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Sample records for failure trial tac-hft

  1. Acute Heart Failure | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available r investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Heart Failure MedDRA Classification E.1.3...in one hour of admission to ICU.3. Signed informed consent E.4Principal exclusion criteria 1. Age less than 18 years.2. Acute...y with Trimetazidine in Acute heart failure: an open pilot randomized trial (The METTA – PRAGUE 10 Trial) A....e ConcernedCzech Republic - SUKL A.2EudraCT number2007-002893-76 A.3Full title of the trial MEtabolic Therap

  2. Acute liver failure | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nvestigation E.1.2Version 14.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10049844 E.1.2Term Acute liver failur...n(s) being investigated Acute liver failure MedDRA Classification E.1.2 Medical condition or disease under i... General Information on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical conditio

  3. Clinical outcome endpoints in heart failure trials : a European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association consensus document

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, Faiez; Garcia, Angeles Alonso; Anker, Stefan D.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Calvo, Gonzalo; Cleland, John G. F.; Cohn, Jay N.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Domanski, Michael J.; Ekman, Inger; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Koglin, Joerg; Konstam, Marvin; Kupfer, Stuart; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Metra, Marco; Nowack, Christina; Pieske, Burkert; Pina, Ileana L.; Pocock, Stuart J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ruilope, Luis M.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Severin, Thomas; Solomon, Scott; Stein, Kenneth; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi; Voors, Adriaan A.; Wasserman, ScottM.; Woehrle, Holger; Zalewski, Andrew; McMurray, John J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Endpoint selection is a critically important step in clinical trial design. It poses major challenges for investigators, regulators, and study sponsors, and it also has important clinical and practical implications for physicians and patients. Clinical outcomes of interest in heart failure trials in

  4. Geographic variations in the PARADIGM-HF heart failure trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Martinez, Felipe; Jhund, Pardeep S; Arango, Juan Luis; Bĕlohlávek, Jan; Boytsov, Sergey; Cabrera, Walter; Gomez, Efrain; Hagège, Albert A; Huang, Jun; Kiatchoosakun, Songsak; Kim, Kee-Sik; Mendoza, Iván; Senni, Michele; Squire, Iain B; Vinereanu, Dragos; Wong, Raymond Ching-Chiew; Gong, Jianjian; Lefkowitz, Martin P; Rizkala, Adel R; Rouleau, Jean L; Shi, Victor C; Solomon, Scott D; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R; Packer, Milton; McMurray, John J V

    2016-11-01

    The globalization of clinical trials has highlighted geographic variations in patient characteristics, event rates, and treatment effects. We investigated these further in PARADIGM-HF, the largest and most globally representative trial in heart failure (HF) to date. We looked at five regions: North America (NA) 602 (8%), Western Europe (WE) 1680 (20%), Central/Eastern Europe/Russia (CEER) 2762 (33%), Latin America (LA) 1433 (17%), and Asia-Pacific (AP) 1487 (18%). Notable differences included: WE patients (mean age 68 years) and NA (65 years) were older than AP (58 years) and LA (63 years) and had more coronary disease; NA and CEER patients had the worst signs, symptoms, and functional status. North American patients were the most likely to have a defibrillating-device (54 vs. 2% AP) and least likely prescribed a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (36 vs. 65% LA). Other evidence-based therapies were used most frequently in NA and WE. Rates of the primary composite outcome of cardiovascular (CV) death or HF hospitalization (per 100 patient-years) varied among regions: NA 13.6 (95% CI 11.7-15.7) WE 9.6 (8.6-10.6), CEER 12.3 (11.4-13.2), LA 11.2 (10.0-12.5), and AP 12.5 (11.3-13.8). After adjustment for prognostic variables, relative to NA, the risk of CV death was higher in LA and AP and the risk of HF hospitalization lower in WE. The benefit of sacubitril/valsartan was consistent across regions. There were many regional differences in PARADIGM-HF, including in age, symptoms, comorbidity, background therapy, and event-rates, although these did not modify the benefit of sacubitril/valsartan. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01035255. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  5. An economic evaluation of rosuvastatin treatment in systolic heart failure : evidence from the CORONA trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorgelly, Paula K.; Briggs, Andrew H.; Wedel, Hans; Dunselman, Peter; Hjalmarson, Ake; Kjekshus, John; Waagstein, Finn; Wikstrand, John; Janosi, Andras; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Barrios, Vivencio; Fonseca, Candida; McMurray, John J. V.

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of 10 mg rosuvastatin daily for older patients with systolic heart failure in the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Study in Heart Failure (CORONA) trial. This within trial analysis of CORONA used major cardiovascular (CV) events as the outcome measure. Resourc

  6. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.

    2008-01-01

    led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...... of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has...

  7. Misoprostol versus curettage in women with early pregnancy failure after initial expectant management : a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graziosi, GCM; Mol, BWJ; Reuwer, PJH; Drogtrop, A; Bruinse, HW

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effectiveness of misoprostol treatment in women with early pregnancy failure who have been managed expectantly. We therefore performed a randomized trial on this subject. METHODS: Women with early pregnancy failure, who had been managed expectantly for at least

  8. Statins in heart failure: do we need another trial?

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsu KO; Kadirvelu A; Reidpath DD

    2013-01-01

    Kwadwo Osei Bonsu, Amudha Kadirvelu, Daniel Diamond ReidpathSchool of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Bandar Sunway, MalaysiaAbstract: Statins lower serum cholesterol and are employed for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Clinical evidence from observational studies, retrospective data, and post hoc analyses of data from large statin trials in various cardiovascular conditions, as well as small scale randomized trials, suggest survival a...

  9. A Randomized Trial of Heart Failure Disease Management in Skilled Nursing Facilities: Design and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Rebecca S.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Bodnar, Christine A.; Singer, Mendel E.; Albert, Jeffery M.; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart failure disease management can improve health outcomes for older community dwelling patients with heart failure. Heart failure disease management has not been studied in skilled nursing facilities, a major site of transitional care for older adults. Methods and Anticipated Results The objective of this trial is to investigate if a heart failure disease management program (HF-DMP) in skilled nursing facilities (SNF) will decrease all-cause rehospitalizations for the first 60 days post SNF admission. The trial is a randomized cluster trial to be conducted in 12 for-profit SNF in the greater Cleveland area. The study population is inclusive of patients with heart failure regardless of ejection fraction but excludes those patients on dialysis and with a life expectancy of 6 months or less. The HF-DMP includes 7 elements considered standard of care for patients with heart failure: documentation of left ventricular function, tracking of weight and symptoms, medication titration, discharge instructions, 7 day follow up appointment post SNF discharge, patient education. The HF-DMP is conducted by a research nurse tasked with adhering to each element of the program and regularly audited to maintain fidelity of the program. Additional outcomes include health status, self-care management, and discharge destination. Conclusion The SNF-Connect Trial is the first trial of its kind to assess if a HF-DMP will improve outcomes for patients in SNFs. This trial will provide evidence on the effectiveness of HF-DMP to improve outcomes for older frail heart failure patients undergoing post-acute rehabilitation. PMID:23871475

  10. Angiotensin receptor blockers in heart failure after the ELITE II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willenheimer Ronnie

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Specific blockers of the angiotensin type1 receptor, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, have been introduced as an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi for the treatment of heart failure. In comparison with ACEi, ARBs are better tolerated and have similar effects on haemodynamics, neurohormones and exercise capacity. Early studies have suggested that ARBs might have a superior effect on mortality. However, the first outcome trial, ELITE II (Losartan Heart Failure Survival Study, did not show any significant difference between losartan and captopril in terms of mortality or morbidity. This commentary outlines the role of ARBs in the treatment of heart failure.

