered from the outer to the inner Solar System [6], with a plausible (unconstrained) date of 3.9 Ga - but asteroidal meteorite impact melt clasts (like lunar meteorites) show no spike at 3.9. (3) Meanwhile, reports of pre-4.0 impact melts have increased among upland breccia clasts. Nice and Grand Tack modelers have introduced “sawteeth” spikes before 4.0 and gradual declines after 3.8 (both had been proposed earlier), thus softening the “cataclysm” spike. A 2014 model by Marchi, Bottke, Morbidelli, Kring, et al. [7] illustrates a curve of impact flux vs. time, 4.4 to 3.5 Ga, showing no spike at 3.9 Ga - signaling a possible demise of the terminal cataclysm hypothesis. [1] Hartmann W.K. 1966. Icarus 5, 406-418[2] Tera F. et al. 1973. LPSC abstract, p. 723[3] Tera F. et al. 1974. EPSK 22, 1-21[4] Ryder G. 1990. EOS 71, 313[5] Cohen B., Swindle T., Kring D. 2000. Science 290

  10. DETECTION OF ACCRETION X-RAYS FROM QS Vir: CATACLYSMIC OR A LOT OF HOT AIR?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matranga, Marco; Drake, Jeremy J.; Kashyap, Vinay [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Steeghs, Danny, E-mail: mmatranga@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-10

    An XMM-Newton observation of the nearby 'pre-cataclysmic' short-period (P{sub orb} = 3.62 hr) binary QS Vir (EC 13471-1258) revealed regular narrow X-ray eclipses when the white dwarf passed behind its M2-4 dwarf companion. The X-ray emission provides a clear signature of mass transfer and accretion onto the white dwarf. The low-resolution XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are consistent with a cooling flow model and indicate an accretion rate of M-dot = 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. At 48 pc distant, QS Vir is then the second nearest accreting cataclysmic variable known, with one of the lowest accretion rates found to date for a non-magnetic system. To feed this accretion through a wind would require a wind mass-loss rate of M-dot {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} if the accretion efficiency is of the order of 10%. Consideration of likely mass-loss rates for M dwarfs suggests this is improbably high and pure wind accretion unlikely. A lack of accretion disk signatures also presents some difficulties for direct Roche lobe overflow. We speculate that QS Vir is on the verge of Roche lobe overflow, and that the observed mass transfer could be supplemented by upward chromospheric flows on the M dwarf, analogous to spicules and mottles on the Sun, that escape the Roche surface to be subsequently swept up into the white dwarf Roche lobe. If so, QS Vir would be in a rare evolutionary phase lasting only a million years. The X-ray luminosity of the M dwarf estimated during primary eclipse is L{sub X} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} erg s{sup -1}, which is consistent with that of rapidly rotating 'saturated' K and M dwarfs.

  11. A Far-Ultraviolet Survey of 47 Tucanae.II The Long-Period Cataclysmic Variable AKO 9

    CERN Document Server

    Knigge, C; Shara, M M; Long, K S; Gilliland, R L; Knigge, Christian; Zurek, David. R.; Shara, Michael M.; Long, Knox S.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We present time-resolved, far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectroscopy and photometry of the 1.1 day eclipsing binary system AKO 9 in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. AKO 9's FUV spectrum is blue and exhibits prominent C IV and He II emission lines. The spectrum broadly resembles that of long-period, cataclysmic variables in the galactic field. Combining our time-resolved FUV data with archival optical photometry of 47 Tuc, we refine AKO 9's orbital period and define an accurate ephemeris for the system. We also place constraints on several other system parameters, using a variety of observational constraints. We find that all of the empirical evidence is consistent with AKO 9 being a long-period dwarf nova in which mass transfer is driven by the nuclear expansion of a sub-giant donor star. We therefore conclude that AKO 9 is the first spectroscopically confirmed cataclysmic variable in 47 Tuc. We also briefly consider AKO 9's likely formation and ultimate evolution. Regarding the former, we find that the system was al...

  12. 1927: a British eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, R. A.

    1999-06-01

    The total solar eclipse of 1927 June 29 was the first to be seen over the British mainland for 203 years. It caused nationwide excitement, induced mass population movement to the towns, villages, moorlands and offshore waters of Wales and the north of England, and severely tested the country's transport and communication systems.

  13. Nature of eclipsing pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Khechinashvili, D; Gil, J; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Gil, Janusz

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for pulsar radio eclipses in some binary systems, and test this model for PSRs B1957+20 and J2051-0827. We suggest that in these binaries the companion stars are degenerate dwarfs with strong surface magnetic fields. The magnetospheres of these stars are permanently infused by the relativistic particles of the pulsar wind. We argue that the radio waves emitted by the pulsar split into the eigenmodes of the electron-positron plasma as they enter the companion's magnetosphere and are then strongly damped due to cyclotron resonance with the ambient plasma particles. Our model explains in a natural way the anomalous duration and behavior of radio eclipses observed in such systems. In particular, it provides stable, continuous, and frequency-dependent eclipses, in agreement with the observations. We predict a significant variation of linear polarization both at eclipse ingress and egress. In this paper we also suggest several possible mechanisms of generation of the optical and $X$-ray emission ...

  14. Genetic Algoritm Eclipse Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevin, A. V.

    In this paper we analyse capabilities of eclipse mapping technique, based on genetic algorithm optimization. To model of accretion disk we used the "fire-flies" conception. This model allows us to reconstruct the distribution of radiating medium in the disk using less number of free parameters than in other methods. Test models show that we can achieve good approximation without optimizing techniques.

  15. Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Bachmann, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout (PEPC) is a program written to leverage parallelism and to automate the checkout process of plug-ins created in Eclipse RCP (Rich Client Platform). Eclipse plug-ins can be aggregated in a feature project. This innovation digests a feature description (xml file) and automatically checks out all of the plug-ins listed in the feature. This resolves the issue of manually checking out each plug-in required to work on the project. To minimize the amount of time necessary to checkout the plug-ins, this program makes the plug-in checkouts parallel. After parsing the feature, a request to checkout for each plug-in in the feature has been inserted. These requests are handled by a thread pool with a configurable number of threads. By checking out the plug-ins in parallel, the checkout process is streamlined before getting started on the project. For instance, projects that took 30 minutes to checkout now take less than 5 minutes. The effect is especially clear on a Mac, which has a network monitor displaying the bandwidth use. When running the client from a developer s home, the checkout process now saturates the bandwidth in order to get all the plug-ins checked out as fast as possible. For comparison, a checkout process that ranged from 8-200 Kbps from a developer s home is now able to saturate a pipe of 1.3 Mbps, resulting in significantly faster checkouts. Eclipse IDE (integrated development environment) tries to build a project as soon as it is downloaded. As part of another optimization, this innovation programmatically tells Eclipse to stop building while checkouts are happening, which dramatically reduces lock contention and enables plug-ins to continue downloading until all of them finish. Furthermore, the software re-enables automatic building, and forces Eclipse to do a clean build once it finishes checking out all of the plug-ins. This software is fully generic and does not contain any NASA-specific code. It can be applied to any

  16. Spectroscopy of Nine Cataclysmic Variable Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sheets, H A; Peters, C J; Kapusta, A B; Taylor, C J

    2007-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of nine cataclysmic binary stars, mostly dwarf novae, obtained primarily to determine orbital periods Porb. The stars and their periods are LX And, 0.1509743(5) d; CZ Aql, 0.2005(6) d; LU Cam, 0.1499686(4) d; GZ Cnc, 0.0881(4) d; V632 Cyg, 0.06377(8) d; V1006 Cyg, 0.09903(9) d; BF Eri, 0.2708804(4) d; BI Ori, 0.1915(5) d; and FO Per, for which Porb is either 0.1467(4) or 0.1719(5) d. Several of the stars proved to be especially interesting. In BF Eri, we detect the absorption spectrum of a secondary star of spectral type K3 +- 1 subclass, which leads to a distance estimate of approximately 1 kpc. However, BF Eri has a large proper motion (100 mas/yr), and we have a preliminary parallax measurement that confirms the large proper motion and yields only an upper limit for the parallax. BF Eri's space velocity is evidently large, and it appears to belong to the halo population. In CZ Aql, the emission lines have strong wings that move with large velocity amplitude, suggesting a mag...

  17. Novalike Cataclysmic Variables are Significant Radio Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Deanne L; Miller-Jones, James C A; Rupen, Michael P; Knigge, Christian; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Groot, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Radio emission from non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs, accreting white dwarfs) could allow detailed studies of outflows and possibly accretion flows in these nearby, numerous and non-relativistic compact accretors. Up to now, however, very few CVs have been detected in the radio. We have conducted a VLA pilot survey of four close and optically-bright novalike CVs at 6 GHz, detecting three, and thereby doubling the number of radio detections of these systems. RW Sex, V603 Aql and the old nova TT Ari were detected in both of the epochs, while V1084 Her was not detected (to a $3\\sigma$ upper-limit of 7.8 $\\mu\\rm{Jy}\\,\\rm{beam}^{-1}$). These observations clearly show that the sensitivity of previous surveys was typically too low to detect these objects and that non-magnetic CVs can indeed be significant radio emitters. The three detected sources show a range of properties, including flaring and variability on both short ($\\sim$200 s) and longer-term (days) time-scales, as well as circular polarization level...

  18. Searching for nova shells around cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Sahman, D I; Knigge, C; Marsh, T R

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a search for nova shells around 101 cataclysmic variables (CVs), using Halpha images taken with the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric Halpha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS). Both telescopes are located on La Palma. We concentrated our WHT search on nova-like variables, whilst our IPHAS search covered all CVs in the IPHAS footprint. We found one shell out of the 24 nova-like variables we examined. The newly discovered shell is around V1315 Aql and has a radius of approx.2.5 arcmin, indicative of a nova eruption approximately 120 years ago. This result is consistent with the idea that the high mass-transfer rate exhibited by nova-like variables is due to enhanced irradiation of the secondary by the hot white dwarf following a recent nova eruption. The implications of our observations for the lifetime of the nova-like variable phase are discussed. We also examined 4 asynchronous polars, but found no new shells around an...

  19. White dwarf masses in cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnen, T P G; Schreiber, M R

    2015-01-01

    The white dwarf (WD) mass distribution of cataclysmic variables (CVs) has recently been found to dramatically disagree with the predictions of the standard CV formation model. The high mean WD mass among CVs is not imprinted in the currently observed sample of CV progenitors and cannot be attributed to selection effects. Two possibilities have been put forward: either the WD grows in mass during CV evolution, or in a significant fraction of cases, CV formation is preceded by a (short) phase of thermal time-scale mass transfer (TTMT) in which the WD gains a sufficient amount of mass. We investigate if either of these two scenarios can bring theoretical predictions and observations into agreement. We employed binary population synthesis models to simulate the present intrinsic CV population. We incorporated aspects specific to CV evolution such as an appropriate mass-radius relation of the donor star and a more detailed prescription for the critical mass ratio for dynamically unstable mass transfer. We also imp...

  20. Eclipse of epsilon Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2009-07-01

    The bright, long-period, eclipsing binary star epsilon Aurigae is predicted to begin its next eclipse late July or early August of 2009. Epsilon Aurigae is now past solar conjunction and has reappeared as a morning object. All observers -- both visual and instrumental -- are encouraged to contribute observations of the eclipse during the next two years, beginning immediately for morning observers. Observations are urgently requested right now because it is less likely to be observed in the morning, and the eclipse will begin within the next month. The AAVSO is participating in a global campaign to record this eclipse as part of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 celebrations, organized by the Citizen Sky project (http://www.citizensky.org). For experienced visual observers, please observe this star on a weekly basis, using charts available via VSP from the AAVSO website. For novice visual observers, we recommend participating in this observing program by following the Citizen Sky 10-Star tutorial program, which provides a simple training experience in variable star observing. Photoelectric observers belonging to the AAVSO PEP-V program may submit data as usual via the WebObs feature of the AAVSO website Blue&Gold section. Photoelectric observers may also contribute reduced observations in all filters (including infrared J- and H-bands) directly to the AAVSO via WebObs. Observers using wide-field CCD and DSLR systems are also encouraged to participate; avoid saturating the star. For those with narrower-field systems (D Jeffrey Hopkins are co-leading the precision photometry efforts.

  1. Physical parameters and orbital period variation of a newly discovered cataclysmic variable GSC 4560–02157

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhong-Tao; Qian, Sheng-Bang; Voloshina, Irina; Metlov, Vladimir G.; Zhu, Li-Ying; Li, Lin-Jia

    2016-10-01

    GSC 4560–02157 is a new eclipsing cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 0.265359 days. By using the published V ‑ and R ‑ band data together with our observations, we discovered that the O ‑ C curve of GSC 4560–02157 may show a cyclic variation with a period of 3.51 years and an amplitude of 1.40 min. If this variation is caused by a light travel-time effect via the existence of a third body, then its mass can be derived as M 3 sin i' ≈ 91.08 M Jup, and it should be a low-mass star. In addition, several physical parameters were measured. The color of the secondary star was determined to be V ‑ R = 0.77(±0.03) which corresponds to a spectral type of K2–3. The secondary star's mass was estimated as M 2 = 0.73(±0.02) M ⊙ by combing the derived V ‑ R value around phase 0 with the assumption that it obeys the mass-luminosity relation for main sequence stars. This mass is consistent with the mass—period relation for CV donor stars. For the white dwarf, the eclipse durations and contacts of the white dwarf yield an upper limit on the white dwarf's radius corresponding to a lower limit on mass of M 1 ≈ 0.501 M ⊙. The overestimated radius and previously published spectral data indicate that the boundary layer may have a very high temperature.

  2. The Lunar Cataclysm and How LRO Can Help Test It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    One of the important outstanding goals of lunar science is understanding the bombardment history of the Moon and calibrating the impact flux curve for extrapolation to the Earth and other terrestrial planets. The "terminal lunar cataclysm," a brief but intense period of bombardment about 3.9 billion years ago, is of particular scientific interest. Radiometric dating of lunar impact-melt rocks forms the backbone of the lunar cataclysm hypothesis. A histogram of precise age determinations of impact-melt rocks shows the characteristics of the classic formulation of the lunar cataclysm hypothesis: a sharp peak at 3.9 Ga, a steep decline after 3.9 Ga perhaps only 20-200 Myr long, and few rocks of impact origin prior to 4.0 Ga.

  3. Hubble Deep Fever A faint galaxy diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, S P

    1998-01-01

    The longstanding faint blue galaxy problem is gradually subsiding as a result of technological advancement, most notably from high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging. In particular two categorical facts have recently been established, these are: 1) The excess faint blue galaxies are of irregular morphologies, and, 2) the majority of these irregulars occur at redshifts 1 2. Taking these facts together we favour a scenario where the faint blue excess is primarily due to the formation epoch of spiral systems via merging at redshifts 1 < z < 2. The final interpretation now awaits refinements in our understanding of the local galaxy population !

  4. An investigation of a magnetic cataclysmic variable with a period of 14.1 ks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Song; Zhang, Chuan-peng; Liu, Ji-feng

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) contain a white dwarf with magnetic field strong enough to control the accretion flow from a late type secondary. In this paper, we discover a magnetic CV (CXOGSG J215544.4+380116) from the $Chandra$ archive data. The X-ray light curves show a significant period of 14.1 ks, and the X-ray spectra can be described by a multi-temperature hot thermal plasma, suggesting the source as a magnetic CV. The broad dip in the X-ray light curve is due to the eclipse of the primary magnetic pole, and the additional dip in the bright phase of the soft and medium bands may be caused by the accretion stream crossing our line of sight to the primary pole. Follow-up optical spectra show features of an M2--M4 dwarf dominating the red band and a WD which is responsible for the weak upturn in the blue band. The mass ($\\sim$ 0.4 $M_{\\odot}$) and radius ($\\sim$ 0.4 $R_{\\odot}$) for the M dwarf are obtained using CV evolution models and empirical relations between the orbital period and the mass/r...

  5. Cajal on solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triarhou, Lazaros C; del Cerro, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An impression that sculpted a lasting memory on the mind of the great neuroanatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal, an 8-year-old boy at the time, was the total solar eclipse of 18 July 1860. This short article provides a translation of the relevant passage, found in a 1933 Buenos Aires schoolbook, and places the celestial event at the crossroads of neuroscience, astronomy and literature.

  6. Detection of X-ray periodicity from a new eclipsing polar candidate XGPS-I J183251-100106

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Hu, C P; Lin, L C C; Chou, Y

    2012-01-01

    We report the results from a detailed analysis of an archival XMM-Newton observation of the X-ray source XGPS-I J183251-100106, which has been suggested as a promising magnetic cataclysmic variable candidate based on its optical properties. A single periodic signal of 1.5 hrs is detected from all EPIC cameras on board XMM-Newton. The phase-averaged X-ray spectrum can be well-modeled with a thermal bremsstrahlung of a temperature kT~50 keV. Both X-ray spectral and temporal behavior of this system suggest it as a eclipsing cataclysmic variable of AM Herculis (or polar) type.

  7. The space density of cataclysmic variables: constraints from the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Pretorius, M L; O'Donoghue, D; Henry, J P; Gioia, I M; Mullis, C R

    2007-01-01

    We use the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey to construct a small, but purely X-ray flux-limited sample of cataclysmic variable stars (CVs). The sample includes only 4 systems, 2 of which (RX J1715.6+6856 and RX J1831.7+6511) are new discoveries. We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the new CVs and measure orbital periods of 1.64 \\pm 0.02 h and 4.01\\pm 0.03 h for RX 1715.6+6856 and RX J1831.7+6511, respectively. We also estimate distances for all the CVs in our sample, based mainly on their apparent brightness in the infrared. The space density of the CV population represented by our small sample is (1.1 +2.3/-0.7) 10^-5 pc^-3. We can also place upper limits on the space density of any sub-population of CVs too faint to be included in the NEP survey. In particular, we show that if the overall space density of CVs is as high as 2 10^-4 pc^-3 (as has been predicted theoretically), the vast majority of CVs must be fainter than L_X \\simeq 2 10^29 erg/s.

  8. Total eclipses of the sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirker, J B

    1980-12-19

    Total eclipses of the sun offer research opportunities in a variety of sciences. Some of the advances in solar physics resulting from eclipse observations are discussed. Experiments at the total eclipse of 16 February 1980 in India are also described. These included a test of general relativity, studies in coronal physics, investigations of solar prominences, diameter measurements, a search for interplanetary dust, a study of the gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere, and experiments on the biological effects on animals and humans.

  9. Solar Eclipses Observed from Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of the solar corona are still best observed during totality of solar eclipses, and other high-resolution observations of coronal active regions can be observed with radio telescopes by differentiation of occultation observations, as we did with the Jansky Very Large Array for the annular solar eclipse of 2012 May 20 in the US. Totality crossing Antarctica included the eclipse of 2003 November 23, and will next occur on 2021 December 4; annularity crossing Antarctica included the eclip...

  10. Total eclipses of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Zirker, Jack B

    2014-01-01

    Eclipses have captured attention and sparked curiosity about the cosmos since the first appearance of humankind. Having been blamed for everything from natural disasters to the fall of kings, they are now invaluable tools for understanding many celestial as well as terrestrial phenomena. This clear, easy-to-understand guide explains what causes total eclipses and how they can be used in experiments to examine everything from the dust between the planets to general relativity. A new chapter has been added on the eclipse of July 11, 1991 (the great Hawaiian eclipse). Originally published in 19

  11. Annular and Total Solar Eclipses of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, J.

    2008-01-01

    While most NASA eclipse bulletins cover a single eclipse, this publication presents predictions for two solar eclipses during 2010. This has required a different organization of the material into the following sections. Section 1 -- Eclipse Predictions: The section consists of a general discussion about the eclipse path maps, Besselian elements, shadow contacts, eclipse path tables, local circumstances tables, and the lunar limb profile. Section 2 -- Annular Solar Eclipse of 2010 Ja n 15: The section covers predictions and weather prospects for the annular eclipse. Section 3 -- Total Solar Eclipse of 2010 Jul 11: The se ction covers predictions and weather prospects for the total eclipse. Section 4 -- Observing Eclipses: The section provides information on eye safety, solar filters, eclipse photography, and making contact timings from the path limits. Section 5 -- Eclipse Resources: The final section contains a number of resources including information on the IAU Working Group on Eclipses, the Solar Eclipse Mailing List, the NASA eclipse bulletins on the Internet, Web sites for the two 2010 eclipses, and a summary identifying the algorithms, ephemerides, and paramete rs used in the eclipse predictions.

  12. Discovery of Fourier-dependent time lags in cataclysmic variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scaringi, S.; Körding, E.; Groot, P.J.; Uttley, P.; Marsh, T.; Knigge, C.; Maccarone, T.; Dhillon, V.S.

    2013-01-01

    We report the first study of Fourier-frequency-dependent coherence and phase/time lags at optical wavelengths of cataclysmic variables (MV Lyr and LU Cam) displaying typical flickering variability in white light. Observations were performed on the William Herschel Telescope using ULTRACAM. Light

  13. High-Speed Photo-Polarimetry of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Potter

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available I review recent highlights of the SAAO High-speed Photo-POlarimeter (HIPPO on the study of magnetic Cataclysmic Variables. Its high-speed capabilities are demonstrated with example observations made of the intermediate polar NY Lup and the polar IGRJ14536-5522.

  14. Two Cataclysmic Variables Identified from ROSAT Bright Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of optical spectroscopic observations of two ROSAT bright sources, 1RXS J020928.9+283243 and 1RXS J042332.8+745300. The low-dispersion spectra suggest the cataclysmic variable classification for the two objects. Further photometric observations are expected to reveal the variable features and to confirm the classifications.

  15. Integration of BETA with Eclipse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Enevoldsen, Mads Brøgger

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents language interoperability issues appearing in order to implement support for the BETA language in the Java-based Eclipse integrated development environment. One of the challenges is to implement plug-ins in BETA and be able to load them in Eclipse. In order to do this, some form...

  16. Eclipses in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2011-01-01

    We explore 50 Australian Aboriginal accounts of lunar and solar eclipses to determine how Aboriginal groups understood this phenomenon. We summarise the literature on Aboriginal references to eclipses, showing that many Aboriginal groups viewed eclipses negatively, frequently associating them with bad omens, evil magic, disease, blood and death. In many communities, Elders or medicine men were believed to have the ability to control or avert eclipses by magical means, solidifying their role as provider and protector within the community. We also show that many Aboriginal groups understood the motions of the sun-earth-moon system, the connection between the lunar phases and tides, and acknowledged that solar eclipses were caused by the moon blocking the sun.

  17. Retinopathy after solar eclipse, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, L; Sharma, N; Tewari, H K; Gupta, S

    1996-01-01

    Visual damage following direct sighting of the solar eclipse is a well established clinical entity. In spite of warnings in the media, a number of people attempted to observe the solar eclipse. Consequently, some developed visual damage. Twenty-one patients were referred to the Solar Eclipse Cell at our centre. Their demographic and clinical features were evaluated. Foveal findings correlated with the duration of exposure and frequency of watching the eclipse. Six patients had used protective devices for viewing the eclipse. More than 47% eyes had discernible fundus lesions. Lasting visual damage can follow a solar retinal burn with little or no protection from the viewing devices. Prevention remains the best treatment and there is a need to educate the public in this regard.

  18. The Total Solar Eclipse, March 1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, William H.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the circumstances of the total and partial solar eclipse of March 7, 1970 in certain American cities. Also discussed are (1) a classroom demonstration of the cause of solar eclipses, (2) techniques for safely observing the eclipse, and (3) what to observe during the eclipse. Bibliography. (LC)

  19. Detection and Analysis of Solar Eclipse

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We propose an algorithm that can be used by amateur astronomers to analyze the images acquired during solar eclipses. The proposed algorithm analyzes the image, detects the eclipse and produces results for parameters like magnitude of eclipse, eclipse obscuration and the approximate distance between the Earth and the Moon.

  20. SS 433: Stationary lines and primary eclipses

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, M G

    2015-01-01

    Some stationary lines in the emission spectra of SS 433 are eclipsed, but most are not. Lines attributed to a circumbinary disk are not eclipsed, but double in relative intensity during primary eclipse. A C II doublet is eclipsed and Doppler shifts over two periods yield an orbital speed of 176 +/- 13 km/s.

  1. The Total Solar Eclipse, March 1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, William H.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the circumstances of the total and partial solar eclipse of March 7, 1970 in certain American cities. Also discussed are (1) a classroom demonstration of the cause of solar eclipses, (2) techniques for safely observing the eclipse, and (3) what to observe during the eclipse. Bibliography. (LC)

  2. Getting started with Eclipse Juno

    CERN Document Server

    Durelli, Vinicius H S; Teixeira, Rafael Medeiros

    2013-01-01

    Written as a concise yet practical guide that details the main features which are usually required by a programmer who makes use of the Eclipse platform, this book covers Eclipse 3.8 in a way that is accessible to the Java novice and expert alike. The reader is guided through a series of hands-on examples that introduce Eclipse and some of its plugins.The primary audience for this book are the Java programmers. This book has been written in a way that it is accessible both to beginners and advanced Java programmers alike. Also, if you are a seasoned Java developer who has been using another ID

  3. Sky surveys of interest for cataclysmic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkody, Paula

    2016-07-01

    Sky Surveys provide much useful information for finding and understanding catacylsmic variables (CVs). Depending on the length of time the survey runs and the cadence used, the surveys can easily locate novae and dwarf novae based on the amplitude and shape of the light curves. For systems with high inclination or prominent hot spots and periods of hours, some orbital information can be derived from eclipses that are caught or repetitive modulations in the folded light curves. However, in most cases, detailed knowledge of the type of system and its orbital period must come from extended observations at other wavelengths, as most surveys take place in one filter or unfiltered. Currently, we are in the midst of an explosion of recently past, continuing and future plans for sky surveys. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey found about 300 CVs in its Legacy Mode, with small numbers continuing to be added through the extended phases. The CVs were primarily identified through spectroscopic coverage of selected objects from the photometric survey and subsequently found a wide variety of systems (polars, intermediate polars, novalikes, dwarf novae, objects with pulsating white dwarfs) due to spectroscopic differences among these types. The Palomar Transit Factory (PTF), Intermediate PTF and future Zwicky Transient Facilty (ZTF) operate in the same mode of candidate discovery via outbursts followed by spectroscopy for confirmation. The Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey primarily adds dwarf novae that are found from outbursts in the long time span of observations. The Kepler K2 mission operates with a much higher cadence (48-1440 observations/day) but shorter total length (70-80 days) and thus finds CVs through orbital variability as well as those with short outburst intervals. Gaia will provide distances for most of the objects under study, thus locating them in the galaxy. The upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will go much fainter and cover variability on a 10 yr

  4. Searching for Cataclysmic Variables in the J-PLUS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, J.; Ederoclite, A.

    2017-03-01

    Cataclysmic Variables (CVs) are binary systems made of a white dwarf which is accreting mass from a less evolved companion. Depending on the physical properties of the system, the observational characteristics of CVs can be very diverse. Nevertheless, as we learned from projects like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, CVs occupy the same locus of quasars in color- color diagrams, hence their discovery can be quite challenging. In this paper, we expose how the filter set of the J-PLUS project can help to efficiently separate CVs from other objects (mostly quasars) and even get their type. Through simulations and real data, we explain how accurate the method is and identify the following steps to finally get the first complete unbiased magnitude-limited sample of Cataclysmic Variables to date, a fundamental data set to be able to study the evolution of this type of objects.

  5. Realistic MHD Modelling of Cataclysmic Variable Spin-Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascelles, Alex; Garraffo, Cecilia; Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    The orbital evolution of cataclysmic variables with periods above the "period gap" (>3 hrs) is governed by angular momentum loss via the magnetized wind of the unevolved secondary star. The usual prescription to study such systems takes into account only the magnetic field of the secondary and assumes its field is dipolar. It has been shown that introduction of the white dwarf and its magnetic field can significantly impact the wind’s structure, leading to a change in angular momentum loss rate and evolutionary timescale by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the complexity of the magnetic field can drastically alter stellar spin-down rates. We explore the effects of orbital separation and magnetic field configuration on mass and angular momentum loss rates through 3-D magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We present the results of a study of cataclysmic variable orbital evolution including these new ingredients.

  6. Faint stars and OmegaCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K; Cristiani, S; Renzini, A; Williams, RE

    2001-01-01

    OmegaCAM will be the wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope. In this contribution I present applications of this instrument to the study of faint stellar populations. Two projects are highlighted: a proper motion study to uncover the galactic halo population, and a microlensing study towards

  7. Faint stars and OmegaCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K; Cristiani, S; Renzini, A; Williams, RE

    2001-01-01

    OmegaCAM will be the wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope. In this contribution I present applications of this instrument to the study of faint stellar populations. Two projects are highlighted: a proper motion study to uncover the galactic halo population, and a microlensing study towards

  8. Faint Galaxies in deep ACS observations

    CERN Document Server

    Benítez, N; Bouwens, R; Menanteau, F; Blakeslee, J P; Gronwall, C; Illingworth, G D; Meurer, G; Broadhurst, T J; Clampin, M; Franx, M; Hartig, G F; Magee, D; Sirianni, M; Ardila, D R; Bartko, F; Brown, R A; Burrows, C J; Cheng, E S; Cross, N J G; Feldman, P D; Golimowski, D A; Infante, L; Kimble, R A; Krist, J E; Lesser, M P; Levay, Z G; Martel, A R; Miley, G K; Postman, M; Rosati, P; Sparks, W B; Tran, H D; Tsvetanov, Z I; Zheng, R L

    2003-01-01

    We present the analysis of the faint galaxy population in the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Early Release Observation fields VV 29 (UGC 10214) and NGC 4676. Here we attempt to thoroughly consider all aspects relevant for faint galaxy counting and photometry, developing methods which are based on public software and that are easily reproducible by other astronomers. Using simulations we determine the best SExtractor parameters for the detection of faint galaxies in deep HST observations, paying special attention to the issue of deblending, which significantly affects the normalization and shape of the number count distribution. We confirm, as claimed by Bernstein, Freedman and Madore (2002), that Kron-like magnitudes, such as the ones generated by SExtractor, can miss more than half of the light of faint galaxies, what dramatically affects the slope of the number counts. We present catalogs for the VV 29 and NGC 4676 fields with photometry in the g,V and I bands. We also show that combining the bayesian so...

  9. Cataclysmic variables in Globular clusters: First results on the analysis of the MOCCA simulations database

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, Diogo; Askar, Abbas; Hypki, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    In this first investigation of the MOCCA database with respect to cataclysmic variables, we found that for models with Kroupa initial distributions, considering the standard value of the efficiency of the common-envelope phase adopted in BSE, no single cataclysmic variable was formed only via binary stellar evolution, i. e., in order to form them, strong dynamical interactions have to take place. Our results also indicate that the population of cataclysmic variables in globular clusters are, mainly, in the last stage of their evolution and observational selection effects can change drastically the expected number and properties of observed cataclysmic variables.

  10. Stellar background observation during Total Solar Eclipse March 9th 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtahana, Farahhati; Timur Jaelani, Anton; Muhamad, Johan; Sutastio, Heri

    2016-11-01

    We report observation and an early analysis of stellar background from total solar eclipse in Ternate, Indonesia. The eclipse phenomena which occurred on March, 9th 2016 was observed with certain portable instruments in order to obtain the stars behind the Sun in particular field of view and resolution. From our observation site in Ternate city, solar eclipse occurred in the late morning when the weather was unfortunately cloudy. However, during the darkness of totality, we obtained several point source objects between the gaps of the moving clouds and we suspected them as very faint stars due to their appearance in several frames. Those so called stars have been identified and measured with respect to their positions toward the center of the Sun. The main purpose of this research is to revisit strong lensing calculation of the Sun during total solar eclipse by measuring the deflection angle of the background stars as it had been calculated by Einstein and proved by Eddington at a total solar eclipse in 1919. To accomplish this aim, we need to conduct another observation to measure position of the same stars in the next period when those stars appear in the night sky.

  11. Hard X-ray properties of magnetic cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Scaringi, S; Norton, A J; Knigge, C; Hill, A B; Clark, D J; Dean, A J; McBride, V A; Barlow, E J; Bassani, L; Bazzano, A; Fiocchi, M; Landi, R

    2009-01-01

    Hard X-ray surveys have proven remarkably efficient in detecting intermediate polars and asynchronous polars, two of the rarest type of cataclysmic variable (CV). Here we present a global study of hard X-ray selected intermediate polars and asynchronous polars, focusing particularly on the link between hard X-ray properties and spin/orbital periods. To this end, we first construct a new sample of these objects by cross-correlating candidate sources detected in INTEGRAL/IBIS observations against catalogues of known CVs. We find 23 cataclysmic variable matches, and also present an additional 9 (of which 3 are definite) likely magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs) identified by others through optical follow-ups of IBIS detections. We also include in our analysis hard X-ray observations from Swift/BAT and SUZAKU/HXD in order to make our study more complete. We find that most hard X-ray detected mCVs have P_{spin}/P_{orb}<0.1 above the period gap. In this respect we also point out the very low number of detecte...

  12. Orbital View of Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) crew members were able to document a rare occurrence. The dark area near the center of the frame is actually a shadow cast by the moon during the total solar eclipse of December 4, 2002. The shadow obscures an area of cloud cover. The Station, with three Expedition Six crew members aboard, was over the Indian Ocean at the time of the eclipse.

  13. Heliophysics at total solar eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2017-08-01

    Observations during total solar eclipses have revealed many secrets about the solar corona, from its discovery in the 17th century to the measurement of its million-kelvin temperature in the 19th and 20th centuries, to details about its dynamics and its role in the solar-activity cycle in the 21st century. Today's heliophysicists benefit from continued instrumental and theoretical advances, but a solar eclipse still provides a unique occasion to study coronal science. In fact, the region of the corona best observed from the ground at total solar eclipses is not available for view from any space coronagraphs. In addition, eclipse views boast of much higher quality than those obtained with ground-based coronagraphs. On 21 August 2017, the first total solar eclipse visible solely from what is now United States territory since long before George Washington's presidency will occur. This event, which will cross coast-to-coast for the first time in 99 years, will provide an opportunity not only for massive expeditions with state-of-the-art ground-based equipment, but also for observations from aloft in aeroplanes and balloons. This set of eclipse observations will again complement space observations, this time near the minimum of the solar activity cycle. This review explores the past decade of solar eclipse studies, including advances in our understanding of the corona and its coronal mass ejections as well as terrestrial effects. We also discuss some additional bonus effects of eclipse observations, such as recreating the original verification of the general theory of relativity.

  14. Eclipse mapping of accretion discs

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Raymundo

    2000-01-01

    The eclipse mapping method is an inversion technique that makes use of the information contained in eclipse light curves to probe the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs. In this review I present the basics of the method and discuss its different implementations. I summarize the most important results obtained to date and discuss how they have helped to improve our understanding of accretion physics, from testing the theoretical radial brightness temperature dist...

  15. Long-term Accretion Variations of the Magnetic Cataclysmic Variable Star QQ Vulpecula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper Rose, Sanaea; Kafka, Stella; Jorgenson, Regina; Carr, Derrick; Childs, Francesca; Christenson, Holly; Karim, Md. Tanveer; Konchady, Tarini; Walker, Gary E.; Honeycutt, R. K.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic cataclysmic variable stars have brightness variations that repeat with each revolution of the two stars about the center of mass of the system. However, in the case of QQ Vulpecula (QQ Vul), this brightness variation pattern changes in the long term. This study makes use of two decades worth of data from the Roboscope Telescope as well as data from the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) database to examine the long-term evolution of QQ Vul’s phase curves. Nightly observations using the Maria Mitchell Association's Vestal and Loines Observatories supplemented this analysis by clarifying short-term brightness variation. The long-term data was divided into four commonly observed behavioral types ranging from a double peaked curve of ~15.5 magnitude to a ~15.0 magnitude curve that had a primary minimum and a slow, linear rise in brightness in place of the secondary minimum. The nightly data kept within the confines of these categories, though the secondary minimum in the nightly data never vanished. No periodicity was found in the long-term variations. The model often invoked to explain the double peaked curve consists of single pole accretion in which a partial self-eclipse causes the secondary minimum and cyclotron beaming causes the primary minimum. However, the long-term variation may indicate a changing accretion rate, which may manifest itself in changes to the shape, size, or location of the accretion spot on the white dwarf such that it lessens or removes the secondary minimum. This project was supported by the NSF REU grant AST-1358980, the Massachusetts Space Grant, and the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  16. The long-term light curve of the cataclysmic variable V794 Aquilae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honeycutt, R. K. [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Swain Hall West, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Kafka, S. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Inst. of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Robertson, J. W., E-mail: honey@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: skafka@aip.org, E-mail: Jeff.Robertson@atu.edu [Arkansas Tech University, Department of Physical Sciences, 1701 N. Boulder, Russellville, AR 72801-2222 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The 1990-2012 light curve of the nova-like (NL) cataclysmic variable V794 Aql is studied in order to characterize and better understand the transitions to and from the faint state, and the variations within the bright state. Investigations of earlier portions of this data had concluded that the transitions to the low state were much slower than the rapid recovery, giving a sawtoothed appearance to the light curve. This behavior differs from that of most other VY Scl stars, which led to an interpretation of the large amplitude sawtooths as being due to an accretion disk (AD) instability. However, more recent photometry strongly suggests that the bright state itself has transitions of 1-1.5 mag, and that earlier studies had intermixed these bright state variations with the transitions to the low state. These newly recognized variations within the bright state sometimes appear as small outbursts (OBs) with typical amplitudes of 0.5-1.5 mag and spacings of ∼15-50 days. The rise times of the OBs are 2-3 times faster than the decline times. We argue that the V794 Aql bright state variations are due to AD behavior similar to that seen in dwarf novae, but with varying degrees of stability. Similar regular small OBs have also been reported in other NL CVs, which we compare with V794 Aql. The true deep low states in V794 Aql appear to be normal, having transition speeds and shapes very similar to the transitions in other VY Scl stars.

  17. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star IM Persei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Southworth, John, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: astro.js@keele.ac.uk [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    IM Per is a detached A7 eccentric eclipsing binary star. We have obtained extensive measurements of the light curve (28,225 differential magnitude observations) and radial velocity curve (81 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.7831 ± 0.0094 and 1.7741 ± 0.0097 solar masses, and radii of 2.409 ± 0.018 and 2.366 ± 0.017 solar radii. The orbital period is 2.25422694(15) days and the eccentricity is 0.0473(26). A faint third component was detected in the analysis of the light curves, and also directly observed in the spectra. The observed rate of apsidal motion is consistent with theory (U = 151.4 ± 8.4 year). We determine a distance to the system of 566 ± 46 pc.

  18. Eclipse takeoff and flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This 25-second clip shows the QF-106 'Delta Dart' tethered to the USAF C-141A during takeoff and in flight. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, supported a Kelly Space and Technology, Inc. (KST)/U.S. Air Force project known as Eclipse, which demonstrated a reusable tow launch vehicle concept. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate a reusable tow launch vehicle concept that had been conceived and patented by KST. Kelly Space obtained a contract with the USAF Research Laboratory for the tow launch demonstration project under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The USAF SBIR contract included the modifications to turn the QF-106 into the Experimental Demonstrator #1 (EXD-01), and the C141A aircraft to incorporate the tow provisions to link the two aircraft, as well as conducting flight tests. The demonstration consisted of ground and flight tests. These tests included a Combined Systems Test of both airplanes joined by a tow rope, a towed taxi test, and six towed flights. The primary goal of the project was demonstrating the tow phase of the Eclipse concept using a scaled-down tow aircraft (C-141A) and a representative aerodynamically-shaped aircraft (QF-106A) as a launch vehicle. This was successfully accomplished. On December 20, 1997, NASA research pilot Mark Stucky flew a QF-106 on the first towed flight behind an Air Force C-141 in the joint Eclipse project with KST to demonstrate the reusable tow launch vehicle concept developed by KST. Kelly hoped to use the data from the tow tests to validate a tow-to-launch procedure for reusable space launch vehicles. Stucky flew six successful tow tests between December 1997 and February 6, 1998. On February 6, 1998, the sixth and final towed flight brought the project to a successful completion. Preliminary flight results determined that the handling qualities of the QF-106 on tow were very stable; actual flight measured values of tow rope tension were well within predictions

  19. Eclipse RCP入门

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈刚

    2005-01-01

    Eclipse的插件机制更是提供了一种令人耳目一新的开发方式。现在国内做Eclipse插件的渐渐多了,并且很多用SWT/JFace和插件方式来开发应用项目中的界面。这时将插件用于应用类项目的就有些不爽:插件要依赖Eclipse运行,而这些项目在部需要程序更象一个传统的应用程序,如果表面上看起和Eclipse一点关系也没有那就最好了。而Eclipse3.0之后便解决了RCP的这个问题。本文作者通过一个开发实例,介绍了一些RCP所特有的东西。

  20. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Behind Lensing Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Lauchlan Cowie, Lennox; Barger, Amy J.; Desai, Vandana; Murphy, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Faint submillimeter galaxies are the major contributors to the submillimeter extragalactic background light and hence the dominant star-forming population in the dusty universe. Determining how much these galaxies overlap the optically selected samples is critical to fully account for the cosmic star formation history. Observations of massive cluster fields are the best way to explore this faint submillimeter population, thanks to gravitational lensing effects. We have been undertaking a lensing cluster survey with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to map nine galaxy clusters, including the northern five clusters in the HST Frontier Fields program. We have also been using the Submillimeter Array and the Very Large Array to determine the accurate positions of our detected sources. Our observations have discovered high-redshift dusty galaxies with far-infrared luminosities similar to that of the Milky Way or luminous infrared galaxies. Some of these galaxies are still undetected in deep optical and near-infrared images. These results suggest that a substantial amount of star formation in even the faint submillimeter population may be hidden from rest-frame optical surveys.

