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Sample records for failure a pilot study

  1. Isolating the benefits of fluid restriction in patients with heart failure: A pilot study.

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    Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Smith, Andrew; Culler, Steven D; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2015-12-01

    Fluid restriction (FR) in persons with heart failure (HF) is often prescribed, yet self-regulation and the troublesome symptom of thirst are difficult for patients to manage. The purpose of this pilot study was to test an educational and behavioral intervention (EBI) on adherence with prescribed FR and outcome measures of fluid congestion, symptom distress, and health related quality of life (HRQL). Secondary aims were to describe the relationships between self-reported and objectively measured determinants of fluid status and symptoms, and assess the psychometric properties of piloted instruments, and intervention effect sizes. NYHA Class II-IV (n=25, 44-83 years, 56% male, 20% minority, mean EF 23.0+11.7%) participants were randomized to the EBI or attention control (AC) and evaluated at baseline, 3 and 6 months. EBI patients trended toward decreasing fluid ingestion (p=0.08), experienced less HF symptom frequency (p=0.13) and severity (p=0.06), and increased symptoms of thirst (pfluid congestion between groups. These outcomes suggest that patients receiving the EBI drank slightly less fluid, experienced less typical HF symptoms, greater thirst distress and stable HRQOL. Moderate to large effect sizes for the measures used were observed, and outcomes suggest that a randomized trial of various levels of FR would not potentiate fluid congestion but should specifically address preservation of HRQOL and thirst symptoms. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  2. Lifestyle modification with diet and exercise in obese patients with heart failure - A pilot study

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    There is a paucity of data regarding intentional weight loss in obese heart failure patients. This study sought to ascertain the safety and effectiveness of a lifestyle modification program in patients with systolic heart failure and metabolic syndrome. Patients (n=20) with systolic heart failure (e...

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation program in patients with Chagas heart failure: a single-arm pilot study

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    Mauro Felippe Felix Mediano

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The benefit of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR program for patients with Chagas heart failure (CHF remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of CR for CHF patients. METHODS: A single-arm pilot study, including 12 patients with CHF, was performed. Patients participated in an 8-month physical exercise intervention, comprising aerobic, strength, and stretching exercises (3 times per week, 60 minutes per session. Nutritional and pharmaceutical counseling were also performed. Functional capacity (cardiopulmonary exercise test, muscle respiratory strength (manovacuometry, and body composition (anthropometry and skinfolds were evaluated at baseline, and after 4 and 8 months of intervention. Cardiac function (echocardiography, biomarkers (lipid profile, glucose, and glycated hemoglobin and quality of life (Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire were assessed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. RESULTS: Seven of 12 patients included in the study completed the 8-month follow-up period. Only 2 moderate adverse events occurred during the exercise training. Functional capacity improved after 4 months of CR, while left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and respiratory strength improved after 8 months. Patients with right ventricular (RV dysfunction at baseline exhibited an improvement in functional capacity after 4 months, and improvements in left ventricular (LV diastolic pressure, respiratory strength, and quality of life at the end of follow-up. Conversely, those with normal baseline RV function demonstrated LVEF increases that were not observed in patients with RV dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: CR was feasible, safe, and has important clinical benefits for patients with CHF, specifically for cardiac function and muscle respiratory strength.

  4. Development of self-care educational material for patients with heart failure in Japan: a pilot study.

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    Kato, Naoko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Sano, Miho; Seki, Satomi; Kogure, Asuka; Kobukata, Kihoko; Ochiai, Ryota; Wakita, Sanae; Kazuma, Keiko

    2012-06-01

    This study assessed the need for information regarding heart failure and self-care, developed self-care educational material, and investigated the feasibility of the material. A total of 22 hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 63 years) completed a self-administered questionnaire. We found that more than 90% of patients desired information, particularly about heart failure symptoms, time to notify healthcare providers, prognosis, and exercise/physical activity. After examining the eight existing brochures for Japanese heart failure patients, we developed self-care educational material. This was based on heart failure guidelines and on the results of our inquiry regarding information needs. Finally, a pilot study was conducted in nine hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 57 years). None of the patients had difficulty reading or understanding the educational material. The self-administrated questionnaire survey revealed that comprehension of the following improved after the educational sessions with the material: heart failure symptoms, medication, weighing, sodium intake, and fluid intake (P study suggests that the material was readable and had a beneficial effect on heart failure comprehension. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Different acute cardiovascular stress in response to resistance exercise leading to failure versus not to failure in elderly women with and without hypertension--a pilot study.

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    Tajra, Vitor; Vieira, Denis C L; Tibana, Ramires A; Teixeira, Tatiane G; Silva, Alessandro O; Farias, Darlan L; Nascimento, Dahan da C; de Sousa, Nuno M F; Willardson, Jeffrey; Prestes, Jonato

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of resistance exercise (RE) leading to failure versus not to failure on 24-h blood pressure (BP) and rate-pressure product (RPP) responses in normotensive and hypertensive trained elderly women. Seven normotensive women and seven women with medically documented hypertension randomly performed three experimental sessions: (i) a non-exercise control session that involved 30 min of seated rest, (ii) whole body RE leading to failure that involved three sets with an eight repetitions maximum (8RM) load and (iii) whole body RE not to failure that involved three sets with 70% of an 8RM load. Systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP) and mean BP (MBP) responses during each hour of sleep and awake states were measured. Results of all subjects revealed that the RPP was higher (P ≤ 0.05) during afternoon and night hours after the RE session leading to failure versus not to failure and the non-exercise control session. For the hypertensive group during the night hours, SBP remained higher after the RE session not to failure (P = 0.047) versus non-exercise control session. For the normotensive group, DBP remained higher after the RE session leading to failure over the 24-h period (approximately 8 mmHg h(-1), P = 0.044) and the period upon awaking (approximately 5 mmHg h(-1), P = 0.044) versus the hypertensive group. The normotensive elderly women of this pilot study presented a greater cardiovascular response to RE leading to failure, as a consequence of the higher training intensity. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Patient engagement with a mobile web-based telemonitoring system for heart failure self-management: a pilot study.

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    Zan, Shiyi; Agboola, Stephen; Moore, Stephanie A; Parks, Kimberly A; Kvedar, Joseph C; Jethwani, Kamal

    2015-04-01

    Intensive remote monitoring programs for congestive heart failure have been successful in reducing costly readmissions, but may not be appropriate for all patients. There is an opportunity to leverage the increasing accessibility of mobile technologies and consumer-facing digital devices to empower patients in monitoring their own health outside of the hospital setting. The iGetBetter system, a secure Web- and telephone-based heart failure remote monitoring program, which leverages mobile technology and portable digital devices, offers a creative solution at lower cost. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of using the iGetBetter system for disease self-management in patients with heart failure. This was a single-arm prospective study in which 21 ambulatory, adult heart failure patients used the intervention for heart failure self-management over a 90-day study period. Patients were instructed to take their weight, blood pressure, and heart rate measurements each morning using a WS-30 bluetooth weight scale, a self-inflating blood pressure cuff (Withings LLC, Issy les Moulineaux, France), and an iPad Mini tablet computer (Apple Inc, Cupertino, CA, USA) equipped with cellular Internet connectivity to view their measurements on the Internet. Outcomes assessed included usability and satisfaction, engagement with the intervention, hospital resource utilization, and heart failure-related quality of life. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize data, and matched controls identified from the electronic medical record were used as comparison for evaluating hospitalizations. There were 20 participants (mean age 53 years) that completed the study. Almost all participants (19/20, 95%) reported feeling more connected to their health care team and more confident in performing care plan activities, and 18/20 (90%) felt better prepared to start discussions about their health with their doctor. Although heart failure-related quality of life

  7. Design and Usability of a Heart Failure mHealth System: A Pilot Study.

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    Alnosayan, Nagla; Chatterjee, Samir; Alluhaidan, Ala; Lee, Edward; Houston Feenstra, Linda

    2017-03-24

    Despite the advances in mobile health (mHealth) systems, little is known about patients' and providers' experiences using a new mHealth system design. This study aimed to understand challenges and provide design considerations for a personalized mHealth system that could effectively support heart failure (HF) patients after they transition into the home environment. Following exploratory interviews with nurses and preventive care physicians, an mHealth system was developed. Patients were asked to measure their weight, blood pressure, and blood glucose (if they had diabetes). They were also instructed to enter symptoms, view notifications, and read messages on a mobile app that we developed. A Bluetooth-enabled weight scale, blood pressure monitor, glucometer, and mobile phone was provided after an introductory orientation and training session. HF nurses used a dashboard to view daily measurements for each patient and received text and email alerts when risk was indicated. Observations of usage, cases of deterioration, readmissions, and metrics related to system usability and quality of life outcomes were used to determine overall effectiveness of the system, whereas focus group sessions with patients were conducted to elicit participants' feedback on the system's design. A total of 8 patients with HF participated over a 6-month period. Overall, the mean users' satisfaction with the system ranked 73%, which was above average. Quality of life improvement was 3.6. Patients and nurses used the system on a regular basis and were able to successfully identify and manage 8 health deteriorations, of which 5 were completely managed remotely. Focus groups revealed that, on one hand, the system was beneficial and helped patients with: recording and tracking readings; receiving encouragement and reassurance from nurses; spotting and solving problems; learning from past experiences; and communication. On the other hand, findings also highlighted design issues and

  8. Hijama improves overall quality of life in chronic renal failure patients: A pilot study.

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    Bilal, Muhammad; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Danial, Khurram

    2015-09-01

    Present study assesses the therapeutic effectiveness of Hijama (blood letting) inpatients of chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis for past several years with almost no urinary output.24 patients from Sindh Government Qatar Hospital Karachi were selected randomly under going dialysis 2-3 times/week for an average of 3 years under supervision of Dr. Khurram Danial, in-charge nephrologist at dialysis Centre Sindh Government Qatar Hospital Karachi after the written consent from patients. Each patient was subjected to Hijama session once a week after dialysis for a period of one year in a nearby hospital Aligarh Shifa with the consent of the ethical committee of the hospital. Serum urea, creatinine, complete blood count and electrolytes were determined prior to Hijama as baseline values and were again recorded on monthly basis for twelve months of Hijama sessions. The patient's feedback regarding quality of life after each Hijama session shows that almost all the patients reported a significant recovery from severe fatigue which they used to face during the interval between the dialysis sessions. There was significant recovery in all patients from anorexia and insomnia with the improvement in quality of life as compared to patients not undergoing Hijama. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures were shifted towards normal in almost all patients after Hijama. Serum Creatinine level was declined significantly, while electrolyte and hematological parameters were also improved significantly. The hemoglobin of all patients undergoing Hijama was maintained near normal without any blood transfusion, which was frequently needed in patients not undergoing Hijama sessions. There was insignificant improvement in Urinary output in 2 out of 24 patients. Results of the present study suggest that Hijama may be performed safely in patients of chronic renal failure on dialysis with overall improvement in quality of life, since there was reduction in fatigue, improvement in

  9. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Selection of Blastocysts for Repeated Implantation Failure Treatment: A Pilot Study

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    Greco, Ermanno; Bono, Sara; Ruberti, Alessandra; Lobascio, Anna Maria; Greco, Pierfrancesco; Biricik, Anil; Spizzichino, Letizia; Greco, Alessia; Tesarik, Jan; Minasi, Maria Giulia; Fiorentino, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if the use of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and transfer of a single euploid blastocyst in patients with repeated implantation failure (RIF) can improve clinical results. Three patient groups are compared: 43 couples with RIF for whom embryos were selected by array CGH (group RIF-PGS), 33 couples with the same history for whom array CGH was not performed (group RIF NO PGS), and 45 good prognosis infertile couples with array CGH selected embryos (group NO RIF PGS). A single euploid blastocyst was transferred in groups RIF-PGS and NO RIF PGS. Array CGH was not performed in group RIF NO PGS in which 1-2 blastocysts were transferred. One monoembryonic sac with heartbeat was found in 28 patients of group RIF PGS and 31 patients of group NO RIF PGS showing similar clinical pregnancy and implantation rates (68.3% and 70.5%, resp.). In contrast, an embryonic sac with heartbeat was only detected in 7 (21.2%) patients of group RIF NO PGS. In conclusion, PGS by array CGH with single euploid blastocyst transfer appears to be a successful strategy for patients with multiple failed IVF attempts. PMID:24779011

  10. Investigation of Pathogenic Genes in Peri-Implantitis from Implant Clustering Failure Patients: A Whole-Exome Sequencing Pilot Study

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    Lee, Soohyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Han, Dong-Hoo

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a frequently occurring gum disease linked to multi-factorial traits with various environmental and genetic causalities and no known concrete pathogenesis. The varying severity of peri-implantitis among patients with relatively similar environments suggests a genetic aspect which needs to be investigated to understand and regulate the pathogenesis of the disease. Six unrelated individuals with multiple clusterization implant failure due to severe peri-implantitis were chosen for this study. These six individuals had relatively healthy lifestyles, with minimal environmental causalities affecting peri-implantitis. Research was undertaken to investigate pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis albeit with a small number of subjects and incomplete elimination of environmental causalities. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on collected saliva samples via self DNA collection kit. Common variants with minor allele frequencies (MAF) > = 0.05 from all control datasets were eliminated and variants having high and moderate impact and loss of function were used for comparison. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to reveal functional groups associated with the genetic variants. 2,022 genes were left after filtering against dbSNP, the 1000 Genomes East Asian population, and healthy Korean randomized subsample data (GSK project). 175 (p-value implant failure. This result may demonstrate the feasibility of and provide pilot data for a larger research project aimed at discovering biomarkers for early diagnosis of peri-implantitis. PMID:24921256

  11. A pilot study of angiogenin in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a novel potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis?

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    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Ying; Liu, Ming; Jin, Xuejuan; Zhang, Peipei; Yu, Peng; Zhang, Shuning; Zhu, Hongmin; Chen, Ruizhen; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2014-11-01

    Characteristics of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) have not yet been fully understood. The objectives of this pilot study are to detect protein expression profile in the sera of HFPEF patients, and to identify potential biomarkers for the disease. Five hundred and seven proteins were detected in the sera of healthy volunteers and patients with either HFPEF or hypertension using antibody microarrays (three in each group). The results showed that the serum concentrations of 17 proteins (e.g. angiogenin, activin A and artemin) differed considerably between HFPEF and non-HFPEF patients (hypertensive patients and healthy controls), while a protein expression pattern distinct from that in non-HFPEF patients was associated with HFPEF patients. The up-regulation of angiogenin in both HFPEF patients with LVEF ≥50% (P = 0.004) and a subset of HFPEF patients with LVEF = 41-49% (P HFPEF patients and 16 healthy controls. Meanwhile, angiogenin distinguished HFPEF patients from controls with a mean area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.88 (P HFPEF patients were positively correlated with Lg(N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, NT-proBNP) (P HFPEF.

  12. Investigation of pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis from implant clustering failure patients: a whole-exome sequencing pilot study.

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    Soohyung Lee

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis is a frequently occurring gum disease linked to multi-factorial traits with various environmental and genetic causalities and no known concrete pathogenesis. The varying severity of peri-implantitis among patients with relatively similar environments suggests a genetic aspect which needs to be investigated to understand and regulate the pathogenesis of the disease. Six unrelated individuals with multiple clusterization implant failure due to severe peri-implantitis were chosen for this study. These six individuals had relatively healthy lifestyles, with minimal environmental causalities affecting peri-implantitis. Research was undertaken to investigate pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis albeit with a small number of subjects and incomplete elimination of environmental causalities. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on collected saliva samples via self DNA collection kit. Common variants with minor allele frequencies (MAF > = 0.05 from all control datasets were eliminated and variants having high and moderate impact and loss of function were used for comparison. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to reveal functional groups associated with the genetic variants. 2,022 genes were left after filtering against dbSNP, the 1000 Genomes East Asian population, and healthy Korean randomized subsample data (GSK project. 175 (p-value <0.05 out of 927 gene sets were obtained via GSEA (DAVID. The top 10 was chosen (p-value <0.05 from cluster enrichment showing significance of cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and metal ion binding. Network analysis was applied to find relationships between functional clusters. Among the functional groups, ion metal binding was located in the center of all clusters, indicating dysfunction of regulation in metal ion concentration might affect cell morphology or cell adhesion, resulting in implant failure. This result may demonstrate the feasibility of and provide pilot data for a larger research

  13. Specific Metabolome Profile of Exhaled Breath Condensate in Patients with Shock and Respiratory Failure: A Pilot Study

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    Brice Fermier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shock includes different pathophysiological mechanisms not fully understood and remains a challenge to manage. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC may contain relevant biomarkers that could help us make an early diagnosis or better understand the metabolic perturbations resulting from this pathological situation. Objective: we aimed to establish the metabolomics signature of EBC from patients in shock with acute respiratory failure in a pilot study. Material and methods: We explored the metabolic signature of EBC in 12 patients with shock compared to 14 controls using LC-HRMS. We used a non-targeted approach, and we performed a multivariate analysis based on Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA to differentiate between the two groups of patients. Results: We optimized the procedure of EBC collection and LC-HRMS detected more than 1000 ions in this fluid. The optimization of multivariate models led to an excellent model of differentiation for both groups (Q2 > 0.4 after inclusion of only 6 ions. Discussion and conclusion: We validated the procedure of EBC collection and we showed that the metabolome profile of EBC may be relevant in characterizing patients with shock. We performed well in distinguishing these patients from controls, and the identification of relevant compounds may be promising for ICC patients.

  14. Lactate levels as a marker of tissue hypoperfusion in acute heart failure patients seen in the emergency department: a pilot study

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    Kori Sauser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute heart failure (AHF may lead to subclinical tissue ischemia due to hypoperfusion from inadequate forward flow or congestion. The aim of the present study is to test whether lactate levels are elevated in emergency department (ED patients with AHF. A prospective pilot study of ED AHF patients was conducted. Venous lactate level was measured at baseline and 6-12 hours after initial draw. Of the 50 patients enrolled, mean age was 65.3 years, 68% were male. Only 7 (14% had an elevated lactate on either draw, with no differences in baseline characteristics between patients with and without elevated lactate. Patients with an elevated lactate had a higher mean heart rate (99 vs 81, P=0.03 and trended toward an increased rate of abnormal initial temperature (57 vs 23%, P=0.06. In this pilot study, only a minority of acute HF patients had an elevated lactate on presentation.

  15. submitter CXCL$_{10}$ Is a Circulating Inflammatory Marker in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure: a Pilot Study

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    Altara, Raffaele; Hessel, Marleen H; Gu, Yumei; van Vark, Laura C; Akkerhuis, K Martijn; Staessen, Jan A; Struijker-Boudier, Harry A J; Booz, George W; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are involved in the remodeling of the heart; however, their significance as biomarkers in heart failure is unknown. We observed that circulating CXCR3 receptor chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in a rat model of heart failure were increased 1 week after myocardial infarction. CXCL10 was also increased in both remote and infarcted regions of the heart and remained elevated at 16 weeks; CXCL9 was elevated in the remote area at 1 week. In humans, hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that circulating CXCL10, MIP-1α, and CD40 ligand were the best indicators for differentiating healthy and heart failure subjects. Serum CXCL10 levels were increased in patients with symptomatic heart failure as indexed by NYHA classification II through IV. The presence of CXCL10, MIP-1α, and CD40 ligand appears to be dominant in patients with advanced heart failure. These findings identify a distinct profile of inflammatory mediators in heart failure patients

  16. Interleukin-1 Blockade in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

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    Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Abouzaki, Nayef A; Oddi Erdle, Claudia; Carbone, Salvatore; Trankle, Cory R; Melchior, Ryan D; Turlington, Jeremy S; Thurber, Clinton J; Christopher, Sanah; Dixon, Dave L; Fronk, Daniel T; Thomas, Christopher S; Rose, Scott W; Buckley, Leo F; Dinarello, Charles A; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure is an inflammatory disease. Patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) exhibit significant inflammatory activity on admission. We hypothesized that Interleukin-1 blockade, with anakinra (Kineret, Swedish Orphan Biovitrum), would quench the acute inflammatory response in patients with ADHF. We randomized 30 patients with ADHF, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (Interleukin-1 blockade with anakinra reduces the systemic inflammatory response in patients with ADHF. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this anti-inflammatory effect translates into improved clinical outcomes.

  17. Pocket-sized ultrasound examination of fluid imbalance in patients with heart failure: a pilot and feasibility study of heart failure nurses without prior experience of ultrasonography.

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    Gustafsson, Mikael; Alehagen, Urban; Johansson, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Detecting fluid imbalance in patients with chronic heart failure can be challenging. Use of a pocket-sized ultrasound device (PSUD) in addition to physical examination can be helpful to assess this important information. To evaluate the feasibility for nurses without prior experience of ultrasonography to examine fluid imbalance by the use of a PSUD on heart failure patients. Four heart failure nurses and an expert cardiologist participated. The nurses underwent a four-hour PSUD training programme. One hundred and four heart failure outpatients were included. The examinations obtained information of pulmonary congestion, pleural effusion and the diameter of the vena cava inferior. Examinations took nine minutes on average. In 28% and 14% of the patients, pulmonary congestion and pleural effusion respectively were found by the nurses. The sensitivities and specificities for nurses' findings were 79% and 91%, and, 88% and 93% respectively. The inter-operator agreement between the nurses and the cardiologist reached a substantial level (kappa values: 0.71 and 0.66). The inter-operator agreement for vena cava inferior reached a fair level (kappa value=0.39). Bland-Altman plots of the level of agreement revealed a mean difference of vena cava inferior diameter of 0.11 cm, while the 95% lower and upper limits ranged from -0.78 cm to 1.00 cm. After brief training, heart failure nurses can reliably identify pulmonary congestion and pleural effusion with a PSUD. Assessment of vena cava inferior was less valid. PSUD readings, when added to the history and a physical examination, can improve nurse assessment of fluid status in patients with heart failure. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  18. miR-142-3p as a biomarker of blastocyst implantation failure - A pilot study

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    Borges Jr., Edson; Setti, Amanda Souza; Braga, Daniela P.A.F.; Geraldo, Murilo V; Figueira, Rita de Cássia S; Iaconelli Jr, Assumpto

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to find whether microRNAs (miRNAs) detected in the culture medium of embryos produced in vitro could be potential biomarkers of embryo implantation. Methods Culture media samples from 36 embryos, derived from patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in a private university-affiliated IVF center, were collected between January/2015 and November/2015. Samples were collected on day three and embryo transfers were performed on day five and all embryos reached the blastocyst stage. Samples were split into groups according to the embryo implantation result: Positive-Implantation-Group (n=18) or Negative-Implantation-Group (n=18). For the first analysis, samples were pooled in three sets for each group (6-7 spent media per pool). MicroRNAs were extracted from spent media and cDNA was synthesized. C. elegans miR-39 was used as RNA spike-in to normalize the gene expression analysis. The expression of microRNAs into the spent media from the Positive-Implantation-Group was compared with those from the Negative-Implantation-Group. A set of seven miRNAs (miR-21, miR-142-3p, miR-19b, miR-92a, miR-20b, miR-125a and miR148a) selected according with the literature, was tested. To check whether miRNAs could be detected in individual samples of culture media, in a second analysis, ten more samples were tested for miR-21 and miR-142-3p. Results From the sevens tested miRNAs, a significant increased expression of miR-142-3p could be noted in the Negative-Implantation-Group (P<0.001). For other three miRNAs (miR-21, miR-19b and miR-92a) a difference in expression was observed, however it did not reach a statistical significance. In addition, when ten non-redundant samples were tested to check if miRNAs could be detected in individual samples of culture media, the highly specific amplification of mature miRNAs, including miR-142-3p, could be noted. Conclusion Our findings suggest that miR-142-3p, previously described as a tumor suppressor and

  19. Health locus of control and the sense of self-efficacy in patients with systolic heart failure: a pilot study.

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    Rydlewska, Agnieszka; Krzysztofik, Justyna; Libergal, Julia; Rybak, Agata; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of heart failure (HF) requires the lifelong adherence to medical self-care regimes. The objective of this study was to examine health-control beliefs and the sense of self-efficacy (psychological features particularly important for efficient compliance among patients suffering from chronic diseases) in patients with systolic HF in relation to clinical status and depressive symptoms. Sixty-six consecutive patients with chronic systolic HF, hospitalized in the Centre for Heart Diseases, Military Hospital (94% men, age: 61 ± 11 years, ischemic etiology: 63%, left ventricular ejection fraction: 32% ± 12%), filled in (during their hospital stay): (1) the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale measuring three possible localizations of health control: "internality" (ie, the belief that health status depends only on personal decisions and behaviors); "powerful others externality" ([PHLC subscale] ie, the conviction that health depends on "powerful people" such as doctors, family members, close friends), and "chance externality" (ie, belief that health status is determined by chance, fate, or luck), and (2) the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. The results obtained by HF patients were compared to those reported by patients with other chronic diseases and healthy subjects. In patients with HF, internality was similar to values obtained by patients with diabetes, men after myocardial infarction, and women after mastectomy; and was lower than in healthy subjects. Powerful others externality was more pronounced in patients with HF as compared to other groups of patients and healthy people. Only women after mastectomy had higher scores of PHLC. In patients with HF, chance externality was similar to values reported in patients with renal failure, men after myocardial infarction, and women after mastectomy; and was less pronounced than in healthy subjects. The majority (77%) of patients with HF were characterized by a high sense of self-efficacy (>the 7th sten

  20. Health locus of control and the sense of self-efficacy in patients with systolic heart failure: a pilot study

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    Rydlewska A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Agnieszka Rydlewska,1,2 Justyna Krzysztofik,3 Julia Libergal,3 Agata Rybak,3 Waldemar Banasiak,1 Piotr Ponikowski,1,2 Ewa A Jankowska1,21Centre for Heart Diseases, Department of Cardiology, Military Hospital, Wroclaw, Poland; 2Department of Heart Diseases, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 3Student’s Scientific Organization, Laboratory for Applied Research on Cardiovascular System, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, PolandBackground: Treatment of heart failure (HF requires the lifelong adherence to medical self-care regimes. The objective of this study was to examine health-control beliefs and the sense of self-efficacy (psychological features particularly important for efficient compliance among patients suffering from chronic diseases in patients with systolic HF in relation to clinical status and depressive symptoms.Subjects and methods: Sixty-six consecutive patients with chronic systolic HF, hospitalized in the Centre for Heart Diseases, Military Hospital (94% men, age: 61 ± 11 years, ischemic etiology: 63%, left ventricular ejection fraction: 32% ± 12%, filled in (during their hospital stay: (1 the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale measuring three possible localizations of health control: “internality” (ie, the belief that health status depends only on personal decisions and behaviors; “powerful others externality” ([PHLC subscale] ie, the conviction that health depends on “powerful people” such as doctors, family members, close friends, and “chance externality” (ie, belief that health status is determined by chance, fate, or luck, and (2 the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. The results obtained by HF patients were compared to those reported by patients with other chronic diseases and healthy subjects.Results: In patients with HF, internality was similar to values obtained by patients with diabetes, men after myocardial infarction, and women after mastectomy; and was lower than in healthy

  1. Heart rate variability and n-3 fatty acids in patients with chronic renal failure--a pilot study.

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    Christensen, J H; Aarøe, J; Knudsen, N; Dideriksen, K; Kornerup, H J; Dyerberg, J; Schmidt, E B

    1998-02-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) often have autonomic cardiac dysfunction, which can be assessed by measuring heart rate variability (HRV). This dysfunction prediposes the patients to sudden cardiac death. This study describes 24-hour HRV in patients with CRF compared to HRV in patients with a previous myocardial infarction (MI). Furthermore, associations between HRV in patients with CRF and the content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in cell membranes were examined, because n-3 PUFA may improve HRV. Twenty-nine patients with CRF treated with dialysis were enrolled. A 24-hour Holter recording was obtained at baseline and the HRV variables, RR (= mean of all normal RR intervals during the 24-hour recording) and SDNN (= standard deviation of all normal RR intervals in the entire 24-hour recording) were analyzed. Also, granulocyte fatty acid composition was determined. The patients were allocated to dietary supplementation with either 5.2 g of n-3 PUFA or a placebo oil (olive oil) daily for 12 weeks in a double-blind design. At the end of the supplementation period the Holter recording and blood sampling were repeated. At baseline the CRF patients' mean SDNN ws 86 ms compared to 118 ms (p < 0.01) in patients with a previous MI. After supplementation with either n-3 PUFA or placebo a highly significant correlation was observed between the content of n-3 PUFA in cell membranes and HRV (r = 0.71, p < 0.01). Furthermore, when the patients were dichotomized according to their mean SDNN, it was found, that those with the highest SDNN had a higher content of n-3 PUFA in cell membranes compared to those with the lowest SDNN (7.8% vs 4.2%, p < 0.05). In conclusion, HRV was decreased in CRF patients indicating a cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. The positive correlation between the n-3 PUFA content in cell membranes and HRV suggests that the effects of an increased intake of n-3 PUFA in CRF patients should be further studied.

  2. Simple platelet markers: Mean platelet volume and congestive heart failure coexistent with periodontal disease. Pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniuk, Maciej R; Bartoszewicz, Zbigniew; Dudzik-Niewiadomska, Iwona; Pilecki, Tomasz; Górska, Renata; Filipiak, Krzysztof J

    2017-07-17

    Conducted pilot study concerning mean platelet volume parameter among patients suffering from congestive heart failure and periodontal disease. Examination of dynamic changes of platelet and periodontal markers in group of 50 patients before and an average of 6 months subsequent to professional periodontal treatment. Both platelet and periodontal parameters decreased after periodontal treatment, what is more, the decrease of mean platelet volume (MPV) value due to periodontal disease/mm improvement was shown to be statistically significant (p = 0.05). Improvement of periodontal status may influence decrease of MPV value andincrease of congestive heart failure treatment efficacy and effect patient comfort. It is a new, not frequently used pattern of chronic disease treatment optimalization.

  3. Paraguayan Education Study: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia

    A qualitative pilot study, guided by an ecological framework, illustrates the complexities involved in studying the unique linguistic situation in Paraguay between Spanish and the indigenous language of Guarani, and its relationship with education. The pilot study interviewing eight kindergarten children. Seventy five children have been…

  4. A phase 4, single-arm, open-label, pilot study of maraviroc, raltegravir and darunavir/r in HIV-1 adults with triple class failure: TERCETO study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Patterson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this phase 4, single-arm, open-label study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, efficacy, antiviral and immunological activity of maraviroc (MVC in combination with raltegravir (RGV and darunavir/r (DRV/r in adult HIV-1 infected patients (pts with limited treatment options. HIV-1 pts with documented virologic triple class failure or multi-drug class resistance defined as the presence of Q151 complex, 69 insertion complex and/or≥3 TAMs for NRTIs and K103N, G190S+Y181C or Y188L mutants for NNRTIs and≥3 RAMs (L10F/I/R/V; M46I/L; I54V/M/L; V82A/F/T/S; I84V; L90M for protease inhibitors (PIs were offered a triple drug regimen consisting of MVC 150 mg BID, RGV 400 mg BID and DRV/r 600/100 mg BID. Safety, lipid profile and virologic efficacy were evaluated at week 4, 12, 24, 36 and 48. Between January 2010 and March 2012, 27 pts were enrolled. Screening failure rate was 52% due to undetectable viral load (pVL or non R5 tropism type (Trofile™. Despite being heavily pre-treated pts, only 26% had negative tropism test at SCR. Baseline characteristics of 13 included pts were: 77% male, median age 43 years (IQR: 40.1–48.6, 38% had a prior AIDS-defining condition. Median BSL pVL was 23,350 cps/mL (4.4 log10 (IQR: 11,236–55,785 and median CD4 was 222 cells/mm3 (IQR: 179–318. Median time on NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs were 10.7 (8.6–13.7, 1.7 (1.3–7.6 and 5.4 (4.7–10 years respectively. Pts had received a median of 2 PIs (IQR: 2–3. 8/13 pts showed thymidine analogue-associated mutations (TAMs, and≥2 were present in 5/13. Detectable NNRTI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs were present in 10/13 patients. 9/13 had≥4 primary PI RAMs. At 48 weeks, 2 pts had discontinued therapy (OIs related death (cryptococcal meningitis=1, withdrawn from the study on W36 due to blips despite not achieving criteria for virologic failure=1 and the remaining pts (11/13 achieved undetectable pVL and increased CD4 in 133 cell/mm3 from BSL (IQR

  5. A randomized controlled pilot study of outcomes of strict allowance of fluid therapy in hyponatremic heart failure (SALT-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M; Nutter, Benjamin; Forney, Jennifer; Slifcak, Ellen; Tang, W H Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Currently, fluid restriction recommendations in heart failure (HF) are based on expert opinion. After implementing a 1,000-mL/d fluid restriction for 60 days after discharge, outcomes were examined. In a randomized controlled design, hyponatremic patients (serum sodium ≤137 mg/dL) received usual care (UC; n = 26) or 1,000 mL/d fluid restriction (n = 20) at discharge. Quality of life (QoL), thirst, difficulty following fluid recommendations, adherence to fluid restriction, HF emergency care, HF rehospitalization, and all-cause death were examined. Mean age was 62.8 ± 12.8 years; 46% were white. There were no differences by group in baseline demographics, comorbidities, and QoL, except that more UC patients had New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III/IV status (P = .019). Median [interquartile range] QoL scores were better in the 1,000 mL/d group for symptom burden (83.3 [68.8-91.7] vs 50 [29.2-79.2]; P = .018), total symptoms (77.1 [58.1-91.7] vs 54.2 [30.2-73.9]; P = .022), overall QoL summary (72.6 [52.2-86.3] vs 51.0 [37.7-68.5]; P = .038), and clinical QoL summary (75.5 [57.8-92.9] vs 59.1 [35.7-77.3]; P = .039). There were no group differences in thirst, difficulty adhering to fluid recommendations, adherence to fluid restriction, or health care consumption. The 1,000 mL/d fluid restriction led to improved QoL at 60 days after discharge. Future research in a larger more heterogeneous sample is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Failure to Improve Parameters of Lactose Maldigestion using the Multiprobiotic Product VSL3 in Lactose Maldigesters: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Yesovitch

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactose maldigestion is a common genetic trait in up to 70% of the world's population. In these subjects, the ingestion of lactose may lead to prebiotic effects which can be confirmed by measurement of breath hydrogen. After a period of continuous lactose ingestion, colonic bacterial adaptation is measurable as improved parameters of lactose digestion. There may be inherent benefits in this process of adaptation which may protect against some diseases. We attempt to link therapeutically beneficial probiotics (VSL3, Seaford Pharmaceuticals Inc, Ontario with improvement in parameters of lactose maldigestion. Two groups of five subjects with maldigestion were fed one or four packets of VSL3 (one packet containing 450x109 live bacteria before testing and then 17 days later. A 50 g lactose challenge was carried out before and after feeding. While there was a trend toward increasing rather than reducing of summed breath hydrogen, no statistically significant changes were observed between results from before testing and those from testing 17 days later. The authors conclude that direct consumption of the probiotic VSL3 may not improve parameters of lactose maldigestion without metabolic activation. In its present format, therefore, the test for colonic adaptation cannot be used to demonstrate direct bacterial embedding with VSL3.

  7. A study of airline pilot morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Adrian J; Larsen, Peter D; Griffiths, Robin F; Aldington, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    It has long been believed that airline pilots are healthier than the general population. There are a number of reasons why this should be the case. However, there is very little evidence to support this belief as fact. This study investigates the health of the pilot population of an Oceanic based airline compared to the health of the general population. Pilots who conducted their medical certificate renewal at the airline's medical unit between 1 November 2009 and 31 October 2010 were included. A medical questionnaire was completed by each pilot at the time of their medical certificate renewal. Data from the questionnaire was entered into a database as well as the pilot's BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, and blood glucose level. The comparison population was the population who completed the New Zealand Health Survey (NZHS) between 2006-2007. Demographic, lifestyle characteristics, and health status data from the pilots was compared to the NZHS using a Chi-squared test. Included in the study were 595 pilots. With respect to most medical conditions, pilots had a lower prevalence when compared to the general population. Pilots had a higher prevalence of kidney disease (3.3% vs 0.6%) and melanoma skin cancer (19 per 1000 vs 0.4 per 1000). This study suggests that pilots in New Zealand are healthier than the general population with respect to most medical conditions. The two medical conditions that were identified as being overrepresented in pilots may be the result of the occupational environment.

  8. Pilates in heart failure patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; d'Avila, Veridiana Moraes

    2012-12-01

    Conventional cardiac rehabilitation program consist of 15 min of warm-up, 30 min of aerobic exercise and followed by 15 min calisthenics exercise. The Pilates method has been increasingly applied for its therapeutic benefits, however little scientific evidence supports or rebukes its use as a treatment in patients with heart failure (HF). Investigate the effects of Pilates on exercise capacity variables in HF. Sixteen pts with HF, left ventricular ejection fraction 27 ± 14%, NYHA class I-II were randomly assigned to conventional cardiac rehabilitation program (n = 8) or mat Pilates training (n = 8) for 16 weeks of 30 min of aerobic exercise followed by 20 min of the specific program. At 16 weeks, pts in the mat Pilates group and conventional group showed significantly increase on exercise time 11.9 ± 2.5 to 17.8 ± 4 and 11.7 ± 3.9 to 14.2 ± 4 min, respectively. However, only the Pilates group increased significantly the ventilation (from 56 ± 20 to 69 ± 17 L/min, P = 0.02), peak VO(2) (from 20.9 ± 6 to 24.8 ± 6 mL/kg/min, P = 0.01), and O(2) pulse (from 11.9 ± 2 to 13.8 ± 3 mL/bpm, P = 0.003). The Pilates group showed significantly increase in peak VO(2) when compared with conventional group (24.8 ± 6 vs. 18.3 ± 4, P = 0.02). The result suggests that the Pilates method may be a beneficial adjunctive treatment that enhances functional capacity in patients with HF who are already receiving standard medical therapy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. EURObservational Research Programme: the Heart Failure Pilot Survey (ESC-HF Pilot)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggioni, Aldo P; Dahlström, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos;

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the new ESC-HF Pilot Survey was to describe the clinical epidemiology of outpatients and inpatients with heart failure (HF) and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across 12 participating European countries. This pilot study was specifically aimed at validating...... the structure, performance, and quality of the data set, for continuing the survey into a permanent registry....

  10. Superiority of transcutaneous CO2 over end-tidal CO2 measurement for monitoring respiratory failure in nonintubated patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermuzeaux, Mathilde; Meric, Henri; Sauneuf, Bertrand; Girard, Salomé; Normand, Hervé; Lofaso, Frédéric; Terzi, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Arterial blood gas measurement is frequently performed in critically ill patients to diagnose and monitor acute respiratory failure. At a given metabolic rate, carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) is entirely determined by CO2 elimination through ventilation. Transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PtcCO2) monitoring permits a noninvasive and continuous estimation of arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2). The accuracy of PtcCO2, however, has not been well studied. To assess the accuracy of different CO2 monitoring methods, we compared PtcCO2 and end-tidal CO2 concentration (EtCO2) to PaCO2 measurements in nonintubated intensive care unit (ICU) patients with acute respiratory failure. During a 2-month period, we conducted a prospective observational cohort study in 25 consecutive nonintubated and spontaneously breathing patients admitted to our ICU. Arterial blood gases were measured at study inclusion, 30, 60, and 120 minutes later. At each sampling time, EtCO2 was continuously monitored using a Philips Smart Capnoline Plus, and PtcCO2 was measured using was measured using SenTec device. The aim of the study was to assess agreement between PtcCO2 and PaCO2 and between EtCO2 and PaCO2 in nonintubated ICU patients with acute respiratory failure. Bland-Altman techniques and Pearson correlation coefficients were used. The differences over time (at 30, 60, and 120 minutes) between PaCO2 and EtCO2 and between PtcCO2 and PaCO2 were evaluated using 1-way analysis of variance. Transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide and PaCO2 were well correlated (R = 0.97), whereas the correlation between EtCO2 and PaCO2 was poor (R = 0.62) probably due to the presence of an alveolar dead space in a few patients, most notably in the group with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The difference over time remained stable for both PaCO2 vs EtCO2 (analysis of variance; P = .88) and PaCO2 vs PtcCO2 (P = .93). We found large differences between EtCO2 and Paco2 in spontaneously

  11. Novel echocardiographic approach to the accurate measurement of pulmonary vascular resistance based on a theoretical formula in patients with left heart failure -- pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Takashi; Fujita, Masashi; Iida, Osamu; Masuda, Masaharu; Okamoto, Shin; Ishihara, Takayuki; Nanto, Kiyonori; Shiraki, Tatsuya; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Sakata, Yasushi; Uematsu, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Several non-invasive methods for measuring pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) have been proposed to date, but they remain empirical, lacking sufficient accuracy to be used in clinical practice. The aims of this study were to propose a novel echocardiographic measurement of PVR based on a theoretical formula and investigate the feasibilty and accuracy of this method in patients with heart failure. Echocardiography was performed in 27 patients before right heart catheterization. Peak tricuspid regurgitation pressure gradient (TRPG), pulmonary regurgitation pressure gradient in end-diastole (PRPGed), and cardiac output derived from the time-velocity integral and the diameter in the left ventricular outflow tract (COLVOT) were measured. PVR based on a theoretical formula (PVRtheo) was calculated as (TRPG-PRPGed)/3COLVOTin Wood units (WU). The results were compared with PVR obtained by right heart catheterization (PVRcath) using linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis. Mean PVRcathwas 2.4±1.4 WU. PVRtheocorrelated well with PVRcath(r=0.83, P<0.001). On Bland-Altman analysis the mean difference was 0.1±0.7 WU. The limits of agreements were smaller than for other non-invasive estimations previously reported. The new echocardiographic approach based on a theoretical formula provides a non-invasive and accurate assessment of PVR in patients with heart failure.

  12. Development of a Burn Escharotomy Assessment Tool: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur, Rebecca; Holmes, James H; Johnson, James E; Molnar, Joseph A; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injuries can require escharotomies which are urgent, infrequent, and relatively high-risk procedures necessary to preserve limb perfusion and sometimes ventilation. The American Burn Association Advanced Burn Life Support© course educates surgeons and emergency providers about escharotomy incisions but lacks a biomimetic trainer to demonstrate, practice, or provide assessment. The goal was to build an affordable biomimetic trainer with discrete points of failure and pilot a validation study. Fellowship-trained burn and plastic surgeons worked with special effect artists and anatomists to develop a biomimetic trainer with three discrete points of failure: median or ulnar nerve injury, fasciotomy, and failure to check distal pulse. Participants were divided between experienced and inexperienced, survey pre- and post-procedure on a biomimetic model while being timed. The trainer total cost per participant was less than $35. Eighteen participants were involved in the study. The inexperienced (0-1 prior escharotomies performed) had significantly more violations at the discrete points of failure relative to more experienced participants (P = .036). Face validity was assessed with 100% of participants agreement that the model appeared similar to real life and was valuable in their training. Given the advancements in biomimetic models and the need to train surgeons in how to perform infrequent, emergent surgical procedures, an escharotomy trainer is needed today. The authors developed an affordable model with a successful pilot study demonstrating discrimination between experienced and inexperienced surgeons. Additional research is needed to increase the reliability and assessment metrics.

  13. Effects of IgM-enriched immunoglobulin therapy in septic-shock-induced multiple organ failure: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Ildiko; Mikor, Andras; Leiner, Tamas; Molnar, Zsolt; Bogar, Lajos; Szakmany, Tamas

    2013-08-01

    Mortality due to septic-shock-induced respiratory failure remains high. A recent meta-analysis suggested that IgM-enriched immunoglobulin treatment may be beneficial in these patients. In this prospective randomised controlled pilot study we investigated the effects of IgM-enriched immunoglobulin treatment in patients with early septic shock accompanied by severe respiratory failure. 33 patients were randomly allocated to receive 5 ml/kg (predicted body weight) IgM-enriched immunoglobulin (16 patients) or placebo (17 patients), respectively, via 8 h IV-infusion for three consecutive days. Daily Multiple Organ Dysfunction Scores (MODS) were calculated. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels were monitored daily. For statistical analysis two-way ANOVA was used. Daily MODS showed ongoing multiple system organ failure without significant resolution during the 8 days. Median length of ICU stay, mechanical ventilation, vasopressor support during the ICU stay and 28-day mortality were nearly identical in the two groups. Serum PCT levels showed no significant difference between the two groups, however, CRP levels were significantly lower in the IgM-enriched immunoglobulin group on days 4, 5 and 6, respectively. In this study the use of IgM-enriched immunoglobulin preparation failed to produce any improvement in the organ dysfunction as compared to standard sepsis therapy.

  14. Cardiac resynchronization therapy and bone marrow cell transplantation in patients with ischemic heart failure and electromechanical dyssynchrony: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokushalov, Evgeny; Romanov, Alexander; Corbucci, Giorgio; Prohorova, Darya; Chernyavsky, Alexander; Larionov, Petr; Terekhov, Igor; Artyomenko, Sergey; Kliver, Elena; Shirokova, Natalya; Karaskov, Alexander; Dib, Nabil

    2011-12-01

    Most studies have confirmed the beneficial effects of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMC) transplantation on angina, myocardial perfusion, regional wall motion, and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has also shown a beneficial effect in patients with heart failure (HF) and electrical/mechanical dyssynchrony. However, the relative contribution of BMMC and CRT in patients with ischemic HF and electromechanical dyssynchrony has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of combining BMMC transplantation with CRT in patients with severe ischemic HF, left bundle branch block (LBBB), and mechanical dyssynchrony. Patients with ischemic HF, LVEF < 35%, LBBB, and mechanical dyssynchrony underwent intramyocardial transplantation of BMMC and CRTD system implantation. This randomized, single-blind, crossover study compared clinical and echocardiographic parameters during two follow-up periods: 6 months of active CRT (BMMC + CRTact) and 6 months of inactive CRT (BMMC + CRTinact). Physical performance was assessed by means of a 6-min walking test. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by SPECT. Quality of Life (QoL) was assessed through the Minnesota Living with HF Questionnaire (MLwHFQ). Twenty-six patients (64 ± 7 years) were enrolled in the study. The distance covered by the patients during the 6-min walking test significantly increased in the BMMC + CRTinact phase (BMMC therapy only) in comparison with the baseline (269 ± 68 vs 206 ± 51; p = 0.007) and in the BMMC + CRTact phase (BMMC therapy + CRT) in comparison with the BMMC + CRTinact (378 ± 59 vs 269 ± 68; p < 0.001). The summed rest and stress score (SPECT) decreased significantly in the BMMC + CRTact and BMMC + CRTinact phases in comparison with the baseline (p ≤ 0.03). Both phases showed equivalent myocardial perfusion in the segments into which BMMC had been injected. QoL score was significantly lower in the BMMC

  15. Cytogenetics of jaw cysts - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Esther; Brennan, Peter A; Bodner, Lipa

    2012-07-01

    The pathogenesis of cysts that arise in the jaws is still not certain, and the underlying mechanisms of epithelial proliferation are not fully understood. Cysts of the jaw may involve a reactive, inflammatory, or neoplastic process. Cytogenetics, the study of the number and structure of chromosomes, has provided valuable information about the diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted treatment in many cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytogenetics can also provide information about the possible aetiology or neoplastic potential of a lesion, though to our knowledge no studies of this technique have been used for cysts in the jaws. In this pilot study we used cytogenetics in a series of 10 cysts (3 radicular, 4 dentigerous, 2 of the nasopalatine duct, and 1 dermoid). In all cases we found normal karyotypes. Further work and larger numbers are needed for a definitive study, but we can hypothesise from this pilot study that these cysts do not have cytogenetic aberrations and so have no neoplastic potential.

  16. Development and Pilot of a Checklist for Management of Acute Liver Failure in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren K Fix

    Full Text Available Acute liver failure (ALF is an ideal condition for use of a checklist. Our aims were to develop a checklist for the management of ALF in the intensive care unit (ICU and assess the usability of the checklist among multiple providers.The initial checklist was developed from published guidelines and expert opinion. The checklist underwent pilot testing at 11 academic liver transplant centers in the US and Canada. An anonymous, written survey was used to assess the usability and quality of the checklist. Written comments were used to improve the checklist following the pilot testing period.We received 81 surveys involving the management of 116 patients during the pilot testing period. The overall quality of the checklist was judged to be above average to excellent by 94% of users. On a 5-point Likert scale, the majority of survey respondents agreed or agreed strongly with the following checklist characteristics: the checklist was easy to read (99% agreed/agreed strongly, easy to use (97%, items are categorized logically (98%, time to complete the checklist did not interfere with delivery of appropriate and safe patient care (94% and was not excessively burdensome (92%, the checklist allowed the user the freedom to use his or her clinical judgment (80%, it is a useful tool in the management of acute liver failure (98%. Web-based and mobile apps were developed for use of the checklist at the point of care.The checklist for the management of ALF in the ICU was shown in this pilot study to be easy to use, helpful and accepted by a wide variety of practitioners at multiple sites in the US and Canada.

  17. Hazing in the Military: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    different. It is important not to assume they are the same in policy or treatment. A policy covering hazing may enable workplace bullying to go unnoticed...while an education program to reduce workplace bullying will not likely transfer to decrease hazing. HAZING IN THE MILITARY: A PILOT STUDY 3...however, it is also found in the adult workplace . Bullying behaviors, like hazing, may be psychological or physical in nature, vary in severity, and

  18. High-intensity interval training vs. moderate-intensity continuous exercise training in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Siddhartha S; Mookadam, Farouk; Lee, Chong D; Tucker, Wesley J; Haykowsky, Mark J; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2015-09-15

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Exercise training is an established adjuvant therapy in heart failure; however, the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in HFpEF are unknown. We compared the effects of HIIT vs. moderate-intensity aerobic continuous training (MI-ACT) on peak oxygen uptake (V̇o₂peak), left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, and endothelial function in patients with HFpEF. Nineteen patients with HFpEF (age 70 ± 8.3 yr) were randomized to either HIIT (4 × 4 min at 85-90% peak heart rate, with 3 min active recovery) or MI-ACT (30 min at 70% peak heart rate). Fifteen patients completed exercise training (HIIT: n = 9; MI-ACT: n = 6). Patients trained 3 days/wk for 4 wk. Before and after training patients underwent a treadmill test for V̇o₂peak determination, 2D-echocardiography for assessment of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) for assessment of endothelial function. HIIT improved V̇o₂peak (pre = 19.2 ± 5.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1); post = 21.0 ± 5.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1); P = 0.04) and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction grade (pre = 2.1 ± 0.3; post = 1.3 ± 0.7; P = 0.02), but FMD was unchanged (pre = 6.9 ± 3.7%; post = 7.0 ± 4.2%). No changes were observed following MI-ACT. A trend for reduced left atrial volume index was observed following HIIT compared with MI-ACT (-3.3 ± 6.6 vs. +5.8 ± 10.7 ml/m(2); P = 0.06). In HFpEF patients 4 wk of HIIT significantly improved V̇o₂peak and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. HIIT may provide a more robust stimulus than MI-ACT for early exercise training adaptations in HFpEF. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Fusion beat in patients with heart failure treated with left ventricular pacing: may ECG morphology relate to mechanical synchrony? A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassone Biagio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrical fusion between left ventricular pacing and spontaneous right ventricular activation is considered the key to resynchronisation in sinus rhythm patients treated with single-site left ventricular pacing. Aim Use of QRS morphology to optimize device programming in patients with heart failure (HF, sinus rhythm (SR, left bundle branch block (LBBB, treated with single-site left ventricular pacing. Methods and Results We defined the "fusion band" (FB as the range of AV intervals within which surface ECG showed an intermediate morphology between the native LBBB and the fully paced right bundle branch block patterns. Twenty-four patients were enrolled. Echo-derived parameters were collected in the FB and compared with the basal LBBB condition. Velocity time integral and ejection time did not improve significantly. Diastolic filling time, ejection fraction and myocardial performance index showed a statistically significant improvement in the FB. Interventricular delay and mitral regurgitation progressively and significantly decreased as AV delay shortened in the FB. The tissue Doppler asynchrony index (Ts-SD-12-ejection showed a non significant decreasing trend in the FB. The indications provided by the tested parameters were mostly concordant in that part of the FB corresponding to the shortest AV intervals. Conclusion Using ECG criteria based on the FB may constitute an attractive option for a safe, simple and rapid optimization of resynchronization therapy in patients with HF, SR and LBBB.