  11. Acute Heart Failure | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available condition(s) being investigated Acute Heart Failure E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute...Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10000803 E.1.2Term Acute heart failure E.1.2System Organ Class 10007541 -

  12. Pilates in heart failure patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; d'Avila, Veridiana Moraes

    2012-12-01

    Conventional cardiac rehabilitation program consist of 15 min of warm-up, 30 min of aerobic exercise and followed by 15 min calisthenics exercise. The Pilates method has been increasingly applied for its therapeutic benefits, however little scientific evidence supports or rebukes its use as a treatment in patients with heart failure (HF). Investigate the effects of Pilates on exercise capacity variables in HF. Sixteen pts with HF, left ventricular ejection fraction 27 ± 14%, NYHA class I-II were randomly assigned to conventional cardiac rehabilitation program (n = 8) or mat Pilates training (n = 8) for 16 weeks of 30 min of aerobic exercise followed by 20 min of the specific program. At 16 weeks, pts in the mat Pilates group and conventional group showed significantly increase on exercise time 11.9 ± 2.5 to 17.8 ± 4 and 11.7 ± 3.9 to 14.2 ± 4 min, respectively. However, only the Pilates group increased significantly the ventilation (from 56 ± 20 to 69 ± 17 L/min, P = 0.02), peak VO(2) (from 20.9 ± 6 to 24.8 ± 6 mL/kg/min, P = 0.01), and O(2) pulse (from 11.9 ± 2 to 13.8 ± 3 mL/bpm, P = 0.003). The Pilates group showed significantly increase in peak VO(2) when compared with conventional group (24.8 ± 6 vs. 18.3 ± 4, P = 0.02). The result suggests that the Pilates method may be a beneficial adjunctive treatment that enhances functional capacity in patients with HF who are already receiving standard medical therapy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Relationship between angina pectoris and outcomes in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction : an analysis of the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badar, Athar A.; Perez-Moreno, Ana Cristina; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Wong, Chih M.; Hawkins, Nathaniel M.; Cleland, John G. F.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Wikstrand, John; Kjekshus, John; Wedel, Hans; Watkins, Stuart; Gardner, Roy S.; Petrie, Mark C.; McMurray, John J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Angina pectoris is common in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) but its relationship with outcomes has not been well defined. This relationship was investigated further in a retrospective analysis of the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure

  14. Reprioritization of failures in a system failure mode and effects analysis by decision making trial and evaluation laboratory technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyed-Hosseini, S.M. [Industrial Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: seyedhoseini@yahoo.com; Safaei, N. [Industrial Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: nimasafaei@iust.ac.ir; Asgharpour, M.J. [Industrial Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: asgharpour@iust.ac.ir

    2006-08-15

    In this paper an effective methodology related to decision making field has been developed for reprioritization of failure modes in a system Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for corrective actions. The proposed methodology can cover some of inherently shortcomings of conventional Risk Priority Number (RPN) method and like. The current prioritization methods have two main deficiencies as: they have not considered indirect relations between components and are deficient for systems with many subsystems or components. The proposed method called Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) is an effective approach for analyzing relation between components of a system in respect to its type (direct/indirect) and severity. The main advantages of DEMATEL are involving indirect relations in analyze, allocating as possible as unique ranks to alternatives and clustering alternatives in large systems. The demonstrated results have shown that DEMATEL method can be an efficient, complementary and confident approach for reprioritization of failure modes in a FMEA. For verification of proposed methodology, two illustrative practical examples are solved and obtained outcomes are reported.

  15. Sepsis/Acute renal failure | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Sepsis/Acute renal failure E.1.1.1Medical ...condition in easily understood language Sepsis /Acute Kidney failure E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Diseases [C] - ...l inclusion criteria Aged >18 years ITU stay > 12 hours – expected to stay for at least 3 daysHb less than 11.5 gm/dlAcute

  16. A randomized trial of heart failure disease management in skilled nursing facilities (SNF Connect): Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddato, Andrea; Wald, Heidi L; Horney, Carolyn; Fairclough, Diane L; Leister, Erin C; Coors, Marilyn; Capell, Warren H; Boxer, Rebecca S

    2017-06-01

    Conducting clinical trials in skilled nursing facilities is particularly challenging. This manuscript describes facility and patient recruitment challenges and solutions for clinical research in skilled nursing facilities. Lessons learned from the SNF Connect Trial, a randomized trial of a heart failure disease management versus usual care for patients with heart failure receiving post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities, are discussed. Description of the trial design and barriers to facility and patient recruitment along with regulatory issues are presented. The recruitment of Denver-metro skilled nursing facilities was facilitated by key stakeholders of the skilled nursing facilities community. However, there were still a number of barriers to facility recruitment including leadership turnover, varying policies regarding research, fear of litigation and of an increased workload. Engagement of facilities was facilitated by their strong interest in reducing hospital readmissions, marketing potential to hospitals, and heart failure management education for their staff. Recruitment of patients proved difficult and there were few facilitators. Identified patient recruitment challenges included patients being unaware of their heart failure diagnosis, patients overwhelmed with their illness and care, and frequently there was no available proxy for cognitively impaired patients. Flexibility in changing the recruitment approach and targeting skilled nursing facilities with higher rates of admissions helped to overcome some barriers. Recruitment of skilled nursing facilities and patients in skilled nursing facilities for clinical trials is challenging. Strategies to attract both facilities and patients are warranted. These include aligning study goals with facility incentives and flexible recruitment protocols to work with patients in "transition crisis."

  17. A systematic review of discontinued trials suggested that most reasons for recruitment failure were preventable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briel, Matthias; Olu, Kelechi Kalu; von Elm, Erik; Kasenda, Benjamin; Alturki, Reem; Agarwal, Arnav; Bhatnagar, Neera; Schandelmaier, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    To collect and classify reported reasons for recruitment failure in discontinued randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to assess reporting quality. We systematically searched MEDLINE and EMBASE (2010-2014) and a previous cohort of RCTs for published RCTs reporting trial discontinuation due to poor recruitment. Teams of two investigators selected eligible RCTs working independently and extracted information using standardized forms. We used an iterative approach to classify reasons for poor recruitment. We included 172 RCTs discontinued due to poor recruitment (including 26 conference abstracts and 63 industry-funded RCTs). Of those, 131 (76%) reported one or more reasons for discontinuation due to poor recruitment. We identified 28 different reasons for recruitment failure; most frequently mentioned were overestimation of prevalence of eligible participants and prejudiced views of recruiters and participants on trial interventions. Few RCTs reported relevant details about the recruitment process such as how eligible participants were identified, the number of patients assessed for eligibility, and who actually recruited participants. Our classification could serve as a checklist to assist investigators in the planning of RCTs. Most reasons for recruitment failure seem preventable with a pilot study that applies the planned informed consent procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Editor's Choice-Recent therapeutic trials on fluid removal and vasodilation in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennezat, Pierre V; Stewart, Merrill; Samson, Rohan; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Banfi, Carlo; Bouvaist, Hélène; Le Jemtel, Thierry H

    2016-02-01

    Recent therapeutic trials regarding the management of acute heart failure (AHF) failed to demonstrate the efficacy of newer therapeutic modalities and agents. Low- versus high-dose and continuous administration of furosemide were shown not to matter. Ultrafiltration was not found to be more efficacious than sophisticated diuretic therapy including dose-adjusted intravenous furosemide and metolazone. Dopamine and nesiritide were not shown to be superior to current therapy. Tezosentan and tovalptan had no effect on mortality. The development of rolofylline was terminated due to adverse effect (seizures). Lastly, preliminary experience with serelaxin indicates a mortality improvement at six months that remains to be confirmed. The disappointing findings of these recent trials may reflect the lack of efficacy of newer therapeutic modalities and agents. Alternatively the disappointing findings of these recent trials may be in part due to methodological issues. The AHF syndrome is complex with many clinical phenotypes. Failure to match clinical phenotypes and therapeutic modalities is likely to be partly responsible for the disappointing findings of recent AHF trials. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  19. Toward phase 4 trials in heart failure: A social and corporate responsibility of the medical profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Beneby, Glen S

    2015-12-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic condition, requiring polypharmacy, allied health supports and regular monitoring. All these factors are needed to ensure compliance and to deliver the positive outcomes demonstrated from randomized controlled trials. Unfortunately many centers around the world are unable to match trial level support. The outcomes for many communities are thus unclear. Research design factors in post-marketing surveillance to address this issue. Phase 4 studies is the name given to trials designed to obtain such community level data and thus address issues of external validity. CHF phase 4 studies are relatively underutilized. We feel the onus for this research lies with the health profession. In this commentary we provide arguments as to why phase 4 studies should be viewed as a social and corporate responsibility of health professional that care for clients with CHF.