  1. Total Solar Eclipse--A Caribbean Adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Steven; Tunstall, Louisa; Tunstall, Neil

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences of two high school students who traveled to the Caribbean island of Curacao to view a total solar eclipse and prepare methods for teaching classmates about the eclipse the following school year. (Author/WRM)

  2. Total Solar Eclipse--A Caribbean Adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Steven; Tunstall, Louisa; Tunstall, Neil

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences of two high school students who traveled to the Caribbean island of Curacao to view a total solar eclipse and prepare methods for teaching classmates about the eclipse the following school year. (Author/WRM)

  3. Io in Eclipse 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This image of Io eclipsed by Jupiter's shadow is a combination of several images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) between 09:35 and 09:41 Universal Time on February 27, 2007, about 28 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. North is at the top of the image. In the darkness, only glowing hot lava, auroral displays in Io's tenuous atmosphere and the moon's volcanic plumes are visible. The brightest points of light in the image are the glow of incandescent lava at several active volcanoes. The three brightest volcanoes south of the equator are, from left to right, Pele, Reiden and Marduk. North of the equator, near the disk center, a previously unknown volcano near 22 degrees north, 233 degrees west glows brightly. (The dark streak to its right is an artifact.) The edge of Io's disk is outlined by the auroral glow produced as intense radiation from Jupiter's magnetosphere bombards the atmosphere. The glow is patchy because the atmosphere itself is patchy, being denser over active volcanoes. At the 1 o'clock position the giant glowing plume from the Tvashtar volcano rises 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the edge of the disk, and several smaller plumes are also visible as diffuse glows scattered across the disk. Bright glows at the edge of Io on the left and right sides of the disk mark regions where electrical currents connect Io to Jupiter's magnetosphere. New Horizons was 2.8 million kilometers (1.7 million miles) from Io when this picture was taken, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 2 degrees south, 238 degrees west. The image has been heavily processed to remove scattered light from Jupiter, but some artifacts remain, including a horizontal seam where two sets of frames were pieced together. Total exposure time for this image was 56 seconds.

  4. Eclipse Editor for MARC Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Dimić Surla

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Editing bibliographic data is an important part of library information systems. In this paper we discuss existing approaches in developing of user interface for editing MARC records. There are two basic approaches, screen forms that support entering bibliographic data without knowledge of the MARC structure and direct editing of MARC records that is shown on the screen. The main result presented in the paper is Eclipse editor for MARC records that fully supports editing of MARC records. It is written in Java as Eclipse plug-in so it is platform-independent. It can be extended for using with any data store. At the end, the paper presents Rich Client Platform application made of MARC editor plug-in which can be used outside of Eclipse. The practical application of the results is integration of created Rich Client Platform application in BISIS library information system.

  5. Discovery of a new class of coronal structures in white light eclipse images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druckmüller, Miloslav [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw, E-mail: shadia@ifa.hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    White light images of the solar corona, taken during total solar eclipses, capture the complex dynamic relationship between the coronal plasma and the magnetic field. This relationship can be recorded on timescales of seconds to minutes, within a few solar radii above the solar surface. Rays, large-scale loops, and streamers, which are the brightest structures in these images, have shaped current models of the coronal magnetic field and solar wind flow. We show in this work how the application of novel image processing techniques to unique high-resolution white light eclipse images reveals the presence of a new class of structures, reminiscent of smoke rings, faint nested expanding loops, expanding bubbles, and twisted helical structures. These features are interpreted as snapshots of the dynamical evolution of instabilities developing at prominence-corona interfaces and propagating outward with the solar wind.

  6. Record-Breaking Eclipsing Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    A new record holder exists for the longest-period eclipsing binary star system: TYC-2505-672-1. This intriguing system contains a primary star that is eclipsed by its companion once every 69 years with each eclipse lasting several years!120 Years of ObservationsIn a recent study, a team of scientists led by Joseph Rodriguez (Vanderbilt University) characterizes the components of TYC-2505-672-1. This binary star system consists of an M-type red giant star that undergoes a ~3.45-year-long, near-total eclipse with a period of ~69.1 years. This period is more than double that of the previous longest-period eclipsing binary!Rodriguez and collaborators combined photometric observations of TYC-2505-672-1 by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) with a variety of archival data, including observations by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) network and historical data from the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) program.In the 120 years spanned by these observations, two eclipses are detected: one in 1942-1945 and one in 2011-2015. The authors use the observations to analyze the components of the system and attempt to better understand what causes its unusual light curve.Characterizing an Unusual SystemObservations of TYC-2505-672-1 plotted from 1890 to 2015 reveal two eclipses. (The blue KELT observations during the eclipse show upper limits only.) [Rodriguez et al. 2016]By modeling the systems emission, Rodriguez and collaborators establish that TYC-2505-672-1 consists of a 3600-K primary star thats the M giant orbited by a small, hot, dim companion thats a toasty 8000 K. But if the companion is small, why does the eclipse last several years?The authors argue that the best model of TYC-2505-672-1 is one in which the small companion star is surrounded by a large, opaque circumstellar disk. Rodriguez and collaborators suggest that the companion could be a former red giant whose atmosphere was stripped from it, leaving behind

  7. Variable Stars in the Field of the Hydra II Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, A. Katherina; Olsen, Knut; Blum, Robert; Nidever, David L.; Walker, Alistair R.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Besla, Gurtina; Gallart, Carme; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Majewski, Steven R.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Jin, Shoko

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of one RR Lyrae star in the ultra-faint satellite galaxy Hydra II based on time series photometry in the g, r and i bands obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. The association of the RR Lyrae star discovered here with Hydra II is clear because is located at 42\\prime\\prime from the center of the dwarf, well within its half-light radius of 102\\prime\\prime . The RR Lyrae star has a mean magnitude of i=21.30+/- 0.04 which is too faint to be a field halo star. This magnitude translates to a heliocentric distance of 151 ± 8 kpc for Hydra II; this value is ∼ 13% larger than the estimate from the discovery paper based on the average magnitude of several blue horizontal branch star candidates. The new distance implies a slightly larger half-light radius of {76}-10+12 pc and a brighter absolute magnitude of {M}V=-5.1+/- 0.3, which keeps this object within the realm of the dwarf galaxies. A comparison with other RR Lyrae stars in ultra-faint systems indicates similar pulsational properties among them, which are different to those found among halo field stars and those in the largest of the Milky Way satellites. We also report the discovery of 31 additional short period variables in the field of view (RR Lyrae, SX Phe, eclipsing binaries, and a likely anomalous cepheid) which are likely not related with Hydra II.

  8. The Formation of Cataclysmic Variables: The Influence of Nova Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelemans, G.; Siess, L.; Repetto, S.; Toonen, S.; Phinney, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    The theoretical and observed populations of pre-cataclysmic variables are dominated by systems with low-mass white dwarfs (WDs), while the WD masses in cataclysmic variables (CVs) are typically high. In addition, the space density of CVs is found to be significantly lower than in the theoretical models. We investigate the influence of nova outbursts on the formation and initial evolution of CVs. In particular, we calculate the stability of the mass transfer in the case where all of the material accreted on the WD is lost in classical novae and part of the energy to eject the material comes from a common-envelope-like interaction with the companion. In addition, we study the effect of an asymmetry in the mass ejection that may lead to small eccentricities in the orbit. We find that a common-envelope-like ejection significantly decreases the stability of the mass transfer, particularly for low-mass WDs. Similarly, the influence of asymmetric mass loss can be important for short-period systems and even more so for low-mass WDs; however, this influence likely disappears long before the next nova outburst due to orbital circularization. In both cases the mass-transfer rates increase, which may lead to observable (and perhaps already observed) consequences for systems that do survive to become CVs. However, a more detailed investigation of the interaction between nova ejecta and the companion and the evolution of slightly eccentric CVs is needed before definite conclusions can be drawn.

  9. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Gomez, Juan; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2016-01-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the GEO orbital regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the size of the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small size of the field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude have been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The observed detections have a wide range in characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections with variations in brightness, flashers, during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected size times albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm. The data in this paper was collected over the last several years using Magellan's IMACS camera in f/2 mode. The analysis shows the brightness bins for the observed GEO population as well as the periodicity of the flashers. All objects presented are correlated with the catalog: the focus of the paper will be on the uncorrelated, optically faint, objects. The goal of this project is to better characterize the faint debris population in GEO that access to a 6.5-m optical telescope in a superb site can provide.

  10. Double-lined M dwarf eclipsing binaries from Catalina Sky Survey and LAMOST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Lin, Chien-Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Eclipsing binaries provide a unique opportunity to determine fundamental stellar properties. In the era of wide-field cameras and all-sky imaging surveys, thousands of eclipsing binaries have been reported through light curve classification, yet their basic properties remain unexplored due to the extensive efforts needed to follow them up spectroscopically. In this paper we investigate three M2-M3 type double-lined eclipsing binaries discovered by cross-matching eclipsing binaries from the Catalina Sky Survey with spectroscopically classified M dwarfs from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope survey data release one and two. Because these three M dwarf binaries are faint, we further acquire radial velocity measurements using GMOS on the Gemini North telescope with R∼ 4000, enabling us to determine the mass and radius of individual stellar components. By jointly fitting the light and radial velocity curves of these systems, we derive the mass and radius of the primary and secondary components of these three systems, in the range between 0.28-0.42M_ȯ and 0.29-0.67R_ȯ, respectively. Future observations with a high resolution spectrograph will help us pin down the uncertainties in their stellar parameters, and render these systems benchmarks to study M dwarfs, providing inputs to improving stellar models in the low mass regime, or establishing an empirical mass-radius relation for M dwarf stars.

  11. HIDES spectroscopy of bright detached eclipsing binaries from the Kepler field - I. Single-lined objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Ukita, N.; Kambe, E.; Kozłowski, S. K.; Sybilski, P.; Ratajczak, M.; Maehara, H.; Konacki, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of our spectroscopic observations of nine detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs), selected from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, that only show one set of spectral lines. Radial velocities (RVs) were calculated from the high-resolution spectra obtained with the HIgh-Dispersion Echelle Spectrograph (HIDES) instrument, attached to the 1.88-m telescope at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, and from the public Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment archive. In our sample, we found five single-lined binaries, with one component dominating the spectrum. The orbital and light-curve solutions were found for four of them, and compared with isochrones, in order to estimate absolute physical parameters and evolutionary status of the components. For the fifth case, we only update the orbital parameters, and estimate the properties of the unseen star. Two other systems show orbital motion with a period known from the eclipse timing variations (ETVs). For these we obtained parameters of outer orbits, by translating the ETVs to RVs of the centre of mass of the eclipsing binary, and combining with the RVs of the outer star. Of the two remaining ones, one is most likely a blend of a faint background DEB with a bright foreground star, which lines we see in the spectra, and the last case is possibly a quadruple bearing a sub-stellar mass object. Where possible, we compare our results with literature, especially with results from asteroseismology. We also report possible detections of solar-like oscillations in our RVs.

  12. Io in Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This unusual image shows Io glowing in the darkness of Jupiter's shadow. It is a combination of eight images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) between 14:25 and 14:55 Universal Time on February 27, 2007, about 15 hours before the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. North is at the top of the image. Io's surface is invisible in the darkness, but the image reveals glowing hot lava, auroral displays in Io's tenuous atmosphere and volcanic plumes across the moon. The three bright points of light on the right side of Io are incandescent lava at active volcanoes - Pele and Reiden (south of the equator), and a previously unknown volcano near 22 degrees north, 233 degrees west near the edge of the disk at the 2 o'clock position. An auroral glow, produced as intense radiation from Jupiter's magnetosphere bombards Io's atmosphere, outlines the edge of the moon's disk. The glow is patchy because the atmosphere itself is patchy, being denser over active volcanoes. In addition to the near-surface glow, there is a remarkable auroral glow suspended 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the edge of the disk at the 2 o'clock position; perhaps this glowing gas was ejected from the new volcano below it. Another glowing gas plume, above a fainter point of light, is visible just inside Io's disk near the 6 o'clock position; this plume is above another new volcanic eruption discovered by New Horizons. On the left side of the disk, near Io's equator, a cluster of faint dots of light is centered near the point on Io that always faces Jupiter. This is the region where electrical currents connect Io to Jupiter's magnetosphere. It is likely that electrical connections to individual volcanoes are causing the glows seen here, though the details are mysterious. Total exposure time for this image was 16 seconds. The range to Io was 2.8 million kilometers (1.7 million miles), and the image is centered at Io coordinates 7 degrees south, 306 degrees west. The image

  13. Eclipse plugin development by example beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Blewitt, Alex

    2013-01-01

    A Beginner's Guide following the ""by Example"" approach. There will be 5-8 major examples that will be used in the book to develop advanced plugins with the Eclipse IDE.This book is for Java developers who are familiar with Eclipse as a Java IDE and are interested in learning how to develop plug-ins for Eclipse. No prior knowledge of Eclipse plug-in development or OSGi is necessary, although you are expected to know how to create, run, and debug Java programs in Eclipse.

  14. Close Binaries, Triples, and Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Jason; Zavala, R. T.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the variable radio source b Per (HR1324) are part of an ongoing survey of close binary systems using the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer. Historical observations of b Per include sparse photometric and spectroscopic observations dating back to 1923, clearly showing this object to be a non-eclipsing, single-lined ellipsoidal variable. This is where the story for b Per stopped until recent inclusion of optical interferometric data which led to the detection of a third, long-period component. As the interferometric observations continue to build up so to is the understanding of this binary system, with the modeled orbital parameters pointing to an edge-on orientation that may allow for the detection of an eclipse by the long-period component. These types of eclipse events are quite rare for long-period binaries due to the nearly edge-on orientation required for their detection, leaving open the opportunity for more traditional methods of observation to add to the body of knowledge concerning this understudied system. Here we present the latest observational data of the b Per system along with an introduction to the best fit orbital parameters governing the eclipsing nature of this complex triple-system.

  15. Android development tools for Eclipse

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial aimed at developing Android applications in a practical manner.Android Development Tools for Eclipse is aimed at beginners and existing developers who want to learn more about Android development. It is assumed that you have experience in Java programming and that you have used IDE for development.

  16. Reflected eclipses on circumbinary planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeg H.J.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A photometric method to detect planets orbiting around shortperiodic binary stars is presented. It is based on the detection of eclipse-signatures in the reflected light of circumbinary planets. Amplitudes of such ’reflected eclipses’ will depend on the orbital configurations of binary and planet relative to the observer. Reflected eclipses will occur with a period that is distinct from the binary eclipses, and their timing will also be modified by variations in the light-travel time of the eclipse signal. For the sample of eclipsing binaries found by the Kepler mission, reflected eclipses from close circumbinary planets may be detectable around at least several dozen binaries. A thorough detection effort of such reflected eclipses may then detect the inner planets present, or give solid limits to their abundance.

  17. Symbolism and discovery: eclipses in art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, Ian

    2016-09-28

    There is a fascinating tradition of depicting solar eclipses in Western art, although these representations have changed over time. Eclipses have often been an important feature of Christian iconography, but valued as much for their biblical significance as for the splendour of the physical event. However, as Western culture passed through the Renaissance and Enlightenment the depictions of eclipses came to reflect new astronomical knowledge and a thirst for rational learning well beyond the confines of the church and other elites. Artists also played a surprisingly important role in helping scientists in the nineteenth century understand and record the full phenomena of an eclipse, even as the advent of photography also came to solve a number of scientific puzzles. In the most recent century, artists have responded to eclipses with symbolism, abstraction and playfulness.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  18. The Standardisation and Sequencing of Solar Eclipse Images for the Eclipse Megamovie Project

    CERN Document Server

    Krista, Larisza

    2015-01-01

    We present a new tool, the Solar Eclipse Image Standardisation and Sequencing (SEISS), developed to process multi-source total solar eclipse images by adjusting them to the same standard of size, resolution, and orientation. Furthermore, by analysing the eclipse images we can determine the relative time between the observations and order them to create a movie of the observed total solar eclipse sequence. We successfully processed images taken at the 14 November 2012 total solar eclipse that occurred in Queensland, Australia, and created a short eclipse proto-movie. The SEISS tool was developed for the Eclipse Megamovie Project (EMP: https://www.eclipsemegamovie.org), with the goal of processing thousands of images taken by the public during solar eclipse events. EMP is a collaboration among multiple institutes aiming to engage and advance the public interest in solar eclipses and the science of the Sun-Earth connection.

  19. Faint Objects and How to Observe Them

    CERN Document Server

    Cudnik, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Astronomers' Observing Guides provide up-to-date information for amateur astronomers who want to know all about what it is they are observing. This is the basis of the first part of the book. The second part details observing techniques for practical astronomers, working with a range of different instruments. Faint Objects and How to Observe Them is for visual observers who want to "go deep" with their observing. It's a guide to some of the most distant, dim, and rarely observed objects in the sky, with background information on surveys and object lists -- some familiar and some not. Typically, amateur astronomers begin by looking at the brighter objects, and work their way "deeper" as their experience and skills improve. Faint Objects is about the faintest objects we can see with an amateur's telescope -- their physical nature, why they appear so dim, and how to track them down. By definition, these objects are hard to see! But moderate equipment (a decent telescope of at least 10-inch aperture) and the righ...

  20. The space density and X-ray luminosity function of non-magnetic cataclysmic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Magaretha L.; Knigge, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We combine two complete, X-ray flux-limited surveys, the ROSAT Bright Survey (RBS) and the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey, to measure the space density (ρ) and X-ray luminosity function (Φ) of non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs). The combined survey has a flux limit of FX≳ 1.1 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 over most of its solid angle of just over ?, but is as deep as ≃10-14 erg cm-2 s-1 over a small area. The CV sample that we construct from these two surveys contains 20 non-magnetic systems. We carefully include all sources of statistical error in calculating ρ and Φ by using Monte Carlo simulations; the most important uncertainty proves to be the often large errors in distances estimates. If we assume that the 20 CVs in the combined RBS and NEP survey sample are representative of the intrinsic population, the space density of non-magnetic CVs is ?. We discuss the difficulty in measuring Φ in some detail - in order to account for biases in the measurement, we have to adopt a functional form for Φ. Assuming that the X-ray luminosity function of non-magnetic CVs is a truncated power law, we constrain the power-law index to -0.80 ± 0.05. It seems likely that the two surveys have failed to detect a large, faint population of short-period CVs, and that the true space density may well be a factor of 2 or 3 larger than what we have measured; this is possible, even if we only allow for undetected CVs to have X-ray luminosities in the narrow range 28.7 log(LX/erg s-1) < 29.7. However, ρ as high as 2 × 10-4 pc-3 would require that the majority of CVs has X-ray luminosities below LX= 4 × 1028 erg s-1 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band.

  1. On the White Dwarf Mass Problem of Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations show that the white dwarfs (WDs) in cataclysmic Variables (CVs) have an average mass significantly higher than isolated WDs and WDs in post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs), which are thought to the progenitors of CVs. This suggests that either the WDs have grown in mass during the PCEB/CV evolution or the binaries with low-mass WDs are unable to evolve to be CVs. In this paper, we calculate the evolution of accreting WD binaries with updated hydrogen accumulation efficiency and angular momentum loss prescriptions. We show that thermal timescale mass transfer is not effective in changing the average WD mass distribution. The WD mass discrepancy is most likely related to unstable mass transfer in WD binaries in which an efficient mechanism of angular momentum loss is required.

  2. Cataclysmic variables in the SUPERBLINK proper motion survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Julie N.; Thorstensen, John R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755-3528 (United States); Lépine, Sébastien, E-mail: jns@dartmouth.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place NE, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We have discovered a new high proper motion cataclysmic variable (CV) in the SUPERBLINK proper motion survey, which is sensitive to stars with proper motions greater than 40 mas yr{sup −1}. This CV was selected for follow-up observations as part of a larger search for CVs selected based on proper motions and their near-UV−V and V−K{sub s} colors. We present spectroscopic observations from the 2.4 m Hiltner Telescope at MDM Observatory. The new CV's orbital period is near 96 minutes, its spectrum shows the double-peaked Balmer emission lines characteristic of quiescent dwarf novae, and its V magnitude is near 18.2. Additionally, we present a full list of known CVs in the SUPERBLINK catalog.

  3. Cataclysmic Variables in the SUPERBLINK Proper Motion Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, Julie N; Lépine, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    We have discovered a new high proper motion cataclysmic variable (CV) in the SUPERBLINK proper motion survey, which is sensitive to stars with proper motions greater than 40 mas/yr. This CV was selected for follow-up observations as part of a larger search for CVs selected based on proper motions and their NUV-V and V-K$_{s}$ colors. We present spectroscopic observations from the 2.4m Hiltner Telescope at MDM Observatory. The new CV's orbital period is near 96 minutes, its spectrum shows the double-peaked Balmer emission lines characteristic of quiescent dwarf novae, and its V magnitude is near 18.2. Additionally, we present a full list of known CVs in the SUPERBLINK catalog.

  4. IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3: a deeply eclipsing intermediate polar

    CERN Document Server

    Aungwerojwit, A; Wheatley, P J; Pyrzas, S; Staels, B; Krajci, T; Rodríguez-Gil, P

    2012-01-01

    We present time-resolved photometry of a cataclysmic variable discovered in the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric Halpha Survey of the northern galactic plane, IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3 and classify the system as the fourth deeply eclipsing intermediate polar known with an orbital period of Porb=8.16 h, and spin period of Pspin=2210 s. The system shows mild variations of its brightness, that appear to be accompanied by a change in the amplitude of the spin modulation at optical wavelengths, and a change in the morphology of the eclipse profile. The inferred magnetic moment of the white dwarf is mu_wd = 6-7 x 10^33 Gcm^3, and in this case IPHAS J0627 will either evolve into a short-period EX Hya-like intermediate polar with a large Pspin\\Porb ratio, or, perhaps more likely, into a synchronised polar. Swift observations show that the system is an ultraviolet and X-ray source, with a hard X-ray spectrum that is consistent with those seen in other intermediate polars. The ultraviolet light curve shows orbital mo...

  5. Faint Infrared-Excess Field Galaxies FROGs

    CERN Document Server

    Moustakas, L A; Zepf, S E; Bunker, A J

    1997-01-01

    Deep near-infrared and optical imaging surveys in the field reveal a curious population of galaxies that are infrared-bright (I-K>4), yet with relatively blue optical colors (V-I20, is high enough that if placed at z>1 as our models suggest, their space densities are about one-tenth of phi-*. The colors of these ``faint red outlier galaxies'' (fROGs) may derive from exceedingly old underlying stellar populations, a dust-embedded starburst or AGN, or a combination thereof. Determining the nature of these fROGs, and their relation with the I-K>6 ``extremely red objects,'' has implications for our understanding of the processes that give rise to infrared-excess galaxies in general. We report on an ongoing study of several targets with HST & Keck imaging and Keck/LRIS multislit spectroscopy.

  6. Eclipse mapping of accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Baptista, R

    2000-01-01

    The eclipse mapping method is an inversion technique that makes use of the information contained in eclipse light curves to probe the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs. In this review I present the basics of the method and discuss its different implementations. I summarize the most important results obtained to date and discuss how they have helped to improve our understanding of accretion physics, from testing the theoretical radial brightness temperature distribution and measuring mass accretion rates to showing the evolution of the structure of a dwarf novae disc through its outburst cycle, from isolating the spectrum of a disc wind to revealing the geometry of disc spiral shocks. I end with an outline of the future prospects.

  7. Solar Eclipse Effect on Shelter Air Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, M.; Turner, R. W.; Prusa, J.; Bitzer, R. J.; Finley, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Decreases in shelter temperature during eclipse events were quantified on the basis of observations, numerical model simulations, and complementary conceptual evaluations. Observations for the annular eclipse on 10 May 1994 over the United States are presented, and these provide insights into the temporal and spatial changes in the shelter temperature. The observations indicated near-surface temperature drops of as much as 6 C. Numerical model simulations for this eclipse event, which provide a complementary evaluation of the spatial and temporal patterns of the temperature drops, predict similar decreases. Interrelationships between the temperature drop, degree of solar irradiance reduction, and timing of the peak eclipse are also evaluated for late spring, summer, and winter sun conditions. These simulations suggest that for total eclipses the drops in shelter temperature in midlatitudes can be as high as 7 C for a spring morning eclipse.

  8. Eclipse 2017: Through the eyes of NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Louis; NASA/GSFC Heliophysics Education Consortium

    2016-10-01

    The August 21, 2017 eclipse will be the first time a total solar eclipse has traversed the Continental US since June 8th, 1918. Anticipation y for energy for this eclipse is off the charts. Over 500 million in North America alone will catch the eclipse in either partial or total phase. Parts of South America, Africa, and Europe will see a partial eclipse as well. NASA is planning to take full advantage of this unique celestial event as an education and public engagement opportunity by leveraging its extensive networks of partners, numerous social media platforms, broadcast media, and its significant unique space assets and people to bring the eclipse to America and the world as only NASA can. This talk will outline NASA's education plans in some detail replicating our many Big Events successes including the 2012 Transit of Venus and the MSL/Curiosity landing and show how scientists and the public can get involved.

  9. The eclipse period of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Freiesleben, Ulrik; Krekling, Martin A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2000-01-01

    The minimal time between successive initiations on the same origin (the eclipse) in Escherichia coli was determined to be approximately 25-30 min. An inverse relationship was found between the length of the eclipse and the amount of Dam methyltransferase in the cell, indicating that the eclipse...... corresponds to the period of origin hemimethylation. The SeqA protein was absolutely required for the eclipse, and DnaA titration studies suggested that the SeqA protein prevented the binding of multiple DnaA molecules on oriC (initial complex formation). No correlation between the amount of SeqA and eclipse...... length was revealed, but increased SeqA levels affected chromosome partitioning and/or cell division. This was corroborated further by an aberrant nucleoid distribution in SeqA-deficient cells. We suggest that the SeqA protein's role in maintaining the eclipse is tied to a function in chromosome...

  10. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARIES WITH STELLAR COMPANIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gies, D. R.; Matson, R. A.; Guo, Z.; Lester, K. V. [Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 5060, Atlanta, GA 30302-5060 (United States); Orosz, J. A. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Peters, G. J., E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: rmatson@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: guo@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: lester@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: jorosz@mail.sdsu.edu, E-mail: gjpeters@mucen.usc.edu [Space Sciences Center and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1341 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Many short-period binary stars have distant orbiting companions that have played a role in driving the binary components into close separation. Indirect detection of a tertiary star is possible by measuring apparent changes in eclipse times of eclipsing binaries as the binary orbits the common center of mass. Here we present an analysis of the eclipse timings of 41 eclipsing binaries observed throughout the NASA Kepler mission of long duration and precise photometry. This subset of binaries is characterized by relatively deep and frequent eclipses of both stellar components. We present preliminary orbital elements for seven probable triple stars among this sample, and we discuss apparent period changes in seven additional eclipsing binaries that may be related to motion about a tertiary in a long period orbit. The results will be used in ongoing investigations of the spectra and light curves of these binaries for further evidence of the presence of third stars.

  11. Hard X-ray Observations of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, K P; Mukerjee, K; Barrett, P; Schlegel, E M

    2003-01-01

    Hard X-ray light curves and spectral parameters from our analysis of X-ray data of five AM Her type systems - V2301 Oph, V1432 Aql, EP Draconis, GG Leonis, V834 Cen, and one intermediate polar - TV Col, observed using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer satellite are presented. A new improved ephemeris has been derived for V2301 Oph using the mid-eclipse timings. Average intensity variations, without any change of shape of the light curve or hardness ratio, are observed on timescales of a few days to a few months in V2301 Oph. V1432 Aql shows erratic variations on a timescale of a day, at least 2 sharp dips near orbital phases 0.35 and 0.5, and a total eclipse. Hard X-ray eclipses are also reported in EP Dra and GG Leo. V834 Cen shows intensity variations on yearly timescale and is found to be in a low state in 2002. In TV Col, a binary orbital modulation at 5.5h, in addition to the spin period of 1910s, is reported for the first time. Maximum spectral temperatures in Polars have been determined and used to estim...

  12. INFRARED STUDIES OF EPSILON AURIGAE IN ECLIPSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Wall, Randall E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208 (United States); Hopkins, Jeffrey L. [Hopkins Phoenix Observatory, Phoenix, AZ 85033 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rayner, John; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Sitko, Michael L.; Bradford, Suellen [Department of Physics, Cincinnati University, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K. [Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009 (United States); Hammel, Heidi; Whitney, Barbara [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Orton, Glenn; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Hora, Joseph L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William, E-mail: rstencel@du.edu [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2011-11-15

    We report here on a series of medium resolution spectro-photometric observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae, during its eclipse interval of 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra obtained with SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), mid-infrared spectra obtained with BASS on AOES and IRTF, MIRSI on IRTF, and MIRAC4 on the MMT, along with mid-infrared photometry using MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on the MMT, plus 1995-2000 timeframe published photometry and data obtained with Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO. The goals of these observations included: (1) comparing eclipse depths with prior eclipse data, (2) confirming the re-appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, associated with sublimation in the disk, (3) seeking evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, and (4) providing evidence that the externally irradiated disk has azimuthal temperature differences. IR eclipse depths appear similar to those observed during the most recent (1983) eclipse, although evidence for post-mid-eclipse disk temperature increase is present, due to F star heated portions of the disk coming into view. Molecular CO absorption returned 57 days after nominal mid-eclipse, but was not detected at mid-eclipse plus 34 days, narrowing the association with differentially heated sub-regions in the disk. Transient He I 10830A absorption was detected at mid-eclipse, persisting for at least 90 days thereafter, providing a diagnostic for the hot central region. The lack of solid-state features in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, BASS, and MIRAC spectra to date suggests the dominance of large particles (micron-sized) in the disk. Based on these observations, mid-infrared studies out of eclipse can directly monitor and map the disk thermal changes, and better constrain disk opacity and thermal conductivity.

  13. Cataclysmic variables and related objects; Proceedings of the Seventy-second Colloquium, Haifa, Israel, August 9-13, 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, M.; Shaviv, G.

    The periods of cataclysmic variable stars are considered along with photometric and spectroscopic observations of the cataclysmic variable AC Cancri, recent spectroscopy of X-ray sources and systems related to cataclysmic variables, orbital solutions for WZ Sagittae during quiescence, spectra of symbiotic stars, and the formation of optical CNO emission lines in cataclysmic variables. Attention is given to infrared spectra of nova dust shells, evolutionary models for SNI progenitor stars, the physical conditions inside white dwarfs and type I supernovae, the energy distribution of hard X-ray emitting cataclysmic variables, time dependence in accretion onto magnetic white dwarfs, polarized radiation from AM Herculis stars, and radio emission and synchronization. Other topics discussed are related to X-ray emission from cataclysmic variables, mass loss associated with X-ray bursts of neutron stars, and fast oscillations in variable X-ray sources and X-ray bursters. For individual items see A84-35927 to A84-35954

  14. Resource Letter OSE-1: Observing Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Fraknoi, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the available literature, listing selected books, articles, and online resources about scientific, cultural, and practical issues related to observing solar eclipses. It is timely, given that a total solar eclipse will cross the continental United States on August 21, 2017. The next total solar eclipse path crossing the U.S. and Canada will be on April 8, 2024. In 2023, the path of annularity of an annular eclipse will cross Mexico, the United States, and Canada, with partial phases visible throughout those countries.

  15. First science with SALT: peering at the accreting polar caps of the eclipsing polar SDSS J015543.40+002807.2

    CERN Document Server

    O'Donoghue, D; Balona, L A; Bester, D; Botha, L; Brink, J; Carter, D B; Charles, P A; Christians, A; Ebrahim, F; Emmerich, R; Esterhuyse, W; Evans, G P; Fourie, C; Fourie, P; Gajjar, H; Gordon, M; Gumede, C; De Kock, M; Koeslag, A; Koorts, W P; Kriel, H; Marang, F; Meiring, J G; Menzies, J W; Menzies, P; Metcalfe, D; Meyer, B; Nel, L; O'Connor, J; Osman, F; Plessis, C; Rall, H; Riddick, A; Romero-Colmenero, E; Potter, S B; Sass, C; Schalekamp, H; Sessions, N; Siyengo, S; Sopela, V; Steyn, H; Stoffels, J; Stoltz, J; Swart, G; Swat, A; Swiegers, J; Tiheli, T; Väisänen, P; Whittaker, W; Van Wyk, F

    2006-01-01

    We describe briefly the properties of the recently completed Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), along with its first light imager SALTICAM. Using this instrument, we present 4.3 hr of high speed unfiltered photometric observations of the eclipsing polar SDSSJ015543.40+002807.2 with time resolution as short as 112 ms, the highest quality observations of this kind of any polar to date. The system was observed during its high luminosity state. Two accreting poles are clearly seen in the eclipse light curve. The binary system parameters have been constrained: the white dwarf mass is at the low end of the range expected for cataclysmic variables. Correlations between the positions of the accretion regions on or near the surface of the white dwarf and the binary system parameters were established. The sizes of the accretion regions and their relative movement from eclipse to eclipse were estimated: they are typically 4-7 deg depending on the mass of the white dwarf. The potential of these observations will on...

  16. IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3: A DEEPLY ECLIPSING INTERMEDIATE POLAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aungwerojwit, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Gaensicke, B. T.; Wheatley, P. J.; Pyrzas, S. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Staels, B. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Avenida Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Krajci, T. [CBA Flanders, Alan Guth Observatory, Koningshofbaan 51, B-9308 Hofstade, Aalst (Belgium); Rodriguez-Gil, P. [Astrokolkhoz Observatory, PO Box 1351 Cloudcroft, NM 88317 (United States)

    2012-10-20

    We present time-resolved photometry of a cataclysmic variable discovered in the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H{alpha} Survey of the northern galactic plane, IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3, and classify the system as the fourth deeply eclipsing intermediate polar known with an orbital period of P {sub orb} = 8.16 hr and a spin period of P {sub spin} = 2210 s. The system shows mild variations of its brightness that appear to be accompanied by a change in the amplitude of the spin modulation at optical wavelengths and a change in the morphology of the eclipse profile. The inferred magnetic moment of the white dwarf is {mu}{sub wd} {approx} (6-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} G cm{sup 3}, and in this case IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3 will evolve either into a short-period EX Hya-like intermediate polar with a large P {sub spin}/P{sub orb} ratio or, perhaps more likely, into a synchronized polar. Swift observations show that the system is an ultraviolet and X-ray source, with a hard X-ray spectrum that is consistent with those seen in other intermediate polars. The ultraviolet light curve shows orbital modulation and an eclipse, while the low signal-to-noise ratio X-ray light curve does not show a significant modulation on the spin period. The measured X-ray flux is about an order of magnitude lower than would be expected from scaling by the optical fluxes of well-known X-ray-selected intermediate polars.

  17. Faint Submillimter Galaxy Counts at 450 micron

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Barger, Amy J; Casey, Caitlin M; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B; Wang, Wei-Hao; Williams, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of SCUBA2 observations at 450 micron and 850 micron of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area > 100 arcmin2 and 1 sigma sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy/beam at 450 and 850 micron respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 micron and 26 sources at 850 micron with a signal-to-noise ratio > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 micron number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that ~47-61% of the 450 micron extragalactic background light (EBL) resolved into individual sources with 450 micron fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 micron sources in the 4 sigma sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcseconds, while brighter sources (signal-to-noise > 6 sigma) are good to 1.4 arcseconds. Using the deep radio map (1 sigma ~ 6 uJy) we find tha...

  18. Optically Faint Radio Sources: Reborn AGN?

    CERN Document Server

    Filho, Mercedes E; Lobo, Catarina; Antón, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    We have discovered a number of relatively strong radio sources in the field-of-view of SDSS galaxy clusters which present no optical counterparts down to the magnitude limits of the SDSS. The optically faint radio sources appear as double-lobed or core-jet objects on the FIRST radio images and have projected angular sizes ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 arcmin. We have followed-up these sources with near-infrared imaging using the wide-field imager HAWK-I on the VLT. K_s-band emitting regions, about 1.5 arcsec in size and coincident with the centers of the radio structures, were detected in all the sources, with magnitudes in the range 17-20 mag. We have used spectral modelling to characterize the sample sources. In general, the radio properties are similar to those observed in 3CRR sources but the optical-radio slopes are consistent with moderate to high redshift (z<4) gigahertz-peaked spectrum sources. Our results suggest that these unusual objects are galaxies whose black hole has been recently re-ignited but r...

  19. Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the role which clouds could play in resolving the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP). Lower solar luminosity in the past means that less energy was absorbed on Earth (a forcing of -50 Wm-2 during the late Archean), but geological evidence points to the Earth being at least as warm as it is today, with only very occasional glaciations. We perform radiative calculations on a single global mean atmospheric column. We select a nominal set of three layered, randomly overlapping clouds, which are both consistent with observed cloud climatologies and reproduce the observed global mean energy budget of Earth. By varying the fraction, thickness, height and particle size of these clouds we conduct a wide exploration of how changed clouds could affect climate, thus constraining how clouds could contribute to resolving the FYSP. Low clouds reflect sunlight but have little greenhouse effect. Removing them entirely gives a~forcing of +25 Wm-2 whilst more modest reduction in their efficacy gives a forcing of +10 ...

  20. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, P.; Barker, E.; Buckalew, B.; Burkhardt, A.; Cowardin, H.; Frith, J.; Kaleida, C.; Lederer, S.; Lee, C.

    2016-09-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope, 'Walter Baade', at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude has been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The detections have a wide range of characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections that vary in brightness ("flashers") during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected product of size * albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm.

  1. Paper Moon: Simulating a Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Sean P.; Downing, James P.; Comstock, Jocelyne M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a classroom activity in which a solar eclipse is simulated and a mathematical model is developed to explain the data. Students use manipulative devices and graphing calculators to carry out the experiment and then compare their results to those collected in Koolymilka, Australia, during the 2002 eclipse.

  2. Mastering Eclipse plug-in development

    CERN Document Server

    Blewitt, Alex

    2014-01-01

    If you are a Java developer who is familiar with the Eclipse plug-in environment, this book covers the advanced concepts that you need to know to achieve true expertise. Prior experience in creating Eclipse plug-ins is assumed for this book.

  3. Paper Moon: Simulating a Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Sean P.; Downing, James P.; Comstock, Jocelyne M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a classroom activity in which a solar eclipse is simulated and a mathematical model is developed to explain the data. Students use manipulative devices and graphing calculators to carry out the experiment and then compare their results to those collected in Koolymilka, Australia, during the 2002 eclipse.

  4. Countdown to the Great American Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulco, Charles

    2017-01-01

    The Great American Total Solar Eclipse (TSE2017) will occur on August 21 this year--the first total solar eclipse in the continental United States since 1979. For many reasons, this is a scientific and educational milestone event of the highest magnitude that should not be missed by any teacher and student whether or not their school is in session…

  5. Mach bands change asymmetrically during solar eclipses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John; Diamond, Mark R; Badcock, David R

    2003-01-01

    Observations made during two partial eclipses of the Sun show that the Mach bands on shadows cast by the Sun disappear and reappear asymmetrically as an eclipse progresses. These changes can be explained as due to changes in the shape of the penumbras of shadows as the visible portion of the Sun forms crescents of different orientation.

  6. The eclipse period of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Freiesleben, Ulrik; Krekling, Martin A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2000-01-01

    corresponds to the period of origin hemimethylation. The SeqA protein was absolutely required for the eclipse, and DnaA titration studies suggested that the SeqA protein prevented the binding of multiple DnaA molecules on oriC (initial complex formation). No correlation between the amount of SeqA and eclipse...

  7. Get Ready for the Great American Eclipse!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulco, Charles

    2017-01-01

    This year marks 38 years since any part of the continental United States was darkened by the Moon's umbral shadow. During this "eclipse drought," no U.S. residents except those on Hawaii's Big Island in 1991 have had the opportunity to observe totality without traveling abroad. The 2017 Total Solar Eclipse (TSE2017, August 21, 2017) is…

  8. Is an eclipse described in the Odyssey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikouzis, Constantino; Magnasco, Marcelo O

    2008-07-01

    Plutarch and Heraclitus believed a certain passage in the 20th book of the Odyssey ("Theoclymenus's prophecy") to be a poetic description of a total solar eclipse. In the late 1920s, Schoch and Neugebauer computed that the solar eclipse of 16 April 1178 B.C.E. was total over the Ionian Islands and was the only suitable eclipse in more than a century to agree with classical estimates of the decade-earlier sack of Troy around 1192-1184 B.C.E. However, much skepticism remains about whether the verses refer to this, or any, eclipse. To contribute to the issue independently of the disputed eclipse reference, we analyze other astronomical references in the Epic, without assuming the existence of an eclipse, and search for dates matching the astronomical phenomena we believe they describe. We use three overt astronomical references in the epic: to Boötes and the Pleiades, Venus, and the New Moon; we supplement them with a conjectural identification of Hermes's trip to Ogygia as relating to the motion of planet Mercury. Performing an exhaustive search of all possible dates in the span 1250-1115 B.C., we looked to match these phenomena in the order and manner that the text describes. In that period, a single date closely matches our references: 16 April 1178 B.C.E. We speculate that these references, plus the disputed eclipse reference, may refer to that specific eclipse.

  9. American Solar Eclipses 2017 & 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCanzio, Albert

    2016-06-01

    This research focuses on harnessing the statistical capacity of many available concurrent observers to advance scientific knowledge. By analogy to some Galilean measurement-experiments in which he used minimal instrumentation, this researcher will address the question: How might an individual observer, with a suitably chosen common metric and with widely available, reasonably affordable equipment, contribute to new knowledge from observing the solar eclipse of 2017? Each observer would report data to an institutional sponsor who would analyze these data statistically toward new knowledge about some question currently unsettled in astronomy or in the target field connected with the question which the chosen metric is targeted to address. A subordinate question will be discussed: As a tradeoff between “best question to answer” and “easiest question for observers’ data to answer”, is there an event property and related target question that, with high potential utility and low cost, would be measurable by an observer positioned in the path of totality with minimal or inexpensive equipment and training? (And that, as a statistical sample point, might contribute to new knowledge?) In dialog with the audience, the presenter will suggest some measurables; e.g., solar flares, ground shadow bands, atmospheric metrics, coronal structure, etc., correlated or not with certain other dependent variables. The independent variable would be time in the intervention interval from eclipse contacts 1 -- 4. By the aforementioned analogy, the presenter will review as examples some measurement-experiments conducted or suggested by Galileo; e.g., pendulum laws, Jovian satellite eclipse times, geokinesis as later seen in Bessel's parallactic measurement, and Michelson's measurement of light speed. Because criteria of metrics-determination would naturally include existence of a data-collection-analysis method, this presentation requires dialogue with a critical mass of audience

  10. Structure and Dynamics of the 2009 July 22 Eclipse White-light Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Rušin, V.; Saniga, M.; Druckmüllerová, H.; Babcock, B. A.