  20. Helicopter pilot back pain: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, D F; Reading, T E

    1984-02-01

    Because of the high prevalence of back pain experienced by U.S. Army helicopter pilots, a study was conducted to ascertain the feasibility of reproducing these symptoms in the laboratory. A mock-up of a UH-1H seat and control configuration was mounted to a multi-axis vibration simulator (MAVS). Eleven subjects were tested on the apparatus for two 120-min periods. During one period, the MAVS was programmed to reproduce vibrations recorded from a UH-1H in cruise flight. The subjects received no vibration during the other test period. All subjects reported back pain which they described as identical to the pain they experience during flight, during one or more of their test periods. There was no statistical difference between the vibration and nonvibration test conditions (p greater than 0.05) in terms of time of onset of pain or intensity of pain as measured by a visual analog scale. It appears the vibration at the frequencies and amplitudes tested plays little or no role in the etiology of the back symptoms reported by these pilots. It is proposed that the primary etiological factor for these symptoms is the poor posture pilots are obliged to assume for extended periods while operating helicopters.

  1. Ballet and stress. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, G; Casale, T; Rosati, M V; Melcarne, R; Sinibaldi, F; Capozzella, A; Di Giorgio, V; Giubilati, R; Sacco, C; Tomei, F; Sancini, A

    2015-01-01

    Work-related stress is a complex problem requiring a work environment-based assessment. Artists like dancers represent a category of atypical workers potentially at high risk for work-related stress. Aim of our pilot study is to evaluate organizational stress in a population of professional dancers, using the HSE Indicator Tool for Work Related Stress. We administered the Italian version of the HSE Indicator Tool to 38 ballet dancers, males and females. The questionnaire evaluates 7 key organizational dimensions: demand, control, managers' support, peer support, relationships, role and change. The standards required-ideal conditions are achieved in none of the above-mentioned dimensions. Change is the only dimension for which results fall between the 20th and the 50th percentile, while for other dimensions results fall below the 20th percentile suggesting the need for immediate corrective action. In male dancers an acceptable situation is highlighted for the dimension "change" compared to female dancers. In both sexes there is a high frequency of subjects complaining of verbal abuse, bullying and harassment. Despite the small sample size, our pilot study highlights the presence of heightened levels of organizational stress. Preventive measures targeted towards improving communication between managers and dancers and aimed at team building should be implemented.

  2. In-Flight Validation of a Pilot Rating Scale for Evaluating Failure Transients in Electronic Flight Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Kevin F.; Tucker, George E.; Moralez, Ernesto, III

    2006-01-01

    Engineering development and qualification of a Research Flight Control System (RFCS) for the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) JUH-60A has motivated the development of a pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems. The RASCAL RFCS includes a highly-reliable, dual-channel Servo Control Unit (SCU) to command and monitor the performance of the fly-by-wire actuators and protect against the effects of erroneous commands from the flexible, but single-thread Flight Control Computer. During the design phase of the RFCS, two piloted simulations were conducted on the Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to help define the required performance characteristics of the safety monitoring algorithms in the SCU. Simulated failures, including hard-over and slow-over commands, were injected into the command path, and the aircraft response and safety monitor performance were evaluated. A subjective Failure/Recovery Rating (F/RR) scale was developed as a means of quantifying the effects of the injected failures on the aircraft state and the degree of pilot effort required to safely recover the aircraft. A brief evaluation of the rating scale was also conducted on the Army/NASA CH-47B variable stability helicopter to confirm that the rating scale was likely to be equally applicable to in-flight evaluations. Following the initial research flight qualification of the RFCS in 2002, a flight test effort was begun to validate the performance of the safety monitors and to validate their design for the safe conduct of research flight testing. Simulated failures were injected into the SCU, and the F/RR scale was applied to assess the results. The results validate the performance of the monitors, and indicate that the Failure/Recovery Rating scale is a very useful tool for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems.

  3. Urinary Proteomics Pilot Study for Biomarker Discovery and Diagnosis in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Kasper; Bosselmann, Helle Skovmand; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Background Biomarker discovery and new insights into the pathophysiology of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) may emerge from recent advances in high-throughput urinary proteomics. This could lead to improved diagnosis, risk stratification and management of HFrEF. Methods......EF103 very accurately (area under the curve, AUC = 0.972) discriminated between HFrEF patients (N = 94, sensitivity = 93.6%) and control individuals with and without impaired renal function and hypertension (N = 552, specificity = 92.9%). Interestingly, HFrEF103 showed low sensitivity (12...... to determine a vast array of HFrEF-related urinary peptide biomarkers which might help improving our understanding and diagnosis of heart failure....

  4. Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-02-01

    This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

  5. EURObservational Research Programme : The Heart Failure Pilot Survey (ESC-HF Pilot)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggioni, Aldo P.; Dahlstrom, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Crespo Leiro, Marisa; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Gullestad, Lars; Logeart, Damien; Metra, Marco; Parissis, John; Persson, Hans; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rauchhaus, Mathias; Voors, Adriaan A.; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Zannad, Faiez; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the new ESC-HF Pilot Survey was to describe the clinical epidemiology of outpatients and inpatients with heart failure (HF) and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across 12 participating European countries. This pilot study was specifically aimed at validating the

  6. Successive failure, repeat entrepreneurship and no learning: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Pretorius

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Current theories of repeat entrepreneurship provide little explanation for the effect of failure as a ‘trigger’ for creating successive ventures or learning from repeated failures. Research purpose: This study attempts to establish the role of previous failures on the ventures that follow them and to determine the process of learning from successive failures.Motivation for the study: Successive failures offer potentially valuable insights into the relationship between failures on the ventures that follow and the process of learning from failure.Research design, approach and method: The researchers investigated a single case study of one entrepreneur’s successive failures over 20 years.Main findings: Although the causes varied, all the failures had fundamental similarities. This suggested that the entrepreneur had not learnt from them. The previous failures did not trigger the subsequent ventures. Instead, they played a role in causing the failures. Learning from failure does not happen immediately but requires deliberate reflection. Deliberate reflection is a prerequisite for learning from failure as the entrepreneur repeated similar mistakes time after time until he reflected on each failure.Practical/managerial implications: It confirms that failure is a part of entrepreneurial endeavours. However, learning from it requires deliberate reflection. Failure does not ‘trigger’ the next venture and educators should note this.Contribution/value-add: Knowing the effect of failure on consecutive ventures may help us to understand the development of prototypes (mental frameworks and expand the theory about entrepreneurial prototype categories.

  7. Urinary Proteomics Pilot Study for Biomarker Discovery and Diagnosis in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Rossing

    Full Text Available Biomarker discovery and new insights into the pathophysiology of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF may emerge from recent advances in high-throughput urinary proteomics. This could lead to improved diagnosis, risk stratification and management of HFrEF.Urine samples were analyzed by on-line capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization micro time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-MS to generate individual urinary proteome profiles. In an initial biomarker discovery cohort, analysis of urinary proteome profiles from 33 HFrEF patients and 29 age- and sex-matched individuals without HFrEF resulted in identification of 103 peptides that were significantly differentially excreted in HFrEF. These 103 peptides were used to establish the support vector machine-based HFrEF classifier HFrEF103. In a subsequent validation cohort, HFrEF103 very accurately (area under the curve, AUC = 0.972 discriminated between HFrEF patients (N = 94, sensitivity = 93.6% and control individuals with and without impaired renal function and hypertension (N = 552, specificity = 92.9%. Interestingly, HFrEF103 showed low sensitivity (12.6% in individuals with diastolic left ventricular dysfunction (N = 176. The HFrEF-related peptide biomarkers mainly included fragments of fibrillar type I and III collagen but also, e.g., of fibrinogen beta and alpha-1-antitrypsin.CE-MS based urine proteome analysis served as a sensitive tool to determine a vast array of HFrEF-related urinary peptide biomarkers which might help improving our understanding and diagnosis of heart failure.

  8. A pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in electronic flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindson, William S.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Eshow, Michelle M.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot rating scale was developed to describe the effects of transients in helicopter flight-control systems on safety-of-flight and on pilot recovery action. The scale was applied to the evaluation of hardovers that could potentially occur in the digital flight-control system being designed for a variable-stability UH-60A research helicopter. Tests were conducted in a large moving-base simulator and in flight. The results of the investigation were combined with existing airworthiness criteria to determine quantitative reliability design goals for the control system.

  9. Climatotherapy in Japan: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Hitomi; Kusaka, Yukinori; Hirai, Takayoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko; Schuh, Angela

    2017-08-01

    Twenty-nine urban inhabitants participated in a half-day climatotherapy programme at the moderate mountain area and lowland area in the northwest part of the main island of Japan. The current study was aimed to investigate physically and mentally the objective and subjective influence of our short programme, which was a prospective pilot study of single intervention. Blood pressure was significantly descended during terrain cure at the uphill mountain path and returned after fresh-air rest cure, while there was no significant change throughout the programme at lowland flat path. Heart rate was significantly ascended and descended at both area, and more clearly changed at the mountain path. Profile of Mood Status brief form Japanese version administered before and after our half-day programme. Age adjusted T score of negative subscales, `tension-anxiety', `depression', `anger-hostility', `fatigue' and `confusion' were significantly lower after climatotherapy at both sites. Whereas, there was no significant change concerning `vigour' score. This short-version climatotherapy programme has been designed for people without enough time for long stay at health resort. It turned out our half-day climatotherapy programme contribute to mood status improvement. In addition, repeated practice of our short-version programme including endurance exercise with cool body shell using uphill path can be expected that blood pressure will go toward the normal range and heart rate will decrease both in usual time and during exercise. Therefore, health benefits can be expected of this climatotherapy programme.

  10. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in commercial airline pilots: a cohort study of 2630 pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, S; Venemans-Jellema, A; Cannegieter, S C; van Haften, M; Middeldorp, S; Büller, H R; Rosendaal, F R

    2014-08-01

    Airline pilots may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) because air travel has recently been established as a risk factor for VTE. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of VTE in a cohort of Dutch airline pilots. Airline pilots who had been active members of the Dutch aviation society (VNV) were questioned for the occurrence of VTE, presence of risk factors for VTE and number of flight hours per year and rank. Incidence rates among pilots were compared with those of the general Dutch population and with a population of frequently flying employees of multinational organizations. A total of 2630 male pilots were followed-up for a total of 20420 person-years (py). Six venous thromboses were reported, yielding an incidence rate of 0.3 per 1000 py. The standardized morbidity ratio, comparing these pilots with the general Dutch population adjusted for age, was 0.8. Compared with the international employee cohort, the standardized morbidity ratio was 0.7 when all employees were included and 0.6 when only the frequently travelling employees were included. The incidence rate did not increase with number of flight hours per year and did not clearly vary by rank. We conclude that the risk of VTE is not increased amongst airline pilots. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  11. A study of rock bolting failure modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Chen; Jan Nemcik; Ren Ting; Naj Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Rock bolting has advanced rapidly during the past 4 decades due to a better understanding of load transfer mechanisms and advances made in the bolt system technology.Bolts are used as permanent and temporary support systems in tunnelling and mining operations.A review of has indicated that three systems of reinforcement devices have evolved as part of rock bolt and ground anchor while the rock is not generally thought of as being a component of the reinforcement system.A classification of rock bolting reinforcement systems is presented,followed by the fundamental theory of the load transfer mechanism.The failure mode of two phases of rock bolting system is formularised.The failure modes of cable bolting are discussed using a bond strength model as well as an iterative method.Finally,the interfacial shear stress model for ribbed bar is introduced and a closed form solution is obtained using a tri-line stress strain relationship.

  12. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study. ... of microbes that cause infections are helpful to determine proper antibiotic therapy. ... including extended spectrum beta lactamase producing strains of Proteus ...

  13. The Pilot Staffing Conundrum: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-2. School of Logistics and Acquisition Management, Air Force Institute of Technology (AU), Wright Patterson AFB, OH, June...Kafer, John H. Relationship of Airline Pilot Demand and Air Force Pilot Retention. Graduate Research Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-11. School of Logistics

  14. [Severe acute liver failure: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Arroyo, M Carmen; Puig Llobet, Montserrat; Cuervo Lavado, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), also known as fulminant hepatitis, is a rare and extremely serious condition with a high mortality rate. Its rapid evolution and complexity in managing the treatment, creates the need to provide some immediate care by a team that specialises in intensive care. This acute decompensation is usually associated with other disorders, such as coagulopathy and hepatic encephalopathy, being responsible for major complications that can lead to organ failure. In our region the most common origin is unknown, followed by acute infection with hepatitis B. The treatment of this syndrome is based on the general measures applicable to any critically ill patient: treat the cause and early detection of extrahepatic complications, urgent liver transplantation being one of the alternatives with a better prognosis. This article presents a case report describing the monitoring of an Irish woman of 20 years who was transferred from a hospital in Ibiza to a hospital in Barcelona, with a suspected diagnosis of FHF. Following the conceptual model of Virginia Henderson, the collaborative problems and nursing diagnoses are described, presenting a care plan according to NANDA (North American Nursing Association), NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification), NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification). This case helps to establish an individualised care plan that provides guidance to nurse professionals in critical patient care by increasing the knowledge of FHF.

  15. Using Faculty Learning Communities to Link FYE and High-Risk Core Courses: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Mo; Campbell, Kendra; Lowery-Hart, Russell D.; Mallard, Jessica; Andersen, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Can success rates in a gateway course be improved by linking it to a college success course? This article describes the results of a pilot study that linked a first-year biology course that had a high drop-out and failure rate to a college success course that included study skills. The proposal to link courses came from the work of a faculty…

  16. Teaching Speech Communication with a Foreign Accent: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Ming; Chung, Jensen

    A pilot study examined problems encountered by foreign instructors teaching in American colleges. Fourteen Chinese-born instructors teaching in Speech Communication answered a questionnaire containing 12 open-ended questions. Recurring themes were coded from the answers, and then organized into three categories: cultural differences; linguistic…

  17. A novel assessment of adolescent mobility: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Tom; Duncan, Scott; Chaix, Basile

    2015-01-01

    . The recent development of VERITAS - a web-based application nested within a computer-assisted personal interview - allows researchers to assess daily mobility, travel to regular destinations, and perceived neighbourhood boundaries using interactive mapping technology. The aims of this pilot study were to (1...

  18. Case conferences between general practitioners and specialist teams to plan end of life care of people with end stage heart failure and lung disease: an exploratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Geoffrey; Zhang, Jianzhen; Burridge, Letitia; Senior, Hugh; Miller, Elizabeth; Young, Sharleen; Donald, Maria; Jackson, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Most people die of non-malignant disease, but most patients of specialist palliative care services have cancer. Adequate end of life care for people with non-malignant disease requires acknowledgement of their limited prognosis and appropriate care planning. Case conferences between specialist palliative care services and GPs improve outcomes in cancer-based populations. We report a pilot study of case conferences between the patient's GP and specialist staff to facilitate care planning for people with end stage heart failure or non-malignant lung disease in a regional health service in Queensland Australia. Single face to face case conferences about patients with a primary diagnosis of advanced heart failure or respiratory failure from non-malignant disease were conducted between a palliative care consultant, a case management nurse and the patient's GP. Annualised rates of service utilisation (emergency department [ED] presentations, ED discharges back to home, hospital admissions, and admission length of stay) before and after case conference were calculated. Content and counts of case conference recommendations, and the rate of adherence to recommendations were also assessed. A process evaluation of case conferences was undertaken. Twenty-three case conferences involving 21 GPs were conducted between November 2011 and November 2012. One GP refused to participate. Ten patients died, three at home. Of 82 management recommendations made, 55 (67%) were enacted. ED admissions fell from 13.9 per annum (pa) to 2.1 (difference 11.8, 95% CI 2.2-21.3, p = 0.001); ED admissions leading to discharge home from 3.9 to 0.4 pa (difference 3.5, 95% CI -0.4-7.5, p = 0.05); hospital admissions from 11.4 to 3.5 pa (difference 7.9, 95% CI 2.2-13.7, p = 0.002); and length of stay from 7.0 to 3.7 days (difference 3.4, 95% CI 0.9-5.8, p = 0.007). Participating health professionals were enthusiastic about the process. This pilot is the initial step in the development and testing of a

  19. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Ester H; Draaisma, Jos M; den Hamer, Sabien; Loeffen, Jan L

    2015-01-01

    Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often report having little opportunity to perform in the role of team leader during residency. In order to gain more insight into leadership skills and behaviors, we classified leadership styles of pediatric residents during simulated emergencies. We conducted a prospective quantitative study to investigate leadership styles used by pediatric residents during simulated emergencies with clinical deterioration of a child at a pediatric ward. Using videotaped scenarios of 48 simulated critical events among 12 residents, we were able to classify verbal and nonverbal communication into different leadership styles according to the situational leadership theory. The coaching style (mean 54.5%, SD 7.8) is the most frequently applied by residents, followed by the directing style (mean 35.6%, SD 4.1). This pattern conforms to the task- and role-related requirements in our scenarios and it also conforms to the concept of situational leadership. We did not find any significant differences in leadership style according to the postgraduate year or scenario content. The model used in this pilot study helps us to gain a better understanding of the development of effective leadership behavior and supports the applicability of situational leadership theory in training leadership skills during residency.

  20. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Ester H; Draaisma, Jos M; den Hamer, Sabien; Loeffen, Jan L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often report having little opportunity to perform in the role of team leader during residency. In order to gain more insight into leadership skills and behaviors, we classified leadership styles of pediatric residents during simulated emergencies. Methods We conducted a prospective quantitative study to investigate leadership styles used by pediatric residents during simulated emergencies with clinical deterioration of a child at a pediatric ward. Using videotaped scenarios of 48 simulated critical events among 12 residents, we were able to classify verbal and nonverbal communication into different leadership styles according to the situational leadership theory. Results The coaching style (mean 54.5%, SD 7.8) is the most frequently applied by residents, followed by the directing style (mean 35.6%, SD 4.1). This pattern conforms to the task- and role-related requirements in our scenarios and it also conforms to the concept of situational leadership. We did not find any significant differences in leadership style according to the postgraduate year or scenario content. Conclusion The model used in this pilot study helps us to gain a better understanding of the development of effective leadership behavior and supports the applicability of situational leadership theory in training leadership skills during residency. PMID:25610010

  1. Comparison of the rhythm control treatment strategy versus the rate control strategy in patients with permanent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation and heart failure treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy - a pilot study of Cardiac Resynchronization in Atrial Fibrillation Trial (Pilot-CRAfT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ciszewski, Jan; Maciag, Aleksander; Kowalik, Ilona; Syska, Pawel; Lewandowski, Michal; Farkowski, Michal M; Borowiec, Anna; Chwyczko, Tomasz; Pytkowski, Mariusz; Szwed, Hanna; Sterlinski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Background The only subgroups of patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation in which the efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy has been scientifically proven are patients with indications for right ventricular pacing and patients after atrioventricular junction ablation. However it is unlikely that atrioventricular junction ablation would be a standard procedure in the majority of the heart failure patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy and concomitant atrial fibrill...

  2. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  3. Self moving patients to the operation theatre - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvarfordh, Anna Pernilla; Rovsing, Marie Louise; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate patients' satisfaction with walking to the operation theatre instead of being driven in a bed or wheel chair, and to identify the need for information. In total, 75 patients (aged 15-83 years) participated in the study. A questionnaire...

  4. Telemonitoring Adherence to Medications in Heart Failure Patients (TEAM-HF): A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Benjamin D; Moise, Nathalie; Haerizadeh, Mytra; Ye, Siqin; Medina, Vivian; Kronish, Ian M

    2017-04-01

    Medication nonadherence contributes to hospitalizations in recently discharged patients with heart failure (HF). We aimed to test the feasibility of telemonitoring medication adherence in patients with HF. We randomized 40 patients (1:1) hospitalized for HF to 30 days of loop diuretic adherence monitoring with telephonic support or to passive adherence monitoring alone. Eighty-three percent of eligible patients agreed to participate. The median age of patients was 64 years, 25% were female, and 45% were Hispanic. Overall, 67% of patients were nonadherent (percentage of days that the correct number of doses were taken telemonitoring was acceptable to most patients with HF. Diuretic nonadherence was common even when patients knew they were being monitored. Future studies should assess whether adherence telemonitoring can improve adherence and reduce readmissions among patients with HF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Attitudes Toward Guarani and Spanish: A Pilot Study in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Nancy C.

    This study analyzes the language attitudes of the Paraguayan people toward their two languages, Guarani and Spanish. To study the bilingual situation in the South American country, a pilot survey was carried out in the capital city addressing the major topics of language attitudes, language usage, and language varieties. The goals of the survey…

  6. Experiences of Patients Living With Heart Failure: A Descriptive Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Alvin Chuen Wei; Tan, Khoon Kiat; Huang Gan, Juvena Chew; Wang, Wenru

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences, needs, and coping strategies of patients living with heart failure in Singapore. A descriptive qualitative design was used. A purposive sample of 15 informants was recruited from two cardiology wards of a tertiary public hospital in Singapore. Individual face-to-face interviews were conducted with a semistructured interview guideline that was developed based on a review of the literature and a pilot study. Content analysis was adopted to analyze the data, and four main categories were identified: perceived causes, manifestations, and prognosis; enduring emotions; managing the condition; and needs from health care professionals. The informants were overwhelmed with the experience of living with heart failure due to the disruptive and uncertain nature of the condition. This study offers health care professionals practical and useful suggestions when providing holistic care for patients with heart failure.

  7. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  8. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  9. Facial recognition and laser surface scan: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Kristoffersen, Agnethe May

    2009-01-01

    Surface scanning of the face of a suspect is presented as a way to better match the facial features with those of a perpetrator from CCTV footage. We performed a simple pilot study where we obtained facial surface scans of volunteers and then in blind trials tried to match these scans with 2D...

  10. Assessing the Flipped Classroom in Operations Management: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The author delved into the results of a flipped classroom pilot conducted for an operations management course module. It assessed students' perception of a flipped learning environment after making them experience it in real time. The classroom environment was construed using a case research approach and students' perceptions were studied using…

  11. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coolen EH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ester H Coolen,1 Jos M Draaisma,2 Sabien den Hamer,3 Jan L Loeffen2 1Department of Pediatric Surgery, Amalia Children’s Hospital, Radboud University Medical Center, 2Department of Pediatrics, Amalia Children’s Hospital, Radboud University Medical Center, 3Department of Communication Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Purpose: Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often report having little opportunity to perform in the role of team leader during residency. In order to gain more insight into leadership skills and behaviors, we classified leadership styles of pediatric residents during simulated emergencies. Methods: We conducted a prospective quantitative study to investigate leadership styles used by pediatric residents during simulated emergencies with clinical deterioration of a child at a pediatric ward. Using videotaped scenarios of 48 simulated critical events among 12 residents, we were able to classify verbal and nonverbal communication into different leadership styles according to the situational leadership theory. Results: The coaching style (mean 54.5%, SD 7.8 is the most frequently applied by residents, followed by the directing style (mean 35.6%, SD 4.1. This pattern conforms to the task- and role-related requirements in our scenarios and it also conforms to the concept of situational leadership. We did not find any significant differences in leadership style according to the postgraduate year or scenario content. Conclusion: The model used in this pilot study helps us to gain a better understanding of the development of effective leadership behavior and supports the applicability of situational leadership theory in training leadership skills during residency. Keywords

  12. Development of the gagging problem assessment : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvell, G. F. E. C. van Linden; Ter Pelkwijk, B. J.; Stegenga, B.

    An accepted management strategy for gagging problems appears not to exist. A reliable and valid instrument is needed to develop an evidence based treatment for this clinical problem. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a newly developed measurement tool for

  13. Development of the gagging problem assessment : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvell, G. F. E. C. van Linden; Ter Pelkwijk, B. J.; Stegenga, B.

    2008-01-01

    An accepted management strategy for gagging problems appears not to exist. A reliable and valid instrument is needed to develop an evidence based treatment for this clinical problem. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a newly developed measurement tool for de

  14. Emission studies from a CO2 capture pilot plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, E.F. da; Kolderup, H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Hjarbo, K.W.; Huizinga, A.; Khakharia, P.M.; Tuinman, I.L.; Mejdell, T.; Zahlsen, K.; Vernstad, K.; Hyldbakk, A.; Holten, T.; Kvamsdal, H.M.; Os, P.J. van; Einbu, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of emissions from a pilot-plant for CO2 capture at Maasvlakte (in the Netherlands). Three contributions to emissions were identified and analyzed: Gas phase emission, aerosols (also referred to as mist or fog) and droplets of entrained solvents. For the emission campaig

  15. Effects of aquajogging in obese adults: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PhD Ad Vingerhoets; PhD Rinie Geenen; MD E.J.M. Wouters; PhD Ronette Kolotkin; MSc Annemieke van Nunen

    2009-01-01

    Aim and method: To examine in obese people the potential effectiveness of a six-week, two times weekly aquajogging program on body composition, fitness, health-related quality of life and exercise beliefs. Fifteen otherwise healthy obese persons participated in a pilot study. Results: Total fat mass

  16. A Study of Failure Criteria of Fibrous Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Federico; Jackson, Karen E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The research described in this paper is focused on two areas: (1) evaluation of existing composite failure criteria in the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code, MSC.Dytran, and (2) exploration of the possibilities for modification of material and failure models to account for large deformations, progressive failure, and interaction of damage accumulation with stress/strain response of laminated composites. Following a review of the MSC.Dytran user manual, a bibliographical review of existing failure criteria of composites was performed. The papers considered most interesting for the objective of this report are discussed in section 2. The failure criteria included in the code under consideration are discussed in section 3. A critical summary of the present procedures to perform analysis and design of composites is presented in section 4. A study of the most important historical failure criteria for fibrous composite materials and some of the more recent modifications proposed were studied. The result of this analysis highlighted inadequacies in the existing failure criteria and the need to perform some numerical analyses to elucidate the answer to questions on which some of the proposed criteria are based. A summary of these ideas, which is a proposal of studies to be developed, is presented in section 5. Finally, some ideas for future developments are summarized in section 6.

  17. A failure study of a locking compression plate implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirajan Thapa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this case study a failed locking compression plate was investigated. Such plating systems are used to provide the stability to fractured bone and fixation. The locking compression plate had been separated in two pieces. One of the fracture surfaces from the failed component was investigated for surface topographical features. The visual, optical and scanning electron microscopy results indicated the presence of beach marks, intermetallic inclusions, corrosion pits and striations indicating fatigue crack propagation and overload failure. Some corrosion damage also was documented on the fractography. This case study shows that corrosion may have initiated fatigue crack which grew by the activities of daily living causing the failure.

  18. Tai Chi for People with Visual Impairments: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszko, Tanya A.; Ramsey, Vincent K.; Blasch, Bruce B.

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the physical and psychological outcomes of a tai chi exercise program for eight adults with visual impairments. It found that after eight weeks of orientation and mobility training and tai chi practice, the participants' single leg-stance time and total knee flexion work and power improved, as did their frequency of,…

  19. Consumer Understanding of Nutrition Marketing Terms: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldson, Amber; Yen, Chih-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the validity of a questionnaire developed to assess adult consumer understanding of nutrition marketing terms and the resulting impact on consumer behavior. Participants (n = 40) completed an electronic questionnaire. Efforts to establish validity and reliability suggest that the questionnaire is a…

  20. Mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GYGAX, MARINE JEQUIER; SCHNEIDER, PATRICK; NEWMAN, CHRISTOPHER JOHN

    2011-01-01

    ...‐paretic arm, is used in the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke in adults. We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia by performing a pilot crossover study in ten participants (aged 6–14y...

  1. Elderly Homosexual Women and Men: Report on a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnigerode, Fred A.; Adelman, Marcy R.

    1978-01-01

    A pilot study is described in which four- to five-hour tape-recorded interviews were conducted with 11 homosexual women and men, 60-77 years of age. Areas examined included: physical change and physical health; work, retirement and leisure time; social behavior; psychological functioning; sexual behavior; and personal perspectives on the life…

  2. Consumer Understanding of Nutrition Marketing Terms: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldson, Amber; Yen, Chih-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the validity of a questionnaire developed to assess adult consumer understanding of nutrition marketing terms and the resulting impact on consumer behavior. Participants (n = 40) completed an electronic questionnaire. Efforts to establish validity and reliability suggest that the questionnaire is a…

  3. Skin and Plasma Autofluorescence During Hemodialysis : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, Reindert; Arsov, Stefan; Ramsauer, Bernd; Koetsier, Marten; Sundvall, Nils; Engels, Gerwin E.; Sikole, Aleksandar; Lundberg, Lennart; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) is related to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and is one of the strongest prognostic markers of mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether changes in skin AF appear after a single HD session an

  4. Managing patients with heart failure: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams with specialist heart failure nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, Margaret; Simmonds, Rosemary; McLachlan, Sarah; Cramer, Helen; Sanders, Tom; Johnson, Rachel; Kadam, Umesh T; Lasserson, Daniel S; Purdy, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of health care clinicians working in multidisciplinary teams that include specialist heart failure nurses when caring for the management of heart failure patients. We used a qualitative in-depth interview study nested in a broader ethnographic study of unplanned admissions in heart failure patients (HoldFAST). We interviewed 24 clinicians across primary, secondary, and community care in 3 locations in the Midlands, South Central, and South West of England. Within a framework of the role and contribution of the heart failure specialist nurse, our study identified 2 thematic areas that the clinicians agreed still represent particular challenges when working with heart failure patients. The first was communication with patients, in particular explaining the diagnosis and helping patients to understand the condition. The participants recognized that such communication was most effective when they had a long-term relationship with patients and families and that the specialist nurse played an important part in achieving this relationship. The second was communication within the team. Multidisciplinary input was especially needed because of the complexity of many patients and issues around medications, and the participants believed the specialist nurse may facilitate team communication. The study highlights the role of specialist heart failure nurses in delivering education tailored to patients and facilitating better liaison among all clinicians, particularly when dealing with the management of comorbidities and drug regimens. The way in which specialist nurses were able to be caseworkers for their patients was perceived as a method of ensuring coordination and continuity of care. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  5. Indonesian EFL Students’ Perspective on Writing Process: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Imelda Hermilinda Abas; Noor Hashima Abd. Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at understanding the EFL Indonesian students’ perspective on the writing process. The pilot study involved two male Indonesian postgraduate students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. The Indonesian students were selected based on the following criteria: (1) had enough knowledge in English writing, indicated by the completion of Academic Writing and Research Methodology courses taken in UUM; (2) had written an unpublished thesis during their undergraduate studies in Indonesia a...

  6. Educational Optimism among Parents: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räty, Hannu; Kasanen, Kati

    2016-01-01

    This study explored parents' (N = 351) educational optimism in terms of their trust in the possibilities of school to develop children's intelligence. It was found that educational optimism could be depicted as a bipolar factor with optimism and pessimism on the opposing ends of the same dimension. Optimistic parents indicated more satisfaction…

  7. Pilot study of a multimodal intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary Ellen; Hovgaard, Doris; Boesen, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Substantial physical and functional deconditioning and diminished psychological wellbeing are all potential adverse effects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and benefits (physical and functional capacity) of a 4-6 w...

  8. Pilot study of a multimodal intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary Ellen; Hovgaard, Doris; Boesen, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Substantial physical and functional deconditioning and diminished psychological wellbeing are all potential adverse effects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and benefits (physical and functional capacity) of a 4......-6 week supervised and structured mixed-type exercise, progressive relaxation and psychoeducation programme in patients undergoing allo-HSCT. Nineteen patients were randomized to an intervention or a conventional care group (CC) and were tested for physical and functional capacity before admission...

  9. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  10. Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Souto Valente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic media for transmission of information and medical data from one site to another. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an experience of telemedicine in plastic surgery. Methods. 32 plastic surgeons received a link with password for real-time streaming of a surgery. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons attending the procedure by the Internet answered five questions. The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. 27 plastic surgeons attended the online procedure in real-time. 96.3% considered the access to the website as good or excellent and 3.7% considered it bad. 14.8% reported that the transmission was bad and 85.2% considered the quality of transmission as good or excellent. 96.3% classified the live broadcasting as a good or excellent learning experience and 3.7% considered it a bad experience. 92.6% reported feeling able to perform this surgery after watching the demo and 7.4% did not feel able. 100% of participants said they would like to participate in other surgical demonstrations over the Internet. Conclusion. We conclude that the use of telemedicine can provide more access to education and medical research, for plastic surgeons looking for medical education from distant regions.

  11. Hijama (wet cupping) for female infertility treatment: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Abduljabbar; Anhar Gazzaz; Samiha Mourad; Ayman Oraif

    2016-01-01

    Background: To assess the effectiveness of wet cupping (Hijama) as a treatment of female factor infertility. The primary outcome measured was pregnancy rates after Hijama. The secondary outcome measured was the effect on the reproductive hormonal profile before and after Hijama. Methods: A pilot clinical study was conducted for the use of Hijama as treatment for female infertility at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from September 2013 to May 2015. Inclusion criteria included: patients w...

  12. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  13. Ecological study of sleep disruption in PTSD: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica; Katherine Shear, M; Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J

    2006-07-01

    Laboratory-based sleep studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding the presence and nature of objective sleep anomalies in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This pilot study aimed at assessing sleep in adult crime victims with PTSD by using in-home polysomnography. Compared to healthy archival subjects, PTSD subjects showed longer sleep latency, reduced total sleep time, and increased duration of nocturnal awakening. Quantitative electroencephalography (EEG) measures of delta and beta activity also differed in PTSD and healthy subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that ambulatory methods can capture objective signs of sleep disruption, and corroborate subjective complaints of disrupted sleep in PTSD.

  14. Endoscopic procedure with a modified Reiki intervention: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Rosalinda S; Stuart-Shor, Eileen M; Russo, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined the use of Reiki prior to colonoscopy to reduce anxiety and minimize intraprocedure medications compared with usual care. A prospective, nonblinded, partially randomized patient preference design was employed using 21 subjects undergoing colonoscopy for the first time. Symptoms of anxiety and pain were assessed using a Likert-type scale. Between-group differences were assessed using chi-square analyses and analysis of variance. There were no differences between the control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 11) groups on age (mean = 58 years, SD = 8.5) and gender (53% women). The experimental group had higher anxiety (4.5 vs. 2.6, p = .03) and pain (0.8 vs. 0.2, p = .42) scores prior to colonoscopy. The Reiki intervention reduced mean heart rate (-9 beats/minute), systolic blood pressure (-10 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg), and respirations (-3 breaths/minute). There were no between-group differences on intraprocedure medication use or postprocedure physiologic measures. Although the experimental group patients had more symptoms, they did not require additional pain medication during the procedure, suggesting that (1) anxious people may benefit from an adjunctive therapy; (2) anxiety and pain are decreased by Reiki therapy for patients undergoing colonoscopy, and (3) additional intraprocedure pain medication may not be needed for colonoscopy patients receiving Reiki therapy. This pilot study provided important insights in preparation for a rigorous, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  15. Motivation in the Classroom: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Deanna E.

    Purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the validity of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as it applies to young children; (2) determine developmental shifts in expressed motivational needs; (3) gather information concerning the worries and fears of young children, particularly those of low socioeconomic status; and (4) gather data regarding…

  16. A Pilot Study on EFL Reading Teaching through Linguistic Landscape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The public displays of languages have been described as “linguistic landscape”. Nowadays, most globalized cities have worked hard at creating English-friendly environments by including bilingual signs to facilitate communication. The domain of linguistic landscape, therefore, has drawn the interests of English educators. This paper serves as a pilot study to exploit every possibility in the linguistic landscape as EFL teaching material, and optimize pedagogic activities in reading classes by adopting this linguistic resource.

  17. Teledermatology in pharmacies: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan, Melissa N; Soyer, H Peter; Nissen, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    We investigated community pharmacists' management of skin conditions in order to identify a need for further educational support. Twenty community pharmacists in Queensland completed a questionnaire regarding their management of skin conditions and their opinions regarding the usefulness of a potential teledermatology service. The pharmacists' accuracy in managing skin conditions was tested by a dermatologist who reviewed the pharmacists' advice in 33 cases obtained by 14 pharmacists. Overall agreement between the pharmacists and the dermatologist was moderate, with a kappa statistic of 0.58 (P < 0.05) The uptake of a potential teledermatology service was investigated in one pharmacy over one month. Five patients were offered the teledermatology service. Of these, two patients consented and three refused. All pharmacists (n = 20) indicated a desire for further education and supported the idea of a teledermatology service.

  18. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  19. Coping with Academic Stressors: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-20

    trends in theory and research (Vol. 2) N.Y.: Academic Press, 1972. Sarason, 1. G. Te’,, anxiety, attention and the general problem of anxiety. In C. D...34Gordon Allport could best be described as a: A. Freudian B. Gestalt Psychologist C. Behaviorist D. None of the above Lets see, Allport did a lot of...writing about traits of personality, how about A. No, Freud believed In psychoanalytic principles. Freudians aren’t big on the idea of traits. B. Gestalt

  20. Organizational Failure in an NHS Hospital Trust: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaghi, Hamid; Mannion, Russell; Sajadi, Haniye Sadat

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to explore the key factors associated with organizational failure in an NHS Hospital Trust. This case study adopted a qualitative design. Fifty-seven semistructured interviews and document analyses were conducted as well. Data were analyzed using a framework analysis method. A range of symptoms of organizational performance failure was identified. These relate to a financial deficit, lack of good external relationships, inability to meet core targets, a lack of clear management systems, and low staff morale. These markers had not been taken seriously by the previous senior management team. Symptoms of failure were the reflection of presence of secondary and primary causes of failure. Poor managerial leadership, poor financial control and performance management, lack of open culture, distraction by 2 large projects, and the lack of clinician engagement were perceived as internal causes of failure and the high level of policy changes within the NHS as the key external cause. The level of deprivation in the area was also thought to have had a negative impact on performance. The findings reinforce and expand on those of recent studies across the public sector. Tracking an organization's performance and early diagnosis of performance problems, focusing on performance management systems, and taking into account contextual factors are issues that should be considered.

  1. THERAPY: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOFIA VON HUMBOLDT

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio que se informa fue ex- plorar si una intervención individual de terapia centrada en la persona (TCP en personas adul- tas mayores puede promover su sentido de cohe- rencia, en comparación con un grupo control (lista de espera. Se plantea que los participantes asignados al azar a TCP informarían mejoras en SDC de pre y post-intervención en comparación con el grupo control. Un grupo de 87 participantes de 65 a 86 años (M = 72.4; DE = 5.15 fue evaluado con la Escala de Sentido de Coherencia (ESDC y el cuestio- nario sociodemográfico en tres momentos dife- rentes: al inicio del estudio (t1, post-tratamiento (t2 y a los 12 meses de seguimiento (t3. Los resultados indicaron que los participan- tes en TCP evidenciaron un aumento significa- tivo en cuanto a su SDC (16.7%, mientras que en el grupo control se encontró una disminu- ción significativa (-2.7%, entre el inicio del es- tudio y el momento de seguimiento. El tamaño del efecto en el grupo TCP fue alto (η2p = .776. En concreto, tanto en la post-intervención como en el momento del seguimiento, los participan- tes que se sometieron a TCP tenían un SDC sig- nificativamente mayor (M = 3.84, DE = .219 Se encontraron diferencias significativas entre el grupo de intervención y el grupo control en la post-intervención y en el seguimiento. Se concluye que los cambios en SDC fueron positivos y mantenidos, por lo tanto, los resul- tados sugieren que la TCP es favorable a la me- jora de SDC. Por otra parte, ya que la SDC se asocia con el bienestar relacionado con la salud de las poblaciones de mayor edad, hay que en- fatizar el desarrollo de SDC en la vejez.

  2. Worsening Heart Failure Following Admission for Acute Heart Failure A Pooled Analysis of the PROTECT and RELAX-AHF Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, Beth A.; Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gad; Massie, Barry M.; Cleland, John G. F.; Dittrich, Howard C.; Edwards, Christopher; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Givertz, Michael M.; Greenberg, Barry; Ponikowski, Piotr; Voors, Adriaan A.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Teerlink, John R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES These studies conducted analyses to examine patient characteristics and outcomes associated with worsening heart failure (WHF). BACKGROUND WHF during an admission for acute heart failure (AHF) represents treatment failure and is a potential therapeutic target for clinical trials of AHF. M

  3. Antibiotics and oral contraceptive failure - a case-crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toh, Sengwee; Mitchell, Allen A.; Anderka, Marlene; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the association between antibiotic use and combined oral contraceptive (COC) failure is controversial. We examined the effect of concomitant antibiotic treatment on the risk of breakthrough pregnancy among COC users. Study Designs: We performed a case-crossover study of 1330

  4. A remotely piloted aircraft system in major incident management: concept and pilot, feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsen, Håkon B

    2015-06-10

    Major incidents are complex, dynamic and bewildering task environments characterised by simultaneous, rapidly changing events, uncertainty and ill-structured problems. Efficient management, communication, decision-making and allocation of scarce medical resources at the chaotic scene of a major incident is challenging and often relies on sparse information and data. Communication and information sharing is primarily voice-to-voice through phone or radio on specified radio frequencies. Visual cues are abundant and difficult to communicate between teams and team members that are not co-located. The aim was to assess the concept and feasibility of using a remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) system to support remote sensing in simulated major incident exercises. We carried out an experimental, pilot feasibility study. A custom-made, remotely controlled, multirotor unmanned aerial vehicle with vertical take-off and landing was equipped with digital colour- and thermal imaging cameras, a laser beam, a mechanical gripper arm and an avalanche transceiver. We collected data in five simulated exercises: 1) mass casualty traffic accident, 2) mountain rescue, 3) avalanche with buried victims, 4) fisherman through thin ice and 5) search for casualties in the dark. The unmanned aerial vehicle was remotely controlled, with high precision, in close proximity to air space obstacles at very low levels without compromising work on the ground. Payload capacity and tolerance to wind and turbulence were limited. Aerial video, shot from different altitudes, and remote aerial avalanche beacon search were streamed wirelessly in real time to a monitor at a ground base. Electromagnetic interference disturbed signal reception in the ground monitor. A small remotely piloted aircraft can be used as an effective tool carrier, although limited by its payload capacity, wind speed and flight endurance. Remote sensing using already existing remotely piloted aircraft technology in pre

  5. Structural differences in gray matter between glider pilots and non-pilots. A voxel based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosif eAhamed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full body rotations. In the present study we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry (VBM. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction and oculomotor control.

  6. Development of a Korean family attitude scale: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heeyoung; Schepp, Karen G; Jung, Young-Mi

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop and pilot test a Korean version of the Family Attitude Scale (FAS). We developed the Korean FAS using the translation/back-translation method. Two English monolinguals assessed its translation validity by comparing the original with a back-translated English version. Translation equivalence of the FAS and the refined Korean FAS was evaluated in a convenience sample of 56 bilingual Korean college students. The internal consistency of the Korean FAS and the FAS was 0.96 and 0.76, respectively. Mean scores on the two versions did not differ (t = -0.14, p = 0.89). The test-retest correlation coefficient was 0.37 (p < .001). Although the Korean FAS needs further refinement and psychometric testing, it was translated to reflect the original version and was a reliable instrument for the Korean population.

  7. A COMPARATIVE STUDY UNDER PROGRESSIVELY FIRST FAILURE CENSORED RAYLEIGH DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyan Prakash

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study presented in this article for two different asymmetric loss functions is based on simulation. Two-parameter Rayleigh model is considered here as the underline model for evaluating the properties of Bayes estimators under progressive first failure censored data. Known and unknown both cases of location parameter are considered here for Bayes estimation of scale parameter.

  8. Increased neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio in delirium: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egberts A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Angelique Egberts, Francesco US Mattace-Raso Section of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Aim: Delirium is a common and severe complication among older hospitalized patients. The pathophysiology is poorly understood, but it has been suggested that inflammation and oxidative stress may play a role. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate levels of the neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR – a marker of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress – in patients with and without delirium. Methods: This pilot study was performed within a retrospective chart review study that included acutely ill patients, 65 years and older, who were admitted to the ward of geriatrics of the Erasmus University Medical Center. All patients in whom the differential white blood cell (WBC counts as well as the C-reactive protein (CRP level were determined within 24 h after admission were included in the present study. Differences in NLR between patients with and without delirium were investigated using univariate analysis of variance, with adjustments for age, sex, comorbidities, CRP level, and total WBC count. Results: Eighty-six patients were included. Thirteen patients were diagnosed with delirium. In adjusted models, higher mean NLR values were found in patients with, than in those without, delirium (9.10 vs 5.18, P=0.003. Conclusion: In this pilot study, we found increased NLR levels in patients with delirium. This finding might suggest that an inadequate response of the immune system and oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of delirium. Further studies are needed to confirm the association between NLR and delirium. Keywords: delirium, pathology, biomarkers, leukocytes, immune system, brain 

  9. Pharmacogenetics of Ketamine-Induced Emergence Phenomena: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroke, Edwin N; Crawford, Sybil L; Dungan, Jennifer R

    Up to 55% of patients who are administered ketamine experience an emergence phenomena (EP) that closely mimics schizophrenia and increases their risk of injury; however, to date, no studies have investigated genetic association of ketamine-induced EP in healthy patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility and sample sizes required to explore the relationship between CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP. This cross-sectional, pharmacogenetic candidate, gene pilot study recruited 75 patients having minor elective outpatient surgeries. EP was measured with the Clinician Administered Dissociative State Scale. Genetic association of CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B (rs1019385 and rs1806191) single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP occurrence and severity were tested using logistic and linear regression. Forty-seven patients (63%) received ketamine and were genotyped, and 40% of them experienced EP. Occurrence and severity of EP were not associated with CYP2B6*6 or GRIN2B (p > .10). Exploratory analysis of nongenotype models containing age, ketamine dose, duration of anesthesia, and time from ketamine administration to assessment for EP significantly predicted EP occurrence (p = .001) and severity (p = .007). This pilot study demonstrates feasibility for implementing a pharmacogenetic study in a clinical setting, and we estimate that between 380 and 570 cases will be needed to adequately power future genetic association studies. Younger age, higher dose, and longer duration of anesthesia significantly predicted EP occurrence and severity among our pilot sample. Although the small sample size limited our ability to demonstrate significant genotype differences, we generated effect sizes, sample size estimates, and nongenetic covariates information in order to support future pharmacogenetic study design for evaluating this adverse event.

  10. Chiropractic manipulation in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoline Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS remains the most common deforming orthopedic condition in children. Increasingly, both adults and children are seeking complementary and alternative therapy, including chiropractic treatment, for a wide variety of health concerns. The scientific evidence supporting the use chiropractic intervention is inadequate. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot study and explore issues of safety, patient recruitment and compliance, treatment standardization, sham treatment refinement, inter-professional cooperation, quality assurance, and outcome measure selection. Methods Six patients participated in this 6-month study, 5 of whom were female. One female was braced. The mean age of these patients was 14 years, and the mean Cobb angle was 22.2 degrees. The study design was a randomized controlled clinical trial with two independent and blinded observers. Three patients were treated by standard medical care (observation or brace treatment, two were treated with standard medical care plus chiropractic manipulation, and one was treated with standard medical care plus sham manipulation. The primary outcome measure was Cobb, and the psychosocial measure was Scoliosis Quality of Life Index. Results Orthopedic surgeons and chiropractors were easily recruited and worked cooperatively throughout the trial. Patient recruitment and compliance was good. Chiropractic treatments were safely employed, and research protocols were successful. Conclusion Overall, our pilot study showed the viability for a larger randomized trial. This pilot confirms the strength of existing protocols with amendments for use in a full randomized controlled trial. Trial registration This trial has been assigned an international standard randomized controlled trial number by Current Controlled Trials, Ltd. http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/. The number is ISRCTN41221647.

  11. Simulation study of an automatic trim system for reducing the control forces on a light twin after an engine failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, E. C.; Brown, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    An automatic trim system for reducing the control forces after an engine failure on a light twin has been investigated on the Langley General Aviation Simulator. The system schedules open-loop trim tab deflections as a function of differential propeller slipstream dynamic pressure and freestream dynamic pressure. The system is described and the airplane-system static and dynamic characteristics are documented. Three NASA research pilots evaluated the effectiveness of the system for takeoff and landing maneuvers. A variety of off-nominal system characteristics were studied. The system was judged to be generally beneficial, providing a 2 to 3 point improvement in pilot rating for the tasks used in the evaluations.

  12. Simulation study of an automatic trim system for reducing the control forces on a light twin after an engine failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, E. C.; Brown, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    An automatic trim system for reducing the control forces after an engine failure on a light twin has been investigated on the Langley General Aviation Simulator. The system schedules open-loop trim tab deflections as a function of differential propeller slipstream dynamic pressure and freestream dynamic pressure. The system is described and the airplane-system static and dynamic characteristics are documented. Three NASA research pilots evaluated the effectiveness of the system for takeoff and landing maneuvers. A variety of off-nominal system characteristics were studied. The system was judged to be generally beneficial, providing a 2 to 3 point improvement in pilot rating for the tasks used in the evaluations.

  13. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting.

  14. Quantifying Pilot Contribution to Flight Safety during Hydraulic Systems Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Etherington, Timothy J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Kennedy, Kellie D.

    2017-01-01

    Accident statistics cite the flight crew as a causal factor in over 60% of large transport aircraft fatal accidents. Yet, a well-trained and well-qualified pilot is acknowledged as the critical center point of aircraft systems safety and an integral safety component of the entire commercial aviation system. The latter statement, while generally accepted, cannot be verified because little or no quantitative data exists on how and how many accidents/incidents are averted by crew actions. A joint NASA/FAA high-fidelity motion-base human-in-the-loop test was conducted using a Level D certified Boeing 737-800 simulator to evaluate the pilot's contribution to safety-of-flight during routine air carrier flight operations and in response to aircraft system failures. To quantify the human's contribution, crew complement (two-crew, reduced crew, single pilot) was used as the independent variable in a between-subjects design. This paper details the crew's actions, including decision-making, and responses while dealing with a hydraulic systems leak - one of 6 total non-normal events that were simulated in this experiment.

  15. Flight simulation using a Brain-Computer Interface: A pilot, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryger, Michael; Wester, Brock; Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Rich, Matthew; John, Brendan; Beaty, James; McLoughlin, Michael; Boninger, Michael; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C

    2017-01-01

    As Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems advance for uses such as robotic arm control it is postulated that the control paradigms could apply to other scenarios, such as control of video games, wheelchair movement or even flight. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether our BCI system, which involves decoding the signals of two 96-microelectrode arrays implanted into the motor cortex of a subject, could also be used to control an aircraft in a flight simulator environment. The study involved six sessions in which various parameters were modified in order to achieve the best flight control, including plane type, view, control paradigm, gains, and limits. Successful flight was determined qualitatively by evaluating the subject's ability to perform requested maneuvers, maintain flight paths, and avoid control losses such as dives, spins and crashes. By the end of the study, it was found that the subject could successfully control an aircraft. The subject could use both the jet and propeller plane with different views, adopting an intuitive control paradigm. From the subject's perspective, this was one of the most exciting and entertaining experiments she had performed in two years of research. In conclusion, this study provides a proof-of-concept that traditional motor cortex signals combined with a decoding paradigm can be used to control systems besides a robotic arm for which the decoder was developed. Aside from possible functional benefits, it also shows the potential for a new recreational activity for individuals with disabilities who are able to master BCI control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Homeopathic Secretin in autism: a clinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T W

    2001-04-01

    Autism is a condition characterised by impairments of social communication, social interaction and social imagination. The exact aetiology of autism is unknown but some autistic features have been explained by the 'opioid excess theory' in which excess brain peptide levels have a morphine-like activity. Reduction of peptide levels by administration of the duodenal enzyme Secretin has been found to improve social and language skills in autistic patients. Homeopathic Secretin has been said to produce similar effects. A pilot study was undertaken to study these effects by administration of Secretin to a group of autistic patients. Weekly assessment for 12 weeks was performed by the patients' care workers. Statistical analysis of the mean pre-treatment results compared with the mean treatment results suggested a worsening in the autistic symptoms during treatment. Discussion with the care workers revealed changes and some improvements that were not recordable on the scoring system. Further research into Secretin treatment of autism using a more detailed and customized scoring system would be justified. Following this pilot study a randomised controlled trial of Secretin vs placebo would be appropriate.