  20. Screen failure data in clinical trials: Are screening logs worth it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elm, Jordan J; Palesch, Yuko; Easton, J Donald; Lindblad, Anne; Barsan, William; Silbergleit, Robert; Conwit, Robin; Dillon, Catherine; Farrant, Mary; Battenhouse, Holly; Perlmutter, Aaron; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2014-08-01

    Clinical trials frequently spend considerable effort to collect data on patients who were assessed for eligibility but not enrolled. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines' recommended flow diagram for randomized clinical trials reinforces the belief that the collection of screening data is a necessary and worthwhile endeavor. The rationale for collecting screening data includes scientific, trial management, and ethno-socio-cultural reasons. We posit that the cost of collecting screening data is not justified, in part due to inability to centrally monitor and verify the screening data in the same manner as other clinical trial data. To illustrate the effort and site-to-site variability, we analyzed the screening data from a multicenter, randomized clinical trial of patients with transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke (Platelet-Oriented Inhibition in New Transient Ischemic Attack and Minor Ischemic Stroke (POINT)). Data were collected on over 27,000 patients screened across 172 enrolling sites, 95% of whom were not enrolled. Although the rate of return of screen failure logs was high overall (95%), there were a considerable number of logs that were returned with 'no data to report' (23%), often due to administrative reasons rather than no patients screened. In spite of attempts to standardize the collection of screening data, due to differences in site processes, multicenter clinical trials face challenges in collecting those data completely and uniformly. The efforts required to centrally collect high-quality data on an extensive number of screened patients may outweigh the scientific value of the data. Moreover, the lack of a standardized definition of 'screened' and the challenges of collecting meaningful characteristics for patients who have not signed consent limits the ability to compare across studies and to assess generalizability and selection bias as intended. © The Author(s), 2014.

  1. Modelling of Safety Instrumented Systems by using Bernoulli trials: towards the notion of odds on for SIS failures analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauffriez, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling of a random failures process of a Safety Instrumented System (SIS). It aims to identify the expected number of failures for a SIS during its lifecycle. Indeed, the fact that the SIS is a system being tested periodically gives the idea to apply Bernoulli trials to characterize the random failure process of a SIS and thus to verify if the PFD (Probability of Failing Dangerously) experimentally obtained agrees with the theoretical one. Moreover, the notion of "odds on" found in Bernoulli theory allows engineers and scientists determining easily the ratio between “outcomes with success: failure of SIS” and “outcomes with unsuccess: no failure of SIS” and to confirm that SIS failures occur sporadically. A Stochastic P-temporised Petri net is proposed and serves as a reference model for describing the failure process of a 1oo1 SIS architecture. Simulations of this stochastic Petri net demonstrate that, during its lifecycle, the SIS is rarely in a state in which it cannot perform its mission. Experimental results are compared to Bernoulli trials in order to validate the powerfulness of Bernoulli trials for the modeling of the failures process of a SIS. The determination of the expected number of failures for a SIS during its lifecycle opens interesting research perspectives for engineers and scientists by completing the notion of PFD.

  2. New medicinal products for chronic heart failure: advances in clinical trial design and efficacy assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Martin R; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Alonso Garcia, Maria de Los Angeles; Anker, Stefan D; Baczynska, Anna; Bloomfield, Daniel M; Borentain, Maria; Bruins Slot, Karsten; Cronin, Maureen; Doevendans, Pieter A; El-Gazayerly, Amany; Gimpelewicz, Claudio; Honarpour, Narimon; Janmohamed, Salim; Janssen, Heidi; Kim, Albert M; Lautsch, Dominik; Laws, Ian; Lefkowitz, Martin; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Lyon, Alexander R; Malik, Fady I; McMurray, John J V; Metra, Marco; Figueroa Perez, Santiago; Pfeffer, Marc A; Pocock, Stuart J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Prasad, Krishna; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle; Roessig, Lothar; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Sherman, Warren; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Swedberg, Karl; Tyl, Benoit; Zannad, Faiez; Boulton, Caroline; De Graeff, Pieter

    2017-06-01

    Despite the availability of a number of different classes of therapeutic agents with proven efficacy in heart failure, the clinical course of heart failure patients is characterized by a reduction in life expectancy, a progressive decline in health-related quality of life and functional status, as well as a high risk of hospitalization. New approaches are needed to address the unmet medical needs of this patient population. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is undertaking a revision of its Guideline on Clinical Investigation of Medicinal Products for the Treatment of Chronic Heart Failure. The draft version of the Guideline was released for public consultation in January 2016. The Cardiovascular Round Table of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in partnership with the Heart Failure Association of the ESC, convened a dedicated two-day workshop to discuss three main topic areas of major interest in the field and addressed in this draft EMA guideline: (i) assessment of efficacy (i.e. endpoint selection and statistical analysis); (ii) clinical trial design (i.e. issues pertaining to patient population, optimal medical therapy, run-in period); and (iii) research approaches for testing novel therapeutic principles (i.e. cell therapy). This paper summarizes the key outputs from the workshop, reviews areas of expert consensus, and identifies gaps that require further research or discussion. Collaboration between regulators, industry, clinical trialists, cardiologists, health technology assessment bodies, payers, and patient organizations is critical to address the ongoing challenge of heart failure and to ensure the development and market access of new therapeutics in a scientifically robust, practical and safe way. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  3. Statin therapy and clinical outcomes in myocardial infarction patients complicated by acute heart failure : insights from the EPHESUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; Rossignol, Patrick; Murin, Jan; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Lamiral, Zohra; Krum, Henry; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    2013-01-01

    Several clinical trials have shown that in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), statin therapy improves cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, but in these trials patients with acute heart failure (HF) were excluded or only a few were included. In patients with chronic HF, statin therapy does not

  4. Mobile phone-based telemonitoring for heart failure management: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Emily; Leonard, Kevin J; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Barnsley, Jan; Masino, Caterina; Ross, Heather J

    2012-02-16

    Previous trials of telemonitoring for heart failure management have reported inconsistent results, largely due to diverse intervention and study designs. Mobile phones are becoming ubiquitous and economical, but the feasibility and efficacy of a mobile phone-based telemonitoring system have not been determined. The objective of this trial was to investigate the effects of a mobile phone-based telemonitoring system on heart failure management and outcomes. One hundred patients were recruited from a heart function clinic and randomized into telemonitoring and control groups. The telemonitoring group (N = 50) took daily weight and blood pressure readings and weekly single-lead ECGs, and answered daily symptom questions on a mobile phone over 6 months. Readings were automatically transmitted wirelessly to the mobile phone and then to data servers. Instructions were sent to the patients' mobile phones and alerts to a cardiologist's mobile phone as required. Baseline questionnaires were completed and returned by 94 patients, and 84 patients returned post-study questionnaires. About 70% of telemonitoring patients completed at least 80% of their possible daily readings. The change in quality of life from baseline to post-study, as measured with the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, was significantly greater for the telemonitoring group compared to the control group (P = .05). A between-group analysis also found greater post-study self-care maintenance (measured with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index) for the telemonitoring group (P = .03). Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels, self-care management, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved significantly for both groups from baseline to post-study, but did not show a between-group difference. However, a subgroup within-group analysis using the data from the 63 patients who had attended the heart function clinic for more than 6 months revealed the telemonitoring group had significant