    2011-11-01

    The white-light corona (WLC) during the total solar eclipse of 2009 July 22 was observed by several teams in the Moon's shadow stretching from India and China across the Pacific Ocean with its many isolated islands. We present a comparison of the WLC as observed by eclipse teams located in China (Shanghai region) and on the Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands, with observations taken 112 minutes apart, combined with near-simultaneous space observations. The eclipse was observed at the beginning of solar cycle 24, during a deep solar minimum (officially estimated as 2008 December according to the smoothed sunspot number, but very extended). The solar corona shows several different types of features (coronal holes, polar rays, helmet streamers, faint loops, voids, etc.), though it was extremely sparse in streamers as shown from Large-Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph data. No large-scale dynamical phenomena were seen when comparing the observations from the two sites, confirming that the corona was quiescent. We measure a Ludendorff flattening coefficient of 0.238, typical of solar minimum.

  11. Faint spatial object classifier construction based on data mining technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xin; Zhao, Yang; Liao, Yurong; Nie, Yong-ming

    2016-11-01

    Data mining can effectively obtain the faint spatial object's patterns and characteristics, the universal relations and other implicated data characteristics, the key of which is classifier construction. Faint spatial object classifier construction with spatial data mining technology for faint spatial target detection is proposed based on theoretical analysis of design procedures and guidelines in detail. For the one-sidedness weakness during dealing with the fuzziness and randomness using this method, cloud modal classifier is proposed. Simulating analyzing results indicate that this method can realize classification quickly through feature combination and effectively resolve the one-sidedness weakness problem.

  12. Total Solar Eclipse of 2002 December 04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    2001-01-01

    On 2002 December 04, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses the Southern Hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in the South Atlantic, crosses southern Africa and the Indian Ocean, and ends at sunset in southern Australia. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes the southern two thirds of Africa, Antarctica, Indian Ocean and Australia. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 400 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile and the sky during totality. Information on safe eclipse viewing and eclipse photography is included.

  13. Total Solar Eclipse of 2008 August 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, F.; Anderson, J.

    2007-01-01

    On 2008 August 01, a total eclipse of the Sun is visible from within a narrow corridor that traverses half the Earth. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in northern Canada and extends across Greenland, the Arctic, central Russia, Mongolia, and China. A partial eclipse is seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes northeastern North America, most of Europe and Asia. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for 308 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile and the sky during totality. Information on safe eclipse viewing and eclipse photography is included.

  14. Total Solar Eclipse of 2006 March 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, F.; Anderson, J.

    2004-01-01

    On 2006 March 29, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses half the Earth. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in Brazil and extends across the Atlantic, northern Africa, and central Asia where it ends at sunset in western Mongolia. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes the northern two thirds of Africa, Europe, and central Asia.Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 350 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile, and the sky during totality. Information on safe eclipse viewing and eclipse photography is included.

  15. Scientific observations at total solar eclipses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jay M.Pasachoff

    2009-01-01

    The occasion of the longest totality of an eclipse in the 18 yr 111/3 d saros cycle leads to taking stock of the scientific value of ground-based eclipse observations in this space age. Though a number of space satellites from the U.S., Europe, Japan, and Russia study the Sun, scientists at eclipses can observe the solar chromosphere and corona at higher spatial resolution, at higher temporal resolution, and at higher spectral resolution than are possible aloft. Furthermore, eclipse expeditions can transport a wide variety of state-of-the-art equipment to the path of totality. Thus, for at least some years to come, solar eclipse observations will remain both scientifically valuable and cost-effective ways to study the outer solar atmosphere.

  16. Effect of solar eclipse on microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Shriyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A solar eclipse was observed in India on 15 th January, 2010. It was a total eclipse in some parts of the country, while it was a partial eclipse in other parts. Microorganisms play an important role in various phenomena on the earth. This study was undertaken to know the influence of solar eclipse on nature indirectly, by analyzing certain genotypic and phenotypic variations in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Since yeast have similar gene expression as that of humans, investigations were pursued on Candida albicans. Hence the study of the effect of solar eclipse on cultures of Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella species, Escherichia coli, and C. albicans was performed in the laboratory. The effect of the total or partial eclipse on the microorganism isolated from clinical isolates was investigated during the time period from 11.15 am to 3.15 pm. Materials and Methods : Cultures of S. aureus, Klebsiella species, and E. coli colonies on nutrient agar slants and broth and C. albicans on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar plates and broth. Slants were exposed to sunlight during eclipse and exposure to normal sunlight at Mangalore, Dakshina Kannada district, Karnataka state, India. Results : There was significant change observed during exposure to normal sunlight and eclipse phase. Bacterial colonies showed difference in morphology on smear examination and sensitivity pattern during this study. One fungal species and three bacterial isolates were studied and changes were recorded. Fungal species showed a definite change in their morphology on exposure to sunlight during eclipse observed by stained smear examination from broth, plate, and slant. Conclusion : Present study concludes that blocking of the sun rays during eclipse does not harm prokaryotes and eukaryotes, instead promoted the progeny of predators in the race of better acclimatization and survival in the natural and changing environmental conditions.

  17. Effect of solar eclipse on microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriyan, Amrita; Bhat, Angri M; Nayak, Narendra

    2011-01-01

    A solar eclipse was observed in India on 15(th) January, 2010. It was a total eclipse in some parts of the country, while it was a partial eclipse in other parts. Microorganisms play an important role in various phenomena on the earth. This study was undertaken to know the influence of solar eclipse on nature indirectly, by analyzing certain genotypic and phenotypic variations in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Since yeast have similar gene expression as that of humans, investigations were pursued on Candida albicans. Hence the study of the effect of solar eclipse on cultures of Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella species, Escherichia coli,and C. albicans was performed in the laboratory. The effect of the total or partial eclipse on the microorganism isolated from clinical isolates was investigated during the time period from 11.15 am to 3.15 pm. Cultures of S. aureus, Klebsiella species, and E. coli colonies on nutrient agar slants and broth and C. albicans on Sabouraud's dextrose agar plates and broth. Slants were exposed to sunlight during eclipse and exposure to normal sunlight at Mangalore, Dakshina Kannada district, Karnataka state, India. There was significant change observed during exposure to normal sunlight and eclipse phase. Bacterial colonies showed difference in morphology on smear examination and sensitivity pattern during this study. One fungal species and three bacterial isolates were studied and changes were recorded. Fungal species showed a definite change in their morphology on exposure to sunlight during eclipse observed by stained smear examination from broth, plate, and slant. Present study concludes that blocking of the sun rays during eclipse does not harm prokaryotes and eukaryotes, instead promoted the progeny of predators in the race of better acclimatization and survival in the natural and changing environmental conditions.

  18. Observing Solar Eclipses in the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.

    2006-08-01

    The paths of totality of total solar eclipses cross the world, with each spot receiving such a view about every 300 years. The areas of the world from which partial eclipses are visible are much wider. For the few days prior to a total eclipse, the attention of a given country is often drawn toward the eclipse, providing a teachable moment that we can use to bring astronomy to the public's attention. Also, it is important to describe how to observe the partial phases of the eclipse safely. Further, it is important to describe to those people in the zone of totality that it is not only safe but also interesting to view totality. Those who are misled by false warnings that overstate the hazards of viewing the eclipse, or that fail to distinguish between safe and unsafe times for naked-eye viewing, may well be skeptical when other health warnings--perhaps about AIDS or malaria prevention or polio inoculations--come from the authorities, meaning that the penalties for misunderstanding the astronomical event can be severe. Through the International Astronomical Union's Working Group on Solar Eclipses and through the I.A.U.'s Program Group on Public Education at the Times of Eclipses, part of the Commission on Education and Development, we make available information to national authorities, to colleagues in the relevant countries, and to others, through our Websites at http://www.eclipses.info and http://www.totalsolareclipse.net and through personal communication. Among our successes at the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse was the distribution through a colleague in Nigeria of 400,000 eye-protection filters.

  19. AE Aquarii represents a new subclass of Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Ikhsanov, N R

    2012-01-01

    We analyze properties of the unique nova-like star AE Aquarii identified with a close binary system containing a red dwarf and a very fast rotating magnetized white dwarf. It cannot be assigned to any of the three commonly adopted sub-classes of Cataclysmic Variables: Polars, Intermediate Polars, and Accreting non-magnetized White Dwarfs. Our study has shown that the white dwarf in AE Aqr is in the ejector state and its dipole magnetic moment is $\\mu ~ 1.5 \\times 10^{34} G cm^3$. It switched into this state due to intensive mass exchange between the system components during a previous epoch. A high rate of disk accretion onto the white dwarf surface resulted in temporary screening of its magnetic field and spin-up of the white dwarf to its present spin period. Transition of the white dwarf to the ejector state had occurred at a final stage of the spin-up epoch as its magnetic field emerged from the accreted plasma due to diffusion. In the frame of this scenario AE Aqr represents a missing link in the chain of...

  20. Exploring inside-out Doppler tomography: magnetic cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Kotze, Enrico J; McBride, Vanessa A

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of applying our inside-out velocity projection and flux modulation mapping techniques to the Doppler tomography of magnetic cataclysmic variables. The inside-out tomogram is constructed by directly projecting phase-resolved spectra onto the inside-out framework. In addition, our flux modulation mapping technique extracts any information related to the modulation of the line flux by utilising consecutive half-phase tomograms. We apply this to both the standard and the inside-out techniques. Our test cases, the polars HU Aqr and V834 Cen, and the intermediate polar PQ Gem, were chosen because of their known accretion characteristics, namely ballistic, magnetic and curtain dominated accretion, respectively. In all three cases the inside-out tomogram better exposes low-velocity emission details which are overly compacted in the standard tomogram. This is especially apparent for the mid-inclination V834 Cen where the almost blob-like blended lower velocity emission in the standard tomogram i...

  1. Photometry of some neglected bright cataclysmic variables and candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Albert

    2017-04-01

    As part of an effort to better characterize bright cataclysmic variables (CVs) which have received little attention in the past light curves of four confirmed systems (CZ Aql, BO Cet, V380 Oph and EF Tuc) and one candidate (Lib 3) are analyzed. For none of these stars time resolved photometry has been published previously. While no variability was found in the case of Lib 3, which thus cannot be confirmed as a CV, the light curves of all other targets are dominated by strong flickering. Modulations on hourly time scales superimposed on the flickering can probably be related to orbital variations in BO Cet and V380 Oph, but not in CZ Aql and EF Tuc. Variations on the time scale of 10 min in CZ Aql, while not yet constituting convincing evidence, together with previous suspicions of a magnetically channeled accretion flow may point at an intermediate polar nature of this star. Some properties of the flickering are quantified in an effort to enlarge the data base for future comparative flickering studies in CVs and to refine the classification of the target stars.

  2. The formation of Cataclysmic Variables: the influence of nova eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Nelemans, G; Repetto, S; Toonen, S; Phinney, E S

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical and observed populations of pre-cataclysmic variables (pre-CVs) are dominated by systems with low-mass white dwarfs (WDs), while the WD masses in CVs are typically high. In addition, the space density of CVs is found to be significantly lower than theoretical models. We investigate the influence of nova outbursts on the formation and (initial) evolution of CVs. In particular, we calculate the stability of the mass transfer in case all the material accreted on the WD is lost in classical novae, and part of the energy to eject the material comes from a common-envelope like interaction with the companion. In addition, we study the effect of an asymmetry in the mass ejection, that may lead to small eccentricities in the orbit. We find that a common-envelope like ejection significantly decreases the stability of the mass transfer, in particular for low-mass WD. Similarly, the influence of asymmetric mass loss can be important for short-period systems and even more so for low-mass WD, but likely dis...

  3. Characterization of new hard X-ray Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, F; Falanga, M; Mukai, K; Matt, G; Bonnet-Bidaud, J -M; Masetti, N; Mouchet, M

    2012-01-01

    We aim at characterizing a sample of 9 new hard X-ray selected Cataclysmic Variable (CVs), to unambiguously identify them as magnetic systems of the Intermediate Polar (IP) type. We performed timing and spectral analysis by using X-ray, and simultaneous UV and optical data collected by XMM-Newton, complemented with hard X-ray data provided by INTEGRAL and Swift. The pulse arrival time were used to estimate the orbital periods. The X-ray spectra were fitted using composite models consisting of different absorbing columns and emission components. Strong X-ray pulses at the White Dwarf (WD) spin period are detected and found to decrease with energy. Most sources are spin-dominated systems in the X-rays, though four are beat dominated at optical wavelengths. We estimated the orbital period in all system (except for IGR J16500-3307), providing the first estimate for IGR J08390-4833, IGR J18308-1232, and IGR J18173-2509. All X-ray spectra are multi-temperature. V2069 Cyg and RX J0636+3535 posses a soft X-ray optica...

  4. Optical Studies of Twenty Longer-Period Cataclysmic Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Thorstensen, John R; Skinner, Julie N

    2010-01-01

    We obtained time-series radial velocity spectroscopy of twenty cataclysmic variable stars, with the aim of determining orbital periods P_orb. All of the stars reported here prove to have P_orb > 3.5 h. For sixteen of the stars, these are the first available period determinations, and for the remaining four (V709 Cas, AF Cam, V1062 Tau, and RX J2133+51) we use new observations to improve the accuracy of previously-published periods. Most of the targets are dwarf novae, without notable idiosyncracies. Of the remainder, three (V709 Cas, V1062 Tau, and RX J2133+51) are intermediate polars (DQ Her stars); one (IPHAS 0345) is a secondary-dominated system without known outbursts, similar to LY UMa; one (V1059 Sgr) is an old nova; and two others (V478 Her and V1082 Sgr) are long-period novalike variables. The stars with new periods are IPHAS 0345 (0.314 d); V344 Ori (0.234 d); VZ Sex (0.149 d); NSVS 1057+09 (0.376 d); V478 Her (0.629 d); V1059 Sgr (0.286 d); V1082 Sgr (0.868 d); FO Aql (0.217 d); V587 Lyr (0.275 d); ...

  5. Detached cataclysmic variables are crossing the orbital period gap

    CERN Document Server

    Zorotovic, Monica; Parsons, Steven G; Gänsicke, Boris T; Hardy, Adam; Agurto-Gangas, Carolina; Gómez-Morán, Ada Nebot; Rebassa-Mansergas, Alberto; Schwope, Axel D

    2016-01-01

    A central hypothesis in the theory of cataclysmic variable (CV) evolution is the need to explain the observed lack of accreting systems in the ~2-3 h orbital period range, known as the period gap. The standard model, disrupted magnetic braking (DMB), reproduces the gap by postulating that CVs transform into inconspicuous detached white dwarf (WD) plus main sequence (MS) systems, which no longer resemble CVs. However, observational evidence for this standard model is currently indirect and thus this scenario has attracted some criticism throughout the last decades. Here we perform a simple but exceptionally strong test of the existence of detached CVs (dCVs). If the theory is correct dCVs should produce a peak in the orbital period distribution of detached close binaries consisting of a WD and an M4-M6 secondary star. We measured six new periods which brings the sample of such binaries with known periods below 10 h to 52 systems. An increase of systems in the ~2-3 h orbital period range is observed. Comparing ...

  6. Photometry of some neglected bright cataclysmic variables and candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Bruch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    As part of an effort to better characterize bright cataclysmic variables (CVs) which have received little attention in the past light curves of four confirmed systems (CZ Aql, BO Cet, V380 Oph and EF Tuc) and one candidate (Lib 3) are analyzed. For none of these stars time resolved photometry has been published previously. While no variability was found in the case of Lib 3, which thus cannot be confirmed as a CV, the light curves of all other targets are dominated by strong flickering. Modulations on hourly time scales superimposed on the flickering can probably be related to orbital variations in BO Cet and V380 Oph, but not in CZ Aql and EF Tuc. Variations on the time scale of 10 minutes in CZ Aql, while not yet constituting convincing evidence, together with previous suspicions of a magnetically channeled accretion flow may point at an intermediate polar nature of this star. Some properties of the flickering are quantified in an effort to enlarge the data base for future comparative flickering studies in ...

  7. Photometric CCD observations of four Pre-cataclysmic binary candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, R.; Vogt, N.; Colque, Juan Pablo

    We present preliminary results of differential photometric observations of Abell 65, HZ 9, GD 1401 and BPM 46460, obtained between September and December 2006 with the 42 cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Observatory which belongs to the Universidad Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta. All four stars are close red dwarf/white dwarf binaries which could have formed be recent common envelope events. In two of the four cases we detected (or confirmed) significant variability. In one of them, the central star of a planetary nebula Abell 65, we confirmed the rather strong photometric variability with a period very near to 24 hours (Bond and Livio, 1990). In the white dwarf binary HZ9 we detected, for the first time, photometric variations with a period near 0.58 days which corresponds to the known orbital period (Lanning and Pesch, 1981; Stauffer, 1987). The amplitude of this variation is 0.08 mag, it probably refers to reflection of the white dwarf radiation on the surface of the red companion. - These observations are part of a larger on-going project which pretends to identify and to study pre-cataclysmic binaries by means of photometric and spectroscopic methods and to improve, this way, the hitherto poor statistics on the properties of these interesting stars.

  8. Dynamical formation of cataclysmic variables in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-01-01

    The formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters is likely to be affected by the cluster internal dynamics and the stellar interactions in the cluster dense environment. Several observational studies have revealed a correlation between the number of X-ray sources and the stellar encounter rate, and provided evidence of the role of dynamics in the formation of X-ray binaries. We have performed a survey of Monte Carlo simulations aimed at exploring the connection between the dynamics and formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and the origin of the observed correlation between the number of these objects, Ncv, and the stellar encounter rate, Γ. The results of our simulations show a correlation between Ncv and Γ, as found in observational data, illustrate the essential role played by the dynamics, and shed light on the dynamical history behind this correlation. CVs in our simulations are more centrally concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off stars, although this trend is stronger for CVs formed from primordial binaries undergoing exchange encounters, which include a population of more massive CVs absent in the group of CVs formed from binaries not suffering any component exchange.

  9. Excess mid-IR emission in Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Dubus, G; Kern, B; Taam, R E; Spruit, H C

    2004-01-01

    We present a search for excess mid-IR emission due to circumbinary material in the orbital plane of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Our motivation stems from the fact that the strong braking exerted by a circumbinary (CB) disc on the binary system could explain several puzzles in our current understanding of CV evolution. Since theoretical estimates predict that the emission from a CB disc can dominate the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the system at wavelengths > 5 microns, we obtained simultaneous visible to mid-IR SEDs for eight systems. We report detections of SS Cyg at 11.7 microns and AE Aqr at 17.6 microns, both in excess of the contribution from the secondary star. In AE Aqr, the IR likely originates from synchrotron-emitting clouds propelled by the white dwarf. In SS Cyg, we argue that the observed mid-IR variability is difficult to reconcile with simple models of CB discs and we consider free-free emission from a wind. In the other systems, our mid-IR upper limits place strong constraints on the...

  10. Dynamical Formation of Cataclysmic Variables in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Jongsuk; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters is likely to be affected by the cluster internal dynamics and the stellar interactions in the cluster dense environment.Several observational studies have revealed a correlation between the number of X-ray sources and the stellar encounter rate and provided evidence of the role of dynamics in the formation of X-ray binaries. We have performed a survey of Monte-Carlo simulations aimed at exploring the connection between the dynamics and formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and the origin of the observed correlation between the number of these objects, $N_{\\rm cv}$, and the stellar encounter rate, $\\Gamma$.The results of our simulations show a correlation between $N_{\\rm cv}$ and $\\Gamma$ as found in observational data, illustrate the essential role played by dynamics, and shed light on the dynamical history behind this correlation. CVs in our simulations are more centrally concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off...

  11. Nova-like cataclysmic variables in the infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoard, D. W. [Eureka Scientific, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States); Long, Knox S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Howell, Steve B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Wachter, Stefanie [Max Planck Institut für Astronomie, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brinkworth, Carolyn S. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Knigge, Christian [Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Drew, J. E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom); Szkody, Paula [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kafka, S. [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Washington, DC (United States); Belle, Kunegunda [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Froning, Cynthia S. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Van Belle, Gerard T. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Pretorius, M. L., E-mail: hoard@mpia.de [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-01

    Nova-like (NL) cataclysmic variables have persistently high mass transfer rates and prominent steady state accretion disks. We present an analysis of infrared observations of 12 NLs obtained from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All Sky Survey. The presence of an infrared excess at λ ≳ 3-5 μm over the expectation of a theoretical steady state accretion disk is ubiquitous in our sample. The strength of the infrared excess is not correlated with orbital period, but shows a statistically significant correlation (but shallow trend) with system inclination that might be partially (but not completely) linked to the increasing view of the cooler outer accretion disk and disk rim at higher inclinations. We discuss the possible origin of the infrared excess in terms of emission from bremsstrahlung or circumbinary dust, with either mechanism facilitated by the mass outflows (e.g., disk wind/corona, accretion stream overflow, and so on) present in NLs. Our comparison of the relative advantages and disadvantages of either mechanism for explaining the observations suggests that the situation is rather ambiguous, largely circumstantial, and in need of stricter observational constraints.

  12. On the late spectral types of cataclysmic variable secondaries

    CERN Document Server

    Baraffe, I

    2000-01-01

    We investigate why the spectral type of most cataclysmic variable (CV) secondaries is significantly later than that of a ZAMS star with the same mean density. Using improved stellar input physics, tested against observations of low-mass stars at the bottom of the main sequence, we calculate the secular evolution of CVs with low-mass donors. We consider sequences with different mass transfer rates and with a different degree of nuclear evolution of the donor prior to mass transfer. Systems near the upper edge of the gap ($P \\sim 3 - 6$ h) can be reproduced by models with a wide range of mass transfer rates from $1.5 \\times 10^{-9} \\msolyr$ to $10^{-8} \\msolyr$. Evolutionary sequences with a small transfer rate and donors that are substantially evolved off the ZAMS (central hydrogen content $0.05-0.5$) reproduce CVs with late spectral types above $P \\simgr$ 6 h. Systems with the most discrepant (late) spectral type should have the smallest donor mass at any given $P$. Consistency with the period gap suggests th...

  13. Another Faint UV Object Associated with a Globular Cluster X-Ray Source The Case of M92

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Rood, R T; Pecci, F F; Buonanno, R; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Paltrinieri, Barbara; Rood, Robert T.; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Buonanno, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    The core of the metal poor Galactic Globular Cluster M92 (NGC 6341) has been observed with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope through visual, blue and mid-UV filters in a program devoted to study the evolved stellar population in a selected sample of Galactic Globular Clusters. In the UV $(m_{255}, m_{255}-U)$ color magnitude diagram we have discovered a faint `UV-dominant' object. This star lies within the error box of a Low Luminosity Globular Cluster X-ray source (LLGCX) recently found in the core of M92. The properties of the UV star discovered in M92 are very similar to those of other UV stars found in the core of some clusters (M13, 47 Tuc, M80, etc)---all of them are brighter in the UV than in the visible and are located in the vicinity of a LLGCX. We suggest that these stars are a new sub-class of cataclysmic variables.

  14. Faint Ultraviolet Objects in the Core of M13 Optical Counterparts of the Low Luminosity X-ray Source?

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Pecci, F F; Rood, R T; Dorman, B; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Paltrinieri, Barbara; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Rood, Robert T.; Dorman, Ben

    1997-01-01

    The core of the galactic globular cluster M13 (NGC 6205) has been observed with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope through visual, blue and mid- and far-UV filters in a programme devoted to study the UV population in a sample of Galactic globular clusters. In the UV Color Magnitude Diagrams derived from the HST images we have discovered three faint objects with a strong UV excess, which lie significantly outside the main loci defined by more than 12,000 normal cluster stars. The positions of two of the UV stars are nearly coincident (7" & 1") to those of a low luminosity X-ray source recently found in the core of M13 and to a 3.5-sigma peak in the X-ray contour map. We suggest that the UV stars are physically connected to the X-ray emission. The UV stars are very similar to the quiescent nova in the globular cluster M80, and they might be a, perhaps new, subclass of cataclysmic variable.

  15. Phemenological Modeling of Eclipsing Binary Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Andronov, Ivan L; Chinarova, Lidia L

    2016-01-01

    We review the method NAV (New Algol Variable) first introduced in 2012Ap.....55..536A, which uses the locally-dependent shapes of eclipses in an addition to the trigonometric polynomial of the second order (which typically describes the "out-of-eclipse" part of the light curve with effects of reflection, ellipticity and O'Connell). Eclipsing binary stars are believed to show distinct eclipses only if belonging to the EA type. With a decreasing eclipse width, the statistically optimal value of the trigonometric polynomial s (2003ASPC..292..391A) drastically increases from ~2 for elliptic (EL) variables without eclipses, ~6-8 for EW and up to ~30-50 for some EA with narrow eclipses. In this case of large number of parameters, the smoothing curve becomes very noisy and apparent waves (the Gibbs phenomenon) may be seen. The NAV set of the parameters may be used for classification in the GCVS, VSX and similar catalogs. The maximal number of parameters is m=12, which corresponds to s=5, if correcting both the perio...

  16. The solar eclipse: a natural meteorological experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R Giles; Hanna, Edward

    2016-09-28

    A solar eclipse provides a well-characterized reduction in solar radiation, of calculable amount and duration. This captivating natural astronomical phenomenon is ideally suited to science outreach activities, but the predictability of the change in solar radiation also provides unusual conditions for assessing the atmospheric response to a known stimulus. Modern automatic observing networks used for weather forecasting and atmospheric research have dense spatial coverage, so the quantitative meteorological responses to an eclipse can now be evaluated with excellent space and time resolution. Numerical models representing the atmosphere at high spatial resolution can also be used to predict eclipse-related changes and interpret the observations. Combining the models with measurements yields the elements of a controlled atmospheric experiment on a regional scale (10-1000 km), which is almost impossible to achieve by other means. This modern approach to 'eclipse meteorology' as identified here can ultimately improve weather prediction models and be used to plan for transient reductions in renewable electricity generation. During the 20 March 2015 eclipse, UK electrical energy demand increased by about 3 GWh (11 TJ) or about 4%, alongside reductions in the wind and photovoltaic electrical energy generation of 1.5 GWh (5.5 TJ).This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  17. EE Cep observations requested for upcoming eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-07-01

    The AAVSO requests observations for the upcoming eclipse of EE Cephei, a long-period eclipsing variable. EE Cep has a period of 2,050 days, and shows strong variations in the eclipse light curve from one event to the next. Observations are needed to study the morphology of the upcoming eclipse, which will be used to better understand the shape of the eclipsing disk and how it precesses. Mid-eclipse is predicted to be August 23, 2014, but the early stages of the eclipse may begin as much as a month earlier. EE Cep is being observed by a number of amateur and professional astronomers using multiple telescopes at multiple wavelengths. Among these is a collaboration (see https://sites.google.com/site/eecep2014campaign/) headed by Cezary Galan at the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland; several individual AAVSO observers are already participating in this effort. The AAVSO is not currently a partner in that campaign, but all data submitted to the AAVSO will be publicly available. The AAVSO strongly encourages observers to begin following this star now, and to continue observations into October 2014 at least. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  18. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF THE 2012 NOVEMBER 13/14 ECLIPSE WHITE-LIGHT CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasachoff, J. M. [Williams College—Hopkins Observatory, Williamstown, MA 01267-2565 (United States); Rušin, V.; Saniga, M. [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 05960 Tatranská Lomnica (Slovakia); Babcock, B. A.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B., E-mail: eclipse@williams.edu, E-mail: vrusin@ta3.sk, E-mail: metod.saniga@tuwien.ac.at [Astronomy Department, Williams College, Williamstown, MA 01267-2565 (United States); and others

    2015-02-20

    Continuing our series of observations of coronal motion and dynamics over the solar-activity cycle, we observed from sites in Queensland, Australia, during the 2012 November 13 (UT)/14 (local time) total solar eclipse. The corona took the low-ellipticity shape typical of solar maximum (flattening index ε = 0.01), a change from the composite coronal images we observed and analyzed in this journal and elsewhere for the 2006 and 2008-2010 eclipses. After crossing the northeast Australian coast, the path of totality was over the ocean, so further totality was seen only by shipborne observers. Our results include velocities of a coronal mass ejection (CME; during the 36 minutes of passage from the Queensland coast to a ship north of New Zealand, we measured 413 km s{sup –1}) and we analyze its dynamics. We discuss the shapes and positions of several types of coronal features seen on our higher-resolution composite Queensland coronal images, including many helmet streamers, very faint bright and dark loops at the bases of helmet streamers, voids, and radially oriented thin streamers. We compare our eclipse observations with models of the magnetic field, confirming the validity of the predictions, and relate the eclipse phenomenology seen with the near-simultaneous images from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA), NASA's Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, ESA/Royal Observatory of Belgium's Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) on PROBA2, and Naval Research Laboratory's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment on ESA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. For example, the southeastern CME is related to the solar flare whose origin we trace with a SWAP series of images.

  19. Preparing for and Observing the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    I discuss ongoing plans and discussions for EPO and scientific observing of the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse. I discuss aspects of EPO based on my experiences at the 60 solar eclipses I have seen. I share cloud statistics along the eclipse path compiled by Jay Anderson, the foremost eclipse meteorologist. I show some sample observations of composite imagery, of spectra, and of terrestrial temperature changes based on observations of recent eclipses, including 2012 from Australia and 201...

  20. Central Serous Chorioretinopathy after Solar Eclipse Viewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allie Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of central serous chorioretinopathy after solar eclipse viewing. Case Report: A middle-age man developed a sudden-onset unilateral scotoma after viewing a partial solar eclipse in Hong Kong. Fundus examination, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography showed features compatible with central serous chorioretinopathy. The patient was managed conservatively and reevaluated periodically. Serial optical coherence tomographic evaluations demonstrated an initial increase in the amount of subretinal fluid which spontaneously resolved 10 weeks after the onset of symptoms. Conclusion: This case demonstrates the possibility of development of central serous chorioretinopathy following solar eclipse viewing.

  1. Influence of a solar eclipse on twilight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, E H; Hoffmann, M; Volland, H

    1994-07-20

    The morning twilight of the presunrise sky was measured at the Hoher-List Observatory during the total eclipse of 22 July 1990. The location of observation was far away from the central eclipse zone. The luminance showed a deep minimum in twilight during the main phase of the solar eclipse compared with normal conditions. A first order scattering model explains the observations reasonably well and shows that the sky radiation during the first phase of twilight at a location far away from the central umbra depends primarily on the height profile of the air pressure between ~ 100 and 200 km.

  2. Central serous chorioretinopathy after solar eclipse viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allie; Lai, Timothy Y Y

    2010-07-01

    To report a case of central serous chorioretinopathy after solar eclipse viewing. A middle-age man developed a sudden-onset unilateral scotoma after viewing a partial solar eclipse in Hong Kong. Fundus examination, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography showed features compatible with central serous chorioretinopathy. The patient was managed conservatively and reevaluated periodically. Serial optical coherence tomographic evaluations demonstrated an initial increase in the amount of subretinal fluid which spontaneously resolved 10 weeks after the onset of symptoms. This case demonstrates the possibility of development of central serous chorioretinopathy following solar eclipse viewing.

  3. Boundary-layer temperatures in high accretion rate cataclysmic variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoare, M.G.; Drew, J.E. (Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astrophysics)

    1991-04-01

    We use the Zanstra method to derive limits on boundary-layer temperatures in eclipsing dwarf novae during outburst and nova-like variables, using the observed He II {lambda}1640 and {lambda}4686 recombination lines. It is assumed that all the emission is produced in the wind rather than the accretion disc. This method constrains the boundary-layer temperatures to between 50 000 and 100 000 K depending on the degree of wind bipolarity. These estimates are lower than the T>or approx200 000 K predicted theoretically. Possible explanations include rapid rotation of the white dwarf and spreading of the boundary layer over the entire white-dwarf surface. (author).

  4. Total Solar Eclipse of 1997 March 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1995-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from Asia and the Pacific Ocean on 1997 March 9. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in eastern Kazakhstan and travels through Mongolia and eastern Siberia, where it swings northward to end at sunset in the Arctic Ocean. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes eastern Asia, the northern Pacific, and the northwest corner of North America. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for 280 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile, and the sky during totality. Tips and suggestions are also given on how to safely view and photograph the eclipse.

  5. Total Solar Eclipse of 2001 June 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1999-01-01

    On 2001 June 21, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses the Southern Hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in the South Atlantic, crosses southern Africa and Madagascar, and ends at sunset in the Indian Ocean. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes eastern South America and the southern two thirds of Africa. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 350 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile and the sky during totality. Tips and suggestions are also given on how to safely view and photograph the eclipse.

  6. Total Solar Eclipse of 1999 August 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1997-01-01

    On 1999 August 11, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses the Eastern Hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in the Atlantic and crosses central Europe, the Middle East, and India, where it ends at sunset in the Bay of Bengal. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes northeastern North America, all of Europe, northern Africa, and the western half of Asia. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 1400 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile, and the sky during totality. Tips and suggestions are also given on how to safely view and photograph the eclipse.

  7. Fluxon Global Predictions for the 2017 Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Lamb, Derek

    2017-08-01

    We present predicted coronal morphologies for the 2017 total solar eclipse, produced using quasi-stationary MHD simulation on a semi-Lagrangian grid with the FLUX code. FLUX uses the "fluxon" approach to ideal MHD: the magnetic field is modeled as a finite-element skeleton of field lines, which experience the familiar magnetic energy density ("pressure") and curvature ("tension") forces. Ongoing and recent work with FLUX enables simulation of solar wind flow and coronal density in the low-beta regime, and permits global 3-D solutions without the use of a supercomputer.Using magnetograms acquired up to one solar rotation before the eclipse, we expect to publish fluxon-derived models 2-3 weeks before the eclipse, and will present those models side-by-side with actual eclipse images to compare the model and actual coronae.

  8. Total solar eclipse of 3 November 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1993-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from the southern half of the Western Hemisphere on 3 November 1994. The path of the Moon's shadow passes through Peru, Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Brazil. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include tables of geographic coordinates of the path of totality, local circumstances for hundreds of cities, maps of the path of total and partial eclipse, weather prospects, and the lunar limb profile.

  9. Solar eclipses as an astrophysical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M

    2009-06-11

    Observations of the Sun during total eclipses have led to major discoveries, such as the existence of helium (from its spectrum), the high temperature of the corona (though the reason for the high temperature remains controversial), and the role of magnetic fields in injecting energy into-and trapping ionized gases within-stellar atmospheres. A new generation of ground-based eclipse observations reaches spatial, temporal and spectral-resolution domains that are inaccessible from space and therefore complement satellite studies.

  10. Eclipse plugins for LHCb software development

    CERN Document Server

    Astruc, Gregoire

    2011-01-01

    CERN LHCb Offline team, working on experiments around the LHC particle collider, had a number of tools to assist developers. LHCb projects use a domain-specific structure. Tools are always evolving and some team members started to look for ways to integrate those programs (most of them being CLIs) into more recent programming software like the Eclipse IDE. During this internship, a set of Eclipse plugins was created. They link the LHCb projects concepts to the ones in the IDE.

  11. Modelling secondary eclipses of Kepler exoplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hambálek Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have selected several Kepler objects with potentially the deepest secondary eclipses. By combination of many single phased light-curves (LCs we have produced a smooth LC with a larger SNR and made the secondary eclipses more distinct. This allowed us to measure the depth of primary and secondary minimum with greater accuracy and then to determine stellar and planetary radii by simplex modelling.

  12. [Optical coherence tomography in solar eclipse retinopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-González, C; Reche-Frutos, J; Santos-Bueso, E; Díaz-Valle, D; Benítez-del-Castillo, J M; García-Sánchez, J

    2006-05-01

    We describe the case of a patient suffering from acute visual loss soon after watching a solar eclipse. Optical coherence tomography was the main diagnostic tool used. Solar retinopathy is now an unusual cause of visual loss, although there are still some cases diagnosed, especially after viewing solar eclipses. Optical coherence tomography is suitable for detecting permanent retinal injuries related to solar exposure, with the outer retinal layers being typically affected.

  13. Planets transiting non-eclipsing binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David V.; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.

    2014-10-01

    The majority of binary stars do not eclipse. Current searches for transiting circumbinary planets concentrate on eclipsing binaries, and are therefore restricted to a small fraction of potential hosts. We investigate the concept of finding planets transiting non-eclipsing binaries, whose geometry would require mutually inclined planes. Using an N-body code we explore how the number and sequence of transits vary as functions of observing time and orbital parameters. The concept is then generalised thanks to a suite of simulated circumbinary systems. Binaries are constructed from radial-velocity surveys of the solar neighbourhood. They are then populated with orbiting gas giants, drawn from a range of distributions. The binary population is shown to be compatible with the Kepler eclipsing binary catalogue, indicating that the properties of binaries may be as universal as the initial mass function. These synthetic systems produce transiting circumbinary planets occurring on both eclipsing and non-eclipsing binaries. Simulated planets transiting eclipsing binaries are compared with published Kepler detections. We find 1) that planets transiting non-eclipsing binaries are probably present in the Kepler data; 2) that observational biases alone cannot account for the observed over-density of circumbinary planets near the stability limit, which implies a physical pile-up; and 3) that the distributions of gas giants orbiting single and binary stars are likely different. Estimating the frequency of circumbinary planets is degenerate with the spread in mutual inclination. Only a minimum occurrence rate can be produced, which we find to be compatible with 9%. Searching for inclined circumbinary planets may significantly increase the population of known objects and will test our conclusions. Their presence, or absence, will reveal the true occurrence rate and help develop circumbinary planet formation theories.

  14. The DEBCat detached eclipsing binary catalogue

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Detached eclipsing binary star systems are our primary source of measured physical properties of normal stars. I introduce DEBCat: a catalogue of detached eclipsing binaries with mass and radius measurements to the 2% precision necessary to put useful constraints on theoretical models of stellar evolution. The catalogue was begun in 2006, as an update of the compilation by Andersen (1991). It now contains over 170 systems, and new results are added on appearance in the refereed literature. DE...

  15. Long-term photometry of the eclipsing dwarf nova V893 Scorpii: Orbital period, oscillations, and a possible giant planet

    CERN Document Server

    Bruch, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The cataclysmic variable V893 Sco is an eclipsing dwarf nova which, apart from outbursts with comparatively low amplitudes, exhibits a particularly strong variability during quiescence on timescales of days to seconds.The present study aims to update the outdated orbital ephemerides published previously, to investigate deviations from linear ephemerides, and to characterize non-random brightness variations in a range of timescales. Light curves of V893 Sco were observed on 39 nights, spanning a total time base of about 14 years. They contain 114 eclipses which were used to significantly improve the precision of the orbital period and to study long-term variations of the time of revolution. Oscillations and similar brightness variations were studied with Fourier techniques in the individual light curves. The orbital period exhibits long-term variations with a cycle time of 10.2 years. They can be interpreted as a light travel time effect caused by the presence of a giant planet with approximately 9.5 Jupiter m...

  16. The solar eclipse: a natural meteorological experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A solar eclipse provides a well-characterized reduction in solar radiation, of calculable amount and duration. This captivating natural astronomical phenomenon is ideally suited to science outreach activities, but the predictability of the change in solar radiation also provides unusual conditions for assessing the atmospheric response to a known stimulus. Modern automatic observing networks used for weather forecasting and atmospheric research have dense spatial coverage, so the quantitative meteorological responses to an eclipse can now be evaluated with excellent space and time resolution. Numerical models representing the atmosphere at high spatial resolution can also be used to predict eclipse-related changes and interpret the observations. Combining the models with measurements yields the elements of a controlled atmospheric experiment on a regional scale (10–1000 km), which is almost impossible to achieve by other means. This modern approach to ‘eclipse meteorology’ as identified here can ultimately improve weather prediction models and be used to plan for transient reductions in renewable electricity generation. During the 20 March 2015 eclipse, UK electrical energy demand increased by about 3 GWh (11 TJ) or about 4%, alongside reductions in the wind and photovoltaic electrical energy generation of 1.5 GWh (5.5 TJ). This article is part of the themed issue ‘Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse’. PMID:27550768

  17. Characterization of New Hard X-ray Cataclysmic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, F.; deMartino, D.; Falanga, M.; Mukai, K.; Matt, G.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Masetti, N.; Mouchet, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We aim at characterizing a sample of nine new hard X-ray selected Cataclysmic Variable (CVs), to unambiguously identify them as magnetic systems of the Intermediate Polar (IP) type. Methods. We performed detailed timing and spectral analysis by using X-ray, and simultaneous UV and optical data collected by XMM-Newton, complemented with hard X-ray data provided by INTEGRAL and Swift. The pulse arrival time were used to estimate the orbital periods. The broad band X-ray spectra were fitted using composite models consisting of different absorbing columns and emission components. Results. Strong X-ray pulses at the White Dwarf (WD) spin period are detected and found to decrease with energy. Most sources are spin-dominated systems in the X-rays, though four are beat dominated at optical wavelengths. We estimated the orbital period in all system (except for IGR J16500-3307), providing the first estimate for IGRJ08390-4833, IGRJ18308-1232, and IGR J18173-2509. All X-ray spectra are multi-temperature. V2069 Cyg and RX J0636+3535 poses a soft X-ray optically thick component at kT approx. 80 eV. An intense K (sub alpha) Fe line at 6.4 keV is detected in all sources. An absorption edge at 0.76 keV from OVII is detected in IGR J08390-4833. The WD masses and lower limits to the accretion rates are also estimated. Conclusions. We found all sources to be IPs. IGR J08390-4833, V2069 Cyg, and IGR J16500-3307 are pure disc accretors, while IGR J18308-1232, IGR J1509-6649, IGR J17195-4100, and RX J0636+3535 display a disc-overflow accretion mode. All sources show a temperature gradient in the post-shock regions and a highly absorbed emission from material located in the pre-shock flow which is also responsible for the X-ray pulsations. Reflection at the WD surface is likely the origin of the fluorescent iron line. There is an increasing evidence for the presence of a warm absorber in IPs, a feature that needs future exploration. The addition of two systems to the subgroup of

  18. Ultraviolet spectra of HZ Herculis/Hercules X-1 from HST: Hot gas during total eclipse of the neutron star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Scott F.; Wachter, Stefanie; Margon, Bruce; Downes, Ronald A.; Blair, William P.; Halpern, Jules P.