  17. Indonesian EFL Students’ Perspective on Writing Process: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imelda Hermilinda Abas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at understanding the EFL Indonesian students’ perspective on the writing process. The pilot study involved two male Indonesian postgraduate students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. The Indonesian students were selected based on the following criteria: (1 had enough knowledge in English writing, indicated by the completion of Academic Writing and Research Methodology courses taken in UUM; (2 had written an unpublished thesis during their undergraduate studies in Indonesia and they are writing their master or doctoral thesis in English; (3 used English extensively in writing their assignments, and in daily activities. Pseudonyms were used to refer to the participants as Sukarno and Suharto. The data were collected through in-depth interviews with the participants. The interview sessions took approximately 15-20 minutes for each participant and were videotaped and audiotaped. Semi-structured interview with 15 questions and probes were used. The results showed that the two participants had positive feelings and attitudes towards writing in English. Although they had a hard time in English writing during their undergraduate in Indonesia, they become fond of writing in English in their postgraduate time due to the exposure to English extensively. In composing, they used brainstorming, drafting, pausing, revising and editing in a recursive manner. Keywords: in-depth interview, pilot study, writing process, English as a Foreign Language (EFL

  18. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iragüen, D; Urcelay, S; San Martín, B

    2011-04-01

    Iragüen, D., Urcelay, S., San Martín, B. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap.34, 108-115. In Chile, there is no present government policy to survey and analyse adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the field of veterinary medicine. The intent of this study is to assess, for the first time, ADR frequency in treated animals. To this purpose, a 6-month period pilot study based on WHO recommendations was conducted to monitor ADRs in cats and dogs for frequently used drugs and common labelled signs. Of a total of 149 detected ADRs, 29 (6 in cats and 23 in dogs) were notified by means of ADR report forms, while the rest was identified after reviewing patient clinical records, thus evidencing strong under-reporting problems. More than 70% of ADRs were related to antimicrobials, vaccines and tranquilizers. In dogs, there was a significant effect on ADRs' presentation when acepromazine, amoxicillin, carprofen, ivermectin, sextuple vaccine (polyvalent vaccine that confers immunity against canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, Leptospira canicola, L. icterohemmoragiae, canine adenovirus type 2 and canine parainfluenza virus) and phytomenadione (subcutaneous injection) were administered. In the case of cats, a significant influence on ADRs was detected when acepromazine, amoxicillin or vitamin K was administered. Present results suggest the need for a pharmacovigilance programme in veterinary medicine for timely ADR-presenting drug detection and drug safety improvement.

  19. Plant substrate as a vehicle for trituration: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Mariani Verginelli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Lactose and hydroalcoholic solutions are not the proper substances to study the High Dilution (HD effects using plant models. Plant substrate can not be considered an inert vehicle, but it is not harmful to plants. Aim: In this pilot study we verify the possibility to use plant substrate as a trituration vehicle to prepare substances to be used in plants. Methods: We used a partially dried commercial plant substrate (12% humidity as the vehicle to prepare a set of trituration, having NaCl as the initial active substance. Triturations were performed using a ball mill, with a mass dilution rate of 1:18 (set A and 1:100 (set B, up to the 7th trituration, that is, each set contained 8 groups: A0 to A7 and B0 to B7. For each group, the triturated substrate was mixed with a fresh one in a mass ratio of 1:1. After homogenization, 18 seeds of radish (Raphanus sativus were sown in plastic trays (31 ml cell, for each group and kept in a green house exposed to natural thermal and light variations. After 4 weeks we determine the germination rate and number of mature cotyledon. Then 5 plants from each group were selected at random to determine the following parameters: averaged leaf area, length, fresh and dry mass and pigments amount (chlorophyll a and b, carotenes. Results: Groups A0 and B0 (higher saline concentration showed those typical effects of saline stress: lower germination ratio, immature cotyledons, smaller and shorter leaves, higher water content and less pigments. All the others groups showed similar results, for all parameters, except pigments amount. The chlorophyll to carotene ratio (CCr showed an unexpected but interesting behavior (figure 1.Both sets showed an initial CCr growing (as expected due the saline ratio decrease, but followed by an unexpected decrement. Set B (the higher mass dilution rate, 1:100 showed a slower change, compared to set A. When we sort the results in order of saline amount we observe two peaks (figure

  20. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? - A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ashish; Dhull, Kanika Singh; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-05-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (pdenture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures.

  1. Psycho-education programme for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Maaytah Mohammed

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are by far the most predominant condition affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, however many patients have mild self-limiting symptoms and should not be referred for specialist care. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a simple, cost-effective management programme for TMDs using CD-ROM. 41 patients (age 18–70 participated in this study, patients were divided into three groups: the 1st group were involved in an attention placebo CD-ROM (contain anatomical information about the temporomandibular system, the 2nd group received information on CD-ROM designed to increase their control and self efficacy, while the 3rd group received the same programme of the 2nd group added to it an introduction to self-relaxing techniques followed by audio tape of progressive muscle relaxation exercises. Each of the groups was asked to complete a number of questionnaires on the day of initial consultation and six weeks afterwards. Results The two experimental groups (2nd & 3rd were equally effective in reducing pain, disability and distress, and both were more effective than the attention placebo group (1st, however the experimental groups appeared to have improved at follow-up relative to the placebo-group in terms of disability, pain and depressed mood. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of the design. A full, randomized, controlled trial is required to confirm the efficacy of the interventions developed here.

  2. [Dental caries and early childhood development: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, F Loreto; Sanz, B Javier; Mejía, L Gloria

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between dental caries and early childhood development in 3-year-olds from Talca, Chile. A pilot study with a convenience sample of 3-year-olds from Talca (n = 39) who attend public healthcare centers. Child development was measured by the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI), a screening tool used nationally among pre-school children to assess language development, fine motor skills and coordination areas. Dental caries prevalence was evaluated by decayed, missing, filled teeth (DFMT) and decayed, missing, filled tooth surfaces (DFMS) ceo-d and ceo-s indexes. The children were divided into two groups according to the PDIscore: those with a score of 40 or more were considered developmentally normal (n = 32), and those with a score below 40 were considered as having impaired development (n = 7). The severity of caries (DMFT) was negatively correlated with PDI (r = -0.82), and children with the lowest TEPSI score had the highest DFMT values. The average DMFT in children with normal development was 1.31, and 3.57 for those with impaired development. This pilot study indicates that the severity of dental caries is correlated with early childhood development. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  3. Cervical Spine Motion During Extrication: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafer, Jeffrey S

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal immobilization is one of the most commonly performed pre-hospital procedures. Little research has been done on the movement of the neck during immobilization and extrication. In this study we used a sophisticated infrared six-camera motion-capture system (Motion Analysis Corporation, Santa Rosa, CA, to study the motion of the neck and head during extrication. A mock automobile was constructed to scale, and volunteer patients, with infrared markers on bony prominences, were extricated by experienced paramedics. We found in this pilot study that allowing an individual to exit the car under his own volition with cervical collar in place may result in the least amount of motion of the cervical spine. Further research should be conducted to verify these findings. In addition, this system could be utilized to study a variety of methods of extrication from automobile accidents. [WestJEM. 2009;10:74-78.

  4. Using singing to nurture children's hearing? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Graham F; Saunders, Jo; Edwards, Sian; Palmer, Zoe; Himonides, Evangelos; Knight, Julian; Mahon, Merle; Griffin, Susanna; Vickers, Deborah A

    2015-09-01

    This article reports a pilot study of the potential benefits of a sustained programme of singing activities on the musical behaviours and hearing acuity of young children with hearing impairment (HI). Twenty-nine children (n=12 HI and n=17 NH) aged between 5 and 7 years from an inner-city primary school in London participated, following appropriate ethical approval. The predominantly classroom-based programme was designed by colleagues from the UCL Institute of Education and UCL Ear Institute in collaboration with a multi-arts charity Creative Futures and delivered by an experienced early years music specialist weekly across two school terms. There was a particular emphasis on building a repertoire of simple songs with actions and allied vocal exploration. Musical learning was also supported by activities that drew on visual imagery for sound and that included simple notation and physical gesture. An overall impact assessment of the pilot programme embraced pre- and post-intervention measures of pitch discrimination, speech perception in noise and singing competency. Subsequent statistical data analyses suggest that the programme had a positive impact on participant children's singing range, particularly (but not only) for HI children with hearing aids, and also in their singing skills. HI children's pitch perception also improved measurably over time. Findings imply that all children, including those with HI, can benefit from regular and sustained access to age-appropriate musical activities.

  5. Why undertake a pilot in a qualitative PhD study? Lessons learned to promote success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Jane; Archibong, Uduak; Walton, Sean

    2017-01-23

    Background Pilot studies can play an important role in qualitative studies. Methodological and practical issues can be shaped and refined by undertaking pilots. Personal development and researchers' competence are enhanced and lessons learned can inform the development and quality of the main study. However, pilot studies are rarely published, despite their potential to improve knowledge and understanding of the research. Aim To present the main lessons learned from undertaking a pilot in a qualitative PhD study. Discussion This paper draws together lessons learned when undertaking a pilot as part of a qualitative research project. Important methodological and practical issues identified during the pilot study are discussed including access, recruitment, data collection and the personal development of the researcher. The resulting changes to the final study are also highlighted. Conclusion Sharing experiences of and lessons learned in a pilot study enhances personal development, improves researchers' confidence and competence, and contributes to the understanding of research. Implications for practice Pilots can be used effectively in qualitative studies to refine the final design, and provide the researcher with practical experience to enhance confidence and competence.

  6. Parental Grief and Marital Issues Aftermath: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Atikah Mohamed Hussin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The death of a child is difficult to the bereaved parents. Literature had associated the loss with marriage disruption. The issues on that the difficulties to communicate, gender-related coping mechanisms and sexual need were discussed as reasons for bereaved parents to have conflict in their relationship. However there is limited knowledge about this issue. A pilot study has been conducted among six bereaved parents. The bereaved parents were Malaysian Muslim bereaved parents. They were interviewed individually to explore the challenges or conflicts that they had experienced after the death of their child. This study revealed that there were situations which bereaved parents described as having difficulties in their relationship. However, this study also revealed that the mutual understanding and respect to each other are the most of important components for bereaved parents to maintain their relationship post-loss. This study suggested the importance of suggesting couple counselling to bereaved parents after the death of their child.

  7. A Problem Solving Intervention for hospice caregivers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Fruehling, Lynne Thomas; Haggarty-Robbins, Donna; Doorenbos, Ardith; Wechkin, Hope; Berry, Donna

    2010-08-01

    The Problem Solving Intervention (PSI) is a structured, cognitive-behavioral intervention that provides people with problem-solving coping skills to help them face major negative life events and daily challenges. PSI has been applied to numerous settings but remains largely unexplored in the hospice setting. The aim of this pilot study was to demonstrate the feasibility of PSI targeting informal caregivers of hospice patients. We enrolled hospice caregivers who were receiving outpatient services from two hospice agencies. The intervention included three visits by a research team member. The agenda for each visit was informed by the problem-solving theoretical framework and was customized based on the most pressing problems identified by the caregivers. We enrolled 29 caregivers. Patient's pain was the most frequently identified problem. On average, caregivers reported a higher quality of life and lower level of anxiety postintervention than at baseline. An examination of the caregiver reaction assessment showed an increase of positive esteem average and a decrease of the average value of lack of family support, impact on finances, impact on schedules, and on health. After completing the intervention, caregivers reported lower levels of anxiety, improved problem solving skills, and a reduced negative impact of caregiving. Furthermore, caregivers reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention, perceiving it as a platform to articulate their challenges and develop a plan to address them. Findings demonstrate the value of problem solving as a psycho-educational intervention in the hospice setting and call for further research in this area.

  8. Patient satisfaction with colonoscopy: A literature review and pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Lucas; Arthurs, Erin; Sewitch, Maida J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend that colonoscopic colorectal cancer screening be undertaken every 10 years after the age of 50 years. However, because the procedure does not meet criteria that promote screening uptake, patient satisfaction with colonoscopy may encourage repeat screening. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature and conduct a pilot study of patient satisfaction with the colonoscopy experience. METHODS: All cohort studies from January 1997 to August 2008 in the MEDLINE database that measured either patient satisfaction with colonoscopy, patient willingness to return for colonoscopy under the same conditions or patient preference for colonoscopy compared with other large bowel procedures were identified. The search was supplemented by journal citation lists in the retrieved articles. RESULTS: Of the 29 studies identified, 15 met the inclusion criteria. Consistently, the vast majority of patients (approximately 95%) were very satisfied with their colonoscopy experience. Patient satisfaction was similar for screening and nonscreening colonoscopy. Patient willingness to return for the procedure ranged from 73% to 100%. Of the five studies that examined modality preference, three studies reported the majority of patients preferred colonography to colonoscopy and two studies reported the reverse. Our pilot study findings mirrored those of other studies that were conducted in the United States. The major limitation of the included studies was that patients who were most dissatisfied may have gone elsewhere to have their colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients were very satisfied with colonoscopy. The majority were willing to return for repeat testing under the same conditions, and colonoscopy was not preferred over other modalities. However, studies were limited by methodological shortcomings. PMID:19319384

  9. Pilot Study of a Patient-Centered Radiology Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, J Shannon; Furtado, Vanessa F; Keller, Lisa A; Lotti, Judith Borsody; Saltalamacchia, Catherine A; Lennes, Inga T; Salazar, Gloria M

    2017-02-01

    The Radiology Process Model (RPM) was previously described in terms of its conceptual basis and proposed survey items. The current study describes the first pilot application of the RPM in the field and the results of initial psychometric analysis. We used an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot RPM survey in 100 patients having outpatient interventional radiology procedures. The 24 survey items had 4 or 5 levels of severity. We assessed for missing data, items that patients found confusing, any suggestions by patients for additional items and clarity of items from patient feedback. Factor analysis was performed and internal consistency measured. Construct validity was assessed by correlation of patient responses to the items as a summated scale with a visual analog scale (VAS) they completed indicating their interventional radiology experience. The visual analog scale and the RPM summated scale were strongly correlated (r = 0.7). Factor analysis showed four factors: interactions with facility and doctors/staff, time-sensitive aspects, pain, and anxiety. The items showed high internal consistency (alpha: 0.86) as a group and approximately 0.7 to 0.9 by the factors. Analysis shows that two items could be deleted (cost and communication between radiologist and referrers). Revision of two items and potential addition of others are discussed. The RPM shows initial evidence of psychometric validity and internal consistency reliability. Minor changes are anticipated before wider use. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Management of psychiatric inpatients with advanced cancer: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhondali, Wadih; Ledoux, Mathilde; Sahraoui, Fatma; Marotta, Juliette; Sanchez, Vincent; Filbet, Marilène

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of cancer is not well established and probably underestimated in long-stay psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric patients do not have the same access for cancer screening and care. Therapeutic decision-making is a real ethical problem. In this context, access to medical care should be provided by the establishment of guidelines and/or recommendations for this specific population. The aim of our study was to assess how cancer was managed among long term psychiatric inpatients. For this pilot study, we used a mixed methodology: a quantitative part with a retrospective chart review of cancer patients in a psychiatric institution and a qualitative part based on semi-structured interviews with psychiatrists with discourse analysis. Delay in cancer diagnosis can be explained by communication and behavior disorders, inadequate screening, and additional tests often refused by patients. Compliance and ethical issues (i.e. obtaining informed consent) are many pitfalls to optimal cancer care that should be explored in further research.

  11. Connecting Primary Health Care: A Comprehensive Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Maghsoudloo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The collection of data within the primary health care facilities in Iran is essentially paper-based. It is focused on family’s health, monitoring of non-infectious and infectious diseases. Clearly due to the paper-based nature of the tasks, timely decision making at most can be difficult if not impossible. As part of an on-going electronic health record implementation project at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, for the first time in the region, based on a comprehensive pilot project, four urban healthcare facilities are connected to their headquarters and beyond, covering all aspects of primary health care, for the last four years. Without delving into the technical aspects of its software engineering processes, the progress of the implementation is reported, selection of summarized data is presented, and experience gained thus far are discussed. Four years passed and if time is any important reason to go by, then it is safe to accept that the software architecture and electronic health record structural model implemented are robust and yet extensible. Aims and duration of a pilot study should be clearly defined prior to start and managed till its completion. Resistance to change and particularly to information technology, apart from its technical aspects, is also based on human factors.

  12. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls.

  13. Canine heartworm disease: a review and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, K C

    1987-01-01

    Canine heartworm disease is a mosquito vectored illness resulting from parasitization by the filariid worm Dirofilaria immitis. While presenting some danger to humans, the filariid has its greatest impact on the canine population. In recent years the disease has become established throughout much of the United States, perhaps as the result of diffusion from a suspected hearth in the southeastern coastal plain. While its distribution is known in general terms, much research remains to be done to assess the pattern of distribution as well as the impact of D. immitis on canine populations and their human owners for many locales. The present study provides a review of the literature on the parasite; on its distribution, particularly in the United States; and on the ecology of canine heartworm disease. A pilot study is presented which emphasizes the problems encountered in establishing a data base for observations on the disease at the local level.

  14. A mentored cooperative group pilot study: atrophic vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Joanne L; Jarvis, Chandler; Bartholomew, Deborah; Yee, Lisa

    2014-02-01

    To review nursing research initiatives from two cooperative groups and outline a pilot study performed by a junior nurse researcher mentored by cooperative group nurse researchers and institutional physicians. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus, World Wide Web. Nursing research can be initiated and led by nurses in the cooperative group setting. The team approach model of research includes several disciplines to examine multiple facets of the same problem, or of multiple problems that a cancer patient may face. This new model will enable a greater number of nurse researchers to investigate symptom management, survivorship, and quality-of-life issues. Nurse researchers should be included in every cooperative group study to investigate nurse-sensitive outcomes and issues related to symptom management, survivorship, and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tai Chi for older nurses: a workplace wellness pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Mary Val; Wu, Ge; Shaner-McRae, Hollie; Rambur, Betty; McIntosh, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of a Tai Chi workplace wellness program as a cost effective way of improving physical and mental health, reducing work related stress, and improving work productivity among older nurses in a hospital setting Design A randomized control trial of two groups (control and Tai Chi group). A randomized control trial of two groups (control and Tai Chi group). Northeastern academic medical center. A convenience sample of eleven female nurses (mean age 54.4 years). The Tai Chi group (n = 6) was asked to attend Tai Chi classes once a week offered at their worksite and to practice on their own for 10 minutes each day at least 4 days per week for 15 weeks. Controls (n = 5) received no intervention. SF-36 Health Survey, Nursing Stress Scale (NSS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Sit-and-Reach test, Functional Reach test, the Work Limitations Questionnaire, workplace injury and unscheduled time off. The two study groups were compared descriptively and changes across time in the intervention versus control were compared. The Tai Chi group took no unscheduled time-off hours, whereas, the control group was absent 49 hours during the study period. There was also a 3% increase in work productivity and significant improvement in functional reach (p=0.03) compared to the control group. Other outcomes were not statistically significant. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of Tai Chi with older female workers as a cost effective wellness option in the workplace; thus encouraging replication with a larger sample. Methodological implications were also addressed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CHASE assessment of the North Sea – a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, N.; Andersen, Jesper; Høgåsen, T.

    In this pilot study, hazardous substances in the North Sea were assessed and classified using the HELCOM Chemical Substances Status Assessment Tool (CHASE). The study was based on monitoring by Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Together, 1350...

  17. Acupressure for smoking cessation – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moody Russell C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco smoking is a serious risk to health: several therapies are available to assist those who wish to stop. Smokers who approach publicly funded stop-smoking clinics in the UK are currently offered nicotine replacement therapy (NRT or bupropion, and group behaviour therapy, for which there is evidence of effectiveness. Acupuncture and acupressure are also used to help smokers, though a systematic review of the evidence of their effectiveness was inconclusive. The aim of this pilot project was to determine the feasibility of a study to test acupressure as an adjunct to one anti-smoking treatment currently offered, and to inform the design of the study. Methods An open randomised controlled pilot study was conducted within the six week group programme offered by the Smoking Advice Service in Plymouth, UK. All participants received the usual treatment with NRT and group behavioural therapy, and were randomised into three groups: group A with two auricular acupressure beads, group B with one bead, and group C with no additional therapy. Participants were taught to press the beads when they experienced cravings. Beads were worn in one ear for four weeks, being replaced as necessary. The main outcome measures assessed in the pilot were success at quitting (expired CO ≤ 9 ppm, the dose of NRT used, and the rating of withdrawal symptoms using the Mood and Symptoms Scale. Results From 49 smokers attending four clinics, 24 volunteered to participate, 19 attended at least once after quitting, and seven remained to the final week. Participants who dropped out reported significantly fewer previous quit attempts, but no other significant differences. Participants reported stimulating the beads as expected during the initial days after quitting, but most soon reduced the frequency of stimulation. The discomfort caused by the beads was minor, and there were no significant side effects. There were technical problems with adhesiveness of

  18. A case study on engineering failure analysis of link chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Gu; Lee, Seong-Beom; Lee, Hong-Chul

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of chain installation condition on stress distribution that could eventually cause disastrous failure from sudden deformation and geometric rupture. Fractographic method used for the failed chain indicates that over-stress was considered as the root cause of failure. 3D modeling and finite element analysis for the chain, used in a crane hook, were performed with a three-dimensional interactive application program, CATIA, commercial finite element analysis and computational fluid dynamic software, ANSYS. The results showed that the state of stress was changed depending on the initial position of the chain that was installed in the hook. Especially, the magnitude of the stress was strongly affected by the bending forces, which are 2.5 times greater (under the simulation condition currently investigated) than that from the plain tensile load. Also, it was noted that the change of load state is strongly related to the failure of parts. The chain can hold an ultimate load of about 8 tons with only the tensile load acting on it. The conclusions of this research clearly showed that a reduction of the loss from similar incidents can be achieved when an operator properly handles the installation of the chain.

  19. A pharmacokinetic study of roxatidine acetate in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameire, N; Rosenkranz, B; Maass, L; Brockmeier, D

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of roxatidine acetate 150 mg were studied in 31 patients with varying degrees of chronic renal failure. The patients were divided into 5 groups according to their creatinine clearance (Clcr): controls (Clcr 94.5 +/- 13.9 ml/min; n = 6); mild chronic renal failure (Clcr 47 +/- 6 ml/min; n = 4); moderate chronic renal failure (Clcr 27.3 +/- 3.1 ml/min; n = 4); severe chronic renal failure (Clcr 12.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min; n = 5) and uraemia (Clcr 6.6 +/- 0.6 ml/min; n = 12). Serum and urine samples were analysed with capillary gas chromatography to measure the salt of the desacetyl metabolite of roxatidine acetate (roxatidine). The terminal half-life was 6.02 +/- 0.31 hours in controls and 7.35 +/- 0.57, 9.3 +/- 0.83, 14.6 +/- 3.7 and 18.10 +/- 2.77 hours, respectively, in the 4 other groups, with progressively decreasing creatinine clearance. Maximum serum concentration and time to maximum serum concentration rose from 816 +/- 75 ng/ml and 2.08 +/- 0.22 hours, respectively, in controls to 1364.7 +/- 156 ng/ml and 4.05 +/- 0.47 hours, respectively, in uraemic patients. Relative total clearance progressively decreased with decreasing glomerular filtration rate (GFR) [from 353.6 +/- 26 ml/min in controls to 90.31 +/- 12.2 ml/min in patients with uraemia]. Renal clearance decreased from a control of 243.9 +/- 56 ml/min to 12.32 +/- 0.18 ml/min in uraemic patients. A linear correlation between creatinine clearance and both relative total clearance and renal drug clearance was noted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. CHASE assessment of the North Sea – a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, N.; Andersen, Jesper; Høgåsen, T.;

    In this pilot study, hazardous substances in the North Sea were assessed and classified using the HELCOM Chemical Substances Status Assessment Tool (CHASE). The study was based on monitoring by Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Together, 1350...... assessment and classification of “hazardous substances status”. This can be in particular advantageous for use in remedial action plan and, in particular, for the sciencebased evaluation of whether the North Sea is undisturbed by hazardous substances....... locations (1155 for sediment and 195 for biota) were used resulting in 966 matrices sampled in the open-sea and 506 in coastal areas. CHASE is a multi-metric indicator-based tool developed for the HELCOM integrated thematic assessment of hazardous substances in the Baltic Sea. CHASE produces an integrated...

  1. Charting a roadmap for heart failure biomarker studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tariq; Fiuzat, Mona; Pencina, Michael J; Geller, Nancy L; Zannad, Faiez; Cleland, John G F; Snider, James V; Blankenberg, Stephan; Adams, Kirkwood F; Redberg, Rita F; Kim, Jae B; Mascette, Alice; Mentz, Robert J; O'Connor, Christopher M; Felker, G Michael; Januzzi, James L

    2014-10-01

    Heart failure is a syndrome with a pathophysiological basis that can be traced to dysfunction in several interconnected molecular pathways. Identification of biomarkers of heart failure that allow measurement of the disease on a molecular level has resulted in enthusiasm for their use in prognostication and selection of appropriate therapies. However, despite considerable amounts of information available on numerous biomarkers, inconsistent research methodologies and lack of clinical correlations have made bench-to-bedside translations rare and left the literature with countless publications of varied quality. There is a need for a systematic and collaborative approach aimed at definitively studying the clinical benefits of novel biomarkers. In this review, on the basis of input from academia, industry, and governmental agencies, we propose a systematized approach based on adherence to specific quality measures for studies looking to augment current prediction model or use biomarkers to tailor therapeutics. We suggest that study quality, rather than results, should determine publication and propose a system for grading biomarker studies. We outline the need for collaboration between clinical investigators and statisticians to introduce more advanced statistical methodologies into the field of biomarkers that would allow for data from a large number of variables to be distilled into clinically actionable information. Lastly, we propose the creation of a heart failure biomarker consortium that would allow for a comprehensive list of biomarkers to be concomitantly analyzed in a pooled sample of randomized clinical trials and hypotheses to be generated for testing in biomarker-guided trials. Such a consortium could collaborate in sharing samples to identify biomarkers, undertake meta-analyses on completed trials, and spearhead clinical trials to test the clinical utility of new biomarkers.

  2. Social media in adolescent health literacy education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Carrie Kw; Bridges, Susan M; Srinivasan, Divya Parthasarathy; Cheng, Brenda Ss

    2015-03-09

    While health literacy has gained notice on a global stage, the initial focus on seeking associations with medical conditions may have overlooked its impact across generations. Adolescent health literacy, specifically in dentistry, is an underexplored area despite the significance of this formative stage on an individual's approach to healthy lifestyles and behaviors. The aim is to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of three major social media outlets - Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube - in supporting adolescents' oral health literacy (OHL) education. A random sample of 22 adolescents (aged 14-16 years) from an English-medium international school in Hong Kong provided informed consent. Sociodemographic information, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience were collected via a questionnaire. A pre- and post-test of OHL (REALD-30) was administered by two trained, calibrated examiners. Following pre-test, participants were randomly assigned to one of three social media outlets: Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube. Participants received alerts posted daily for 5 consecutive days requiring online accessing of modified and original OHL education materials. One-way ANOVA ( analysis of variance) was used to compare the mean difference between the pre- and the post-test results among the three social media. No associations were found between the social media allocated and participants' sociodemographics, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience. Of the three social media, significant differences in literacy assessment scores were evident for participants who received oral health education messages via Facebook (P=.02) and YouTube (P=.005). Based on the results of the pilot study, Facebook and YouTube may be more efficient media outlets for OHL promotion and education among adolescent school children when compared to Twitter. Further analyses with a larger study group is warranted.

  3. Familial paraphilia: a pilot study with the construction of genograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labelle, Alain; Bourget, Dominique; Bradford, John M W; Alda, Martin; Tessier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Biological factors are likely predisposing and modulating elements in sexually deviant behavior. The observation that paraphilic behavior tends to cluster in some families is intriguing and potentially raises questions as to whether shared genetic factors may play a role in the transmission of paraphilia. This pilot study introduces five families in which we found presence of paraphilia over generations. We constructed genograms on the basis of a standardized family history. Results document the aggregation of sexual deviations within the sample of families and support a clinical/phenomenological heterogeneity of sexual deviation. The concept of paraphilia in relation to phenotypic expressions and the likelihood of a spectrum of related disorders must be clarified before conclusions can be reached as to family aggregation of paraphilia based on biological factors.

  4. A Pilot Study of Mindfulness Meditation for Pediatric Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn C. Waelde

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in psychological interventions for pediatric chronic pain, there has been little research examining mindfulness meditation for these conditions. This study presents data from a pilot clinical trial of a six-week manualized mindfulness meditation intervention offered to 20 adolescents aged 13–17 years. Measures of pain intensity, functional disability, depression and parent worry about their child’s pain were obtained at baseline and post-treatment. Results indicated no significant changes in pain or depression, however functional disability and frequency of pain functioning complaints improved with small effect sizes. Parents’ worry about child’s pain significantly decreased with a large effect size. Participants rated intervention components positively and most teens suggested that the number of sessions be increased. Three case examples illustrate mindfulness meditation effects and precautions. Mindfulness meditation shows promise as a feasible and acceptable intervention for youth with chronic pain. Future research should optimize intervention components and determine treatment efficacy.

  5. Early caries detection: comparison of two procedures. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Guerra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Caries is one of the most common chronic diseases and the main cause of tooth loss. Early detection provides a better evaluation of the disease and improves the chances to succeed of prevention strategies. This pilot study aims to compare the effectiveness of ICDAS-II system (International Caries Detection and Assessment System and the fluorescence terminal (Proof of VistaCam iX intraoral camera, in the early diagnosis and assessment of caries in permanent teeth. Results shows a fair correlation between ICDAS II and VistaCam iX Proof; intraoral camera proved to be a useful support to the ICDAS II visual / tactile monitoring of carious lesions in occlusal surfaces.

  6. Physical activity in Georgia state parks: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln R. Larson; Jason W. Whiting; Gary T. Green

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the role of Georgia State Parks in the promotion of physical activity among different racial/ethnic and age groups. Data were collected at three state parks in north Georgia during the summer of 2009 using two research methods: behavior observations (N=2281) and intercept surveys (N=473).

  7. Land use mapping in Erie County, Pennsylvania: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); May, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of mapping land use in the Great Lakes Basin area utilizing ERTS-1 data. Small streams were clearly defined by the presence of trees along their length in predominantly agricultural country. Field patterns were easily differentiated from forested areas; dairy and beef farms were differentiated from other farmlands, but no attempt was made to identify crops. Large railroad lines and major highway systems were identified. The city of Erie and several smaller towns were identified, as well as residential areas between these towns, and docks along the shoreline in Erie. Marshes, forests, and beaches within Presque Isle State Park were correctly identified, using the DCLUS program. Bay water was differentiated from lake water, with a small amount of misclassification.

  8. A study of bone marrow failure syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bone marrow failure syndrome (BMFS, or aplastic anemia, includes peripheral blood single cytopenias, as well as pancytopenia due to inability of the marrow to effectively produce blood cells. Aim: To study the clinico-hematological profile and etiological factors of bone marrow failure syndrome in children. Setting and Design: This prospective study was carried out in the Department of Pediatrics of a university teaching hospital over 36 months. Materials and Methods: Children with pancytopenia (Hb < 10 g/dl, absolute neutrophil count < 1.5 x 10 9 /L, platelet count < 100 x 10 9 /L and bone marrow cellularity < 25% were included in the study. History of exposure to drugs, socioeconomic status, ethnicity and occupation of father were noted. Bone marrow aspiration; trephine biopsy; Ham test; viral studies for hepatitis A, B and C; and cytogenetic investigations were carried out. Statistical Analysis: Relative risk was estimated by odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI in matched cases and controls. Results: Of the 53 children studied, 6 (11.3% were diagnosed as Fanconi anemia. Two cases had features of myelodysplastic syndrome. Forty-five children were labeled as acquired aplastic anemia, of whom one had evidence of hepatitis B infection and two patients (5.8% had paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Aplastic anemia was more common in children from family with lower socioeconomic status; in Muslims; and where the father′s occupation was weaving, dyeing and painting. However, the number was small to make statistically significant conclusions. No correlation could be established with exposure to drugs. Conclusion: Fanconi anemia was responsible for approximately one-tenth of the cases of bone marrow failure syndrome. Majority of the patients had acquired aplastic anemia. Hepatitis B infection was an uncommon cause of acquired aplastic anemia.

  9. A Pilot Study on Measuring Customer’s Satisfaction Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vide Boltez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Determine the level of customer satisfaction of a company’s products and services to obtain information on needed improvements.Purpose: The purpose of measuring customer’s satisfaction level is to obtain information directly from the final buyer that bought our product. The next step is to analyze the information obtained and to take the results into consideration to improve the working process in production and in other departments of the company.Method: The method used for the pilot study to measure customer satisfaction was a short questionnaire that was given to 10 customers of our product and 10 completed questionnaires were obtained.Results: The results showed the level of satisfaction of final buyers of roof tiles and roofs that the company has achieved through their products and services. The results facilitate the production, logistics, purchasing and sales department to obtain information on positive satisfaction levels and areas that need change. At the same time, the final buyer was identified (i.e., name, surname, address, and so forth, which up until now had not been.Organization: The organization will save time and money in the future, because it will continuously measure customer satisfaction to improve production and other departments in the organization towards creating satisfied customers.Society: Final buyers of roofs are, and will be, more satisfied with their decisions, because the organization carries out after-sales satisfaction levels.Originality: The research was original, because up to this date the organization has not conducted research in such a manner.Limitations: The pilot study used 10 completed questionnaires that represent a very small sample to make any generalizations.

  10. Tryptophan degradation in women with breast cancer: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schubert Christine M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered tryptophan metabolism and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity are linked to cancer development and progression. In addition, these biological factors have been associated with the development and severity of neuropsychiatric syndromes, including major depressive disorder. However, this biological mechanism associated with both poor disease outcomes and adverse neuropsychiatric symptoms has received little attention in women with breast cancer. Therefore, a pilot study was undertaken to compare levels of tryptophan and other proteins involved in tryptophan degradation in women with breast cancer to women without cancer, and secondarily, to examine levels in women with breast caner over the course of chemotherapy. Findings Blood samples were collected from women with a recent diagnosis of breast cancer (n = 33 before their first cycle of chemotherapy and after their last cycle of chemotherapy. The comparison group (n = 24 provided a blood sample prior to breast biopsy. Plasma concentrations of tryptophan, kynurenine, and tyrosine were determined. The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (KYN/TRP was used to estimate indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. On average, the women with breast cancer had lower levels of tryptophan, elevated levels of kynurenine and tyrosine and an increased KYN/TRP ratio compared to women without breast cancer. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the KYN/TRP ratio (p = 0.036, which remained elevated in women with breast cancer throughout the treatment trajectory. Conclusions The findings of this pilot study suggest that increased tryptophan degradation may occur in women with early-stage breast cancer. Given the multifactorial consequences of increased tryptophan degradation in cancer outcomes and neuropsychiatric symptom manifestation, this biological mechanism deserves broader attention in women with breast cancer.

  11. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Junichi; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Seki, Noriko; Hongo, Atsushi; Mizutani, Yasushi; Miyagi, Yasunari; Yoshinouchi, Mitsuo; Kudo, Takafumi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    Recently, attempts have made to use radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in various solid tumors including cervical cancer. Twenty-four patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were treated with concurrent Carboplatin (16-24 mg/m{sup 2}/day) or Nedaplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/week) and conventional radiotherapy. Of 13 evaluable patients, there were nine complete responders and four partial responders. There was no renal damage or grade 4 hematological toxicity. Gastrointestinal adverse reactions were mild. One patient had grade 3 dermatologic toxicity after delayed radiation therapy. This pilot study suggests that daily Carboplatin or weekly Nedaplatin administered with standard radiation therapy is safe, well-tolerated, and thus may be useful as a radiation sensitizer in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. (author)

  12. Acute Renal Failure in Snake Envenomation: A Large Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athappan Ganesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Venomous snakebite is a common problem in India. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence, risk factors and prognostic factors in snakebite induced acute renal failure and to determine their outcome from a tertiary care center in India. A total of 1548 cases of snakebite admitted to adult medical wards of Government Rajaji hospital from January 2003 to December 2004, were studied from hospitalization to discharge or death. There were 1180 poisonous and 368 nonpoisonous snakebites. Among the poisonous, there were 1121 viperidae and 59 elapidae bites. A total of 159 (13.5% patients (M = 98, F = 61 developed acute renal failure; of them 72 (45.3% required dialysis and 36 (22.6% expired (of them, 23 required dialysis. ARF patients were older than non ARF (39.1 vs. 35.4 years, p = 0.03. Cellulites (OR 9.20, p = 0.032, regional lymphadenopathy (OR 22.0, p= 0.001, intravascular hemolysis (OR 3.70, p = 0.004 and bite to needle time more than 2 hours (OR 2.10, p = 0.001 were identified as independent risk factors for the development of acute renal failure. Bite to needle time more than 2 hours (OR 2.10, p = 0.01, presence of intravascular hemolysis (OR 13.0, p = 0.004 and hypotension (OR 22.2, p = 0.04 and the presence of bleeding manifestations (OR 7.91, p = 0.032 were identified as independent predictors of poor outcome in snakebite victims. We conclude that our study demonstrates several risk factors and predictors for the development and outcome of ARF in patients with snakebites.

  13. Appreciative Inquiry: A Pilot Study of School Counselor Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rolla E.; Emil, Serap

    2010-01-01

    Counselor education programs are influenced by humanistic philosophy, including the strengths-based perspective. This article describes how appreciative inquiry, a strengths-based approach to systems change, informed the development of a pilot survey used to assess graduate perceptions of a school counselor education program. (Contains 1 table.)

  14. Pulp response in sound and carious teeth: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, R C

    1981-02-01

    This article describes a pilot investigation in which the response of the pulps in both sound and carious rat molar teeth to traumatic exposure and treatment with three different compounds was assessed. Two of the compounds appeared to give a more favorable response in carious teeth. These results are discussed, and future experiments described.

  15. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  16. Effects of interleukin-1 blockade with anakinra on aerobic exercise capacity in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (from the D-HART pilot study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tassell, B.W. Van; Arena, R.; Biondi-Zoccai, G.; Canada, J.; Oddi, C.; Abouzaki, N.A.; Jahangiri, A.; Falcao, R.A.; Kontos, M.C.; Shah, K.B.; Voelkel, N.F.; Dinarello, C.A.; Abbate, A.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a clinical syndrome of exercise intolerance due to impaired myocardial relaxation and/or increased stiffness. Patients with HFpEF often show signs of chronic systemic inflammation, and experimental studies have shown that interleukin-1 (IL-1)

  17. Research Note-Testing for Gerontological Competencies: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, Colleen; Curl, Angela L.; Woodbury, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the pilot delivery of an evaluation method to gauge student learning of gerontological competencies. Using a pretest and posttest design, data were collected on 46 students over 3 classes. Results indicated significant improvement in how students rated or perceived their competencies skill level between pretest and posttest…

  18. Virtual Service, Real Data: Results of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbee, Jo; Ward, David; Ma, Wei

    2002-01-01

    Describes a pilot project at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign reference and undergraduate libraries to test the feasibility of offering real-time online reference service via their Web site. Discusses software selection, policies and procedures, promotion and marketing, user interface, training and staffing, data collection, and…

  19. A couples’ based self-management program for heart failure: Results of a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranak Trivedi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure (HF is associated with frequent exacerbations and shortened lifespan. Informal caregivers such as significant others often support self-management in patients with HF. However, existing programs that aim to enhance self-management seldom engage informal caregivers or provide tools that can help alleviate caregiver burden or improve collaboration between patients and their informal caregivers. Objective: To develop and pilot test a program targeting the needs of self-management support among HF patients as well as their significant others. Methods: We developed the Dyadic Health Behavior Change model and conducted semi-structured interviews to determine barriers to self-management from various perspectives. Participants’ feedback was used to develop a family-centered self-management program called SUCCEED: Self-management Using Couples’ Coping EnhancEment in Diseases. The goals of this program are to improve HF self-management, quality of life, communication within couples, relationship quality, and stress and caregiver burden. We conducted a pilot study with 17 Veterans with HF and their significant others to determine acceptability of the program. We piloted psychosocial surveys at baseline and after participants’ program completion to evaluate change in depressive symptoms, caregiver burden, self-management of HF, communication, quality of relationship, relationship mutuality, and quality of life. Results: Of the 17 couples, 14 completed at least 1 SUCCEED session. Results showed high acceptability for each of SUCCEED’s sessions. At baseline, patients reported poor quality of life, clinically significant depressive symptoms, and inadequate self-management of HF. After participating in SUCCEED, patients showed improvements in self-management of HF, communication, and relationship quality, while caregivers reported improvements in depressive symptoms and caregiver burden. Quality of life of both patients and

  20. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  1. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  2. Psychological Impact of Life as Refugees: A Pilot Study on a Syrian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological Impact of Life as Refugees: A Pilot Study on a Syrian Camp .... was then pretested by pharmacy students (n = 10) and ... These factors included type of shelter; period spent in .... counselors, along with a training mental program.

  3. Microcirculation and atherothrombotic parameters in prolactinoma patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuwer, Anne Q; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M; Battjes, Suzanne; van Zijderveld, Rogier; Stuijver, Danka J F; Bisschop, Peter H; Twickler, Marcel Th B; Meijers, Joost C M; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Stroes, Erik S

    2012-12-01

    Atherothrombosis is a multifactorial process, governed by an interaction between the vessel wall, hemodynamic factors and systemic atherothrombotic risk factors. Recent in vitro, human ex vivo and animal studies have implicated the hormone prolactin as an atherothrombotic mediator. To address this issue, we evaluated the anatomy and function of various microvascular beds as well as plasma atherothrombosis markers in patients with elevated prolactin levels. In this pilot study, involving 10 prolactinoma patients and 10 control subjects, sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging revealed a marked perturbation of the sublingual microcirculation in prolactinoma patients compared to control subjects, as attested to by significant changes in microvascular flow index (2.74 ± 0.12 vs. 2.91 ± 0.05, respectively; P = 0.0006), in heterogeneity index (0.28 [IQR 0.18-0.31] vs. 0.09 [IQR 0.08-0.17], respectively; P = 0.002) and lower proportion of perfused vessels (90 ± 4.0% vs. 95 ± 3.0%, respectively; P = 0.016). In the retina, fluorescein angiography (FAG) confirmed these data, since prolactinoma patients more often have dilatated perifoveal capillaries. In plasma, prolactinoma patients displayed several pro-atherogenic disturbances, including a higher endogenous thrombin potential and prothrombin levels as well as decreased HDL-cholesterol levels. Prolactinoma patients are characterized by microvascular dysfunction as well as plasma markers indicating a pro-atherothrombotic state. Further studies are required to assess if prolactin is causally involved in atherothrombotic disease.

  4. Plantar focal idiopathic hyperhidrosis and botulinum toxin: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanati, Anna; Bernardini, Maria Luisa; Gesuita, Rosaria; Offidani, Annamaria

    2007-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective treatment for idiopatic focal axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis, but very few data are reported in the literature on its effect on plantar idiopatic hyperhidrosis. The current study was undertaken to investigate the impact of BTX-A administration on sweat production and quality of life in patients suffering from plantar hyperhidrosis. Ten patients with idiopathic, recalcitrant plantar hyperhidrosis were included in a pilot study and underwent intradermal injections with 100 MU of BTX-A in the plantar skin, bilaterally. All the patients were followed for 16 weeks after treatment with objective (Minor's test) and subjective (DLQI test) evaluation. Patients experienced an improvement of symptoms with a significant decrease of Minor's test and DLQI levels for 12 weeks. No significant side effects occurred in any treated patient. BTX-A seems to be a promising treatment for plantar hyperhidrosis. However, clinical trials on larger patient series are needed in order to evaluate its safety and effectiveness for this application.

  5. Moving mammogram-reluctant women to screening: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Mary E; Luckmann, Roger; White, Mary Jo; Rosal, Milagros C; LaPelle, Nancy; Cranos, Caroline

    2009-06-01

    Effective interventions are needed for women long overdue for screening mammography. The purpose of this study is to pilot test an intervention for motivating overdue women to receive a mammogram. Subjects aged 45-79 without a mammogram in > or =27 months and enrolled in study practices were identified from claims data. The intervention included a mailed, educational booklet, computer-assisted barrier-specific tailored counseling and motivational interviewing, and facilitated, short-interval mammography scheduling. Of 127 eligible women, 45 (35.4%) agreed to counseling and data collection. Most were > or =3 years overdue. Twenty-six (57.8%) of the counseled women got a mammogram within 12 months. Thirty-one (72.1%) of 43 counseled women moved > or =1 stage closer to screening, based on a modified Precaution Adoption Process Model. It is feasible to reach and counsel women who are long overdue for a mammogram and to advance their stage of adoption. The intervention should be formally evaluated in a prospective trial comparing it to control or to proven interventions.

  6. A pilot study on mindfulness based stress reduction for smokers

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    Baker Timothy B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mindfulness means paying attention in the present moment, non-judgmentally, without commentary or decision-making. We report results of a pilot study designed to test the feasibility of using Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR (with minor modifications as a smoking intervention. Methods MBSR instructors provided instructions in mindfulness in eight weekly group sessions. Subjects attempted smoking cessation during week seven without pharmacotherapy. Smoking abstinence was tested six weeks after the smoking quit day with carbon monoxide breath test and 7-day smoking calendars. Questionnaires were administered to evaluate changes in stress and affective distress. Results 18 subjects enrolled in the intervention with an average smoking history of 19.9 cigarettes per day for 26.4 years. At the 6-week post-quit visit, 10 of 18 subjects (56% achieved biologically confirmed 7-day point-prevalent smoking abstinence. Compliance with meditation was positively associated with smoking abstinence and decreases in stress and affective distress. Discussions and conclusion The results of this study suggest that mindfulness training may show promise for smoking cessation and warrants additional study in a larger comparative trial.

  7. Failure Analysis in Steam Generators: A Study Case

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    Alberto Eduardo Calvo González

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of crude oil as alternative to fuel steam power stations was justifi ed by economic reasons. Thischange of fuel required to modify the operational procedures, due fundamentally to its lower heating valueand its high density and viscosity. Nevertheless the changes made, the use of the crude oil caused aquick deterioration of the thermal exchange surfaces causing not planned forced outages. The statisticalanalysis of the steam generator forced outages went to reheater number two. Therefore the scope of thiswork is the study of the happened failures in reheater number two, of 433,536 kg/hr, 13,4 MPa, and 525 Ctemperature of superheated and reheated steam generator used to move 125 MW turbines. In the carriedout failure analysis, based on nondestructive evaluation methods, towered with metallographic test, waspossible to clarify the root cause, as well as establish the worsening growth rate that allowed establishingthe sequence of tests to avoid a possible not planned outage. In turn it was possible to choose the kind ofsteel should be used in that reheater to give the defi nitive solution of the problem. While steel substitutionis not carried out it sho uld stay the régime of tests and proposed assays. This experience can serve frombase to the design of a maintenance system based on the condition.

  8. Photoacoustic analysis of thyroid cancer in vivo: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Min-Hee; Jo, Kwanhoon; Ha, Jeonghoon; Kim, Yongmin; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers. About 3-8% of the people in the United States have thyroid nodules, and 5-15% of these nodules are malignant. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a standard procedure to diagnose malignity of nodules. However, about 10-20% of FNABs produce indeterminable results, which leads to repeat biopsies and unnecessary surgical operations. We have explored photoacoustic (PA) imaging as a new method to identify cancerous nodules. In a pilot study to test its feasibility, we recruited patients with thyroid nodules (currently 36 cases with 21 malignant and 15 benign nodules), acquired in vivo PA and ultrasound (US) images of the nodules in real time using a recently-developed clinical PA/US imaging system, and analyzed the acquired data offline. The preliminary results show that malignant and benign nodules could be differentiated by utilizing their PA amplitudes at different excitation wavelengths. This is the first in vivo PA analysis of thyroid nodules. Although a larger-scale study is needed for statistical significance, the preliminary results show the good potential of PA imaging as a non-invasive tool for triaging thyroid cancer.

  9. Effects of a multidisciplinary group rehabilitation programme on participation of the visually impaired elderly : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alma, Manna A.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Post, Marcel W. M.; Suurmeijer, Theo P. B. M.; van der Mei, Sijrike F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To pilot test the newly developed multidisciplinary group rehabilitation programme Visually Impaired elderly Persons Participating (VIPP). Method: A single group pretest-posttest design pilot study included 29 visually impaired persons (>= 55 years). The intervention (20 weekly meetings) co

  10. Do chiropractic college faculty understand informed consent: a pilot study

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    Hondras Maria A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to survey full-time faculty at a single chiropractic college concerning their knowledge of Institutional Review Board (IRB policies in their institution as they pertain to educational research. Methods All full-time faculty were invited to participate in an anonymous survey. Four scenarios involving educational research were described and respondents were asked to select from three possible courses of action for each. In addition, respondents were queried about their knowledge of IRB policies, how they learned of these policies and about their years of service and departmental assignments. Results The response rate was 55%. In no scenario did the level of correct answers by all respondents score higher than 41% and in most, the scores were closer to just under 1 in 3. Sixty-five percent of respondents indicated they were unsure whether Palmer had any policies in place at all, while 4% felt that no such policies were in place. Just over one-quarter (27% were correct in noting that students can decline consent, while more than half (54% did not know whether there were any procedures governing student consent. Conclusion Palmer faculty have only modest understanding about institutional policies regarding the IRB and human subject research, especially pertaining to educational research. The institution needs to develop methods to provide knowledge and training to faculty. The results from this pilot study will be instrumental in developing better protocols for a study designed to survey the entire chiropractic academic community.

  11. Patterns of federal Internet offenders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ann W; Carretta, Carrie M; Burgess, Allen G

    2012-09-01

    Internet-facilitated sexual offending is receiving increased forensic and clinical attention. Two issues confront this field. First, studies are equivocal as to whether (or not) the possession of Internet pornography can escalate to contact sexual offenses against a child, and second, federal judges have been questioning the length of sentences for users only of child pornography. The findings of this pilot study of 101 federal Internet offenders revealed over half of the men at the time of arrest were employed, educated, were in (or had been in) a relationship, had children, and did not have a prior criminal offense, suggesting a changing profile of a convicted sex offender. Forensic and psychiatric nurses who evaluate users of child pornography contraband need to be knowledgeable of Internet file transfer technology and the various types of contraband viewed specifically for the age of the preferred child, extreme acts to the child (e.g., bondage, S&M), and whether the user prefers images of adults with children or images of children only.

  12. Patterns of Sweet Taste Liking: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Miller, Jason; Arcori, Leann; Lumeng, Julie C.; Han-Markey, Theresa; Herman, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct patterns of sweet taste liking have been described: one showing a peak liking response in the mid-range of sucrose concentrations and the other showing a monotonic liking response at progressively higher sucrose concentrations. Classification of these patterns has been somewhat arbitrary. In this report, we analyzed patterns of sweet taste liking in a pilot study with 26 adults including 14 women and 12 men, 32.6 ± 14.5 years of age with body mass index 26.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 (mean ± SD). Sweet taste liking was measured for 10 levels of sucrose solutions (0.035 M to 1.346 M). Participants rated their liking of each solution using a visual analog scale with 0 indicating strongly disliking and 100 strongly liking. The cluster analysis demonstrated two distinct groups: 13 liked relatively low sucrose concentrations and liked high sucrose concentrations less, and 13 liked high sucrose concentrations greatly. If we use the 0.598 M sucrose solution alone and a cutoff liking score of 50, we can distinguish the two clusters with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%). If validated in additional studies, this simple tool may help us to better understand eating behaviors and the impact of sweet taste liking on nutrition-related disorders. PMID:26404363

  13. Patterns of Sweet Taste Liking: A Pilot Study

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    Keiko Asao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two distinct patterns of sweet taste liking have been described: one showing a peak liking response in the mid-range of sucrose concentrations and the other showing a monotonic liking response at progressively higher sucrose concentrations. Classification of these patterns has been somewhat arbitrary. In this report, we analyzed patterns of sweet taste liking in a pilot study with 26 adults including 14 women and 12 men, 32.6 ± 14.5 years of age with body mass index 26.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 (mean ± SD. Sweet taste liking was measured for 10 levels of sucrose solutions (0.035 M to 1.346 M. Participants rated their liking of each solution using a visual analog scale with 0 indicating strongly disliking and 100 strongly liking. The cluster analysis demonstrated two distinct groups: 13 liked relatively low sucrose concentrations and liked high sucrose concentrations less, and 13 liked high sucrose concentrations greatly. If we use the 0.598 M sucrose solution alone and a cutoff liking score of 50, we can distinguish the two clusters with high sensitivity (100% and specificity (100%. If validated in additional studies, this simple tool may help us to better understand eating behaviors and the impact of sweet taste liking on nutrition-related disorders.

  14. Effect of caffeine on the vocal folds: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S; Wood, G; Rubin, J S; O'Flynn, P E; Ratcliffe, P

    1999-04-01

    Caffeine is considered to be a dehydrating agent with detrimental effects on the quality of voice of persons ingesting it. This has led medical personnel dealing with voice disorders, especially in the case of professional voice users, to give advice against the use of caffeine. Yet this is an anecdotal truth as an extensive Medline literature search did not reveal any scientific evidence of caffeine being proven to have adverse effects on the vocal folds. We, therefore, initiated this pilot study to ascertain the connection between caffeine and voice quality on a laboratory basis. Two hundred and fifty mg of caffeine were provided to eight volunteers in tablet form, and blood levels along with laryngograph readings were recorded to document the changes produced. Analysing the irregularities of frequencies in a) free speech b) a reading passage and c) singing 'Happy Birthday', substantial changes were seen to authenticate the fact that caffeine does produce alterations in voice quality but these alterations have considerable intra-subject variability. A full study with wider parameters is to be performed on this subject as we consider it to be of importance in the management of voice disorders.