  5. Breathing measurement reduces false-negative classification of tachypneic preextubation trial failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, C B; Kirton, O C; Morgan, J P; Hart, A M; Shatz, D V; Civetta, J M

    1996-06-01

    There is increased awareness of imposed work of breathing contributing to apparent ventilatory dependency. This study evaluates the impact of tachypnea as an indicator of ventilatory failure during a room air-5 cm H2O continuous positive airway pressure, spontaneous breathing, preextubation trial when associated with increased imposed work of breathing. Prospective, descriptive, 1-yr data collection. University hospital trauma intensive care unit (ICU). Mechanically ventilated trauma ICU patients surviving to discharge. Patients were weaned to minimal mechanical ventilator support and underwent a 20-min room air-continuous positive airway pressure preextubation trial (FIO2 = 0.21, continuous positive airway pressure = 5 cm H2O [0.5 kPa]). When passed (PaO2 >/= 55 torr [>/= 7.3 kPa], PaCO2 /= 7.35, respiratory rate 1.1 joule/L, imposed work of breathing was measured, and if residual "physiologic" work of breathing (patient work of breathing minus imposed work of breathing) was 30 breaths/min. Of these, 97 were successfully extubated despite tachypnea ranging from 32 to 56 breaths/min, when combined with either a patient work of breathing failure within 72 hours was 7.8% (8/105) in the tachypneaic group, compared with 7.9% (38/484) for those patients with a respiratory rate of

  6. Rationale and Design of the Reduce Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Patients With Heart Failure (Reduce LAP-HF) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasenfuss, Gerd; Gustafsson, Finn; Kaye, David

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is characterized by elevated left atrial pressure during rest and/or exercise. The Reduce LAP-HF (Reduce Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Patients With Heart Failure) trial will evaluate the safety and performance of the Interatrial...... include exercise tolerance, quality of life, and the incidence of heart failure hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Reduce LAP-HF is the first trial intended to lower left atrial pressure in HFpEF by means of creating a permanent shunt through the atrial septum with the use of a device. Although the trial...... patients with ejection fraction ≥40% and New York Heart Association functional class III or IV heart failure with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) ≥15 mm Hg at rest or ≥25 mm Hg during supine bike exercise will be implanted with an IASD System II, and followed for 6 months to assess the primary...

  7. Patient recruitment to a randomized clinical trial of behavioral therapy for chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendricks Ann M

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient recruitment is one of the most difficult aspects of clinical trials, especially for research involving elderly subjects. In this paper, we describe our experience with patient recruitment for the behavioral intervention randomized trial, "The relaxation response intervention for chronic heart failure (RRCHF." Particularly, we identify factors that, according to patient reports, motivated study participation. Methods The RRCHF was a three-armed, randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate the efficacy and cost of a 15-week relaxation response intervention on veterans with chronic heart failure. Patients from the Veterans Affairs (VA Boston Healthcare System in the United States were recruited in the clinic and by telephone. Patients' reasons for rejecting the study participation were recorded during the screening. A qualitative sub-study in the trial consisted of telephone interviews of participating patients about their experiences in the study. The qualitative study included the first 57 patients who completed the intervention and/or the first follow-up outcome measures. Factors that distinguished patients who consented from those who refused study participation were identified using a t-test or a chi-square test. The reason for study participation was abstracted from the qualitative interview. Results We successfully consented 134 patients, slightly more than our target number, in 27 months. Ninety-five of the consented patients enrolled in the study. The enrollment rate among the patients approached was 18% through clinic and 6% through telephone recruitment. The most commonly cited reason for declining study participation given by patients recruited in the clinic was 'Lives Too Far Away'; for patients recruited by telephone it was 'Not Interested in the Study'. One factor that significantly distinguished patients who consented from patients who declined was the distance between their residence and the study

  8. The Rationale and Design of the Surgical Treatment for IsChemic Heart failure (STICH) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Eric J.; Lee, Kerry L.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Oh, Jae K.; Bonow, Robert O.; Pohost, Gerald M.; Feldman, Arthur M.; Mark, Daniel B.; Panza, Julio A.; Sopko, George; Rouleau, Jean L.; Jones, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The rationale and design of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trial is described. Prior to STICH, <1000 ischemic cardiomyopathy patients had been studied in randomized comparisons of medical therapy (MED) versus coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Trial data reflect how these therapies were delivered over 20 years ago and do not indicate the relative benefits of MED versus CABG in contemporary practice. Methods Randomization of consenting patients with heart failure, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction ≤0.35, and coronary artery disease is based on whether patients are judged by attending physicians to be candidates only for CABG or for MED or CABG. Patients eligible for surgical ventricular reconstruction (SVR) due to significant anterior wall akinesis or dyskinesis, but ineligible for MED are randomly assigned to CABG with or without SVR. Patients eligible for MED are randomly assigned between MED only and MED with CABG. Patients eligible for all 3 are randomly assigned evenly to MED only, MED and CABG, or MED and CABG and SVR. Major substudies will examine quality of life, cost-effectiveness, changes in LV volumes, impact of myocardial viability, selected biomarkers, and selected polymorphisms on treatment differences Conclusions STICH is an NHLBI-funded multicenter international randomized trial addressing 2 specific primary hypotheses: 1) CABG with intensive MED improves long-term survival compared with MED alone; and 2) in patients with anterior LV dysfunction, SVR to a more normal LV size plus CABG improves survival free of subsequent hospitalization for cardiac cause when compared with CABG alone. PMID:18023680

  9. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Costigan, Jeannine; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Kouz, Simon; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Ross, Heather J; White, Michel

    2009-02-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.

  10. Augmented case-only designs for randomized clinical trials with failure time endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, James Y; Zhang, Xinyi Cindy; Wang, Ching-Yun; Kooperberg, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Under suitable assumptions and by exploiting the independence between inherited genetic susceptibility and treatment assignment, the case-only design yields efficient estimates for subgroup treatment effects and gene-treatment interaction in a Cox model. However it cannot provide estimates of the genetic main effect and baseline hazards, that are necessary to compute the absolute disease risk. For two-arm, placebo-controlled trials with rare failure time endpoints, we consider augmenting the case-only design with random samples of controls from both arms, as in the classical case-cohort sampling scheme, or with a random sample of controls from the active treatment arm only. The latter design is motivated by vaccine trials for cost-effective use of resources and specimens so that host genetics and vaccine-induced immune responses can be studied simultaneously in a bigger set of participants. We show that these designs can identify all parameters in a Cox model and that the efficient case-only estimator can be incorporated in a two-step plug-in procedure. Results in simulations and a data example suggest that incorporating case-only estimators in the classical case-cohort design improves the precision of all estimated parameters; sampling controls only in the active treatment arm attains a similar level of efficiency.

  11. Site selection in global clinical trials in patients hospitalized for heart failure : perceived problems and potential solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greene, Stephen J.; Mentz, Robert J.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Anker, Stefan D.; Arnold, Malcolm; Baschiera, Fabio; Cleland, John G. F.; Cotter, Gadi; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Giordano, Christopher; Metra, Marco; Misselwitz, Frank; Muehlhofer, Eva; Nodari, Savina; Peacock, W. Frank; Pieske, Burkert M.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Sato, Naoki; Shah, Monica R.; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Teerlink, John R.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Zalewski, Andrew; Zannad, Faiez; Butler, Javed

    2014-01-01

    There are over 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) annually in the United States alone, and a similar number has been reported in Europe. Recent clinical trials investigating novel therapies in patients with hospitalized HF (HHF) have been negative, and the post-discharge event rate re