    1994-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) aboard Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has been used in the UV to observe the prototypical X-ray pulsar Her X-1 and its companion HZ Her. Optical spectra were also obtained contemporaneously at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 2.1 m. The FOS spectra encompass the 1150-3300 A range near binary orbital phases 0.5 (X-ray maximum) and at 0.0 (mid-X-ray eclipse). The maximum light spectra show strong, narrow C III, N V, O V, Si IV + O IV), N IV), C IV, He II, and N IV emission lines, extending previous IUE results; the O III lambda 3133 Bowen resonance line is also prominent, confirming that the Bowen mechanism is the source of the strong lambda lambda 4640, 4650 emission complex, also seen at maximum light. Most remarkable, however, are the minimum light spectra, where the object is too faint for reasonable observations from IUE. Despite the total eclipse of the X-ray-emitting neutron star, our spectra show strong emission at N V lambda 1240, S IV + O IV) whose emission dominates the UV light at phase 0.0 might be associated with the 'accretion disk corona,' it is more likely the source is somewhat less hot (but extended) gas above and around the disk, or perhaps circumstellar material such as a stellar wind.

  19. Chemical enrichment in Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Donatella

    2016-08-01

    Our view of the Milky Way's satellite population has radically changed after the discovery, ten years ago, of the first Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies (UFDs). These extremely faint, dark-matter dominated, scarcely evolved stellar systems are found in ever-increasing number in our cosmic neighbourhood and constitute a gold-mine for studies of early star formation conditions and early chemical enrichment pathways. Here we show what can be learned from the measurements of chemical abundances in UFD stars read through the lens of chemical evolution studies, point out the limitations of the classic approach, and discuss the way to go to improve the models.

  20. Analysis of the Lunar Eclipse Records from the Goryeosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Won; Mihn, Byeong-Hee; Ahn, Young Sook; Ahn, Sang-Hyeon

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study the lunar eclipse records in the Goryeosa (History of the Goryeo Dynasty), an official history book of the Goryeo dynasty (A.D. 918 -- 1392). In the history book, a total of 228 lunar eclipse accounts are recorded, covering the period from 1009 to 1392. However, we find that two accounts are duplications and four accounts correspond to no known lunar eclipses around the dates. For the remaining lunar eclipses, we calculate the magnitude and the time of the eclipse at different phases using the DE406 ephemeris. Of the 222 lunar eclipse accounts, we find that the minimum penumbral magnitude was 0.5583. For eclipses which occurred after midnight, we find that some accounts were recorded on the day before the eclipse, like the astronomical records of the Joseonwangjosillok (Annals of the Joseon Dynasty), while others were on the day of the lunar eclipse. We also find that four accounts show a difference in the Julian dates between this study and that of Ahn et al., even though it is assumed that the Goryeo court did not change the dates in the accounts for lunar eclipses that occurred after midnight. With regard to the contents of the lunar eclipse accounts, we confirm that the accounts recorded as total eclipses are accurate, except for two accounts. However, both eclipses were very close to the total eclipse. We also confirm that all predicted lunar eclipses did occur, although one eclipse happened two days after the predicted date. In conclusion, we believe that this study is very helpful for investigating the lunar eclipse accounts of other periods in Korea, and furthermore, useful for verifying the calendar dates of the Goryeo dynasty.

  1. Coronal activity from the ASAS eclipsing binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Szczygiel, D M; Paczynski, B; Pojmanski, G; Pilecki, B

    2008-01-01

    We combine the catalogue of eclipsing binaries from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) with the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). The combination results in 836 eclipsing binaries that display coronal activity and is the largest sample of active binary stars assembled to date. By using the (V-I) colors of the ASAS eclipsing binary catalogue, we are able to determine the distances and thus bolometric luminosities for the majority of eclipsing binaries that display significant stellar activity. A typical value for the ratio of soft X-ray to bolometric luminosity is L_X/L_bol ~ a few x 10^-4, similar to the ratio of soft X-ray to bolometric flux F_X/F_bol in the most active regions of the Sun. Unlike rapidly rotating isolated late-type dwarfs -- stars with significant outer convection zones -- a tight correlation between Rossby number and activity of eclipsing binaries is absent. We find evidence for the saturation effect and marginal evidence for the so-called "super-saturation" phenomena. Our work shows that wide-...

  2. Galilean Satellite Atmospheres and Aurora in Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kurt

    Io, Europa, and Ganymede all demonstrate unique displays of auroral and atmospheric emis-sions, and all three routinely pass into Jupiter's shadow. Callisto on the other hand very rarely passes into eclipse by Jupiter, and no auroral emissions have been detected there to date. In eclipse, Io's dayside surface temperature is known to rapidly drop from 120 K to 90 K, which is sufficient to diminish the sublimation component of the atmosphere across most of the surface and possibly results in an atmosphere mostly made directly from volcanos. While surface sputtering by magnetospheric particles is likely the primary source of the icy satel-lite atmospheres for Ganymede and Europa, little observational evidence is available regarding the relative contribution of the smaller sublimation components and potential changes in icy surface temperatures near the sub-solar point in eclipse. Eclipse observations of auroral emis-sions generally have the ability to correlate changes in the atmosphere with changes in surface temperature and/or photochemistry. They also offer the practical advantage of little or no confusion from reflected sunlight. We will review the present auroral observations available for investigating the behavior of Galilean satellite atmospheres in eclipse.

  3. Celestial shadows eclipses, transits, and occultations

    CERN Document Server

    Westfall, John

    2015-01-01

    Much of what is known about the universe comes from the study of celestial shadows—eclipses, transits, and occultations.  The most dramatic are total eclipses of the Sun, which constitute one of the most dramatic and awe-inspiring events of nature.  Though once a source of consternation or dread, solar eclipses now lead thousands of amateur astronomers and eclipse-chasers to travel to remote points on the globe to savor their beauty and the adrenaline-rush of experiencing totality, and were long the only source of information about the hauntingly beautiful chromosphere and corona of the Sun.   Long before Columbus, the curved shadow of the Earth on the Moon during a lunar eclipse revealed that we inhabit a round world. The rare and wonderful transits of Venus, which occur as it passes between the Earth and the Sun, inspired eighteenth century expeditions to measure the distance from the Earth to the Sun, while the recent transits of 2004 and 2012 were the most widely observed ever--and still produced re...

  4. HST/FOS Eclipse mapping of IP Pegasi in outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Saitô, R; Horne, K

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a time-resolved eclipse mapping of the dwarf nova IP Pegasi during the decline of its May 1993 outburst from HST/FOS fast spectroscopy covering 3 eclipses in the ultraviolet spectral range.

  5. Anxiety, fainting and gagging in dentistry: Separate or overlapping constructs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtem, C.M.H.H. van

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aimed to increase the knowledge about severe forms of anxiety, gagging and fainting in dentistry and to investigate whether these phenomena are overlapping or separate constructs. In Chapter 2 a literature review of twin studies showed that the estimated heritability of specific phobias

  6. Ultra faint dwarfs : probing early cosmic star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvadori, Stefania; Ferrara, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the newly discovered Ultra Faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UF dSphs) in a general cosmological context simultaneously accounting for various 'classical' dSphs and Milky Way properties including their metallicity distribution function (MDF). To this aim, we extend the

  7. Short timescale variability in the Faint Sky Variability Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Rueda, L.; Groot, P.J.; Augusteijn, T.; Nelemans, G.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Besselaar, E.J.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    We present the V-band variability analysis of the point sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey on time-scales from 24 min to tens of days. We find that about one per cent of the point sources down to V = 24 are variables. We discuss the variability-detection probabilities for each field dependi

  8. MOCCA-SURVEY Database I. Accreting White Dwarf Binary Systems in Globular Clusters I. Cataclysmic Variables -- present-day population

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, Diogo T; Askar, Abbas; Leigh, Nathan; Hypki, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, which is the first in a series of papers associated with cataclysmic variables and related objects, we introduce the CATUABA code, a numerical machinery written for analysis of the MOCCA simulations, and show some first results by investigating the present-day population of cataclysmic variables in globular clusters. Emphasis was given on their properties and the observational selection effects when observing and detecting them. In this work we analysed in this work six models, including three with Kroupa distributions of the initial binaries. We found that for models with Kroupa initial distributions, considering the standard value of the efficiency of the common envelope phase adopted in BSE, no single cataclysmic variable was formed only via binary stellar evolution, i. e., in order to form them, strong dynamical interactions have to take place. We show and explain why this is inconsistent with observational and theoretical results. Our results indicate that the population of cataclysmic var...

  9. Eclipse mapping of the flickering sources in the dwarf nova V2051 Ophiuchi

    CERN Document Server

    Baptista, R; Baptista, Raymundo; Bortoletto, Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    We report on the eclipse mapping analysis of an ensemble of light curves of the dwarf nova V2051 Oph with the aim to study the spatial distribution of its steady-light and flickering sources. The data are combined to derive the orbital dependency of the steady-light and the flickering components at two different brightness levels, named the 'faint' and 'bright' states. The differences in brightness are caused by long-term variations in the mass transfer rate from the secondary star. Eclipse maps of the steady-light show enhanced emission along the ballistic stream trajectory, in a clear evidence of gas stream overflow. We identify two different and independent sources of flickering in V2051 Oph. Low-frequency flickering arises in the overflowing gas stream and is associated to the mass transfer process. It maximum emission occurs at the position of closest approach of the gas stream to the white dwarf, and its spatial distribution changes in response to variations in mass transfer rate. High-frequency flicker...

  10. Broadband Eclipse Spectra of Exoplanets are Featureless

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, C J; Cowan, N B

    2014-01-01

    Spectral retrieval methods leverage features in emission spectra to constrain the atmospheric composition and structure of transiting exoplanets. Most of the observed emission spectra consist of broadband photometric observations at a small number of wavelengths. We compare the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) of blackbody fits and spectral retrieval fits for all planets with eclipse measurements in multiple thermal wavebands, typically hot Jupiters with 2-4 observations. If the published error bars are taken at face value, then eight planets are significantly better fit by a spectral model than by a blackbody. In this under-constrained regime, however, photometric uncertainties directly impact one's ability to constrain atmospheric properties. By considering the handful of planets for which eclipse measurements have been repeated and/or reanalyzed, we obtain an empirical estimate of systematic uncertainties for broadband eclipse depths obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope: sigma_sys = 5E-4. When thi...

  11. The Gaugamela Battle Eclipse: An Archaeoastronomical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcaro, V. F.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Verderame, L.

    A total lunar eclipse occurred during the night preceding the decisive Battle of Gaugamela (20th September 331 BCE), when the Macedonian army, led by Alexander the Great, finally defeated the Persian king Darius and his army. This astronomical event, well known to historians, had a relevant role on the battle outcome. The eclipse was described in detail by Babylonian astronomers, though, unfortunately, the text of their report has only partially been preserved. We have reconstructed the evolution of the phenomenon as it appeared to the observer in Babylonia, by using the positional astronomy code "Planetario V2.0". On the base of this reconstruction we suggest a number of integrations to the lost part of the text, allowing a finer astrological interpretation of the eclipse and of its influence on the mood of the armies that set against each other on the following morning.

  12. Total solar eclipses and how to observe them

    CERN Document Server

    Mobberley, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This is the ultimate, easy-to-read guide for "eclipse-chasers" which includes everything an eclipse chaser needs. It provides a checklist of where to go to see total solar eclipses, for the next 15 years, and includes travel details.

  13. Anticipation of total solar eclipse and suicide incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Rancāns, Elmārs; Vintilă, Mona; Fisher, Maryanne

    2004-09-01

    Around the total solar eclipse of August 11 1999, suicide incidence decreased in Timiş county, Romania, a region crossed by the path of totality and subject to eclipse-trekking, whereas no such decrease was observed in Latvia, where only a partial eclipse was observed. Collective anticipation of a positive event could have a preventive effect on suicide incidence.

  14. 78 FR 30243 - Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... all Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Model EA500 airplanes equipped with Avio, Avio with ETT, or Avio NG 1.0... identified in this proposed AD, contact Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. 26 East Palatine Road, Wheeling,...

  15. Total solar eclipse of 1995 October 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1994-01-01

    A total eclipse of the sun will be visible from Asia and the Pacific Ocean on 24 Oct. 1995. The path of the moon's shadow begins in the Middle East and sweeps across India, Southeast Asia, and the waters of the Indonesian archipelago before ending at sunset in the Pacific. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for 400 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile, and the sky during totality.

  16. Spectropolarimetry of Solar Corona during Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhongquan

    2017-08-01

    We present the results from spectropolarimetry of solar corona. These observations were conducted during solar eclipses in 2008 China, 2013 Gabon, and probably 2017 United States of America respectively. From the former two observations, it is shown that the patterns of linear polarization of radiation from the solar corona are very abundant, and the abundance may be related to the complexity of mass motions and magnetic configuration in the corona. And the spectropolarimetry during solar eclipses may open a new window to probe precisely the physical features of the local corona, especially its magnetic configuration.

  17. Living matter: the "lunar eclipse" phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpan, Nikolai N

    2010-01-01

    The present investigations describe a unique phenomenon, namely the phenomenon of the "lunar eclipse", which has been observed and discovered by the author in living substance during the freeze-thawing processes in vivo using temperatures of various intensities and its cryosurgical response in animal experiment. Similar phenomena author has observed in nature, namely the total lunar eclipse and total solar eclipse. In this experimental study 76 animals (mongrel dogs) were investigated. A disc cryogenic probe was placed on the pancreas after the laparotomy. For cryosurgical exposure a temperature range of -40 degrees C, -80 degrees C, -120 degrees C and -180 degrees C was selected in contact with pancreas parenchyma. The freeze-thaw cycle was monitored by intraoperative ultrasound before, during and after cryosurgery. Each cryolesion was observed for one hour after thawing intraoperatively. Immediately after freezing, during the thawing process, the snow-white pancreas parenchyma, frozen hard to an ice block and resembling a full moon with a sharp demarcation line, gradually assumed a ruby-red shade and a hemispherical shape as it grew in size depend on reconstruction vascular circulation from the periphery to the center. This snow-white cryogenic lesion dissolved in the same manner in all animal tissues. The "lunar eclipse" phenomenon contributes to a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of biological tissue damage during low temperature exposure in cryoscience and cryomedicine. Properties of the pancreas parenchyma response during the phenomenon of the "lunar eclipse" provide important insights into the mechanisms of damage and the formation of cryogenic lesion immediately after thawing in cryosurgery. Vascular changes and circulatory stagnation are commonly considered to be the main mechanism of biological tissue injury during low temperature exposure. The phenomenon of the "lunar eclipse" suggests that cryosurgery is the first surgical technique to use

  18. Eclipse Omega数字矩阵

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Clear-com公司最新推出的Eclipse Omega6RU数字矩阵内部通讯平台.可通过上面的15个模块插槽.可最多扩充到240个RJ-45端口。这款Eclipse Omega矩阵适用于大规模通讯的产品中。尤其是在多个用户同时操作多个设备的环境下。

  19. The DEBCat detached eclipsing binary catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Southworth, John

    2014-01-01

    Detached eclipsing binary star systems are our primary source of measured physical properties of normal stars. I introduce DEBCat: a catalogue of detached eclipsing binaries with mass and radius measurements to the 2% precision necessary to put useful constraints on theoretical models of stellar evolution. The catalogue was begun in 2006, as an update of the compilation by Andersen (1991). It now contains over 170 systems, and new results are added on appearance in the refereed literature. DEBCat is available at: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/jkt/debcat/

  20. How eclipse time variations, eclipse duration variations, and radial velocities can reveal S-type planets in close eclipsing binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Oshagh, M; Dreizler, S

    2016-01-01

    While about a dozen transiting planets have been found in wide orbits around an inner, close stellar binary (so-called "P-type planets"), no planet has yet been detected orbiting only one star (a so-called "S-type planet") in an eclipsing binary. This is despite a large number of eclipsing binary systems discovered with the Kepler telescope. Here we propose a new detection method for these S-type planets, which uses a correlation between the stellar radial velocities (RVs), eclipse timing variations (ETVs), and eclipse duration variations (EDVs). We test the capability of this technique by simulating a realistic benchmark system and demonstrate its detectability with existing high-accuracy RV and photometry instruments. We illustrate that, with a small number of RV observations, the RV-ETV diagrams allows us to distinguish between prograde and retrograde planetary orbits and also the planetary mass can be estimated if the stellar cross-correlation functions can be disentangled. We also identify a new (though ...

  1. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. II. 2165 Eclipsing Binaries in the Second Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Slawson, Robert W; Welsh, William F; Orosz, Jerome A; Rucker, Michael; Batalha, Natalie M; Doyle, Laurance R; Engle, Scott G; Conroy, Kyle; Coughlin, Jared; Gregg, Trevor Ames; Fetherolf, Tara; Short, Donald R; Windmiller, Gur; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Uddin, Kamal; Mullally, Fergal; Seader, Shawn E; Thompson, Susan E; Sanderfer, Dwight T; Borucki, William; Koch, David

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler Mission provides nearly continuous monitoring of ~156 000 objects with unprecedented photometric precision. Coincident with the first data release, we presented a catalog of 1879 eclipsing binary systems identified within the 115 square degree Kepler FOV. Here, we provide an updated catalog augmented with the second Kepler data release which increases the baseline nearly 4-fold to 125 days. 386 new systems have been added, ephemerides and principle parameters have been recomputed. We have removed 42 previously cataloged systems that are now clearly recognized as short-period pulsating variables and another 58 blended systems where we have determined that the Kepler target object is not itself the eclipsing binary. A number of interesting objects are identified. We present several exemplary cases: 4 EBs that exhibit extra (tertiary) eclipse events; and 8 systems that show clear eclipse timing variations indicative of the presence of additional bodies bound in the system. We have updated the period a...

  2. Studies of an x ray selected sample of cataclysmic variables. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Andrew D.

    1986-01-01

    Just prior to the thesis research, an all-sky survey in hard x rays with the HEAO-1 satellite and further observations in the optical resulted in a catalog of about 700 x-ray sources with known optical counterparts. This sample includes 43 cataclysmic variables, which are binaries consisting of a detached white-dwarf and a Roche lobe filling companion star. This thesis consists of studies of the x-ray selected sample of catalcysmic variables.

  3. Angular momentum transport in the magnetospheres of cataclysmic variable accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koen, C.

    1986-12-01

    The theory of stellar magnetic braking is applied to circumstellar discs. The focus is concentrated on cataclysmic variable stars but results apply to any disc in which the rotational velocity is Keplerian. Calculations are done for two magnetic field configurations and numerical results given for a range of physical parameter values. It is found that magnetic processes could be efficient in the removal of angular momentum from such systems.

  4. [Data mining for cataclysmic variables candidates in SDSS-DR8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Pan, Jing-Chang; Wang, Wei

    2013-02-01

    An automatic and efficient method for cataclysmic variables candidates is presented in this paper. The nonlinear locally linear embedding-LLE method is applied in the newly released SDSS-DR8 spectra. Spectra are dimension-reduced by LLE and classified by artificial neural network. The greatly reduced final candidates can be identified manually. 6 new CVs candidates were found in the experiment, and the compare between LLE with PCA shows the feasibility of nonlinear method in data mining in astronomical data.

  5. Observations of the Cataclysmic Variable 1 RXPJ113123+4322.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, Kirk S.; Durig, Douglas T.

    We observed the cataclysmic variable star l RXPJ113123+4322.5 while it was undergoing its recent outburst. We collected data using R and V filters, alternating the filters every two minutes. We obtained two to three hour-long data sets on two different nights. The light curve was analyzed using Mathematica. The period determined was near 95 minutes and there was also some indication of a lower amplitude, higher frequency variation.

  6. The Benchmark Eclipsing Binary V530 Ori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, Guillermo; Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Pavlovski, Kresimir

    2015-01-01

    We report accurate measurements of the physical properties (mass, radius, temperature) of components of the G+M eclipsing binary V530 On. The M-type secondary shows a larger radius and a cooler temperature than predicted by standard stellar evolution models, as has been found for many other low...

  7. Spectral irradiance curve calculations for any type of solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, A.; Merrill, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    A simple procedure is described for calculating the eclipse function (EF), alpha, and hence the spectral irradiance curve (SIC), (1-alpha), for any type of solar eclipse: namely, the occultation (partial/total) eclipse and the transit (partial/annular) eclipse. The SIC (or the EF) gives the variation of the amount (or the loss) of solar radiation of a given wavelength reaching a distant observer for various positions of the moon across the sun. The scheme is based on the theory of light curves of eclipsing binaries, the results of which are tabulated in Merrill's Tables, and is valid for all wavelengths for which the solar limb-darkening obeys the cosine law: J = sub c (1 - X + X cost gamma). As an example of computing the SIC for an occultation eclipse which may be total, the calculations for the March 7, 1970, eclipse are described in detail.

  8. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  9. An HST study of three very faint GRB host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaunsen, A.O.; Andersen, M.I.; Hjorth, J.;

    2003-01-01

    . (2002). We obtain a revised and much higher probability that the galaxies identified as hosts indeed are related to the GRBs (P(n(chance))=0.69, following Bloom et al. 2002), thereby strengthening the conclusion that GRBs are preferentially located in star-forming regions in their hosts. Apart from......As part of the HST/STIS GRB host survey program we present the detection of three faint gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies based on an accurate localisation using ground-based data of the optical afterglows (OAs). A common property of these three hosts is their extreme faintness. The location...... at which GRBs occur with respect to their host galaxies and surrounding environments are robust indicators of the nature of GRB progenitors. The bursts studied here are among the four most extreme outliers, in terms of relative distance from the host center, in the recent comprehensive study of Bloom et al...

  10. The Faint Globular Cluster in the Dwarf Galaxy Andromeda I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Strader, Jay; Sand, David J.; Willman, Beth; Seth, Anil C.

    2017-09-01

    Observations of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies can be used to study a variety of topics, including the structure of dark matter halos and the history of vigorous star formation in low-mass galaxies. We report on the properties of the faint globular cluster (M V -3.4) in the M31 dwarf galaxy Andromeda I. This object adds to the growing population of low-luminosity Local Group galaxies that host single globular clusters.

  11. Faint Galaxies at the North Galactic Pole: The Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, L.; Pritchet, C. J.; Hertling, G.

    The North Galactic Pole Canada--France--Hawaii Telescope Catalogue of faint galaxies is made available. We provide positions, photometric and structural parameters for more than 50,000 galaxies. The J and F magnitudes were obtained from IIIaJ and IIIaF CFHT prime focus plates respectively. This catalogue have been used in many studies of faint galaxy properties. Galaxy counts, colour distributions and clustering properties of faint galaxies have been obtained with these data. Statistical properties of stars have been studie d as well. For details refer to Infante and Pritchet (1992), Pritchet and Infante (1992), Infante (1994a), Infante (1994b) and Infante and Pritchet (1995). Infante, L. and Pritchet, C.J., 1992, ApJ Suppl. 83, 237. Infante, L., 1994a, AA 282, 353. Infante, L., 1994b, AA Suppl. 107, 413. Infante, L. and Pritchet, C.J., 1995, ApJ 439, 565. Pritchet, C.J. and Infante, L., 1992, ApJ 399, L35.

  12. The faint radio sky: radio astronomy becomes mainstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Radio astronomy has changed. For years it studied relatively rare sources, which emit mostly non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. radio quasars and radio galaxies. Now, it is reaching such faint flux densities that it detects mainly star-forming galaxies and the more common radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. These sources make up the bulk of the extragalactic sky, which has been studied for decades in the infrared, optical, and X-ray bands. I follow the transformation of radio astronomy by reviewing the main components of the radio sky at the bright and faint ends, the issue of their proper classification, their number counts, luminosity functions, and evolution. The overall "big picture" astrophysical implications of these results, and their relevance for a number of hot topics in extragalactic astronomy, are also discussed. The future prospects of the faint radio sky are very bright, as we will soon be flooded with survey data. This review should be useful to all extragalactic astronomers, irrespective of their favourite electromagnetic band(s), and even stellar astronomers might find it somewhat gratifying.

  13. The faint radio sky: radio astronomy becomes mainstream

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Radio astronomy has changed. For years it studied relatively rare sources, which emit mostly non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. radio quasars and radio galaxies. Now it is reaching such faint flux densities that it detects mainly star-forming galaxies and the more common radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. These sources make up the bulk of the extragalactic sky, which has been studied for decades in the infrared, optical, and X-ray bands. I follow the transformation of radio astronomy by reviewing the main components of the radio sky at the bright and faint ends, the issue of their proper classification, their number counts, luminosity functions, and evolution. The overall "big picture" astrophysical implications of these results, and their relevance for a number of hot topics in extragalactic astronomy, are also discussed. The future prospects of the faint radio sky are very bright, as we will soon be flooded with survey data. This review should be useful to all extragalac...

  14. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources are at high redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, Andreas; Norris, Ray P; Sharp, Rob; Spitler, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Context. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for High-redshift Radio Galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between these classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study diffcult. So far, no redshift is known for an original IFRS which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims. This work tests the hypothesis that IFRS follow the relation between 3.6 um flux density and redshift found for HzRGs. Furthermore, redshifts will enable us to reveal the intrinsic radio and infrared properties of IFRS and we will test the current suggestions that IFRS are high-redshift radio-loud active galactic nuclei. Methods. A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and lo...

  15. Discovery of a Faint Old Stellar System at 150 kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, T

    2006-01-01

    We report the detection of a faint old stellar system at $(\\alpha,\\delta)=(194.29^\\circ,~34.32^\\circ)$ (SDSS J1257+3419), based on the spatial distribution of bright red-giant branch stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4. SDSS J1257+3419 has a half-light radius of $38\\pm 12$ pc and an absolute integrated $V$-magnitude of $M_V=-4.8^{+1.4}_{-1.0}$ mag at a heliocentric distance of $150\\pm 15$ kpc. A comparison between SDSS J1257+3419 and known Galactic halo objects suggests that SDSS J1257+3419 is either (a) a faint and small dwarf galaxy or (b) a faint and widely extended globular cluster. In the former case, SDSS J1257+3419 could represent an entity of a postulated subhalo of the Milky Way. Further photometric and dynamical study of this stellar system is vital to discriminate these possibilities.

  16. Eclipsing binaries observed with the WIRE satellite I. Discovery and photometric analysis of the new bright A0 IV eclipsing binary psi centauri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruntt, Hans; Southworth, J.; Penny, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Stars: fundamental parameters, binaries: close, eclipsing, techniques: photometric Udgivelsesdato: Sep.......Stars: fundamental parameters, binaries: close, eclipsing, techniques: photometric Udgivelsesdato: Sep....

  17. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VIII. Identification of False Positive Eclipsing Binaries and Re-extraction of New Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Abdul-Masih, Michael; Conroy, Kyle; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R; Johnston, Cole; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David W; Matijevic, Gal; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of $\\sim$200,000 objects in the $\\sim$105 deg$^{2}$ field of view from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler Field of View. Using Target Pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e. targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separa...

  18. Solar Eclipse Computer API: Planning Ahead for August 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jennifer L.; Chizek Frouard, Malynda; Lesniak, Michael V.; Bell, Steve

    2016-01-01

    With the total solar eclipse of 2017 August 21 over the continental United States approaching, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) on-line Solar Eclipse Computer can now be accessed via an application programming interface (API). This flexible interface returns local circumstances for any solar eclipse in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) that can be incorporated into third-party Web sites or applications. For a given year, it can also return a list of solar eclipses that can be used to build a more specific request for local circumstances. Over the course of a particular eclipse as viewed from a specific site, several events may be visible: the beginning and ending of the eclipse (first and fourth contacts), the beginning and ending of totality (second and third contacts), the moment of maximum eclipse, sunrise, or sunset. For each of these events, the USNO Solar Eclipse Computer reports the time, Sun's altitude and azimuth, and the event's position and vertex angles. The computer also reports the duration of the total phase, the duration of the eclipse, the magnitude of the eclipse, and the percent of the Sun obscured for a particular eclipse site. On-line documentation for using the API-enabled Solar Eclipse Computer, including sample calls, is available (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/api.php). The same Web page also describes how to reach the Complete Sun and Moon Data for One Day, Phases of the Moon, Day and Night Across the Earth, and Apparent Disk of a Solar System Object services using API calls.For those who prefer using a traditional data input form, local circumstances can still be requested that way at http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/SolarEclipses.php. In addition, the 2017 August 21 Solar Eclipse Resource page (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/Eclipse2017.php) consolidates all of the USNO resources for this event, including a Google Map view of the eclipse track designed by Her Majesty's Nautical Almanac Office (HMNAO). Looking further ahead, a

  19. Eclipse Megamovie: Solar Discoveries, Education, and Outreach through Crowdsourcing 2017 Eclipse Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Hudson, H. S.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Johnson, C.; Zevin, D.; Krista, L. D.; Bender, M.; Mcintosh, S. W.; Konerding, D.; Koh, J.; Pasachoff, J.; Lorimore, B.; Jiang, G.; Storksdieck, M.; Yan, D.; Shore, L.; Fraknoi, A.; Filippenko, A.

    2016-12-01

    Since 2011, a team of solar scientists, eclipse chasers, education and outreach professionals, and film makers have been working to explore the possibility of gathering images from the public during the 2017 eclipse across the United States, to be used for scientific research, education, and enhancing the public's experience of the eclipse. After years of testing the initial ideas, engaging new organizations, and exploring new technologies, our team has developed a blueprint for this project. There are three main goals for this effort: 1. to learn more about the dynamic non-equilibrium processes in the corona and lower atmosphere of the Sun, 2. to educate the public about space physics, 3. provide different levels of engagement opportunities for an interested public, and 4. to understand how these various levels of engagement with a major scientific phenomena allow people to develop deeper personal connections to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). We will meet these goals by training 1000 volunteers to take scientifically valid images and donate the images to this project, while also allowing the general public to share their images as well. During the Aug 21, 2017 eclipse, we will analyze these images in real-time to produce public-generated movies showing the corona of the Sun during totality from thousands of people. These movies will be disseminated in near real-time (on the order of 10s of minutes) to other eclipse programs, news organizations, and to the general public. Meanwhile, images collected during and after the eclipse will be available to scientists and the public for research purposes. To further engage the public, video clips, film, and a documentary will be produced prior and after the event. A science education research team will work alongside the team to understand how the project supports deeper connections to the eclipse experience.

  20. Solar eclipse effect on geomagnetic induction parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ádám

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The 11 August 1999 total solar eclipse had been studied using a large array of stations in Central Europe (Bencze et al., 2005. According to the result of this study, the amplitudes of the field line resonance (FLR-type pulsations decreased in and around the dark spot by about a factor of 2, and this decrease moved with the velocity of the dark spot in the same direction. This decrease was interpreted as a switch-off of the FLR-type pulsations, due to a change in the eigenperiod of the field line as a consequence of a change in the charged particle distribution along the field line. An effect was also found in the phase of the (magnetic or electric perpendicular components.

    At the Nagycenk (NCK observatory lying in the zone of totality, both magnetic and electric records were available. The magnetotelluric (MT sounding curve computed by the usual method for the eclipse interval (08:00-14:00 UT fits the previously known standard curve extremely well. During the eclipse, however, impedance values in the FLR period range were highly scattered. The scatter remained as long as the eclipse lasted. Coherence values between magnetic and electric components decreased significantly. In contrast, an earlier similar switch-off of the FLR-type activity on the same day did not cause a similar scatter, in spite of a comparably low coherence. Thus, the lack of FLR-type activity disturbed the usual MT connection between the magnetic and electric components during the eclipse.

    The induction vector (tipper, especially its real part, shows a clear effect of the eclipse in the FLR period range (24-29 s, too. Both at NCK and at Bad Bergzabern (BBZ, westernmost station and longest FLR period, a definite decrease in the real tipper was ascertained during the totality. The average direction of the tipper did not change.

    Concerning both parameters, a random effect cannot fully

  1. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VIII. Identification of False Positive Eclipsing Binaries and Re-extraction of New Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Masih, Michael; Prša, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Johnston, Cole; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David W.; Matijevič, Gal; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John

    2016-04-01

    The Kepler mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of ∼200,000 objects in the ∼105 deg2 field of view (FOV) from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters, and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler FOV. Using target pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e., targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separate light curves for each quarter of available data by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio, the relative percent eclipse depth, and the flux eclipse depth. We present 289 new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler FOV that were not targets for observation, and these have been added to the catalog. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  2. System Geometries and Transit/Eclipse Probabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard A.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Transiting exoplanets provide access to data to study the mass-radius relation and internal structure of extrasolar planets. Long-period transiting planets allow insight into planetary environments similar to the Solar System where, in contrast to hot Jupiters, planets are not constantly exposed to the intense radiation of their parent stars. Observations of secondary eclipses additionally permit studies of exoplanet temperatures and large-scale exo-atmospheric properties. We show how transit and eclipse probabilities are related to planet-star system geometries, particularly for long-period, eccentric orbits. The resulting target selection and observational strategies represent the principal ingredients of our photometric survey of known radial-velocity planets with the aim of detecting transit signatures (TERMS.

  3. Stream eclipse mapping with 'fire-flies'

    CERN Document Server

    Bridge, C M; Cropper, M; Ramsay, G; Hakala, Pasi; Cropper, Mark; Ramsay, Gavin

    2003-01-01

    We apply a new method of eclipse mapping to the light curves of eclipsing polars. The technique aims to locate the bright emission associated with the accretion stream, using a technique that makes the fewest prior assumptions about the location of the accretion stream material. We have obtained data of EP Dra and HU Aqr with the S-Cam 2 superconducting tunnel junction camera using the William Herschel Telescope. The location of emission regions in both systems show that previously assumed trajectories are consistent with those found using our technique. Most of the emission is located in a region where we expect material to be confined to magnetic field lines, particularly for HU Aqr, while there appears to be less emission from where we conventionally expect material to follow a ballistic trajectory from the L1-point.

  4. Radial velocity eclipse mapping of exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolov, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter-McLauglin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blue-shifted) or receding (red-shifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet's spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet's radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt and impact factor (i.e. sky-projected planet spin-orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetrie...

  5. The explanation of eclipses in Greco-Roman antiquity

    CERN Document Server

    Casazza, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The search of a rational explanation of eclipses pervades the beginnings of philosophical and scientific thought. Within this intellectual frame, the knowledge of the "saros cycle" (a cycle of 18 years, 10 or 11 days and 1/3 of a day that separates two successive sun or moon eclipses of similar features), inherited by the Greeks from the Babylonians, favored important theoretical developments in the West. The purpose of this paper is to present, briefly and schematically, a) the ancient theorizations on the causes of eclipses, b) the range of predictability of eclipses in Antiquity, c) the warnings -transmitted by some classical writers- to those who want to observe in naked eyes a solar eclipse, and d) the popular beliefs and social practices upon the occurrence of unexpected eclipses in ancient times.

  6. The 2017 Total Solar Eclipse: Through the Eyes of NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. Alex; Mayo, Louis; Ng, Carolyn; Cline, Troy; Lewis, Elaine; Reed, Shannon; Debebe, Asidesach; Stephenson, Bryan; Odenwald, Sten; Hill, Steele; Wright, Ernest

    2017-01-01

    The August 21, 2017 eclipse will be the first time a total solar eclipse has traversed the Continental US since June 8th, 1918. Anticipation and energy for this eclipse is off the charts! Over 500 million in North America alone will catch the eclipse in either partial or total phase. Parts of South America, Africa, and Europe will see a partial eclipse as well. NASA is planning to take full advantage of this unique celestial event as an education and public engagement opportunity by leveraging its extensive networks of partners, numerous social media platforms, broadcast media, and its significant unique space assets and people to bring the eclipse to America and the world as only NASA can.This talk will outline NASA’s education plans in some detail replicating our many Big Events successes including the 2012 Transit of Venus and the MSL/Curiosity landing and show how scientists and the public can get involved.

  7. Secondary eclipses in the CoRoT light curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmonte Juan Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We identify and characterize secondary eclipses in the original light curves of published CoRoT planets using uniform detection and evaluation criteria. Our analysis is based on a Bayesian statistics: the eclipse search is carried out using Bayesian model selection, and the characterization of the plausible eclipse candidates using Bayesian parameter estimation. We discover statistically significant eclipse events for two planets, CoRoT-6b and CoRoT-11b, and for one brown dwarf, CoRoT-15b. We also find marginally significant eclipse events passing our plausibility criteria for CoRoT-3b, 13b, 18b, and 21b, and confirm the previously published CoRoT-1b and CoRoT-2b eclipses.

  8. Records of solar eclipse observations in ancient China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Like ancient people at other places of the world, the ancient Chinese lived in awe of the Sun. As they felt solar eclipses extremely significant events, they closely observed the occurrence of solar eclipse. Ancient astronomers further realized very early that solar eclipses were one of the important astronomical phenomena to revise and improve the ancient calendar. Interestingly, ancient emperors regarded solar eclipses as warnings from heaven that might affect the stability of their throne. Consequently, observing and recording solar eclipses became official, which dated far back to ancient China when numerous relevant descriptions were recorded in historical books. These records contribute substantially to China as an ancient civilization, as well as to the research of the long-term variation of the rotation rate of the Earth during >2000 years before the 17th century. This paper briefly reviews the perception, observations and recording of solar eclipses by ancient Chinese astronomers.

  9. Records of solar eclipse observations in ancient China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN YanBen; QIAO OiYuan

    2009-01-01

    Like ancient people at other places of the world, the ancient Chinese lived in awe of the Sun. As they felt solar eclipses extremely significant events, they closely observed the occurrence of solar eclipse. Ancient astronomers further realized very early that solar eclipses were one of the important astro-nomical phenomena to revise and improve the ancient calendar. Interestingly, ancient emperors re-garded solar eclipses as warnings from heaven that might affect the stability of their throne. Conse-quently, observing and recording solar eclipses became official, which dated far back to ancient China when numerous relevant descriptions were recorded in historical books. These records contribute substantially to China as an ancient civilization, as well as to the research of the long-term variation of the rotation rate of the Earth during >2000 years before the 17th century. This paper briefly reviews the perception, observations and recording of solar eclipses by ancient Chinese astronomers.

  10. Annular and Total Solar Eclipses of 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    2002-01-01

    On Saturday, 2003 May 31, an annular eclipse of the Sun will be visible from a broad corridor that traverses the North Atlantic. The path of the Moon's antumbral shadow begins in northern Scotland, crosses Iceland and central Greenland, and ends at sunrise in Baffin Bay (Canada). A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes most of Europe, the Middle East, central and northern Asia, and northwestern North America. The trajectory of the Moon's shadow is quite unusual during this event. The shadow axis passes to the far north where it barely grazes Earth's surface. In fact, the northern edge of the antumbra actually misses Earth so that one path limit is defined by the day/night terminator rather than by the shadow's upper edge. As a result, the track of annularity has a peculiar "D" shape that is nearly 1200 kilometers wide. Since the eclipse occurs just three weeks prior to the northern summer solstice, Earth's northern axis is pointed sunwards by 22.8 deg. As seen from the Sun, the antumbral shadow actually passes between the North Pole and the terminator. As a consequence of this extraordinary geometry, the path of annularity runs from east to west rather than the more typical west to east. The event transpires near the Moon's ascending node in Taurus five degrees north of Aldebaran. Since apogee occurs three days earlier (May 28 at 13 UT), the Moon's apparent diameter (29.6 arc-minutes) is still too small to completely cover the Sun (31.6 arc-minutes) resulting in an annular eclipse.

  11. Calcification of thoracic aorta - solar eclipse sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Puttarajappa, Chethan

    2008-08-29

    Calcification of thoracic aorta is very common in old people, especially ones with hypertension. This can sometime be visible on plain chest radiograph. We present a case of a male patient who had extensive deposition of calcium in the thoracic aorta. The relationship between aortic calcification and coronary atherosclerosis remains contentious. Computed tomography of the thorax can display this calcification which appears like 'solar eclipse'.

  12. The Galactic Distribution of Contact Eclipsing Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Dorn, Leah; Breitfeld, Abby; Mies, Regan; Avery, Tess

    2017-01-01

    The number of eclipsing contact binaries in different galactic latitudes and longitudes show peak distributions in the number per square degree in two latitudinal zones (-30 degrees to -25 degrees and +25 degrees to +30 degrees) and large fluctuations in longitude (Huang and Wade 1966, ApJ, 143, 146). Semi-detached or detached binaries are largely concentrated in the galactic plane as shown by Paczynski et al. (MNRAS, 368, 1311), different from the distribution of contact eclipsing binaries. The differences in distributions of different types of eclipsing binaries may be related to either distances or interstellar reddening. We will present a method to calculate photometric distances of W Urase Majoris systems (W UMa; used as a proxy for contact binaries) from 2MASS J and K magnitudes and interstellar reddening models (Schlafly and Finkbeiner 2011, ApJ. 737, 103). We compare the distances to those calculated from the period-luminosity-color relationship described by Rucinski (2004, NewAR, 48, 703). The W UMa systems are taken from the General Catalog of Variable Stars.

  13. First results from Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tilvi, V.; Pirzkal, N.; Malhotra, S.

    2016-01-01

    in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with G102 grism on Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6{\\sigma}) in multiple observational position angles (PA), with total integrated Ly{\\alpha} line flux of 1.06+/- 0.12 e10-17erg s-1cm-2. The line flux......-redshift AGN yet found. Thus, this observation from the Hubble Space Telescope clearly demonstrates the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy to study the epoch of reionization....

  14. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  15. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, A D Cameron M J; Norris, R P; Mao, M Y; Middelberg, E

    2011-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50% duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  16. Serendipitous ALMA detections of faint submm galaxies in SERVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pallavi; Lacy, Mark; Nyland, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    We present a preliminary ALMA study of faint (ALMA observations. The high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and positional accuracy of ALMA have enabled us to probe the nature of the sub-mJy population by resolving their spatial extents and improving constraints on their SEDS and photometric redshifts. We are building a catalog of sources by searching the ALMA archive for moderate to deep observations in the area covered by SERVS. This study will help us begin to understand the contribution of obscured star formation to the total star formation rate at high redshift and guide future wide-area surveys of submm galaxies with ALMA.