  15. Mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gygax, Marine Jequier; Schneider, Patrick; Newman, Christopher John

    2011-05-01

    Mirror therapy, which provides the visual illusion of a functional paretic limb by using the mirror reflection of the non-paretic arm, is used in the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke in adults. We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia by performing a pilot crossover study in ten participants (aged 6-14 y; five males, five females; Manual Ability Classification System levels: one at level I, two at level II, four at level III, three at level IV) randomly assigned to 15 minutes of daily bimanual training with and without a mirror for 3 weeks. Assessments of maximal grasp and pinch strengths, and upper limb function measured by the Shriner's Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation were performed at weeks 0 (baseline), 3, 6 (intervention), and 9 (wash-out). Testing of grasp strength behind the mirror improved performance by 15% (p=0.004). Training with the mirror significantly improved grasp strength (with mirror +20.4%, p=0.033; without +5.9%, p>0.1) and upper limb dynamic position (with mirror +4.6%, p=0.044; without +1.2%, p>0.1), while training without a mirror significantly improved pinch strength (with mirror +6.9%, p>0.1; without +21.9%, p=0.026). This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia and that it may improve strength and dynamic function of the paretic arm.

  16. SoCIAL - training cognition in schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Davide; Mucci, Armida; Piegari, Giuseppe; D'Alise, Valentina; Mazza, Annapaola; Galderisi, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a new social cognition (SC) remediation intervention, the Social Cognition Individualized Activities Lab (SoCIAL), for subjects with schizophrenia. The training includes a module for emotion recognition and one for theory of mind. A comparison with a validated cognitive remediation intervention, the Social Skills And Neurocognitive Individualized Training (SSANIT), was conducted to verify the efficacy of the SoCIAL in improving SC. Ten stabilized patients with schizophrenia accepted to participate. Five patients were randomized to SoCIAL and five to SSANIT. The SoCIAL intervention includes individual sessions of neurocognitive individualized training (NIT) and group sessions of SC training. SSANIT includes individual sessions of NIT and group sessions of social skills individualized training. The interventions were matched for the overall treatment duration (20 weeks) and for the frequency of the sessions (two times a week, one for SoCIAL or social skills individualized training and one for NIT, with a duration of 80 minutes for each session). Results showed a significant treatment effect (effect size: Cohen's d 0.32) on the primary outcome; in fact, only the SoCIAL intervention improved theory of mind. Patients receiving the SoCIAL intervention also showed an improvement of avolition. These preliminary findings support further development of the SoCIAL and suggest that cognitive remediation should include an SC module.

  17. Enhancing treatment effectiveness through social modelling: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faasse, Kate; Perera, Anna; Loveys, Kate; Grey, Andrew; Petrie, Keith J

    2017-05-01

    Medical treatments take place in social contexts; however, little research has investigated how social modelling might influence treatment outcomes. This experimental pilot study investigated social modelling of treatment effectiveness and placebo treatment outcomes. Fifty-nine participants took part in the study, ostensibly examining the use of beta-blockers (actually placebos) for examination anxiety. Participants were randomly assigned to observe a female confederate report positive treatment effects (reduced heart rate, relaxed, calm) or feeling no different. Heart rate, anxiety and blood pressure were assessed, as were symptoms and attributed side effects. Heart rate decreased significantly more in the social modelling compared to control condition, p = .027 (d = .63), and there were trends towards effects in the same direction for both anxiety, p = .097 (d = .46), and systolic blood pressure, p = .077 (d = .51). Significant pre-post placebo differences in heart rate, anxiety and diastolic blood pressure were found in the social modelling group, ps  .28 (ds = .09-.59). Social observation of medication effectiveness enhanced placebo effectiveness in heart rate, and showed a trend towards enhancing treatment effectiveness in both anxiety and systolic blood pressure. Social modelling may have utility in enhancing the effectiveness of many active medical treatments.

  18. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S; Vilhelmsen, Jeanet R; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-02-20

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient's self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals. The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals, and found it worth the time spent using it. However, no clear advantage in relation to their quality of life (WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score) was reported.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  19. A pilot study to delimit tsetse target populations in Zimbabwe.

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    Gerald Chikowore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse (Glossina sensu stricto are cyclical vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses, that are presently targeted by the Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC coordinated by the African Union. In order to achieve effective control of tsetse, there is need to produce elaborate plans to guide intervention programmes. A model intended to aid in the planning of intervention programmes and assist a fuller understanding of tsetse distribution was applied, in a pilot study in the Masoka area, Mid-Zambezi valley in Zimbabwe, and targeting two savannah species, Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina pallidipes.The field study was conducted between March and December 2015 in 105 sites following a standardized grid sampling frame. Presence data were used to study habitat suitability of both species based on climatic and environmental data derived from MODIS and SPOT 5 satellite images. Factors influencing distribution were studied using an Ecological Niche Factor Analysis (ENFA whilst habitat suitability was predicted using a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt model at a spatial resolution of 250 m. Area Under the Curve (AUC, an indicator of model performance, was 0.89 for G. m. morsitans and 0.96 for G. pallidipes. We then used the predicted suitable areas to calculate the probability that flies were really absent from the grid cells where they were not captured during the study based on a probability model using a risk threshold of 0.05. Apart from grid cells where G. m. morsitans and G. pallidipes were captured, there was a high probability of presence in an additional 128 km2 and 144 km2 respectively.The modelling process promised to be useful in optimizing the outputs of presence/absence surveys, allowing the definition of tsetse infested areas with improved accuracy. The methodology proposed here can be extended to all the tsetse infested parts of Zimbabwe and may also be useful for other PATTEC national initiatives in other

  20. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience.

  1. Evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laura; Bruce, Natalie; Suh, Kathryn N; Roth, Virginia

    2014-07-01

    Environmental auditing is an important tool to ensure consistent and effective cleaning. Our pilot study compared an alcohol-based fluorescent marking product and an adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence product for use in an environmental auditing program to determine which product was more practical and acceptable to users. Both products were tested on 15 preselected high touch objects in randomly selected patient rooms, following regular daily cleaning. A room was considered a "pass" if ≥80% of surfaces were adequately cleaned as defined by manufacturers' guidelines. A qualitative survey assessed user preference and operational considerations. Using fluorescent marking, 9 of 37 patient rooms evaluated (24%) were considered a "pass" after daily cleaning. Using adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence, 21 of 37 patient rooms passed (57%). There was great variability in results between different high touch objects. Eighty percent of users preferred the alcohol-based fluorescent marking product because it provided an effective visual aid to coach staff on proper cleaning techniques and allowed simple and consistent application. Environmental auditing using translucent, alcohol-based fluorescent marking best met the requirements of our organization. Our results reinforce the importance of involving a multidisciplinary team in evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sociomoral Reasoning in Adults with ADHD: A Pilot Study

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    Kate E. Thomason

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is frequently linked with antisocial behaviour, yet less is known about its relationship with sociomoral reasoning, and the possible mediating effect of intelligence. A pilot study was designed to investigate the relationship between antisocial personality traits, intelligence and sociomoral reasoning in adults with ADHD. Twenty two adults with ADHD and 21 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and IQ completed a battery of measures including the National Adult Reading Test, Gough Socialisation Scale and Sociomoral Reflection Measure-Short Form. There was no difference between the groups and levels of sociomoral reasoning, despite the ADHD group reporting greater antisocial personality traits. Sociomoral reasoning was positively correlated with intelligence. Results from a hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that both antisocial traits and IQ were significant predictors of sociomoral reasoning, with IQ proving the most powerful predictor. Whilst antisocial personality traits may explain some of the variance in levels of sociomoral reasoning, a diagnosis of ADHD does not appear to hinder the development of mature moral reasoning. Intellectual functioning appears to facilitate the development of sociomoral reasoning. A further analysis showed that both ADHD and low sociomoral reasoning were significant predictors of antisocial traits. The current findings have important treatment implications.

  3. Conceptualizing and Validating Marital Quality in Beijing: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiping; Xu, Xiaohe; Tsang, Sandra K M

    2013-08-01

    Since the inception of the economic reform, marital relationship in urban China has undergone dramatic transformations. Though the burgeoning body of scholarly research has demonstrated that marital quality has increasingly become an important aspect of family life among married persons in urban China, both the conceptualization and measurement of marital quality remain underdeveloped. The purpose of this pilot study is to develop and validate a comprehensive and culturally appropriate marital quality scale, namely the Chinese Marital Quality Scale (CMQS). Results from the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) conducted on a sample of 387 married persons from Beijing indicate that the CMQS can be conceptualized as a two-factorial and multidimensional construct, encompassing marital happiness, marital interaction, marital disagreement, marital problem, and marital instability. Additional statistical analyses also indicate that the CMQS has exhibited satisfactory reliability and concurrent validity. It is thus concluded that the CMQS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure marital quality in contemporary Beijing and possibly in other Chinese cities.

  4. Lucid dreaming treatment for nightmares: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoormaker, Victor I; van den Bout, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of the cognitive-restructuring technique 'lucid dreaming treatment' (LDT) on chronic nightmares. Becoming lucid (realizing that one is dreaming) during a nightmare allows one to alter the nightmare storyline during the nightmare itself. After having filled out a sleep and a posttraumatic stress disorder questionnaire, 23 nightmare sufferers were randomly divided into 3 groups; 8 participants received one 2-hour individual LDT session, 8 participants received one 2-hour group LDT session, and 7 participants were placed on the waiting list. LDT consisted of exposure, mastery, and lucidity exercises. Participants filled out the same questionnaires 12 weeks after the intervention (follow-up). At follow-up the nightmare frequency of both treatment groups had decreased. There were no significant changes in sleep quality and posttraumatic stress disorder symptom severity. Lucidity was not necessary for a reduction in nightmare frequency. LDT seems effective in reducing nightmare frequency, although the primary therapeutic component (i.e. exposure, mastery, or lucidity) remains unclear.

  5. Perceived harmfulness of substance use: A pilot study

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    Siddharth Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Harm ratings of substances help in understanding the perception toward substance use and formulating policies. Evidence of such harm ratings by substance users and their caregivers provides a clearer perspective of those who experience and observe such harm closely. Materials and Methods: Substance users and their caregivers were recruited from the Drug De-addiction and Treatment Centre of PGIMER, Chandigarh. Sociodemographic details of the subjects were noted. The subjects were then asked to rate a list of psychoactive preparations according to the harms they thought the preparation caused. The list of substances was developed taking into consideration substance commonly encountered in the geographical area. The harm ratings were transformed on a scale of 0-100. Results: All subjects were males and majority of them were educated above 10 th standard, were not employed and belonged to urban background. Most of them had taken psychoactive substances in their lifetimes but were currently abstinent. Most of the subjects endorsed intravenous drugs as the most harmful, followed by heroin. Beer and chewable tobacco considered the least harmful substances. Greater degree of education was associated with lower harm rankings for heroin, cannabis, dextropropoxyphene, and raw opium; while urban residence was associated with greater harm ratings for cannabis and raw opium. Differences in the harms were perceived for different preparations of the same active compound for alcohol and nicotine. Conclusion: Harm ratings of substances can be a useful guide while formulating policies and allocating resources. Need for further research extending this pilot study is emphasized.

  6. [School failure and epilepsy: a case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraoui, Chawki; Kasraoui, Sabeh; Fredj, Mohamed; Zouari, Bechir; Halayem, Mohmamed B; Mrabet, Amel

    2002-07-01

    School difficulties and educational inadequacy usually correlate with the child's epilepsy. The target of our study is to discover the most precocious possible the epilepsy and to prevent educational failure in the population of children from 6 to 15 years old. We have carried out a retrospective study on 162 children of an educational age. This population was made up of 100 epileptic children followed over a period of 3 years (1995-1997) and a witness group made up of 62 children selected from brothers and sisters of the study group, with the same sex in default of the opposed sex who are educated. We have noted that at the same age between children from the group of study and children from the witness group. The class of study was significantly inferior in the group of study: the educational average class is 4th against 5th in the witness group P = 0.11. The difference was about one year. The difference of educational results was significant. For the last educational year, the educational mark was 8.99/20 in the group of study against 12/20 in the witness one. P < 10-5. For the last educational semester, the educational mark was 9.5/20 in the group of study against 11.9/20 in the witness group. (P = 3 x 10(-4)).

  7. Psychiatry Residents' Use of Educational Websites: A Pilot Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torous, John; Franzan, Jamie; O'Connor, Ryan; Mathew, Ian; Keshavan, Matcheri; Kitts, Robert; Boland, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatry residents have numerous online educational resources readily available to them although currently there are no data regarding residents' use and perception of such websites. A survey was offered to 62 residents from all four years of training as well as recent graduates of a single psychiatry residency training program. Residents reported utilizing online resources on average 68 % of the time, in comparison to 32 % on average for printed materials. Residents reported UpToDate, PubMed, and Wikipedia as the most visited websites and ranked each highly but for different purposes. Thirty-five percent of residents felt that insufficient faculty guidance was a barrier to use of these educational websites. Pilot data indicate psychiatry residents use online resources daily for their education in various settings. Resident perceptions of individual website's trustworthiness, ease of use, and sources of clinical decision-making and personal learning suggest potential opportunities for educators to better understand the current use of these resources in residency training. Reported barriers including lack of faculty guidance suggest opportunities for academic psychiatry. Further study is necessary at multiple sites before such results may be generalized.

  8. Skin and plasma autofluorescence during hemodialysis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graaff, Reindert; Arsov, Stefan; Ramsauer, Bernd; Koetsier, Marten; Sundvall, Nils; Engels, Gerwin E; Sikole, Aleksandar; Lundberg, Lennart; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) is related to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and is one of the strongest prognostic markers of mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether changes in skin AF appear after a single HD session and if they might be related to changes in plasma AF. Skin and plasma AF were measured before and after HD in 35 patients on maintenance HD therapy (nine women and 26 men, median age 68 years, range 33-83). Median dialysis time was 4 h (range 3-5.5). Skin AF was measured noninvasively with an AGE Reader, and plasma AF was measured before and after HD at 460 nm after excitation at 370 nm. The HD patients had on average a 65% higher skin AF value than age-matched healthy persons (P < 0.001). Plasma AF was reduced by 14% (P < 0.001), whereas skin AF was not changed after a single HD treatment. No significant influence of the reduced plasma AF on skin AF levels was found. This suggests that the measurement of skin AF can be performed during the whole dialysis period and is not directly influenced by the changes in plasma AF during HD.

  9. Adjustable recessions in horizontal comitant strabismus: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the surgical outcome of adjustable with the conventional recession in patients with horizontal comitant strabismus. Patients and Methods: A prospective comparative nonrandomized interventional pilot study was performed on patients with horizontal comitant strabismus. Fifty-four patients (27 in each group were allocated into 2 groups to undergo either adjustable suture (AS recession or non-AS (NAS recession along with conventional resection. The patients were followed up for 6 months. A successful outcome was defined as deviation ±10 prism diopters at 6 months. The results were statistically analyzed by Chi-square test, Fisher′s exact test, and Student′s t-test. Results: A successful outcome was found in 24 (88.8% patients in AS and 17 (62.9% in NAS group (P = 0.02. The postoperative adjustment was done in 13 (48.1% patients in AS group. There was one complication (tenon′s cyst in AS group. Conclusion: AS recession may be considered in all cooperative patients undergoing strabismus surgery for comitant deviations.

  10. Gene Expression Correlation for Cancer Diagnosis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbing Ling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor prognosis for late-stage, high-grade, and recurrent cancers has been motivating cancer researchers to search for more efficient biomarkers to identify the onset of cancer. Recent advances in constructing and dynamically analyzing biomolecular networks for different types of cancer have provided a promising novel strategy to detect tumorigenesis and metastasis. The observation of different biomolecular networks associated with normal and cancerous states led us to hypothesize that correlations for gene expressions could serve as valid indicators of early cancer development. In this pilot study, we tested our hypothesis by examining whether the mRNA expressions of three randomly selected cancer-related genes PIK3C3, PIM3, and PTEN were correlated during cancer progression and the correlation coefficients could be used for cancer diagnosis. Strong correlations (0.68≤r≤1.0 were observed between PIK3C3 and PIM3 in breast cancer, between PIK3C3 and PTEN in breast and ovary cancers, and between PIM3 and PTEN in breast, kidney, liver, and thyroid cancers during disease progression, implicating that the correlations for cancer network gene expressions could serve as a supplement to current clinical biomarkers, such as cancer antigens, for early cancer diagnosis.

  11. Intraoperative music application in children and adolescents - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, P K; Spielmann, N; Buehrer, S; Schmidt, A R; Weiss, M; Schmitz, A

    2017-09-01

    Hospitalization, surgery and anaesthesia may lead to new-onset maladaptive behaviour, emotional distress and trauma. This pilot study aims to investigate the influence of intraoperatively applied music on post-operative behaviour in children and adolescents. Children with an ASA physical state classification of I or II, aged from 4 to 16 years and scheduled for elective circumcision or inguinal hernia repair under combined general and caudal anaesthesia were included. The children were randomized into two groups. They wore headphones during surgery, and were either exposed to music or not. All involved staff were blinded. Post-operative behaviour was documented by parents on day 7, 14 and 28 after surgery, using a questionnaire adapted from the "Post Hospitalization Behavioural Questionnaire" (PHBQ). Overall occurrence of at least one item indicating maladaptive behaviour was the primary outcome. Data are presented as median (interquartile range). In total, 135 children aged 6.6 (5.3-8.5) years, weighing 22 (19-29) kg, were included, with 112 completed questionnaires returned. Overall occurrence of at least one maladaptive item was lower in the music group, with a significantly lower incidence on day 7 (51% vs. 77% in controls; P < 0.01). Intraoperative music application in children undergoing minor surgical procedures may reduce the incidence of post-operative maladaptive behaviour within the first week. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Visual consequences of electronic reader use: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maducdoc, Marlon M; Haider, Asghar; Nalbandian, Angèle; Youm, Julie H; Morgan, Payam V; Crow, Robert W

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing prevalence of electronic readers (e-readers) for vocational and professional uses, it is important to discover if there are visual consequences in the use of these products. There are no studies in the literature quantifying the incidence or severity of eyestrain, nor are there clinical characteristics that may predispose to these symptoms with e-reader use. The primary objective of this pilot study was to assess the degree of eyestrain associated with e-reader use compared to traditional paper format. The secondary outcomes of this study were to assess the rate of eyestrain associated with e-reader use and identify any clinical characteristics that may be associated with the development of eyestrain. Forty-four students were randomly assigned to study (e-reader iPAD) and control (print) groups. Participant posture, luminosity of the room, and reading distance from reading device were measured during a 1-h session for both groups. At the end of the session, questionnaires were administered to determine symptoms. Significantly higher rates of eyestrain (p = 0.008) and irritation (p = 0.011) were found among the iPAD study group as compared to the print 'control' group. The study group was also 4.9 times more likely to report severe eyestrain (95 % CI [1.4, 16.9]). No clinical characteristics predisposing to eyestrain could be identified. These findings conclude that reading on e-readers may induce increased levels of irritation and eyestrain. Predisposing factors, etiology, and potential remedial interventions remain to be determined.

  13. A Comparative Study of Failure with Incremental Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. H.; Song, N. N.; Pires, F. M. Andrade

    2016-08-01

    Incremental forming (ISF) is an innovative flexible sheet metal forming process which can be used to manufacture complex shapes from various materials. Due to its flexibility, it has attracted more and more attention over recent decades. Localized deformation and shear through the thickness are essential characteristics of ISF. These lead to specific failure modes and formability of ISF that are different from the conventional stamping process. In this contribution, three continuum damage models (Lemaitre, Gurson, extended GTN models) are formulated and fully coupled with the finite element simulation in a commercial software ABAQUS to predict failure in incremental forming. A comparative investigation of these three damage models has been carried out to analyze both the deformation behavior and failure mechanisms.

  14. Effects of visual and motion simulation cueing systems on pilot performance during takeoffs with engine failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parris, B. L.; Cook, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Data are presented that show the effects of visual and motion during cueing on pilot performance during takeoffs with engine failures. Four groups of USAF pilots flew a simulated KC-135 using four different cueing systems. The most basic of these systems was of the instrument-only type. Visual scene simulation and/or motion simulation was added to produce the other systems. Learning curves, mean performance, and subjective data are examined. The results show that the addition of visual cueing results in significant improvement in pilot performance, but the combined use of visual and motion cueing results in far better performance.

  15. Free online otolaryngology educational modules: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina; Bryson, Paul C; Sykes, Kevin J; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-04-01

    Otolaryngology residents need concise, easily accessible modules to expand educational opportunities between surgical cases. These modules should be inexpensive to create and improve learning outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether otolaryngology residents at multiple institutions used online video modules to supplement their studying for the Otolaryngology Training Exam, whether the modules had any effect on their Otolaryngology Training Examination Scores, and to obtain survey feedback about the modules. This randomized trial was conducted in 3 academic departments of otolaryngology in the United States among 37 residents enrolled in 3 otolaryngology residency programs. Residents were randomized into 2 groups, one with access to the educational modules and the other with no access. Otolaryngology training examination scores were obtained from the year prior to the intervention (2012) and the year following module access (2013). Residents with access to the modules were also surveyed to assess use and obtain feedback about the modules. Otolaryngology training examination scores improved significantly from 2012 to 2013 among both residents who had access to the modules and those who did not in the sections of head and neck, laryngology, and sleep medicine. However, scores in the sections of pediatric otolaryngology (8% increase, P = .03), otology (7% increase, P = .02), and facial plastic surgery (10% increase, P = .02) improved from 2012 to 2013 only among residents with access to the modules. All respondents rated the videos as very helpful, with a rating of 4 of 5 on a Likert scale. Online otolaryngology educational modules are an inexpensive way to expand resident learning opportunities. Despite the lack of quantifiable improvement in otolaryngology training examination scores in this study, use of online modules sends a message to otolaryngology residents that their education is a priority; self-study outside the hospital

  16. The Hong Kong vision study: a pilot assessment of visual impairment in adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Newkirk, M R

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Hong Kong Adult Vision Pilot Study is a population based study of the distribution and determinants of eye disease in a random sample of the Chinese population age 40 and over. The present pilot study identifies the extent and causes of visual loss using methods developed in the United States and Australia. The pilot study uses the prevalence data to estimate the sample size necessary to predict the size of an effect a larger study may detect and the confidence with which that ef...

  17. Menstrual phase effects on smoking cessation: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Matthew J; Saladin, Michael E; Leinbach, Ashley S; Larowe, Steven D; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2008-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that nicotine withdrawal and cigarette craving may vary across the menstrual cycle and that the luteal phase of the cycle may be associated with increases in each. This potential relationship suggests that careful timing of quit attempts during the menstrual cycle may improve initial success at abstinence, although there are no direct tests of this approach yet published. Our objectives were to preliminarily test the effect of timing of quit attempts for smoking cessation relative to menstrual cycle and to identify methodological procedures that could guide subsequent, larger clinical trials. In this pilot study, we randomized female smokers aged 18-40 who were not currently using hormonal contraception to quit smoking during either the follicular (n = 25) or luteal phase (n = 19) of their menstrual cycle. Participants were provided with two sessions of smoking cessation counseling (90 minutes total). All participants were provided with a transdermal nicotine patch contingent on maintenance of abstinence throughout the course of the 6-week study. Among participants who initiated treatment, received the patch, and made a quit attempt (n = 35), carbon monoxide-verified repeated point prevalence abstinence 2 weeks after the target quit date was higher in the follicular than the luteal group (32% vs. 19%, respectively; OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 0.4-9.8). Within the overall study population, this difference was slightly lower (24% vs. 16%; OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.4-7.8). Timing quit attempts based on menstrual phase is feasible. Insights gained from this study and the recommendations made herein may inform future research on this important clinical question.

  18. Prioritization strategies in clinical practice guidelines development: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Marcela

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Few methodological studies address the prioritization of clinical topics for the development of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs. The aim of this study was to validate a methodology for Priority Determination of Topics (PDT of CPGs. Methods and results Firstly, we developed an instrument for PDT with 41 criteria that were grouped under 10 domains, based on a comprehensive systematic search. Secondly, we performed a survey of stakeholders involved in CPGs development, and end users of guidelines, using the instrument. Thirdly, a pilot testing of the PDT procedure was performed in order to choose 10 guideline topics among 34 proposed projects; using a multi-criteria analysis approach, we validated a mechanism that followed five stages: determination of the composition of groups, item/domain scoring, weights determination, quality of the information used to support judgments, and finally, topic selection. Participants first scored the importance of each domain, after which four different weighting procedures were calculated (including the survey results. The process of weighting was determined by correlating the data between them. We also reported the quality of evidence used for PDT. Finally, we provided a qualitative analysis of the process. The main domains used to support judgement, having higher quality scores and weightings, were feasibility, disease burden, implementation and information needs. Other important domains such as user preferences, adverse events, potential for health promotion, social effects, and economic impact had lower relevance for clinicians. Criteria for prioritization were mainly judged through professional experience, while good quality information was only used in 15% of cases. Conclusion The main advantages of the proposed methodology are supported by the use of a systematic approach to identify, score and weight guideline topics selection, limiting or exposing the influence of personal biases

  19. Screening Preschool Children for Visual Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Adhikari, BOptom

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ocular and/or vision defects are one of the most common reasons for the referral of young children to the hospital. Vision disorders are the fourth most common disability of children and the leading cause of handicapping conditions in childhood. In preschool-age children, amblyopia and amblyogenic risk factors, such as strabismus and significant refractive errors, are the most prevalent and important visual disorders. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the prevalence of visual disorders in preschool children in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.Methods: Four hundred and eighty-four children attending eight preschools in Kathmandu Valley underwent detailed optometric examination. Visual acuity was assessed with either Sheridan Gardiner or Kay Picture chart monocularly. Binocularity was assessed with cover test and prism bar neutralisation. Refraction was carried out in all children. In most instances this was done without the use of a cycloplegic agent. Stereopsis was assessed with the Lang stereo test. Anterior and posterior segment abnormalities were assessed by using a pen light, hand-held slit lamp, and direct ophthalmoscope.Results: Refractive error was the most common visual disorder. Considering our criteria of refractive error for myopia ≥ 0.50 D, hyperopia ≥ 1.50 D, astigmatism ≥ 1.00 D, and anisometropia ≥ 1.00 D, the overall prevalence of refractive error in our study was 31.82%. The overall prevalence of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism was 24.17%, 2.48%, and 5.17%, respectively. Anisometropia was present in 1.65% of the participants, and 2%, 1.4%, and 0.2% had strabismus, amblyopia, and nystagmus, respectively.Conclusion: The relatively high prevalence of refractive error in our studied population needs more attention. The results suggest that there is a need for a large-scale community-based preschool screening program in Nepal so that affected children can be identified early and appropriate treatment can be

  20. Using Social Media While Waiting in Pain: A Clinical 12-Week Longitudinal Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merolli, Mark; Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Mantopoulos, Steven; Hogg, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim was to conduct a longitudinal pilot study to understand what aspects of research design are key to the success of running a larger-scale study of social media use in the clinical management of chronic pain...

  1. Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) Second Pilot Study, March - May 1972: A Documentary Film

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project described in this documentary was a pilot study conducted in 1972 in preparation for the AIDJEX main experiment of 1975 to 1976. The study included a...

  2. The Incidence and Temporal Patterning of Insomnia: a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Michael; Phillips, Cindy; Gehrman, Philip R.; Pigeon, Wilfred; Matteson, Sara; Jungquist, Carla

    2014-01-01

    To date very little research has been conducted on night-to-night variability in the incidence of insomnia. Unclear from prior research is whether subjects with Primary Insomnia (PI) exhibit good sleep (or better than average sleep) on some interval basis. In the present study, pilot data are provided on 1) the frequency with which “good sleep” occurs in subjects with PI and 2) whether these events occur in a non-random manner. 10 PI subjects participated in this “naturalistic” study. All subjects completed daily sleep diaries for a minimum of 20 days. None of the subjects received treatment for their insomnia during the monitoring period. The night-tonight data were evaluated by typing each night’s sleep as “Good” or “Bad” and then by determining the number of bad nights that occurred prior to a good night for each subject. Good and bad nights were typed in two ways: 1. using a ≥ 85% cutoff and 2. using a better than the individual’s mean sleep efficiency (idiographic cutoff). Subjects exhibited good sleep on between 29% (> 85% criteria) and 55% (idiographic criteria) of the nights evaluated. The temporal patterning analysis (based on a idiographic cutoff) revealed that better than average sleep most frequently occurred (> 89% of instances) following one to three night’s of poor sleep. These data suggests that insomnia severity may be mediated/moderated by sleep homeostasis and that the homeostat, or input to the homeostat, may be abnormal in patients with Primary Insomnia. PMID:19912510

  3. Problematic internet usage in US college students: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myaing Mon T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet addiction among US college students remains a concern, but robust estimates of its prevalence are lacking. Methods We conducted a pilot survey of 307 college students at two US universities. Participants completed the Internet Addiction Test (IAT as well as the Patient Health Questionnaire. Both are validated measures of problematic Internet usage and depression, respectively. We assessed the association between problematic Internet usage and moderate to severe depression using a modified Poisson regression approach. In addition, we examined the associations between individual items in the IAT and depression. Results A total of 224 eligible respondents completed the survey (73% response rate. Overall, 4% of students scored in the occasionally problematic or addicted range on the IAT, and 12% had moderate to severe depression. Endorsement of individual problematic usage items ranged from 1% to 70%. In the regression analysis, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with several individual items. Relative risk could not be estimated for three of the twenty items because of small cell sizes. Of the remaining 17 items, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with 13 of them, and three others had P values less than 0.10. There was also a significant association between problematic Internet usage overall and moderate to severe depression (relative risk 24.07, 95% confidence interval 3.95 to 146.69; P = 0.001. Conclusion The prevalence of problematic Internet usage among US college students is a cause for concern, and potentially requires intervention and treatment amongst the most vulnerable groups. The prevalence reported in this study is lower than that which has been reported in other studies, however the at-risk population is very high and preventative measures are also recommended.

  4. Including health economic analysis in pilot studies: lessons learned from a cost-utility analysis within the PROSPECTIV pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richéal M. Burns

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available PurposeTo assess feasibility and health economic benefits and costs as part of a pilot study for a nurse-led, psychoeducational intervention (NPLI for prostate cancer in order to understand the potential for cost effectiveness as well as contribute to the design of a larger scale trial.MethodsMen with stable prostate cancer post-treatment were recruited from two cancer centres in the UK. Eighty-three men were randomised to the NLPI plus usual care or usual care alone (UCA (42 NLPI and 41 UCA; the NLPI plus usual care was delivered in the primary-care setting (the intervention and included an initial face-to-face consultation with a trained nurse, with follow-up tailored to individual needs. The study afforded the opportunity to undertake a short-term within pilot analysis. The primary outcome measure for the economic evaluation was quality of life, as measured by the EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L instrument. Costs (£2014 assessed included health-service resource use, out-of-pocket expenses and losses from inability to undertake usual activities.ResultsTotal and incremental costs varied across the different scenarios assessed, with mean cost differences ranging from £173 to £346; incremental effect, as measured by the change in utility scores over the duration of follow-up, exhibited wide confidence intervals highlighting inconclusive effectiveness (95% CI: -0.0226; 0.0438. The cost per patient of delivery of the intervention would be reduced if rolled out to a larger patient cohort.ConclusionsThe NLPI is potentially cost saving depending on the scale of delivery; however, the results presented are not considered generalisable.

  5. Feasibility of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Nispen Ruth MA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demographic ageing will lead to increasing pressure on visual rehabilitation services, which need to be efficiently organised in the near future. The Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI was developed to assess the rehabilitation needs of visually impaired persons. This pilot study tests the feasibility of the D-AI using a computer-assisted telephone interview. Methods In addition to the regular intake, the first version of the D-AI was assessed in 20 patients. Subsequently, patients and intake assessors were asked to fill in an evaluation form. Based on these evaluations, a new version of the D-AI was developed. Results Mean administration time of the D-AI was 88.8 (± 41.0 minutes. Overall, patients and assessors were positive about the D-AI assessment. However, professionals and 60% of the patients found the administration time to be too long. All included items were considered relevant and only minor adjustments were recommended. Conclusion The systematic character of the revised D-AI will prevent topics from being overlooked and indicate which needs have the highest priority from a patient-centred perspective. Moreover, ongoing assessment of the D-AI will enhance evaluation of the rehabilitation process. To decrease administration time, in the revised D-AI only the top priority goals will be fully assessed. Using the D-AI, a rehabilitation plan based on individual needs can be developed for each patient. Moreover, it enables better evaluation of the effects of rehabilitation. A larger validation study is planned.

  6. Interactive home telehealth and burns: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Sean; Gomez, Jason; Meller, Benjamin; Schneider, Jeffery C; Cheney, Meredith; Nejad, Shamim; Schulz, John; Goverman, Jeremy

    2017-06-19

    The objective of this study is to review our experience incorporating Interactive Home Telehealth (IHT) visits into follow-up burn care. A retrospective review of all burn patients participating in IHT encounters over the course of 15 months was performed. Connections were established through secure video conferencing and call-routing software. Patients connected with a personal computer or tablet and providers connected with a desktop computer with a high-definition web camera. In some cases, high-definition digital images were emailed to the provider prior to the virtual consultation. For each patient, the following was collected: (1) patient and injury demographics (diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management), (2) total number of encounters, (3) service for each encounter (burn, psychiatry, and rehabilitation), (4) length of visit, including travel distance and time saved and, (5) complications, including re-admissions and connectivity issues. 52 virtual encounters were performed with 31 patients during the first year of the pilot project from March 2015 to June 2016. Mean age of the participant was 44 years (range 18-83 years). Mean total burn surface area of the participant was 12% (range 1-80%). Average roundtrip travel distance saved was 188 miles (range 4-822 miles). Average round trip travel time saved was 201min (range 20-564min). There were no unplanned re-admissions and no complications. Five connectivity issues were reported, none of which prevented completion of the visit. Interactive Home Telehealth is a safe and feasible modality for delivering follow-up care to burn patients. Burn care providers benefit from the potential to improve outpatient clinic utilization. Patients benefit from improved access to multiple members of their specialized burn care team, as well as cost-reductions for patient travel expenses. Future studies are needed to ensure patient and provider satisfaction and to further validate the significance, cost-effectiveness and

  7. Effect of Piroxicam on ART Outcome: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Sohrabvand

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most important factors affecting success rates in assisted reproductive techniques (ART besides the number of oocytes retrieved and high quality embryos derived from them is the technical aspects of embryo transfer. It seems that pretreatement with uterine relaxants can be helpful in preventing unpleasant cramps which can have an adverse effect on ART outcome. In this respect, some drugs such as prostaglandin inhibitors or sedatives have been evaluated but not confirmed yet remain controversial. This study was performed in order to assess the effect of administrating Piroxicam prior to embryo transfer on pregnancy rates in ART cycles. Materials and Methods: This pilot study was performed from August 2010 through December 2011 on 50 infertile women in ART cycles. Recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH with a long gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH analogue protocol were used for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. The subjects were randomly allocated into two groups of 25 patients after obtaining written consent. Group A received a 10 mg Piroxicam capsule 30 minutes before embryo transfer and group B was the control group with no treatment. Data were analyzed by Chi-square and analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Pregnancy rate was 34% (n=17 totally, with 32% (n=8 in group A and 36% (n=9 in group B (p=0.75. Uterine cramps were experienced by 4 women (16% in group B, while none were reported by women in group A (p=0.037. Conclusion: It seems that Piroxicam administration 30 minutes prior to embryo transfer cannot increase pregnancy rates, but can prevent or reduce uterine cramps after the procedure.

  8. Computerized assessment of pain drawing area: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wenngren

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Wenngren, Britt-Marie StålnackeDepartment of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, SwedenAim: To investigate if pain area in patients with chronic pain could be measured by a computerized assessment on previously marked pain drawings on paper figures and to analyze the further application of the method.Methods: Seventy-two patients (54 women and 18 men who were admitted to Umeå University Hospital during 2003 for assessment of chronic pain answered a set of questionnaires (pain intensity on the visual analog scale [VAS], disability on the Disability Rating Index [DRI], life satisfaction on the LiSat-11 and filled in pain drawings on paper figures of the human body. The pain drawings were later analyzed by using computerized assessment.Results: Women marked a greater pain area than men, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.433. No significant difference was shown for the previous seven days between men and women on the VAS (p = 0.914, DRI (p = 0.493, or LiSat-11 (p = 0.124. A statistically significant correlation was found between pain area and VAS for the previous seven days (r = 0.250; p = 0.046. Pain area was statistically significantly correlated to the DRI (r = 0.336; p = 0.014 and close to negatively correlated to the LiSat-11 (r = -0.687; p = 0.057.Conclusion: This pilot study shows that pain drawing area could be measured by a computerized assessment of pain drawings. The method points to the possibility of relating pain area with other instruments. In the present study, an association between the patients’ pain drawing area and pain intensity and between pain area and level of activity was shown.Keywords: musculoskeletal pain, screening, pain drawing, computerized assessment

  9. A study on centrifugal charaging pump shaft failure investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, S. D.; Kim, B. K. [KEPCO, Woolsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Pump shafts in the centrifugal charging safety injection pumps in PWRs have been subject to occasional failures over the past several years. Service experience showed that the pump shaft failures can result in significant emergency repair and maintenance costs to the plant. Metallurgical investigations of the pump shafts fabricated prior to 1977 confirmed that the cracking was initiated at stress concentrations sitcs, such as a locknut thread root or a split ring groove, and progressed by a high cycle fatigue mechanism. Westinghouse implemented a series of improvements and upgrades to increase the safety margins and to mitigate the effect of the off-design operating conditions. These included design enhancements as well as material condition (heat treatment) modifications. The pump shaft upgrading program significantly improved the design life of the shafts but did not fully mitigate the issue. Investigation of recent failures of the upgraded shafts suggested that these failures are initiated by a combination of off-design loading events such as loss of flow or gas binding and a reduction of pump shaft resistance to cracking due to the aqueous environmental conditions.

  10. Pump shaft failures - a compendium of case studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bernt, F

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available of failure. Pump shafts are generally exposed to the liquid being pumped either on a continual basis or at certain locations along the length of the shaft. Specialised sealing arrangements comprising sleeves and o-rings can be used to reduce the amount...

  11. A Study on Pragmatic Failure in Cross-Cultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Through analyzing and comparing the anecdotes of pragmatic failure in cross-cultural communication from the aspects of lexicon, syntax and discourse, some pragmatic strategies are suggested in intercultural communication. To improve learners' cultural awareness and communicative competence, a cultural-linguistic approach in foreign language…

  12. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, E.H.; Draaisma, J.M.T.; Hamer, S. den; Loeffen, J.L.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often rep

  13. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, E.H.; Draaisma, J.M.T.; Hamer, S. den; Loeffen, J.L.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often rep

  14. A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVocht, James W; Goertz, Christine M; Hondras, Maria

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular pain has multiple etiologies and a range of therapeutic options. In this pilot study, the authors assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate chiropractic treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). METHODS: The authors assigned 80...... the study design and methodology to be manageable. They gained substantial knowledge to aid in conducting a larger study. AMCT, RIST and self-care should be evaluated in a future comparative effectiveness study. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study was a necessary step to prepare for a larger study...

  15. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Lancaster, Gillian A; Campbell, Michael J; Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Coleman, Claire L; Bond, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention.

  16. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M Eldridge

    Full Text Available We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention.

  17. Ethical values in emergency medical services: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Anders; Herrera, María Jiménez; Axelsson, Christer; Martí, Dolors Burjalés; Sandman, Lars; Casali, Gian Luca

    2015-12-01

    Ambulance professionals often address conflicts between ethical values. As individuals' values represent basic convictions of what is right or good and motivate behaviour, research is needed to understand their value profiles. To translate and adapt the Managerial Values Profile to Spanish and Swedish, and measure the presence of utilitarianism, moral rights and/or social justice in ambulance professionals' value profiles in Spain and Sweden. The instrument was translated and culturally adapted. A content validity index was calculated. Pilot tests were carried out with 46 participants. This study conforms to the ethical principles for research involving human subjects and adheres to national laws and regulations concerning informed consent and confidentiality. Spanish professionals favoured justice and Swedish professionals' rights in their ambulance organizations. Both countries favoured utilitarianism least. Gender differences across countries showed that males favoured rights. Spanish female professionals favoured justice most strongly of all. Swedes favour rights while Spaniards favour justice. Both contexts scored low on utilitarianism focusing on total population effect, preferring the opposite, individualized approach of the rights and justice perspectives. Organizational investment in a utilitarian perspective might jeopardize ambulance professionals' moral right to make individual assessments based on the needs of the patient at hand. Utilitarianism and a caring ethos appear as stark opposites. However, a caring ethos in its turn might well involve unreasonable demands on the individual carer's professional role. Since both the justice and rights perspectives portrayed in the survey mainly concern relationship to the organization and peers within the organization, this relationship might at worst be given priority over the equal treatment and moral rights of the patient. A balanced view on ethical perspectives is needed to make professionals observant and

  18. Endometrial Histology of Depomedroxyprogesterone Acetate Users: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To obtain pilot data on the endometrial histology of Depomedroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera, DMPA users experiencing breakthrough bleeding (BTB versus users with amenorrhea. To compare the endometrial histology of patients who used DMPA continuously for 3–12 months versus those who used it for 13 months or more. Methods. Cross-sectional study. Endometrial biopsy was obtained from all consenting patients who used DMPA for at least 3 months. Patients were divided into those with BTB in the last 3 months versus those with amenorrhea for at least 3 months. Histology results and duration of therapy were compared. Results. The proportion of women with chronic endometritis, uterine polyps, atrophic, proliferative, or progesterone-dominant endometrium did not differ between those DMPA users with BTB versus those with amenorrhea. Duration of therapy did not correlate with symptoms of BTB or endometrial histology. Chronic endometritis was the most common histologic finding (10/40, 25% and occurred more often in women experiencing BTB (35% versus 15% (RR 1.62 CI 0.91–2.87. Moreover, 45% of women with BTB had received DMPA for more than 12 months. Conclusions. BTB was more common than previously reported in women using DMPA for more than 12 months. Chronic endometritis, which may indicate an underlying infectious or intracavitary anatomic etiology, has not been previously reported as a frequent finding in DMPA users, and may be related to ethnic or other sociodemographic characteristics of our patient population. Further study to elucidate the etiology of chronic endometritis in these patients is warranted.

  19. Lung Ultrasound Surface Wave Elastography: A Pilot Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Osborn, Thomas; Zhou, Boran; Meixner, Duane; Kinnick, Randall R; Bartholmai, Brian; Greenleaf, James F; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-09-01

    A lung ultrasound surface wave elastography (LUSWE) technique is developed to measure superficial lung tissue elastic properties. The purpose of this paper was to translate LUSWE into clinical studies for assessing patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and present the pilot data from lung measurements on 10 healthy subjects and 10 patients with ILD. ILD includes multiple lung disorders in which the lung tissue is distorted and stiffened by tissue fibrosis. Chest radiography and computed tomography are the most commonly used techniques for assessing lung disease, but they are associated with radiation and cannot directly measure lung elastic properties. LUSWE provides a noninvasive and nonionizing technique to measure the elastic properties of superficial lung tissue. LUSWE was used to measure regions of both lungs through six intercostal spaces for patients and healthy subjects. The data are presented as wave speed at 100, 150, and 200 Hz at the six intercostal spaces. As an example, the surface wave speeds are, respectively, 1.88 ± 0.11 m/s at 100 Hz, 2.74 ± 0.26 m/s at 150 Hz, and 3.62 ± 0.13 m/s at 200 Hz for a healthy subject in the upper right lung; this is in comparison to measurements from an ILD patient of 3.3 ± 0.37 m/s at 100 Hz, 4.38 ± 0.33 m/s at 150 Hz, and 5.24 ± 0.44 m/s at 200 Hz in the same lung space. Significant differences in wave speed between healthy subjects and ILD patients were found. LUSWE is a safe and noninvasive technique which may be useful for assessing ILD.

  20. Learning the 'SMART' way... results from a pilot study evaluating an interprofessional acute care study day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of patients requiring critical care are now being managed outside of critical care facilities. There is evidence that staff looking after these patients lack the necessary knowledge and skills to care for them safely, and that effective pre-registration education can play a significant role in addressing these shortfalls in nurses' knowledge and skills. A team from Sheffield Hallam University, in collaboration with the University of Sheffield, developed a pilot one day interprofessional acute illness programme which was called SMART® (Student Management of Acute illness - Recognition and Treatment). To evaluate the pilot programme, 16 student doctors and 72 student nurses were recruited. A pre- and post-course questionnaire based on the Featherstone et al. (2005) evaluation of ALERT was used to ascertain the students' general level of knowledge of the deteriorating patient, their experiences of and confidence in caring for an acutely unwell patient, and their level of comfort with interprofessional working. The results from the pilot study indicate that the students' levels of knowledge, their levels of confidence and their comfort with interprofessional working all rose after undertaking the programme. The pilot study has a number of implications for the future teaching and learning of acute care clinical skills, within a theoretically based curriculum.

  1. Practical Implications of Metacognitively Oriented Psychotherapy in Psychosis : Findings From a Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; van Donkersgoed, Rozanne J. M.; Aleman, Andre; van der Gaag, Mark; Wunderink, Lex; Arends, Johan; Lysaker, Paul H.; Pijnenborg, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    In preparation for a multicenter randomized controlled trial, a pilot study was conducted investigating the feasibility and acceptance of a shortened version (12 vs. 40 sessions) of an individual metacognitive psychotherapy (Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy [MERIT]). Twelve participants

  2. Cluster Sampling Bias in Government-Sponsored Evaluations: A Correlational Study of Employment and Welfare Pilots in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaganay, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    For pilot or experimental employment programme results to apply beyond their test bed, researchers must select 'clusters' (i.e. the job centres delivering the new intervention) that are reasonably representative of the whole territory. More specifically, this requirement must account for conditions that could artificially inflate the effect of a programme, such as the fluidity of the local labour market or the performance of the local job centre. Failure to achieve representativeness results in Cluster Sampling Bias (CSB). This paper makes three contributions to the literature. Theoretically, it approaches the notion of CSB as a human behaviour. It offers a comprehensive theory, whereby researchers with limited resources and conflicting priorities tend to oversample 'effect-enhancing' clusters when piloting a new intervention. Methodologically, it advocates for a 'narrow and deep' scope, as opposed to the 'wide and shallow' scope, which has prevailed so far. The PILOT-2 dataset was developed to test this idea. Empirically, it provides evidence on the prevalence of CSB. In conditions similar to the PILOT-2 case study, investigators (1) do not sample clusters with a view to maximise generalisability; (2) do not oversample 'effect-enhancing' clusters; (3) consistently oversample some clusters, including those with higher-than-average client caseloads; and (4) report their sampling decisions in an inconsistent and generally poor manner. In conclusion, although CSB is prevalent, it is still unclear whether it is intentional and meant to mislead stakeholders about the expected effect of the intervention or due to higher-level constraints or other considerations.

  3. Testing a tri-partite contingent model of engineering cultures: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Glen D., E-mail: gd.murphy@qut.edu.a [Cooperative Research Centre for Integrated Engineering Asset Management (CIEAM), School of Management, Queensland University of Technology, PO Box 2434, Brisbane 4001 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    For some time there has been a growing awareness of organizational culture and its impact on the functioning of engineering and maintenance departments. Those wishing to implement contemporary maintenance regimes (e.g. condition based maintenance) are often encouraged to develop 'appropriate cultures' to support a new method's introduction. Unfortunately these same publications often fail to specifically articulate the cultural values required to support those efforts. In the broader literature, only a limited number of case examples document the cultural values held by engineering asset intensive firms and how they contribute to their success (or failure). Consequently a gap exists in our knowledge of what engineering cultures currently might look like, or what might constitute a best practice engineering asset culture. The findings of a pilot study investigating the perceived ideal characteristics of engineering asset cultures are reported. Engineering managers, consultants and academics (n=47), were surveyed as to what they saw were essential attributes of both engineering cultures and engineering asset personnel. Valued cultural elements included those orientated around continuous improvement, safety and quality. Valued individual attributes included openness to change, interpersonal skills and conscientiousness. The paper concludes with a discussion regarding the development of a best practice cultural framework for practitioners and engineering managers.

  4. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Styron

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This project focused on a pilot project implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year. The overall purpose was to facilitate interprofessional collaborative practice innovations through the development of leadership, core competencies, and the use of technology, especially among nurses. Nursing, medicine, and physician assistant students were educated on the IOM competencies for interprofessional teams and the core competencies identified by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel [1] to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to practice in the collaborative practice environments. The project addressed four goals: Develop faculty expertise and leadership in interprofessional collaborative practice to provide a current, high quality education to nursing, physician assistant, and medical students; Implement a culturally responsive and respectful collaborative interprofessional practice curriculum to prepare nurses, physician assistants, and medical students to deliver high quality, efficient, team-based care in a dynamically evolving environment; Focus interprofessional collaborative practice education on models and practices that lead to improvement in patient outcomes; and Evaluate the program and disseminate best practices. Findings from this pilot include strategies to engage different health professions' students and faculty, partnering with community agencies, building an effective interprofessional team to guide the project, and seeking funding for extension and expansion of the offerings.

  5. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Styron

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This project focused on a pilot project implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year. The overall purpose was to facilitate interprofessional collaborative practice innovations through the development of leadership, core competencies, and the use of technology, especially among nurses. Nursing, medicine, and physician assistant students were educated on the IOM competencies for interprofessional teams and the core competencies identified by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel [1] to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to practice in the collaborative practice environments. The project addressed four goals: Develop faculty expertise and leadership in interprofessional collaborative practice to provide a current, high quality education to nursing, physician assistant, and medical students; Implement a culturally responsive and respectful collaborative interprofessional practice curriculum to prepare nurses, physician assistants, and medical students to deliver high quality, efficient, team-based care in a dynamically evolving environment; Focus interprofessional collaborative practice education on models and practices that lead to improvement in patient outcomes; and Evaluate the program and disseminate best practices. Findings from this pilot include strategies to engage different health professions' students and faculty, partnering with community agencies, building an effective interprofessional team to guide the project, and seeking funding for extension and expansion of the offerings.

  6. Observation of Autoregulation Indices During Ventricular CSF Drainage After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, Marcel J. H.; de Jong, Sytse F.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Regtien, Joost; Depreitere, Bart; Czosnyka, Marek; Smielewski, Peter; Elting, Jan Willem J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is increasingly recognized as a factor that requires evaluation when managing poor grade aneurysmal subarachno aSAH) patients. In this single center pilot study, we investigated whether intraventricular intracranial pressure (ICP) derived when

  7. Pilot projects and their diffusion: a case study of integrated coastal management in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vreugdenhil, H

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilot projects are policy instruments mainly applied to introduce or test new practices, concepts or technologies. Pilot projects can lead to a broader policy transition. However, the diffusion process associated with the pilot projects is not well...

  8. Learning from Engineering Failures: A Case Study of the Deepwater Horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Mary Annette; Hunt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Natural catastrophes and engineering failures provide timely, motivating, and conceptually rich backdrops for learning. Engineering educators have long embraced case studies of engineering failures as a sound pedagogical strategy for meeting several learning standards, such as "design within realistic constraints", and teaching failure analysis.…

  9. Treatment of subacute hepatitis B with lamivudine: A pilot study in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delić Dragan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The incidence of acute hepatitis B viral (HBV infection in adults has increased in recent years in Serbia. Most icteric patients with acute hepatitis B resolve their infection and do not require treatment. Fulminant hepatitis B is a severe form of acute infection complicated by encephalopathy and liver failure. Subgroups of fulminant hepatitis B including hyperacute, acute and subacute are defined by the interval between jaundice and encephalopathy. Fulminant hepatic failure or subacute hepatitis B infection we observed in about 1% of all cases. In cases of fulminant hepatic failure or subacute form of HBV infection orthotopic liver transplantation can be life-saving operation, but in our country this procedure is difficult to achieve. Lamivudine has been established as a safe and effective antiviral agent for the treatment of chronic HBV hepatitis. Methods. In our pilot study performed at the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases in Belgrade, Serbia in the period between 2002 and 2006 we treated 10 patients with clinically verified subacute HBV infection with lamivudine, 100 mg orally per day. Results. The most of the treated patients (9/10; 90% survived subacute form of hepatitis B. After a few weeks of the treatment serum aminotransferase levels and other liver-function tests were normalized. Also, after a four-month lamivudine treatment all the patients lost HBsAg. Lamivudine was discontinued after six months in all the patients. In addition, six months after lamivudine was discontinued the patients remained well with normal results on liver-function tests. Conclusion. The obtained results suggest significant efficacy of lamivudine in patients with subacute hepatitis B. Also, we suggest that lamivudine therapy should be administered early in progression of subacute disease since it could be life-saving treatment in some patients, especially in the countries (like Serbia where orthotopic liver transplantation is

  10. A pilot study into measurements of markers of atherosclerosis in periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leivadaros, E; van der Velden, U; Bizzarro, S; ten Heggeler, JMAG; Gerdes, VEA; Hoek, FJ; Nagy, TOM; Scholma, J; Bakker, SJL; Gans, ROB; ten Cate, H; Loos, BG

    Background: Periodontitis may be a possible risk factor for atherosclerosis. The current pilot study explored arterial wall thickness and other variables associated with atherosclerosis in healthy subjects with and without periodontitis. Methods: Patients with moderate (N = 34) and severe

  11. Dry deposition of sulphur on the Mpumalanga highveld: a pilot study using the inferential method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zunckel, M

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available A pilot study which uses the inferential method to estimate dry deposition of sulphur on the central Mpumalanga highveld is discussed in this paper. Ambient concentrations of sulphur dioxide, particulates and micro-meteorological measurements from 2...