  12. Serelaxin, recombinant human relaxin-2, for treatment of acute heart failure (RELAX-AHF) : a randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerlink, John R.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Felker, G. Michael; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greenberg, Barry H.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Unemori, Elaine; Voors, Adriaan A.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Dorobantu, Maria I.; Grinfeld, Liliana R.; Jondeau, Guillaume; Marmor, Alon; Masip, Josep; Pang, Peter S.; Werdan, Karl; Teichman, Sam L.; Trapani, Angelo; Bush, Christopher A.; Saini, Rajnish; Schumacher, Christoph; Severin, Thomas M.; Metra, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Serelaxin, recombinant human relaxin-2, is a vasoactive peptide hormone with many biological and haemodynamic effects. In a pilot study, serelaxin was safe and well tolerated with positive clinical outcome signals in patients with acute heart failure. The RELAX-AHF trial tested the hypoth

  13. Acute heart failure in elderly patients : worse outcomes and differential utility of standard prognostic variables. Insights from the PROTECT trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Mentz, Robert J.; Chiswell, Karen; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; Cleland, John G. F.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Dittrich, Howard C.; Fiuzat, Mona; Givertz, Michael M.; Lazzarini, Valentina; Mansoor, George A.; Massie, Barry M.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R.; Voors, Adriaan A.; O'Connor, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    AimsPrevious heart failure (HF) trials suggested that age influences patient characteristics and outcome; however, under-representation of elderly patients has limited characterization of this cohort. Whether standard prognostic variables have differential utility in various age groups is unclear. M

  14. Acute heart failure in elderly patients : worse outcomes and differential utility of standard prognostic variables. Insights from the PROTECT trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Mentz, Robert J.; Chiswell, Karen; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; Cleland, John G. F.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Dittrich, Howard C.; Fiuzat, Mona; Givertz, Michael M.; Lazzarini, Valentina; Mansoor, George A.; Massie, Barry M.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R.; Voors, Adriaan A.; O'Connor, Christopher M.

    AimsPrevious heart failure (HF) trials suggested that age influences patient characteristics and outcome; however, under-representation of elderly patients has limited characterization of this cohort. Whether standard prognostic variables have differential utility in various age groups is unclear.

  15. Serelaxin, recombinant human relaxin-2, for treatment of acute heart failure (RELAX-AHF) : a randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerlink, John R.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Felker, G. Michael; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greenberg, Barry H.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Unemori, Elaine; Voors, Adriaan A.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Dorobantu, Maria I.; Grinfeld, Liliana R.; Jondeau, Guillaume; Marmor, Alon; Masip, Josep; Pang, Peter S.; Werdan, Karl; Teichman, Sam L.; Trapani, Angelo; Bush, Christopher A.; Saini, Rajnish; Schumacher, Christoph; Severin, Thomas M.; Metra, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Serelaxin, recombinant human relaxin-2, is a vasoactive peptide hormone with many biological and haemodynamic effects. In a pilot study, serelaxin was safe and well tolerated with positive clinical outcome signals in patients with acute heart failure. The RELAX-AHF trial tested the hypoth