  17. Solar Eclipses and the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2009-05-01

    Solar eclipses capture the attention of millions of people in the countries from which they are visible and provide a major opportunity for public education, in addition to the scientific research and student training that they provide. The 2009 International Year of Astronomy began with an annular eclipse visible from Indonesia on 26 January, with partial phases visible also in other parts of southeast Asia. On 22 July, a major and unusually long total solar eclipse will begin at dawn in India and travel across China, with almost six minutes of totality visible near Shanghai and somewhat more visible from Japanese islands and from ships at sea in the Pacific. Partial phases will be visible from most of eastern Asia, from mid-Sumatra and Borneo northward to mid-Siberia. Eclipse activities include many scientific expeditions and much ecotourism to Shanghai, Hangzhou, and vicinity. My review article on "Eclipses as an Astrophysical Laboratory" will appear in Nature as part of their IYA coverage. Our planetarium presented teacher workshops and we made a film about solar research. Several new books about the corona or eclipses are appearing or have appeared. Many articles are appearing in astronomy magazines and other outlets. Eclipse interviews are appearing on the Planetary Society's podcast "365 Days of Astronomy" and on National Geographic Radio. Information about the eclipse and safe observation of the partial phases are available at http://www.eclipses.info, the Website of the International Astronomical Union's Working Group on Solar Eclipses and of its Program Group on Public Education at the Times of Eclipses of its Commission on Education and Development. The Williams College Expedition to the 2009 Eclipse in the mountains near Hangzhou, China, is supported in part by a grant from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society. E/PO workshops were supported by NASA.

  18. Fifteen years of solar eclipses - 1986-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred

    1986-01-01

    The dates of occurrence and the paths of observability of the three total eclipses and 30 partial eclipses of the sun which will occur over the period 1986-2000 AD are identified. Data are provided for the times and duration of local maxima, the extent of coverage of the solar disk, and the breadth of the footprint of the eclipses on the earth's surface.

  19. The nearby eclipsing stellar system delta Velorum. II. First reliable orbit for the eclipsing pair

    CERN Document Server

    Pribulla, T; Kervella, P; Vaňko, M; Stevens, I R; Chini, R; Hoffmeister, V; Stahl, O; Berndt, A; Mugrauer, M; Eiff, M Ammler-von

    2010-01-01

    Context. The nearby multiple system delta Velorum contains a widely detached eclipsing binary and a third component. Aims. The system offers an opportunity to determine the set of fundamental parameters (masses, luminosities, and radii) of three coeval stars with sufficient precision to test models of stellar evolution. Methods. Extensive high-resolution spectroscopy is analyzed by the broadening function technique to provide the first spectroscopic orbit for the eclipsing pair. Simultaneous analysis of the spectroscopic data and the SMEI satellite light curve is performed to provide astrophysical parameters for the components. Modified Roche model assuming eccentric orbit and asynchronous rotation is used. Results. The observations show that components of the eclipsing pair rotate at about 2/3 of the break-up velocity which prevents any chemical peculiarity and results in non-uniform surface brightness. Although the inner orbit is eccentric, no apsidal motion is seen during the SMEI photometric observations....

  20. Educating the Public about the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2017-01-01

    On behalf of the International Astronomical Union's Working Group on Solar Eclipses, I have long worked to bring knowledge about eclipses and how to observe the safely to the people of the various countries from which partial, annular, or total solar eclipses are visible. In 2017, we have first a chance to educate the people of South America on the occasion of the February 26 annular eclipse through southern Chile and Argentina that is partial throughout almost the entire continent (and an eclipse workshop will be held February 22-24 in Esquel, Argentina: http://sion.frm.utn.edu.ar/WDEAII) and then a chance to educate the 300 million people of the United States and others in adjacent countries as far south as northern South America about the glories of totality and how to observe partial phases. Our website, a compendium of links to information about maps, safe observing, science, and more is at http://eclipses.info. We link to important mapping sites at EclipseWise.com, GreatAmericanEclipse.com, and http://xjubier.free.fr/en/site_pages/solar_eclipses/xSE_GoogleMap3.php?Ecl=+20170821&Acc=2&Umb=1&Lmt=1&Mag=1&Max=1, and information about cloudiness statistics at http://eclipsophile.com, as well as simulation sites at https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=4314 and http://eyes.jpl.nasa.gov. The American Astronomical Society's task force on the 2017 eclipse has a website at http://eclipse.aas.org. We are working to disseminate accurate information about how and why to observe the total solar eclipse, trying among other things to head off common misinformation about the hazards of looking at the sun at eclipses or otherwise. About 12 million Americans live within the 70-mile-wide band of totality, and we encourage others to travel into it, trying to make clear the difference between even a 99% partial eclipse and a total eclipse, with its glorious Baily's beads, diamond rings, and totality that on this occasion lasts between 2 minutes and 2 minutes 40 seconds

  1. First Results from the August 21, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2017-08-01

    I report on the observations planned and, weather permitting, made from our site in Salem, Oregon, at the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse. I also give a first report on collaborators' successes, including Megamovie and simultaneous space observations. We also describe our participation in PBS's NOVA on the eclipse that was to be aired on public television on eclipse night. Our eclipse expedition is supported in large part by grants from the Solar Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of NSF and by the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  2. Lunar eclipses: Probing the atmosphere of an inhabited planet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz A. García

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Moon's brightness during a lunar eclipse is indicative of the composition, cloudiness and aerosol loading of the Earth's atmosphere. The idea of using lunar eclipse observations to characterize the Earth's atmosphere is not new, but the interest raised by the prospects of discovering Earth-like exoplanets transiting their host stars has brought renewed attention to the method. We review some recent efforts made in the prediction and interpretation of lunar eclipses. We also comment on the contribution of the lunar eclipse theory to the refractive theory of planetary transits.

  3. Total Addiction The Life of an Eclipse Chaser

    CERN Document Server

    Russo, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Seeing a total solar eclipse is often described as a once-in-a-lifetime experience. However, for many who have experienced totality, once-in-a-lifetime is simply not enough. They want more, and are willing to go to great lengths often at great expense to repeat the experience. What is it like to experience totality? What is it about the experience that motivates these eclipse chasers? Is there an eclipse chaser personality? Can eclipse chasing actually be described as an addiction? This book describes the people who dedicate their lives to chasing their dream.

  4. Behavior of Photovoltaic during the Partial Solar Eclipse in Bandung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Rusli, A.; Purnamasari, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Riza, L. S.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavior of photovoltaic system during the partial solar eclipse phenomenon of 9 March 2016 in Bandung, Indonesia. In the experimental method, we monitored the impact of the solar eclipse on the photovoltaic system in solar cell system. To qualitatively explain the experimental observations, we compared the behavior of photovoltaic system in the solar eclipse day (9 March 2016) with the two sunny days (8 and 10 March 2016). The experimental results showed that the intensity and electricity power increased along with the solar light irradiation time. However, when there is a solar eclipse phenomenon, the intensity and electricity power is suddenly down.

  5. Cohort profile: Epidemiological Clinicopathological studies in Europe (EClipSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological Clinicopathological Studies in Europe (EClipSE) is the harmonization of neuropathological and longitudinal clinical data from three population-based prospective longitudinal studies of aging. The EClipSE database (Version 1.0) comprises data from the first 970 people who donated their brain at death and this number will increase. EClipSE enables sociodemographic, health, cognitive, and genetic measures collected during life to be related to neuropathology at death, testing hypotheses which require more power than has been previously possible. EClipSE aims to help throw light on relationships between biological, health and psychological factors underlying ageing and the manifestation of clinical dementia.

  6. Instant Eclipse 4 RCP development how-to

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, Ram

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks.A concise guide that delivers immediate results with practical recipes on learning practical hints and avoiding pitfalls in Eclipse 4 development.You will find this book useful if you are looking to create cross-platform rich client applications. Eclipse platform is built with Java, so basic knowledge of Java is essential. The focus of this book is to understand the new APIs and concepts of the Eclipse 4 platform. Prior knowledge of basic concepts of the Eclipse framework (plugin, ex

  7. AN ONLINE CATALOG OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE SPECTRA FROM THE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPIC EXPLORER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward M. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Levay, Karen [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Linnell, Albert P.; Szkody, Paula [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Barrett, Paul E. [United States Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States); Hubeny, Ivan [Steward Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Blair, William P., E-mail: patrick.godon@villanova.edu, E-mail: edward.sion@villanova.edu, E-mail: klevay@stsci.edu, E-mail: linnell@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: szkody@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: barrett.paul@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: hubeny@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: wpb@pha.jhu.edu [Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We present an online catalog containing spectra and supporting information for cataclysmic variables that have been observed with the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). For each object in the catalog we list some of the basic system parameters such as (R.A., decl.), period, inclination, and white dwarf mass, as well as information on the available FUSE spectra: data ID, observation date and time, and exposure time. In addition, we provide parameters needed for the analysis of the FUSE spectra such as the reddening E(B - V), distance, and state (high, low, intermediate) of the system at the time it was observed. For some of these spectra we have carried out model fits to the continuum with synthetic stellar and/or disk spectra using the codes TLUSTY and SYNSPEC. We provide the parameters obtained from these model fits; this includes the white dwarf temperature, gravity, projected rotational velocity, and elemental abundances of C, Si, S, and N, together with the disk mass accretion rate, the resulting inclination, and model-derived distance (when unknown). For each object one or more figures are provided (as gif files) with line identification and model fit(s) when available. The FUSE spectra and the synthetic spectra are directly available for download as ASCII tables. References are provided for each object, as well as for the model fits. In this article we present 36 objects, and additional ones will be added to the online catalog in the future. In addition to cataclysmic variables, we also include a few related objects, such as a wind-accreting white dwarf, a pre-cataclysmic variable, and some symbiotics.

  8. Reconstructing Glacial Lake Vitim and its cataclysmic drainage to the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margold, Martin; Jansen, John D.; Gurinov, Artem L.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Preusser, Frank

    2013-04-01

    A large glacial lake (23500 km2/3000 km3) was formed when the River Vitim, one of the largest tributaries of the Lena River in Siberia, Russia, was blocked by glaciers from the Kodar Mountains. This lake, Glacial Lake Vitim, was subsequently drained in a large outburst flood that followed the rivers Vitim and Lena to the Arctic Ocean. Evidence of a cataclysmic drainage was first identified in the form of a large bedrock canyon in the area of the postulated ice dam. The enormous dimensions of this feature (6 x 2 x 0.3 km) suggest formation via a drainage event of extreme magnitude, and field inspection downstream revealed giant bars >100 m above the valley floor, similar to those described from cataclysmic floods elsewhere. We present chronological constraints for the duration of the ice dam and for the timing of the flood based on terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides and optically stimulated luminescence. Given that the volume of Glacial Lake Vitim was significantly larger than other well known lakes associated with cataclysmic outbursts-glacial lakes Missoula (northwestern USA) and Chuja-Kuray (Altai Mountains, Russia)-it is pertinent to assess the possible climatic consequences of Lake Vitim's drainage. The outburst flood from Glacial Lake Vitim is likely among the largest floods documented on Earth thus far. Possible impacts include rapid change of climate and precipitation patterns in the area of the former glacial lake, major disturbance along the flood course to the Arctic, and perhaps even regional-scale climatic feedbacks linked to altered sea ice dynamics in the Arctic Ocean.

  9. On the long term evolution of white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables and their recurrence times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sion, E. M.; Starrfield, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The relevance of the long term quasi-static evolution of accreting white dwarfs to the outbursts of Z Andromeda-like symbiotics; the masses and accretion rates of classical nova white dwarfs; and the observed properties of white dwarfs detected optically and with IUE in low M dot cataclysmic variables is discussed. A surface luminosity versus time plot for a massive, hot white dwarf bears a remarkable similarity to the outburst behavior of the hot blue source in Z Andromeda. The long term quasi-static models of hot accreting white dwarfs provide convenient constraints on the theoretically permissible parameters to give a dynamical (nova-like) outburst of classic white dwarfs.

  10. SW Sex stars, old novae, and the evolution of cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidtobreick, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The population of cataclysmic variables with orbital periods right above the period gap are dominated by systems with extremely high mass transfer rates, the so-called SW Sextantis stars. On the other hand, some old novae in this period range which are expected to show high mass transfer rate instead show photometric and/or spectroscopic resemblance to low mass transfer systems like dwarf novae. We discuss them as candidates for so-called hibernating systems, CVs that changed their mass transfer behaviour due to a previously experienced nova outburst. This paper is designed to provide input for further research and discussion as the results as such are still very preliminary.

  11. A Tool for Optimizing Observation Planning for Faint Moving Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Anicia; Bosh, Amanda S.; Levine, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Observations of small solar system bodies such as trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs are vital for understanding the basic properties of these small members of our solar system. Because these objects are often very faint, large telescopes and long exposures may be necessary, which can result in crowded fields in which the target of interest may be blended with a field star. For accurate photometry and astrometry, observations must be planned to occur when the target is free of background stars; this restriction results in limited observing windows. We have created a tool that can be used to plan observations of faint moving objects. Features of the tool include estimates of best times to observe (when the object is not too near another object), a finder chart output, a list of possible astrometric and photometric reference stars, and an exposure time calculator. This work makes use of the USNOFS Image and Catalogue Archive operated by the United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station (S.E. Levine and D.G. Monet 2000), the JPL Horizons online ephemeris service (Giorgini et al. 1996), the Minor Planet Center's MPChecker (http://cgi.minorplanetcenter.net/cgi-bin/checkmp.cgi), and source extraction software SExtractor (Bertin & Arnouts 1996). Support for this work was provided by NASA SSO grant NNX15AJ82G.

  12. Exploring the faint source population at 15.7 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Whittam, Imogen H; Green, David A; Jarvis, Matt J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss our current understanding of the nature of the faint, high-frequency radio sky. The Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey at 15.7 GHz is the deepest high-frequency radio survey to date, covering 12 square degrees to a completeness limit of 0.5 mJy, making it the ideal starting point from which to study this population. In this work we have matched the 10C survey to several lower-frequency radio catalogues and a wide range of multi-wavelength data (near- and far-infrared, optical and X-ray). We find a significant increase in the proportion of flat-spectrum sources at flux densities below 1 mJy - the median radio spectral index between 15.7 GHz and 610 MHz changes from 0.75 for flux densities greater than 1.5 mJy to 0.08 for flux densities less than 0.8 mJy. The multi-wavelength analysis shows that the vast majority (> 94 percent) of the 10C sources are radio galaxies; it is therefore likely that these faint, flat spectrum sources are a result of the cores of radio galaxies becoming dominant at high frequenci...

  13. FIGGS2: An HI survey of extremely faint irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Karachentsev, Igor D; Sharina, Margarita E

    2016-01-01

    We present the observations and first results from the FIGGS2 survey. FIGGS2 is an extension of the earlier Faint Irregular Galaxies GMRT survey (FIGGS) towards faint luminosity end. The sample consists of 20 galaxies of which 15 were detected in HI 21cm line using the Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The median blue band magnitude of our sample is ~ -11.6, which is more than one magnitude fainter than earlier FIGGS survey. From our GMRT observations we find that, for many of our sample galaxies, the HI disks are offset from their optical disks. The HI diameters of the FIGGS2 galaxies show a tight correlation with their HI mass. The slope of the correlation is 2.08 +/- 0.20 similar to what is found for FIGGS galaxies. We also find that for almost all galaxies, the HI disks are larger than the optical disks which is a common trend for dwarf or spiral galaxies. The mean value of the ratio of HI to optical diameter is ~ 1.54.

  14. Evolution of accretion disc flow in cataclysmic variables. 3. Outburst properties of constant and uniform-. cap alpha. model discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.N.C.; Faulkner, J. (Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA (USA); California Univ., Santa Cruz (USA). Board of Studies in Astronomy and Astrophysics); Papaloizou, J. (Queen Mary Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Applied Mathematics)

    1985-01-01

    The investigation of accretion disc models relevant to cataclysmic-variable systems is continued. This paper examines the stability and evolution of some simple accretion disc models in which the viscosity is prescribed by an ad hoc uniform-..cap alpha.. model. It is primarily concerned with systems in which the mass-input rate from the secondary to the disc around the primary is assumed to be constant. However, initial calculations with variable mass-input rates are also performed. The time-dependent visual magnitude light-curves are constructed for cataclysmic binaries with a range of disc size, primary mass, mass-input rate, and magnitude of viscosity.

  15. Gravity Effects of Solar Eclipse and Inducted Gravitational Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K.; Wang, Q.; Zhang, H.; Hua, C.; Peng, F.; Hu, K.

    2003-12-01

    During solar eclipses in recent decades, gravity anomalies were observed and difficult to be explained by Newton's gravitational theory. During the solar eclipse of 1995, India scientists Mishra et al. recorded a gravity valley in amplitude of 12 μ Gal; they interpreted that qualitatively as atmospheric effects. During the total solar eclipse of March 1997, we conducted a comprehensive geophysical observation at Mohe geophysical observatory of China (with latitude of 53.490 N and longitude of 122.340 E. From the data we recorded, we found two valleys about 5 to 7 μ Gal. Unnikrishnan et al. inferred this gravity anomaly was caused by the environment changes. We know that the observation had been conducting in a room inside a small building with a stable coal heating system; the temperature variation inside the experimental room was less 10C during the eclipse. Moreover, the measured atmospheric pressure change was less 1hPa during the eclipse. It is reasonable to believe that surrounding environment of the observatory excluded the significant gravity variations caused by temperature, pressure variation and local moving of persons and vehicles. To further study the gravity effects related to solar eclipses, our scientific team took more observations during Zambia total solar eclipse of June 2001 and Australia total solar eclipse of December 2002. After data corrections, we found respectively two gravity anomalies, with 3 to 4μ Gal for Zambia eclipse and 1.5μ Gal for Australia eclipse. As many scientists have pointed out that pressure-gravity factor is lower than 0.3μ Gal/hPa, it means that any gravity anomaly great than 0.5μ Gal could not be inferred as the results of atmospheric pressure change. The two more gravity anomalies recorded during the solar eclipses provided us strong evidences that some gravity anomalies could not simply be inferred as atmospheric pressure change. We have tried to explain those anomalies by the induced gravitational field.

  16. Public Education and Outreach for Observing Solar Eclipses and Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2015-08-01

    The general public is often very interested in observing solar eclipses, with widespread attention from newspapers and other sources often available only days before the events. Recently, the 2012 eclipse's partial phases in Australia and the 2015 eclipse's partial phases throughout Europe as well as western Asia and northern Africa, were widely viewed. The 21 August 2017 eclipse, whose totality will sweep across the Continental United States from northwest to southeast, will have partial phases visible throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Central America, and into South America. The 2019 and 2020 partial phases of total eclipses will be visible throughout South America, and partial phases from annular eclipses will be visible from other parts of the world. The 9 May 2016 transit of Mercury will be best visible from the Western Hemisphere, Europe, and Africa. Many myths and misunderstandings exist about the safety of observing partial phases, and it is our responsibility as astronomers and educators to transmit accurate information and to attempt the widest possible distribution of such information. The Working Group on Public Education at Eclipses and Transits, formerly of Commission 46 on Education and Development and now of New Commission 11, tries to coordinate the distribution of information. In collaboration with the Solar Division's Working Group on Solar Eclipses, their website at http://eclipses.info is a one-stop shop for accurate information on how to observe eclipses, why it is interesting to do so, where they will be visible (with links to online maps and weather statistics), and how encouraging students to observe eclipses can be inspirational for them, perhaps even leading them to realize that the Universe can be understood and therefore renewing the strength of their studies. Links to information about transits of Mercury and Venus are also included.

  17. OMC/INTEGRAL photometric observations of pulsating components in eclipsing binaries and characterization of DY Aqr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Garzón, J.; Montesinos, B.; Moya, A.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Martín-Ruiz, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present the search for eclipsing binaries with a pulsating component in the first catalogue of optically variable sources observed by Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC)/INTEGRAL, which contains photometric data for more than 1000 eclipsing binaries. Five objects were found and a detailed analysis of one of them, DY Aqr, has been performed. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of DY Aqr were obtained to analyse the binary system and the pulsational characteristics of the primary component. By applying the binary modelling software PHOEBE to the OMC and ground-based photometric light curves, and to the radial velocity curve obtained using echelle high-resolution spectroscopy, the physical parameters of the system have been determined. Frequency analysis of the residual data has been performed using Fourier techniques to identify pulsational frequencies. We have built a grid of theoretical models to classify spectroscopically the primary component as an A7.5V star (plus or minus one spectral subtype). The best orbital fit was obtained for a semidetached system configuration. According to the binary modelling, the primary component has Teff = 7625 ± 125 K and log g = 4.1 ± 0.1 and the secondary component has Teff = 3800 ± 200 K and log g = 3.3 ± 0.1, although it is too faint to isolate its spectral features. From the analysis of the residuals, we have found a main pulsation frequency at 23.37 d-1, which is typical of a δ Scuti star. In the O-C diagram, no evidence of orbital period changes over the last 8 yr has been found.

  18. Eclipse burns: a prospective study of solar retinopathy following the 1999 solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S C; Eke, T; Ziakas, N G

    2001-01-20

    Looking at the sun can cause focal burns to the retina. We prospectively followed up all patients who presented to Eye Casualty of Leicester Royal Infirmary having observed the solar eclipse of August, 1999. 45 patients attended, of whom 20 had visual symptoms and five had visible changes in the retina; four patients were still symptomatic after 7 months.

  19. Cataclysm No More: New Views on the Timing and Delivery of Lunar Impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Nicolle E. B.

    2017-09-01

    If properly interpreted, the impact record of the Moon, Earth's nearest neighbour, can be used to gain insights into how the Earth has been influenced by impacting events since its formation 4.5 billion years (Ga) ago. However, the nature and timing of the lunar impactors - and indeed the lunar impact record itself - are not well understood. Of particular interest are the ages of lunar impact basins and what they tell us about the proposed "lunar cataclysm" and/or the late heavy bombardment (LHB), and how this impact episode may have affected early life on Earth or other planets. Investigations of the lunar impactor population over time have been undertaken and include analyses of orbital data and images; lunar, terrestrial, and other planetary sample data; and dynamical modelling. Here, the existing information regarding the nature of the lunar impact record is reviewed and new interpretations are presented. Importantly, it is demonstrated that most evidence supports a prolonged lunar (and thus, terrestrial) bombardment from 4.2 to 3.4 Ga and not a cataclysmic spike at 3.9 Ga. Implications for the conditions required for the origin of life are addressed.

  20. Superhumps in Cataclysmic Binaries. XXV. q_crit, epsilon(q), and Mass-Radius

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, J; Harvey, D; Fried, R; Rea, R; Monard, B; Cook, L; Skillman, D R; Vanmunster, T; Bolt, G; Armstrong, E; McCormick, J; Krajci, T; Jensen, L; Gunn, J; Butterworth, N D; Foote, J; Bos, M; Masi, G; Warhurst, P; Patterson, Joseph; Kemp, Jonathan; Harvey, David; Fried, Robert; Rea, Robert; Monard, Berto; Cook, Lewis; Skillman, David; Vanmunster, Tonny; Bolt, Greg; Armstrong, Eve; Cormick, Jennie Mc; Krajci, Thomas; Jensen, Lasse; Gunn, Jerry; Butterworth, Neil; Foote, Jerry; Bos, Marc; Masi, Gianluca; Warhurst, Paul

    2005-01-01

    We report on successes and failures in searching for positive superhumps in cataclysmic variables, and show the superhumping fraction as a function of orbital period. Basically, all short-period systems do, all long-period systems don't, and a 50% success rate is found at P_orb=3.1+-0.2 hr. We can use this to measure the critical mass ratio for the creation of superhumps. With a mass-radius relation appropriate for cataclysmic variables, and an assumed mean white-dwarf mass of 0.75 M_sol, we find a mass ratio q_crit=0.35+-0.02. We also report superhump studies of several stars of independently known mass ratio: OU Virginis, XZ Eridani, UU Aquarii, and KV UMa (= XTE J1118+480). The latter two are of special interest, because they represent the most extreme mass ratios for which accurate superhump measurements have been made. We use these to improve the epsilon(q) calibration, by which we can infer the elusive q from the easy-to-measure epsilon (the fractional period excess of P_superhump over P_orb). This rela...

  1. Project Report ECLIPSE: European Citizenship Learning Program for Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardelli, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a European project, the Comenius ECLIPSE project (European Citizenship Learning in a Programme for Secondary Education) developed by six European partners coordinated by the University of Trento in the years 2011-2014. ECLIPSE (co-financed by the EACEA--Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency) aims at developing,…

  2. Capsicum Annuum L. Midnight Creeper and Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA, ARS announces the release of two new pepper cultivars 06C84 (trademarked as Midnight Creeper) and 07C114-1 (trademarked as Solar Eclipse). Midnight Creeper and Solar Eclipse are intended for ornamental applications. Midnight Creeper’s prostrate spreading indeterminate growth habit, black f...

  3. Absolute dimensions of eclipsing binaries XXVII. V1130 tauri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jens Viggo; Olsen, E, H.; Helt, B. E.

    2010-01-01

    stars: evolution / stars: fundamental parameters / stars: individual: V1130¿Tau / binaries: eclipsing / techniques: photometric / techniques: radial velocities Udgivelsesdato: 17 Feb.......stars: evolution / stars: fundamental parameters / stars: individual: V1130¿Tau / binaries: eclipsing / techniques: photometric / techniques: radial velocities Udgivelsesdato: 17 Feb....

  4. The penumbral Moon's eclipse form 16 september 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Adrian; Pteancu, Mircea; Zaharia, Cristian

    2016-10-01

    The web page represents circumstances and photographs from the Moon's partial/penumbral eclipse from 16 September 2016 obtained from few various places in Romania (East Europe). A part of photographs give the maximum phase of the Eclipse, while another give the reddened Moon.

  5. RZ Cassiopeia: Eclipsing Binary with Pulsating Component

    CERN Document Server

    Golovin, A

    2007-01-01

    We report time-resolved VR-band CCD photometry of the eclipsing binary RZ Cas obtained with 38-cm Cassegrain telescope at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory during July 2004 - October 2005. Obtained lightcurves clearly demonstrates rapid pulsations with the period about 22 minutes. Periodogram analysis of such oscillations also is reported. On the 12, January, 2005 we observed rapid variability with higher amplitude (~0.^m 1) that, perhaps, may be interpreted as high-mass-transfer-rate event and inhomogeneity of accretion stream. Follow-up observations (both, photometric and spectroscopic) of RZ Cas are strictly desirable for more detailed study of such event.

  6. Apsidal motion in eclipsing binary GG Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilan, E.; Bulut, I.

    2016-03-01

    The study of apsidal motion in binary stars with eccentric orbit is well known as an important source of information for the stellar internal structure as well as the possibility of verification of general relativity. In this study, the apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary GG Ori (P = 6.631 days, e = 0.22) has been analyzed using the times of minimum light taken from the literature and databases and the elements of apsidal motion have been computed. The method described by Giménez and García-Pelayo (1983) has been used for the apsidal motion analysis.

  7. Oh Glorious Geometry: Eclipses, Transits, and Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomical objects are like a grand clockwork in the sky; they follow steady patterns in time. However, these bright objects we see are not just points of light but have finite dimensions and thus can get in each other's way. As a result, some stars puzzle us by brightening or dimming, or the Sun can frighten us by going out unexpectedly when something else blocks its light. There is nothing unusual about these eclipses, occultations, or transits—they are demonstrations of simple physics—and we take some for granted, like the rotation of Earth moving us into darkness each night. The periodic dimming of a bright star worried mankind for millennia and helped give astronomy a shove. And unexpected events, like a solar or lunar eclipse, can inspire awe and change the course of history. Now that we can observe through telescopes and travel by proxy throughout the solar system, we find the universe is rife with shadow and light shows. Those taking place within our solar system have been useful to astronomy (like the recent transits of Venus or the ever-present eclipses of the Jovian satellites), and were of considerable popular interest, allowing us to think beyond the confines of Earth. Now we detect distant exoplanets transiting their parent stars, announcing the presence of other solar systems in our corner of the Galaxy and changing the discussion about life elsewhere in the universe from mere speculation to plausible possibility. Distant galaxies can make visible ever-further galaxies by forming Einstein rings, allowing us to see behind them and make the structure of the universe more evident. This paper will discuss these phenomena, from those visible easily on Earth to those that can now be seen for the first time from probes in space. We will also discuss how this has expanded popular knowledge of the universe we live in. This paper is illustrated by a number of examples ranging from eclipses and transits throughout the solar system and the nearby stars to

  8. On the Eclipse of Thales, Cycles and Probabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Querejeta, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    According to classical tradition, Thales of Miletus predicted the total solar eclipse that took place on 28 May 585 BCE. Even if some authors have flatly denied the possibility of such a prediction, others have struggled to find cycles which would justify the achievement of the philosopher. Some of the proposed cycles have already been refuted, but two of them, namely those of Willy Hartner and Dirk Couprie, remain unchallenged. This paper presents some important objections to these two possibilities, based on the fact that these authors do not list all the eclipses potentially visible by their criteria. In addition, any explanation based on cycles will need to face the complex problem of visibility (smallest observable eclipse, weather...). The present article also includes a statistical study on the predictability of solar eclipses for a variety of periods, similar to that performed by Willy Hartner for lunar eclipses, resulting in lower probabilities in the solar case (and percentages depend on the chosen ...

  9. A sample of Swift/SDSS faint blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Bernardo; Giommi, Paolo; Turriziani, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We aim here to provide a complete sample of faint (fr ≳ 1 mJy, fx ≳ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1) blazars and blazar candidates serendipitously discovered in deep Swift images centered on Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By stacking all available images, we obtain exposures ranging from 104 to more than a million seconds. Since GRBs are thought to explode randomly across the sky, this set of deep fields can be considered as an unbiased survey of ≈ 12 square degrees of extragalactic sky, with sensitivities reaching a few 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band. We then derive the x-ray Log N Log S and show that, considering that our sample may be contaminated by sources other than blazars, we are in agreement with previous estimations based on data and simulations.

  10. Very faint X-ray binaries with XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2016-06-01

    A population of very faint X-ray binaries has been discovered in the last years thanks to the improvement in sensitivity and resolution of the new generations of X-ray missions. These systems show anomalously low luminosities, below 10^{36} ergs/sec, challenging our understanding of accretion physics and binary evolution models, and thereby opening new windows for both observational and theoretical work on accretion onto compact objects. XMM-Newton is playing a crucial role in the study of this dim family of objects thanks to its incomparable spectral capabilities at low luminosities. I will review the state-of-the-art of the field and present our XMM results in both black hole and neutron star objects. Finally, I will discuss the possibilities that the new generation of X-ray telescopes offer for this research line.

  11. A Comprehensive Survey of Neptune's Small Moons and Faint Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Mark

    2009-07-01

    We will use a subarray of the WFC3/UVIS to study the inner rings, arcs and moons of Neptune with a sensitivity that exceeds that achieved by any previous observations, including Voyager 2 during its 1989 flyby. Our study will reveal any inner moons down to V magnitude 25, corresponding to a radius 20 km {assuming 9% albedo}, to address a peculiar, apparent truncation in the size distribution of inner moons and to look for the "shepherds" and source bodies for Neptune's dusty rings. {For comparison, the radius of Neptune's smallest known regular moon, Naiad, is 33 km.} Monitoring of the arcs at fine resolution and sensitivity will reveal their ongoing evolution more clearly and will enable us to assess the role of Galatea, whose resonant perturbations are widely believed to confine the arcs. Our study will also reveal any broad, faint rings with optical depth 10^-6, comparable to those now known to encircle all of the other giant planets.

  12. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  13. Morphology and astrometry of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Randall, Kate; Mao, Minnie; Hales, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, are an unexpected class of object discovered in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, ATLAS. They are compact 1.4GHz radio sources with no visible counterparts in co-located (relatively shallow) Spitzer infrared and optical images. We have detected two of these objects with VLBI, indicating the presence of an AGN. These observations and our ATLAS data indicate that IFRS are extended on scales of arcseconds, and we wish to image their morphologies to obtain clues about their nature. These observations will also help us to select optical counterparts from very deep, and hence crowded, optical images which we have proposed. With these data in hand, we will be able to compare IFRS to known object types and to apply for spectroscopy to obtain their redshifts.

  14. Student artistry sparks eclipse excitement on Maui: NSO/DKIST EPO for the 2016 Partial Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Penn, Matthew J.; Armstrong, James

    2016-05-01

    Local creativity and artistry is a powerful resource that enhances education programs and helps us generate excitement for science within our communities. In celebration of the 2016 Solar Eclipse, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) and its Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) project were pleased to engage with students across Maui County, Hawai`i, via the 2016 Maui Eclipse Art Contest. With the help of the Maui Economic Development Board and the University of Hawai'is Institute for Astronomy, we solicited art entries from all K-12 schools in Maui County approximately 6 months prior to the eclipse. Along with divisional prizes, a grand prize was selected by a panel of local judges, which was subsequently printed on 25,000 solar eclipse viewing glasses and distributed to all Maui students. We found that the impact of a locally-sourced glasses design cannot be understated. Overall, the success of this program relied upon reaching out to individual teachers, supplying educational flyers to all schools, and visiting classrooms. On the day of the eclipse, all of the art entries were prominently displayed during a community eclipse viewing event at Kalama Beach Park in Kihei, HI, that was co-hosted by NSO and the Maui Science Center. This eclipse art contest was integral to making local connections to help promote science education on Maui, and we suggest that it could be adapted to the solar community's EPO activities for the upcoming 2017 Great American Solar Eclipse.

  15. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VII. The Catalog of Eclipsing Binaries Found in the Entire Kepler Data-Set

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, Brian; Prša, Andrej; Abdul-Masih, Michael; Kochoska, Angela; Matijevič, Gal; Hambleton, Kelly; Barclay, Thomas; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R; Fulton, B J; Hoekstra, Abe Johannes; Jek, Kian; Kane, Stephen R; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David; Mazeh, Tsevi; Orosz, Jerome A; Pepper, Joshua; Quarles, Billy; Ragozzine, Darin; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John; Stassun, Keivan; Thompson, Susan E; Welsh, William F; Agol, Eric; Derekas, Aliz; Devor, Jonathan; Fischer, Debra; Green, Gregory; Gropp, Jeff; Jacobs, Tom; Johnston, Cole; LaCourse, Daryll Matthew; Saetre, Kristian; Schwengeler, Hans; Toczyski, Jacek; Werner, Griffin; Garrett, Matthew; Gore, Joanna; Martinez, Arturo O; Spitzer, Isaac; Stevick, Justin; Thomadis, Pantelis C; Vrijmoet, Eliot Halley; Yenawine, Mitchell; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William

    2015-01-01

    The primary Kepler Mission provided nearly continuous monitoring of ~200,000 objects with unprecedented photometric precision. We present the final catalog of eclipsing binary systems within the 105 square degree Kepler field of view. This release incorporates the full extent of the data from the primary mission (Q0-Q17 Data Release). As a result, new systems have been added, additional false positives have been removed, ephemerides and principal parameters have been recomputed, classifications have been revised to rely on analytical models, and eclipse timing variations have been computed for each system. We identify several classes of systems including those that exhibit tertiary eclipse events, systems that show clear evidence of additional bodies, heartbeat systems, systems with changing eclipse depths, and systems exhibiting only one eclipse event over the duration of the mission. We have updated the period and galactic latitude distribution diagrams and included a catalog completeness evaluation. The to...

  16. External pneumatic compression device prevents fainting in standing weight-bearing MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Brandt; Bouert, Rasmus; Bliddal, Henning

    2013-01-01

    To investigate if a peristaltic external pneumatic compression device attached to the legs, while scanning, can reduce a substantial risk of fainting in standing weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).......To investigate if a peristaltic external pneumatic compression device attached to the legs, while scanning, can reduce a substantial risk of fainting in standing weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)....

  17. The M Dwarf Eclipsing Binary CU Cancri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. E.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Terrell, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    Spectral features, radial velocities, elemental abundance estimates, other spectral data, and BVIC light curves are reported for the double-M dwarf eclipsing binary CU Cancri—a good target for a radius check versus the Zero Age Main Sequence (ZAMS) due to the low component masses and corresponding very slow evolutionary expansion. The estimate of [Fe/H] is about 0.4, although continuum placement and other difficulties due to line crowding introduce the usual uncertainties for red dwarfs. Detection of the Li i λ6707 line was attempted, with an estimated upper limit of 50 mÅ. Spectral and photometric indicators of stellar activity are described and illustrated. Other objectives were to measure the stellar radii via simultaneous velocity and light-curve solutions of earlier and new data while also improving the ephemeris by filling gaps in timewise coverage with the new velocities and eclipse data from the new light curves. The radii from our solutions agree within about 2% with those from Ribas, being slightly larger than expected for most estimates of the ZAMS. Some aspects of the red dwarf radius anomaly are briefly discussed. Evolution tracks show only very slight age-related expansion for masses near those in CU Cnc. Such expansion could be significant if CU Cnc were similar in age to the Galaxy, but then its Galactic velocity components should be representative of Population II, and they are not.

  18. RADIAL VELOCITY ECLIPSE MAPPING OF EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix, E-mail: nikolay@astro.ex.ac.uk [Astrophysics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-20

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter–McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin–orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  19. PX Andromedae superhumps and variable eclipse depth

    CERN Document Server

    Stanishev, V; Boffin, H M J; Genkov, V

    2002-01-01

    Results of a photometric study of the SW Sex novalike PX And are presented. The periodogram analysis of the observations obtained in October 2000 reveals the presence of three signals with periods of 0.142, 4.8 and 0.207 days. The first two periods are recognized as "negative superhumps" and the corresponding retrograde precession period of the accretion disk. The origin of the third periodic signal remains unknown. The observations in September-October 2001 point only to the presence of "negative superhumps" and possibly to the precession period. The origin of the "negative superhumps" is discussed and two possible mechanisms are suggested. All light curves show strong flickering activity and power spectra with a typical red noise shape. PX And shows eclipses with highly variable shape and depth. The analysis suggests that the eclipse depth is modulated with the precession period and two possible explanations of this phenomenon are discussed. An improved orbital ephemeris is also determined: T_min[HJD]=49238...

  20. Spitzer Secondary Eclipses of WASP-18b

    CERN Document Server

    Nymeyer, Sarah; Hardy, Ryan A; Stevenson, Kevin B; Campo, Christopher J; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, William C; Britt, Christopher B T; Cubillos, Patricio; Hellier, Coel; Gillon, Michael; Maxted, Pierre F L; Hebb, Leslie; Wheatley, Peter J; Pollacco, Don; Anderson, David

    2010-01-01

    The transiting exoplanet WASP-18b was discovered in 2008 by the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) project. The \\textit{Spitzer}\\ Exoplanet Target of Opportunity Program observed secondary eclipses of WASP-18b using \\textit{Spitzer}'s Infrared Array Camera (IR\\ AC) in the 3.6-{\\micron} and 5.8-{\\micron} bands on 2008 December 20, and in the 4.5-{\\micron} and 8.0-{\\micron} bands on 2008 Dece\\ mber 24. We report eclipse depths of \\math{0.31\\pm{0.02}, 0.38\\pm{0.03}, 0.41\\pm{0.02}, 0.43\\pm{0.03}\\%}, and brightness temperatu\\ res of 2920 \\pm {90}, 3150 \\pm {130}, 3040 \\pm {130} and 2960 \\pm {130} K, respectively. WASP-18b is one of the hottest planets ye\\ t discovered - as hot as an M-class star. The planet's pressure-temperature profile features a thermal inversion. The observation\\ s also require WASP-18b to have near-zero albedo and almost no redistribution of energy from the day-side to the night side of the \\ planet.

  1. 75 FR 39472 - Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Model EA500 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse Aerospace... directive (AD) for certain Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. (Eclipse) Model EA500 airplanes. This proposed AD would... proposed AD, contact Eclipse Aerospace, Incorporated, 2503 Clark Carr Loop, SE., Albuquerque, New...

  2. KIC 9246715: The Double Red Giant Eclipsing Binary With Odd Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Rawls, Meredith L; McKeever, Jean; Jackiewicz, Jason; Orosz, Jerome A; Corsaro, Enrico; Beck, Paul; Mosser, Benoît; Latham, David W; Latham, Christian A

    2016-01-01

    We combine Kepler photometry with ground-based spectra to present a comprehensive dynamical model of the double red giant eclipsing binary KIC 9246715. While the two stars are very similar in mass (M1 = 2.171 [+0.006 / -0.008], M2 = 2.149 [+0.006 / -0.008] Msun) and radius (R1 = 8.37 [+0.03 / -0.07], R2 = 8.30 [+0.04 / -0.03] Rsun), an asteroseismic analysis finds one main set of solar-like oscillations with unusually low-amplitude, wide modes. A second set of oscillations from the other star may exist, but this marginal detection is extremely faint. Because the two stars are nearly twins, KIC 9246715 is a difficult target for a precise test of the asteroseismic scaling relations, which yield M = 2.17 +/- 0.14 Msun and R = 8.26 +/- 0.18 Rsun. Both stars are consistent with the inferred asteroseismic properties, but we suspect the main oscillator is Star 2 because it is less active than Star 1. We find evidence for stellar activity and modest tidal forces acting over the 171-day eccentric orbit, which are like...

  3. Optical flares and flaring oscillations on the M-type eclipsing binary CU Cnc

    CERN Document Server

    -B., Qian S; Zhu, L -Y; Liu, L; Liao, W -P; Zhao, E -G; He, J -J; Li, L -J; Li, K; Dai, Z -B

    2012-01-01

    We report here the discovery of an optical flare observed in R band from the red-dwarf eclipsing binary CU Cnc whose component stars are at the upper boundary of full convection (M1=0.43 and M2=0.4M0, M0 is the solar mass). The amplitude of the flare is the largest among those detected in R band (~0.52mag) and the duration time is about 73 minutes. As those observed on the Sun, quasi-periodic oscillations were seen during and after the flare. Three more R-band flares were found by follow up monitoring. In total, this binary was monitored photometrically by using R filter for 79.9 hours, which reveals a R-band flare rate about 0.05 flares per hour. These detections together with other strong chromospheric and coronal activities, i.e., very strong H_alpha and H_beta emission features and an EUV and X-ray source, indicate that it has very strong magnetic activity. Therefore, the apparent faintness (~1.4 magnitude in V) of CU Cnc compared with other single red dwarfs of the same mass can be plausibly explained by...