  12. Hand Robotic Therapy in Children with Hemiparesis: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lauri; Gordon, Andrew M; Kim, Heakyung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the impact of training with a hand robotic device on hand paresis and function in a population of children with hemiparesis. Twelve children with hemiparesis (mean age, 9 [SD, 3.64] years) completed participation in this prospective, experimental, pilot study. Participants underwent clinical assessments at baseline and again 6 weeks later with instructions to not initiate new therapies. After these assessments, participants received 6 weeks of training with a hand robotic device, consisting of 1-hour sessions, 3 times weekly. Assessments were repeated on completion of training. Results showed significant improvements after training on the Assisting Hand Assessment (mean difference, 2.0 Assisting Hand Assessment units; P = 0.011) and on the upper-extremity component of the Fugl-Meyer scale (raw score mean difference, 4.334; P = 0.001). No significant improvements between pretest and posttest were noted on the Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function, the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test, or the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory after intervention. Total active mobility of digits and grip strength also failed to demonstrate significant changes after training. Participants tolerated training with the hand robotic device, and significant improvements in bimanual hand use, as well as impairment-based scales, were noted. Improvements were carried over into bimanual skills during play. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Understand key components of neuroplasticity; (2) Discuss the benefits of robotic therapy in the recovery of hand function in pediatric patients with hemiplegia; and (3) Appropriately incorporate robotic therapy into the treatment plan of pediatric patients with hemiplegia. Advanced ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the

  13. Treatment of Aspergillus fumigatus in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn D Aaron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many patients with cystic fibrosis develop persistent airway infection/colonization with Aspergillus fumigatus, however the impact of A. fumigatus on clinical outcomes remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether treatment directed against Aspergillus fumigatus improves pulmonary function and clinical outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. METHODS: We performed a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled pilot clinical trial involving 35 patients with CF whose sputum cultures were chronically positive for A. fumigatus. Participants were centrally randomized to receive either oral itraconazole 5 mg/kg/d (N = 18 or placebo (N = 17 for 24 weeks. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who experienced a respiratory exacerbation requiring intravenous antibiotics over the 24 week treatment period. Secondary outcomes included changes in FEV(1 and quality of life. RESULTS: Over the 24 week treatment period, 4 of 18 (22% patients randomized to itraconazole experienced a respiratory exacerbation requiring intravenous antibiotics, compared to 5 of 16 (31% placebo treated patients, P = 0.70. FEV(1 declined by 4.62% over 24 weeks in the patients randomized to itraconazole, compared to a 0.32% improvement in the placebo group (between group difference = -4.94%, 95% CI: -15.33 to 5.45, P = 0.34. Quality of life did not differ between the 2 treatment groups throughout the study. Therapeutic itraconazole blood levels were not achieved in 43% of patients randomized to itraconazole. CONCLUSION: We did not identify clinical benefit from itraconazole treatment for CF patients whose sputum was chronically colonized with A. fumigatus. Limitations of this pilot study were its small sample size, and failure to achieve therapeutic levels of itraconazole in many patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528190.

  14. Hemodynamic Effects of Phenylephrine, Vasopressin, and Epinephrine in Children With Pulmonary Hypertension: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siehr, Stephanie L; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Yang, Weiguang; Peng, Lynn F; Ogawa, Michelle T; Ramamoorthy, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    During a pulmonary hypertensive crisis, the marked increase in pulmonary vascular resistance can result in acute right ventricular failure and death. Currently, there are no therapeutic guidelines for managing an acute crisis. This pilot study examined the hemodynamic effects of phenylephrine, arginine vasopressin, and epinephrine in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension. In this prospective, open-label, nonrandomized pilot study, we enrolled pediatric patients previously diagnosed with pulmonary hypertensive who were scheduled electively for cardiac catheterization. Primary outcome was a change in the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic vascular resistance. Baseline hemodynamic data were collected before and after the study drug was administered. Eleven of 15 participants were women, median age was 9.2 years (range, 1.7-14.9 yr), and median weight was 26.8 kg (range, 8.5-55.2 kg). Baseline mean pulmonary artery pressure was 49 ± 19 mm Hg, and mean indexed pulmonary vascular resistance was 10 ± 5.4 Wood units. Etiology of pulmonary hypertensive varied, and all were on systemic pulmonary hypertensive medications. Patients 1-5 received phenylephrine 1 μg/kg; patients 6-10 received arginine vasopressin 0.03 U/kg; and patients 11-15 received epinephrine 1 μg/kg. Hemodynamics was measured continuously for up to 10 minutes following study drug administration. After study drug administration, the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic vascular resistance decreased in three of five patients receiving phenylephrine, five of five patients receiving arginine vasopressin, and three of five patients receiving epinephrine. Although all three medications resulted in an increase in aortic pressure, only arginine vasopressin consistently resulted in a decrease in the ratio of systolic pulmonary artery-to-aortic pressure. This prospective pilot study of phenylephrine, arginine vasopressin, and epinephrine in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertensive showed an increase in aortic

  15. Coal resources available for development; a methodology and pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Jane R.; Carter, M. Devereux; Cobb, James C.

    1990-01-01

    Coal accounts for a major portion of our Nation's energy supply in projections for the future. A demonstrated reserve base of more than 475 billion short tons, as the Department of Energy currently estimates, indicates that, on the basis of today's rate of consumption, the United States has enough coal to meet projected energy needs for almost 200 years. However, the traditional procedures used for estimating the demonstrated reserve base do not account for many environmental and technological restrictions placed on coal mining. A new methodology has been developed to determine the quantity of coal that might actually be available for mining under current and foreseeable conditions. This methodology is unique in its approach, because it applies restrictions to the coal resource before it is mined. Previous methodologies incorporated restrictions into the recovery factor (a percentage), which was then globally applied to the reserve (minable coal) tonnage to derive a recoverable coal tonnage. None of the previous methodologies define the restrictions and their area and amount of impact specifically. Because these restrictions and their impacts are defined in this new methodology, it is possible to achieve more accurate and specific assessments of available resources. This methodology has been tested in a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Kentucky Geological Survey on the Matewan 7.5-minute quadrangle in eastern Kentucky. Pertinent geologic, mining, land-use, and technological data were collected, assimilated, and plotted. The National Coal Resources Data System was used as the repository for data, and its geographic information system software was applied to these data to eliminate restricted coal and quantify that which is available for mining. This methodology does not consider recovery factors or the economic factors that would be considered by a company before mining. Results of the pilot study indicate that, of the estimated

  16. Cardiometabolic Risk among African-American Women: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Susan J.; Oster, Robert A.; Floyd, Natalie A.; Ovalle, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the associations of the Homeostatic Model of Assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-ir), acanthosis nigricans, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) with two of the commonly used definitions of the metabolic syndrome (Adult Treatment Panel III {ATP III} and International Diabetes Federation {IDF}) among reproductive age healthy free living African-American women. Methods A pilot study with a cross-sectional design examined 33 African-American women aged 20 to 46 (mean 31.24, +/- 7.25), for the presence of metabolic syndrome determined by ATP III and IDF criteria, insulin resistance (HOMA-ir and/or acanthosis nigricans), degree of inflammation (hs-CRP) and presence of dysfibrinolysis (PAI-1). Results HOMA-ir identified insulin resistance in 27 (81.8%) of the women, whereas the presence of acanthosis nigricans indicated that 16 (48 %) of these women manifested insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome was found in 7 women (21.2 %) by ATP III or 9 (27.3 %) by IDF criteria. Bivariate correlations showed associations between HOMA-ir and waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), acanthosis nigricans, the ATP III and IDF definitions for metabolic syndrome. PAI-1 was significantly correlated with waist circumference, BMI, fasting glucose, HOMA-ir, and ATP III. Both HOMA-ir and PAI-1 were significantly and negatively correlated with HDL-C. hs-CRP was significantly correlated with BMI and 2-hour post glucose. Conclusion Both dysfibrinolysis (PAI-1 levels) and insulin resistance (HOMA-ir) when individually regressed on the ATP III definition of metabolic syndrome explained 32 % and 29% of the respective variance. The addition of HOMA-ir measurement may significantly improve early recognition of cardiometabolic risk among reproductive age African-American women who have not yet met the criteria for the ATP III or IDF definitions of the metabolic syndrome. Likewise, acanthosis nigricans is potentially a

  17. Promoting childbirth companions in South Africa: a randomised pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Helen

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most women delivering in South African State Maternity Hospitals do not have a childbirth companion; in addition, the quality of care could be better, and at times women are treated inhumanely. We piloted a multi-faceted intervention to encourage uptake of childbirth companions in state hospitals, and hypothesised that lay carers would improve the behaviour of health professionals. Methods We conducted a pilot randomised controlled trial of an intervention to promote childbirth companions in hospital deliveries. We promoted evidence-based information for maternity staff at 10 hospitals through access to the World Health Organization Reproductive Health Library (RHL, computer hardware and training to all ten hospitals. We surveyed 200 women at each site, measuring companionship, and indicators of good obstetric practice and humanity of care. Five hospitals were then randomly allocated to receive an educational intervention to promote childbirth companions, and we surveyed all hospitals again at eight months through a repeat survey of postnatal women. Changes in median values between intervention and control hospitals were examined. Results At baseline, the majority of hospitals did not allow a companion, or access to food or fluids. A third of women were given an episiotomy. Some women were shouted at (17.7%, N = 2085, and a few reported being slapped or struck (4.3%, N = 2080. Despite an initial positive response from staff to the childbirth companion intervention, we detected no difference between intervention and control hospitals in relation to whether a companion was allowed by nursing staff, good obstetric practice or humanity of care. Conclusion The quality and humanity of care in these state hospitals needs to improve. Introducing childbirth companions was more difficult than we anticipated, particularly in under-resourced health care systems with frequent staff changes. We were unable to determine whether the presence

  18. A pilot study to evaluate runoff quantity from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Lee, Min Jung; Han, Mooyoung

    2015-04-01

    The use of green roofs is gaining increased recognition in many countries as a solution that can be used to improve environmental quality and reduce runoff quantity. To achieve these goals, pilot-scale green roof assemblies have been constructed and operated in an urban setting. From a stormwater management perspective, green roofs are 42.8-60.8% effective in reducing runoff for 200 mm soil depth and 13.8-34.4% effective in reducing runoff for 150 mm soil depth. By using Spearman rank correlation analysis, high rainfall intensity was shown to have a negative relationship with delayed occurrence time, demonstrating that the soil media in green roofs do not efficiently retain rainwater. Increasing the number of antecedent dry days can help to improve water retention capacity and delay occurrence time. From the viewpoint of runoff water quality, green roofs are regarded as the best management practice by filtration and adsorption through growth media (soil).

  19. [Fear of falling in a fall clinic for geriatric patients: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dautzenberg, P.L.; Buurman, B.H.; Loonen, A.J.; Wouters, C.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this pilot study we want to determine how often fear of falling occurs in geriatric patients visiting a fall clinic and to study the characteristics of fear of falling and its consequences. DESIGN: Retrospective study of patient's records. METHOD: A random sample of 100 medical records

  20. Central motor control failure in fibromyalgia: a surface electromyography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buskila Dan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is characterised by diffuse musculoskeletal pain and stiffness at multiple sites, tender points in characteristic locations, and the frequent presence of symptoms such as fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess whether the myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in patients affected by FM are central or peripheral in origin. Methods Eight female patients aged 55.6 ± 13.6 years (FM group and eight healthy female volunteers aged 50.3 ± 9.3 years (MCG were studied by means of non-invasive surface electromyography (s-EMG involving a linear array of 16 electrodes placed on the skin overlying the biceps brachii muscle, with muscle fatigue being evoked by means of voluntary and involuntary (electrically elicited contractions. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs, motor unit action potential conduction velocity distributions (mean ± SD and skewness, and the mean power frequency of the spectrum (MNF were estimated in order to assess whether there were any significant differences between the two groups and contraction types. Results The motor pattern of recruitment during voluntary contractions was altered in the FM patients, who also showed fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue (normalised conduction velocity rate of changes: -0.074 ± 0.052%/s in FM vs -0.196 ± 0.133%/s in MCG; normalised MNF rate of changes: -0.29 ± 0.16%/s in FM vs -0.66 ± 0.34%/s in MCG. Mean conduction velocity distribution and skewnesses values were higher (p Conclusion The apparent paradox of fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in FM is the electrophysiological expression of muscle remodelling in terms of the prevalence of slow conducting fatigue-resistant type I fibres. As the only between-group differences concerned voluntary contractions, they are probably more related to central motor control failure than muscle membrane alterations, which suggests pathological muscle fibre remodelling related to altered

  1. Comorbid Depression and Heart Failure: A Community Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhautesh Dinesh Jani

    Full Text Available To examine the association between depression and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF in a community cohort.HF patients in Minnesota, United States completed depression screening using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 between 1st Oct 2007 and 1st Dec 2011; patients with PHQ-9≥5 were labelled "depressed". We calculated the risk of death and first hospitalization within 2 years using Cox regression. Results were adjusted for 10 commonly used prognostic factors (age, sex, systolic blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum sodium, ejection fraction, blood urea nitrogen, brain natriuretic peptide, presence of diabetes and ischaemic aetiology. Area under the curve (AUC, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI and net reclassification improvement (NRI compared depression as a predictor against the aforementioned factors.425 patients (mean age 74, 57.6% males were included in the study; 179 (42.1% had PHQ-9≥5. The adjusted hazard ratio of death was 2.02 (95% CI 1.34-3.04 and of hospitalization was 1.42 (95% CI 1.13-1.80 for those with compared to those without depression. Adding depression to the models did not appreciably change the AUC but led to statistically significant improvements in both the IDI (p = 0.001 and p = 0.005 for death and hospitalization, respectively and NRI (for death and hospitalization, 35% (p = 0.002 and 27% (p = 0.007 were reclassified correctly, respectively.Depression is frequent among community patients with HF and associated with increased risk of hospitalizations and death. Risk prediction for death and hospitalizations in HF patients can be improved by considering depression.

  2. A pilot home-based early intervention study to improve the mathematical skills of young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Şükran Öz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Children who come from low socioeconomic backgrounds and children with learning disabilities are found to be at risk for future failure in mathematics. Even though the mathematics scores increases over time the achievement gap remains between the various ethnic and socioeconomic groups. One way to prevent this failure is to identify the students who are at risk and provide them with effective early intervention. This study reports the results of a pilot early mathematics intervention study focusing on two Turkish families in the US. In this single-subject research, a multiple probe technique was used in order to examine the impact of the SRA DLM Math Pre-K CD-ROM in combination with parent scaffolding on young children’s number sense skills. Two parent-child dyads participated in this study. Two semi-structured interviews were conducted with the parents before and after the intervention. The child participants received 3 Mathematical Curriculum Based Measure (CBM every week to monitor their progress. Building Blocks Assessment was used to identify whether children were able to generalize the number sense skills developed during work sessions in different settings. This measure was administered both before and after the intervention.This study demonstrated that children’s and parents’ use of a software program where they work collaboratively at home resulted in increased number sense skills. These results were interpreted in the context of socio-cultural theory. The parents displayed different strategies during the mathematics work sessions, reflecting their own feelings about mathematics and technology.

  3. Psychosocial consequences for children of a parent with cancer : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, GA; van der Graaf, WTA; Visser, A; Dijkstra, JS; Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM

    2003-01-01

    When cancer is diagnosed in a parent, this may also have consequences for the children. The purpose of this pilot study was to gain more insight into the psychosocial consequences for children of a parent with cancer, from the perspective of both the children and their parents. For this study, 14 fa

  4. Psychosocial consequences for children of a parent with cancer : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, GA; van der Graaf, WTA; Visser, A; Dijkstra, JS; Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM

    2003-01-01

    When cancer is diagnosed in a parent, this may also have consequences for the children. The purpose of this pilot study was to gain more insight into the psychosocial consequences for children of a parent with cancer, from the perspective of both the children and their parents. For this study, 14 fa

  5. The ArtAssist Device in chronic lower limb ischemia. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louridas, G; Saadia, R; Spelay, J; Abdoh, A; Weighell, W; Arneja, A S; Tanner, J; Guzman, R

    2002-03-01

    Patients with chronic critical limb ischemia following a failed bypass graft or with non-reconstructable distal disease diagnosed angiographically, have a very poor prognosis. This is a prospective pilot study to assess the influence of the ArtAssist Device on pedal blood flow and amputation rate. Thirty-three legs in 25 patients were evaluated. Ten legs presented with rest pain, and 23 legs with tissue loss. Nine legs had previously undergone bypass surgery. At a mean follow-up of 3 months, 14 (42%) legs were amputated, and 19 (58%) were saved. Eleven of the amputated legs were in patients with chronic renal failure, a known risk factor. The amputation rate, excluding this group, was 13.6% (3/22). Toe pressures measured initially and after 3 months on the pump showed a significant improvement (p=0.03). Forty percent of patients presenting with rest pain improved, while 26% of foot ulcers healed on the pump. Mortality rate was 12%. The results from this prospective study are encouraging but need to be validated in a larger prospective randomized study.

  6. A systematic approach for designing a HBM Pilot Study for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Kerstin; Seiwert, Margarete; Casteleyn, Ludwine

    2014-01-01

    The objective of COPHES (Consortium to Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale) was to develop a harmonised approach to conduct human biomonitoring on a European scale. COPHES developed a systematic approach for designing and conducting a pilot study for an EU-wide cross-sectional human b...

  7. A Case Study of Environmental Injustice: The Failure in Flint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Campbell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The failure by the city of Flint, Michigan to properly treat its municipal water system after a change in the source of water, has resulted in elevated lead levels in the city’s water and an increase in city children’s blood lead levels. Lead exposure in young children can lead to decrements in intelligence, development, behavior, attention and other neurological functions. This lack of ability to provide safe drinking water represents a failure to protect the public’s health at various governmental levels. This article describes how the tragedy happened, how low-income and minority populations are at particularly high risk for lead exposure and environmental injustice, and ways that we can move forward to prevent childhood lead exposure and lead poisoning, as well as prevent future Flint-like exposure events from occurring. Control of the manufacture and use of toxic chemicals to prevent adverse exposure to these substances is also discussed. Environmental injustice occurred throughout the Flint water contamination incident and there are lessons we can all learn from this debacle to move forward in promoting environmental justice.

  8. A pilot study of rivastigmine in the treatment of delirium after stroke : A safe alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Annemarie W.; de Kort, Paul L. M.; Jansen, Ben P. W.; Kappelle, Jaap; Roks, Gerwin

    2008-01-01

    Background: Delirium is a common disorder in the early phase of stroke. Given the presumed cholinergic deficiency in delirium, we tested treatment with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Methods: This pilot study was performed within an epidemiological study. In 527 consecutive stroke

  9. A novel, online social cognitive training program for young adults with schizophrenia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mor Nahum

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: This study provides an initial proof of concept for online social cognition training in schizophrenia. This form of training demonstrated feasibility and resulted in within-subject gains in social functioning and motivation. This pilot study represents a first step towards validating this training approach; randomized controlled trials, now underway, are designed to confirm and extend these findings.

  10. Virtual Golden Foods Corporation: Generic Skills in a Virtual Crisis Environment (A Pilot Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godat, Meredith

    2007-01-01

    Workplace learning in a crisis-rich environment is often difficult if not impossible to integrate into programs so that students are able to experience and apply crisis management practices and principles. This study presents the results of a pilot project that examined the effective use of a virtual reality (VR) environment as a tool to teach…

  11. Effects of interleukin-1 blockade with anakinra on adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure after acute myocardial infarction [from the Virginia Commonwealth University-Anakinra Remodeling Trial (2) (VCU-ART2) pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Antonio; Van Tassell, Benjamin Wallace; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Kontos, Michael Christopher; Grizzard, John Dallas; Spillman, Debra Whittaker; Oddi, Claudia; Roberts, Charlotte Susan; Melchior, Ryan David; Mueller, George Herman; Abouzaki, Nayef Antar; Rengel, Lenore Rosemary; Varma, Amit; Gambill, Michael Lucas; Falcao, Raquel Appa; Voelkel, Norbert Felix; Dinarello, Charles Anthony; Vetrovec, George Wayne

    2013-05-15

    A first pilot study of interleukin-1 blockade in ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction showed improved remodeling. In the present second pilot study, we enrolled 30 patients with clinically stable ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction randomized to anakinra, recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, 100 mg/day for 14 days or placebo in a double-blind fashion. The primary end point was the difference in the interval change in left ventricular (LV) end-systolic volume index between the 2 groups within 10 to 14 weeks. The secondary end points included changes in the LV end-diastolic volume index, LV ejection fraction, and C-reactive protein levels. No significant changes in end-systolic volume index, LV end-diastolic volume index, or LV ejection fraction were seen in the placebo group. Compared to placebo, treatment with anakinra led to no measurable differences in these parameters. Anakinra significantly blunted the increase in C-reactive protein between admission and 72 hours (+0.8 mg/dl, interquartile range -6.4 to +4.2, vs +21.1 mg/dl, interquartile range +8.7 to +36.6, p = 0.002), which correlated with the changes in LV end-diastolic volume index and LV end-systolic volume index at 10 to 14 weeks (R = +0.83, p = 0.002, and R = +0.55, p = 0.077, respectively). One patient in the placebo group (7%) died. One patient (7%) in the anakinra group developed recurrent acute myocardial infarction. More patients were diagnosed with new-onset heart failure in the placebo group (4, 27%) than in the anakinra group (1, 7%; p = 0.13). When the data were pooled with those from the first Virginia Commonwealth University-Anakinra Remodeling Trial (n = 40), this difference reached statistical significance (30% vs 5%, p = 0.035). In conclusion, interleukin-1 blockade with anakinra blunted the acute inflammatory response associated with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. Although it failed to show a statistically significant

  12. Conveying a Biblical Worldview to Charter School Students: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barke, Steve

    2014-01-01

    This doctoral project is a pilot study to assess the effectiveness of a church discipleship co-op designed to convey a biblical worldview to middle and high school students enrolled in charter homeschooling in Southern California. Research by the Nehemiah Institute indicated that 90% of Christian families in the United States send their children…

  13. A Pilot Study of a Kindergarten Summer School Reading Program in High-Poverty Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Carolyn A.; Solari, Emily J.; Ciancio, Dennis J.; Hecht, Steven A.; Swank, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined an implementation of a kindergarten summer school reading program in 4 high-poverty urban schools. The program targeted both basic reading skills and oral language development. Students were randomly assigned to a treatment group (n = 25) or a typical practice comparison group (n = 28) within each school; however,…

  14. A Pilot Study on the Impact of a Home-Based Parenting Intervention: Parents Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Ellie; Holland, Sally; Jerzembek, Gabi

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot study undertaken in order to explore the impact of a home-based parenting intervention (Parents Plus), on parents and families. Parents Plus is part of a Welsh Early Years strategy called Flying Start and aims to promote positive parent-child interactions. This article explores the medium-term to long-term impact of…

  15. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
.

  16. Priming a Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus; Ie Pedersen, Maria

    Abstract. We report on the initial findings of an action research study about effects specifications. It is a part of larger IS pilot implementation project conducted in the Danish healthcare sector. Through interviews and a workshop we have identified and specified the main effects that comprise...

  17. Priming a Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus; Ie Pedersen, Maria

    Abstract. We report on the initial findings of an action research study about effects specifications. It is a part of larger IS pilot implementation project conducted in the Danish healthcare sector. Through interviews and a workshop we have identified and specified the main effects that comprise...

  18. Advancing safe drug use through interprofessional learning (IPL): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achike, Francis I; Smith, John; Leonard, Stuart; Williams, Janet; Browning, Felicia; Glisson, James

    2014-07-01

    Interprofessional collaborative patient-centered care (IPCPC) improves healthcare quality and cost. Drug-related morbidity drives healthcare costs, thus requiring IPCPC approaches. The lack of educational preparedness for would-be IPCPC practitioners underlies the failure of historic IPCPC attempts, hence today's emphasis on pre-licensure interprofessional education (IPE). A pilot IPE class was conducted on rational drug use (RDU) through rational drug prescribing. Twenty fourth-year nursing students and 88 second-year medical students participated (8-10 medical per 2-3 nursing students) in small group activity in a lecture hall. A case study on rational drug choice and prescription writing processes from medical and nursing perspectives was used. Eighty of 108 (74%) students completed the post-activity questionnaire and were satisfied with the class, with a mean weighted score (mws) of 0.8. The learning outcomes (mws = 1.0) contributed more (P classroom were, respectively, the most- and least-liked aspects of the class. The study revealed students' appetite for IPE, highlights the challenges in developing IPE curricula, and could serve as impetus for schools developing IPE for RDU curricula.

  19. Improving Homework Compliance in Career Counseling with a Behavioral Activation Functional Assessment Procedure: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, David E.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Bowe, William M.; Pfennig, Sherri L.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation has emerged as a widely used treatment for depression in a number of health care settings due to its concrete, straightforward emphasis on out-of-session client homework, but it lacks explicit guidelines for identifying and overcoming barriers that interfere with homework completion. The purpose of this pilot study was to…

  20. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Assisted in vitro Electroporation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novickij, Vitalij; Grainys, Audrius; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Pamedytytė, Dovilė; Kalėdienė, Lilija; Novickij, Jurij; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-09-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon occurring due to exposure of cells to Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) which leads to increase of membrane permeability. Electroporation is used in medicine, biotechnology, and food processing. Recently, as an alternative to electroporation by PEF, Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields (PEMF) application causing similar biological effects was suggested. Since induced electric field in PEMF however is 2–3 magnitudes lower than in PEF electroporation, the membrane permeabilization mechanism remains hypothetical. We have designed pilot experiments where Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida lusitaniae cells were subjected to single 100–250 μs electrical pulse of 800 V with and without concomitant delivery of magnetic pulse (3, 6 and 9 T). As expected, after the PEF pulses only the number of Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent cells has increased, indicative of membrane permeabilization. We further show that single sub-millisecond magnetic field pulse did not cause detectable poration of yeast. Concomitant exposure of cells to pulsed electric (PEF) and magnetic field (PMF) however resulted in the increased number PI fluorescent cells and reduced viability. Our results show increased membrane permeability by PEF when combined with magnetic field pulse, which can explain electroporation at considerably lower electric field strengths induced by PEMF compared to classical electroporation.

  1. Priming a Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus Rotvit Perlt; Pedersen, Maria Ie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. We report on the initial findings of an exploratory action research study about effects specifications using the systems development method Effects-driven IT development. It is part of a larger IS pilot implementation project conducted in the Danish healthcare sector. Through interviews...

  2. Pilot age and geographic region of commuter and air taxi crashes: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebok, George W; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies of major airline and general aviation crashes have identified a host of risk factors. We examined risk factors related to crashes involving commuter air carrier and air taxi flights. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of pilot age, total flight time, and geographic region with commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes (14 CFR Part 135) from 1983-2002 in the United States. A total of 2033 commuter air carrier or air taxi crashes from the National Transportation Safety Board aviation crash database were identified as eligible cases. Controls were randomly selected incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) aviation incident database coded under Part 135 operation. Relative to controls, commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes were less likely to occur in pilots under 30 yr of age (adjusted odds ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.88) after adjusting for geographic region and total flight time. With adjustment for pilot age and total flight time, the commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes with pilot error were nearly 13 times as likely to be in Alaska as their matched controls (adjusted odds ratio 12.84, 95% confidence interval 5.24-31.45). These results suggest that pilot age may be associated with risk of crash involvement in Part 135 operations. The excess crash risk in Alaska with or without pilot error underscores the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety.

  3. Feasibility and impact of a physical exercise program in patients with advanced cancer: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dungen, I.A. van den; Verhagen, C.A.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Berg, J.P. van den; Vissers, K.C.P.; Engels, Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of completing an exercise program in patients with advanced cancer and to obtain preliminary data of its impact on physical and quality of life (QoL) outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a nonrandomized pilot study. Participants were 26 palliative

  4. Assessment of Military Cultural Competence: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eric G; Hall-Clark, Brittany N; Hamaoka, Derrick; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-08-01

    Cultural competence is widely considered a cornerstone of patient care. Efforts to improve military cultural competency have recently gained national attention. Assessment of cultural competence is a critical component to this effort, but no assessment of military cultural competence currently exists. An assessment of military cultural competence (AMCC) was created through broad input and consensus. Careful review of previous cultural competency assessment designs and analysis techniques was considered. The AMCC was organized into three sections: skills, attitudes, and knowledge. In addition to gathering data to determine absolute responses from groups with different exposure levels to the military (direct, indirect, and none), paired questions were utilized to assess relative competencies between military culture and culture in general. Piloting of the AMCC revealed significant differences between military exposure groups. Specifically, those with personal military exposure were more likely to be in absolute agreement that the military is a culture, were more likely to screen for military culture, and had increased knowledge of military culture compared to those with no military exposure. Relative differences were more informative. For example, all groups were less likely to agree that their personal culture could be at odds with military culture as compared to other cultures. Such perceptions could hinder asking difficult questions and thus undermine care. The AMCC is a model for the measurement of the skills, attitudes, and knowledge related to military cultural competence. With further validity testing, the AMCC will be helpful in the critical task of measuring outcomes in ongoing efforts to improve military cultural competence. The novel approach of assessing variance appears to reduce bias and may also be helpful in the design of other cultural competency assessments.

  5. Eye movements as an index of pathologist visual expertise: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tad T Brunyé

    Full Text Available A pilot study examined the extent to which eye movements occurring during interpretation of digitized breast biopsy whole slide images (WSI can distinguish novice interpreters from experts, informing assessments of competency progression during training and across the physician-learning continuum. A pathologist with fellowship training in breast pathology interpreted digital WSI of breast tissue and marked the region of highest diagnostic relevance (dROI. These same images were then evaluated using computer vision techniques to identify visually salient regions of interest (vROI without diagnostic relevance. A non-invasive eye tracking system recorded pathologists' (N = 7 visual behavior during image interpretation, and we measured differential viewing of vROIs versus dROIs according to their level of expertise. Pathologists with relatively low expertise in interpreting breast pathology were more likely to fixate on, and subsequently return to, diagnostically irrelevant vROIs relative to experts. Repeatedly fixating on the distracting vROI showed limited value in predicting diagnostic failure. These preliminary results suggest that eye movements occurring during digital slide interpretation can characterize expertise development by demonstrating differential attraction to diagnostically relevant versus visually distracting image regions. These results carry both theoretical implications and potential for monitoring and evaluating student progress and providing automated feedback and scanning guidance in educational settings.

  6. Familial Risks of Kidney Failure in Sweden: A Nationwide Family Study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of family history as a risk factor for kidney failure has not been determined in a nationwide setting. AIM: This nationwide family study aimed to determine familial risks for kidney failure in Sweden. METHODS: The Swedish multi-generation register on 0-78-year-old subjects were linked to the Swedish patient register and the Cause of death register for 1987-2010. Individuals diagnosed with acute kidney failure (n = 10063), chronic kidney failure (n = 18668), or unspecifie...

  7. Maintenance Model of Integrated Psychosocial Treatment in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Amy E.; Henry, David B.; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The chronic and refractory course of pediatric bipolar disorder merits the study of adjunctive psychosocial interventions designed to facilitate long-term improvements. The objective of this study is to conduct a pilot study of a maintenance model of the child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy program (CFF-CBT), which…

  8. Community reintegration following a total joint replacement: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Grigorovich, Alisa

    2014-06-01

    To examine community reintegration following a hip or knee total joint replacement (TJR) from the perspective of rehabilitation clients. A phenomenological frame of reference guided the present study. Ten participants who received inpatient rehabilitation completed semi-structured qualitative interviews to explore their experiences with reintegrating back into their chosen communities and the meanings that they ascribed to their reintegration. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. Demographic data, and information regarding participants' living situation and supports were extracted from existing databases and used to characterize the sample. Participants revealed that reintegration after a TJR encompassed two key elements of meaning: i) engagement in meaningful activities; and ii) satisfaction levels. Additionally, the following five factors were identified as facilitators or barriers to community reintegration following a TJR: i) ongoing preparation and education; ii) confounding health issues; iii) driving and transportation; iv) personal facilitators; v) access to supports from professionals, family and friends, and community programmes. The present study highlights the significance of engaging in meaningful activities and being satisfied in one's level of engagement to achieving a sense of community reintegration following a TJR. This suggests that reintegration post-TJR has broader meanings than just improvements in functional abilities. Practitioners are encouraged to inquire about patients' meaningful activities, support their preparedness throughout the rehabilitation process, to identify confounding health issues that may limit reintegration, consider patients' fears and anxieties and establish supports to enhance their feelings of self-efficacy and abilities to cope following a TJR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Pump impeller failures - a compendium of case studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Bennekom, A

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available particular plant has to be retained and recycled within the plant rather than discarding the e?uent into rivers or the environment. Unfortunately, the e?uent becomes more contaminated with each recycle and as such several problems can be encountered... with pumps and associated piping systems since many of these systems were simply not designed to handle such concentrated or contaminated solutions. One of the best ways to avoid future failures is to examine the causes of failure in the past and to try...

  10. [Experiences from a stress clinic. A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Bech, Per; Eller, Nanna H

    2007-01-08

    The aim of the study was to develop a multi-disciplinary stress management program for employees with long-term stress. In a two-year period, 66 people active in the labour market were referred to the stress clinic at an occupational medicine clinic. All but 10 went through the program for four months and were further evaluated after one year regarding employment, symptoms and salivary cortisol. The program consisted of 1) an evaluation of symptoms of depression and stress, 2) stress management consultations, 3) introduction to relaxation techniques and physical exercise and 4) in some cases contact to the work place for adjustments or referral to psychiatric evaluation. Physiological measures such as maximal oxygen uptake, blood pressure, cholesterol, HDL, TSH, HbA1C, fasting glucose and fibrinogen were carried out at baseline and after four months. Salivary cortisol was measured at baseline, after four months and one year. As a control group 24 people with similar symptoms referred to the Clinic of Occupational Medicine were used. A significantly larger number of people in the study group (82%) than in the control group (42%) were employed after one year. There was no difference between the two groups regarding the prevalence of stress symptoms during the follow-up period, even though the prevalence decreased significantly. However, the prevalence of depression was significantly lower after one year in the study group (4%) compared to the control group (40%). Maximum oxygen uptake increased and fibrinogen decreased significantly in four months. The rise in salivary cortisol from awakening until 30 minutes later increased significantly during one year and correlated with symptoms of depression.

  11. A quantitative study of a physics-first pilot program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasero, Spencer Lee; /Northern Illinois U.

    2008-09-01

    Hundreds of high schools around the United States have inverted the traditional core sequence of high school science courses, putting physics first, followed by chemistry, and then biology. A quarter-century of theory, opinion, and anecdote are available, but the literature lacks empirical evidence of the effects of the program. The current study was designed to investigate the effects of the program on science achievement gain, growth in attitude toward science, and growth in understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge. One hundred eighty-five honor students participated in this quasi-experiment, self-selecting into either the traditional or inverted sequence. Students took the Explore test as freshmen, and the Plan test as sophomores. Gain scores were calculated for the composite scores and for the science and mathematics subscale scores. A two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) on course sequence and cohort showed significantly greater composite score gains by students taking the inverted sequence. Participants were administered surveys measuring attitude toward science and understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge twice per year. A multilevel growth model, compared across program groups, did not show any significant effect of the inverted sequence on either attitude or understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge. The sole significant parameter showed a decline in student attitude independent of course sequence toward science over the first two years of high school. The results of this study support the theory that moving physics to the front of the science sequence can improve achievement. The importance of the composite gain score on tests vertically aligned with the high-stakes ACT is discussed, and several ideas for extensions of the current study are offered.

  12. Careers of Professional Staff in Australian and UK Universities: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    This article confirms the reliability of a protean and boundaryless career attitudes scale, tested in a pilot study. Additionally, it summarises the results of this study into the career attitudes of professional staff in Australian and UK universities. A mixed methods approach was taken using a survey consisting of both closed questions on a…

  13. Integrating Virtual Worlds with Tangible User Interfaces for Teaching Mathematics: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Guerrero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a pilot study of the use of two new tangible interfaces and virtual worlds for teaching geometry in a secondary school. The first tangible device allows the user to control a virtual object in six degrees of freedom. The second tangible device is used to modify virtual objects, changing attributes such as position, size, rotation and color. A pilot study on using these devices was carried out at the “Florida Secundaria” high school. A virtual world was built where students used the tangible interfaces to manipulate geometrical figures in order to learn different geometrical concepts. The pilot experiment results suggest that the use of tangible interfaces and virtual worlds allowed a more meaningful learning (concepts learnt were more durable.

  14. Integrating Virtual Worlds with Tangible User Interfaces for Teaching Mathematics: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Graciela; Ayala, Andrés; Mateu, Juan; Casades, Laura; Alamán, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a pilot study of the use of two new tangible interfaces and virtual worlds for teaching geometry in a secondary school. The first tangible device allows the user to control a virtual object in six degrees of freedom. The second tangible device is used to modify virtual objects, changing attributes such as position, size, rotation and color. A pilot study on using these devices was carried out at the “Florida Secundaria” high school. A virtual world was built where students used the tangible interfaces to manipulate geometrical figures in order to learn different geometrical concepts. The pilot experiment results suggest that the use of tangible interfaces and virtual worlds allowed a more meaningful learning (concepts learnt were more durable). PMID:27792132

  15. Redesigning nursing tutorials for ESL students: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel, Caroline; Townsend, Lisa; Waters, Cheryl

    2013-04-01

    Increased enrolments of Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students who speak English as a second language (ESL) can help create a multilingual and culturally diverse workforce that is better prepared to meet the needs of increasingly diverse health populations. However, although ESL enrolments are increasing, attrition rates for ESL students tend to be higher than those of native speakers of English, partly due to academic failure. At the same time, concerns have been expressed in some quarters about the low levels of English language of entering students. As it is unlikely that language entry levels to university will be raised, sustainable programmes that help ESL students better meet the academic challenges they may face need to be developed. So far, models of ESL support have been mostly an adjunct to their degree, voluntary and not well attended. This paper discusses a model using tutorials integrated into the first year nursing curriculum that were specifically designed for ESL students with low levels of English language proficiency. The paper also examines students' perceptions of such tutorials, which they found beneficial to their learning.

  16. Giving a Sense: A Pilot Study in Concept Annotation from Multiple Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Bojar, Ondřej; Sudarikov, Roman

    2015-01-01

    We present a pilot study of a web-based annotation of words with senses. The annotated senses come from several knowledge bases and sense inventories. The study is the first step in a planned larger annotation of grounding and should allow us to select a subset of the sense sources that cover any given text reasonably well and show an acceptable level of inter-annotator agreement.

  17. Human SLC26A1 Gene Variants: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Dawson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney stones are a global health problem, incurring massive health costs annually. Why stones recur in many patients remains unknown but likely involves environmental, physiological, and genetic factors. The solute linked carrier (SLC 26A1 gene has previously been linked to kidney stones in mice. SLC26A1 encodes the sulfate anion transporter 1 (SAT1 protein, and its loss in mice leads to hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate renal stones. To investigate the possible involvement of SAT1 in human urolithiasis, we screened the SLC26A1 gene in a cohort of 13 individuals with recurrent calcium oxalate urolithiasis, which is the commonest type. DNA sequence analyses showed missense mutations in seven patients: one individual was heterozygous R372H; 4 individuals were heterozygous Q556R; one patient was homozygous Q556R; and one patient with severe nephrocalcinosis (requiring nephrectomy was homozygous Q556R and heterozygous M132T. The M132 amino acid in human SAT1 is conserved with 15 other species and is located within the third transmembrane domain of the predicted SAT1 protein structure, suggesting that this amino acid may be important for SAT1 function. These initial findings demonstrate genetic variants in SLC26A1 of recurrent stone formers and warrant wider independent studies of SLC26A1 in humans with recurrent calcium oxalate stones.

  18. A virtual classroom for undergraduate periodontology: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, N; Nattestad, A; Schittek, M; Attström, R

    2001-11-01

    The Integrated Distributed Learning Environments or virtual classrooms constitute a new promising structure in education of health care personnel. A virtual classroom was developed aiming to teach periodontology to an international group of 28 dental students using a problem-based learning (PBL) approach. The course was web-based and included synchronous and asynchronous communication, on-line libraries and multimedia material. Students were organised in 4 independent groups and each group was appointed a tutor. The results of the study indicate that one of the most positive effects students experienced was competence in using the computer. They also rated highly the use of multimedia for learning of clinical procedures. It was found that web boards and email were too slow to allow group work in the virtual classroom. Real time communication programs were found to be superior for problem discussion and hypothesis formulation. However, email and the web board played a significant role during certain steps of the PBL method. The students expressed a positive attitude for the combined use of network-based learning and problem-based education. Our present experience suggests that distance learning should be organised with a mixture of different media, allowing communication of knowledge and skills between the resources and the students, as well as cooperation between the students. Computer literacy among teachers and students is limited and should be enhanced. Finally, personal contact between the resource persons and the students before the distant learning course commences helps the learning process.

  19. Pilot Study of Flow and Meaningfulness as Psychological Learning Concepts in Patient Education: A Short Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicic, Sara; Nørby, Karina; Bruun Johansen, Clea

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this pilot study was to explore patient experiences of meaningfulness and flow related to group based patient education in type 2 diabetes. Meaningfulness and flow are underexposed as psychological learning concepts in patient education, and the ambition...... of this study was to investigate the applicability of these concepts of positive psychological theory in a patient education setting. Methods: This pilot study combines participating observation of group based patient education and 8 qualitative interviews with 4 patients with type 2 diabetes. Meaning...

  20. Pilot Study of Flow and Meaningfulness as Psychological Learning Concepts in Patient Education: A Short Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicic, Sara; Nørby, Karina; Bruun Johansen, Clea;

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this pilot study was to explore patient experiences of meaningfulness and flow related to group based patient education in type 2 diabetes. Meaningfulness and flow are underexposed as psychological learning concepts in patient education, and the ambition...... of this study was to investigate the applicability of these concepts of positive psychological theory in a patient education setting. Methods: This pilot study combines participating observation of group based patient education and 8 qualitative interviews with 4 patients with type 2 diabetes. Meaning...

  1. A Pilot Study of the Effects of Atomoxetine on Driving Performance in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Russell A.; Anderson, Deborah L.; Kruesi, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Objective: There is a high risk of vehicular crashes, traffic citations, and poorer driving performance in adults with ADHD. This pilot study examines the value of a new nonstimulant (atomoxetine) for improving the driving performance of adults with ADHD. Method: Atomoxetine (1.2 mg/kg daily for 3 weeks) and a placebo are studied on 18 adults with…

  2. Developing Emotional Literacy through Individual Dance Movement Therapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekums, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports a pragmatic mixed methods pilot study of teacher perceptions regarding a school-based Dance Movement therapy (DMT) service for six children aged four to seven in a North of England primary school. No previous studies have systematically evaluated DMT in terms of the development of Emotional Literacy (EL), though theoretical…

  3. Feasibility of cold snare polypectomy in Japan: A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoji; Takeuchi; Takeshi; Yamashina; Noriko; Matsuura; Takashi; Ito; Mototsugu; Fujii; Kengo; Nagai; Fumi; Matsui; Tomofumi; Akasaka; Noboru; Hanaoka; Koji; Higashino; Hiroyasu; Iishi; Ryu; Ishihara; Henrik; Thorlacius; Noriya; Uedo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of cold snare polypectomy(CSP) in Japan.METHODS: The outcomes of 234 non-pedunculated polyps smaller than 10 mm in 61 patients who underwent CSP in a Japanese referral center were retrospectively analyzed. The cold snare polypectomies were performed by nine endoscopists with no prior experience in CSP using an electrosurgical snare without electrocautery.RESULTS: CSPs were completed for 232 of the 234 polyps. Two(0.9%) polyps could not be removed without electrocautery. Immediate postpolypectomy bleeding requiring endoscopic hemostasis occurred in eight lesions(3.4%; 95%CI: 1.1%-5.8%), but all were easily managed. The incidence of immediate bleeding after CSP for small polyps(6-9 mm) was significantly higher than that of diminutive polyps(≤ 5 mm; 15% vs 1%, respectively). Three(5%) patients complained of minor bleeding after the procedure but required no intervention. The incidence of delayed bleeding requiringendoscopic intervention was 0.0%(95%CI: 0.0%-1.7%). In total, 12% of the resected lesions could not be retrieved for pathological examination. Tumor involvement in the lateral margin could not be histologically assessed in 70(40%) lesions.CONCLUSION: CSP is feasible in Japan. However, immediate bleeding, retrieval failure and uncertain assessment of the lateral tumor margin should not be underestimated. Careful endoscopic diagnosis before and evaluation of the tumor residue after CSP are recommended when implementing CSP in Japan.

  4. Physical restraint usage at a teaching hospital: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton-Gooden, Antoinette; Dawkins, Pauline E; Bennett, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    This mixed method study examines the prevalence of restraint usage; perception of nurses and doctors about the practice and whether they were trained to apply physical restraints. The physical restraint prevalence tools were used to observe 172 adult patients and conduct 47 chart audits in the medical-surgical wards and a psychiatric unit in November 2011. Focus group discussions with nurses and doctors were conducted. Quantitative data were analyzed using the SPSS and focus group discussions thematically analyzed. The prevalence of physical restraints between the medical-surgical wards was 75%. Nurses and medical doctors were not formally trained to apply restraint, and had learnt from peer observation. They expressed sadness, guilt, and fear when restraints are used and identified that inadequate institutional support existed. Restraint usage was high, and nurses and doctors experienced moral dilemma when they perceived that lack of formal training and inadequate institutional support may contribute to patient injury. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Treatment of a colored groundwater by ozone-biofiltration: pilot studies and modeling interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittmann, B.E.; Stilwell, D.; Garside, J.C.; Amy, G.L.; Spangenberg, C.; Kalinsky, A.; Akiyoshi, E. [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineers

    2002-07-01

    Pilot studies investigated the fates of color, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and biodegradable organic matter (BOM) by the tandem of ozone plus biofiltration for treating a source water having significant color (50 cu) and DOC (3.2 mg/l). Transferred ozone doses were from 1.0 to 1.8 g O{sub 3}/g C. Rapid biofilters used sand, anthracite, or granular activated carbon as media with empty-bed contact time (EBCT) up to 9 min. The pilot studies demonstrated that ozonation plus biofiltration removed most color and substantial DOC, and increasing the transferred ozone dose enhanced the removals. Compared to sand and anthracite biofilters, the GAC biofilter gave the best performance for color and DOC removal, but some of this enhanced performance was caused by adsorption, since the GAC was virgin at the beginning of the pilot studies.

  6. Learning from Engineering Failures: A Case Study of the Deepwater Horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Mary Annette; Hunt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Natural catastrophes and engineering failures provide timely, motivating, and conceptually rich backdrops for learning. Engineering educators have long embraced case studies of engineering failures as a sound pedagogical strategy for meeting several learning standards, such as "design within realistic constraints", and teaching failure…

  7. Defective support network: a major obstacle to coping for patients with heart failure: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Mangolian Shahrbabaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure as a chronic disease poses many challenges for a patient in his or her everyday life. Support in various aspects of life positively affects coping strategies and influences the well-being and health outcomes of heart failure patients. Inadequate support may lead to a worsening of symptoms, increased hospital readmissions, psychological disorders, and a reduced quality of life. Objective: This study explored obstacles to coping related to support for heart failure patients as viewed by the patients themselves and their family members and caregivers. Design: This qualitative study was conducted using content analysis. The 20 Iranian participants included 11 patients with heart failure, three cardiologists, three nurses, and three family members of heart failure patients selected through purposive sampling. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the Lundman and Graneheim qualitative content analysis method. Results: During data analysis, ‘defective support network’ developed as the main theme along with four other categories of ‘inadequate family performance’, ‘inadequate support by the healthcare team’, ‘distorted societal social support’, and ‘inadequate welfare support’. Conclusion: The findings of the current study can assist health authorities and planners in identifying the needs of patients with heart failure so as to focus and plan on facilitating their coping as much as possible by obviating the existing obstacles.

  8. A new tilt on pelvic radiographs: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, P.J. [North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Pattison, J.M. [University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Department of Radiology, Stoke on Trent (United Kingdom); Belcher, J. [Keele University, Department of Mathematics, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); DeCann, R.W. [IMECS, Department of Radiology, Market Drayton, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Anderson, Suzanne [University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, Melbourne (Australia); Wynn-Jones, C. [University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stoke on Trent (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pelvic tilt on commonly performed measurements on radiography in primary protrusio acetabuli and developmental dysplasia of the hip. A dry assembled pelvis and spine skeleton was positioned in an isocentric skull unit and films exposed with increasing degrees of angulation of pelvic tilt. The films were then read by two independent readers for seven different measurements used to evaluate the hips and acetabular: acetabular line to ilioischial line, teardrop appearance, intercristal/intertuberous ratio, co-ordinates of femoral head, centre edge angle, acetabular depth/width ratio and acetabular angle. There was so much variation in the protrusio results that no formal recommendation of any standard radiographic test can be given. Only the inter tuberous distance is not effected by pelvic tilt. The acetabular angles for developmental dysplasia of the hip showed the most potential with pelvic tilt below 15 . As pelvic tilt increases, measurements used in protusio become unreliable, and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging are probably going to be more accurate as one can directly visualise pelvic intrusion. We recommend a lateral view to assess the degree of pelvic tilt in patients with protrusion to ensure these measurements are valid. (orig.)

  9. Effects of Distance Coaching on Teachers' Use of Pyramid Model Practices: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artman-Meeker, Kathleen; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Snyder, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effects of 2 professional development approaches on teachers' implementation of the "Pyramid" model, a classroom-wide approach for fostering social-emotional development and addressing challenging behavior. The study had 2 goals: (a) to examine the differential effects of workshop…

  10. Introduction of the Utrecht Tasks for Attention in Toddlers Using Eye Tracking (UTATE) : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marjanneke; Verhoeven, Marjolein; Hooge, Ignace T C; van Baar, Anneloes L

    2016-01-01

    Attention capacities underlie everyday functioning from an early age onwards. Little is known about attentional processes at toddler age. A feasible assessment of attention capacities at toddler age is needed to allow further study of attention development. In this study, a test battery is piloted t

  11. Cellular Phone Use in Class: Implications for Teaching and Learning a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Shari M.; Lohenry, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Students equipped with the cell phones enter college classrooms daily. Realizing the impact of technology on fellow learners and faculty represents an area of concern. A pilot study was conducted to determine student and faculty perception regarding cellular phone use in the classroom. A quantitative descriptive study examined the perception of…

  12. Emerging Literacy in Spanish among Hispanic Heritage Language University Students in the USA: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Marta; Belpoliti, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study identifies some lexical aspects of the emerging writing skills in Spanish among receptive English/Spanish bilingual students with little or no exposure to formal study of the home language upon entering a Spanish Heritage Language Program at a large public university in the Southwestern United States. The 200+ essays analyzed in…

  13. Cellular Phone Use in Class: Implications for Teaching and Learning a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Shari M.; Lohenry, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Students equipped with the cell phones enter college classrooms daily. Realizing the impact of technology on fellow learners and faculty represents an area of concern. A pilot study was conducted to determine student and faculty perception regarding cellular phone use in the classroom. A quantitative descriptive study examined the perception of…

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A SPORTS SPECIFIC AEROBIC CAPACITY TEST FOR KARATE - A PILOT STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop an aerobic fitness assessment test for competitive Karate practitioners and describe the preliminary findings. Five well-trained, competitive Karate practitioners participated in this study. A protocol simulating common attack strikes used in competition Karate sparring was developed from video analysis. In addition, pilot testing established a specific sequence of strikes and timings to be used in the test. The time to perform the strike sequence remai...