  16. Baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, John J.V.; Anand, Inder S.; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P.; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Albizem, Moetaz; Cheng, Sunfa; Scarlata, Debra; Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B.; Amuchastegui, M.; Belziti, C.; Bluguermann, J.; Caccavo, M.; Cartasegna, L.; Colque, R.; Cuneo, C.; Fernandez, A.; Gabito, A.; Goicochea, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Gorosito, V.; Grinfeld, L.; Hominal, M.; Kevorkian, R.; Litvak Bruno, M.; Llanos, J.; Mackinnon, I.; Manuale, O.; Marzetti, E.; Nul, D.; Perna, E.; Riccitelli, M.; Sanchez, A.; Santos, D.; Schygiel, P.; Toblli, J.; Vogel, D.; Aggarwal, A.; Amerena, J.; De Looze, F.; Fletcher, P.; Hare, D.; Ireland, M.; Krum, H.; Lattimore, J.; Marwick, T.; Sindone, A.; Thompson, P.; Waites, J.; Altenberger, J.; Ebner, C.; Lenz, K.; Pacher, R.; Poelzl, G.; Charlier, F.; de Ceuninck, M.; De Keulenaer, G.; Dendale, P.; Maréchal, P.; Mullens, W.; Thoeng, J.; Vanderheyden, M.; Vanhaecke, J.; Weytjens, C.; Wollaert, B.; Albuquerque, D.; Almeida, D.; Aspe y Rosas, J.; Bocchi, E.; Bordignon, S.; Clausell, N.; Kaiser, S.; Leaes, P.; Martins Alves, S.; Montera, M.; Moura, L.; Pereira de Castro, R.; Rassi, S.; Reis, A.; Saraiva, J.; Simões, M.; Souza Neto, J.; Teixeira, M.; Benov, H.; Chompalova, B.; Donova, T.; Georgiev, P.; Gotchev, D.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Guenova, D.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Ivanov, D.; Kostova, E.; Manolova, A.; Marchev, S.; Nikolov, F.; Popov, A.; Raev, D.; Tzekova, M.; Czarnecki, W.; Giannetti, N.; Haddad, H.; Heath, J.; Huynh, T.; Lepage, S.; Liu, P.; Lonn, E.; Ma, P.; Manyari, D.; Moe, G.; Parker, J.; Pesant, Y.; Rajda, M.; Ricci, J.; Roth, S.; Sestier, F.; Sluzar, V.; Sussex, B.; Vizel, S.; Antezana, G.; Bugueno, C.; Castro, P.; Conejeros, C.; Manriquez, L.; Martinez, D.; Potthoff, S.; Stockins, B.; Vukasovic, J.; Gregor, P.; Herold, M.; Jerabek, O.; Jirmar, R.; Kuchar, R.; Linhart, A.; Podzemska, B.; Soucek, M.; Spac, J.; Spacek, R.; Vodnansky, P.; Bronnum-Schou, J.; Clemmensen, K.; Egstrup, K.; Jensen, G.; Kjoller-Hansen, L.; Kober, L.; Markenvard, J.; Rokkedal, J.; Skagen, K.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Tuxen, C.; Videbak, L.; Laks, T.; Vahula, V.; Harjola, V.; Kettunen, R.; Kotila, M.; Bauer, F.; Cohen Solal, A.; Coisne, D.; Davy, J.; De Groote, P.; Dos Santos, P.; Funck, F.; Galinier, M.; Gibelin, P.; Isnard, R.; Neuder, Y.; Roul, G.; Sabatier, R.; Trochu, J.; Anker, S.; Denny, S.; Dreykluft, T.; Flesch, M.; Genth-Zotz, S.; Hambrecht, R.; Hein, J.; Jeserich, M.; John, M.; Kreider-Stempfle, H.; Laufs, U.; Muellerleile, K.; Natour, M.; Sandri, M.; Schäufele, T.; von Hodenberg, E.; Weyland, K.; Winkelmann, B.; Tse, H.; Yan, B.; Barsi, B.; Csikasz, J.; Dezsi, C.; Edes, I.; Forster, T.; Karpati, P.; Kerekes, C.; Kis, E.; Kosa, I.; Lupkovics, G.; Nagy, A.; Preda, I.; Ronaszeki, A.; Tomcsanyi, J.; Zamolyi, K.; Agarwal, D.; Bahl, V.; Bordoloi, A.; Chockalingam, K.; Chopda, M.; Chopra, V.; Dugal, J.; Ghaisas, N.; Ghosh, S.; Grant, P.; Hiremath, S.; Iyengar, S.; Jagadeesa Subramania, B.; Jain, P.; Joshi, A.; Khan, A.; Mullasari, A.; Naik, S.; Oomman, A.; Pai, V.; Pareppally Gopal, R.; Parikh, K.; Patel, T.; Prakash, V.; Sastry, B.; Sathe, S.; Sinha, N.; Srikanthan, V.; Subburamakrishnan, P.; Thacker, H.; Wander, G.; Admon, D.; Katz, A.; Klainman, E.; Lewis, B.; Marmor, A.; Moriel, M.; Mosseri, M.; Shotan, A.; Weinstein, J.; Zimlichman, R.; Agostoni, P.; Albanese, M.; Alunni, G.; Bini, R.; Boccanelli, A.; Bolognese, L.; Campana, C.; Carbonieri, E.; Carpino, C.; Checco, L.; Cosmi, F.; D'Angelo, G.; De Cristofaro, M.; Floresta, A.; Fucili, A.; Galvani, M.; Ivleva, A.; Marra, S.; Musca, G.; Peccerillo, N.; Perrone Filardi, P.; Picchio, E.; Russo, T.; Scelsi, L.; Senni, M.; Tavazzi, L.; Erglis, A.; Jasinkevica, I.; Kakurina, N.; Veze, I.; Volans, E.; Bagdonas, A.; Berukstis, E.; Celutkiene, J.; Dambrauskaite, A.; Jarasuniene, D.; Luksiene, D.; Rudys, A.; Sakalyte, G.; Sliaziene, S.; Aguilar-Romero, R.; Cardona-Muñoz, E.; Castro-Jimenez, J.; Chavez-Herrera, J.; Chuquiure Valenzuela, E.; De la Pena, G.; Herrera, E.; Leiva-Pons, J.; Lopez Alvarado, A.; Mendez Machado, G.; Ramos-Lopez, G.; Basart, D.; Buijs, E.; Cornel, J.; de Leeuw, M.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Dunselman, P.; Freericks, M.; Hamraoui, K.; Lenderlink, T.; Linssen, G.; Lodewick, P.; Lodewijks, C.; Lok, D.; Nierop, P.; Ronner, E.; Somsen, A.; van Dantzig, J.; van der Burgh, P.; van Kempen, L.; van Vlies, B.; Voors, A.; Wardeh, A.; Willems, F.; Dickstein, K.; Gundersen, T.; Hole, T.; Thalamus, J.; Westheim, A.; Dabrowski, M.; Gorski, J.; Korewicki, J.; Kuc, K.; Miekus, P.; Musial, W.; Niegowska, J.; Piotrowski, W.; Podolec, P.; Polonski, L.; Ponikowski, P.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Szelemej, R.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Ujda, M.; Wojciechowski, D; Wysokinski, A.; Camacho, A.; Fonseca, C.; Monteiro, P.; Apetrei, E.; Bruckner, I.; Carasca, E.; Coman, I.; Datcu, M.; Dragulescu, S.; Ionescu, P.; Iordachescu-Petica, D.; Manitiu, I.; Popa, V.; Pop-Moldovan, A.; Radoi, M.; Stamate, S.; Tomescu, M.; Vita, I.; Aroutiounov, G.; Ballyuzek, M.; Bart, B.; Churina, S.; Glezer, M.; Goloshchekin, B.; Ivleva, A.; Kobalava, Z.; Kostenko, V.; Lopatin, Y.; Martynov, A.; Orlov, V.; Semernin, E.; Shogenov, Z.; Sidorenko, B.; Skvortsov, A.; Storzhakov, G.; Sulimov, V.; Talibov, O.; Tereshenko, S.; Tsyrline, V.; Zadionchenko, V.; Zateyshchikov, D.; Dzupina, A.; Hranai, M.; Kmec, J.; Micko, K.; Murin, J.; Pella, D.; Sojka, G.; Spisak, V.; Vahala, P.; Vinanska, D.; Badat, A.; Bayat, J.; Dawood, S.; Delport, E.; Ellis, G.; Garda, R.; Klug, E.; Mabin, T.; Naidoo, D.; Pretorius, M.; Ranjith, N.; Van Zyl, L.; Weich, H.; Anguita, M.; Berrazueta, J.; Bruguera i Cortada, J.; de Teresa, E.; Gómez Sánchez, M.; González Juanatey, J.; Gonzalez-Maqueda, I.; Jordana, R.; Lupon, J.; Manzano, L.; Pascual Figal, D.; Pulpón, L.; Recio, J.; Ridocci Soriano, F.; Rodríguez Lambert, J.; Roig Minguell, E.; Roig Minguell, E.; Romero, J.; Valdovinos, P.; Klintberg, L.; Kronvall, T.; Lycksell, M.; Morner, S.; Rydberg, E.; Swedberg, K.; Timberg, I.; Wikstrom, G.; Moccetti, T.4; Ashok, J.; Banerjee, P.; Carr-White, G.; Cleland, J.; Connolly, E.; Francis, M.; Greenbaum, R.; Kadr, H.; Lindsay, S.; McMurray, J.; Megarry, S.; Memon, A.; Murdoch, D.; Senior, R.; Squire, I.; Tan, L.; Witte, K.; Adams, K.; Adamson, P.; Adler, A.; Altschul, L.; Altschuller, A.; Amirani, H.; Anand, I.; Andreou, C.; Ansari, M.; Antonishen, M.; Banchs, H.; Banerjee, S.; Banish, D.; Bank, A.; Barbagelata, A.; Barnard, D.; Bellinger, R.; Benn, A.; Berk, M.; Berry, B.; Bethala, V.; Bilazarian, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bleyer, F.; Blum, M.; Boehmer, J.; Bouchard, A.; Boyle, A.; Bozkurt, B.; Brown, C.; Burlew, B.; Burnham, K.; Butler, J.; Call, J.; Cambier, P.; Cappola, T.; Carlson, R.; Chandler, B.; Chandra, R.; Chandraratna, P.; Chernick, R.; Colan, D.; Colfer, H.; Colucci, W.; Connelly, T.; Costantini, O.; Dadkhah, S.; Dauber, I.; Davis, J.; Davis, S.; Denning, S.; Drazner, M.; Dunlap, S.; Egbujiobi, L.; Elkayam, U.; Elliott, J.; El-Shahawy, M.; Essandoh, L.; Ewald, G.; Fang, J.; Farhoud, H.; Felker, G.; Fernandez, J.; Festin, R.; Fishbein, G.; Florea, V.; Flores, E.; Floro, J.; Gabris, M.; Garg, M.; Gatewood, R.; Geller, M.; Ghali, J.; Ghumman, W.; Gibbs, G.; Gillespie, E.; Gilmore, R.; Gogia, H.; Goldberg, L.; Gradus-Pizlo, I.; Grainger, T.; Gudmundsson, G.; Gunawardena, D.; Gupta, D.; Hack, T.; Hall, S.; Hamroff, G.; Hankins, S.; Hanna, M.; Hargrove, J.; Haught, W.; Hauptman, P.; Hazelrigg, M.; Herzog, C.; Heywood, J.; Hill, T.; Hilton, T.; Hirsch, H.; Hunter, J.; Ibrahim, H.; Imburgia, M.; Iteld, B.; Jackson, B.; Jaffrani, N.; Jain, D.; Jain, A.; James, M.; Jimenez, J.; Johnson, E.; Kale, P.; Kaneshige, A.; Kapadia, S.; Karia, D.; Karlsberg, R.; Katholi, R.; Kerut, E.; Khoury, W.; Kipperman, R.; Klapholz, M.; Kosinski, E.; Kozinn, M.; Kraus, D.; Krueger, S.; Krum, H.; Kumar, S.; Lader, E.; Lee, C.; Levy, W.; Lewis, E.; Light-McGroary, K.; Loh, I.; Lombardi, W.; Machado, C.; Maislos, F.; Mancini, D.; Markus, T.; Mather, P.; McCants, K.; McGrew, F.; McLaurin, B.; McMillan, E.; McNamara, D.; Meyer, T.; Meymandi, S.; Miller, A.; Minami, E.; Modi, M.; Mody, F.; Mohanty, P.; Moscoso, R.; Moskowitz, R.; Moustafa, M.; Mullen, M.; Naz, T.; Noonan, T.; O'Brien, T.; Oellerich, W.; Oren, R.; Pamboukian, S.; Pereira, N.; Pitt, W.; Porter, C.; Prabhu, S.; Promisloff, S.; Ratkovec, R.; Richardson, R.; Ross, A.; Saleh, N.; Saltzberg, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schmedtje, J.; Schneider, R.; Schuyler, G.; Shanes, J.; Sharma, A.; Siegel, C.; Siegel, R.; Silber, D.; Singh, V.; Singh, N.; Singh, J.; Sklar, J.; Small, R.; Smith, A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smull, D.; Sotolongo, R.; Staniloae, C.; Stapleton, D.; Steele, P.; Stehlik, J.; Stein, M.; Tang, W.; Thadani, U.; Torre-Amoine, G.; Trichon, B.; Tsai, C.; Tummala, R.; Van Bakel, A.; Vicari, R.; Vijay, N.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Vittorio, T.; Vossler, M.; Wagoner, L.; Wallis, D.; Ward, N.; Widmer, M.; Wight, J.; Wilkins, C.; Williams, C.; Williams, G.; Winchester, M.; Winkel, E.; Wittmer, B.; Wood, D.; Wormer, D.; Wright, R.; Xu, Z.; Yasin, M.; Zolty, R.