  4. The solar eclipse of 2017 where and how to best view it

    CERN Document Server

    Held, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    On Monday, August 21, 2017, there will be a solar eclipse of the sun visible from large parts of North America, from Oregon across to South Carolina. It will be the first total eclipse visible from mainland US since 1979, and there will not be a significant total eclipse in Europe until 2026. For many westerners, therefore, 2017 is the best opportunity for decades to view a solar eclipse.Preparation is key to successfully observing an eclipse. This guide to the 2017 eclipse tells you the best places and exact times to see the eclipse (including detailed maps), as well as lots of tips on the be

  5. Eclipse journeys to the dark side of the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Close, Frank

    2017-01-01

    On August 21st, over one hundred million people will gather across the USA to witness the most-watched total solar eclipse in history. Eclipse: Journeys to the Dark Side of the Moon, by popular science author Frank Close, describes the spellbinding allure of this beautiful natural phenomenon. The book explains why eclipses happen, reveals their role in history, literature and myth, and introduces us to eclipse chasers, who travel with ecstatic fervor to some of the most inaccessible places on the globe. The book also includes the author's quest to solve a 3000-year-old mystery: how did the moon move backward during a total solar eclipse, as claimed in the Book of Joshua? Eclipse is also the story of how a teacher inspired the author, aged eight, to pursue a career in science and a love affair with eclipses that has taken him to a war zone in the Western Sahara, the South Pacific, and the African bush. The tale comes full circle with another eight-year old boy - the author's grandson - at the 2017 great Americ...

  6. The collapse of Io's primary atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Spencer, John R.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Richter, Matthew J.

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic outgassing due to tidal heating is the ultimate source of a tenuous SO2 atmosphere around Jupiter's moon Io. The question of whether SO2 frost on the surface plays a part, and to what degree, in maintaining Io's atmosphere with the constant volcanic outgassing is still debated. It is believed that for a sublimation-supported atmosphere, the primary atmosphere should collapse during eclipses by Jupiter, as the SO2 vapor pressure is strongly coupled to the temperature of the ice on the surface. No direct observations of Io's atmosphere in eclipse have previously been possible, due to the simultaneous need for high spectral and time sensitivity, as well as a high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we present the first ever high-resolution spectra at 19 µm of Io's SO2 atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse from the Gemini telescope. The strongest atmospheric band depth is seen to dramatically decay from 2.5 ± (0.08)% before the eclipse to 0.18 ± (0.16)% after 40 min in eclipse. Further modeling indicates that the atmosphere has collapsed shortly after eclipse ingress, implying that the atmosphere of Io has a strong sublimation-controlled component. The atmospheric column density—from pre-eclipse to in-eclipse—drops by a factor of 5 ± 2.

  7. Five Millennium Catalog of Lunar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This catalog is a supplement to the "FiveMillenniumCanonofLunarEclipses." It includes additional information for each eclipse that could not be included in the original publication because of size limits. The data tabulated for each eclipse include the catalog number, canon plate number, calendar date, Terrestrial Dynamical Time of greatest eclipse, (Delta)T, lunation number, Saros number, eclipse type, Quincena Solar Eclipse parameter, gamma, penumbral and umbral eclipse magnitudes, durations of penumbral, partial and total eclipse phases, and geographic coordinates of greatest eclipse (latitude and longitude). The Canon and the Catalog both use the same solar and lunar ephemerides as well as the same values of (Delta)T. This 1-to-1 correspondence between them will enhance the value of each. The researcher may now search, evaluate, and compare eclipses graphically (Canon) or textually (Catalog).

  8. Five Millennium Catalog of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean

    2008-01-01

    This catalog is a supplement to the "Five Millennium Canon of Solar Eclipses." It includes additional information for each eclipse that could not be included in the original 648-page publication because of size limits. The data tabulated for each eclipse include the catalog number, canon plate number, calendar date, Terrestrial Dynamical Time of greatest eclipse, (Delta)T, lunation number, Saros number, eclipse type, Quincena Lunar Eclipse parameter, gamma, eclipse magnitude, geographic coordinates of greatest eclipse (latitude and longitude), and the circumstances at greatest eclipse (i.e., Sun altitude and azimuth, path width, and central line duration). The Canon and the Catalog both use the same solar and lunar ephemerides as well as the same values of (Delta)T. This 1-to-1 correspondence between them will enhance the value of each. The researcher may now search, evaluate, and compare eclipses graphically (Canon) or textually (Catalog).

  9. Five Millennium Catalog of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)-Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This catalog is a supplement to the "Five Millennium Canon of Lunar Eclipses. "It includes additional information for each eclipse that could not be included in the original publication because of size limits. The data tabulated for each eclipse include the catalog number, canon plate number, calendar date, Terrestrial Dynamical Time of greatest eclipse, (Delta)T, lunation number, Saros number, eclipse type, Quincena Solar Eclipse parameter, gamma, penumbral and umbral eclipse magnitudes, durations of penumbral, partial and total eclipse phases, and geographic coordinates of greatest eclipse(latitude and longitude). The Canon and the Catalog both use the same solar and lunar ephemerides as well as the same values of (Delta)T. This 1-to-1 correspondence between them will enhance the value of each. The researcher may now search, evaluate, and compare eclipses graphically (Canon) or textually (Catalog).

  10. Coordinated weather balloon solar radiation measurements during a solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R G; Marlton, G J; Williams, P D; Nicoll, K A

    2016-09-28

    Solar eclipses provide a rapidly changing solar radiation environment. These changes can be studied using simple photodiode sensors, if the radiation reaching the sensors is unaffected by cloud. Transporting the sensors aloft using standard meteorological instrument packages modified to carry extra sensors, provides one promising but hitherto unexploited possibility for making solar eclipse radiation measurements. For the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44°N, 0.94°W), Lerwick (60.15°N, 1.13°W) and Reykjavik (64.13°N, 21.90°W), straddling the path of the eclipse. The balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. In the swing-averaged technique, the mean value across a set of swings was used to approximate the radiation falling on a horizontal surface; in the swing-maximum technique, the direct beam was estimated by assuming that the maximum solar radiation during a swing occurs when the photodiode sensing surface becomes normal to the direction of the solar beam. Both approaches, essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  11. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  12. Study on geomagnetic effects of the March 9, 1997 solar eclipse in Mohe area, China*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯忠孝; 高金田; 任熙宪

    2002-01-01

    The geomagnetic effects of the total solar eclipse in Mohe area and the partial eclipse occurred on March 9, 1997 in China are analyzed in this paper. The geomagnetic effects of the eclipse widely distributed in China are obtained, which show H component decreases obviously and is symmetric along the latitude with a center near 33(N during the eclipse time. These results of solar eclipse geomagnetic effects are the newest in recent years obtained in the largest area in China.

  13. Global MHD Simulations of Accretion Disks in Cataclysmic Variables (CVs): I. The Importance of Spiral Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Wenhua; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the first global 3D MHD simulations of accretion disks in Cataclysmic Variable (CV) systems in order to investigate the relative importance of angular momentum transport via turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) compared to that driven by spiral shock waves. Remarkably, we find that even with vigorous MRI turbulence, spiral shocks are an important component to the overall angular momentum budget, at least when temperatures in the disk are high (so that Mach numbers are low). In order to understand the excitation, propagation, and damping of spiral density waves in our simulations more carefully, we perform a series of 2D global hydrodynamical simulations with various equation of states and both with and without mass inflow via the Lagrangian point (L1). Compared with previous similar studies, we find the following new results. 1) Linear wave dispersion relation fits the pitch angles of spiral density waves very well. 2) We demonstrate explicitly that mass accreti...

  14. Two Rare Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables with Extreme Cyclotron Features Identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Szkody, P; Schmidt, G; Hall, P B; Margon, B; Miceli, A; Subba-Rao, M; Frith, W J; Harris, H; Szkody, Paula; Anderson, Scott F.; Schmidt, Gary; Hall, Patrick B.; Margon, Bruce; Miceli, Antonino; Rao, Mark Subba; Frith, James; Harris, Hugh

    2003-01-01

    Two newly identified magnetic cataclysmic variables discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), SDSSJ155331.12+551614.5 and SDSSJ132411.57+032050.5, have spectra showing highly prominent, narrow, strongly polarized cyclotron humps with amplitudes that vary on orbital periods of 4.39 and 2.6 hrs, respectively. In the former, the spacing of the humps indicates the 3rd and 4th harmonics in a magnetic field of ~60 MG. The narrowness of the cyclotron features and the lack of strong emission lines imply very low temperature plasmas and very low accretion rates, so that the accreting area is heated by particle collisions rather than accretion shocks. The detection of rare systems like these exemplifies the ability of the SDSS to find the lowest accretion rate close binaries.

  15. Catalogue of cataclysmic binaries, low-mass X-ray binaries and related objects (Seventh edition)

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, H

    2003-01-01

    The catalogue lists coordinates, apparent magnitudes, orbital parameters, and stellar parameters of the components and other characteristc properties of 472 cataclysmic binaries, 71 low-mass X-ray binaries and 113 related objects with known or suspected orbital periods together with a comprehensive selection of the relevant recent literature. In addition the catalogue contains a list of references to published finding charts for 635 of the 656 objects, and a cross-reference list of alias object designations. Literature published before 1 January 2003 has, as far as possible, been taken into account. All data can be accessed via the dedicated catalogue webpage at http://www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/RKcat/ (MPA) and http://physics.open.ac.uk/RKcat/ (OU). We will update the information given on the catalogue webpage regularly, initially every six months.

  16. Dwarf nova-type cataclysmic variable stars are significant radio emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Deanne L; Miller-Jones, James C A; Rupen, Michael P; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Knigge, Christian; Groot, Paul J; Woudt, Patrick A; Waagen, Elizabeth O; Templeton, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We present 8--12\\,GHz radio light curves of five dwarf nova (DN) type Cataclysmic Variable stars (CVs) in outburst (RX And, U Gem and Z Cam), or superoutburst (SU UMa and YZ Cnc), increasing the number of radio-detected DN by a factor of two. The observed radio emission was variable on time-scales of minutes to days, and we argue that it is likely to be synchrotron emission. This sample shows no correlation between the radio luminosity and optical luminosity, orbital period, CV class, or outburst type; however higher-cadence observations are necessary to test this, as the measured luminosity is dependent on the timing of the observations in these variable objects. The observations show that the previously detected radio emission from SS Cyg is not unique in type, luminosity (in the plateau phase of the outburst), or variability time-scales. Our results prove that DN, as a class, are radio emitters in outburst.

  17. A 6.3-h superhump in the cataclysmic variable TV Columbae the longest yet seen

    CERN Document Server

    Retter, A; Augusteijn, T; Naylor, T; Bedding, T R; Bembrick, C; McCormick, J; Velthuis, F

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a two week multi-longitude photometric campaign on TV Col held in 2001 January. The data confirm the presence of a permanent positive superhump found in re-examination of extensive archive photometric data of TV Col. The 6.3-h period is 15 per cent longer than the orbital period and obeys the well known relation between superhump period excess and binary period. At 5.5-h, TV Col has an orbital period longer than any known superhumping cataclysmic variable and, therefore, a mass ratio which might be outside the range at which superhumps can occur according to the current theory. We suggest several solutions for this problem.

  18. Rapid Oscillations in Cataclysmic Variables. XV. HT Camelopardalis (= RX J0757.0+6306)

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, J; Thorstensen, J R; Fried, R E; Skillman, D R; Billings, G W; Kemp, Jonathan; Patterson, Joseph; Thorstensen, John; Fried, Robert; Skillman, David; Billings, Gary

    2002-01-01

    We present photometry and spectroscopy of HT Camelopardalis, a recently discovered X-ray-bright cataclysmic variable. The spectrum shows bright lines of H, He I, and He II, all moving with a period of 0.059712(1) d, which we interpret as the orbital period. The star's brightness varies with a strict period of 515.0592(2) s, and a mean full amplitude of 0.11 mag. These properties qualify it as a /bona fide/ DQ Herculis star (intermediate polar) -- in which the magnetism of the rapidly rotating white dwarf channels accretion flow to the surface. Normally at V=17.8, the star shows rare and very brief outbursts to V=12-13. We observed one in December 2001, and found that the 515 s pulse amplitude had increased by a factor of ~100 (in flux units). A transient orbital signal may also have appeared.

  19. Statistical properties of dwarf novae-type cataclysmic variables: The Outburst Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Deanne L; Knigge, Christian; Pretorius, Margaretha L; Woudt, Patrick A; Groot, Paul J; Van Eck, Cameron L; Drake, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The Outburst Catalogue contains a wide variety of observational properties for 722 dwarf nova-type (DN) cataclysmic variables (CVs) and 309 CVs of other types from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey. In particular, it includes the apparent outburst and quiescent V-band magnitudes, duty cycles, limits on the recurrence time, upper- and lower-limits on the distance and absolute quiescent magnitudes, colour information, orbital parameters, and X-ray counterparts. These properties were determined by means of a classification script presented in this paper. The DN in the catalogue show a correlation between the outburst duty cycle and the orbital period (and outburst recurrence time), as well as between the quiescent absolute magnitude and the orbital period (and duty cycle). This is the largest sample of dwarf nova properties collected to date. Besides serving as a useful reference for individual systems and a means of selecting objects for targeted studies, it will prove valuable for statistical studies tha...

  20. On the diversity and similarity of outbursts of symbiotic binaries and cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Skopal, Augustin

    2015-01-01

    Outbursts in two classes of interacting binary systems, the symbiotic stars (SSs) and the cataclysmic variables (CVs), show a number of similarities in spite of very different orbital periods. Typical values for SSs are in the order of years, whereas for CVs they are of a few hours. Both systems undergo unpredictable outbursts, characterized by a brightening in the optical by 1 - 3 and 7 - 15 mag for SSs and CVs, respectively. By modelling the multiwavelength SED of selected examples from both groups of these interacting binaries, I determine their basic physical parameters at a given time of the outburst evolution. In this way I show that the principal difference between outbursts of these objects is their violence, whereas the ionization structure of their ejecta is basically very similar. This suggests that the mechanism of the mass ejection by the white dwarfs in these systems is also similar.

  1. Unusual recurrent eclipses of the UX Ori star WW Vul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostopchina-Shakhovskaja, A. N.; Grinin, V. P.; Shakhovskoi, D. N.

    2012-06-01

    In a prolonged study (about 30 years) of the photometric activity of WW Vul we have discovered unusual eclipses in the light curve of this star. They last 2-3 years and repeat with a period of 13.9 years. One nontrivial feature of these eclipses is that in their deepest part the star's brightness increases. Changes in the color indices during these events indicate that the brightening of the star is caused by reduced extinction in the center of an extended gas-dust structure that periodically intersects the line of sight. Possible mechanisms for these eclipses are discussed briefly.

  2. Predictions for the total solar eclipse of 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred

    1989-01-01

    A total eclipse of the sun will be widely visible from the Western Hemisphere on July 11, 1991. Detailed predictions for this event are presented which include tables of geographic coordinates for the northern limit, southern limit and center line of the path of totality, local circumstances on the center line and for 95 cities within the partial and total eclipse paths, maps depicting the path of totality, the sky during totality and the lunar limb profile. The author discusses the general characteristics of the eclipse including local circumstances from various points along the central path, the Saros series history and effects caused by the lunar limb profile.

  3. Predictions for the total solar eclipse of 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred

    1987-01-01

    A total eclipse of the sun will be widely visible from the East Indies on March 18, 1988. Detailed predictions for this event are presented which include tables of geographic coordinates for the northern limit, center line and southern limit of the path of totality, local circumstances for 40 cities within the total and partial eclipse paths, the lunar-limb profile, and maps depicting the path of totality. The author discusses the general characteristics of the eclipse, local circumstances from various points along the central path and the Saros-series history.

  4. Theoretical and observational problems related to solar eclipses. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, Z.; Stavinschi, M.

    The contributions to this book are based on the current knowledge of solar corona physics and on the prospects for future total eclipse observations, focusing on the eclipse of August 11, 1999, which forecasters believe will occur at precisely the maximum of solar activity. The results of past eclipse observations are reviewed, including coronal hot and cold structures, coronal heating, public education and instrumental problems. The relation of the corona to the Sun is discussed, viz., the energy and mass transfer between the chromosphere and the corona, including the formation of prominences by coronal condensation in coronal cavities and the supply of mass to the corona by spicules.

  5. A Smoothed Eclipse Model for Solar Electric Propulsion Trajectory Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Jonathan; Scheeres, Daniel; Parker, Jeffrey; Englander, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) is the dominant design option for employing low-thrust propulsion on a space mission. Spacecraft solar arrays power the SEP system but are subject to blackout periods during solar eclipse conditions. Discontinuity in power available to the spacecraft must be accounted for in trajectory optimization, but gradient-based methods require a differentiable power model. This work presents a power model that smooths the eclipse transition from total eclipse to total sunlight with a logistic function. Example trajectories are computed with differential dynamic programming, a second-order gradient-based method.

  6. Lunar Eclipse Observations Reveal Anomalous Thermal Performance of Apollo Reflectors

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, T W; Johnson, N H; Goodrow, S D

    2013-01-01

    Laser ranging measurements during the total lunar eclipse on 2010 December 21 verify previously suspected thermal lensing in the retroreflectors left on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts. Signal levels during the eclipse far exceeded those historically seen at full moon, and varied over an order of magnitude as the eclipse progressed. These variations can be understood via a straightforward thermal scenario involving solar absorption by a ~50% covering of dust that has accumulated on the front surfaces of the reflectors. The same mechanism can explain the long-term degradation of signal from the reflectors as well as the acute signal deficit observed near full moon.

  7. Lunar eclipse observations reveal anomalous thermal performance of Apollo reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, T. W.; McMillan, R. J.; Johnson, N. H.; Goodrow, S. D.

    2014-03-01

    Laser ranging measurements during the total lunar eclipse on 2010 December 21 verify previously suspected thermal lensing in the retroreflectors left on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts. Signal levels during the eclipse far exceeded those historically seen at full moon, and varied over an order of magnitude as the eclipse progressed. These variations can be understood via a straightforward thermal scenario involving solar absorption by a ∼50% covering of dust that has accumulated on the front surfaces of the reflectors. The same mechanism can explain the long-term degradation of signal from the reflectors as well as the acute signal deficit observed near full moon.

  8. Eclipse effects on field crops and marine zooplankton: the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Economou

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Some effects in the biosphere from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 were investigated in field crops and marine zooplankton. Taking into account the decisive role of light on plant life and productivity, measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal behaviour were conducted on seven important field-grown cereal and leguminous crops. A drop in photosynthetic rates, by more than a factor of 5 in some cases, was observed, and the minimum values of photosynthetic rates ranged between 3.13 and 10.13 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1. The drop in solar irradiance and the increase in mesophyll CO2-concentration during the eclipse did not induce stomatal closure thus not blocking CO2 uptake by plants. Light effects on the photochemical phase of photosynthesis may be responsible for the observed depression in photosynthetic rates. Field studies addressing the migratory responses of marine zooplankton (micro-zooplankton (ciliates, and meso-zooplankton due to the rapid changes in underwater light intensity were also performed. The light intensity attenuation was simulated with the use of accurate underwater radiative transfer modeling techniques. Ciliates, responded to the rapid decrease in light intensity during the eclipse adopting night-time behaviour. From the meso-zooplankton assemblage, various vertical migratory behaviours were adopted by different species.

  9. Eclipse effects on field crops and marine zooplankton: the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, G.; Christou, E. D.; Giannakourou, A.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Georgopoulos, D.; Kotoulas, V.; Lyra, D.; Tsakalis, N.; Tzortziou, M.; Vahamidis, P.; Papathanassiou, E.; Karamanos, A.

    2008-08-01

    Some effects in the biosphere from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 were investigated in field crops and marine zooplankton. Taking into account the decisive role of light on plant life and productivity, measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal behaviour were conducted on seven important field-grown cereal and leguminous crops. A drop in photosynthetic rates, by more than a factor of 5 in some cases, was observed, and the minimum values of photosynthetic rates ranged between 3.13 and 10.13 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. The drop in solar irradiance and the increase in mesophyll CO2-concentration during the eclipse did not induce stomatal closure thus not blocking CO2 uptake by plants. Light effects on the photochemical phase of photosynthesis may be responsible for the observed depression in photosynthetic rates. Field studies addressing the migratory responses of marine zooplankton (micro-zooplankton (ciliates), and meso-zooplankton) due to the rapid changes in underwater light intensity were also performed. The light intensity attenuation was simulated with the use of accurate underwater radiative transfer modeling techniques. Ciliates, responded to the rapid decrease in light intensity during the eclipse adopting night-time behaviour. From the meso-zooplankton assemblage, various vertical migratory behaviours were adopted by different species.

  10. Acute eclipse retinopathy: a small case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Nur; Knyazer, Boris; Lifshitz, Tova; Levy, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We present four young patients with acute severe solar retinopathy after observation of the total eclipse on January 4, 2011 without appropriate eye protection. Funduscopic findings were accompanied by optical coherence tomography (OCT) investigation of the macula. All our patients were young (range 14-29 years). In three of the four patients we have been able to repeat OCT evaluation revealing that the retinal changes were reversible, but delineating mild pathology in the retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors. Best-corrected visual acuity in the fourth case was 6/24. In addition, macular edema, which has been previously described in literature, could not be demonstrated by OCT. In the two cases we performed an early fluorescein angiogram, no pathology was seen.

  11. B-type stars in eclipsing binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Milena; Pigulski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    B-type stars in eclipsing binary systems are unique astrophysical tools to test several aspects of stellar evolution. Such objects can be used e.g. to determine the masses of Beta Cephei variable stars, as well as help to place tighter constraints on the value of the convective core overshooting parameter α. Both precise photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy with high SNR are required to achieve these goals, but since many of the targets are bright enough, the challenge is fair. Following this assumption, we shall explain how we plan to examine both the aforementioned aspects of stellar evolution using observations of B-type stars obtained with a wide range of spectrographs, as well as BRITE-Constellation satellites.

  12. Eclipsing binary stars modeling and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kallrath, Josef

    1999-01-01

    This book focuses on the formulation of mathematical models for the light curves of eclipsing binary stars, and on the algorithms for generating such models Since information gained from binary systems provides much of what we know of the masses, luminosities, and radii of stars, such models are acquiring increasing importance in studies of stellar structure and evolution As in other areas of science, the computer revolution has given many astronomers tools that previously only specialists could use; anyone with access to a set of data can now expect to be able to model it This book will provide astronomers, both amateur and professional, with a guide for - specifying an astrophysical model for a set of observations - selecting an algorithm to determine the parameters of the model - estimating the errors of the parameters It is written for readers with knowledge of basic calculus and linear algebra; appendices cover mathematical details on such matters as optimization, coordinate systems, and specific models ...

  13. FIGS—Faint Infrared Grism Survey: Description and Data Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzkal, Norbert; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Ryan, Russell E.; Rothberg, Barry; Grogin, Norman; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Rhoads, James; Larson, Rebecca L.; Christensen, Lise; Cimatti, Andrea; Ferreras, Ignacio; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Hathi, Nimish P.; Hibon, Pascale; Joshi, Bhavin; Kuntschner, Harald; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; O’Connell, Robert W.; Oestlin, Goeran; Pasquali, Anna; Pharo, John; Straughn, Amber N.; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Watson, Darach; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Zirm, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    The Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS) is a deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3/IR (Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared) slitless spectroscopic survey of four deep fields. Two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) area and two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) area. One of the southern fields selected is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Each of these four fields were observed using the WFC3/G102 grism (0.8 μm–1.15 μm continuous coverage) with a total exposure time of 40 orbits (≈100 kilo-seconds) per field. This reaches a 3σ continuum depth of ≈ 26 AB magnitudes and probes emission lines to ∼ {10}-17 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2. This paper details the four FIGS fields and the overall observational strategy of the project. A detailed description of the Simulation Based Extraction (SBE) method used to extract and combine over 10,000 spectra of over 2000 distinct sources brighter than {m}F105W=26.5 mag is provided. High fidelity simulations of the observations is shown to significantly improve the background subtraction process, the spectral contamination estimates, and the final flux calibration. This allows for the combination of multiple spectra to produce a final high quality, deep, 1D spectra for each object in the survey.

  14. SUPERNOVA 2003ie WAS LIKELY A FAINT TYPE IIP EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sergeev, Sergey G., E-mail: iair.arcavi@weizmann.ac.il [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, P/O Nauchny, Crimea 98409 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We present new photometric observations of supernova (SN) 2003ie starting one month before discovery, obtained serendipitously while observing its host galaxy. With only a weak upper limit derived on the mass of its progenitor (<25 M{sub Sun }) from previous pre-explosion studies, this event could be a potential exception to the ''red supergiant (RSG) problem'' (the lack of high-mass RSGs exploding as Type IIP SNe). However, this is true only if SN2003ie was a Type IIP event, something which has never been determined. Using recently derived core-collapse SN light-curve templates, as well as by comparison to other known SNe, we find that SN2003ie was indeed a likely Type IIP event. However, with a plateau magnitude of {approx} - 15.5 mag, it is found to be a member of the faint Type IIP class. Previous members of this class have been shown to arise from relatively low-mass progenitors (<12 M{sub Sun }). It therefore seems unlikely that this SN had a massive RSG progenitor. The use of core-collapse SN light-curve templates is shown to be helpful in classifying SNe with sparse coverage. These templates are likely to become more robust as large homogeneous samples of core-collapse events are collected.

  15. HST NICMOS snapshot survey of faint galaxies at z < 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, S.; Im, M.; DEEP Team

    2000-12-01

    During Cycle 7 HST observations, we have obtained NICMOS H-band images of faint field galaxies for which both HST morphological information (in V and/or I) and spectroscopic redshifts are available. The purpose of the NICMOS observation is to provide their morphology in rest frame NIR wavelengths (8000 - 16000 Å), where the effect of dust extinction is less severe, and to obtain their near infrared (NIR) colors. The objects in our field are partly contained in the Groth Strip being studied in detail by the DEEP team. In addition, we have made use of a software package called GIM2D (Simard et al. 2001). This package is designed to perform detailed 2-dimensional decompositions for images of distant galaxies. Using this software, we have obtained structural parameters for the objects in the H-band to complement those parameters in V and I. We will present: i) color gradients inside elliptical galaxies to test models of their formation; ii) the effect of dust extinction on the properties of field galaxies at 0 < z < 1; iii) evolution of V-H, and V-I colors of bulges as well as the B/T ratio of spiral galaxies as a function of redshift; iv) morphological k-correction. The median redshift of our sample is z ~ 0.5 and this corresponds to about one half of the current age of the universe. This work is supported by the STScI grant GO-07895.02-96A.

  16. Serendipitous discovery of the faint solar twin Inti 1

    CERN Document Server

    Galarza, Jhon Yana; Cohen, Judith G

    2016-01-01

    Methods. We determine the atmospheric parameters and differential abundances using high-resolution ($R \\approx 50 000$), high signal-to-noise (S/N $\\approx$ 110 - 240 per pixel) Keck HIRES spectra for our solar twin candidate, the previously known solar twin HD 45184, and the Sun. Results. For the bright solar twin HD 45184, we found $T_{\\rm{eff}} = 5864 \\pm 9$ K, log $g = 4.45 \\pm 0.03$ dex, $v_{t} = 1.11 \\pm 0.02$ $\\rm{km\\ {s}}^{-1}$, and [Fe/H]$ = 0.04 \\pm 0.01$ dex, which are in good agreement with previous works. The star Inti 1 has atmospheric parameters $T_{\\rm{eff}} = 5837 \\pm 11$ K, log $g = 4.42 \\pm 0.03$ dex, $v_{t} = 1.04 \\pm 0.02$ $\\rm{km\\ {s}}^{-1}$, and [Fe/H]$ = 0.07 \\pm 0.01$ dex that are higher than solar. The age and mass of the solar twin HD 45184 (3 Gyr and 1.05 $\\rm{M_{\\odot}}$) and the faint solar twin Inti 1 (4 Gyr and 1.04 $\\rm{M_{\\odot}}$) were estimated using isochrones. The differential analysis shows that HD 45184 presents an abundance pattern that is similar to typical nearby sol...

  17. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Middelberg, Enno; Hales, Christopher A; Seymour, Nick; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Huynh, Minh T; Lenc, Emil; Mao, Minnie Y

    2010-01-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6um when using sensitive Spitzer observations with uJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8GHz and 8.6GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spec...

  18. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  19. The Faint Young Sun Paradox: A Simplified Thermodynamic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Angulo-Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical models of the Sun suggest that the energy output in the early stage of its evolution was 30 percent less than today. In this context, radiative balance alone between The Sun and the Earth was not sufficient to explain the early presence of liquid water on Earth’s surface. This difficulty is called the faint young Sun paradox. Many proposals have been published to solve this paradox. In the present work, we propose an oversimplified finite-time thermodynamic approach that describes the air convective cells in the Earth atmosphere. This model introduces two atmospheric modes of thermodynamic performance: a first mode consisting in the maximization of the power output of the convective cells (maximum power regime and a second mode that consists in maximizing a functional representing a good trade-off between power output and entropy production (the ecological regime. Within the assumptions of this oversimplified model, we present different scenarios of albedo and greenhouse effects that seem realistic to preserve liquid water on the Earth in the early stage of formation.

  20. Distribution of Faint Atomic Gas in Hickson Compact Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M; Zhu, Guangtun; Braatz, James A

    2015-01-01

    We present 21cm HI observations of four Hickson Compact Groups with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H I emission in a region of 25$^{\\prime}\\times$25$^{\\prime}$ (140-650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of HI masses. In particular, we detected 65% more \\HI than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG92. We also identify if the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high-surface brightness (HSB) HI features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the HI strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the HI observed with the GBT to have a similar spatial distribution as the HSB structures in HCGs 31 and 68. Conversely, the observed HI distributions in HCGs44 and 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG44 lies to the Northeast-Southwest region...

  1. THE PRIMEVAL POPULATIONS OF THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C., E-mail: tbrown@stsci.edu, E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu, E-mail: jkalirai@stsci.edu, E-mail: avila@stsci.edu, E-mail: ferguson@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, using deep photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A galaxy class recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the UFDs appear to be an extension of the classical dwarf spheroidals to low luminosities, offering a new front in efforts to understand the missing satellite problem. They are the least luminous, most dark-matter-dominated, and least chemically evolved galaxies known. Our HST survey of six UFDs seeks to determine if these galaxies are true fossils from the early universe. We present here the preliminary analysis of three UFD galaxies: Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Classical dwarf spheroidals of the Local Group exhibit extended star formation histories, but these three Milky Way satellites are at least as old as the ancient globular cluster M92, with no evidence for intermediate-age populations. Their ages also appear to be synchronized to within {approx}1 Gyr of each other, as might be expected if their star formation was truncated by a global event, such as reionization.

  2. Radio faint AGN: a tale of two populations

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Kellermann, K I; Miller, N; Mainieri, V; Tozzi, P

    2015-01-01

    We study the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDFS) Very Large Array sample, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 32.5 microJy at the field centre and redshift ~ 4, and covers ~ 0.3 deg^2. Number counts are presented for the whole sample while the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions are derived for active galactic nuclei (AGN). The faint radio sky contains two totally distinct AGN populations, characterised by very different evolutions, luminosity functions, and Eddington ratios: radio-quiet (RQ)/radiative-mode, and radio-loud/jet-mode AGN. The radio power of RQ AGN evolves ~ (1+z)^2.5, similarly to star-forming galaxies, while the number density of radio-loud ones has a peak at ~ 0.5 and then declines at higher redshifts. The number density of radio-selected RQ AGN is consistent with that of X-ray selected AGN, which shows that we are sampling the same population. The unbiased fraction of radiative-mode RL AGN, derived from our own and previously published data, is a strong funct...

  3. a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Discovery of KELU-1 Promises New Insights into Strange Objects Brown Dwarfs are star-like objects which are too small to become real stars, yet too large to be real planets. Their mass is too small to ignite those nuclear processes which are responsible for the large energies and high temperatures of stars, but it is much larger than that of the planets we know in our solar system. Until now, very few Brown Dwarfs have been securely identified as such. Two are members of double-star systems, and a few more are located deep within the Pleiades star cluster. Now, however, Maria Teresa Ruiz of the Astronomy Department at Universidad de Chile (Santiago de Chile), using telescopes at the ESO La Silla observatory, has just discovered one that is all alone and apparently quite near to us. Contrary to the others which are influenced by other objects in their immediate surroundings, this new Brown Dwarf is unaffected and will thus be a perfect object for further investigations that may finally allow us to better understand these very interesting celestial bodies. It has been suggested that Brown Dwarfs may constitute a substantial part of the unseen dark matter in our Galaxy. This discovery may therefore also have important implications for this highly relevant research area. Searching for nearby faint stars The story of this discovery goes back to 1987 when Maria Teresa Ruiz decided to embark upon a long-term search (known as the Calan-ESO proper-motion survey ) for another type of unusual object, the so-called White Dwarfs , i.e. highly evolved, small and rather faint stars. Although they have masses similar to that of the Sun, such stars are no larger than the Earth and are therefore extremely compact. They are particularly interesting, because they most probably represent the future end point of evolution of our Sun, some billions of years from now. For this project, the Chilean astronomer obtained large-field photographic exposures with the 1-m ESO Schmidt telescope at

  4. Science Experimenter: Observing the Sun and Solar Eclipses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, Forrest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of simple optical aids that allow the amateur scientist to safely observe sunspots and solar eclipses and also to measure the sun's rotation. (five references) (JJK)

  5. Characterisation of COPD heterogeneity in the ECLIPSE cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex condition with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary manifestations. This study describes the heterogeneity of COPD in a large and well characterised and controlled COPD cohort (ECLIPSE)....

  6. Eclipse 2017: Partnering with NASA MSFC to Inspire Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Craig " Ghee" Adams, Mitzi; Gallagher, Dennis; Krause, Linda

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is partnering with the U.S. Space and Rocket Center (USSRC), and Austin Peay State University (APSU) to engage citizen scientists, engineers, and students in science investigations during the 2017 American Solar Eclipse. Investigations will support the Citizen Continental America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE), Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation(HamSCI), and Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments (INSPIRE). All planned activities will engage Space Campers and local high school students in the application of the scientific method as they seek to explore a wide range of observations during the eclipse. Where planned experiments touch on current scientific questions, the camper/students will be acting as citizen scientists, participating with researchers from APSU and MSFC. Participants will test their expectations and after the eclipse, share their results, experiences, and conclusions to younger Space Campers at the US Space & Rocket Center.

  7. Characterisation of COPD heterogeneity in the ECLIPSE cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex condition with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary manifestations. This study describes the heterogeneity of COPD in a large and well characterised and controlled COPD cohort (ECLIPSE)....

  8. Lessons from ECLIPSE: a review of COPD biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faner, Rosa; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Riley, John H; Celli, Bartolomé; Vestbo, Jørgen; MacNee, William; Bakke, Per; Calverley, Peter M A; Coxson, Harvey; Crim, Courtney; Edwards, Lisa D; Locantore, Nick; Lomas, David A; Miller, Bruce E; Rennard, Stephen I; Wouters, Emiel F M; Yates, Julie C; Silverman, Edwin K; Agusti, Alvar

    2014-07-01

    The Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-points (ECLIPSE) study was a large 3-year observational controlled multicentre international study aimed at defining clinically relevant subtypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and identifying novel biomarkers and genetic factors. So far, the ECLIPSE study has produced more than 50 original publications and 75 communications to international meetings, many of which have significantly influenced our understanding of COPD. However, because there is not one paper reporting the biomarker results of the ECLIPSE study that may serve as a reference for practising clinicians, researchers and healthcare providers from academia, industry and government agencies interested in COPD, we decided to write a review summarising the main biomarker findings in ECLIPSE.

  9. Visual damage following direct sighting of solar eclipse in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visual damage following direct sighting of solar eclipse in Ghana. ... Abstract. A study was carried out at the department of Ophthalmology and ... assessment of Visual Acuity (VA), Slit Lamp examination, Fundoscopy, Amsle Test, Intra-ocular ...

  10. NTS-2 battery after 1 year and 3 eclipse seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockel, J.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of the nickel hydrogen batteries on board the NTS-2 satellite was determined after being in orbit for several months. The effects of the eclipses were presented as well as the power loading operations.

  11. Eclipsing Binary Stars: the Royal Road to Stellar Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Southworth, John

    2012-01-01

    Russell (1948) famously described eclipses as the "royal road" to stellar astrophysics. From photometric and spectroscopic observations it is possible to measure the masses and radii (to 1% or better!), and thus surface gravities and mean densities, of stars in eclipsing binary systems using nothing more than geometry. Adding an effective temperature subsequently yields luminosity and then distance (or vice versa) to high precision. This wealth of directly measurable quantities makes eclipsing binaries the primary source of empirical information on the properties of stars, and therefore a cornerstone of stellar astrophysics. In this review paper I summarise the current standing of eclipsing binary research, present an overview of useful analysis techniques, and conclude with a glance to the future.

  12. Detached eclipsing binaries with very unequal members - HR 7464

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M.

    1984-06-01

    Waelkens and Rufener's (1983) photoelectric lightcurve (as yet unexplored) of the newly discovered eclipsing binary HR 7464 has been analyzed. The photometric solution presented here reveals that this binary is an A5m + G main sequence detached system, which is particularly remarkable for the great dissimilarity between its members. The frequency of detached eclipsing pairs with very unequal members (i.e., with low mass ratio) is then discussed; some bimodality in the innate mass ratio distribution of close binaries is inferred.

  13. Photometric study of the eclipsing binary ET Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özalp, G. Z.; Özkardeş, B.

    2016-03-01

    We present the photometric solution of the eclipsing binary ET Psc (GSC 00608-00490). The ASAS V-band photometric data of the system was modelled using the Wilson-Devinney method. The result shows that the eclipsing pair could be classified as A-subtype of W UMa-type binary system. The absolute dimensions of the system were also estimated based on the photometric solution.

  14. The total solar eclipse of March 2006: overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karamanos

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the overview of an integrated, multi-disciplinary effort to study the effects of the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse on the environment, with special focus on the atmosphere. The eclipse has been visible over the Eastern Mediterranean, and on this occasion several research and academic institutes organised co-ordinated experimental campaigns, at different distances from eclipse totality and at various environments in terms of air quality. Detailed results and findings are presented in a number of component scientific papers included in a Special Issue of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. The effects of the eclipse on meteorological parameters, though very clear, were shown to be controlled by local factors rather than the eclipse magnitudes, and the turbulence activity near surface was suppressed causing a decrease in the Planetary Boundary Layer. In addition to the above, the decrease in solar radiation has caused change to the photochemistry of the atmosphere, with night time chemistry dominating. The abrupt "switch off" of the sun, induced changes also in the ionosphere (140 up to 220 km and the stratosphere. In the ionosphere, both photochemistry and dynamics resulted to changes in the reflection heights and the electron concentrations. Among the most important scientific findings from the experiments undertaken has been the experimental proof of eclipse induced thermal fluctuations in the ozone layer (Gravity Waves, due to the supersonic movement of the moon's shadow, for the first time with simultaneous measurements at three altitudes namely the troposphere, the stratosphere and the ionosphere. Within the challenging topics of the experiments has been the investigation of eclipse impacts on ecosystems (field crops and marine plankton. The rare event of a total solar eclipse provided the opportunity to evaluate 1 dimensional (1-D and three dimensional (3-D radiative transfer (in the atmosphere and underwater

  15. Multiples among detached eclipsing binaries from the ASAS catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Hełminiak, K G; Ratajczak, M; Jordán, A; Espinoza, N; Brahm, R; Kambe, E; Ukita, N

    2015-01-01

    For more than three years now we have been conducting a spectroscopic survey of detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) from the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) database. Thousands of high-resolution spectra of over 300 systems were secured, and used for radial velocity measurements and spectral analysis. In our sample we found a zoo of multiple systems, such as spectroscopic triples and quadruples, visual binaries with eclipsing components, and circumbinary low-mass companions, including sub-stellar-mass candidates

  16. Coordinated weather balloon solar radiation measurements during a solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Solar eclipses provide a rapidly changing solar radiation environment. These changes can be studied using simple photodiode sensors, if the radiation reaching the sensors is unaffected by cloud. Transporting the sensors aloft using standard meteorological instrument packages modified to carry extra sensors, provides one promising but hitherto unexploited possibility for making solar eclipse radiation measurements. For the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44°N, 0.94°W), Lerwick (60.15°N, 1.13°W) and Reykjavik (64.13°N, 21.90°W), straddling the path of the eclipse. The balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. In the swing-averaged technique, the mean value across a set of swings was used to approximate the radiation falling on a horizontal surface; in the swing-maximum technique, the direct beam was estimated by assuming that the maximum solar radiation during a swing occurs when the photodiode sensing surface becomes normal to the direction of the solar beam. Both approaches, essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse’. PMID:27550757

  17. Characterisation of COPD heterogeneity in the ECLIPSE cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex condition with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary manifestations. This study describes the heterogeneity of COPD in a large and well characterised and controlled COPD cohort (ECLIPSE).......Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex condition with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary manifestations. This study describes the heterogeneity of COPD in a large and well characterised and controlled COPD cohort (ECLIPSE)....

  18. Eclipse Count, Calculation or Prediction According to the Huichapan Codex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz Ennis, Rossana

    2016-11-01

    This article discusses a gloss fragment of the Huichapan Codex (17th Century) that appears to make reference to a mathematical formula for calculating and/or counting eclipses. The gloss is analyzed in terms of the Mesoamerican calendar models, the idea that otomí astronomers were avid moon cycle followers and, finally, in accordance to the internal chronologic structure of the actual codex and the eclipses in it registered.

  19. Timing variations in the secondary eclipse of NN Ser

    CERN Document Server

    Parsons, S G; Bours, M C P; Littlefair, S P; Copperwheat, C M; Dhillon, V S; Breedt, E; Caceres, C; Schreiber, M R

    2013-01-01

    The eclipsing white dwarf plus main-sequence binary NN Serpentis provides one of the most convincing cases for the existence of circumbinary planets around evolved binaries. The exquisite timing precision provided by the deep eclipse of the white dwarf has revealed complex variations in the eclipse arrival times over the last few decades. These variations have been interpreted as the influence of two planets in orbit around the binary. Recent studies have proved that such a system is dynamically stable over the current lifetime of the binary. However, the existence of such planets is by no means proven and several alternative mechanisms have been proposed that could drive similar variations. One of these is apsidal precession, which causes the eclipse times of eccentric binaries to vary sinusoidally on many year timescales. In this paper we present timing data for the secondary eclipse of NN Ser and show that they follow the same trend seen in the primary eclipse times, ruling out apsidal precession as a poss...