  15. Use of a Data-Linked Weather Information Display and Effects on Pilot Navigation Decision Making in a Piloted Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuchnovicz, Daniel E.; Novacek, Paul F.; Burgess, Malcolm A.; Heck, Michael L.; Stokes, Alan F.

    2001-01-01

    This study provides recommendations to the FAA and to prospective manufacturers based on an exploration of the effects of data link weather displays upon pilot decision performance. An experiment was conducted with twenty-four current instrument rated pilots who were divided into two equal groups and presented with a challenging but realistic flight scenario involving weather containing significant embedded convective activity. All flights were flown in a full-mission simulation facility within instrument meteorological conditions. The inflight weather display depicted NexRad images, graphical METARs and textual METARs. The objective was to investigate the potential for misuse of a weather display, and incorporate recommendations for the design and use of these displays. The primary conclusion of the study found that the inflight weather display did not improve weather avoidance decision making. Some of the reasons to support this finding include: the pilot's inability to easily perceive their proximity to the storms, increased workload and difficulty in deciphering METAR textual data. The compelling nature of a graphical weather display caused many pilots to reduce their reliance on corroborating weather information from other sources. Minor changes to the weather display could improve the ability of a pilot to make better decisions on hazard avoidance.

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Esbensen, Anna J.; Shalev, Rebecca; Vincent, Lori B.; Mihaila, Iulia; Bussanich, Paige

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on psychosocial treatments for depression in adults with intellectual disability (ID). In this pilot study, we explored the efficacy of a group CBT treatment that involved a caregiver component in adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder. Sixteen adults with mild ID and a depressive disorder participated in a…

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Esbensen, Anna J.; Shalev, Rebecca; Vincent, Lori B.; Mihaila, Iulia; Bussanich, Paige

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on psychosocial treatments for depression in adults with intellectual disability (ID). In this pilot study, we explored the efficacy of a group CBT treatment that involved a caregiver component in adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder. Sixteen adults with mild ID and a depressive disorder participated in a…

  18. Development of an auditory test battery for young children: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stollman, M.H.P.; Neijenhuis, C.A.M.; Jansen, S.; Simkens, H.M.F.; Snik, A.F.M.; Broek, P. van den

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the development and results of a pilot study with a recently developed auditory test battery for 4-6-year-old Dutch children. The test battery consisted of a sustained auditory attention (SAA) test, a dichotic words (DW) test, a binaural masking-level difference (BMLD) test,

  19. Information Anxiety from the Undergraduate Student Perspective: A Pilot Study of Second-Semester Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Shelley; Lambert, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In early spring 2013, a pilot study was conducted at a major public university in Ohio to explore elements of information anxiety (defined herein as a combination of library anxiety and information technology anxiety) among second-semester freshmen enrolled in all iterations of both a traditional and a remedial first-year English course. The…

  20. A Pilot Study of Motor Disturbances in Children with ADHD Belonging to Chilean Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancatén González, Carlos; Montes, Rodrigo; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    The present pilot study aimed to determine motor control alterations in children with ADHD belonging to public schools, using Da Fonseca's Psychomotor Battery (BPM). This was a descriptive cross-sectional comparative study. The sample consisted of two groups, each group composed of 15 children between 7 and 9 years old belonging to public…

  1. Peer-Directed, Brief Mindfulness Training with Adolescents: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Samuel J.; Jennings, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study studied the impact of brief mindfulness meditation training with adolescents. Whereas adult mindfulness training programs typically entail weekly 2.5 hour sessions over an eight week period, this program delivered four 50-minute sessions within a three week period. Each session was comprised of two mindfulness exercises delivered…

  2. A Pilot Study of Integrated Listening Systems for Children with Sensory Processing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Sarah A.; Miller, Lucy J.; Sullivan, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study explored the effects of Integrated Listening Systems (iLs) Focus Series on individualized parent goals for children with sensory processing impairments. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline, repeated measure across participants, single-case study design was employed (n = 7). The 40-session intervention was delivered at home and in…

  3. Implementation of Tel Aviv University MOOCs in Academic Curriculum: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer, Tal; Cohen, Anat

    2015-01-01

    The study presented in this paper examines the feasibility of using MOOCs [Massive open online courses] as a learning environment in academic courses. This paper focuses on the students who participated in two MOOCs offered by Tel Aviv University (TAU) during the year 2013. The preliminary findings of this pilot study illustrate the scope of…

  4. Hearing Aids: Expectations and Satisfaction of People with an Intellectual Disability, a Descriptive Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwese-Jongejeugd, A.; Verschuure, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In spite of an increased risk of hearing impairment in persons with an intellectual disability (ID), rehabilitation with hearing aids often fails. We performed a descriptive pilot study with the following study questions: (1) Do comparable elements as in the general population contribute to expectations of and satisfaction with hearing…

  5. MEASURING QUALITY-OF-LIFE WITH THE SICKNESS IMPACT PROFILE - A PILOT-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HULSEBOS, RG; BELTMAN, FW; MIRANDA, DD; SPANGENBERG, JFA

    1991-01-01

    A pilot-study was done to investigate the applicability of the sickness impact profile (SIP) in ex-ICU patients. For this study 221 consecutively admitted patients were reviewed retrospectively after excluding children, deceased patients and readmissions. SIP was assessed in these patients by either

  6. Managing Ethical Problems in Qualitative Research Involving Vulnerable Populations, Using a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalina van Wijk RN, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the researcher's study was to examine the meaning that intimate partners of female rape victims attached to their lived experiences after the rape. The conduct of qualitative research concerning non-offending partners of female rape victims, however, often involves multifaceted ethical and practical challenges, which can be managed through the use of pilot studies. The pilot study described in this report had three objectives. The first was to pretest and refine the proposed method for locating, accessing, and recruiting intimate partners of female rape victims, within the first two weeks after the rape, for participation in a six-month longitudinal study. The second objective was to identify and prevent all possible risk factors in the proposed recruitment and data collection methods that could harm the participants' safety during the main study. The third objective was to determine the feasibility of the main study, in terms of the limited financial and human resources available. The pilot phase was valuable in identifying ethical and methodological problems during the recruitment of participants and collection of data. It allowed for methodological adjustments prior to the main study and confirmed the feasibility of the overall research design. A pilot, pretesting phase is therefore seen as an essential component of a qualitative study involving a vulnerable population.

  7. Hearing Aids: Expectations and Satisfaction of People with an Intellectual Disability, a Descriptive Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwese-Jongejeugd, A.; Verschuure, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In spite of an increased risk of hearing impairment in persons with an intellectual disability (ID), rehabilitation with hearing aids often fails. We performed a descriptive pilot study with the following study questions: (1) Do comparable elements as in the general population contribute to expectations of and satisfaction with hearing…

  8. Effects of first aid training in the kindergarten - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebust Anne G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Children can be the only persons present in an emergency situation. Aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a first aid course for 4-5-year-old kindergarten children given by a first aid instructor and kindergarten teachers. Methods A mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methods was used to investigate the effects of teaching first aid in the kindergarten in the present study. 10 kindergarten children at the age of 4-5 years were included in a pilot-study, 5 girls and 5 boys. Three of them were four years and seven were five years old. Two months after completion of the first aid course children were tested in a scenario where the children had to provide first aid to an unconscious victim after a cycle accident. The next seven months the children were followed by participant observation. Results The findings suggest that 4-5-year-old children are able to learn and apply basic first aid. Tested two months after course completion 70% of the children assessed consciousness correctly and knew the correct emergency telephone number; 60% showed correct assessment of breathing and 40% of the participants accomplished the other tasks (giving correct emergency call information, knowledge of correct recovery position, correct airway management correctly. Many of the children showed their capabilities to do so in a first aid scenario although some participants showed fear of failure in the test scenario. In an informal group testing most of these children could perform first aid measures, too. Teaching first aid also lead to more active helping behaviour and increased empathy in the children. Conclusion Kindergarten children aged 4-5 years can learn basic fist aid. First aid training should start in the kindergarten.

  9. Lessons learned on approaches to data collection and analysis from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Fiona Alice

    2016-09-01

    Background Pilot studies are more commonly associated with quantitative research, and their use is under-reported in qualitative approaches. This paper discusses the value of undertaking a pilot study in a doctoral research project to examine nursing students' understanding of recovery in mental health by adopting what is called a phenomenographic approach, which in research is concerned with the variation in how particular phenomena are experienced. Aim To explore the usefulness of three different methods of collecting data - interviewing, completed exam papers and a written response to a scenario - and the Dahlgren and Fallsberg ( 1991 ) framework for phenomenographic data analysis. Discussion Methodological issues experienced during the collection and analysis of data in the project are discussed. Conclusion The pilot study provided an opportunity for valuable insights to be gained into the methodological issues related to phenomenography and to revise the research plan for the larger study. Implications for practice While it may not be generalised to other qualitative studies, this paper may help others undertaking studies that adopt this approach and points to the general value of pilot studies in qualitative research.

  10. Administration of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate on the day of mifepristone for medical abortion: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonalkar, Sarita; McClusky, Jessica; Hou, Melody Y; Borgatta, Lynn

    2015-02-01

    We sought to evaluate satisfaction with timing of administration and continuation rates of depot medroxyprogesterone (DMPA) when given on the initial visit for first-trimester medical abortion. In this pilot study, we administered DMPA within 15 min of mifepristone administration. Participants were followed up in the clinic 7 days after enrollment and were contacted at 14 days, 28 days and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months by telephone. We assessed satisfaction with contraception timing, DMPA continuation, bleeding patterns and abortion completion. Twenty women were enrolled. At 7-day follow-up, 18 of 19 contacted participants (94.7%) were satisfied with timing of DMPA administration. Ten of 19 participants (52.6%) discontinued DMPA after the first injection. At 1 year, 3 participants out of 19 were continuing DMPA (15.7%). The median number of bleeding days after abortion was 19. Three participants had medical abortion failure. In the first year after abortion, there were four known repeat pregnancies. The timing of initiation of DMPA on the initial visit for medical abortion is satisfactory to women, but its influence on medical abortion efficacy requires further study. Continuation rates for DMPA were low in our sample. This pilot study provides groundwork for future larger studies to assess initiation of the injectable contraceptive DMPA on the day of mifepristone for medical abortion, but low continuation rates of DMPA in our sample emphasize the importance of access to intrauterine devices and implants after abortion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Extending decision making competence to special populations: a pilot study of persons on the autism spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Irwin P; Gary J Gaeth; Foley-Nicpon, Megan; Yegorova, Vitaliya; Cederberg, Charles; Yan, Haoyang

    2015-01-01

    The area of decision making has much to offer in our effort to understand special populations. This pilot study is an example of just such a project, where we illustrate how traditional decision making tools and tasks can be used to uncover strengths and weaknesses within a growing population of young adults with autism. In this pilot project we extended accounts of autistic behavior such as those derived from “theory of mind” to predict key components of decision making in high-functioning y...

  12. Increasing Physical Activity in Preschool: A Pilot Study to Evaluate Animal Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine L.; Carter, Betty Jean; Kibbe, Debra L.; Dennison, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This report describes a pilot study to evaluate Animal Trackers (AT), a preschool program designed to (1) increase structured physical activity (PA) during the preschool day; (2) increase practice of gross motor skills; (3) provide teachers with an easy-to-use PA program regardless of teacher experience; and (4) implement a teacher…

  13. An animal model for oroantral communications : a pilot study with Gottingen minipigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Minnen, B; Stegenga, B; Zuidema, J; Hissink, CE; van Leeuwen, MBM; van Kooten, TG; Bos, RRM

    2005-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to investigate whether the Gottingen minipig is a suitable animal model for creating and closing oroantral communications (OACs) and to test whether these defects can be closed with a biodegradable polyurethane (PU) foam. In three adult minipigs, an OAC was created on bot

  14. Mindfulness for Teachers: A Pilot Study to Assess Effects on Stress, Burnout, and Teaching Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flook, Lisa; Goldberg, Simon B.; Pinger, Laura; Bonus, Katherine; Davidson, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of teachers in fostering children's academic learning and social-emotional well-being, addressing teacher stress in the classroom remains a significant challenge in education. This study reports results from a randomized controlled pilot trial of a modified Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction course (mMBSR) adapted…

  15. Using Study Plans to Develop Self-Directed Learning Skills: Implications from a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fengning

    2012-01-01

    Self-directed learning has been lauded as a powerful learner-centered approach to involve students in every aspect of their learning. This article depicts a pilot project utilizing study plan as a vehicle to promote self-directed learning in an intensive and teacher-dominant college language program. This article seeks to identify both the…

  16. A preliminary study of the failure mechanisms of cascading landslide dams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordon GD Zhou; Peng Cui; Xinghua Zhu; Jinbo Tang; Huayong Chen; Qicheng Sun

    2015-01-01

    abstract Landslide dams commonly form when mass earth or rock movements reach a river channel and cause a complete or partial blockage of the channel. Intense rainfalls can induce upstream flows along a sloping channel that significantly affect downstream landslide dams. If a series of landslide dams are collapsed by incoming mountain torrents (induced by intense rainfall), large debris flows can form in a very short period. Furthermore, the failure of these dams can amplify the magnitude and scale of debris flows in the flow direction. The catastrophic debris flows that occurred in Zhouqu County, China on 8 August 2010 were caused by intense rainfall and the upstream cascading failure of landslide dams along the gullies. Incorporating the role of outburst floods associated with the complete or partial failure of landslide dams is an interesting problem usually beyond the scope of analysis because of the inherent modeling complexity. To understand the cascading failure modes of a series of landslide dams, and the dynamic effect these failures have on the enlargement of debris flow scales, experimental tests are conducted in sloping channels mimicking field conditions, with the modeled landslide dams distributed along a sloping channel and crushed by different upstream flows. The failure modes of three different cascades of landslide dams fully or partially blocking a channel river are parametrically studied. This study illustrates that upstream flows can induce a cascading failure of the landslide dams along a channel. Overtopping is the primary failure mechanism, while piping and erosion can also induce failures for different constructed landslide dams. A cascading failure of landslide dams causes a gradually increasing flow velocity and discharge of the front flow, resulting in an increase in both diameter and percentage of the entrained coarse particles. Furthermore, large landslide blockages can act to enhance the efficiency of river incision, or conversely to

  17. Protein profile study of breast cancer tissues using HPLC-LIF: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Suraj; Sujatha; Kumar, K. Kalyan; Kurien, Jacob; Krishnanand, B. R.; Mahato, K. K.; George, Sajan D.; Kartha, V. B.; C, Santhosh

    2007-02-01

    Proteomics based techniques are rapidly emerging as alternative techniques to conventional histo-pathological methods for detection and diagnosis of cancers. Tumor markers are of considerable importance in the study of various cancers. A study of various changes in the protein profile associated with breast cancer will facilitate a better understanding of the various dynamic changes associated with the disease. In our study we have used High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with highly sensitive Laser Induced Fluorescence for recording the protein profiles of breast tissue homogenates. The protein profiles were recorded from pathologically certified normal as well as malignant breast tissue samples. The recorded protein profiles were studied by using Principal Component Analysis. Good discrimination of normal, benign and malignant samples was achieved in this pilot study.

  18. A Novel Pedicle Screw with Mobile Connection: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Tokuhashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To prevent adjacent disc problems after spinal fusion, a pedicle screw with a mobile junction between the head and threaded shaft was newly developed. The threaded shaft of the screw has 10 degrees mobility in all directions, but its structure is to prevent abnormal translation and tilting. This screw was evaluated as follows: (1 endurance test: 106 times rotational stress was applied; (2 biological reactions: novel screws with a mobile head and conventional screws with a fixed head were inserted into the bilateral pedicles of the L3, L4, and L5 in two mini pigs with combination. Eight months after surgery, vertebral units with the screw rod constructs were collected. After CT scan, the soft and bony tissues around the screws were examined grossly and histologically. As a result, none of the screws broke during the endurance test stressing. The mean amount of abrasion wear was 0.0338 g. In the resected mini pig section, though zygapophyseal joints between fixed-head screws showed bony union, the amount of callus in the zygapophyseal joints connected with mobile-head screws was small, and joint space was confirmed by CT. No metalloses were noted around any of the screws. Novel screws were suggested to be highly durable and histologically safe.

  19. A pilot study on municipal wastewater treatment using a constructed wetland in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Okurut, T.O.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of using constructed v wetlands as a cheaper and yet effective alternative method for treating domestic wastewater in tropical environments was investigated in this study from May 1996 - April 1999. The major aim was to determine their technical viability with respect to treatment performance under different operating conditions and the economic competitiveness of the technology in Uganda and within the region. A pilot constructed wetland design, based on horizontal flo...

  20. Effects of Group Therapy on Female Adolescent Survivors of Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Debra; Sims, Patricia L.; Adams, Mary Ann; Webb, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Explores treatment interventions for female sexual abuse survivors through a pilot study examining the relationship between group treatment and adolescent self-image. Results revealed that participants who received group therapy increased in levels of impulse control and that the experimental group had a decrease in self-reliance whereas the…

  1. Effects of Group Therapy on Female Adolescent Survivors of Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Debra; Sims, Patricia L.; Adams, Mary Ann; Webb, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Explores treatment interventions for female sexual abuse survivors through a pilot study examining the relationship between group treatment and adolescent self-image. Results revealed that participants who received group therapy increased in levels of impulse control and that the experimental group had a decrease in self-reliance whereas the…

  2. Lecturer Perspectives on Dyslexia within One Greek University: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampoltzis, Aglaia; Tsitsou, Elisavet; Plesti, Helen; Kalouri, Rani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dyslexia is a learning difficulty which affects people in different ways. During the last decades the number of students with dyslexia entering higher education increased steadily. Method: This paper reports a pilot study exploring the attitudes, views and experiences of faculty members at one small size Greek university regarding…

  3. The Treatment of Maladaptive Shame in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Pilot Study of "Opposite Action"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Shireen L.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2005-01-01

    This study sought to pilot test a short-term intervention for maladaptive shame in borderline personality disorder (BPD) based on the skill of "opposite action" from dialectical behavior therapy. Five women with BPD were treated with the intervention using a single-subject, multiple-baseline design. Results indicate that, although state ratings of…

  4. Capillary blood gas analysis in complex regional pain syndrome: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Keijzer, M.H. de; Goris, R.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathophysiology of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1) is still a matter of debate. An inflammatory reaction may cause the syndrome. Increasing evidence points to a role for impairment of oxygen metabolism in the affected limb. METHODS: In this pilot study (16 patients) we

  5. Lecturer Perspectives on Dyslexia within One Greek University: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampoltzis, Aglaia; Tsitsou, Elisavet; Plesti, Helen; Kalouri, Rani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dyslexia is a learning difficulty which affects people in different ways. During the last decades the number of students with dyslexia entering higher education increased steadily. Method: This paper reports a pilot study exploring the attitudes, views and experiences of faculty members at one small size Greek university regarding…

  6. How Newspaper Advertising Sales Managers Spend Their Time: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jerry C.; Saathoff, Roger C.

    A pilot study examined how newspaper advertising sales managers in five southwestern states spend their time during a typical work day. Of the 360 questionnaires mailed, 176 responses were received. The largest number of responses (93) came from retail sales managers of newspapers in markets with less than 50,000 population. The questionnaire…

  7. A pilot study to profile the lower limb musculoskeletal health in children with obesity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, Grace

    2012-01-01

    : Evidence suggests a negative effect of obesity on musculoskeletal health in children. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the presence of musculoskeletal impairments in children with obesity and to explore the relationships among body mass index, physical activity, and musculoskeletal measures.

  8. Private Giving to Public Schools and Districts in Los Angeles County: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Ron; Krop, Cathy; Kaganoff, Tessa; Ross, Karen E.; Brewer, Dominic J.

    In an era of dependence on nonflexible funding by states, private support is a desirable source of funding. Anecdotal reports and a limited body of documented research suggest districts and schools are pursuing private support with increased sophistication and aggressiveness. This pilot study is designed to provide schools and school districts…

  9. A pilot study on acoustic regulations for schools – Comparison between selected countries in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Guigou-Carter, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic regulations for schools exist in most countries in Europe, the main reasons being improving learning conditions for pupils and work conditions for teachers. As a pilot study, comparison between requirements in selected countries in Europe has been carried out. The findings show a diversi...

  10. Renal failure in lithium-treated bipolar disorder: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Helen; Reilly, Joe; Mason, James M; Kripalani, Mukesh; Wilson, Douglas; Main, John; Hungin, A Pali S

    2014-01-01

    Lithium users are offered routine renal monitoring but few studies have quantified the risk to renal health. The aim of this study was to assess the association between use of lithium carbonate and incidence of renal failure in patients with bipolar disorder. This was a retrospective cohort study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) and a nested validation study of lithium exposure and renal failure. A cohort of 6360 participants aged over 18 years had a first recorded diagnosis of bipolar disorder between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 2007. Data were examined from electronic primary care records from 418 general practices across the UK. The primary outcome was the hazard ratio for renal failure in participants exposed to lithium carbonate as compared with non-users of lithium, adjusting for age, gender, co-morbidities, and poly-pharmacy. Ever use of lithium was associated with a hazard ratio for renal failure of 2.5 (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 4.0) adjusted for known renal risk factors. Absolute risk was age dependent, with patients of 50 years or older at particular risk of renal failure: Number Needed to Harm (NNH) was 44 (21 to 150). Lithium is associated with an increased risk of renal failure, particularly among the older age group. The absolute risk of renal failure associated with lithium use remains small.

  11. Renal failure in lithium-treated bipolar disorder: a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Close

    Full Text Available Lithium users are offered routine renal monitoring but few studies have quantified the risk to renal health. The aim of this study was to assess the association between use of lithium carbonate and incidence of renal failure in patients with bipolar disorder.This was a retrospective cohort study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD and a nested validation study of lithium exposure and renal failure. A cohort of 6360 participants aged over 18 years had a first recorded diagnosis of bipolar disorder between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 2007. Data were examined from electronic primary care records from 418 general practices across the UK. The primary outcome was the hazard ratio for renal failure in participants exposed to lithium carbonate as compared with non-users of lithium, adjusting for age, gender, co-morbidities, and poly-pharmacy.Ever use of lithium was associated with a hazard ratio for renal failure of 2.5 (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 4.0 adjusted for known renal risk factors. Absolute risk was age dependent, with patients of 50 years or older at particular risk of renal failure: Number Needed to Harm (NNH was 44 (21 to 150.Lithium is associated with an increased risk of renal failure, particularly among the older age group. The absolute risk of renal failure associated with lithium use remains small.

  12. Reading against All Odds: A Pilot Study of Two Deaf Students with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte; Lafond, Lori Dustan

    2007-01-01

    Learning to read and write is a challenge for most deaf children due to their limited experiences with, and access to, spoken language. In the case of deaf students who have difficulty processing visual print, literacy becomes an even greater challenge. The study piloted an intervention procedure that incorporated the principles of automaticity,…

  13. A Pilot Study of Classroom-Based Cognitive Skill Instruction: Effects on Cognition and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Allyson P.; Park, Anne T.; Robinson, Sydney T.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive skills are associated with academic performance, but little is known about how to improve these skills in the classroom. Here, we present the results of a pilot study in which teachers were trained to engage students in cognitive skill practice through playing games. Fifth-grade students at an experimental charter school were randomly…

  14. Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment for Men with Intellectual Disabilities and Sexually Abusive Behaviour: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Glynis; Powell, Simon; Guzman, Ana-Maria; Hays, Sarah-Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background: Cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) seems to be becoming the treatment of choice for non-disabled sex offenders. Nevertheless, there have been relatively few evaluations of such treatment for men with intellectual disabilities (ID) and sexually abusive behaviour. Method: A pilot study providing CBT for two groups of men with ID is…

  15. Do Children with down Syndrome Perform Sufficient Physical Activity to Maintain Good Health? A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Nora; Dodd, Karen J.; Abblitt, Casey

    2009-01-01

    Our pilot study investigated if children with Down syndrome engaged in the recommended 60 min of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) every day. Twenty-three children with Down syndrome (7 girls, 16 boys; mean age 11.7 years, SD = 3.1) wore a triaxial accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to measure their activity levels. The average…

  16. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  17. Exergames for unsupervised balance training at home : A pilot study in healthy older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diest, Mike; Stegenga, Jan; Wörtche, Heinrich J.; Verkerke, G. J.; Postema, Klaas; Lamoth, Claude

    Exercise videogames (exergames) are gaining popularity as tools for improving balance ability in older adults, yet few exergames are suitable for home-based use. The purpose of the current pilot study was to examine the effects of a 6-week unsupervised home-based exergaming training program on

  18. Exergames for unsupervised balance training at home: A pilot study in healthy older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diest, Mike; Stegenga, Jan; Wörtche, Heinrich J.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus; Postema, Klaas; Lamoth, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Exercise videogames (exergames) are gaining popularity as tools for improving balance ability in older adults, yet few exergames are suitable for home-based use. The purpose of the current pilot study was to examine the effects of a 6-week unsupervised home-based exergaming training program on balan

  19. Shoulder pain and disability in daily life, following supraomohyoid neck dissection : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; Nauta, JM; Vermey, A; Roodenburg, JLN

    Introduction: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess shoulder morbidity; i.e. pain and disability in daily activities, at least I year after unilateral or bilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection. Patients and methods: 52 patients having been subjected to a supraomohyoid neck dissection

  20. Multilingual and Multicultural Task-Based Learning Scenarios: A Pilot Study from the MAGICC Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Inma; Pérez-Cavana, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    In this article we report on the results of a pilot study on the use of task-based multilingual and multicultural professional scenarios for higher education teachers and learners at BA and MA level. The scenarios reflect new learning outcomes and assessment criteria for the presently under-conceptualised domain of communication in multilingual…

  1. Etanercept in the treatment of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbelt, M.; Wilde, P.C.M. de; Damme, P.A. van; Hoyng, C.B.; Putte, L.B.A. van de; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This pilot study evaluated the effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor-a antiinflammatory treatment with etanercept (Enbrel(R)) on sicca, systemic, and histological signs in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS). METHODS: Fifteen patients with well defined primary SS were treated wit

  2. Multi-family treatment for patients with persistent auditory hallucinations and their relatives : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, JA; van de Willige, G; Wiersma, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To test feasibility and effectiveness of multi-family treatment (MFT) for patients with persistent auditory hallucinations. Method: A naturalistic pilot study with 6-month follow-up of 12 patients and 10 relatives. Pre- and post-treatment assessment concerned compliance, satisfaction, sub

  3. A Pilot Study of Using Jazz Warm Up Exercises in Primary School Choir in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason Chi Wai; Lee, Han Wai

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study is to examine whether it is valuable to implement jazz choral practice in Hong Kong primary school setting. The findings can serve as a reference to explore the possibilities of promoting jazz education in Asian countries or in China. The participants were 70 public primary school students from grade 2 to 5 in Hong Kong. All…

  4. Gaming and conventional exercises for improvement of arm function after stroke: a randomised controlled pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottink, A.I.R.; Prange, G.B.; Krabben, T.; Rietman, J.S.; Buurke, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The use of new technologies in rehabilitation, such as virtual reality and/or computerized gaming exercises, may be useful to enable patients to practice intensively in a motivating way. The objective of the present randomized controlled pilot study was to compare the effect of reach trai

  5. Mood Management Intervention for College Smokers with Elevated Depressive Symptoms: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Holly E.; Harris, Kari Jo; Campbell, Duncan G.; Harrar, Solomon W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined smoking reduction and cessation among college smokers with elevated depressive symptomatology participating in a group-based behavioral counseling, mood management, and motivational enhancement combined intervention (CBT). Participants and Methods: Fifty-eight smokers (smoked 6 days in the past 30) were…

  6. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  7. [Somatic screening in child and adolescent psychiatry: a descriptive pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muskens, J.B; Vermeulen, K.; Deurzen, P.A. van; Tomesen, E.M.; Gaag, R.J. van der; Buitelaar, J.; Staal, W.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatic disorders occur more often in psychiatric patients than in the general population. Somatic symptoms can cause or increase psychiatric symptoms. Psychiatric symptoms and their treatment can have an effect on the physical state of the patient. A pilot study involving an adult outpa

  8. Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Mood Management in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoori, Bita; Ratanasiripong, Paul; Holladay, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) often display mental health symptoms that may benefit from psychotherapy. In this pilot study, a newly designed cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group treatment targeting mood difficulties was provided to 8 adults with mild-borderline ID. Assessment occurred at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 4…

  9. A Pilot Study of Problems and Practices in the Induction of Beginning Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, John B.; Hull, Ronald E.

    A pilot study was designed to test the practicality of gathering data through interviews and to provide tentative information on induction problems and practices encountered by beginning teachers in the Cattaraugus-Chautauqua County area of New York. Fifty-three elementary self-contained classroom teachers and secondary academic subject-matter…

  10. Iron Deficiency and the Cognitive and Psychomotor Development of Children: A Pilot Study with Institutionalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driva, A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes a pilot study, involving 48 institutionalized infants and toddlers, which aimed to treat iron deficiency anemia and to discover other factors contributing to the problem. Results indicate improvement in cognitive development after the administration of iron among three groups, while no significant differences were observed in psychomotor…

  11. A Pilot Study of Using Jazz Warm Up Exercises in Primary School Choir in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason Chi Wai; Lee, Han Wai

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study is to examine whether it is valuable to implement jazz choral practice in Hong Kong primary school setting. The findings can serve as a reference to explore the possibilities of promoting jazz education in Asian countries or in China. The participants were 70 public primary school students from grade 2 to 5 in Hong Kong. All…

  12. Shoulder pain and disability in daily life, following supraomohyoid neck dissection : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; Nauta, JM; Vermey, A; Roodenburg, JLN

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess shoulder morbidity; i.e. pain and disability in daily activities, at least I year after unilateral or bilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection. Patients and methods: 52 patients having been subjected to a supraomohyoid neck dissection comple

  13. Iron Deficiency and the Cognitive and Psychomotor Development of Children: A Pilot Study with Institutionalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driva, A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes a pilot study, involving 48 institutionalized infants and toddlers, which aimed to treat iron deficiency anemia and to discover other factors contributing to the problem. Results indicate improvement in cognitive development after the administration of iron among three groups, while no significant differences were observed in psychomotor…

  14. Increasing Access to Evidence-Based Practices and Knowledge and Attitudes: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers, Sonya J.; Strand, Tonya C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of increasing field instructors access to information about evidence-based practices (EBPs) on their level of knowledge and attitudes about EBPs. Method: Eighteen field instructors received training and access to a library with extensive online journals. Half were randomly selected to also receive a…

  15. Association between plasma endocannabinoids and appetite in hemodialysis patients: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss is a well-recognized complication in subjects undergoing hemodialysis for impaired kidney function. This pilot study explored whether plasma levels of compounds known to mediate appetite, the endocannabinoids (EC) and EC-like compounds derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ar...

  16. Practical and Scholarly Implications of Information Behaviour Research: A Pilot Study of Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyungwon; Rubenstein, Ellen; White, Kelvin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This pilot study examined how current information behaviour research addresses the implications and potential impacts of its findings. The goal was to understand what implications and contributions the field has made and how effectively authors communicate implications of their findings. Methods: We conducted a content analysis of 30…

  17. Improving the School Food Environment: Results from a Pilot Study in Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective for this study was to examine the feasibility of instituting environmental changes during a 6-week pilot in school food service programs, with long-term goals of improving dietary quality and preventing obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth. Participants included students and staff from...

  18. Post-operative rounds by anaesthesiologists after hip fracture surgery: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Christensen, Dorte Stig; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    conditions. CONCLUSION: This pilot study, with insufficient power to show significant differences in outcome, supports further evaluation of the concept of intensified orthopaedic-anaesthesiological co-operation after hip fracture surgery. Such a randomized trial should evaluate economic and clinical outcome...

  19. Excessive Use of Massively Multi-Player Online Role-Playing Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zaheer; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are one of the most interesting innovations in the area of online computer gaming. This pilot study set out to examine the psychological and social effects of online gaming using an online questionnaire with particular reference to excessive and "dependent" online gaming. A self-selecting…

  20. The effect of music on brain wave functioning during an acute psychotic episode: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kylie Anne; Harris, Anthony W; Luscombe, Georgina; Tran, Yvonne; Herkes, Geoff; Bartrop, Roger W

    2010-07-30

    This pilot study compared the differences in the quantified electroencephalogram (qEEG) between two conditions; eyes closed resting and eyes closed listening to music of 15 subjects currently experiencing an acute psychotic episode. The results showed a significant decrease in delta, alpha and beta waves when listening to music compared to resting condition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of the thermal decomposition of petrochemical sludge in a pilot plant reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Conesa Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Moltó Berenguer, Julia; Ariza, José; Ariza, María; García Barneto, Agustín

    2014-01-01

    The pyrolysis of a sludge produced in the waste water treatment plant of an oil refinery was studied in a pilot plant reactor provided with a system for condensation of semivolatile matter. The study comprises experiments at 350, 400, 470 and 530 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. Analysis of all the products obtained (gases, liquids and chars) are presented, with a thermogravimetric study of the char produced and analysis of main components of the liquid. In the temperature range studied, the compos...

  2. Registrars teaching undergraduate medical students: A pilot study at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Registrars play a vital role in teaching undergraduate (UG) medical students. ... Despite numerous attempts, the response rate to the study was very poor, with only ... in this manner outweighed that obtained by self-study/attendance of lectures.

  3. A Prospective Study of the Association Between Dispositional Optimism and Incident Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S.; Smith, Jacqui; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although higher optimism has been linked with an array of positive health behaviors, biological processes, and cardiovascular outcomes, the relationship between optimism and heart failure has not been examined. In the United States, 80% of heart failures occur in adults aged 65+. Therefore, we examined whether higher optimism was linked with a reduced incidence of heart failure among older adults. Methods and Results Prospective data were from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative study of older U.S adults. Our sample included 6,808 participants who were followed for four years. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess if optimism was independently associated with incident heart failure. We adjusted for sociodemographic, behavioral, biological, and psychological covariates. Higher optimism was associated with a lower risk of incident heart failure over the follow-up period. In a model that adjusted for sociodemographic factors, each standard deviation increase in optimism had an odds ratio of 0.74 (95% CI, 0.63–0.85) for heart failure. Effects of optimism persisted even after adjusting for a wide range of covariates. There was also evidence of a dose-response relationship. As optimism increased, risk of developing heart failure decreased monotonically, with a 48% reduced odds among people with the highest versus lowest optimism. Conclusions This is the first study to suggest that optimism is associated with a lower risk of heart failure. If future studies confirm these findings, they may be used to inform new strategies for preventing or delaying the onset of heart failure. PMID:24647117

  4. Polymorphism of genes associated with increased cardiovascular risk and cognitive function in patients with chronic heart failure and in healthy persons: the pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana V. Martynovich

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the relationship between polymorphic variants of APOC3 (rs2854117, PON1 (rs854560, rs662, AGT (rs4762, rs699 and AGTR1 (rs5186 genes with the results of cognitive tests in patients with chronic heart failure (СHF of ischemic genesis and healthy persons. The general group included 50 patients with CHF of II-IV functional classes, the control group - 50 healthy volunteers. Cognitive functions were estimated by 5th and 7th subtests of Wexler and Burdon's test. There was revealed statistically significant correlation between the polymorphism of APOC3, PON1, AGT, AGTR1 genes and the results of cognitive tests in patients with CHF and healthy persons. These data suggest that the polymorphism of the studied genes may be important in the genetic susceptibility to the formation and progression of cognitive disorders.

  5. A novel risk assessment method for landfill slope failure: Case study application for Bhalswa Dumpsite, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanfar, Ali; Amirmojahedi, Mohsen; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Dubey, Brajesh; McBean, Edward; Kumar, Dinesh

    2017-03-01

    Rapid population growth of major urban centres in many developing countries has created massive landfills with extraordinary heights and steep side-slopes, which are frequently surrounded by illegal low-income residential settlements developed too close to landfills. These extraordinary landfills are facing high risks of catastrophic failure with potentially large numbers of fatalities. This study presents a novel method for risk assessment of landfill slope failure, using probabilistic analysis of potential failure scenarios and associated fatalities. The conceptual framework of the method includes selecting appropriate statistical distributions for the municipal solid waste (MSW) material shear strength and rheological properties for potential failure scenario analysis. The MSW material properties for a given scenario is then used to analyse the probability of slope failure and the resulting run-out length to calculate the potential risk of fatalities. In comparison with existing methods, which are solely based on the probability of slope failure, this method provides a more accurate estimate of the risk of fatalities associated with a given landfill slope failure. The application of the new risk assessment method is demonstrated with a case study for a landfill located within a heavily populated area of New Delhi, India.

  6. Strategies to promote healthier food purchases: a pilot supermarket intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Blakely, Tony; Wall, Joanne; Rodgers, Anthony; Jiang, Yannan; Wilton, Jenny

    2007-06-01

    To pilot the design and methodology for a large randomised controlled trial (RCT) of two interventions to promote healthier food purchasing: culturally appropriate nutrition education and price discounts. A 12-week, single-blind, pilot RCT. Effects on food purchases were measured using individualised electronic shopping data ('Shop 'N Go' system). Partial data were also collected on food expenditure at other (non-supermarket) retail outlets. A supermarket in Wellington, New Zealand. Eligible customers were those who were the main household shoppers, shopped mainly at the participating store, and were registered to use the Shop 'N Go system. Ninety-seven supermarket customers (72% women; age 40 +/- 9.6 years, mean +/- standard deviation) were randomised to one of four intervention groups: price discounts, nutrition education, a combination of price discounts and nutrition education, or control (no intervention). There was a 98% follow-up rate of participants, with 85% of all reported supermarket purchases being captured via the electronic data collection system. The pilot did, however, demonstrate difficulty recruiting Maori, Pacific and low-income shoppers using the electronic register and mail-out. This pilot study showed that electronic sales data capture is a viable way to measure effects of study interventions on food purchases in supermarkets, and points to the feasibility of conducting a large-scale RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of price discounts and nutrition education. Recruitment strategies will, however, need to be modified for the main trial in order to ensure inclusion of all ethnic and socio-economic groups.

  7. A Study of Greek Teachers' Satisfaction with the Implementation of the European Pedagogical ICT License Pilot Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzakis, Charalambos; Roussakis, Ioannis; Tsagarissianos, George

    2010-01-01

    The survey presented in this study examines Greek teachers' satisfaction with the implementation of the European Pedagogical Information and Communication Technology License (EPICT) pilot course. A total of 51 primary and secondary education teachers participated in the study that followed the pilot course concerning the integration of ICT in the…

  8. Phenomenological Studies of Macroscale Failure in Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwa, Bryan Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hull, Lawrence Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-06

    Highlights of recent phenomenological studies of metal failure are given. Failure leading to spallation and fragmentation are typically of interest. The current ‘best model’ includes the following; a full history stress in tension; nucleation initiating dynamic relaxation; toward a tensile yield function; failure dependent on strain, strain rate, and temperature; a mean-preserving ‘macrodefect’ is introduced when failure occurs in tension; and multifield theoretical refinements

  9. A physiotherapy-directed occupational health programme for Austrian school teachers: a cluster randomised pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figl-Hertlein, A; Horsak, B; Dean, E; Schöny, W; Stamm, T

    2014-03-01

    Although physiotherapists have long advocated workplace health, school teachers have not traditionally been a focus of study by these professionals. However, classroom teaching contributes to a range of occupational health issues related to general health as well as ergonomics that can be prevented or addressed by physiotherapists. To undertake a pilot study to explore the potential effects of a physiotherapy-directed occupational health programme individualised for school teachers, develop study methodology and gather preliminary data to establish a 'proof of concept' to inform future studies. Cluster randomised pilot study using a convenience sample. Eight Austrian regional secondary schools. Schools and their teachers were recruited and allocated to an intervention group (IG, n=26 teachers) or a control group (CG, n=43 teachers). Teachers were eligible to participate if they reported no health issues that compromised their classroom responsibilities. The IG participated in an individualised physiotherapy-directed occupational health programme (six 30-minute sessions) related to ergonomics and stress management conducted over a 5-month semester. The CG had a pseudo-intervention of one oral education session. Primary outcomes included scores from the physical and mental components and health transition item of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36), and emotional well-being and resistance to stress items from the work-related behaviour and experience patterns questionnaire. Data were collected before and after one semester. The primary outcome measure, the SF-36 physical component score, showed a reduction in the CG and no change in the IG, meaning that the CG deteriorated over the study semester while the IG did not show any change. A physiotherapy-directed occupational health programme may prevent deterioration of physical health of school teachers in one semester (proof of concept). This pilot study provided valuable information to inform the

  10. Social Facilitation in Online and Offline Gambling: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Tom; Barrett, Douglas J. K.; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    To date, there has been relatively little research on Internet gambling. Furthermore, there have been few studies comparing the behaviour of Internet gamblers versus non-Internet gamblers. Using the game of roulette, this study experimentally examined (a) the differences in gambling behaviour between online and offline gamblers, and (b) the role…

  11. Changes in chronotype after stroke : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Fitzthum, Katharina; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo; Ulm, Lena

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate associations between stroke onset and severity as well as chronotype (phase of entrainment) and internal time of stroke. Fifty-six first-ever ischemic stroke patients participated in a cross-sectional study assessing chronotype (mid-sleep on work-free days corrected for

  12. Changes in chronotype after stroke : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Fitzthum, Katharina; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo; Ulm, Lena

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate associations between stroke onset and severity as well as chronotype (phase of entrainment) and internal time of stroke. Fifty-six first-ever ischemic stroke patients participated in a cross-sectional study assessing chronotype (mid-sleep on work-free days corrected for

  13. Liverpool Telecare Pilot: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Barnes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Telecare services use information and communications technology (ICT to support the provision of care to people in their own homes. This paper describes a pilot telecare service employed by Liverpool (UK City Council to support a sample of their frail and elderly social services users. The pilot has been running for over two years and has been deployed for 21 individuals in Liverpool. In this paper we present the pilot system and provide real example cases which help to illustrate the benefits of such a system.

  14. Successes and Failures Teaching Visual Ethics: A Class Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundtree, Aimee Kendall

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses and evaluates the inclusion of ethics learning modules in a graduate- level visual design theory course. Modules were designed as a part of an NEH grant. Students grappled with case studies that probed the ethics of visuals at the crux of the BP oil refinery accident, NASA space shuttle disasters, the Enron collapse, and…

  15. Cognitive Behavioral Principles within Group Mentoring: A Randomized Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jent, Jason F.; Niec, Larissa N.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a group mentoring program that included components of empirically supported mentoring and cognitive behavioral techniques for children served at a community mental health center. Eighty-six 8- to 12-year-old children were randomly assigned to either group mentoring or a wait-list control group. Group…

  16. School Psychologist Diagnostic Decision-Making: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Stevens, Tara; Robinson, Eric; Holt, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the diagnostic decision-making of school psychologists as a function of a student's disability and academic performance with three research questions using a randomly-selected sample of school psychologists from the state of Texas. Results from the first research question indicated that school psychologists significantly…

  17. Executive Function Training in Children with SLI: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugs, Brigitte; Knoors, Harry; Cuperus, Juliane; Hendriks, Marc; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-based executive function (EF) training in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Ten children with SLI, ages 8 to 12 years, completed a 25-session training of visuospatial working memory, inhibition and cognitive flexibility over a 6-week period. Treatment outcome was…

  18. Association of renal failure with thyroid dysfunction: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Maimoona Mushtaq

    2014-09-01

    Chronic renal failure is often associated with multiple organ co-morbidities, including thyroid dysfunction. This has been associated with poorer prognosis, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. This study aimed to examine the relationship between renal failure and thyroid dysfunction in an outpatient setting at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Saudi Arabia, from January 2011 to June 2012. Demographic and biochemical data were extracted from medical records. Differences in the levels of thyroid hormones and lipids between the four renal function groups were analyzed using the chi-square test for categorical variables and Kruskal- Wallis test for binomial variables. A total of 486 patients were included in the study population, of whom approximately half were female, and the median (range) age was 61 (17-90) years. According to creatinine measurements, renal function was normal in 48 participants, 290 had mild renal failure, 122 had moderate renal failure and 26 had severe renal failure. No significant relationships were observed between renal failure and cardiac or pulmonary dysfunction. Free triiodothyronine (FT3) levels were significantly reduced (P = 0.005) and both free thyroxin (FT4; P = 0.034) and parathyroid hormone (PTH; P = 0.028) significantly increased with increasing severity of renal failure. Patients with moderate to severe renal failure displayed reduced hemoglobin levels and were significantly more likely to be anemic (P renal dysfunction. To conclude, it was observed that renal dysfunction is associated with notable changes to other organ systems, including the thyroid. Further studies may investigate the association of multiple organ co-morbidities with prognosis in patients with chronic renal failure.

  19. Squat exercise to estimate knee megaprosthesis rehabilitation: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated a specific rehabilitation protocol using a half squat after total knee reconstruction with distal femur megaprosthesis and tibial allograft-prosthesis composite. [Subject and Methods] Squat execution was recorded by a three-dimensional system before and after a specific rehabilitation program on a 28-year-old patient. Squat duration, body center of mass trajectory, and vertical range of motion were determined. Step width and joint angles and symmetry (hip flexio...

  20. Yoga in male sexual functioning: a noncompararive pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhikav, Vikas; Karmarkar, Girish; Verma, Myank; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Supriya; Mittal, Deeksha; Anand, Kuljeet

    2010-10-01

    Yoga is practiced both in developing and developed countries. Many patients and yoga protagonists claim that it is useful in improving sexual functions and treating sexual disorders. We wanted to study the effect of yoga on male sexual functioning. We studied 65 males (age range= 24-60 years, average age=40±8.26 years) who were enrolled in a yoga camp and administered a known questionnaire, i.e., Male Sexual Quotient (MSQ) before and after 12 weeks session of yoga. MSQ scores before and after yoga sessions. It was found that after the completion of yoga sessions, the sexual functions scores were significantly improved (Pfunctions as studied by MSQ (desire, intercourse satisfaction, performance, confidence, partner synchronization, erection, ejaculatory control, orgasm). Yoga appears to be an effective method of improving all domains of sexual functions in men as studied by MSQ. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  1. Treatment of Neurogenic Cough with Tramadol: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Gregory R; Teng, Stephanie E; Achlatis, Efstratios; Fang, Yixin; Amin, Milan R

    2017-07-01

    This study employs validated cough assessment tools to prospectively determine the impact of tramadol on cough severity and quality of life in subjects with neurogenic cough. The study was a prospective case series with planned data collection at a tertiary care academic medical center laryngology practice. Sixteen consecutive collected subjects with neurogenic cough prospectively completed pre- and posttreatment validated cough assessment tools, the cough severity index (CSI) and Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ). All subjects in the study reported at least some improvement in their cough symptoms. In a Wilcoxon signed rank test that compared paired results, CSI scores improved from 23 to 14 and LCQ scores improved from 74 to 103 ( P = .003 and P = .005, respectively). This small preliminary assessment suggests that tramadol warrants additional evaluation as a treatment for neurogenic cough.

  2. Determinants of learning to perform spinal anaesthesia: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kulcsar, Z

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: This study examined attitudes and views held by stakeholders regarding their experience of training in spinal anaesthesia. The aim was to identify key factors related to learning and teaching processes which were perceived to influence the acquisition of competence in spinal anaesthesia. METHODS: The study was carried out at a busy acute tertiary referral teaching hospital over a period of 1 yr. It applied a qualitative research approach in three phases, namely (i) completion of preliminary questionnaires, (ii) completion of focused questionnaires and (iii) focus group discussions. RESULTS: Five factors were perceived to be critical \\'determinants of learning\\': (i) the existence of a formal, structured training programme; (ii) time constraints\\/theatre efficiency; (iii) trainer-trainee interaction; (iv) patient safety\\/trainee\\/trainer stressors; and (v) visualization of the anatomy and procedure. CONCLUSION: The study highlighted the need for a formal and structured training programme in spinal anaesthesia, through which many of the undesirable and discouraging factors (such as stress, adverse trainer-trainee interaction and time constraints) identified in the study could be minimized. Further studies are needed to validate the results in other hospital settings, as well as to define the relative importance of each of the proposed determinants and their interrelationships.

  3. Pilot study of a budget-tailored culinary nutrition education program for undergraduate food science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrison, Dorothy Adair

    The primary objective of this pilot study is to provide evidence that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program is both appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students both in everyday life as well as their future health careers. Two validated programs were combined into one program in order to evaluate their combined effects: Cooking With a Chef and Cooking Matters at the Store. The secondary objective of this pilot study is to evaluate the components and reliability of a questionnaire created specifically for this pilot study. A review of past literature was written, which included culinary nutrition as a source of primary prevention, the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition, and the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition. Based on the literature review, it was determined that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program was appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students interested in pursuing health-related careers. The pilot study design was a semi-crossover study: all four groups received the program, however, two groups were first treated as the control groups. All fifty-four participants received 5 sessions of culinary nutrition information from Cooking With a Chef, collaboratively delivered by a nutrition educator and a chef, and one session of information about shopping healthy on a budget from Cooking Matters at the Store in the form of a grocery store tour led by the nutrition educator. Three questionnaires were administered to the participants that evaluated culinary nutrition and price knowledge, cooking attitudes, and opinions of the programs' relevance to participants' everyday lives and careers. Two of the questionnaires, including a questionnaire developed specifically for the pilot study, were delivered as a pre- and post-test while the third questionnaire was delivered as a post-test. Eight random participants also partook in a focus group session led by the nutrition

  4. Executive function training in children with SLI: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugs, B.A.M.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Cuperus, J.M.; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-based executive function (EF) training in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Ten children with SLI, ages 8 to 12 years, completed a 25-session training of visuospatial working memory, inhibition and cognitive

  5. The Influence of Art Making on Anxiety: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmire, David Alan; Gorham, Sarah Roberts; Rankin, Nancy Elizabeth; Grimm, David Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychological effects of art making in a sample of 57 undergraduate students. One week prior to final examinations, participants were randomly assigned to either an art-making group or a control group. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was administered before and after participation. Art making activities included painting…

  6. A Pilot Study of Nurses' Experience of Giving Spiritual Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Using spiritual and religious resources gives patients and families strength to cope during a crisis, but nurses often do not offer spiritual care (Kloosterhouse & Ames, 2002). The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore nurses" lived experience of giving spiritual care. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to…

  7. Realizing Sustainability in Facilities Management: a pilot study at the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Møller, Jacob Steen; Jäschke, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    shared value. The paper presents a pilot case study on sustainability in facilities management and is intended for a mixed audience of practitioners and researchers. It draws upon the case study findings to establish a baseline of performance and presents practical management implications of integrating...... sustainability in facilities management (FM). Design, methodology and approach: The approach uses an action-oriented research methodology as a means of co-generation of knowledge on realization of sustainability in FM. Case studies take a phased, multi-method approach including organizational profiling...... and value: The paper is based on action research to establish a collaborative framework in late 2011 and the findings of the pilot study, and have not been published before....

  8. Factors Relating to the Success or Failure of College Algebra Internet Students: A Grounded Theory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to discover the factors that contribute to the success or failure of college algebra for students taking college algebra by distance education Internet, and then generate a theory of success or failure of the group of College Algebra Internet students at one Utah college. Qualitative data were collected and analyzed on students’ perceptions and perspectives of a College Algebra Internet course that they took during the spring or summer 2006 semest...

  9. Speech Therapy in Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Farrajota

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA is a neurodegenerative disorder with no effective pharmacological treatment. Cognition-based interventions are adequate alternatives, but their benefit has not been thoroughly explored. Our aim was to study the effect of speech and language therapy (SLT on naming ability in PPA. Methods: An open parallel prospective longitudinal study involving two centers was designed to compare patients with PPA submitted to SLT (1 h/week for 11 months with patients receiving no therapy. Twenty patients were enrolled and undertook baseline language and neuropsychological assessments; among them, 10 received SLT and 10 constituted an age- and education-matched historical control group. The primary outcome measure was the change in group mean performance on the Snodgrass and Vanderwart naming test between baseline and follow-up assessments. Results: Intervention and control groups did not significantly differ on demographic and clinical variables at baseline. A mixed repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of therapy (F(1,18 = 10.763; p = 0.005 on the performance on the Snodgrass and Vanderwart naming test. Conclusion: Although limited by a non-randomized open study design with a historical control group, the present study suggests that SLT may have a benefit in PPA, and it should prompt a randomized, controlled, rater-blind clinical trial.