    2013-01-01

    Aims This report describes the baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF) which is testing the hypothesis that anaemia correction with darbepoetin alfa will reduce the composite endpoint of death from any cause or hospital admission for worsening heart failure, and improve other outcomes. Methods and results Key demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings, along with baseline treatment, are reported and compared with those of patients in other recent clinical trials in heart failure. Compared with other recent trials, RED-HF enrolled more elderly [mean age 70 (SD 11.4) years], female (41%), and black (9%) patients. RED-HF patients more often had diabetes (46%) and renal impairment (72% had an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Patients in RED-HF had heart failure of longer duration [5.3 (5.4) years], worse NYHA class (35% II, 63% III, and 2% IV), and more signs of congestion. Mean EF was 30% (6.8%). RED-HF patients were well treated at randomization, and pharmacological therapy at baseline was broadly similar to that of other recent trials, taking account of study-specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Median (interquartile range) haemoglobin at baseline was 112 (106–117) g/L. Conclusion The anaemic patients enrolled in RED-HF were older, moderately to markedly symptomatic, and had extensive co-morbidity. PMID:23329651

  17. Baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMurray, John J. V.; Anand, Inder S.; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P.; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Albizem, Moetaz; Cheng, Sunfa; Scarlata, Debra; Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Aims This report describes the baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF) which is testing the hypothesis that anaemia correction with darbepoetin alfa will reduce the composite endpoint of death from any cause or hospital ad

  18. Site selection in global clinical trials in patients hospitalized for heart failure : perceived problems and potential solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greene, Stephen J.; Mentz, Robert J.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Anker, Stefan D.; Arnold, Malcolm; Baschiera, Fabio; Cleland, John G. F.; Cotter, Gadi; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Giordano, Christopher; Metra, Marco; Misselwitz, Frank; Muehlhofer, Eva; Nodari, Savina; Peacock, W. Frank; Pieske, Burkert M.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Sato, Naoki; Shah, Monica R.; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Teerlink, John R.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Zalewski, Andrew; Zannad, Faiez; Butler, Javed

    2014-01-01

    There are over 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) annually in the United States alone, and a similar number has been reported in Europe. Recent clinical trials investigating novel therapies in patients with hospitalized HF (HHF) have been negative, and the post-discharge event rate re

  19. A Review of the External Validity of Clinical Trials with Beta-Blockers in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Toukhsati, Samia R.; Thomas, Merlin C.; Jelinek, Michael V.; Hare, David L.; Horowitz, John D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Beta-blockers (BBs) are the mainstay prognostic medication for all stages of chronic heart failure (CHF). There are many classes of BBs, each of which has varying levels of evidence to support its efficacy in CHF. However, most CHF patients have one or more comorbid conditions such as diabetes, renal impairment, and/or atrial fibrillation. Patient enrollment to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) often excludes those with certain comorbidities, particularly if the symptoms are severe. Consequently, the extent to which evidence drawn from RCTs is generalizable to CHF patients has not been well described. Clinical guidelines also underrepresent this point by providing generic advice for all patients. The aim of this review is to examine the evidence to support the use of BBs in CHF patients with common comorbid conditions. METHODS We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, and the reference lists of reviews for RCTs, post hoc analyses, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses that report on use of BBs in CHF along with patient demographics and comorbidities. RESULTS In total, 38 studies from 28 RCTs were identified, which provided data on six BBs against placebo or head to head with another BB agent in ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Several studies explored BBs in older patients. Female patients and non-Caucasian race were underrepresented in trials. End points were cardiovascular hospitalization and mortality. Comorbid diabetes, renal impairment, or atrial fibrillation was detailed; however, no reference to disease spectrum or management goals as a focus could be seen in any of the studies. In this sense, enrollment may have limited more severe grades of these comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS RCTs provide authoritative information for a spectrum of CHF presentations that support guidelines. RCTs may provide inadequate information for more heterogeneous CHF patient cohorts. Greater Phase IV research may be needed to fill this gap and inform guidelines for a more

  20. Effect of Visit‐to‐Visit Variation of Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure on Outcomes in Chronic Systolic Heart Failure: Results From the Systolic Heart Failure Treatment With the I f Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial (SHIFT) Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Böhm, Michael; Robertson, Michele; Borer, Jeffrey; Ford, Ian; Komajda, Michel; Mahfoud, Felix; Ewen, Sebastian; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background Elevated resting heart rate (HR) and low systolic blood pressure (SBP) are related to poor outcomes in heart failure (HF). The association between visit‐to‐visit variation in SBP and HR and risk in HF is unknown. Methods and Results In Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the I f inhibitor ivabradine Trial (SHIFT) patients, we evaluated relationships between mean HR, mean SBP, and visit‐to‐visit variations (coefficient of variation [CV]=SD/mean×100%) in SBP and HR (SBP‐CV and HR‐C...

  1. Aggressive fluid and sodium restriction in acute decompensated heart failure: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliti, Graziella Badin; Rabelo, Eneida R; Clausell, Nadine; Rohde, Luís E; Biolo, Andreia; Beck-da-Silva, Luis

    2013-06-24

    The benefits of fluid and sodium restriction in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) are unclear. To compare the effects of a fluid-restricted (maximum fluid intake, 800 mL/d) and sodium-restricted (maximum dietary intake, 800 mg/d) diet (intervention group [IG]) vs a diet with no such restrictions (control group [CG]) on weight loss and clinical stability during a 3-day period in patients hospitalized with ADHF. Randomized, parallel-group clinical trial with blinded outcome assessments. Emergency room, wards, and intensive care unit. Adult inpatients with ADHF, systolic dysfunction, and a length of stay of 36 hours or less. Fluid restriction (maximum fluid intake, 800 mL/d) and additional sodium restriction (maximum dietary intake, 800 mg/d) were carried out until the seventh hospital day or, in patients whose length of stay was less than 7 days, until discharge. The CG received a standard hospital diet, with liberal fluid and sodium intake. Weight loss and clinical stability at 3-day assessment, daily perception of thirst, and readmissions within 30 days. Seventy-five patients were enrolled (IG, 38; CG, 37). Most were male; ischemic heart disease was the predominant cause of heart failure (17 patients [23%]), and the mean (SD) left ventricular ejection fraction was 26% (8.7%). The groups were homogeneous in terms of baseline characteristics. Weight loss was similar in both groups (between-group difference in variation of 0.25 kg [95% CI, -1.95 to 2.45]; P = .82) as well as change in clinical congestion score (between-group difference in variation of 0.59 points [95% CI, -2.21 to 1.03]; P = .47) at 3 days. Thirst was significantly worse in the IG (5.1 [2.9]) than the CG (3.44 [2.0]) at the end of the study period (between-group difference, 1.66 points; time × group interaction; P = .01). There were no significant between-group differences in the readmission rate at 30 days (IG, 11 patients [29%]; CG, 7 patients [19%]; P = .41

  2. Integrating decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory model and failure mode and effect analysis to determine the priority in solving production problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Failure mode and effect analysis has been applied in manufacturing and service industries but can still be improved. Failure mode and effect analysis is a common tool used to evaluate risk priority number; however, numerous scholars have doubted the effectiveness of failure mode and effect analysis and have thus proposed methods for correcting failure mode and effect analysis from its conventional formula. Because implemented actions can determine or influence resource allocation and its effects, completing one corrective action can occasionally simultaneously improve various failure modes. In this study, failure mode and effect analysis and decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory were integrated to correct failure modes and increase their effectiveness. First, failure mode and effect analysis was employed to identify the items for improvement. Second, decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory was adopted to examine the reciprocal influences and causality among these items. Finally, the priority for improving the items was proposed. By combining the advantages of failure mode and effect analysis and decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory, this research method complemented the shortcomings of the two techniques. According to the empirical research of this case study in which decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory was employed to analyze the causality among the items of the failure modes, the malfunction of production lines can be solved faster and more effectively compared with merely considering the size of risk priority number values.