  20. Results from and Plans for the Two 2017 Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Seaton, Daniel; Kentrianakis, Michael; Fischer, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    At this writing fresh from observing the 26 February 2017 annular solar eclipse in exceptionally clear sky from sites in Patagonia, Argentina, we show images from the centerline near Facundo showing Baily's beads and central annularity of the magnitude 99.3% eclipse. From close to the edge of the path from sites north of Facundo within the northern limit (images by Daniel Fischer) and north of Sarmiento at the southern limit (images by Jörg Schoppmeyer), we show unfiltered images that show substantial solar chromosphere with innermost corona above it. We also show SWAP and SDO eclipse images.For the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse, we describe our plans for observing coronal structure above the limb from the ground in Oregon and for ultraviolet imaging on the solar disk at the time of the terrestrial eclipse through six filters using the new Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-16 spacecraft, planned along with three similar spacecraft for coronal coverage for the next two decades. SUVI has the biggest overlapping field of view, 53 arcmin square, of any multi-channel space-based EUV imager.Our research on the 2017 total solar eclipse is supported by grants from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society and from the Solar Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation. NOAA NCEI are the acronyms for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Centers for Environmental Information.

  1. The Total Solar Eclipse of March 2006: overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gerasopoulos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of integrated, multi-disciplinary effort to study the effects of a total solar eclipse on the environment, with special focus on the atmosphere. On the occasion of the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse, visible over the Eastern Mediterranean, several research and academic institutes organised co-ordinated experimental campaigns, at different distances from the totality and in various environments in terms of air quality. The detailed results are presented in a number of scientific papers included in a Special Issue of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. The effects of the eclipse on the meteorology and the spectral solar radiation, the chemical response of the atmosphere to the abrupt "switch off" of the sun and the induced changes in the stratosphere and the ionosphere, have been among the issues covered. The rare event of a total solar eclipse provided the opportunity to evaluate 1-D and 3-D radiative transfer models (in the atmosphere and underwater, mesoscale meteorological, regional air quality and photochemical box models, against measurements. Within the challenging topics of this effort has been the investigation of eclipse impacts on ecosystems (field crops and marine plankton and the identification of eclipse induced gravity waves, for the first time with simultaneous measurements at three altitudes namely the troposphere, the stratosphere and the ionosphere.

  2. The fraction of young eclipsing binaries that host discs

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Zeyang; Bell, Cameron P M; Mamajek, Eric E; Scott, Erin L

    2014-01-01

    We search for systems hosting eclipsing discs using a complete sample of eclipsing binaries (EBs); those previously identified in the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III). Within a subsample of 2,823 high-cadence, high-photometric precision and large eclipsing depth detached EBs previously identified in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we find that the skewness and kurtosis of the light curves magnitude distribution within the primary eclipse can distinguish EBs hosting a disc from those without. Two systems with previously identified eclipsing discs (OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893 and OGLE-LMC-ECL-17782) are identified with near zero skewness ($|S|<0.5$) and positive kurtosis. No additional eclipsing disc systems were found in the OGLE-III LMC, Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) or Galactic Disc (GD) EB light curves. We estimate that the fraction of detached near main-sequence LMC EBs (which have a primary with an $I$-band magnitude brighter than $\\simeq 19\\,\\rm{mag}$) that host a disc is...

  3. Five Millennium Canon of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean

    2006-01-01

    During 5,000-year period from -1999 to +3000 (2000BCE to 3000CE), Earth will experience 11,898 eclipses of the Sun. The statistical distribution of eclipse types for this interval is as follows: 4,200 partial eclipses, 3956 annular eclipses, 3173 total eclipses,and 569 hybrid eclipses. Detailed global maps for each of the 11,898 eclipses delineate the geographic regions of visibility for both the penumbral (partial) and umbral or antumbral (total, annular, or hybrid) phases of every event. Modern political borders are plotted to assist in the determination of eclipse visibility. The uncertainty in Earth's rotational period expressed in the parameter (delta)T and its impact on the geographic visibility of eclipses in the past and future is discussed.

  4. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VI. Identification of Eclipsing Binaries in the K2 Campaign 0 Data-set

    CERN Document Server

    LaCourse, Daryll M; Jacobs, Thomas L; Winarski, Troy; Boyajian, Tabetha S; Rappaport, Saul A; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Conroy, Kyle E; Nelson, Lorne; Barclay, Tom; Fischer, Debra A; Schmitt, Joseph R; Wang, Ji; Prša, Andrej; Stassun, Keivan G; Pepper, Joshua; Coughlin, Jeffrey L; Shporer, Avi

    2015-01-01

    The original Kepler mission observed and characterized over 2400 eclipsing binaries in addition to its prolific exoplanet detections. Despite the mechanical malfunction and subsequent non-recovery of two reaction wheels used to stabilize the instrument, the Kepler satellite continues collecting data in its repurposed K2 mission surveying a series of fields along the ecliptic plane. Here we present an analysis of the first full baseline K2 data release: the Campaign 0 data-set. In the 7761 light curves, we have identified a total of 207 eclipsing binaries. Of these, 97 are new discoveries that were not previously identified. Our pixel level analysis of these objects has also resulted in identification of several false positive eclipsing binaries and the serendipitous discovery of three short period exoplanet candidates. We provide catalog cross-matched source identifications, orbital periods, morphologies and ephemerides for these eclipsing systems. We also describe the incorporation of the sample into the Kep...

  5. Kinematics and chemistry of faint high latitude dwarf carbon stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jinmi; Beers, Timothy C.; Dietz, Sarah; Lee, Young Sun; Placco, Vinicius M.

    2017-01-01

    The diffuse halo system of the Milky Way is complex, and has been shown to comprise at least two main components: a near-zero net rotation inner-halo and a more rapidly rotating outer-halo component. Studies of the ancient, very metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo system are crucial for understanding its early formation history. The so-called carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars are an important subset of the stars in the halo system, which exhibit distinctive kinematic and chemical signatures that can be used to constrain the star-formation histories and assembly of the various Galactic components.We have examined the sample of main-sequence dwarf and other faint high Galactic latitude carbon-enhanced stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey studied by Green (2013). As noted by Green, many of these starsexhibit high proper motions, which have been later claimed to be related to possible binary ejection models Plant et al. (2016). By use of the CEMP sub-classification approach of Yoon et al. (2016), we investigate whether the kinematics of these stars might instead result from their membership in the inner/outer halo populations of the Galaxy.ReferencesGreen, P. 2013, ApJ, 765, 12Plant, K. et al. 2016, AAS 227.34115Yoon, J. et al. 2016, ApJ, in pressAcknowledgementThis work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1430152 (JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements).

  6. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  7. Near-infrared imaging survey of faint companions around young dwarfs in the Pleiades cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoichi Itoh; Yumiko Oasa; Hitoshi Funayama; Masahiko Hayashi; Misato Fukagawa; Toshio Hashiguchi; Thayne Currie

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a near-infrared imaging survey of 11 young dwarfs in the Pleiades cluster using the Subaru Telescope and the near-infrared coronagraph imager.We found ten faint point sources, with magnitudes as faint as 20 mag in the K-band,with around seven dwarfs. Comparison with the Spitzer archive images revealed that a pair of the faint sources around V 1171 Tau is very red in infrared wavelengths, which indicates very low-mass young stellar objects. However, the results of our follow-up proper motion measurements implied that the central star and the faint sources do not share common proper motions, suggesting that they are not physically associated.

  8. FIREBALL: the Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon: overview and first science flight results

    OpenAIRE

    Milliard, Bruno; Martin, D. Christopher; Schiminovich, David; Evrard, Jean; Matuszewski, Matt; Rahman, Shahinur; Tuttle, Sarah; McLean, Ryan; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Mirc, Frederi; Grange, Robert; Chave, Robert

    2010-01-01

    FIREBALL (the Faint Intergalactic Redshifted Emission Balloon) is a balloon-borne 1m telescope coupled to an ultraviolet fiber-fed spectrograph. FIREBALL is designed to study the faint and diffuse emission of the intergalactic medium, until now detected primarily in absorption. FIREBALL is a path finding mission to test new technology and make new constraints on the temperature and density of this gas. We report on the first successful science flight of FIREBALL, in June 2009, which proved ev...

  9. A Coral Sea Rehearsal for the Eclipse Megamovie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, H. S.; Davey, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Jones, L.; Mcintosh, S. W.; Paglierani, R.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Russell, R. M.; Suarez Sola, F. I.; Sutherland, L.; Thompson, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The "Eclipse on the Coral Sea" - 13/14 November 2012 (GMT/Australia) - will have happened already. Our intention is to have used this opportunity as a trial run for the eclipse in 2017, which features 1.5 hours of totality across the whole width of the continental US. Conceived first and foremost as an education and public outreach activity, the plan is to engage the public in solar science and technology by providing a way for them to include images they have taken of the solar eclipse, into a movie representation of coronal evolution in time. This project will assimilate as much eclipse photography as possible from the public. The resulting movie(s) will cover all ranges of expertise, and at the basic smartphone or hand-held digital camera level, we expect to have obtained a huge number of images in the case of good weather conditions. The capability of modern digital technology to handle such a data flow is new. The basic purpose of this and the 2017 Megamovie observations is to explore this capability and its ability to engage people from many different communities in the solar science, astronomy, mathematics, and technology. The movie in 2017, especially, may also have important science impact because of the uniqueness of the corona as seen under eclipse conditions. In this presentation we will describe our smartphone application development (see the "Transit of Venus" app for a role model here). We will also summarize data acquisition via both the app and more traditional web interfaces. Although for the Coral Sea eclipse event we don't expect to have a movie product by the time of the AGU, for the 2017 event we do intend to assemble the heterogenous data into beautiful movies within a short space of time after the eclipse. These movies may have relatively low resolution but would extend to the base of the corona. We encourage participation in the 2012 observations, noting that no total eclipse, prior to 2017, will occur in a region with good infrastructure

  10. Cataclysms and Catastrophes: A Case Study of Improving K-12 Science Education Through a University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, T.; Ellins, K. K.; Morris, M.; Christeson, G.

    2003-12-01

    The K-12 science teacher is always seeking ways of improving and updating their curriculum by integrating the latest research into their most effective classroom activities. However, the daily demands of delivering instruction to large numbers of students coupled with the rapid advances in some fields of science can often overwhelm this effort. The NSF-sponsored Cataclysms and Catastrophes curriculum, developed by scientists from the The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) and Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), middle and high school teachers, and UT graduate students (NSF GK-12 fellows) working together through the GK-12 program, is a textbook example of how universities can facilitate this quest, benefiting education at both K-12 and university levels. In 1992, "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was developed as an activity in the Planet Earth class at the Liberal Arts and Science Academy of Austin as an interdisciplinary approach to science. Taking advantage of the media attention generated by the impact scenario for the K-T extinction, the activity consists of students participating in a simulated senate hearing on the potential causes of the K-T extinction and their implications for society today. This activity not only exposes students to the wide range of science involved in understanding mass extinctions, but also to the social, political and economic implications when this science is brought into the public arena and the corresponding use of data in decision making and disaster preparedness. While "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was always a popular and effective activity with students, it was in desperate need of updating to keep pace with the evolving scientific debate over the cause of the K-T extinction and the growing body of impact evidence discovered over the past decade. By adding two inquiry-based learning activities that use real geophysical data collected by scientists studying the buried Chicxulub feature as a

  11. Compositional and Geochronological Constraints on the Lunar Cataclysm from Planetary Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    Radiometric dating and compositional clustering of lunar impact-melt rocks form the backbone of the lunar cataclysm hypothesis. Precise age determinations of Apollo and Luna impact-melt rocks define the classic formulation of the cataclysm: a large number of samples 3.9 Ga old, a steep decline after 3.9 Ga, and few impact rocks older than 4.0 Ga. Lunar meteorites more randomly sample the lunar surface, but impact-melt clasts in these rocks show the same apparent age cutoff at 4.0 Ga (though their ages extend approx.500 Myr later). Neither do impact-formed glass spherules and fragments, formed by impacts of all sizes throughout lunar history, predate 4.0 Ga. Geological associations between compositional groups of impact-melt rocks and specific impact basins imply that five large basins formed on the Moon within 200 Myr but a counter-argument postulates they are all products of the Imbrium basin-forming impact; it is not yet proven whether groups of impact melt that are resolvable from each other in age and in trace-element composition represent multiple impacts. The 3.9 Ga age peak and subsequent steep decline are not well mirrored in meteorite data. Radiometric ages in ordinary chondrites and HED meteorites peak around 3.9 Ga but ages older and younger than 3.9 Ga are common. Among Martian meteorites, there is a single impact-related age: ALH 84001 was shocked at 3.92 Ga. Differences in relative impact velocity, impact-melt production, and sampling rate could explain differences between the meteorite and lunar records. One way to anchor the early end of the lunar flux is to directly sample the impact-melt sheet of a large lunar basin distant from Imbrium, such as the South Pole-Aitken basin, where melt rocks probably still resides on the basin floor and could be directly sampled by a human or robotic mission.

  12. Orbital period variations in eclipsing post-common-envelope binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, S. G.; Marsh, T. R.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Littlefair, S. P.; Hickman, R. D. G.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Colque, J. P.; Barraza, N.; Sánchez, N.; Monard, L. A. G.

    2010-10-01

    We present high-speed ULTRACAM photometry of the eclipsing post-common-envelope binaries DE CVn, GK Vir, NN Ser, QS Vir, RR Cae, RX J2130.6+4710, SDSS 0110+1326 and SDSS 0303+0054 and use these data to measure precise mid-eclipse times in order to detect any period variations. We detect a large (~250 s) departure from linearity in the eclipse times of QS Vir which Applegate's mechanism fails to reproduce by an order of magnitude. The only mechanism able to drive this period change is a third body in a highly elliptical orbit. However, the planetary/sub-stellar companion previously suggested to exist in this system is ruled out by our data. Our eclipse times show that the period decrease detected in NN Ser is continuing, with magnetic braking or a third body the only mechanisms able to explain this change. The planetary/sub-stellar companion previously suggested to exist in NN Ser is also ruled out by our data. Our precise eclipse times also lead to improved ephemerides for DE CVn and GK Vir. The width of a primary eclipse is directly related to the size of the secondary star and variations in the size of this star could be an indication of Applegate's mechanism or Wilson (starspot) depressions which can cause jitter in the O-C curves. We measure the width of primary eclipses for the systems NN Ser and GK Vir over several years but find no definitive variations in the radii of the secondary stars. However, our data are precise enough (Δ Rsec/Rsec effects of Applegate's mechanism in the future. We find no evidence of Wilson depressions in either system. We also find tentative indications that flaring rates of the secondary stars depend on their mass rather than rotation rates.

  13. Timing variations in the secondary eclipse of NN Ser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, S. G.; Marsh, T. R.; Bours, M. C. P.; Littlefair, S. P.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Breedt, E.; Caceres, C.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2014-02-01

    The eclipsing white dwarf plus main-sequence binary NN Serpentis provides one of the most convincing cases for the existence of circumbinary planets around evolved binaries. The exquisite timing precision provided by the deep eclipse of the white dwarf has revealed complex variations in the eclipse arrival times over the last few decades. These variations have been interpreted as the influence of two planets in orbit around the binary. Recent studies have proved that such a system is dynamically stable over the current lifetime of the binary. However, the existence of such planets is by no means proven and several alternative mechanisms have been proposed that could drive similar variations. One of these is apsidal precession, which causes the eclipse times of eccentric binaries to vary sinusoidally on many year time-scales. In this Letter, we present timing data for the secondary eclipse of NN Ser and show that they follow the same trend seen in the primary eclipse times, ruling out apsidal precession as a possible cause for the variations. This result leaves no alternatives to the planetary interpretation for the observed period variations, although we still do not consider their existence as proven. Our data limit the eccentricity of NN Ser to e detect a 3.3 ± 1.0 s delay in the arrival times of the secondary eclipses relative to the best planetary model. This delay is consistent with the expected 2.84 ± 0.04 s Rømer delay of the binary, and is the first time this effect has been detected in a white dwarf plus M dwarf system.

  14. MARVELS Radial Velocity Solutions to Seven Kepler Eclipsing Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslar, Michael Francis; Thomas, Neil B.; Ge, Jian; Ma, Bo; Herczeg, Alec; Reyes, Alan; SDSS-III MARVELS Team

    2016-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries serve momentous purposes to improve the basis of understanding aspects of stellar astrophysics, such as the accurate calculation of the physical parameters of stars and the enigmatic mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. We report the investigation results of 7 eclipsing binary candidates, initially identified by the Kepler mission, overlapped with the radial velocity observations from the SDSS-III Multi-Object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS). The RV extractions and spectroscopic solutions of these eclipsing binaries were generated by the University of Florida's 1D data pipeline with a median RV precision of ~60-100 m/s, which was utilized for the DR12 data release. We performed the cross-reference fitting of the MARVELS RV data and the Kepler photometric fluxes obtained from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (V2) and modelled the 7 eclipsing binaries in the BinaryMaker3 and PHOEBE programs. This analysis accurately determined the absolute physical and orbital parameters of each binary. Most of the companion stars were determined to have masses of K and M dwarf stars (0.3-0.8 M⊙), and allowed for an investigation into the mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. Among the cases are KIC 9163796, a 122.2 day period "heartbeat star", a recently-discovered class of eccentric binaries known for tidal distortions and pulsations, with a high eccentricity (e~0.75) and KIC 11244501, a 0.29 day period, contact binary with a double-lined spectrum and mass ratio (q~0.45). We also report on the possible reclassification of 2 Kepler eclipsing binary candidates as background eclipsing binaries based on the analysis of the flux measurements, flux ratios of the spectroscopic and photometric solutions, the differences in the FOVs, the image processing of Kepler, and RV and spectral analysis of MARVELS.

  15. MOC Views of Martian Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The shadow of the martian moon, Phobos, has been captured in many recent wide angle camera views of the red planet obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). Designed to monitor changes in weather and surface conditions, the wide angle cameras are also proving to be a good way to spot the frequent solar eclipses caused by the passage of Phobos between Mars and the Sun.The first figure (above), shows wide angle red (left), blue (middle), and color composite (right) views of the shadow of Phobos (elliptical feature at center of each frame) as it was cast upon western Xanthe Terra on August 26, 1999, at about 2 p.m.local time on Mars. The image covers an area about 250 kilometers (155 miles) across and is illuminated from the left. The meandering Nanedi Valles is visible in the lower right corner of the scene. Note the dark spots on three crater floors--these appear dark in the red camera image (left) but are barely distinguished in the blue image (middle), while the shadow is dark in both images. The spots on the crater floors are probably small fields of dark sand dunes.The second figure shows three samples of MOC's global image swaths, each in this case with a shadow of Phobos visible (arrow). The first scene (left) was taken on September 1, 1999, and shows the shadow of Phobos cast upon southern Elysium Planitia. The large crater with dark markings on its floor at the lower right corner is Herschel Basin. The second scene shows the shadow of Phobos cast upon northern Lunae Planum on September 8, 1999. Kasei Valles dominates the upper right and the deep chasms of Valles Marineris dominate the lower third of the September 8 image. The picture on the right shows the shadow of Phobos near the giant volcano, Olympus Mons (upper left), on September 25, 1999. Three other major volcanoes are visible from lower-center (Arsia Mons) and right-center (Pavonis Mons) to upper-middle-right (Ascraeus Mons

  16. Eclipse - tow flight closeup and release

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This clip, running 15 seconds in length, shows the QF-106 'Delta Dart' gear down, with the tow rope secured to the attachment point above the aircraft nose. First there is a view looking back from the C-141A, then looking forward from the nose of the QF-106, and finally a shot of the aircraft being released from the tow rope. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, supported a Kelly Space and Technology, Inc. (KST)/U.S. Air Force project known as Eclipse, which demonstrated a reusable tow launch vehicle concept. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate a reusable tow launch vehicle concept that had been conceived and patented by KST. Kelly Space obtained a contract with the USAF Research Laboratory for the tow launch demonstration project under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The USAF SBIR contract included the modifications to turn the QF-106 into the Experimental Demonstrator #1 (EXD-01), and the C141A aircraft to incorporate the tow provisions to link the two aircraft, as well as conducting flight tests. The demonstration consisted of ground and flight tests. These tests included a Combined Systems Test of both airplanes joined by a tow rope, a towed taxi test, and six towed flights. The primary goal of the project was demonstrating the tow phase of the Eclipse concept using a scaled-down tow aircraft (C-141A) and a representative aerodynamically-shaped aircraft (QF-106A) as a launch vehicle. This was successfully accomplished. On December 20, 1997, NASA research pilot Mark Stucky flew a QF-106 on the first towed flight behind an Air Force C-141 in the joint Eclipse project with KST to demonstrate a reusable tow launch vehicle concept developed by KST. Kelly Space and Technology hoped to use the data from the tow tests to validate a tow-to-launch procedure for reusable space launch vehicles. Stucky flew six successful tow tests between December 1997 and February 6, 1998. On February 6, 1998, the sixth and final towed

  17. Spitzer ultra faint survey program (surfs up). I. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradač, Maruša; Huang, Kuang-Han; Cain, Benjamin; Hall, Nicholas; Lubin, Lori [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ryan, Russell; Casertano, Stefano [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lemaux, Brian C. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf Dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Allen, Steve; Von der Linden, Anja [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Gladders, Mike [The University of Chicago, The Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 933 East 56th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Treu, Tommaso, E-mail: marusa@physics.ucdavis.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program is a joint Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z ≳ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest-frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z ≳ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hr of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ∼30 hr exposure time in both 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm in the central 4' × 4' field and ∼15 hr in the flanking fields. This results in 3σ sensitivity limits of ∼26.6 and ∼26.2 AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z ≳ 7 sources (using a z = 9.5 galaxy behind MACS J1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical point-spread function models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.

  18. Image Stacking Method Application for Low Earth Orbit Faint Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Kitazawa, Y.; Hanada, T.

    2013-09-01

    Space situational awareness is one of the most important actions for safe and sustainable space development and its utilization. Tracking and maintaining debris catalog are the basis of the actions. Current minimum size of objects in the catalog that routinely tracked and updated is approximately 10 cm in the Low Earth Orbit region. This paper proposes collaborative observation of space-based sensors and ground facilities to improve tracking capability in low Earth orbit. This observation geometry based on role-sharing idea. A space-based sensor has advantage in sensitivity and observation opportunity however, it has disadvantages in periodic observation which is essential for catalog maintenance. On the other hand, a ground facility is inferior to space-based sensors in sensitivity however; observation network composed of facilities has an advantage in periodic observation. Whole observation geometry is defined as follows; 1) space-based sensors conduct initial orbit estimation for a target 2) ground facility network tracks the target based on estimated orbit 3) the network observes the target periodically and updates its orbit information. The second phase of whole geometry is based on image stacking method developed by the Japan aerospace exploration agency and this method is verified for objects in geostationary orbit. This method enables to detect object smaller than a nominal size limitation by stacking faint light spot along archived time-series frames. The principle of this method is prediction and searching target's motion on the images. It is almost impossible to apply the method to objects in Low Earth Orbit without proper orbit information because Low Earth Orbit objects have varied orbital characteristics. This paper discusses whether or not initial orbit estimation results given by space-based sensors have enough accuracy to apply image stacking method to Low Earth Orbit objects. Ground-based observation procedure is assumed as being composed of

  19. Spectrum from Faint Galaxy IRAS F00183-7111

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has detected the building blocks of life in the distant universe, albeit in a violent milieu. Training its powerful infrared eye on a faint object located at a distance of 3.2 billion light-years, Spitzer has observed the presence of water and organic molecules in the galaxy IRAS F00183-7111. With an active galactic nucleus, this is one of the most luminous galaxies in the universe, rivaling the energy output of a quasar. Because it is heavily obscured by dust (see visible-light image in the inset), most of its luminosity is radiated at infrared wavelengths.The infrared spectrograph instrument onboard Spitzer breaks light into its constituent colors, much as a prism does for visible light. The image shows a low-resolution spectrum of the galaxy obtained by the spectrograph at wavelengths between 4 and 20 microns. Spectra are graphical representations of a celestial object's unique blend of light. Characteristic patterns, or fingerprints, within the spectra allow astronomers to identify the object's chemical composition and to determine such physical properties as temperature and density.The broad depression in the center of the spectrum denotes the presence of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand) in the galaxy. An emission peak within the bottom of the trough is the chemical signature for molecular hydrogen. The hydrocarbons (orange) are organic molecules comprised of carbon and hydrogen, two of the most common elements on Earth. Since it has taken more than three billion years for the light from the galaxy to reach Earth, it is intriguing to note the presence of organics in a distant galaxy at a time when life is thought to have started forming on our home planet.Additional features in the spectrum reveal the presence of water ice (blue), carbon dioxide ice (green) and carbon monoxide (purple) in both gas and solid forms. The magenta peak corresponds to singly ionized neon gas, a spectral line often used by astronomers as a

  20. Eclipse effects on field crops and marine zooplankton: the 29 March 2006 Total Solar Eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Economou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects in the biosphere from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 were investigated in field crops and marine zooplankton. Taking into account the decisive role of light on the photoenergetic and photoregulatory plant processes, measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal behaviour were conducted on seven important field-grown cereal and leguminous crops. A drop in photosynthetic rates, by more than a factor of 5 in some cases, was observed, and the minimum values of photosynthetic rates ranged between 3.13 and 10.13 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1. However, since solar irradiance attenuation has not at the same time induced stomatal closure thus not blocking CO2 uptake by plants, it is probably other endogenous factors that has been responsible for the observed fall in photosynthetic rates. Field studies addressing the migratory responses of marine zooplankton (micro-zooplankton (ciliates, and meso-zooplankton due to the rapid changes in underwater light intensity were also performed. The light intensity attenuation was simulated with the use of accurate underwater radiative transfer modeling techniques. Ciliates, responded to the rapid decrease in light intensity during the eclipse adopting night-time behaviour. From the meso-zooplankton assemblage, various vertical migratory behaviours were adopted by different species.

  1. Eclipse retinopathy: follow up of 36 cases after April 1995 solar eclipse in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Abdul Aziz; Khan, Tajamul; Mohammad, Sardar; Arif, Abdus Salam

    2002-01-01

    A study was carried out at the Department of Ophthalmology Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from April 1995 to April 2002 to study the visual acuity changes in patients of solar eclipse retinopathy. Thirty-six patients with solar eclipse retinopathy were seen. Examination included assessment of Visual Acuity (VA), Slit Lamp examination, Fundoscopy, Fundus Photography and Fundus Fluorescein Angiography where the VA was 6/60. The patients were seen at weekly intervals then at monthly interval and later annually. Poor visual acuity was seen in all patients, after images in 28 patients, Erythopsia in 25 patients and Central Scotoma in 23 patients. Eye involvement was unilateral in 27 cases and bilateral in 9 cases. Twenty-nine patients were male and 7 patients were female. The commonest age group was between 10-30 years. Complete recovery was seen in 26 patients, 7 made partial recovery while in three patients the visual acuity remained poor. Maximum recovery occurred between two weeks to six months. After six months, no changes in the visual acuity or macular lesion were noticed.

  2. BK Lyncis: The Oldest Old Nova?... And a Bellwether for Cataclysmic-Variable Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, Joseph; Kemp, Jonathan; de Miguel, Enrique; Krajci, Thomas; Foote, Jerry; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Campbell, Tut; Roberts, George; Cejudo, David; Dvorak, Shawn; Vanmunster, Tonny; Koff, Robert; Skillman, David; Harvey, David; Martin, Brian; Rock, John; Boyd, David; Oksanen, Arto; Morelle, Etienne; Ulowetz, Joseph; Kroes, Anthony; Sabo, Richard; Jensen, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the results of a 20-year campaign to study the light curves of BK Lyncis, a nova-like star strangely located below the 2-3 hour orbital period gap in the family of cataclysmic variables. Two apparent "superhumps" dominate the nightly light curves - with periods 4.6% longer, and 3.0% shorter, than P_orb. The first appears to be associated with the star's brighter states (V~14), while the second appears to be present throughout and becomes very dominant in the low state (V~15.7). Starting in the year 2005, the star's light curve became indistinguishable from that of a dwarf nova - in particular, that of the ER UMa subclass. Reviewing all the star's oddities, we speculate: (a) BK Lyn is the remnant of the probable nova on 30 December 101, and (b) it has been fading ever since, but has taken ~2000 years for the accretion rate to drop sufficiently to permit dwarf-nova eruptions. If such behavior is common, it can explain other puzzles of CV evolution. One: why the ER UMa class even exists (because all...

  3. The Emergence of Negative Superhumps in Cataclysmic Variables: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, David M

    2016-01-01

    Negative superhumps are believed to arise in cataclysmic variable systems when the accretion disk is tilted with respect to the orbital plane. Slow retrograde precession of the line-of-nodes results in a signal---the negative superhump---with a period slightly less than the orbital period. Previous studies have shown that tilted disks exhibit negative superhumps, but a consensus on how a disk initially tilts has not been reached. Analytical work by Lai suggests that a magnetic field on the primary can lead to a tilt instability in a disk when the dipole moment is offset in angle from the spin axis of the primary and when the primary's spin axis is, itself, not aligned with the angular momentum axis of the binary orbit. However, Lai did not apply his work to the formation of negative superhumps. In this paper, we add Lai's model to an existing smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. Using this code, we demonstrate the emergence of negative superhumps in the "light curve" for a range of magnetic dipole moments. W...

  4. Radial velocity studies of HeII and Hβ emission from cataclysmic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, C.; Montgomery, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    Radial velocity (RV) plots of HeII and Hβ emission lines from non-magnetic Cataclysmic Variable (CV) systems are frequently fit with a sin curve but sometimes contain outlying data points around phase ϕ∼1.0. A lack of consensus exists on the origin of these outlying points. In this work, we develop an analytical model that is based upon our 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) numerical model to simulate these RV curves. Our chosen targets are CV SW Sextanis-like systems UX Uma and RW Tri as well as SU UMa dwarf novae systems Hα0242-28 and 1RXSJ1808+10, which have secondary-to-primary mass ratios of q = (0.43, 0.86, 0.27, 0.18), respectively. In our model, we include disk eccentricity, inclination angle, degree of disk-tilt, bright spot (s), and/or gas stream overflow. Our model provides good non-sinusoidal fits to the observed RV data, including outlying data points near ϕ∼1.0, suggesting these excess points may be caused by gas-stream overflow.

  5. THE ROLE OF WHITE DWARFS IN CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE SPIN-DOWN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Kashyap, V. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-02-10

    We study the effect of a white dwarf on the spin-down of a cataclysmic variable (CV) system using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic numerical model. The model includes the stellar corona, the stellar wind, and the WD mass and magnetic field. The existence of the WD modifies the system spin-down by physically blocking the stellar wind, restructuring the wind, channeling the wind toward the WD surface, and modifying the shape and size of the Alfven surface. The combination of these processes differs among a set of simple test cases, and the resulting angular momentum loss rates vary by factors of 2-3, and by factors of 2 relative to a test model with a single M dwarf. While the model employs some simplifications, the results suggest that angular momentum loss schemes currently employed in CV studies do not require drastic revision. Insights are also gained on wind accretion. We find that efficient accretion switches on quite rapidly with decreasing orbital separation. Accretion rates depend on magnetic field alignment and should be modulated by magnetic cycles on the M dwarf. For particular values of white dwarf magnetic field strength, an efficient syphoning of coronal plasma from the inward facing M dwarf hemisphere occurs. Wind accretion rates are expected to vary by factors of 10 or more between fairly similar close binaries, depending on magnetic field strengths and orbital separation.

  6. Roche tomography of cataclysmic variables - VI. Differential rotation of AE Aqr - Not tidally locked!

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Colin; Shahbaz, Tariq; Steeghs, Danny; Dhillon, Vik

    2014-01-01

    We present Roche tomograms of the K4V secondary star in the cataclysmic variable AE Aqr, reconstructed from two datasets taken 9 days apart, and measure the differential rotation of the stellar surface. The tomograms show many large, cool starspots, including a large high-latitude spot and a prominent appendage down the trailing hemisphere. We find two distinct bands of spots around 22$^{\\circ}$ and 43$^{\\circ}$ latitude, and estimate a spot coverage of 15.4-17% on the northern hemisphere. Assuming a solar-like differential rotation law, the differential rotation of AE Aqr was measured using two different techniques. The first method yields an equator-pole lap time of 269 d and the second yields a lap time of 262 d. This shows the star is not fully tidally locked, as was previously assumed for CVs, but has a co-rotation latitude of $\\sim 40^{\\circ}$. We discuss the implications that these observations have on stellar dynamo theory, as well as the impact that spot traversal across the first Lagrangian point ma...

  7. Disk Structure of Cataclysmic Variables in the light of Broadband Noise Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balman, Solen

    2016-07-01

    Flicker noise and its variations in accreting systems have been a diagnostic tool in understanding the structure in accretion disks. I study the nature of time variability of brightness of non-magnetic cataclysmic variables. Dwarf novae demonstrate band limited noise in the UV and X-ray energy bands, which can be adequately explained in the framework of the model of propagating fluctuations. The detected frequency breaks in the range (1-6) mHz indicates an optically thick disk truncation in the inner disk of some dwarf novae systems. Analysis of other available data (SS Cyg, SU UMa, WZ Sge, Z Cha) indicate that during the outburst the inner disk radius moves towards the white dwarf and receeds as the outburst declines while changes in the X-ray energy spectrum is also observed. Cross-correlations between the simultaneous Optical, UV and X-ray light curves show time lags in the X-rays consistent with truncated inner optically thick disk. I compare magnetic and nonmagnetic CVs in terms of their broadband noise characteristics and summarize findings regarding broadband noise structure and time lags in other types of nonmagnetic CVs which in general show compliance with the model of propagating fluctuations. In addition, I discuss comparisons with X-ray binaries.

  8. Mass transfer in cataclysmic variables - Clues from the dwarf nova period distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafter, A. W.; Wheeler, J. C.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented in support of the hypothesis that the mean mass-transfer rate at a given orbital period is not continuous across the 2-3 hr gap in the orbital period distribution for cataclysmic variables. It is pointed out that although dwarf novae comprise nearly half (48 percent) of all disk systems with orbital periods less than 10 hr, only three systems out of the 22 with periods between 3 and 4 hr appear to be dwarf novae. The overall orbital period distribution for dwarf novae in conjunction with the predictions from current theories of dwarf nova eruptions are used to argue that mass-transfer rates must be generally higher for systems with orbital periods greater than 3 hr relative to systems with periods less than 2 hr. It is further argued that the mean mass-transfer rate at a given orbital period cannot increase more steeply than P exp 1.7 unless the white dwarf mass is positively correlated with orbital period.

  9. Roche tomography of cataclysmic variables - VII. The long-term magnetic activity of AE Aqr

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, C A; Steeghs, D; Dhillon, V S; Shahbaz, T

    2016-01-01

    We present a long-term study of the secondary star in the cataclysmic variable AE~Aqr, using Roche tomography to indirectly image starspots on the stellar surface spanning 8~years of observations. The 7 maps show an abundance of spot features at both high and low latitudes. We find that all maps have at least one large high-latitude spot region, and we discuss its complex evolution between maps, as well as its compatibility with current dynamo theories. Furthermore, we see the apparent growth in fractional spot coverage, $f_{\\mathrm{s}}$, around $45^{\\circ}$~latitude over the duration of observations, with a persistently high $f_{\\mathrm{s}}$ near latitudes of $20^{\\circ}$. These bands of spots may form as part of a magnetic activity cycle, with magnetic flux tubes emerging at different latitudes, similar to the `butterfly' diagram for the Sun. We discuss the nature of flux tube emergence in close binaries, as well as the activity of AE~Aqr in the context of other stars.

  10. An Online Catalog of Cataclysmic Variable Spectra from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer

    CERN Document Server

    Godon, P; Levay, K; Linnell, A P; Szkody, P; Barrett, P E; Hubeny, I; Blair, W P

    2012-01-01

    We present an online catalog containing spectra and supporting information for cataclysmic variables that have been observed with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). For each object in the catalog we list some of the basic system parameters such as (RA,Dec), period, inclination, white dwarf mass, as well as information on the available FUSE spectra: data ID, observation date and time, and exposure time. In addition, we provide parameters needed for the analysis of the FUSE spectra such as the reddening E(B-V), distance, and state (high, low, intermediate) of the system at the time it was observed. For some of these spectra we have carried out model fits to the continuum with synthetic stellar and/or disk spectra using the codes TLUSTY and SYNSPEC. We provide the parameters obtained from these model fits; this includes the white dwarf temperature, gravity, projected rotational velocity and elemental abundances of C, Si, S and N, together with the disk mass accretion rate, the resulting inclinati...

  11. Population Synthesis of Cataclysmic Variables: I. Inclusion of Detailed Nuclear Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Goliasch, J

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out an extensive population synthesis study of the ensemble properties of the present-day population of cataclysmic variables (PDCVs) that takes into account the nuclear evolution of high-mass donors close to the bifurcation and dynamical instability limits. Assuming the interrupted magnetic braking paradigm, we confirm many of the general features associated with the observed CV population and find enormous diversity in their secular properties. We predict that nearly half of the non-magnetic CVs with Porb > 6 hours are at least mildly evolved (i.e., greater than one-half of their MS turn-off age). Some of these systems contribute to the observed population of PDCVs in the period gap. We also see an enhancement by up to a factor of two in the probability of detecting CVs at the `minimum period'. This spike is quite narrow (approximately 5 minutes) and is attenuated because of the spectrum of WD masses and partly by the evolution of the donors. Our syntheses imply that there should be a very r...

  12. Infrared Spectroscopic Observations of the Secondary Stars of Short Period Sub-Gap Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Ryan T; Tappert, Claus; Howell, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    We present K-band spectroscopy of short period, "sub-gap" cataclysmic variable (CV) systems obtained using ISAAC on the VLT. We show the infrared spectra (IR) for nine systems below the 2-3 hour period gap: V2051 Oph, V436 Cen, EX Hya, VW Hyi, Z Cha, WX Hyi, V893 Sco, RZ Leo, and TY PsA. We are able to clearly detect the secondary star in all but WX Hyi, V893 Sco, and TY PsA. We present the first direct detection of the secondary stars of V2051 Oph, V436 Cen, and determine new spectral classifications for EX Hya, VW Hyi, Z Cha, and RZ Leo. We find that the CO band strengths of all but Z Cha appear normal for their spectral types, in contrast to their longer period cousins above the period gap. This brings the total number of CVs and pre-CVs with moderate resolution (R >~ 1500) IR spectroscopy to sixty-one systems: nineteen pre-CVs, thirty-one non-magnetic systems, and eleven magnetic or partially magnetic systems. We discuss the trends seen in the IR abundance patterns thus far, and highlight a potential link...

  13. Cataclysmic Variables from SDSS. VIII. The Final Year (2007-2008)

    CERN Document Server

    Szkody, Paula; Brooks, Keira; Gaensicke, Boris T; Kronberg, Martin; Riecken, Thomas; Ross, Nicholas P; Schmidt, Gary D; Schneider, Donald P; Agueros, Marcel A; Gomez-Moran, Ada N; Knapp, Gillian R; Schreiber, Matthias R; Schwope, Axel D

    2011-01-01

    This paper completes the series of cataclysmic variables (CVs) identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey I/II. The coordinates, magnitudes and spectra of 33 CVs are presented. Among the 33 are eight systems known previous to SDSS (CT Ser, DO Leo, HK Leo, IR Com, V849 Her, V405 Peg, PG1230+226 and HS0943+1404), as well as nine objects recently found through various photometric surveys. Among the systems identified since the SDSS are two polar candidates, two intermediate polar candidates and one candidate for containing a pulsating white dwarf. Our followup data have confirmed a polar candidate from Paper VII and determined tentative periods for three of the newly identified CVs. A complete summary table of the 285 CVs with spectra from SDSS I/II is presented as well as a link to an online table of all known CVs from both photometry and spectroscopy that will continue to be updated as future data appear.

  14. CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. VIII. THE FINAL YEAR (2007-2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szkody, Paula; Anderson, Scott F.; Brooks, Keira; Kronberg, Martin; Riecken, Thomas [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Gaensicke, Boris T. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 92420 (United States); Schmidt, Gary D. [The University of Arizona, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Agueeros, Marcel A. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Gomez-Moran, Ada N.; Schwope, Axel D. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Knapp, Gillian R. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Schreiber, Matthias R., E-mail: szkody@astro.washington.edu [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso (Chile)

    2011-12-15

    This paper completes the series of cataclysmic variables (CVs) identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) I/II. The coordinates, magnitudes, and spectra of 33 CVs are presented. Among the 33 are eight systems known prior to SDSS (CT Ser, DO Leo, HK Leo, IR Com, V849 Her, V405 Peg, PG1230+226, and HS0943+1404), as well as nine objects recently found through various photometric surveys. Among the systems identified since the SDSS are two polar candidates, two intermediate polar candidates, and one candidate for containing a pulsating white dwarf. Our follow-up data have confirmed a polar candidate from Paper VII and determined tentative periods for three of the newly identified CVs. A complete summary table of the 285 CVs with spectra from SDSS I/II is presented as well as a link to an online table of all known CVs from both photometry and spectroscopy that will continue to be updated as future data appear.

  15. Abundance Derivations for the Secondary Stars in Cataclysmic Variables from Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    We derive metallicities for 41 cataclysmic variables (CVs) from near-infrared spectroscopy. We use synthetic spectra that cover the 0.8 $\\mu$m $\\leq \\lambda \\leq$ 2.5 $\\mu$m bandpass to ascertain the value of [Fe/H] for CVs with K-type donors, while also deriving abundances for other elements. Using calibrations for determining [Fe/H] from the $K$-band spectra of M-dwarfs, we derive more precise values for T$_{\\rm eff}$ for the secondaries in the shortest period CVs, and examine whether they have carbon deficits. In general, the donor stars in CVs have sub-solar metallicities. We confirm carbon deficits for a large number of systems. CVs with orbital periods $>$ 5 hr are most likely to have unusual abundances. We identify four CVs with CO emission. We use phase-resolved spectra to ascertain the mass and radius of the donor in U Gem. The secondary star in U Gem appears to have a lower {\\it apparent} gravity than a main sequence star of its spectral type. Applying this result to other CVs, we find that the late...