  10. Sports Injuries in Wheelchair Rugby – A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauerfeind Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze etiology and the incidence of sports injuries among wheelchair rugby players. Moreover, we verified if the levels of aggressiveness and anger presented by the athletes and their roles in the team influenced the incidence and severity of the injuries. The study involved 14 male players, members of the Polish National Wheelchair Rugby Team. During a 9-month period, the athletes participated in up to 9 training camps and 4 Wheelchair Rugby tournaments. The study was based on the Competitive Aggressiveness and Anger Scale, registry of sports injuries consulted and non-consulted with a physician and a demographic questionnaire. The following observations were made during the 9-month period corresponding to a mean of 25 training and tournament days: 1 wheelchair rugby players experienced primarily minor injuries (n=102 that did not require a medical intervention, 2 only four injuries needed to be consulted by a physician, 3 sports injuries occurred more frequently among offensive players than in defensive players, 4 offensive players showed a tendency to higher levels of anger and aggressiveness than defensive players. It can be concluded that wheelchair rugby is a discipline associated with a high incidence of minor injuries that do not require a medical intervention. The incidence rate of injuries during the analyzed period was 0.3 per athlete per training day.

  11. Sports Injuries in Wheelchair Rugby - A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerfeind, Joanna; Koper, Magdalena; Wieczorek, Jacek; Urbański, Piotr; Tasiemski, Tomasz

    2015-11-22

    The aim of the study was to analyze etiology and the incidence of sports injuries among wheelchair rugby players. Moreover, we verified if the levels of aggressiveness and anger presented by the athletes and their roles in the team influenced the incidence and severity of the injuries. The study involved 14 male players, members of the Polish National Wheelchair Rugby Team. During a 9-month period, the athletes participated in up to 9 training camps and 4 Wheelchair Rugby tournaments. The study was based on the Competitive Aggressiveness and Anger Scale, registry of sports injuries consulted and non-consulted with a physician and a demographic questionnaire. The following observations were made during the 9-month period corresponding to a mean of 25 training and tournament days: 1) wheelchair rugby players experienced primarily minor injuries (n=102) that did not require a medical intervention, 2) only four injuries needed to be consulted by a physician, 3) sports injuries occurred more frequently among offensive players than in defensive players, 4) offensive players showed a tendency to higher levels of anger and aggressiveness than defensive players. It can be concluded that wheelchair rugby is a discipline associated with a high incidence of minor injuries that do not require a medical intervention. The incidence rate of injuries during the analyzed period was 0.3 per athlete per training day.

  12. Sports Injuries in Wheelchair Rugby – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerfeind, Joanna; Koper, Magdalena; Wieczorek, Jacek; Urbański, Piotr; Tasiemski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze etiology and the incidence of sports injuries among wheelchair rugby players. Moreover, we verified if the levels of aggressiveness and anger presented by the athletes and their roles in the team influenced the incidence and severity of the injuries. The study involved 14 male players, members of the Polish National Wheelchair Rugby Team. During a 9-month period, the athletes participated in up to 9 training camps and 4 Wheelchair Rugby tournaments. The study was based on the Competitive Aggressiveness and Anger Scale, registry of sports injuries consulted and non-consulted with a physician and a demographic questionnaire. The following observations were made during the 9-month period corresponding to a mean of 25 training and tournament days: 1) wheelchair rugby players experienced primarily minor injuries (n=102) that did not require a medical intervention, 2) only four injuries needed to be consulted by a physician, 3) sports injuries occurred more frequently among offensive players than in defensive players, 4) offensive players showed a tendency to higher levels of anger and aggressiveness than defensive players. It can be concluded that wheelchair rugby is a discipline associated with a high incidence of minor injuries that do not require a medical intervention. The incidence rate of injuries during the analyzed period was 0.3 per athlete per training day. PMID:26834880

  13. The Volunteering Legacy of London 2012 Games. A Pilot Study.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The hosting of the London 2012 Olympic Games was seen as an opportunity to harness the enthusiasm of the 70000 volunteers involved and to provide a volunteer legacy post event. A total of 77 London 2012 volunteers completed a web-based open-ended survey. The participants were asked to indicate their level of current volunteering engagement and whether volunteering at the Games had an impact on their current volunteering levels. The study found that the London Olympics were the first volunteer...

  14. Psychological factors involved in prurigo nodularis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Carla; Erma, Daniela; Piccinno, Roberta; Veraldi, Stefano; Caccialanza, Massimo

    2011-08-01

    Emotional stresses and psychological disorders seem to be concurrent factors in some cases of prurigo nodularis (PN), a chronic skin condition with a difficult therapeutic approach. In order to improve the therapeutic strategies, we performed a psychometric study on 20 patients affected by generalized and histological proven PN. Specific questionnaires were employed to examine the hypotheses (General Health Questionnaire, State Trait Anxiety Inventory - form Y, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire). The results show that symptoms of anxiety and depression associated with PN are more severe than in the control group and that some specific traits of personality are more frequently represented in such subjects. The results of our study represent a first attempt to analyze the psychological problems and the personality dimensions which seem to characterize PN patients. Such evidence supports the importance of a psychological approach in the clinical management of PN, which should always include psychological assessment and treatment together with the other therapeutic options.

  15. Piloted simulation study of an ILS approach of a twin-pusher business/commuter turboprop aircraft configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Donald R.; Brandon, Jay M.; Glaab, Louis J.

    1994-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear simulation of a twin-pusher, turboprop business/commuter aircraft configuration representative of the Cessna ATPTB (Advanced turboprop test bed) was developed for use in piloted studies with the Langley General Aviation Simulator. The math models developed are provided, simulation predictions are compared with with Cessna flight-test data for validation purposes, and results of a handling quality study during simulated ILS (instrument landing system) approaches and missed approaches are presented. Simulated flight trajectories, task performance measures, and pilot evaluations are presented for the ILS approach and missed-approach tasks conducted with the vehicle in the presence of moderate turbulence, varying horizontal winds and engine-out conditions. Six test subjects consisting of two research pilots, a Cessna test pilot, and three general aviation pilots participated in the study. This effort was undertaken in cooperation with the Cessna Aircraft Company.

  16. Concussion Education for High School Football Players: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasse-Cohick, Nancy J.; Shapley, Kathy L.

    2014-01-01

    This survey study compared high school football players' knowledge and attitudes about concussion before and after receiving concussion education. There were no significant changes in the Concussion Attitude Index. Results revealed a statistically significant difference in the athletes' scores for the Concussion Knowledge Index,…

  17. Composition Instruction and Cognitive Performance: Results of a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugos, Jennifer; Jacobs, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a composition program, Composers in Public Schools (CiPS), on cognitive skills essential for academic success. The underlying hypothesis is that composition instruction will promote creative expression and increase performance on music-specific skills such as music reading, as well as foster…

  18. Concussion Education for High School Football Players: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasse-Cohick, Nancy J.; Shapley, Kathy L.

    2014-01-01

    This survey study compared high school football players' knowledge and attitudes about concussion before and after receiving concussion education. There were no significant changes in the Concussion Attitude Index. Results revealed a statistically significant difference in the athletes' scores for the Concussion Knowledge Index, "t"(244)…

  19. Concussion Education for High School Football Players: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasse-Cohick, Nancy J.; Shapley, Kathy L.

    2014-01-01

    This survey study compared high school football players' knowledge and attitudes about concussion before and after receiving concussion education. There were no significant changes in the Concussion Attitude Index. Results revealed a statistically significant difference in the athletes' scores for the Concussion Knowledge Index, "t"(244)…

  20. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barneveld, van S.; Palen, van der J.; Putten, van M.J.A.M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a usefu

  1. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Barneveld, S.; van der Palen, J.; van Putten, M. J. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a useful test fo

  2. Hospital Pharmacists’ Attitudes Concerning Antibiotic Resistance: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Roque,Fátima; Soares, Sara; Breitenfeld, Luiza; Figueiras, Adolfo; Herdeiro, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization has defined antimicrobial resistance as one of the main concerns of public health for the next years. This study sought to evaluate a questionnaire’ reproducibility and internal consistency about attitudes and knowledge of pharmacists working in hospital pharmacy concerning antibiotic use and bacterial resistance.

  3. Instructional Set, Deep Relaxation and Growth Enhancement: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeb, Charles; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study provides experimental evidence that instructional set can influence access to altered states of consciousness. Fifteen male subjects were randomly assigned to three groups, each of which received the same autogenic biofeedback training in hand temperature control, but each group received a different attitudinal set. (Editor)

  4. Drug Taking Beliefs of Australian Adolescents: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypiec, Grace; Owens, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    In this study adolescents offered their insights and perspectives of factors associated with adolescent illicit drug taking intentions. The factors explored were identified using a cross-disciplinary approach involving the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and criminological theories, and these formed the framework for data analysis. Interviews…

  5. Neurofeedback As a Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Frenk; Oehlen, Mare; Ronner, Jacco; van Os, Jim; Lousberg, Richel

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in neurofeedback as a treatment for major depressive disorder. Reduction of asymmetry of alpha-activity between left and right prefrontal areas with neurofeedback has been postulated as effective in earlier studies. Unfortunately, methodological shortcomings limit conclusions that can be drawn from these studies. In a pilot-study, we investigated the effectiveness of reduction of asymmetry of alpha-activity with neurofeedback in depressed participants with the use of a stringent methodological approach. Methods Nine participants meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder were treated with a maximum of 30 neurofeedback-sessions, aimed at reducing asymmetry of alpha-activity, over a 10-week period. No changes in the use of antidepressants were allowed 6 weeks before and during the intervention. Changes in depressive symptomatology were assessed with the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms, self-report version. Results We observed response in 1 and remission in 4 out of a total of 9 participants. The effectiveness appeared largest in female participants. The mean asymmetry of alpha-activity decreased significantly over sessions in a quadratic fashion. This decrease was associated with clinical response. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that neurofeedback aimed at a reduction of frontal asymmetry of alpha-activity may be effective as a treatment for depression. However, this was an open label pilot study. Non-specific effects of the procedure and/or a beneficial natural course may have confounded the results. Randomized controlled trials will have to establish the efficacy of neurofeedback for depression. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR1629 PMID:24642756

  6. Neurofeedback as a treatment for major depressive disorder--a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frenk Peeters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in neurofeedback as a treatment for major depressive disorder. Reduction of asymmetry of alpha-activity between left and right prefrontal areas with neurofeedback has been postulated as effective in earlier studies. Unfortunately, methodological shortcomings limit conclusions that can be drawn from these studies. In a pilot-study, we investigated the effectiveness of reduction of asymmetry of alpha-activity with neurofeedback in depressed participants with the use of a stringent methodological approach. METHODS: Nine participants meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder were treated with a maximum of 30 neurofeedback-sessions, aimed at reducing asymmetry of alpha-activity, over a 10-week period. No changes in the use of antidepressants were allowed 6 weeks before and during the intervention. Changes in depressive symptomatology were assessed with the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms, self-report version. RESULTS: We observed response in 1 and remission in 4 out of a total of 9 participants. The effectiveness appeared largest in female participants. The mean asymmetry of alpha-activity decreased significantly over sessions in a quadratic fashion. This decrease was associated with clinical response. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study suggests that neurofeedback aimed at a reduction of frontal asymmetry of alpha-activity may be effective as a treatment for depression. However, this was an open label pilot study. Non-specific effects of the procedure and/or a beneficial natural course may have confounded the results. Randomized controlled trials will have to establish the efficacy of neurofeedback for depression. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Nederlands Trial Register NTR1629.

  7. Changes in chronotype after stroke: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas eKantermann; Andreas eMeisel; Katharina eFitzthum; Thomas ePenzel; Ingo eFietze; Lena eUlm

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate associations between stroke onset and severity as well as chronotype (phase of entrainment) and internal time of stroke. Fifty-six first-ever ischemic stroke patients participated in a cross-sectional study assessing chronotype (mid-sleep on work-free days corrected for sleep deficit on workdays; MSFsc) by applying the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ). The MCTQ was completed twice, on average 68 ± 24 (SD) days post stroke and retrospectively for the time be...

  8. Changes in Chronotype after Stroke: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kantermann, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Fitzthum, Katharina; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo; Ulm, Lena

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate associations between stroke onset and severity as well as chronotype (phase of entrainment) and internal time of stroke. Fifty-six first-ever ischemic stroke patients participated in a cross-sectional study assessing chronotype (mid-sleep on work-free days corrected for sleep deficit on workdays; MSFsc) by applying the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ). The MCTQ was completed twice, on average 68 ± 24 (SD) days post stroke and retrospectively for the time be...

  9. HAVE WE DONE ENOUGH WITH DIABETIC EDUCATION? A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHAIRANI O

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients’ education and empowerment are essential parts of a disease management. Patients have to be educated on the disease as well as lifestyle changes that they need to practise for a holistic and consistent improvement in their disease status. This study examined patients’ knowledge on diabetes and nutrition as well as the role of dietician in the patient education. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of patients aged more than 18 years, in a primary care centre in Kuala Lumpur. Patients responded to a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire which contains socio-demographic profiles of patients, knowledge on diabetes and nutrition. Patients were also asked on dietician consultation and the number of dietician visits. Patients were conveniently selected on the data collection days. Only consented patients and those who could understand Malay or English language were selected. Results: There were 110 patients who participated in the study. Overall the patients had good knowledge on diabetes and nutrition. The mean total knowledge score was 71.2% ± 9.34. Domains such as diabetes complications, exercise, meal practice, food sources and proportion need reinforcement. Only 60 (54.9% patients had seen a dietician. Patients who had seen dietician showed significantly higher level of knowledge score (p=0.04. However frequent meeting with the dietician did not show any significant improvement in the knowledge (p=0.10. Factors such as patients’ gender, ethnicity, level of education, employment status, glycaemic level, duration of illness and body mass index did not show any significant association with the overall diabetic and nutrition knowledge. Conclusion: There is still a need to improve the overall diabetic education particularly in areas that patients were lacking such as diabetes complications, exercise, meal practice, food sources and proportion. It is equally necessary to encourage all diabetics to see a dietician

  10. Head and scapular posture in flutists: a pilot controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Z; Lã, F; Silva, A.

    2011-01-01

    Instrumental practice which requires asymmetrical postures might, in the long term, potentiate musculoskeletal disorders and lead to pain. This, in turn, may have a negative impact on musical performance quality. Thus, the assessment of postural deviations among musicians is of the outmost importance in instrumental pedagogy. This study aims to compare the head and scapular posture of flutists with different levels of expertise and a control group of singers. Results suggest...

  11. Qigong ameliorates symptoms of chronic fatigue: a pilot uncontrolled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Naropa J Mike; Turner, Warren; Zammit-Maempe, Joseph; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2009-06-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners consider that chronic fatigue reflects a disharmony and depletion in the supply of qi in the body. Qigong is one of the traditional complementary interventions used to strengthen qi through self-practice, and to manage the state of qi to prevent and cure disease. The aim of this study is to assess whether qigong could be used to manage the symptoms of chronic fatigue. Eighteen Caucasian, British female participants were recruited, taught a qigong routine during weekly classes over 6 months, and asked to practice it daily for 15 min. Participants completed the core set of the RAND Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire (RAND MOS) and a sleep diary during the 2-week baseline control period, and at 3 and 6 months following the start of the trial. The qigong intervention resulted in significant changes in sleep rate score and in the following subscales of the RAND MOS: SF36 Vitality, Sleep Problems, Social Activity, Social Activity Limitation due to Health, Health Distress, Mental Health Index and Psychological Well-being. Qigong seems to improve factors related to chronic fatigue such as sleep, pain, mental attitude and general mobility after 3 and 6 months. Qigong's positive effects indicate that it represents a potentially safe method of treatment for chronic fatigued patients. However, we cannot completely discount the possible influence of placebo effects, and more objective clinical measures are needed to reproduce our findings with long-term follow-up in a randomized, controlled study involving a larger number of subjects.

  12. Preferred computer activities among individuals with dementia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Sunghee H; Zhang, Hongmei; Hong, Song Hee

    2015-03-01

    Computers offer new activities that are easily accessible, cognitively stimulating, and enjoyable for individuals with dementia. The current descriptive study examined preferred computer activities among nursing home residents with different severity levels of dementia. A secondary data analysis was conducted using activity observation logs from 15 study participants with dementia (severe = 115 logs, moderate = 234 logs, and mild = 124 logs) who participated in a computer activity program. Significant differences existed in preferred computer activities among groups with different severity levels of dementia. Participants with severe dementia spent significantly more time watching slide shows with music than those with both mild and moderate dementia (F [2,12] = 9.72, p = 0.003). Preference in playing games also differed significantly across the three groups. It is critical to consider individuals' interests and functional abilities when computer activities are provided for individuals with dementia. A practice guideline for tailoring computer activities is detailed.

  13. Mindfulness meditation in older adults with postherpetic neuralgia: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meize-Grochowski, Robin; Shuster, George; Boursaw, Blake; DuVal, Michelle; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Schrader, Ron; Smith, Bruce W; Herman, Carla J; Prasad, Arti

    2015-01-01

    This parallel-group, randomized controlled pilot study examined daily meditation in a diverse sample of older adults with postherpetic neuralgia. Block randomization was used to allocate participants to a treatment group (n = 13) or control group (n = 14). In addition to usual care, the treatment group practiced daily meditation for six weeks. All participants completed questionnaires at enrollment in the study, two weeks later, and six weeks after that, at the study's end. Participants recorded daily pain and fatigue levels in a diary, and treatment participants also noted meditation practice. Results at the 0.10 level indicated improvement in neuropathic, affective, and total pain scores for the treatment group, whereas affective pain worsened for the control group. Participants were able to adhere to the daily diary and meditation requirements in this feasibility pilot study.

  14. Exfoliative cytology and titanium dental implants: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Nalli, Gabriela; Verdú, Sergio; Paparella, María L; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2013-01-01

    Oral exfoliative cytology is a diagnostic method that involves the study of cells exfoliated from the oral mucosa. Ions/particles released from metallic implants can remain in the peri-implant milieu. The aim of the present study is to assess the presence of metal particles in cells exfoliated from peri-implant oral mucosa around titanium dental implants. The study comprised 30 patients carrying titanium dental implants, who had neither a metallic prosthesis nor metal restorations in neighboring teeth. Individuals undergoing orthodontic therapy and those who had oral piercing were also excluded from the study. The study sample included patients with and without peri-implantitis. Cytologic samples of the peri-implant area were collected. Samples of the marginal gingiva on the contralateral side of the implant were taken from the same individuals to serve as control. Cytologic analysis was performed using light microscopy. Titanium concentration was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrophotometry. Metal-like particles were observed inside and outside epithelial cells and macrophages in cytologic smears of peri-implant mucosa of both patients with and without peri-implantitis. No particles were found in the control cytologic samples. The concentration of titanium was higher in the peri-implantitis group compared with the group without peri-implantitis; no traces of titanium were observed in controls. Regardless of an inflammatory response, ions/particles are released from the surface of the implant into the biologic milieu. Exfoliative cytology is a simple technique that may be used to detect metal particles in cells exfoliated from the peri-implant mucosa.

  15. Comparison of the learning of two notations: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    AKRAM, ASHFAQ; FUADFUAD, MAHER D; MALIK, ARSHAD MAHMOOD; NASIR ALZURFI, BALSAM MAHDI; CHANGMAI, MANAH CHANDRA; MADLENA, MELINDA

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: MICAP is a new notation in which the teeth are indicated by letters (I-incisor, C-canine, P-premolar, M-molar) and numbers [1,2,3] which are written superscript and subscript on the relevant letters. FDI tooth notation is a two digit system where one digit shows quadrant and the second one shows the tooth of the quadrant. This study aimed to compare the short term retention of knowledge of two notation systems (FDI two digit system and MICAP notation) by lecture method. Methods: Undergraduate students [N=80] of three schools participated in a cross-over study. Two theory-driven classroom based lectures on MICAP notation and FDI notation were delivered separately. Data were collected using eight randomly selected permanent teeth to be written in MICAP format and FDI format at pretest (before the lecture), post-test I (immediately after lecture) and post-test II (one week after the lecture). Analysis was done by SPSS version 20.0 using repeated measures ANCOVA and independent t-test. Results: The results of pre-test and post-test I were similar for FDI education. Similar results were found between post-test I and post-test II for MICAP and FDI notations. Conclusion: The study findings indicated that the two notations (FDI and MICAP) were equally mind cognitive. However, the sample size used in this study may not reflect the global scenario. Therefore, we suggest more studies to be performed for prospective adaptation of MICAP in dental curriculum. PMID:28367462

  16. Comparison of the learning of two notations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASHFAQ AKRAM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: MICAP is a new notation in which the teeth are indicated by letters (I-incisor, C-canine, P-premolar, M-molar and numbers [1,2,3] which are written superscript and subscript on the relevant letters. FDI tooth notation is a two digit system where one digit shows quadrant and the second one shows the tooth of the quadrant. This study aimed to compare the short term retention of knowledge of two notation systems (FDI two digit system and MICAP notation by lecture method. Methods: Undergraduate students [N=80] of three schools participated in a cross-over study. Two theory-driven classroom based lectures on MICAP notation and FDI notation were delivered separately. Data were collected using eight randomly selected permanent teeth to be written in MICAP format and FDI format at pretest (before the lecture, post-test I (immediately after lecture and post-test II (one week after the lecture. Analysis was done by SPSS version 20.0 using repeated measures ANCOVA and independent t-test. Results: The results of pre-test and post-test I were similar for FDI education. Similar results were found between post-test I and post-test II for MICAP and FDI notations. Conclusion: The study findings indicated that the two notations (FDI and MICAP were equally mind cognitive. However, the sample size used in this study may not reflect the global scenario. Therefore, we suggest more studies to be performed for prospective adaptation of MICAP in dental curriculum.

  17. Myopathy in Patients Taking Atorvastatin: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj, K; Jain, N; Madhu, S V

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of statin-induced myopathy. A total of 200 patients aged ≥ 40 years and taking atorvastatin 10 mg/day or more for at least 2 weeks were recruited in the study. A detailed history of participants and anthropometry of study participants was recorded, and features of myopathy were explained. Biochemical investigations along with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and Vitamin D were done in all patients. Mean age of study population was 54.81 ± 9.10 years. Sixty-five percent (65.5%) of atorvastatin users had coronary heart disease, 62.5% were hypertensive, 38% had diabetes. Thirty-five percent (35.5%) patients were taking 10 mg/day atorvastatin, 45% were taking 20 mg/day, and 19.5% were taking 40 mg/day. The overall frequency of myopathy among statin users was 7.5% which was significantly higher with increasing dose of atorvastatin (1.4% in 10 mg/day group, 10% in 20 mg/day group, and 12.8% in 40 mg/day, P < 0.05). The frequency of atorvastatin-related myopathy was higher in females 8.65% compared to 6.25% in males. Serum TSH levels in patients with myopathy were 4.05 ± 7.76 μIU/ml while in those without myopathy were 3.13 ± 2.88 μIU/ml (P = 0.649). Serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D levels were measured in 66 patients randomly. Mean levels in patients with myopathy were 15.98 ± 12.94 ng/ml and without myopathy were 10.20 ± 5.64 ng/ml (P = 0.285). The present study demonstrates that a significantly higher number of patients taking atorvastatin develop myopathy in real life clinical condition. The frequency of myopathy increases with increase in atorvastatin dose.

  18. Intermittent pneumatic compression in intractable critical ischemia of lower limb - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerhake, Ingrid Luise; Henneberg, Eskild Winther; Høgh, Annette Langager

    Posters på "Forskningens Dag" 1. Intermittent pneumatic compression in intractable critical ischemia of the lower limb - a pilot study Feuerhake IL1 , Henneberg E1 , Høgh A1 1 Department of Vascular Surgery, Viborg Regional Hospital Aim: Patients with chronic ischemic wounds or rest pain in the l......Posters på "Forskningens Dag" 1. Intermittent pneumatic compression in intractable critical ischemia of the lower limb - a pilot study Feuerhake IL1 , Henneberg E1 , Høgh A1 1 Department of Vascular Surgery, Viborg Regional Hospital Aim: Patients with chronic ischemic wounds or rest pain...... in the lower extremity (CLI), without the possibility for vascular reconstruction, represent a high selected patient population with high comorbidity and mortality. The aim of this case-study was to investigate the use of intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) among these patients, as a tool to lower pain...

  19. Collecting Biomarkers Using Trained Interviewers. Lessons Learned from a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. McFall

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the design and outcomes of a pilot study for the UK Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS, Understanding Society, to develop and test the feasibility of collection of biomarkers by trained non-clinical interviewers. Feasibility tests performance of procedures, that they are technically satisfactory and reasonable in relation to alternatives. The dimensions reported are recruitment and training of interviewers, completeness, acceptability and time required for data collection, and quality of the biological samples. Some comparisons are made with measures conducted by nurses in wave 2 of the UK Household Longitudinal Study, Understanding Society. Biomeasures included anthropometrics, blood pressure, grip strength and the collection of saliva and dried blood spots. We implemented measurement protocols, introduced training and certification of interviewers, who then collected data from 92 participants. The study produced information about duration of collection, participation and quality of blood and saliva samples. The pilot study informs the design decisions about the biosocial component of Understanding Society

  20. Treatment of oral leukoplakia with photodynamic therapy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranzena Panneer Selvam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: Oral leukoplakia (OL is the most common potentially malignant disorder that may transform into oral carcinoma. By treating leukoplakia in its incipient stage, the risk of occurrence of oral carcinoma can be prevented. In this aspect, photodynamic therapy (PDT can serve as a useful treatment modality. The aim of the study is to treat patients with OL using PDT in which 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA is used as a photosensitizer. Materials and Methods: Five patients with OL were included in the study. They were treated with 10% ALA mediated PDT (light source: Xenon lamp, power: 0.1 W, wavelength: 630 ± 5 nm, total dose: 100 J/cm 2 per session for 6-8 sessions. Follow-up was done for a period of 1 year. Results: One month (4 weeks after ALA-PDT, the response was evaluated based on clinical examination. It was as follows: Complete response: Two patients; partial response: Two patients; and no response: One patient. There was no recurrence in any of the cases. Conclusion: There was satisfactory reduction in the size of the OL lesion without any side-effects. Thus, ALA mediated PDT seems to be a promising alternative for the treatment of OL.

  1. The effects of caffeine abstinence on sleep: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shuk Ching; Chung, Joanne Wai Yee

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether caffeine abstinence in the evening could improve the sleep quality of those who habitually consume coffee. A double-blind control group design (caffeine and caffeine-free groups). A university. A convenience sampling of 10 students (mean age 21.4 years). It was a 14-day experiment. For the first 7 days, all participants consumed caffeinated coffee. In the following 7 days, subjects consumed caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee according to their assigned group. Sleep-wake parameters, self-reported sleep quality and level of refreshment. There were no significant differences (p>.05) among the data of the two groups identified. No significant changes (p>.05) were found in the sleep quality of either group during the study. This study confirms that caffeine abstinence in the evening might not be helpful in sleep promotion. It highlights the need to implement evidence-based practice in health promotion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pilot study of a targeted dance class for physical rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Citlali López-Ortiz; Tara Egan; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This pilot study evaluates the effects of a targeted dance class utilizing classical ballet principles for rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy on balance and upper extremity control. Methods: Twelve children with cerebral palsy (ages 7–15 years) with Gross Motor Function Classification scores II–IV participated in this study and were assigned to either a control group or targeted dance class group. Targeted dance class group participated in 1-h classes three times per...

  3. Cost analysis of prenatal care using the activity-based costing model: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesse, T; Golembeski, S; Potter, J

    1999-01-01

    The cost of prenatal care in a private nurse-midwifery practice was examined using the activity-based costing system. Findings suggest that the activities of the nurse-midwife (the health care provider) constitute the major cost driver of this practice and that the model of care and associated, time-related activities influence the cost. This pilot study information will be used in the development of a comparative study of prenatal care, client education, and self care.

  4. Relationships Between Gum Chewing and Stroop Test: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Y; Takeda, T; Konno, M; Suzuki, Y; Kawano, Y; Ozawa, T; Kondo, Y; Sakatani, K

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive function tends to decrease with aging, therefore maintenance of this function in an aging society is an important issue. The role of chewing in nutrition is important. Although several studies indicate that gum chewing is thought to improve cognitive function, it remains debatable whether gum-chewing does in fact improve cognitive function. The Stroop test is a psychological tool used to measure cognition. A shorter reaction time indicates a mean higher behavioral performance and higher levels of oxy-Hb concentration. fNIRS is a powerful, non-invasive imaging technique offering many advantages, including compact size, no need for specially equipped facilities, and the potential for real-time measurement. The left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) seems to be mainly involved in the Stroop task.The aim of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that gum-chewing changes cerebral blood flow in the left DLPFC during the Stroop test, and also changes the reaction time. Fourteen healthy volunteers (mean age 26.9 years) participated in this study after providing written informed consent. A piece of tasteless gum weighing 1.0 g was used. Each session was designed in a block manner, i.e. 4 rests (30 s) and 3 blocks of task (30 s). A computerized Stroop test was used (including both congruent and incongruent Stroop tasks) which calculates a response time automatically. The Binominal test was used for comparisons (p gum chewing significantly increases responses/oxy-Hb concentration and significantly shortens the reaction time.

  5. Evaluating Boy Scout Geology Education, A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, R. S.; Thomson, B.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated geology knowledge acquisition by Boy Scouts through use of the Boy Scout Geology Merit Handbook. In this study, boys engaged in hands-on interactive learning following the requirements set forth in the Geology Merit Badge Handbook. The purposes of this study were to determine the amount of geology content knowledge engendered in adolescent males through the use of the Geology Merit Badge Handbook published by the Boy Scouts of America; to determine if single sex, activity oriented, free-choice learning programs can be effective in promoting knowledge development in young males; and to determine if boys participating in the Scouting program believed their participation helped them succeed in school. Members of a local Boy Scout Troop between the ages of 11 and 18 were invited to participate in a Geology Merit Badge program. Boys who did not already possess the badge were allowed to self-select participation. The boys' content knowledge of geology, rocks, and minerals was pre- and post-tested. Boys were interviewed about their school and Scouting experiences; whether they believed their Scouting experiences and work in Merit Badges contributed to their success in school. Contributing educational theories included single-sex education, informal education with free-choice learning, learning styles, hands-on activities, and the social cognitive theory concept of self-efficacy. Boys who completed this study seemed to possess a greater knowledge of geology than they obtained in school. If boys who complete the Boy Scout Geology Merit Badge receive additional geological training, their field experiences and knowledge acquired through this learning experience will be beneficial, and a basis for continued scaffolding of geologic knowledge.

  6. A pilot study of coronary angioplasty in outpatients.

    OpenAIRE

    Laarman, G.J.; Kiemeneij, F.; van der Wieken, L R; Tijssen, J.G.; Suwarganda, J S; Slagboom, T.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Is it safe to discharge patients from hospital on the same day as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)? The hypothesis tested was that careful pre and post angioplasty selection of patients can identify a group that is at very low risk of postprocedural complications and that these patients may be discharged on the day of the procedure. METHODS--63 patients undergoing limited risk coronary angioplasty of 72 lesions were studied. So that patients would be able to w...

  7. Cardiovascular risk score and cardiovascular events among airline pilots: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirawan, I Made Ady; Larsen, Peter D; Aldington, Sarah; Griffiths, Robin F; Ellis, Chris J

    2012-05-01

    A cardiovascular risk prediction score is routinely applied by aviation authorities worldwide. We examined the accuracy of the Framingham-based risk chart used by the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority in predicting cardiovascular events among airline pilots. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of 5-yr cardiovascular risk score and cardiovascular events in Oceania-based airline pilots. Cases were pilots with cardiovascular events as recorded on their medical records. Each case was age and gender matched with four controls that were randomly selected from the pilot population. To collect data before the events, 5-yr retrospective evaluations were conducted. Over a 16-yr study period we identified 15 cases of cardiovascular events, 9 (60%) of which were sudden clinical presentations and only 6 (40%) of which were detected using cardiovascular screening. There were 8 cases (53%) and 16 controls (27%) who had a 5-yr risk of > or = 10-15%. Almost half of the events (7/15) occurred in pilots whose highest 5-yr risk was in the 5-10% range. Cases were 3.91 times more likely to have highest 5-yr risk score of > or =10-15% than controls (OR = 3.91, 95% CI 1.04-16.35). The accuracy of the highest risk scores were moderate (AUC = 0.723, 95% CI 0.583-0.863). The cutoff point of 10% is valid, with a specificity of 0.73, but low sensitivity (0.53). Despite a valid and appropriate cutoff point, the tool had low sensitivity and was unable to predict almost half of the cardiovascular events.

  8. A pilot study examining garment severance damage caused by a trained sharp-weapon user

    OpenAIRE

    Cowper, E J; Mahoney, P F; Godhania, K; Carr, D. J.; Harrison, K.

    2016-01-01

    The pilot study summarized in this paper aimed to raise awareness of a gap that exists in the forensic textile science literature about damage caused to clothing by trained sharp-weapon users. A male trained in the Filipino martial arts discipline of Eskrima performed attack techniques on a physical model of a male torso covered with a 97% cotton/3% elastane knitted T-shirt, that is, a garment commonly worn by males. Fabric severance appearance created by three different, but commonly availab...

  9. Qigong Ameliorates Symptoms of Chronic Fatigue: A Pilot Uncontrolled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naropa J. Mike Craske

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners consider that chronic fatigue reflects a disharmony and depletion in the supply of qi in the body. Qigong is one of the traditional complementary interventions used to strengthen qi through self-practice, and to manage the state of qi to prevent and cure disease. The aim of this study is to assess whether qigong could be used to manage the symptoms of chronic fatigue. Eighteen Caucasian, British female participants were recruited, taught a qigong routine during weekly classes over 6 months, and asked to practice it daily for 15 min. Participants completed the core set of the RAND Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire (RAND MOS and a sleep diary during the 2-week baseline control period, and at 3 and 6 months following the start of the trial. The qigong intervention resulted in significant changes in sleep rate score and in the following subscales of the RAND MOS: SF36 Vitality, Sleep Problems, Social Activity, Social Activity Limitation due to Health, Health Distress, Mental Health Index and Psychological Well-being. Qigong seems to improve factors related to chronic fatigue such as sleep, pain, mental attitude and general mobility after 3 and 6 months. Qigong's positive effects indicate that it represents a potentially safe method of treatment for chronic fatigued patients. However, we cannot completely discount the possible influence of placebo effects, and more objective clinical measures are needed to reproduce our findings with long-term follow-up in a randomized, controlled study involving a larger number of subjects.

  10. Tracking the neurodegeneration of parkinsonian disorders - a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, C. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, Lund (Sweden); Lund University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Neurology, Lund (Sweden); Markenroth Bloch, K. [Lund University Hospital, Philips Medical Systems, Lund (Sweden); Brockstedt, S.; Laett, J. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Widner, H. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Neurology, Lund (Sweden); Larsson, E.M. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Radiology, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of the study was to explore the possibilities of using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography (DTT) for the differential diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), compared with the atypical parkinsonian disorders multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). A 3.0-T MR scanner was used. DTI was acquired using a single-shot EPI sequence with diffusion encoding in 32 directions and a voxel size of 2 x 2 x 2 mm{sup 3}. DTI data were analysed and DTT was performed using the PRIDE fibre tracking tool supplied by the manufacturer. The fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) within each tract were determined. DTI and DTT images in patients with moderate to advanced MSA demonstrated degeneration of the middle cerebellar peduncles and pontine crossing tracts, with decreased FA and increased ADC. This accounted for most of the pontine and cerebellar atrophy characteristic of this disease. In contrast, patients with PSP showed a selective degeneration of the superior cerebellar peduncle. Three-dimensional images of whole-brain white matter tracts demonstrated a reduction of cortical projection fibres in all patients with PSP. Visualization of the selective degeneration of individual fibre tracts, using DTI and DTT, adds qualitative data facilitating the differential diagnosis of parkinsonian disorders. Repeated measurements of FA and ADC values in a whole fibre tract might be used for monitoring disease progression and studying the effect of treatment in neuroprotective trials. The results are preliminary considering the small number of subjects in the study. (orig.)

  11. Structure in Biocrystallograms: A Computer Vision Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelsmann, Morten Brandt; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports our work on various aspects image processing and statistical analysis based on local texture and crystal object structure of biocrystallogram images. We built a modular test engine that executes objects of image data and analysis schemes, proposed a series of image processing...... and statistical analysis methods and have implemented a Gabor filter bank, a principal component analysis function capable of operating on high-dimensional data sets, and have our results summarized in a set of tests using multivariate statistics (MANOVA testing for grouping- or factor- effect by use of Wilk...... the requiring Laboratory's in order to devise appropriate statistical tests for the operational statistical analysis not implemented at present in the Laboratory's organization. In this project, structure has been approached as localization, orientation and size. In this study, the mentioned approach...

  12. Solar diffusion in California: a pilot study. Consultant report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, E.M.; Leonard-Barton, D.; Avi-Itzhak, T.; Rosa, E.; Adhikarya, R.

    1979-10-01

    Solar system owners and their neighbors in the San Francisco Bay Area were studied. The study determined the level of homeowner awareness about residential solar energy systems, described characteristics of consumers purchasing solar equipment (e.g. whether they represent identifiable market segments), identified major channels of communication through which solar information is effectively used, determined remaining barriers to solar use, identified needed incentives to accelerate commercialization, and assessed public attitudes toward various state and Federal government actions to increase the rate of solar energy use statewide. Issues and questions explored are being used in the development of a statewide survey of 700 homeowners in California to determine if these findings apply to residents throughout the state.

  13. Solar diffusion in California: a pilot study. Consultant report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, E.M.; Leonard-Barton, D.; Avi-Itzhak, T.; Rosa, E.; Adhikarya, R.

    1979-10-01

    Solar system owners and their neighbors in the San Francisco Bay Area were studied. The study determined the level of homeowner awareness about residential solar energy systems, described characteristics of consumers purchasing solar equipment (e.g. whether they represent identifiable market segments), identified major channels of communication through which solar information is effectively used, determined remaining barriers to solar use, identified needed incentives to accelerate commercialization, and assessed public attitudes toward various state and Federal government actions to increase the rate of solar energy use statewide. Issues and questions explored are being used in the development of a statewide survey of 700 homeowners in California to determine if these findings apply to residents throughout the state.

  14. Quantum Physics Principles and Communication in the Acute Healthcare Setting: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Heidi L; Peyerl, Colleen Kraft; Solheim-Witt, Marit

    This pilot study explores whether clinician awareness of quantum physics principles could facilitate open communication between patients and providers. In the spirit of action research, this study was conceptualized with a holistic view of human health, using a mixed method design of grounded theory as an emergent method. Instrumentation includes surveys and a focus group discussion with twelve registered nurses working in an acute care hospital setting. Findings document that the preliminary core phenomenon, energy as information, influences communication in the healthcare environment. Key emergent themes include awareness, language, validation, open communication, strategies, coherence, incoherence and power. Research participants indicate that quantum physics principles provide a language and conceptual framework for improving their awareness of communication and interactions in the healthcare environment. Implications of this pilot study support the feasibility of future research and education on awareness of quantum physics principles in other clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Insulin Pump Failures: Has There Been an Improvement? Update of a Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenego, Agathe; Bouzillé, Guillaume; Breitel, Stéphanie; Esvant, Annabelle; Poirier, Jean-Yves; Bonnet, Fabrice; Guilhem, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    Insulin pump failures had been assessed in our center by a prospective observational study from 2001 to 2007. The aim of this study was to update our data since 2008 and to determine whether there exist specific risk factors for insulin pump failures. All insulin pump defects were prospectively collected between 2008 and 2013 in a monocentric cohort of 350 new pumps. Clinical consequences were recorded. Brand and model of pumps and type of defects and patients' characteristics (gender, type of diabetes, age at diabetes diagnosis, age at first pump, pump treatment duration, number of previous pumps, and number of previous pump failures) were tested for possible association with insulin pump failure. Malfunctions occurred in 239 (68%) pumps. The incidence rate was 33/100 pump-years. There were 28 (12%) complete failures, 17 (7%) alarms, 83 (35%) mechanical defects, and 105 (44%) minor defects. Survival curves did not differ according to pump brand and model. Hyperglycemia occurred in 2.9% of cases. In multivariate analysis, only patient age less than 40 years at the initiation of pump therapy was associated with higher risk of malfunction (hazard ratio 1.64; 95% confidence interval 1.19-2.24; P = 0.002). Pump malfunctions remain common with modern pumps. We report less complete failures than in our previous study. This could be because of improvement in quality of pumps or to our strategy of systematic screening and replacement in case of mechanical defects.

  16. Prolene Canalostenting in Deep Sclerectomy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed Mostafa; El-Sayed, Yasmine Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of implantation of a 5/0 prolene suture segment inside Schlemm's canal as an adjunct to deep sclerectomy. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, interventional case series of nine eyes of six patients with open angle glaucoma. Patients underwent deep sclerectomy with insertion of a segment of 5/0 prolene into Schlemm's canal at the filtration site without suturing. The main outcome measures were: Intraocular pressure (IOP), postoperative interventions, and complications. Ultrasound biomicroscopy of the filtration area as well as the prolene suture was performed at 6 months postoperatively. Results: Patients were followed for a mean of 8.1 ± 4.5 months. Mean IOP decreased statistically significant from 19 ± 4.2 mmHg preoperatively to 12 mmHg at 15 months postoperatively (P maintain the patency of the intrascleral space and Schlemm's canal thus controlling IOP for 6 months postoperatively. PMID:26692727

  17. Virtual reality in the treatment of fibromyalgia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Cristina; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Vizcaíno, Yolanda; Herrero, Rocio; Baños, Rosa Maria; Belmonte, Miguel Angel

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this article is to present preliminary data on the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) as an adjunct to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM). The sample comprised six women diagnosed with FM according to the American College of Rheumatology guidelines (1990). The treatment program consisted of 10 sessions of group CBT with the support of an adaptive virtual environment containing a specific content for developing relaxation and mindfulness skills. Patients were assessed at pretreatment, post-treatment, and at a 6-month follow-up for the following outcome variables: functional status related to pain, depression, a negative and positive affect, and coping skills. The results showed the long-term benefits of significantly reduced pain and depression and an increased positive affect and use of healthy coping strategies. This is the first study showing a preliminary utility of VR in treating FM.

  18. Diagnosis of Asthma in Primary Health Care: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin C. Ringsberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some patients with an asthma diagnosis have a poor controlled asthma. One explanation may be an incorrect diagnosis. Aim. The aim of the study was to diagnose and classify patients with non-infectious lower respiratory tract problems in primary health care using internationally applied diagnostic criteria and diagnostic tests. Patients and Methods. New adult patients visiting a primary health care centre due to lower airway problems were included. The diagnostic tests included FEV1, FVC, PEF, two questionnaires, methacholine test, and skin prick test. Results. The patients (n=43 could be divided into four groups: asthma (28%, asthma-like disorder (44%, idiopathic cough (12%, and a nonreversible bronchial obstructive group (16%. The asthma and asthma-like groups showed similar patterns of airway symptoms and trigger factors, not significantly separated by a special questionnaire. Phlegm, heavy breathing, chest pressure/pain, cough, and wheezing were the most common symptoms. Physical exercise and scents were the dominating trigger factors. Conclusions. Nonobstructive asthma-like symptoms seem to be as common as bronchial asthma in primary health care. Due to the similarities in symptoms and trigger factors the study supports the hypothesis that asthma and nonobstructive asthma-like disorders are integrated in the same “asthma syndrome,” including different mechanisms, not only bronchial obstruction.

  19. Ozone Therapy for Tumor Oxygenation: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor hypoxia is an adverse factor for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Ozone therapy is a non-conventional form of medicine that has been used successfully in the treatment of ischemic disorders. This prospective study was designed to assess the effect of ozone therapy on tumor oxygenation. Eighteen subjects were recruited for the study. Systemic ozone therapy was administered by autohemotransfusion on three alternate days over one week. Tumor oxygenation levels were measured using polarographic needle probes before and after the first and the third ozone therapy session. Overall, no statistically significant change was observed in the tumor oxygenation in the 18 patients. However, a significant decrease was observed in hypoxic values ≤10 and ≤5 mmHg of pO2. When individually assessed, a significant and inverse non-linear correlation was observed between increase in oxygenation and the initial tumor pO2 values at each measuring time-point, thus indicating that the more poorly-oxygenated tumors benefited most (rho = −0.725; P = 0.001. Additionally, the effect of ozone therapy was found to be lower in patients with higher hemoglobin concentrations (rho = −0.531; P < 0.034. Despite being administered over a very short period, ozone therapy improved oxygenation in the most hypoxic tumors. Ozone therapy as adjuvant in chemo-radiotherapy warrants further research.

  20. Neurotrophic effects of perfluorocarbon emulsion gel: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaacs Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Positive neurotrophic effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment may be more easily achieved by applying a Perflourocarbon (PFC emulsion gel to the repair site. PFCs are halogen substituted carbon oils with unique oxygen transport potentials that are capable of increasing oxygen availability in local tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine if the application of a PFC emulsion to a repaired nerve would improve recovery. Materials and methods The left tibial nerve of 21 immature female Sprague-Dawley rats was transected, immediately repaired, and then circumferentially coated with PFC gel (Group A, n = 7, PFC-less gel (Group B, n = 7, or nothing (suture only, Group C, n = 7. At eight weeks post surgery, electrophysiological testing and histological and morphological analysis was performed. Results No statistically significant differences between experimental groups were found for muscle size and weight, axon counts, or nerve conduction velocity. Group A had a significantly smaller G-ratio than Groups B and C (p Conclusion Overall results do not indicate a functional benefit associated with application of a PFC emulsion gel to rodent tibial nerve repairs. A positive effect on myelination was seen.

  1. Falls in the audiology clinic: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criter, Robin E; Honaker, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Falls are a common and often preventable cause of injury and death among older adults. Hearing loss, vestibular disorders, dizziness, and imbalance are common risk factors for falls; however, the rate of falls among older audiology patients has never been assessed. To examine the fall history and risk factors of older adults seen in a university audiology clinic. A descriptive and correlational retrospective chart review of fall history and characteristics of patients seen in a university audiology clinic. 88 (51 women, 37 men) patients aged 60 yr and older seen in a university audiology clinic. At the time of hearing evaluation, clinic patients filled out the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale, as well as a history form containing fall-related questions. These measures, as well as demographic information (gender and age) were retrieved during a retrospective chart review. Data were analyzed with independent-samples t-tests, Pearson correlations, and descriptive statistics. Fifty percent of the study sample reported falling within the preceding 12 mo, while 70% reported having fallen at some point in the past. ABC Scale score was negatively correlated with age and number of recent falls. There appears to be a higher prevalence of falls within a university audiology clinic relative to previously published fall rates in the general population. American Academy of Audiology.

  2. WhatsApp for Teaching Pathology Postgraduates: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Aditi; Tanveer, Nadeem; Sharma, Pooja

    2017-01-01

    Postgraduate students spend a sizeable proportion of their time on social media platforms such as WhatsApp and Facebook. This change in our social interaction needs to be accommodated in our teaching methods. To engage them and arouse their curiosity, WhatsApp is an ideal platform. Digital photography by cell phone cameras has made it possible to share cases and discuss them with students round the clock. The primary aim of the study was to develop sharing and discussion of images using WhatsApp. It also aimed at gathering feedback by means of a questionnaire from pathology residents about their views about the use of WhatsApp for teaching purpose. A WhatsApp group by the name "Pathology on the Go" was created with the authors of this study as group administrators and all junior and senior resident doctors (69) as members. The group was used to discuss interesting cases, quiz questions, and other pathology-related academic issues. At the end of 4 weeks, a questionnaire was distributed among the members, and feedback was sought regarding their experience in the group. Over a 4-week period, 16 cases were discussed with 647 posts. A total of 45 participants out of 69 were active participants, and they had an average of 14 posts over the 4-week period. Majority of the participants found the discussions very useful with minimal disruption of the daily routine. There is a need to incorporate Web 2.0 tools such as WhatsApp in our teaching methods to capture as much screen time of the students as possible.

  3. WhatsApp for teaching pathology postgraduates: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Goyal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postgraduate students spend a sizeable proportion of their time on social media platforms such as WhatsApp and Facebook. This change in our social interaction needs to be accommodated in our teaching methods. To engage them and arouse their curiosity, WhatsApp is an ideal platform. Digital photography by cell phone cameras has made it possible to share cases and discuss them with students round the clock. Objective: The primary aim of the study was to develop sharing and discussion of images using WhatsApp. It also aimed at gathering feedback by means of a questionnaire from pathology residents about their views about the use of WhatsApp for teaching purpose. Materials and Methods: A WhatsApp group by the name “Pathology on the Go” was created with the authors of this study as group administrators and all junior and senior resident doctors (69 as members. The group was used to discuss interesting cases, quiz questions, and other pathology-related academic issues. At the end of 4 weeks, a questionnaire was distributed among the members, and feedback was sought regarding their experience in the group. Results: Over a 4-week period, 16 cases were discussed with 647 posts. A total of 45 participants out of 69 were active participants, and they had an average of 14 posts over the 4-week period. Majority of the participants found the discussions very useful with minimal disruption of the daily routine. Conclusion: There is a need to incorporate Web 2.0 tools such as WhatsApp in our teaching methods to capture as much screen time of the students as possible.

  4. Qigong improves balance in young women:a pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    María Victoria González López-Arza; Enrique Varela-Donoso; Jesús Montanero-Fernández; Juan Rodríguez-Mansilla; Blanca González-Sánchez; Luis González López-Arza

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Balance problems are common in people of all ages and can lead to falls,thus causing fractures with consequent disability.Qigong practice has long been part of daily life in Chinese culture,and has good effects on physical health maintenance.OBJECTIVE:The present work describes the change in balance in young,healthy women after practising Qigong for eight weeks.DESIGN,SETTING,PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS:The study took the form of a controlled,randomised longitudinal trial,and involved 30 women aged 18-25 years.The subjects had no prior experience of Qigong or Tai Chi and were unaware of the aims of the study.Subjects were randomly assigned to a Qigong intervention group or a control group.Those in the Qigong intervention group performed "exercises in 20 figures for health and long-life" (Wang Ziping) for 1 h twice per week,for 4 weeks.The control group undertook no exercise at all.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The main outcome measure was the stabilometry values.These were obtained in a unipodal support test,using a plantar pressure platform with optical sensors.RESULTS:The Qigong subjects showed a significant improvement in their stabilometry results (40.1% pre-intervention and 56.4% post-intervention) (P<0.045),while no improvement was seen in the control group (51.2% pre-intervention and 53.5% post-intervention).At the beginning of the intervention,the stabilometry values recorded for the Qigong intervention group were worse than those recorded for the control group (40.15% and 51.21% respectively; P=0.121).However,a comparison of the post-intervention values between these groups showed that these differences have disappeared (P=0.653).CONCLUSION:Qigong can improve balance in healthy,young women.

  5. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  6. Sexuality in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucilene Sales da Paixão Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the sexual behavior of women with polycystic ovary syndrome and the relationship between sexual behavior and the clinical parameters related to this syndrome (obesity, hirsutism and menstrual irregularities. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 48 women with polycystic ovary syndrome. The evaluation was based on the complaints reported by the women with particular emphasis on sexual satisfaction, the presence of a sexual partner, phases of the sexual response cycle (desire, arousal, orgasm and resolution phases, sexual frequency, practice of masturbation, evaluation of less usual sexual habits, degree of intimacy and the quality of communication in the women’s involvement with their sexual partner. The variables of sexual behavior (sexual satisfaction, masturbation, sexual fantasies, frequency of desire, arousal and orgasm were compared with three clinical parameters: menstrual cycle, hirsutism and body mass index (BMI. Results: The sexual initiation, ways of expressing sexuality, communication and intimacy with partner and sexual satisfaction were not influenced by the clinical aspects of the syndrome. With respect to association of polycystic ovary syndrome clinical parameters with sexual behavior, a statistically significant correlation was found with the menstrual cycle. Conclusion: The absence of menstruation affected sexual interest in activities not involving the partner, thus increasing the frequency of masturbation.

  7. Treatment of minor depression in older adults: A pilot study comparing sertraline and exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Brenes, Gretchen A; Williamson, Jeff D; Messier, Stephen P.; Rejeski, W Jack; Pahor, Marco; Ip, Edward; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot clinical trial to test the feasibility and efficacy of an exercise program and anti-depressant treatment compared with usual care in improving the emotional and physical functioning of older adults with minor depression. Participants were 37 older adults with minor depression who were randomized to exercise, sertraline, or usual care; 32 participants completed the 16 week study. Outcomes included measures of both emotional (clinician and self-r...

  8. Consumers’ behaviour and motives for selection of dairy beverages in Kvarner region: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Greta Krešić; Zoran Herceg; Vesna Lelas; Anet Režek Jambrak

    2010-01-01

    Since food choice is always a unique and personal experience, consumer behaviour is important for food manufacturers and marketers in term of product success. Due to the beneficial healthprotective effects of dairy beverages, this market segment is very innovative and fast-growing. The aim of this pilot-study was to examine the consumption patterns, purchasing behaviour and motivesfor selection of dairy beverages. The sample of this study included 114 participants (44 males and 70 females) wh...

  9. Elder abuse and dementia--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, C; Mortimer, A

    1995-01-01

    An anonymous postal questionnaire was distributed to 200 members of a voluntary organisation providing information and support for the carers of dementia sufferers. Carers were asked about the possible occurrence of verbal, physical abuse and neglect. Those carers who admitted to any form of abuse were compared with those who did not and risk factors in both carers and patients were analysed to determine risk factors for abuse. Fifty-five per cent of carers admitted to some form of abuse with verbal abuse being the most common form. Verbal abuse was associated with a poor premorbid relationship and social isolation of the carer and was found to be a risk factor for physical abuse. Those carers who had high GHQ scores and who had been caring for longer were more likely to physically abuse the person they cared for. This study supports the hypothesis that various categories of abuse have different correlates.

  10. Photogrammetric 3D skull/photo superimposition: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Valeria; Lubelli, Sergio; De Donno, Antonio; Inchingolo, Alessio; Lavecchia, Fulvio; Introna, Francesco

    2017-02-13

    The identification of bodies through the examination of skeletal remains holds a prominent place in the field of forensic investigations. Technological advancements in 3D facial acquisition techniques have led to the proposal of a new body identification technique that involves a combination of craniofacial superimposition and photogrammetry. The aim of this study was to test the method by superimposing various computerized 3D images of skulls onto various photographs of missing people taken while they were still alive in cases when there was a suspicion that the skulls in question belonged to them. The technique is divided into four phases: preparatory phase, 3d acquisition phase, superimposition phase, and metric image analysis 3d. The actual superimposition of the images was carried out in the fourth step. and was done so by comparing the skull images with the selected photos. Using a specific software, the two images (i.e. the 3D avatar and the photo of the missing person) were superimposed. Cross-comparisons of 5 skulls discovered in a mass grave, and of 2 skulls retrieved in the crawlspace of a house were performed. The morphologyc phase reveals a full overlap between skulls and photos of disappeared persons. Metric phase reveals that correlation coefficients of this values, higher than 0.998-0,997 allow to confirm identification hypothesis.

  11. Using stand/sit workstations in classrooms: lessons learned from a pilot study in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Jamilia J; Benden, Mark E; Wendel, Monica L

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity has grown into a national epidemic since the 1980s. Many school-based intervention efforts that target childhood obesity involve curriculum and programming that demands instructional time, which disincentivizes school participation. Stand-biased classrooms are an environmental intervention that promotes standing rather than sitting by utilizing standing height desks that allow students to stand during normal classroom activities. The quasi-experimental pilot study was conducted in 5 first-grade classrooms in a Texas elementary school, with 2 control classrooms, 2 treatment classrooms, and 1 classroom that was a control in the fall and treatment in the spring (to allow for within-group comparisons). This intervention has been shown effective in significantly increasing caloric expenditure. In addition, the present study reveals potential behavioral effects from standing. This article presents lessons learned from the pilot study that may prove useful for others implementing similar interventions and calls for additional research on the academic benefits of standing for students.

  12. A Pilot Study Examining the Online Behavior of Web Users with Visual Impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Brinkley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the results of a pilot study on the online behavioral habits of 46 internet users; 26 of whom self-identified as having a visual impairment (either blind or low vision. While significant research exists which documents the degree of difficulty that users with visual impairments have in interacting with the Web relative to the sighted, few have addressed the degree to which this usability disparity impacts online behavior; information seeking and online exploratory behaviors especially. Fewer still have addressed this usability disparity within the context of distinct website types; i.e. are usability issues more pronounced with certain categories of websites as opposed to others? This pilot study was effective both in exploring these issues and in identifying the accessibility of online social networks as a primary topic of investigation with respect to the formal study that is to follow.

  13. Immobilisation in Australian paediatric medical imaging: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, S; Spuur, K; Nielsen, S

    2017-05-01

    The primary aim of this study is to document the use of paediatric immobilisation techniques in medical imaging. Secondary aims are to investigate differences between current practice of paediatric and non-paediatric facilities and radiographer gender and to investigate immobilisation protocols. A SurveyMonkey link was distributed through the Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy (ASMIRT) newsletter. Radiographer members of ASMIRT were invited to participate. Frequency percentage analysis was undertaken; as the 'frequency of immobilisation' response was on a Likert scale and the ages categorical, a Fisher's exact test could determine dependency. The use of paediatric immobilisation techniques was determined to be related to age. The most commonly used technique in general X-ray was "other people"; in computed tomography, Velcro, verbal reminders and distraction techniques; and in magnetic resonance imaging, sedation and Velcro. A comparison of immobilisation techniques demonstrated that Velcro use in X-ray was dependent on facility (p = 0.017) with paediatric facilities using it up to 17 years. Immobilisation frequency was dependent in 13-17 years (p = 0.035) with paediatric facilities rarely immobilising and non-paediatric facilities never. No dependencies resulted upon comparing genders. Immobilisation frequency was not dependent between protocols or current practice. The use of paediatric immobilisation technique is related to age with "other people", sedation, Velcro, verbal reminders and distraction techniques being regularly used. The dependency of Velcro use and immobilisation frequency in 13-17 years is for unknown reasons and further investigation is required. A larger study should be carried out to validate these findings. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of conventional and digital cephalometric analysis: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemlata Bhagwan Tanwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to analyze and compare the manual cephalometric tracings with computerized cephalometric tracings using Burstone hard tissue analysis and McNamara analysis. Materials and Methods: Conventional lateral cephalograms of 20 subjects were obtained and manually traced. The radiographs were subsequently scanned and digitized using Dolphin Imaging software version 11.7. McNamara analysis and Burstone hard tissue analysis were performed by both conventional and digital method. No differentiations were made for age or gender. Data were subjected to statistical analysis. Statistical analysis was undertaken using SPSS 17.0 version (Chicago, Illinois, USA statistical software program. A paired t-test was used to detect differences between the manual and digital methods. Statistical significance was set at the P < 0.05 level of confidence. Results: (A From Burstone analysis variables N-Pg II Hp show statistically very significant difference, and ANS-N, U1-NF, N-B II Hp, L1-Mp, and Go-Pg shows the statistically significant difference. (B From McNamara analysis variables Nasolabial angle and L1-APog show statistically significant differences and the Mandibular length shows the statistically very significant difference. Conclusion: According to this study, is reasonable to conclude that the manual and digital tracings show the statistically significant difference.

  15. Changes in chronotype after stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Fitzthum, Katharina; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo; Ulm, Lena

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate associations between stroke onset and severity as well as chronotype (phase of entrainment) and internal time of stroke. Fifty-six first-ever ischemic stroke patients participated in a cross-sectional study assessing chronotype (mid-sleep on work-free days corrected for sleep deficit on workdays; MSFsc) by applying the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ). The MCTQ was completed twice, on average 68 ± 24 (SD) days post stroke and retrospectively for the time before stroke. To assess the impact of stroke in relation to internal time, InTstroke was calculated as MSFsc minus local time of stroke. Stroke severity was assessed via the standard clinical National Institute Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Ranking Scale (mRS), both at hospital admission and discharge. Overall, most strokes occurred between noon and midnight. There was no significant association between MSFsc and stroke onset. MSFsc changed significantly after stroke, especially in patients with more severe strokes. Changes in MSFsc varied with InTstroke - the earlier the internal time of a stroke relative to MSFsc-before-stroke, the more MSFsc advanced after stroke. In addition, we provide first evidence that MSFsc changes varied between stroke locations. Larger trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  16. Vergence in mild traumatic brain injury: A pilot study

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    Dora Szymanowicz, OD, MS

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Vergence dysfunction in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI may have a negative effect on quality of life, functional abilities, and rehabilitative progress. In this study, we used a range of dynamic and static objective and subjective measures of vergence to assess 21 adult patients with mTBI and nearwork symptoms. The results were compared with 10 control adult subjects. With respect to dynamic parameters, responses in those with mTBI were slowed, variable, and delayed. With respect to static parameters, reduced near point of convergence and restricted near vergence ranges were found in those with mTBI. The present results provide evidence for the substantial adverse effect of mTBI on vergence function.

  17. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  18. VIDEO BLOGGING AND ENGLISH PRESENTATION PERFORMANCE: A PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Hung, Shao-Ting; Danny Huang, Heng-Tsung

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the utility of video blogs in improving EFL students' performance in giving oral presentations and, further, examined the students' perceptions toward video blogging. Thirty-six English-major juniors participated in a semester-long video blog project for which they uploaded their 3-min. virtual presentation clips over 18 weeks. Their virtual presentation clips were rated by three raters using a scale for speaking performance that contained 14 presentation skills. Data sources included presentation clips, reflections, and interviews. The results indicated that the students' overall presentation performance improved significantly. In particular, among the 14 presentation skills projection, intonation, posture, introduction, conclusion, and purpose saw the most substantial improvement. Finally, the qualitative data revealed that learners perceived that the video blog project facilitated learning but increased anxiety.

  19. General practitioners' reasoning when considering the diagnosis heart failure: a think-aloud study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bring Johan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosing chronic heart failure is difficult, especially in mild cases or early in the course of the disease, and guidelines are not easily implemented in everyday practice. The aim of this study was to investigate general practitioners' diagnostic reasoning about patients with suspected chronic heart failure in comparison with recommendations in European guidelines. Methods Think-aloud technique was used. Fifteen general practitioners reasoned about six case vignettes, representing authentic patients with suspected chronic heart failure. Information about each case was added successively in five steps. The general practitioners said their thoughts aloud while reasoning about the probability of the patient having chronic heart failure, and tried to decide about the diagnosis. Arguments for and against chronic heart failure were analysed and compared to recommendations in guidelines. Results Information about ejection fraction was the most frequent diagnostic argument, followed by information about cardiac enlargement or pulmonary congestion on chest X-ray. However, in a third of the judgement situations, no information about echocardiography was utilized in the general practitioners' diagnostic reasoning. Only three of the 15 doctors used information about a normal electrocardiography as an argument against chronic heart failure. Information about other cardio-vascular diseases was frequently used as a diagnostic argument. Conclusions The clinical information was not utilized to the extent recommended in guidelines. Some implications of our study are that 1 general practitioners need more information about how to utilize echocardiography when diagnosing chronic heart failure, 2 guidelines ought to give more importance to information about other cardio-vascular diseases in the diagnostic reasoning, and 3 guidelines ought to treat the topic of diastolic heart failure in a clearer way.

  20. Suicide tourism: a pilot study on the Swiss phenomenon.

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    Gauthier, Saskia; Mausbach, Julian; Reisch, Thomas; Bartsch, Christine

    2015-08-01

    While assisted suicide (AS) is strictly restricted in many countries, it is not clearly regulated by law in Switzerland. This imbalance leads to an influx of people-'suicide tourists'-coming to Switzerland, mainly to the Canton of Zurich, for the sole purpose of committing suicide. Political debate regarding 'suicide tourism' is taking place in many countries. Swiss medicolegal experts are confronted with these cases almost daily, which prompted our scientific investigation of the phenomenon. The present study has three aims: (1) to determine selected details about AS in the study group (age, gender and country of residence of the suicide tourists, the organisation involved, the ingested substance leading to death and any diseases that were the main reason for AS); (2) to find out the countries from which suicide tourists come and to review existing laws in the top three in order to test the hypothesis that suicide tourism leads to the amendment of existing regulations in foreign countries; and (3) to compare our results with those of earlier studies in Zurich. We did a retrospective data analysis of the Zurich Institute of Legal Medicine database on AS of non-Swiss residents in the last 5 years (2008-2012), and internet research for current legislation and political debate in the three foreign countries most concerned. We analysed 611 cases from 31 countries all over the world. Non-terminal conditions such as neurological and rheumatic diseases are increasing among suicide tourists. The unique phenomenon of suicide tourism in Switzerland may indeed result in the amendment or supplementary guidelines to existing regulations in foreign countries.

  1. Ultrasound measurements of the masseter muscle as predictors of cephalometric indices in orthodontics: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser-Ud-Din, S; Sampson, W J; Dreyer, C W; Thoirs, K

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the potential of ultrasound measurements of the masseter muscle to accurately predict indices normally derived from cephalograms. Masseter muscle measurements on 11 adults (22 to 30 y) were made using lateral cephalometrics and extended field-of-view ultrasound. The ultrasound technique was validated in a simulation pilot study using 12 dry skulls and raw chicken breasts. Twenty cephalometric variables were analyzed against four ultrasound measurements of the masseter muscle. Highly significant correlations (r = 0.81-0.85, p = 0.001-0.002) between ultrasound measurements of the masseter muscle and cephalometric measurements representing the length of the superficial masseter muscle, the length and shape of the mandible and vertical facial proportions were demonstrated. Predictive equations from regression analyses were constructed to deduce ramus length and shape from the ultrasound measurements. The results provide pilot data suggesting that ultrasound is a potential clinical tool for sequential evaluation of masseter muscle length in orthodontics and facial muscle growth studies.

  2. Effects of Glossopharyngeal Insufflation in Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Pilot Study

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    Nina Brodin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS, thoracic range of motion is often greatly limited. The objective of the study was to describe the effects of 12 weeks of Glossopharyngeal Insufflation (GI training in patients with AS. Dynamic spirometry included vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, and peak expiratory flow. Thoracic and lumbar range of motion was assessed by tragus-to-wall distance, modified Schober test, and tape measure. Disease activity, activity limitation, and health perception were assessed using the BAS-Indices, and tension in the thoracic region during GI was assessed using the Borg CR-10 scale. Adherence to training was recorded in an activity log, along with any remarks on the training. Ten patients were recruited and six male patients fulfilled the study protocol. Three patients were able to learn GI by exceeding their maximal vital capacity with 5% using GI. A significant increase in thoracic range of motion both on costae IV (P=0.04 and at the level of the xiphoid process (P=0.04 was seen. Thus, patients with AS can practice GI, it is safe if maximal exertion is avoided, and patients with some mobility in the chest can increase their lung function substantially by performing GI during 12 weeks.

  3. Effects of Glossopharyngeal Insufflation in Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Nina; Lindholm, Peter; Lennartsson, Claudia; Nygren-Bonnier, Malin

    2014-01-01

    In Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS), thoracic range of motion is often greatly limited. The objective of the study was to describe the effects of 12 weeks of Glossopharyngeal Insufflation (GI) training in patients with AS. Dynamic spirometry included vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, and peak expiratory flow. Thoracic and lumbar range of motion was assessed by tragus-to-wall distance, modified Schober test, and tape measure. Disease activity, activity limitation, and health perception were assessed using the BAS-Indices, and tension in the thoracic region during GI was assessed using the Borg CR-10 scale. Adherence to training was recorded in an activity log, along with any remarks on the training. Ten patients were recruited and six male patients fulfilled the study protocol. Three patients were able to learn GI by exceeding their maximal vital capacity with 5% using GI. A significant increase in thoracic range of motion both on costae IV (P = 0.04) and at the level of the xiphoid process (P = 0.04) was seen. Thus, patients with AS can practice GI, it is safe if maximal exertion is avoided, and patients with some mobility in the chest can increase their lung function substantially by performing GI during 12 weeks. PMID:25506364

  4. Hypertension Education Intervention with Ugandan Nurses Working in Hospital Outpatient Clinic: A Pilot Study

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    Godfrey Katende

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs pose a significant global burden in both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that, by 2025, 41.7% of males and 38.7% of females in Sub-Saharan Africa will develop high blood pressure (HBP. This is particularly true in Uganda with hypertensive prevalence rates estimated to range from 22.5% to 30.5%. Coupled with low levels of detection, treatment, and control, hypertension represents a Ugandan public health crisis. An innovative WHO-ISH education program culturally was adapted in a pilot study and focused on knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA of nurses caring for hypertensive patients in an outpatient clinic. Pre-post intervention data was collected and analyzed in which significant improvements were noted on all the three outcome measures. This pilot study demonstrated that nurses’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes could be significantly improved with a multimodal education program implemented in a low resource environment.

  5. SELF-ESTEEM AND PERSONALITY TYPE IN POLITICALLY ENGAGED PEOPLE: A PILOT STUDY

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    Irina MACSINGA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian political institution is destined to survive in the face of the individual‘s ideological abandonment, passivity and reserve, as well as in the face of a society denouncing the mediocrity of the political class. Based on these considerations, this pilot study sets out to explore and reveal specific personality traits of the Romanian politicians, including the level of selfesteem. A total of 80 participants (divided into two groups, with or without political engagement completed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI and the Rosenberg‘s Self-Esteem Scale (RSES. The results have shown that politically engaged people have a predominant Extrovert Intuitive Feeling Judicative personality type; however, regarding self-esteem, no significant differences were identified in comparison to the group of persons having no political engagement. The results of this pilot study are of interest allowing a better understanding of a politician‘s mindset and behavior

  6. Emotion Acceptance Behavior Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildes, Jennifer E.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Cheng, Yu; McCabe, Elizabeth B.; Gaskill, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of Emotion Acceptance Behavior Therapy (EABT), an outpatient psychotherapeutic intervention for anorexia nervosa (AN) based on a disorder-specific model of symptom maintenance that emphasizes emotion avoidance. EABT combines standard behavioral interventions that are central to the clinical management of AN with evidence-supported strategies to increase emotion awareness, decrease emotion avoidance, and encourage resumption of valued activities and relationships outside the eating disorder. Method Twenty-four individuals aged ≥17 years with AN were treated using the EABT manual. EABT was delivered in 33–58 individual sessions provided over 38–53 weeks. Assessments were conducted before and after treatment, and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Results Thirteen patients (54.2%) completed EABT; 11 (45.8%) dropped out or were withdrawn. EABT was associated with significant improvements in weight, disordered eating symptoms, and emotion avoidance that were maintained over 6-month follow-up. The majority of EABT completers achieved a body mass index >18.5 (n=9/13) or had a normal Eating Disorder Examination Global score (n=10/13) at post-treatment. Discussion Preliminary data suggest that EABT may have utility for a subset of adults with AN. Future research will focus on improving outcomes in EABT non-responders and identifying of mechanisms that drive treatment response. PMID:24407934

  7. Intensification of Renal Nurses’ Self-Esteem: A Pilot Study

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    Stiliani Tziaferi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Renal nurses should have counselling and communication skills with patients, to deal with stressful situations at work. A prerequisite for the acquisition of these skills is renal nurses’ self-knowledge. This study aims to present the effectiveness of an ongoing training program to renal nurses related to selfesteem.Methodology: A quasi experimental research, which has a theoretical background from the Rational- Emotive Behaviour Therapy of A. Ellis and from the transformative learning of J. Mezirow. The programattended 31 renal nurses working in district hospitals.Results: During evaluation of the training activity it was quite successful at the cognitive effect that occurred to the participants. In emotional and in behavioural level, almost 80% of participants improved their attitude towards the absurd ideas that formed their self-esteem by 90%.Conclusion: All who attended the program improved their attitude regarding their absurd ideas-beliefs, something that reduced person’s self-esteem, making further negative consequences for their psychosomatic health.

  8. Laughter and Stress Relief in Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study

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    S. H. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a therapeutic laughter program and the number of program sessions on anxiety, depression, and stress in breast cancer patients. A randomized controlled trial was conducted involving 31 patients who received four sessions of therapeutic laughter program comprised and 29 who were assigned to the no-program control group. Scores for anxiety, depression, and stress were measured using an 11-point numerical rating scale. While no change was detected in the control group, the program group reported reductions of 1.94, 1.84, and 2.06 points for anxiety, depression, and stress, respectively (p<0.01, p<0.01, and p<0.01. Scores decreased significantly after the first therapeutic laughter session (p<0.05, p<0.01, and p<0.01. As the therapeutic laughter program was effective after only a single session in reducing anxiety, depression, and stress in breast cancer patients, it could be recommended as a first-line complementary/alternative therapy.

  9. Laughter, Humor and Pain Perception in Children: A Pilot Study

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    Margaret Stuber

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there are many clinical programs designed to bring humor into pediatric hospitals, there has been very little research with children or adolescents concerning the specific utility of humor for children undergoing stressful or painful procedures. Rx Laughter™, a non-profit organization interested in the use of humor for healing, collaborated with UCLA to collect preliminary data on a sample of 18 children aged 7–16 years. Participants watched humorous video-tapes before, during and after a standardized pain task that involved placing a hand in cold water. Pain appraisal (ratings of pain severity and pain tolerance (submersion time were recorded and examined in relation to humor indicators (number of laughs/smiles during each video and child ratings of how funny the video was. Whereas humor indicators were not significantly associated with pain appraisal or tolerance, the group demonstrated significantly greater pain tolerance while viewing funny videos than when viewing the videos immediately before or after the cold-water task. The results suggest that humorous distraction is useful to help children and adolescents tolerate painful procedures. Further study is indicated to explore the specific mechanism of this benefit.

  10. Nanostructure of Human Aortic Intima in Atherosclerosis (A Pilot Study

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    A. M. Golubev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the nanostructure of human aortic intima in atherosclerosis and demonstrate the poten tial effect of Niodex on cholesterol plaques.Materials and methods. Samples of intima were taken from those parts of aorta, where different stages of atherosclerotic chages were obvious. Aortic samples were incubated in a solution containing cyclodextrins. A solution of NIODEX, a propylene glycol ester of betacyclodextrin, was used in the study. A layer of aortic intima was formed on the glass slide surface with polylysine. The samples were placed into the working area of an atomicforce microscope (Integra Prima, NTMDT, Russian Federation, and their surfaces were scanned. The number of imaging points was 512; and the imaging regions were as follows: 100100 μm, 20002000 nm.Results. Classification of nanosurface objects was performed and typical fragments (craters, ridges, and trabecular fibers were identified, and quantitative assessment of their sizes was carried out. 27 fragments were identified as growing cholesterol plaques. 16 of them measuring 900—1200 nm were identified near ridges, and 11 near craters (600—1050 nm. Niodex caused destruction of lipid spots and smoothing of the intima surface. More than a half of the 27 identified objects (15 demostrated a 30% and more decrease in size (median 340—400 nm. A 10—15% decrease was registered in 7 fragments; in the remaining 5 fragments, the decrease in the lesion size was less than 10%.Conclusion. Raw data permit to suppose that the effect of Niodex on the aortic intima results in decceleartion and decreased intensity of atherosclerotic plaque growth on the intima fragments.

  11. White matter integrity in kleptomania: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E.; Correia, Stephen; Brennan-Krohn, Thea

    2007-01-01

    This study's goal was to examine microstructural organization of frontal white matter in kleptomania. Ten females with DSM-IV kleptomania and 10 female controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging. Inferior frontal white matter was the a priori region of interest. Trace and fractional anisotropy (FA) were also calculated for frontal and posterior cortical regions in both subject groups. Kleptomania subjects had significantly higher mean frontal Trace, and significantly lower mean frontal FA than control subjects. Group differences remained significant when right and left frontal Trace and FA were analyzed. Groups did not differ significantly in posterior Trace or FA. Kleptomania may be associated with decreased white matter microstructural integrity in inferior frontal brain regions. PMID:16956753

  12. STUDY OF LIPID PROFILE IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE PATIENTS UNDERGOING HAEMODIALYSIS: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

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    Sreenivasulu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic renal failure (CRF is decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR to 3 consecut ive months with multiple etiologies. CRF results in profound lipid disorder which stems largely from dysregulation of high density lipoproteins (HDL & triglyceride - rich lipoprotein metabolism. Many a time CRF patients live on hemodialysis on regular basis . Present study was done to know whether hemodialysis has any impact on the lipid profile of the CRF patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Study were divided into 7 groups, Group - 1: healthy controls (40, Group - 2: CRF patients who never undergone hemodialysis (40, Group - 3: CRF patients on hemodialysis (40, Group - 4: Healthy males (28, Group - 5: Healthy females (12, Group - 6: males with chronic renal failure (28, Group - 7: females with chronic renal failure (12. Sample analysed for high density lipoproteins (H DL, low density lipoproteins (LDL & very low density lipoproteins (VLDL. RESULTS: Among the various parameters tested triglyceride and VLDL levels were significantly higher in group - 2 and3 as compared to controls (p<0.0001. HDL levels were significant ly lower in group - 2 compared to Group - 1(p <0.0001. HDL level was found reduced in group - 3 as compare to Group - 2(p=0.0035. There was no significant change (p=0.132 observed in total cholesterol between healthy controls and CRF patients with hemodialysis. There is a significant change (p=0.0309 observed in LDL - c between CRF patients and controls and no significant change observed (P=0.6070 between Group - 2 and Group - 3. CONCLUSION: CRF patients are at risk of cardiovascular diseases due to the elevation of various forms of lipids. Prescribing lipid lowering treatment in CRF patients with dyslipidemias for preventing future episode of cardiovascular events and will a lso preserve renal function.

  13. HLA and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Susceptibility: A Pilot Study

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    Gustavo Rocha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little data on the association between Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA alleles and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD of the preterm newborn. Our aim was to assess associations between HLA alleles and BPD susceptibility. We studied 156 preterm neonates (82 M/74 F < 32 weeks gestational age, alive at 36 weeks gestational age. Detailed clinical data were collected. HLA typing was performed by PCR-SSO. HLA allele frequencies where determined by direct counting for BPD and no-BPD groups. Comparison between BPD and no BPD groups was performed using t-test, χ2 test or Fisher exact test and logistic regression as appropriate. Relative risks (RR and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were also calculated as association measures. We diagnosed 56 (35.9% neonates with mild BPD and 27 (17% with moderate/severe BPD. We found a significant association between HLA-DRB1*01 and mild BPD (OR=3.48[1.23–10.2]. The alleles HLA-A*24, -A*68, -B*51,-Cw*07, -Cw*14, -Cw*15 and -DRB1*01 presented a significant association with moderate/severe BPD. When adjusted to gestational age and birth weight HLA-A*68 (OR=5.41[1.46; 20.05], -B*51 (OR=3.09[1.11; 8.63] and -Cw*14 (OR=4.94[1.15; 21.25] were significantly associated with moderate/severe BPD. Conclusion – Our findings suggest an association between HLA-A*68, -B*51 and -C*14 and BPD susceptibility, and that an autoimmune mechanism may be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  14. Local heat preconditioning in skin sparing mastectomy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saahil; Rolph, Rachel; Cornelius, Victoria; Harder, Yves; Farhadi, Jian

    2013-12-01

    Experimental data has shown an association with a reduction of flap necrosis after local heat-application to a supraphysiological level resulting from the up-regulation of heat shock proteins, such as HSP-32. The proteins maintained capillary perfusion and increased tissue tolerance to ischaemia. The purpose of this translational study was to evaluate the effect of local heat preconditioning before skin sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. A prospective non-randomised trial was performed from July 2009-April 2010. 50 consecutive patients at risk of skin flap necrosis (BMI >30, sternal-to-nipple distance>26 cm or breast size>C-cup) were included. Twenty-five patients were asked to heat-precondition their breast 24-h prior to surgery using a hot water bottle with a water temperature of 43 °C (thermometers provided), in three 30-min cycles interrupted by spontaneous cooling to room temperature. Skin flap necrosis was defined by the need for surgical debridement. LDI images were taken pre- and post-mastectomy to demonstrate an increase in tissue vascularity. 36% of women (n=25) without local heat-treatment developed skin flap necrosis, 12% developed skin flap necrosis in the treatment group, resulting in a 24% difference (n=25; p=0.047 (95%CI 1%-47%)). LDI scanning of the heated breast demonstrated an increase in vascularity compared to the contralateral non-heated breast. Median length of inpatient stay for treatment group was 4 days (95%CI(4, 7)), controls 8 days (95%CI(8, 9) (p=mastectomy. ACTRN12612001197820. II. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Brain type carnosinase in dementia: a pilot study

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    Papaioannou Alexandra

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathological processes underlying dementia are poorly understood and so are the markers which identify them. Carnosinase is a dipeptidase found almost exclusively in brain and serum. Carnosinase and its substrate carnosine have been linked to neuropathophysiological processes. Methods Carnosinase activity was measured by a flourometric method in 37 patients attending a Geriatric Outpatient Clinic. There were 17 patients without dementia, 13 had Alzheimer's disease (AD and 7 had mixed dementia (MD. Results The range of serum carnosinase activity for patients without dementia was 14.5 – 78.5 μmol/ml/h. There was no difference in carnosinase activity between patients without dementia (40.3 ± 15.2 μmol/ml/h and patients with AD (44.4 ± 12.4 μmol/ml/h or MD (26.6 ± 15 μmol/ml/h. However, levels in the MD group were significantly lower than the AD group (p = 0.01. This difference remained significant after adjusting for gender, MMSE score, exercise, but not age, one at a time and all combined. The effect of other medical conditions did not remove the significance between the AD and MD groups. The MD group, but not the AD group, demonstrated a significant trend with carnosinase activity decreasing with duration of disease (from first recorded date of diagnosis to date of blood collection (r = -0.76, p = 0.049. There was no association with carnosinase activity and MMSE score in the AD or MD group. Both AD and MD patients on any dementia medication (donepezil, galantamine, memantine had higher carnosinase activity compared to those not taking a dementia medication. Carnosinase activity was higher in patients who regularly exercised (n = 20 compared to those who did not exercise regularly (n = 17(p = 0.006. Conclusion This exploratory study has shown altered activities of the enzyme carnosinase in patients with dementia.

  16. The development of an educational intervention to address workplace bullying: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Esther Maria; McRury, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of research on workplace bullying which addresses the detrimental consequences of bullying in nursing has emerged. This quasi-experimental pilot study was aimed at examining the effect of an educational program provided to nursing staff on workplace bullying. The development of an educational program and use of a registered nurse educator in a group setting is an effective method for addressing workplace bullying.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnoea among professional taxi drivers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Ridvan Tua; Mihaere, Kara; Gander, Philippa H

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the distribution of risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) among taxi drivers, and to investigate differences by ethnicity in OSAS symptoms among drivers. A two-page postal questionnaire was completed by 241 professional taxi drivers from Wellington, New Zealand. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome was defined as having an estimated 15 or more respiratory disturbances, per hour of sleep (Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI)> or =15) and self-reported daytime sleepiness. Pacific and Māori taxi drivers were more likely to have symptoms and risk factors for OSAS, compared to non-Māori non-Pacific drivers. In particular, Pacific drivers had a significantly increased pre-test probability of having moderate-severe OSA (RDI> or =15). Some professional taxi drivers are at increased risk for moderate-severe OSAS, especially Pacific and Māori taxi drivers. Untreated OSAS increases motor vehicle crash risk, so these findings have implications for the health and safety of drivers and their passengers. They suggest a need for more comprehensive research to guide policy on medical examinations required for licensing professional drivers as fit to drive.

  18. CT-guided suprascapular nerve blocks: a pilot study

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    Schneider-Kolsky, M.E.; Pike, J.; Connell, D.A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Victoria House Private Hospital, 316 Malvern Road, Prahran 3181, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the suprascapular nerve block using CT guidance and to evaluate the short- and medium-term efficacy in a range of shoulder pathologies. CT-guided infiltration around the suprascapular nerve was performed with bupivacaine and Celestone Chronodose on 40 consecutive patients presenting with chronic shoulder pathologies unresponsive to conventional treatment. Patients were interviewed using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) before the procedure, 30 min after the procedure and at 3 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks afterwards. Within 30 min of the block overall pain scores decreased from a mean ({+-}SEM) pain score of 7.0 ({+-}0.4) to 3.5 ({+-}0.5) (n=39, P<0.001). At 3 days after the procedure, the mean overall improvement of the pain and disability scores were 20.4% ({+-}4.9, P<0.001) and 16.8% ({+-}4.8, P=0.004) respectively. Sustained pain relief and reduced disability were achieved in 10 of 35 (29%) patients at 3 weeks and longer. Patients suffering from soft tissue pathologies were the most likely patients to benefit from the injection. No serious side effects were noted. In some patients with chronic soft tissue pathologies who do not respond to conventional treatment, a CT-guided suprascapular nerve block can provide safe short- and medium-term relief from pain and disability. (orig.)

  19. A pilot study of palliative medicine fellows' hospice home visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Laura K; Aktas, Aynur; Walsh, Declan; Hullihen, Barbara; Khan, Mohammed I Ahmed; Russell, Kraig M; Davis, Mellar P; Lagman, Ruth; LeGrand, Susan

    2012-12-01

    This was a prospective descriptive study of hospice physician home visits (HVs) conducted by Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellows. Our objectives were 1) to improve our knowledge of hospice care at home by describing physician HVs 2) to identify the indications for physician HVs and the problems addressed during the HV. Data was collected on 58 consecutive patients using a standardized form completed before and after the home visit. More than half of the persons were women. Most were Caucasian. Median age was 75 years; 57% had cancer; 77% were do-not-resuscitate. 76% HV occurred in the home. The median visit duration was 60 minutes; median travel distance and time 25 miles and 42 minutes, respectively. A hospice nurse case manager was present in 95%. The most common issues addressed during HVs were: health education, symptom management, and psychosocial support. Medication review was prominent. Physicians identified previously unreported issues. Symptom control was usually pain, although 27 symptoms were identified. Medications were important; all home visits included drug review and two thirds drug change. Physicians had unique responsibilities and identified important issues in the HV. Physicians provided both education and symptom management. Physician HVs are an important intervention. HVs were important in continuity of care, however, time-consuming, and incurred considerable travel, and professional time and costs.

  20. Human Microbiota of the Argentine Population- A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonetto, Belén; Fabbro, Mónica C.; Sciara, Mariela; Seravalle, Analía; Méjico, Guadalupe; Revale, Santiago; Romero, María S.; Brun, Bianca; Fay, Marcelo; Fay, Fabián; Vazquez, Martin P.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiota is the collection of microorganisms living in or on the human body. An imbalance or dysbiosis in these microbial communities can be associated with a wide variety of human diseases (Petersen and Round, 2014; Pham and Lawley, 2014; Zaura et al., 2014). Moreover, when the microbiota of the same body sites is compared between different healthy individuals, specific microbial community features are apparent (Li et al., 2012; Yatsunenko et al., 2012; Oh et al., 2014; Relman, 2015). In addition, specific selective pressures are found at distinct body sites leading to different patterns in microbial community structure and composition (Costello et al., 2009; Consortium, 2012b; Zhou et al., 2013). Because of these natural variations, a comprehensive characterization of the healthy microbiota is critical for predicting alterations related to diseases. This characterization should be based on a broad healthy population over time, geography, and culture (Yatsunenko et al., 2012; Shetty et al., 2013; Leung et al., 2015; Ross et al., 2015). The study of healthy individuals representing different ages, cultural traditions, and ethnic origins will enable to understand how the associated microbiota varies between populations and respond to different lifestyles. It is important to address these natural variations in order to later detect variations related to disease. PMID:26870014

  1. A new test apparatus for studying the failure process during loading experiments of snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Achille; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2016-04-01

    We developed a new apparatus for fully load-controlled snow failure experiments. The deformation and applied load are measured with two displacement and two force sensors, respectively. The loading experiments are recorded with a high speed camera, and the local strain is derived by a particle image velocimetry (PIV) algorithm. To monitor the progressive failure process within the snow sample, our apparatus includes six piezoelectric transducers that record the acoustic emissions in the ultrasonic range. The six sensors allow localizing the sources of the acoustic emissions, i.e. where the failure process starts and how it develops with time towards catastrophic failure. The quadratic snow samples have a side length of 50 cm and a height of 10 to 20 cm. With an area of 0.25 m2 they are clearly larger than samples used in previous experiments. The size of the samples, which is comparable to the critical size for the onset of crack propagation leading to dry-snow slab avalanche release, allows studying the failure nucleation process and its relation to the spatial distribution of the recorded acoustic emissions. Furthermore the occurrence of features in the acoustic emissions typical for imminent failure of the samples can be analysed. We present preliminary results of the acoustic emissions recorded during tests with homogeneous as well as layered snow samples, including a weak layer, for varying loading rates and loading angles.

  2. Digital Family History Data Mining with Neural Networks: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Robert; Linnville, Steven; Thaler, Stephen; Moore, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Following the passage of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, electronic health records were widely adopted by eligible physicians and hospitals in the United States. Stage 2 meaningful use menu objectives include a digital family history but no stipulation as to how that information should be used. A variety of data mining techniques now exist for these data, which include artificial neural networks (ANNs) for supervised or unsupervised machine learning. In this pilot study, we applied an ANN-based simulation to a previously reported digital family history to mine the database for trends. A graphical user interface was created to display the input of multiple conditions in the parents and output as the likelihood of diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease in male and female offspring. The results of this pilot study show promise in using ANNs to data mine digital family histories for clinical and research purposes. PMID:26903781

  3. A pilot study: mindfulness meditation intervention in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roxane Raffin; Giardino, Nicholas; Larson, Janet L

    2015-01-01

    Living well with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires people to manage disease-related symptoms in order to participate in activities of daily living. Mindfulness practice is an intervention that has been shown to reduce symptoms of chronic disease and improve accurate symptom assessment, both of which could result in improved disease management and increased wellness for people with COPD. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate an 8-week mindful meditation intervention program tailored for the COPD population and explore the use of breathing timing parameters as a possible physiological measure of meditation uptake. Results demonstrated that those randomized to the mindful meditation intervention group (N=19) had a significant increase in respiratory rate over time as compared to those randomized to the wait-list group (N=22) (P=0.045). It was also found that the mindful meditation intervention group demonstrated a significant decrease in level of mindfulness over time as compared to the wait-list group (P=0.023). When examining participants from the mindful meditation intervention who had completed six or more classes, it was found that respiratory rate did not significantly increase in comparison to the wait-list group. Furthermore, those who completed six or more classes (N=12) demonstrated significant improvement in emotional function in comparison to the wait-list group (P=0.032) even though their level of mindfulness did not improve. This study identifies that there may be a complex relationship between breathing parameters, emotion, and mindfulness in the COPD population. The results describe good feasibility and acceptability for meditation interventions in the COPD population.

  4. Celebrating the end of school life: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Alison; Roderick, Allison; Munt, Rebecca; Mayner, Lidia; Kako, Mayumi; Arbon, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Celebrating the end of secondary schooling ("Schoolies Festival") is an established part of the school culture in Australia, with thousands of young students converging at beachside locations to celebrate this rite of passage. The aim of this study was to identify what young people believe is important to remain safe and healthy at this mass-gathering event. This study was conducted using postcard surveys requesting demographic data and responses to the questions: (1) What do you think is important to stay safe and healthy at this event?; (2) What do you think is risky attending this event?; (3) Which of these is most likely to affect you at this event?; and (4) Where would you seek medical support? The surveys were distributed to attendees of a "Schoolies Festival" in Adelaide, Australia in 2008. One hundred sixty-five of the 300 postcards were returned completed. The average age of the respondents was 17.7 years. "Not using drugs" was considered important to staying safe and healthy by 120 (73%) of respondents; "drinking alcohol responsibly" was considered important by 89 (54%); and "violent behavior" and "exposure to illicit drugs" were identified as important risks by 135 (82%) and 98 (59%) of participants, respectively. Only 35 (21%) of respondents indicated that they would seek on-site health care if needed. Young people attending mass-gathering celebrations have valid concerns about drinking responsibly, exposure to illicit drugs, and sexual harassment. Health messages or health promotion strategies aimed at their specific concerns would be helpful in the mitigation of illness or injury at such events.

  5. Search moves and tactics for image retrieval in the field of journalism: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Youn Hung

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available People engage in multiple types of information-seeking strategies within an information-seeking episode. The objective of this pilot study is to investigate search moves and tactics made by end-users when searching for visual information. The pilot study involves 5 undergraduate students from the Department of Journalism and Media Studies at Rutgers University using the AccuNet/AP Photo Archive to retrieve specific, general, and subjective photos. Data were collected through think-aloud protocols and transaction logs. The results outline an overall picture of the five searchers’ image searching behavior in the field of journalism and show that there is a connection between the types of images searched and the patterns of search moves and tactics employed by the searchers.

  6. Eye movement desensitization in fibromyalgia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Fred

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of eye movement desensitization (EMD) for the relief of pain, fatigue and anxiety and depression in fibromyalgia patients. Six Caucasian female patients (mean age=43.2 yr) participated in two treatment sessions. Outcome assessments included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Fatigue Scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Beck Depression Inventory. In-session process measures included thermal biofeedback monitoring and subjective units of discomfort ratings of pain, stress, and fatigue. Four out of six subjects were considered treatment responders. Thermal biofeedback monitoring revealed an average increase in hand temperature of 5.4 degrees indicating a relaxation effect. At treatment termination, average scores decreased on the measures of anxiety (28.6%), depression (29.9%), fibromyalgia impact (12.6%), and fatigue (11.5%). At the 3-month follow-up assessment, total reductions in average scores from pre-treatment baseline reflected further improvements on measures of anxiety (45.8%), depression (31.6%), fibromyalgia impact (19.2%), and fatigue (26.7%). Because EMD produced a somewhat automatic relaxation response with minimal patient participation, it may be especially useful when standard relaxation techniques fail.

  7. Weight gain following spinal cord injury: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Deborah A.; Little, James W.; Burns, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Study design Retrospective chart review. Objective To define the temporal course of weight gain in persons with new spinal cord injury (SCI), and to identify predictors of weight gain in this population. Setting A United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) SCI Unit. Methods A retrospective chart review in a VA SCI Unit was conducted. Participants (n = 85) included all persons with new SCI completing initial rehabilitation at the center between 1998 and 2006. Outcome measures were mean change in body mass index (BMI) between rehabilitation admission and final follow-up, time of greatest BMI change, and distribution of participants by BMI classification. These measures were also examined relative to SCI level, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade, primary mode of mobility, and age at rehabilitation admission. Results Mean BMI increased by 2.3 kg/m2 between rehabilitation admission (mean 45 days post-injury) and final follow-up (mean 5 years post-injury). The distribution of participants shifted from lower BMI classifications at rehabilitation admission to higher BMI classifications at final follow-up. For participants transitioning from normal to overweight or obese, the greatest increase occurred during the first year after acute rehabilitation. Neurological level, impairment category, primary mode of mobility, and age at rehabilitation admission did not significantly predict BMI change. BMI at rehabilitation admission correlated significantly with BMI at final follow-up (P < 0.0005). Conclusions These findings confirm a significant increase in BMI after new SCI and suggest that persons with new SCI are at greatest weight gain risk during the first year following acute rehabilitation. PMID:21675361

  8. Intracanal use of heated rinsing solutions: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, David; Raab, Wolfgang H-M; Martin, Evelyn; Keppel, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The tissue-dissolving and bactericidal activity of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) can be increased by warming the NaOCl solution without concurrently increasing its toxicity. The present study was set up to determine if and to what extent a heated liquid reaches the apical region. A temperature sensor was introduced from the apical aspect into a human canine 22 mm in length prepared to size 40.04. At 37°C in the incubator the canal was irrigated with water 10 times each at temperatures of 10°C, 21°C, 45°C, 60°C, and 37°C (control group). The apical temperature curve was recorded with a one-second resolution from the time the irrigation started until at least 2 minutes after its end. None of the measurements yielded the same temperature in the apical region as that of the coronally introduced liquid. At 60°C, a maximum value of 52.2°C ± 1.39°C, and at 10°C, a minimum value of 16.09°C ± 0.39°C, was achieved apically. At 1 minute after the end of active rinse cycle, the temperature at the apical probe differed only 4.8°C to 0.9°C ± 1.41°C from the initial value (about 37°C). Only with the cold 10°C solution was the temperature difference higher, at 7.5°C ± 2.14°C. The benefit of heating irrigants accrues primarily during the period of active rinsing; immediately after the end of the rinsing cycle, body temperature is reached again. A positive aspect to be noted is that an irrigant stored at room temperature is quickly warmed to 37°C in the root canal by the temperature of the body.

  9. Success and Failures of Acquisitions: A Case Study for a Chemical Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shainaaz MOOSA MUSTAFFA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to perform a universal inspection of the processes adopted in acquisitions by concentrating on attributes which are speedily implemented in the industry. The approach to this research study was based on literature reviews to gain knowledge on the causes of failure and the factors attributed to the success of acquisitions in the case study concerning a chemical company. This method was applied to identify if the failures and successes researched are shown in the case study. The research study firstly looked at various approaches to acquisitions, namely, the pre-acquisition, post-acquisition and integration phases together with the motives for acquisitions. The study delves further into factors influencing the failures and successes of acquisitions. A notable body of research was consulted to focus on these factors. The research study highlights a framework incorporating the management of post-integration strategy concurrently with the people and the organisational goals. The key findings showed that the company lacked a formal integration plan, cultural integration, ad proper communication plans. This resulted in staff unrest and high attrition of staff from deal announcement date up to post integration, leading to high resistance from staff and poor people integration. The company did however achieve financial success through synergy realisation. This positive outcome could have been achieved quicker with the proper integration plans within the different phases of the acquisition. The knowledge attained from this study will hopefully add to the body of knowledge on acquisitions.

  10. Matching profiles of masked perpetrators: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Bojesen, Sophie; Kuhlman, Michael Bilde

    2010-01-01

    indicate the possible matches, and perhaps even the best match, which may be helpful in police investigations, but it would not carry enough weight to be used as evidence per se. This study only focused on the profile. Future studies will use surface laser scans to analyse congruence between masked...

  11. Supporting Caregivers of Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Smartphone App: A Pilot Study of Usability and Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingting; Yao, Nengliang; Shen, Min; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yanyan; Geng, Zhaohui; Yuan, Changrong

    2016-11-01

    Smartphone applications are widely used for self-help interventions in adult cancer survivors. However, applications for parents of pediatric cancer patients are limited. We developed an applications to assist parents of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The aim of this study is to evaluate the app's usability and effectiveness in a preliminary way. A stepwise approach and mixed methods were used. The application was initially tested by healthcare providers, and their comments and suggestions were used to develop an updated version. This version was tested by parents of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Comments and nonverbal expressions of parents were recorded during a 2-week pilot test. The qualitative study was followed by a quantitative study using audit log data from the administration portal to understand how parents use the application. Six healthcare providers and 15 parents participated. Parents gained a greater knowledge of leukemia, confidence in caregiving, social support, and information on how to reduce stress. Over usability was rated as stable, useful, simple, and self-explanatory. No software failure occurred. Applications have the potential to support caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. We plan to address limitations and perform an empirical interventional study to examine its clinical effectiveness.

  12. Medical educators working abroad: a pilot study of educators' experiences in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle; McKimm, Judy; Major, Stella

    2014-09-01

    Medical education is now a global enterprise, with many medical educators working internationally, either for short or longer periods or even permanently. In parallel, many medical schools are now involved in collaborations and partnerships with schools in other countries. With this in mind, we set out to explore what motivates, supports and inhibits medical educators who wish to or might work outside their "home country". This article reports on the pilot stage (in specific organizational contexts in Middle East) of a longitudinal project aimed at canvassing medical educators on a broader global scale, using reflective accounts and a questionnaire survey. The findings from this pilot study raise interesting issues about the lived experience of medical educators who have chosen to work in a different culture from their own. Respondents identify many advantages around skills, personal and professional development. Three main issues emerged in terms of educators' experiences: the academic environment, medical practice in a different cultural context and personal matters. Adapting to the local culture, gender segregation and the impact on learning and teaching was an overarching factor. We introduce an explanatory framework to explain the development of international educator identity, a cyclical process in which, through experiences and reflection, individual world views and perspectives are continually modified and developed. This pilot study tested the methodologies and developed a new conceptual model that will be used in a wider study across different cultures.

  13. Pharmaceuticals Safety Practices-A Comparative Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Kamilia A.; Jabeen, Arshia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The safety of medicine is essential for the safety of patients. Inappropriate drug storage, expiration dates, sharing prescription drugs, self medication habits and misuse of some drugs are contributing factors affecting medication safety. One or more of these factors may lead to serious health complications and even death. Objectives The purpose of this study was to highlight the common errors and pharmaceutical malpractices that people usually engage in on a daily basis and to correlate these to culture, gender and educational levels. This may spread awareness in an easy and understandable manner and provide certain guidelines to drug consumers ensuring that pharmaceutical preparations are used correctly and safely. Methods Two hundred questionnaires were randomly distributed in two countries; Saudi Arabia and India. The collected data were statistically analyzed. Outcomes and conclusion Results showed that alarming percentages of various participants were using pharmaceuticals inappropriately due to carelessness, unawareness or intentional mistakes. Therefore, active participation by health care professionals is essential for the prevention of drug misuse. Increasing population awareness about self medication, products expiration, pharmaceuticals labels and optimum storage conditions would minimize the adverse effects and may even be life saving. PMID:24533025

  14. Wearable Sensors in Huntington Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Kelly L; Dowling, Ariel V; Stamler, David; Felong, Timothy J; Harris, Denzil A; Wong, Cynthia; Cai, Hang; Reilmann, Ralf; Little, Max A; Gwin, Joseph T; Biglan, Kevin M; Dorsey, E Ray

    2016-06-18

    The Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) is the principal means of assessing motor impairment in Huntington disease but is subjective and generally limited to in-clinic assessments. To evaluate the feasibility and ability of wearable sensors to measure motor impairment in individuals with Huntington disease in the clinic and at home. Participants with Huntington disease and controls were asked to wear five accelerometer-based sensors attached to the chest and each limb for standardized, in-clinic assessments and for one day at home. A second chest sensor was worn for six additional days at home. Gait measures were compared between controls, participants with Huntington disease, and participants with Huntington disease grouped by UHDRS total motor score using Cohen's d values. Fifteen individuals with Huntington disease and five controls completed the study. Sensor data were successfully captured from 18 of the 20 participants at home. In the clinic, the standard deviation of step time (time between consecutive steps) was increased in Huntington disease (p Huntington disease, and participants with Huntington disease grouped by motor impairment.

  15. Flash flood hazard mapping: a pilot case study in Xiapu River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-wei Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flash flood hazard mapping is a supporting component of non-structural measures for flash flood prevention. Pilot case studies are necessary to develop more practicable methods for the technical support systems of flash flood hazard mapping. In this study, the headwater catchment of the Xiapu River Basin in central China was selected as a pilot study area for flash flood hazard mapping. A conceptual distributed hydrological model was developed for flood calculation based on the framework of the Xinanjiang model, which is widely used in humid and semi-humid regions in China. The developed model employs the geomorphological unit hydrograph method, which is extremely valuable when simulating the overland flow process in ungauged catchments, as compared with the original Xinanjiang model. The model was tested in the pilot study area, and the results agree with the measured data on the whole. After calibration and validation, the model is shown to be a useful tool for flash flood calculation. A practicable method for flash flood hazard mapping using the calculated peak discharge and digital elevation model data was presented, and three levels of flood hazards were classified. The resulting flash flood hazard maps indicate that the method successfully predicts the spatial distribution of flash flood hazards, and it can meet the current requirements in China.

  16. Increased gut microbiota diversity and abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia after fasting: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Remely, Marlene; Hippe, Berit; Geretschlaeger, Isabella; Stegmayer, Sonja; Hoefinger, Ingrid; Haslberger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background An impaired gut microbiota has been reported as an important factor in the pathogenesis of obesity. Weight reduction has already been mentioned to improve gut microbial subpopulations involved in inflammatory processes, though other subpopulations still need further investigation. Thus, weight reduction in the context of a fasting program together with a probiotic intervention may improve the abundance and diversity of gut microbiota. Methods In this pilot study, overweight...

  17. Consumer behaviour towards organic, natural and conventional skin care products: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Alina-Aida Drăgan; Dacinia-Crina Petrescu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study is to outline consumers’ profile in terms of their interest in organic, natural and conventional skin care, their knowledge about these products and the differences between them, their opinion regarding the performance and price of organic skin care in relation to conventional skin care. The survey used a self-administered questionnaire and was conducted on a sample of 86 customers from Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The results indicate that consumers who pu...

  18. Using Systems Thinking to Promote Interdisciplinary Outcomes: A Pilot Study in Land Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, Leah Greden; Jones, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Systems thinking is a tool that can be used by faculty to facilitate the exercise of integration while promoting critical thinking in the classroom, which is hypothesized to improve student learning. This paper describes a pilot study undertaken in 2003 in an undergraduate economics course. The paper reflects on the experiences incorporating the use of systems thinking to improve interdisciplinary learning from both the learner and teacher perspective.

  19. Exploring the Limits of Trigonometric Functions: Results and Reflections from a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yiu-Kwong; Poon, Kin-Keung

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report a pilot study on engaging a group of undergraduate students to explore the limits of sin(x)/x and tan(x)/x as x approaches to 0, with the use of non-graphic scientific calculators. By comparing the results in the pretest and the post-test, we found that the students had improvements in the tested items, which involved the…

  20. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) & cervical intraepithelial neoplasia - A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Neerja Bhatla; Kriti Puri; Elizabeth Joseph; Alka Kriplani; Venkateswaran K. Iyer; Sreenivas, V

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the necessary cause of cervical cancer and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is considered a potential cofactor in the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The objective of this pilot study was to determine the association of CT infection with HPV, other risk factors for cervical cancer, and CIN in symptomatic women. Methods: A total of 600 consecutively selected women aged 30-74 yr with persistent vaginal discharge, inter...