  16. Multiple time scales in cataclysmic binaries. The low-field magnetic dwarf nova DO Draconis

    CERN Document Server

    Andronov, I L; Han, W; Kim, Y; Yoon, J -N

    2008-01-01

    We study the variability of the cataclysmic variable DO Dra, on time-scales of between minutes and decades. The characteristic decay time dt/dm=0.902(3) days/mag was estimated from our 3 nights of CCD R observations. The quiescent data show a photometric wave with a cycle about 303(15)d. We analyzed the profile of the composite (or mean) outburst. We discovered however, that a variety of different outburst heights and durations had occurred, contrary to theoretical predictions. With increasing maximum brightness, we find that the decay time also increases; this is in contrast to the model predictions, which indicate that outbursts should have a constant shape. This is interpreted as representing the presence of outburst-to-outburst variability of the magnetospheric radius. A presence of a number of missed weak narrow outbursts is predicted from this statistical relationship. A new type of variability is detected, during 3 subsequent nights in 2007: periodic (during one nightly run) oscillations with rapidly-d...

  17. Observations of GAIA-identified Cataclysmic Variables Using the TUBITAK National Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenoglu, Hasan H.; Kirbiyik, Halil; Kaynar, Suleyman; Okuyan, Oguzhan; Hamitoglu, Irek; Galeev, Almaz; Uluc, Kadir; Kocak, Murat; Kilic, Sila E.; Parmaksizoglu, Murat; Erece, Orhan; Ozisik, Tuncay; Gulsecen, Hulusi

    2016-07-01

    TUBITAK National Observatory supports the GAIA alerts with observations using three telescopes (RTT150, T100, T60) at the site with a limited time quota. We have observed 10 variable stars among GAIA sources discovered in the years 2014-2016 that may be candidate Cataclysmic Variables (CVs). Our TUG observations at this stage involve photometry and spectroscopy to aid the identification of these sources. The first preliminary result of our observations of Gaia14aat among them showed a dwarf nova outburst with an amplitude of 2.69 mag. We aim to construct a GAIA astrophysics group to study CVs along with supported studies using the SRG (Spectrum Roentgen Gamma astrophysical observatory) after the year of 2016. These observations will basically involve spectroscopy, narrow-band CCD imaging and photometry using several filters to aid the identification of these sources. RTT150 observations with very narrow filters (like H-alpha, SII, OIII with band width of range of 2 to 5 nm) will reveal whether shell around the SRG sources to aid identification novae among them.

  18. XMM-Newton observations of the low-luminosity cataclysmic variable V405 Pegasi

    CERN Document Server

    Schwope, A D; Traulsen, I; Schwarz, R; Granzer, T; Pires, A M; Thorstensen, J R

    2013-01-01

    V405 Peg is a low-luminosity cataclysmic variable (CV) that was identified as the optical counterpart of the bright, high-latitude ROSAT all-sky survey source RBS1955. The system was suspected to belong to a largely undiscovered population of hibernating CVs. Despite intensive optical follow-up its subclass however remained undetermined. We want to further classify V405 Peg and understand its role in the CV zoo via its long-term behaviour, spectral properties, energy distribution and accretion luminosity. We perform a spectral and timing analysis of \\textit{XMM-Newton} X-ray and ultra-violet data. Archival WISE, HST, and Swift observations are used to determine the spectral energy distribution and characterize the long-term variability. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by emission from a multi-temperature plasma. No evidence for a luminous soft X-ray component was found. Orbital phase-dependent X-ray photometric variability by $\\sim50\\%$ occurred without significant spectral changes. No further periodicity...

  19. Reversibility of time series: revealing the hidden messages in X-ray binaries and cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Scaringi, S; Middleton, M

    2014-01-01

    We explore the non-linear, high-frequency, aperiodic variability properties in the three cataclysmic variables MV Lyr, KIC 8751494 and V1504 Cyg observed with Kepler, as well as the X-ray binary Cyg X-1 observed with RXTE. This is done through the use of a high-order Fourier statistic called the bispectrum and its related biphase and bicoherence, as well as the time-skewness statistic. We show how all objects display qualitatively similar biphase trends. In particular all biphase amplitudes are found to be smaller than $\\pi/2$, suggesting that the flux distributions for all sources are positively skewed on all observed timescales, consistent with the log-normal distributions expected from the fluctuating accretion disk model. We also find that for all objects the biphases are positive at frequencies where the corresponding power spectral densities display their high frequency break. This suggests that the noise-like flaring observed is rising more slowly than it is falling, and thus not time-reversible. This ...

  20. Evolution of Cataclysmic Variables and Related Binaries Containing a White-Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Kalomeni, B; Rappaport, S; Molnar, M; Quintin, J; Yakut, K

    2016-01-01

    We present a binary evolution study of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and related systems with white dwarf accretors, including for example, AM CVn systems, classical novae, supersoft X-ray sources, and systems with giant donor stars. Our approach intentionally avoids the complications associated with population synthesis algorithms thereby allowing us to present the first truly comprehensive exploration of all of the subsequent binary evolution pathways that ZACVs might follow (assuming fully non-conservative, Roche-lobe overflow onto an accreting WD) using the sophisticated binary stellar evolution code MESA. The grid consists of 56,000 initial models, including 14 white dwarf accretor masses, 43 donor-star masses ($0.1-4.7$ $M_{\\odot}$), and 100 orbital periods. We explore evolution tracks in the orbital period and donor-mass ($P_{\\rm orb}-M_{\\rm don}$) plane in terms of evolution dwell times, masses of the white dwarf accretor, accretion rate, and chemical composition of the center and surface of the donor s...

  1. KIC 9406652: An Unusual Cataclysmic Variable in the Kepler Field of View

    CERN Document Server

    Gies, Douglas R; Howell, Steve B; Still, Martin D; Boyajian, Tabetha S; Hoekstra, Abe J; Jek, Kian J; LaCourse, Daryll; Winarski, Troy

    2013-01-01

    KIC 9406652 is a remarkable variable star in the Kepler field of view that shows both very rapid oscillations and long term outbursts in its light curve. We present an analysis of the light curve over quarters 1 to 15 and new spectroscopy that indicates that the object is a cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 6.108 hours. However, an even stronger signal appears in the light curve periodogram for a shorter period of 5.753 hours, and we argue that this corresponds to the modulation of flux from the hot spot region in a tilted, precessing disk surrounding the white dwarf star. We present a preliminary orbital solution from radial velocity measurements of features from the accretion disk and the photosphere of the companion. We use a Doppler tomography algorithm to reconstruct the disk and companion spectra, and we also consider how these components contribute to the object's spectral energy distribution from ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths. This target offers us a remarkable opportunity to invest...

  2. Exploratory Spectroscopy of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables Candidates and Other Variable Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, A S; Cieslinski, D; Jablonski, F J; Silva, K M G; Almeida, L A; Rodriguez-Ardila, A; Palhares, M S

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of synoptic surveys made by small robotic telescopes, as the photometric Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), represents a unique opportunity for the discovery of new variable objects, improving the samples of many classes of variables. Our goal is the discovery of new magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (mCVs). They are rare objects, which probe interesting accretion scenarios controlled by the white-dwarf magnetic field. We performed an optical spectroscopic survey to search for signatures of magnetic accretion on 47 variable objects selected mostly from CRTS. Our sample includes 13 polar strong candidates, from which 5 are new discoveries. Accretion disks seem to be present in other 19 objects. One is a previously known probable intermediate polar. We suggest 8 other objects could also be of this class. In particular, 7 of them have spectra consistent with short-period intermediate polars. We suggest one object is a novalike of the VY~Scl class. We also caught one dwarf nova in erup...

  3. Tutulemma of near equator Partial Solar Eclipse 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtahana, F.; Sartika; Admiranto, A. G.; Sungging, E.; Nurzaman, M. Z.; Priyatikanto, R.; Dani, T.

    2016-11-01

    Tutulemma which stands for tutulma (eclipse) and analemma is a Turkish name to describe analemma which contains solar eclipse. The photographs of analemma which looks like a figure 8 pattern of the solar path in the sky throughout a year is very common. However, this observation is rarely done in low latitude countries, especially tutulemma's plot. Related to the eclipse event on 9 March 2016, we built the first tutulemma in Indonesia which cointains partial solar eclipse observed from the rooftop of LAPAN Bandung office. The purpose of this endeavor is also to understand how the sun moves in one year, particularly at low latitude region based on observation data. We took the picture of the Sun every week at the same time of the day (the time of the eclipse). In this observation, we used a tripod and DSLR camera with a variable ND filter to take the data. To obtain the pattern, the weekly data were combined by image stacking using the same foreground. Finally, we got a figure 8 shaped pattern tutulemma which a bit different from high latitude country ones.

  4. The effect of starspots on eclipse timings of binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, C A

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the effects that starspots have on the light curves of eclipsing binaries and in particular how they may affect the accurate measurement of eclipse timings. Concentrating on systems containing a low-mass main-sequence star and a white dwarf, we find that if starspots exhibit the Wilson depression they can alter the times of primary eclipse ingress and egress by several seconds for typical binary parameters and starspot depressions. In addition, we find that the effect on the eclipse ingress/egress times becomes more profound for lower orbital inclinations. We show how it is possible, in principle, to determine estimates of both the binary inclination and depth of the Wilson depression from light curve analysis The effect of depressed starspots on the O-C diagrams of eclipsing systems is also investigated. It is found that the presence of starspots will introduce a `jitter' in the O-C residuals and can cause spurious orbital period changes to be observed. Despite this, we show that the period ca...

  5. 20 March 2015 solar eclipse influence on sporadic E layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzopane, M.; Pietrella, M.; Pignalberi, A.; Tozzi, R.

    2015-11-01

    This paper shows how the solar eclipse occurred on 20 March 2015 influenced the sporadic E (Es) layer as recorded by the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder by Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (AIS-INGV) ionosondes installed at Rome (41.8°N, 12.5°E) and Gibilmanna (37.9°N, 14.0°E), Italy. In these locations, the solar eclipse was only partial, with the maximum area of the solar disk obscured by the Moon equal to ∼54% at Rome and ∼45% at Gibilmanna. Nevertheless, it is shown that the strong thermal gradients that usually accompany a solar eclipse, have significantly influenced the Es phenomenology. Specifically, the solar eclipse did not affect the Es layer in terms of its maximum intensity, which is comparable with that of the previous and next day, but rather in terms of its persistence. In fact, both at Rome and Gibilmanna, contrary to what typically happens in March, the Es layer around the solar eclipse time is always present. On the other hand, this persistence is also confirmed by the application of the height-time-intensity (HTI) technique. A detailed analysis of isoheight ionogram plots suggests that traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) likely caused by gravity wave (GW) propagation have played a significant role in causing the persistence of the Es layer.

  6. Orbital Period Variations in Eclipsing Post Common Envelope Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Parsons, S G; Copperwheat, C M; Dhillon, V S; Littlefair, S P; Hickman, R D G; Maxted, P F L; Gänsicke, B T; Unda-Sanzana, E; Colque, J P; Barraza, N; Sánchez, N; Monard, L A G

    2010-01-01

    We present high speed ULTRACAM photometry of the eclipsing post common envelope binaries DE CVn, GK Vir, NN Ser, QS Vir, RR Cae, RX J2130.6+4710, SDSS 0110+1326 and SDSS 0303+0054 and use these data to measure precise mid-eclipse times in order to detect any period variations. We detect a large (~ 250 sec) departure from linearity in the eclipse times of QS Vir which Applegate's mechanism fails to reproduce by an order of magnitude. The only mechanism able to drive this period change is a third body in a highly elliptical orbit. However, the planetary/sub-stellar companion previously suggested to exist in this system is ruled out by our data. Our eclipse times show that the period decrease detected in NN Ser is continuing, with magnetic braking or a third body the only mechanisms able to explain this change. The planetary/sub-stellar companion previously suggested to exist in NN Ser is also ruled out by our data. Our precise eclipse times also lead to improved ephemerides for DE CVn and GK Vir. The width of a...

  7. Your guide to the 2017 total solar eclipse

    CERN Document Server

    Bakich, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    In this book Astronomy Magazine editor Michael Bakich presents all the information you’ll need to be ready for the total solar eclipse that will cross the United States on August 21, 2017. In this one resource you’ll find out where the eclipse will occur, how to observe it safely, what you’ll experience during the eclipse, the best equipment to choose, how to photograph the event, detailed weather forecasts for locations where the Moon’s shadow will fall, and much more. Written in easy-to-understand language (and with a glossary for those few terms you may not be familiar with), this is the must-have reference for this unique occurrence. It’s not a stretch to say that this eclipse will prove to be the most viewed sky event in history. That’s why even now, more than a year before the eclipse, astronomy clubs, government agencies, cities — even whole states — are preparing for the unprecedented onslaught of visitors whose only desire is to experience darkness at midday. Bakich informs observers ...

  8. INTERFEROMETRY OF ϵ AURIGAE: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ASYMMETRIC ECLIPSING DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloppenborg, B. K.; Schaefer, G. H.; Baron, F.; Brummelaar, T. A. ten; Farrington, C. D.; Parks, R.; McAlister, H. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Sallave-Goldfinger, P. J.; Turner, N. [The CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson Observatory, Mount Wilson, California 91023 (United States); Stencel, R. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208 (United States); Monnier, J. D.; Che, X. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 941 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Tycner, C. [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Dow Science Complex 219, Mount Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Zavala, R. T.; Hutter, D. [United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001 (United States); Zhao, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Penn. State, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Pedretti, E. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Thureau, N., E-mail: bkloppenborg@chara.gsu.edu [University of St. Andrews, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    We report on a total of 106 nights of optical interferometric observations of the ϵ Aurigae system taken during the last 14 years by four beam combiners at three different interferometric facilities. This long sequence of data provides an ideal assessment of the system prior to, during, and after the recent 2009–2011 eclipse. We have reconstructed model-independent images from the 10 in-eclipse epochs which show that a disk-like object is indeed responsible for the eclipse. Using new three-dimensional, time-dependent modeling software, we derive the properties of the F-star (diameter, limb darkening), determine previously unknown orbital elements (Ω, i), and access the global structures of the optically thick portion of the eclipsing disk using both geometric models and approximations of astrophysically relevant density distributions. These models may be useful in future hydrodynamical modeling of the system. Finally, we address several outstanding research questions including mid-eclipse brightening, possible shrinking of the F-type primary, and any warps or sub-features within the disk.

  9. Cyclic Period Oscillation of the Eclipsing Dwarf Nova DV UMa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z.-T.; Qian, S.-B.; Irina, Voloshina; Zhu, L.-Y.

    2017-05-01

    DV UMa is an eclipsing dwarf nova with an orbital period of ˜2.06 hr, which lies just at the bottom edge of the period gap. To detect its orbital period changes, we present 12 new mid-eclipse times by using our CCD photometric data and archival data. The latest version of the O-C diagram, combined with the published mid-eclipse times in quiescence, and spanning ˜30 years, was obtained and analyzed. The best fit to those available eclipse timings shows that the orbital period of DV UMa is undergoing a cyclic oscillation with a period of 17.58(+/- 0.52) years and an amplitude of 71.1(+/- 6.7) s. The periodic variation most likely arises from the light-travel-time effect via the presence of a circumbinary object, because the required energy to drive the Applegate mechanism is too high in this system. The mass of the unseen companion was derived as {M}3\\sin i\\prime =0.025(+/- 0.004) {M}⊙ . If the third body is in the orbital plane (i.e., i\\prime =i=82\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 9) of the eclipsing pair, this would indicate it is a brown dwarf. This hypothetical brown dwarf is orbiting its host star at a separation of ˜8.6 au in an eccentric orbit (e = 0.44).

  10. Howard Russell Butler's Oil Paintings of Solar Eclipses and Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, Roberta J. M.

    2014-06-01

    Howard Russell Butler (1856-1934) was invited to join the US Naval Observatory expedition to the total solar eclipse of 1918 because of his ability to paint astronomical phenomena based on quickly-made notes about spatial and color details. His giant triptych of the total eclipses of 1918, 1923, and 1925 was proposed for a never-built astronomical center at the American Museum of Natural History and wound up at their Hayden Planetarium when it was constructed in the mid-1930s. Half-size versions are installed at the Fels Planetarium at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and at the Firestone Library of Princeton University, whose newly conserved canvases were recently hung; the Buffalo Museum of Science has another half-size version in storage. We discuss not only the eclipse triptychs but also the series of large oil paintings he made of solar prominences (in storage at the American Museum of Natural History) and of his 1932-eclipse and other relevant works.JMP was supported for this work in part by Division III Discretionary Funds and the Brandi Fund of Williams College. His current eclipse research is supported by grants AGS-1047726 from the Solar Research Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of NSF and 9327-13 from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  11. Corot 310266512: A Light Curve With Primary, Secondary And Tertiary Eclipses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Fernández Javier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the photometric study of an interesting target in the CoRoT exoplanet database: CoRoT 310266512. Its light curve shows primary, secondary and tertiary eclipses that suggests the presence of at least three celestial bodies. The primary and secondary eclipses have the same orbital period, 7.42 days, and the tertiary eclipse has an orbital period of 3.27 days. Two of the tertiary eclipses fall within a primary eclipse and a secondary eclipse. The properties of the light curve indicate the presence of two physically separated systems. The primary and secondary eclipses corresponds to a binary system (System I. The tertiary eclipses correspond to a star-planet system or a star-dwarf system (System II. Some parameters of these two systems are obtained from JKTEBOP [1] program.

  12. Absolute dimensions of solar-type eclipsing binaries III. EW orionis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jens Viggo; Bruntt, H.; Olsen, E. H.

    2010-01-01

    stars: evolution / stars: fundamental parameters / stars: abundances / binaries: eclipsing / techniques: photometric / techniques: spectroscopic Udgivelsesdato: 23 Feb.......stars: evolution / stars: fundamental parameters / stars: abundances / binaries: eclipsing / techniques: photometric / techniques: spectroscopic Udgivelsesdato: 23 Feb....

  13. There's An App For That: Planning Ahead for the Solar Eclipse in August 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizek Frouard, Malynda R.; Lesniak, Michael V.; Bell, Steve

    2017-01-01

    With the total solar eclipse of 2017 August 21 over the continental United States approaching, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) on-line Solar Eclipse Computer can now be accessed via an Android application, available on Google Play.Over the course of the eclipse, as viewed from a specific site, several events may be visible: the beginning and ending of the eclipse (first and fourth contacts), the beginning and ending of totality (second and third contacts), the moment of maximum eclipse, sunrise, or sunset. For each of these events, the USNO Solar Eclipse 2017 Android application reports the time, Sun's altitude and azimuth, and the event's position and vertex angles. The app also lists the duration of the total phase, the duration of the eclipse, the magnitude of the eclipse, and the percent of the Sun obscured for a particular eclipse site.All of the data available in the app comes from the flexible USNO Solar Eclipse Computer Application Programming Interface (API), which produces JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) that can be incorporated into third-party Web sites or custom applications. Additional information is available in the on-line documentation (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/api.php).For those who prefer using a traditional data input form, the local circumstances can still be requested at http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/SolarEclipses.php.In addition the 2017 August 21 Solar Eclipse Resource page (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/Eclipse2017.php) consolidates all of the USNO resources for this event, including a Google Map view of the eclipse track designed by Her Majesty's Nautical Almanac Office (HMNAO).Looking further ahead, a 2024 April 8 Solar Eclipse Resource page (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/Eclipse2024.php) is also available.

  14. EPIC 220204960: A Quadruple Star System Containing Two Strongly Interacting Eclipsing Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, S.; Vanderburg, A.; Borkovits, T.; Kalomeni, B.; Halpern, J. P.; Ngo, H.; Mace, G. N.; Fulton, B. J.; Howard, A. W.; Isaacson, H.; Petigura, E. A.; Mawet, D.; Kristiansen, M. H.; Jacobs, T. L.; LaCourse, D.; Bieryla, A.; Forgács-Dajka, E.; Nelson, L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a strongly interacting quadruple system associated with the K2 target EPIC 220204960. The K2 target itself is a Kp = 12.7 magnitude star at Teff ≃ 6100 K which we designate as "B-N" (blue northerly image). The host of the quadruple system, however, is a Kp ≃ 17 magnitude star with a composite M-star spectrum, which we designate as "R-S" (red southerly image). With a 3.2″ separation and similar radial velocities and photometric distances, `B-N' is likely physically associated with `R-S', making this a quintuple system, but that is incidental to our main claim of a strongly interacting quadruple system in `R-S'. The two binaries in `R-S' have orbital periods of 13.27 d and 14.41 d, respectively, and each has an inclination angle of ≳ 89°. From our analysis of radial velocity measurements, and of the photometric lightcurve, we conclude that all four stars are very similar with masses close to 0.4 M⊙. Both of the binaries exhibit significant ETVs where those of the primary and secondary eclipses `diverge' by 0.05 days over the course of the 80-day observations. Via a systematic set of numerical simulations of quadruple systems consisting of two interacting binaries, we conclude that the outer orbital period is very likely to be between 300 and 500 days. If sufficient time is devoted to RV studies of this faint target, the outer orbit should be measurable within a year.

  15. Lunar eclipse photometry: absolute luminance measurements and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernitschek, Nina; Schmidt, Elmar; Vollmer, Michael

    2008-12-01

    The Moon's time-dependent luminance was determined during the 9 February 1990 and 3 March 2007 total lunar eclipses by using calibrated, industry standard photometers. After the results were corrected to unit air mass and to standard distances for both Moon and Sun, an absolute calibration was accomplished by using the Sun's known luminance and a pre-eclipse lunar albedo of approximately 13.5%. The measured minimum level of brightness in the total phase of both eclipses was relatively high, namely -3.32 m(vis) and -1.7 m(vis), which hints at the absence of pronounced stratospheric aerosol. The light curves were modeled in such a way as to let the Moon move through an artificial Earth shadow composed of a multitude of disk and ring zones, containing a relative luminance data set from an atmospheric radiative transfer calculation.

  16. Interpretation of Historically Significant Solar and Lunar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradyan, Armine; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Most of the ancient civilizations reacted with great awe and fear to the phenomena occurring in the sky and their changes. Periodically recurring movements of the Sun and the Moon attracting the attention of the astronomers, have given possibility to ancient civilizations to develop various calendars, including quite complicated ones. Since ancient times, Lunar and Solar eclipses were also among the forecasted phenomena, which have played an important role in human history. In the modern era, due to the cooperation of astronomers and historians, precise historical years and dates have been identified and the most important scientific discoveries of mankind have been proved with the help of eclipses. Most important historical Solar and Lunar eclipses, their impact on people, societies, history and science are presented and the interpretation of available to us historical events is given in this article.

  17. Tomographic Study of Ionospheric Effects Associated with a Solar Eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuXiong-bin; XuJi-sheng; MaShu-ying; TianMao

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the ionospheric effects associated with the solar eclipse of October 24th, 1995 by means of Computerized Ionospheric Tomography (CIT). Since the reconstructed profiles from experimental CIT are sporadically located in time, a time domain interpolation method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) technique is proposed and applied to extract the ionospheric effects. The effects can be extracted by comparison analysis between the interpolated CIT profiles of the eclipse days and that of the reference day that are time-aligned. A series of figs have been obtained showing the attenuation of photonization effect at low altitudes and the weakening of plasma's transportation process at high altitudes, etc. The photonization effect recovered to normal level soon after the last contact. The maximum electron density diminishing is observed about 2 h after the eclipse maximum and the effects seem vanished in the hours followed. Analysis on vertical TEC's latitudinal-temporal variation gives similar conclusions.

  18. Behavior of Photovoltaic System during Solar Eclipse in Prague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Libra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available PV power plants have been recently installed in very large scale. So the effects of the solar eclipse are of big importance especially for grid connected photovoltaic (PV systems. There was a partial solar eclipse in Prague on 20th March 2015. We have evaluated the data from our facility in order to monitor the impact of this natural phenomenon on the behavior of PV system, and these results are presented in the paper. The behavior of PV system corresponds with the theoretical assumption. The power decrease of the PV array corresponds with the relative size of the solar eclipse. I-V characteristics of the PV panel correspond to the theoretical model presented in our previous work.

  19. Asteroseismology of Eclipsing Binary Stars in the Kepler Era

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Eclipsing binary stars have long served as benchmark systems to measure fundamental stellar properties. In the past few decades, asteroseismology - the study of stellar pulsations - has emerged as a new powerful tool to study the structure and evolution of stars across the HR diagram. Pulsating stars in eclipsing binary systems are particularly valuable since fundamental properties (such as radii and masses) can determined using two independent techniques. Furthermore, independently measured properties from binary orbits can be used to improve asteroseismic modeling for pulsating stars in which mode identifications are not straightforward. This contribution provides a review of asteroseismic detections in eclipsing binary stars, with a focus on space-based missions such as CoRoT and Kepler, and empirical tests of asteroseismic scaling relations for stochastic ("solar-like") oscillations.

  20. Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries. II. The Increased Model Precision

    CERN Document Server

    Prsa, Andrej; Horvat, Martin; Pablo, Herbert; Kochoska, Angela; Bloemen, Steven; Nemravova, Jana; Giammarco, Joseph; Hambleton, Kelly M; Degroote, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    The precision of photometric and spectroscopic observations has been systematically improved in the last decade, mostly thanks to space-borne photometric missions and ground-based spectrographs dedicated to finding exoplanets. The field of eclipsing binary stars strongly benefited from this development. Eclipsing binaries serve as critical tools for determining fundamental stellar properties (masses, radii, temperatures and luminosities), yet the models are not capable of reproducing observed data well, either because of the missing physics or because of insufficient precision. This led to a predicament where radiative and dynamical effects, insofar buried in noise, started showing up routinely in the data, but were not accounted for in the models. PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs; http://phoebe-project.org) is an open source modeling code for computing theoretical light and radial velocity curves that addresses both problems by incorporating missing physics and by increasing the computational fidelity. ...

  1. Newcomb’s data on ancient eclipses revisited1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protitch-Benishek V.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Relying on the Greek text related to Babylonian-Hellenic observations of lunar eclipses in Ptolemy’s 'Almagest' (Halma M., 1813 and by analysing some Arabian notes about solar and lunar eclipses - for which S. Newcomb found considerable deviations from the adopted theory - a re-analysis of his results and conclusions is herewith undertaken. The results of ancient data revision are based on Newcomb’s alternative presumption that these discrepancies are caused by one or more unknown long-term inequalities in the motion of the Moon. A quantitative analysis of ancient eclipse observations unambiguously indicates that they definitely are not to be rejected provided, of course, that they are interpreted in proper way.

  2. Gravity anomaly during the Mohe total solar eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By using a high-precision LaCoste-Romberg (1)-122#) gravimeter, continuous and precise measurements were carried out during the March 9, 1997 total solar eclipse in the Mohe region in Northeast China. The gravity variations were digitally recorded during the total solar eclipse so as to investigate the possible anomaly of the sun and the moon's gravitational fields on the earth. After the careful processing and analysis of the observed data, no significant anomaly during the very solar eclipse has been found. Howmetrical decrease of about 6- 7 μGal at the first contact and the last contact. This is the anomaly phenomenon observed and reported for the first time in the literature. This note presents some analyses and discussions.

  3. RR Lyrae stars in eclipsing systems - historical candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Liska, J; Hajkova, P; Auer, R F

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of binary systems among RR Lyrae stars belongs to challenges of present astronomy. So far, none of classical RR Lyrae stars was clearly confirmed that it is a part of an eclipsing system. For this reason we studied two RR Lyrae stars, VX Her and RW Ari, in which changes assigned to eclipses were detected in sixties and seventies of the 20th century. In this paper our preliminary results based on analysis of new photometric measurements are presented as well as the results from the detailed analysis of original measurements. A new possible eclipsing system, RZ Cet was identified in the archive data. Our analysis rather indicates errors in measurements and reductions of the old data than real changes for all three stars.

  4. Configuring Eclipse for GMAT Builds: Instructions for Windows Users, Rev. 0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Darrel J.

    2007-01-01

    This document provides instructions about how to configure the Eclipse IDE to build GMAT on Windows based PCs. The current instructions are preliminary; the Windows builds using Eclipse are currently a bit crude. These instructions are intended to give you enough information to get Eclipse setup to build wxWidgets based executables in general, and GMAT in particular.

  5. Effects of total solar eclipse on the behavioural and metabolic activities of tropical intertidal animals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.; Ansari, Z.A.; Verlecar, X.N.; Harkantra, S.N.

    the pre-eclipse, eclipse and post-eclipse period, were carried out in the natural environment of Dias beach, Goa (Lat. 15 degrees 25'N; Long. 73 degrees 45'E). Environmental factors considered are tidal amplitude, atmospheric temperature and the sand...

  6. In the Shadow of the Moon, What Type of Solar Eclipse Will We See?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Todd; Brown, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    Solar eclipses occur several times a year, but most people will be lucky if they see one total solar eclipse in their lifetime. There are two upcoming total solar eclipses that can be seen from different parts of the United States (August 21, 2017 and April 8, 2024), and they provide teachers with an amazing opportunity to engage students with a…

  7. 76 FR 63571 - Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Airplanes Equipped With Pratt & Whitney Canada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Airplanes Equipped With Pratt & Whitney Canada, Corp. PW610F-A Engines...: We propose to revise an existing airworthiness directive (AD) that applies to all Eclipse Aerospace... 10, 2011), for all Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Model EA500 airplanes equipped with Pratt & Whitney...

  8. 76 FR 78526 - Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Airplanes Equipped With Pratt & Whitney Canada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ...-005-AD; Amendment 39-16890; AD 2011-06-06 R1] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse... directive (AD) that applies to all Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Model EA500 airplanes equipped with Pratt...: 2011-06-06 R1 Eclipse Aerospace, Inc.: Amendment 39-16890; Docket No. FAA-2011-0199;...

  9. 78 FR 57470 - Special Conditions: Eclipse, EA500, Certification of Autothrottle Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 23 Special Conditions: Eclipse, EA500, Certification of.... SUMMARY: These special conditions are issued for the Eclipse EA500 airplane. This airplane as modified by... systems installed and under 14 CFR part 135 with additional equipment installed. The Eclipse Model...

  10. 78 FR 46295 - Special Conditions: Eclipse, EA500, Certification of Autothrottle Functions Under Part 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 23 Special Conditions: Eclipse, EA500, Certification of... proposed special conditions. SUMMARY: This action proposes special conditions for the Eclipse EA500.... The Eclipse Model EA500 was certificated under part 23 by the FAA on September 30, 2006...

  11. 75 FR 61345 - Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Model EA500 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... 2010-CE-027-AD; Amendment 39-16459; AD 2010-20-24] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse... identified in this AD, contact Eclipse Aerospace Incorporated, 2503 Clark Carr Loop, SE., Albuquerque, New... Information Bulletin (SAIB) Chris Jackman, Eclipse Aerospace Incorporated, proposed the withdrawal of the...

  12. Social Impact of Solar Eclipse in Indonesia: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumpuni, Emanuel S.; Hidayat, Bambang

    2012-09-01

    The social impact and public comprehension of the natural phenomenon varies depending on how a particular cultural background perceives the phenomenon and how the interaction between general public and the authoritative bodies has persisted. While astronomers and scientists have taken for granted that solar eclipse is a natural phenomenon and subjected it to various scientific studies, large percentages of the population have been left uninformed scientifically and have responded to the phenomena quite differently. The technical and scientific aspects of the earliest expedition, to Padang (Sumatra) in 1901, have recently been discussed at length.Two major solar eclipses, namely the 1926 and 1929, offered many scientific outputs as well as results on observations of societies: anthropology, demography, and culinary habits of the local inhabitants. Those days, science was the preserve of a few selected. To a certain degree, many old perceptions of on natural phenomena, with their ruling deities still lingered on. The purpose of this paper is to show the changing views of the endogenous population in particular after the government's massive efforts to enlighten the people and to empower the younger generations in comprehending natural phenomena. The great efforts of the Government of Indonesia's Institute of Sciences (LIPI) related to the June 1983 solar eclipse produced a dramatic change in the sense of appreciation of solar eclipse as a natural phenomenon in consequence of relative motions of the Sun, Moon and the Earth. It took however another five years, till the time of the great eclipse in 1988, to a full fruition in which younger generations as well as older ones abandoned almost completely the old views and embarked on the understanding the value of solar eclipse for science.

  13. Validation of the Eclipse AAA algorithm at extended SSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Amjad; Villarreal-Barajas, Eduardo; Brown, Derek; Dunscombe, Peter

    2010-06-08

    The accuracy of dose calculations at extended SSD is of significant importance in the dosimetric planning of total body irradiation (TBI). In a first step toward the implementation of electronic, multi-leaf collimator compensation for dose inhomogeneities and surface contour in TBI, we have evaluated the ability of the Eclipse AAA to accurately predict dose distributions in water at extended SSD. For this purpose, we use the Eclipse AAA algorithm, commissioned with machine-specific beam data for a 6 MV photon beam, at standard SSD (100 cm). The model was then used for dose distribution calculations at extended SSD (179.5 cm). Two sets of measurements were acquired for a 6 MV beam (from a Varian linear accelerator) in a water tank at extended SSD: i) open beam for 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 20 x 20 and 40 x 40 cm2 field sizes (defined at 179.5 cm SSD), and ii) identical field sizes but with a 1.3 cm thick acrylic spoiler placed 10 cm above the water surface. Dose profiles were acquired at 5 cm, 10 cm and 20 cm depths. Dose distributions for the two setups were calculated using the AAA algorithm in Eclipse. Confidence limits for comparisons between measured and calculated absolute depth dose curves and normalized dose profiles were determined as suggested by Venselaar et al. The confidence limits were within 2% and 2 mm for both setups. Extended SSD calculations were also performed using Eclipse AAA, commissioned with Varian Golden beam data at standard SSD. No significant difference between the custom commissioned and Golden Eclipse AAA was observed. In conclusion, Eclipse AAA commissioned at standard SSD can be used to accurately predict dose distributions in water at extended SSD for 6 MV open beams.

  14. Polar plumes dynamics observed during total solar eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczynski, K.; Bělík, M.; Marková, E.

    2010-12-01

    Following the successful observation of significant activity in the polar plume during the total solar eclipse in 2006, the analysis of the Sun's polar regions was also carried out in the images obtained in multi-station observations of the eclipse of 2008. In this work polar plumes showing similar although much less significant manifestation of the dynamics have been identified. The dynamics evolution rates have been obtained from comparing the pictures taken at different times. The results are compared with the corresponding phenomena observed in X-rays from the HINODE satellite.

  15. St. Benedict Sees the Light: Asam's Solar Eclipses as Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Roberta J. M.; Pasachoff, Jay M.

    During the Baroque period, artists worked in a style - encouraged by the Roman Catholic Church and the Council of Trent - that revealed the divine in natural forms and made religious experiences more accessible. Cosmas Damian Asam, painter and architect, and his brother Egid (Aegid) Quirin Asam, sculptor and stuccatore, were the principal exponents of eighteenth-century, southern-German religious decoration and architecture in the grand manner, the Gesamtkunstwerk. Cosmas Damian's visionary and ecstatic art utilized light, both physical and illusionistic, together with images of meteorological and astronomical phenomena, such as solar and lunar eclipses. This paper focuses on his representations of eclipses and demonstrates how Asam was galvanized by their visual, as well as metaphorical power and that he studied a number of them. He subsequently applied his observations in a series of paintings for the Benedictine order that become increasingly astronomically accurate and spiritually profound. From the evidence presented, especially in three depictions of St. Benedict's vision, the artist harnessed his observations to visualize the literary description of the miraculous event in the Dialogues of St. Gregory the Great, traditionally a difficult scene to illustrate, even for Albrecht Dürer. Asam painted the trio at Einsiedeln, Switzerland (1724-27); Kladruby, the Czech Republic (1725-27), where he captured the solar corona and the "diamond-ring effect"; and Weltenburg, Germany (1735), where he also depicted the diamond-ring effect at a total solar eclipse. We conclude that his visualizations were informed by his personal observations of the solar eclipses on 12 May 1706, 22 May 1724, and 13 May 1733. Asam may have also known the eclipse maps of Edmond Halley and William Whiston that were issued in advance. Astronomers did not start studying eclipses scientifically until the nineteenth century, making Asam's depictions all the more fascinating. So powerful was the

  16. Using Stellarium to cyber-observe the Great American Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prim, Ellie R.; Sitar, David J.

    2017-09-01

    The Great American Eclipse is over. Somewhat sad, is it not? Individuals who were unable to experience the event on August 21, 2017, can now cyber-observe the eclipse with Stellarium (http://www.stellarium.org). In the authors' opinion, it is fun and has many great applications in the classroom. In addition it is open source and available for Android, iOS, and Linux users. We here at Appalachian use it in our introductory astronomy labs for specific activities such as investigating coordinate systems, discovering differences between solar and sidereal days, as well as determining why your "astrological sign" is most often not your "astronomical sign."

  17. [Eclipse retinopathy : A case series after the partial solar eclipse on 20 March 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmeier, I; Helbig, H; Greslechner, R

    2017-01-01

    Solar retinopathy refers to damage to the central macula caused by exposure to intense solar radiation, most frequently observed after a solar eclipse. Description of the morphological changes in spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and the clinical course in patients with acute solar retinopathy. The study included a retrospective analysis of 12 eyes from 7 patients with solar retinopathy after the partial solar eclipse on 20 March 2015. Best corrected visual acuity, fundus changes and SD-OCT findings were analyzed. Out of the 7 patients 5 underwent treatment with 1 mg prednisolone per kg body weight. The average age of the patients was 30.1±13.1 years. Best corrected visual acuity was 0.65 at initial presentation. In the acute stage all affected eyes showed a small yellowish lesion in the centre of the fovea in the fundoscopic examination. In SD-OCT the continuity of all layers in the foveola appeared disrupted. In the follow-up examination these changes were partially resolved. After 2 months SD-OCT revealed a small defect of the ellipsoid zone. In one patient the defect could not be shown due to slightly excentric imaging sections. Best corrected visual acuity increased to 0.97. The SD-OCT is an appropriate tool to determine the exact localization of the site of damage and for follow-up examination in solar retinopathy. In the acute phase it shows a disruption of the continuity of all layers in the foveola. Despite good recovery of visual acuity a small central defect of the ellipsoid zone remains in the long term.

  18. New Close Binary Systems from the SDSS-I (Data Release Five) and the Search for Magnetic White Dwarfs in Cataclysmic Variable Progenitor Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestri, Nicole M; Hawley, Suzanne L; West, Andrew A; Schmidt, Gary D; Liebert, James; Szkody, Paula; Mannikko, Lee; Wolfe, Michael A; Barentine, J C; Brewington, Howard J; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurik; Long, Dan; Schneider, Donald P; Snedden, Stephanie A

    2007-01-01

    We present the latest catalog of more than 1200 spectroscopically-selected close binary systems observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey through Data Release Five. We use the catalog to search for magnetic white dwarfs in cataclysmic variable progenitor systems. Given that approximately 25% of cataclysmic variables contain a magnetic white dwarf, and that our large sample of close binary systems should contain many progenitors of cataclysmic variables, it is quite surprising that we find only two potential magnetic white dwarfs in this sample. The candidate magnetic white dwarfs, if confirmed, would possess relatively low magnetic field strengths (B_WD < 10 MG) that are similar to those of intermediate-Polars but are much less than the average field strength of the current Polar population. Additional observations of these systems are required to definitively cast the white dwarfs as magnetic. Even if these two systems prove to be the first evidence of detached magnetic white dwarf + M dwarf binaries, th...

  19. Anomalous ultraviolet line flux ratios in the cataclysmic variables 1RXSJ232953.9+062814, CE315, BZ UMa and EY Cyg observed with HST/STIS

    CERN Document Server

    Gänsicke, B T; De Martino, D; Beuermann, K; Long, K S; Sion, E M; Knigge, C; Marsh, T; Hubeny, I; G\\"ansicke, Boris T.; Szkody, Paula; Martino, Domitilla de; Beuermann, Klaus; Long, Knox S.; Sion, Edward M.; Knigge, Christian; Marsh, Tom; Hubeny, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    Brief HST/STIS spectroscopic snapshot exposures of the cataclysmic variables 1RXSJ232953.9+062814, CE315, BZ UMa and EY Cyg reveal very large NV/CIV line flux ratios, similar to those observed in AE Aqr. Such anomalous line flux ratios have so far been observed in 10 systems, and presumably reflect a different composition of the accreted material compared to the majority of cataclysmic variables. We discuss the properties of this small sample in the context of the recent proposal by Schenker et al. (2002) that a significant fraction of the present-day population of cataclysmic variables may have passed through a phase of thermal time-scale mass transfer.

  20. NON-THERMAL EMISSION FROM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES: IMPLICATIONS ON ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtech Šimon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the lines of evidence that some cataclysmic variables (CVs are the sources of non-thermal radiation. It was really observed in some dwarf novae in outburst, a novalike CV in the high state, an intermediate polar, polars, and classical novae (CNe during outburst. The detection of this radiation suggests the presence of highly energetic particles in these CVs. The conditions for the observability of this emission depend on the state of activity, and the system parameters. We review the processes and conditions that lead to the production of this radiation in various spectral bands, from gamma-rays including TeV emission to radio. Synchrotron and cyclotron emissions suggest the presence of strong magnetic fields in CV. In some CVs, e.g. during some dwarf nova outbursts, the magnetic field generated in the accretion disk leads to the synchrotron jets radiating in radio. The propeller effect or a shock in the case of the magnetized white dwarf (WD can lead to a strong acceleration of the particles that produce gamma-ray emission via pi0 decay; even Cherenkov radiation is possible. In addition, a gamma-ray production via pi0 decay was observed in the ejecta of an outburst of a symbiotic CN. Nuclear reactions during thermonuclear runaway in the outer layer of the WD undergoing CN outburst lead to the production of radioactive isotopes; their decay is the source of gamma-ray emission. The production of accelerated particles in CVs often has episodic character with a very small duty cycle; this makes their detection and establishing the relation of the behavior in various bands difficult.