  3. Liberal versus restricted fluid administration in heart failure patients. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Fu, Biao; Qian, Xiaoxian

    2015-01-01

    Restrictive fluid intake is recommended, in addition to standard pharmacologic treatment, in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). However, this recommendation lacks firm scientific evidence. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials to estimate the effect of fluid restriction in patients with heart failure.Randomized controlled trials were identified in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases using the search-keywords "fluid" and "heart failure". Outcomes were compared in heart failure patients with liberal and restricted fluid intake. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) were calculated using random effects models. Studies focusing on decompensated heart failure were analyzed separately.Six small randomized trials comparing liberal and restricted fluid intake met the inclusion criteria. Significant heterogeneity was noted in the reported studies for several outcomes. There were no differences in readmission rate (5 studies, pooled RR = 1.32; 95% CI: 0.86 to 2.01; P = 0.2), mortality rate (5 studies, pooled RR = 1.50; 95% CI: 0.87 to 2.57; P = 0.14), perceived thirst (4 studies, WMD = -0.7; 95% CI: -2.58 to 1.17; P = 0.46), duration of intravenous diuretics (2 studies, WMD = 0.17; 95% CI: -1.26 to 1.6; P = 0.81) or serum sodium levels (WMD = -1.61; 95% CI: -3.28 to 0.07; P = 0.06) between the liberal fluid intake group and the restrictive fluid intake group. Mean serum creatinine and BNP levels were significantly higher in the liberal fluid group: WMD 0.20 (95% CI: 0.15 to 0.25; P fluid intake. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  4. Results of a non-specific immunomodulation therapy on chronic heart failure (ACCLAIM trial): a placebo-controlled randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torre-Amione, G.; Anker, S.D.; Bourge, R.C.;

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators contribute to development and progression of chronic heart failure. We therefore tested the hypothesis that immunomodulation might counteract this pathophysiological mechanism in patients. Methods We did a double-blind, placebo-controlled s...

  5. Results of a non-specific immunomodulation therapy on chronic heart failure (ACCLAIM trial): a placebo-controlled randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torre-Amione, G.; Anker, S.D.; Bourge, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators contribute to development and progression of chronic heart failure. We therefore tested the hypothesis that immunomodulation might counteract this pathophysiological mechanism in patients. Methods We did a double-blind, placebo-controlled s...

  6. Dual vs single protease inhibitor therapy following antiretroviral treatment failure: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Scott M; Vaida, Florin; Bennett, Kara K; Holohan, Mary K; Sheiner, Lewis; Eron, Joseph J; Wheat, Lawrence Joseph; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Gulick, Roy M; Valentine, Fred T; Aberg, Judith A; Rogers, Michael D; Karol, Cheryl N; Saah, Alfred J; Lewis, Ronald H; Bessen, Laura J; Brosgart, Carol; DeGruttola, Victor; Mellors, John W

    2002-07-10

    Management of antiretroviral treatment failure in patients receiving protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimens is a therapeutic challenge. To assess whether adding a second PI improves antiviral efficacy of a 4-drug combination in patients with virologic failure while taking a PI-containing regimen. Multicenter, randomized, 4-arm trial, double-blind and placebo-controlled for second PI, conducted between October 1998 and April 2000, for which there was a 24-week primary analysis with extension to 48 weeks. Thirty-one participating AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) Clinical Trials Units in the United States. A total of 481 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons with prior exposure to a maximum of 3 PIs and viral load above 1000 copies/mL. Selectively randomized assignment (per prior PI exposure) to saquinavir (n = 116); indinavir (n = 69); nelfinavir (n = 139); or placebo twice per day (n = 157); in combination with amprenavir, abacavir, efavirenz, and adefovir dipivoxil. Primary efficacy analysis involved the proportion with viral load below 200 copies/mL at 24 weeks. Other measures were changes in viral load and CD4 cell count from baseline, adverse events, and HIV drug susceptibility. Of 481 patients, 148 (31%) had a viral load below 200 copies/mL at week 24. The proportions of patients with a viral load below 200 copies/mL in the saquinavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and placebo arms were 34% (40/116), 36% (25/69), 34% (47/139), and 23% (36/157), respectively. The proportion in the combined dual-PI arms was higher than in the amprenavir-plus-placebo arm (35% [112/324] vs 23% [36/157], respectively; P =.002). Overall, a higher proportion of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-naive patients had a viral load below 200 copies/mL compared with NNRTI-experienced patients (43% [115/270] vs 16% [33/211], respectively; P<.001). Baseline HIV-1 hypersusceptibility to efavirenz (< or = 0.4-fold difference in susceptibility compared

  7. Chronic vagal stimulation for the treatment of low ejection fraction heart failure : results of the NEural Cardiac TherApy foR Heart Failure (NECTAR-HF) randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, Faiez; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Tuinenburg, Anton E; Wright, David; Brugada, Josep; Butter, Christian; Klein, Helmut; Stolen, Craig; Meyer, Scott; Stein, Kenneth M; Ramuzat, Agnes; Schubert, Bernd; Daum, Doug; Neuzil, Petr; Botman, Cornelis; Castel, Maria Angeles; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Solomon, Scott D; Wold, Nicholas; Ruble, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The neural cardiac therapy for heart failure (NECTAR-HF) was a randomized sham-controlled trial designed to evaluate whether a single dose of vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) would attenuate cardiac remodelling, improve cardiac function and increase exercise capacity in symptomatic heart failure

  8. Implant-based multiparameter telemonitoring of patients with heart failure (IN-TIME): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindricks, Gerhard; Taborsky, Milos; Glikson, Michael; Heinrich, Ullus; Schumacher, Burghard; Katz, Amos; Brachmann, Johannes; Lewalter, Thorsten; Goette, Andreas; Block, Michael; Kautzner, Josef; Sack, Stefan; Husser, Daniela; Piorkowski, Christopher; Søgaard, Peter

    2014-08-16

    An increasing number of patients with heart failure receive implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) or cardiac resynchronisation defibrillators (CRT-Ds) with telemonitoring function. Early detection of worsening heart failure, or upstream factors predisposing to worsening heart failure, by implant-based telemonitoring might enable pre-emptive intervention and improve outcomes, but the evidence is weak. We investigated this possibility in IN-TIME, a clinical trial. We did this randomised, controlled trial at 36 tertiary clinical centres and hospitals in Australia, Europe, and Israel. We enrolled patients with chronic heart failure, NYHA class II-III symptoms, ejection fraction of no more than 35%, optimal drug treatment, no permanent atrial fibrillation, and a recent dual-chamber ICD or CRT-D implantation. After a 1 month run-in phase, patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to either automatic, daily, implant-based, multiparameter telemonitoring in addition to standard care or standard care without telemonitoring. Investigators were not masked to treatment allocation. Patients were masked to allocation unless they were contacted because of telemonitoring findings. Follow-up was 1 year. The primary outcome measure was a composite clinical score combining all-cause death, overnight hospital admission for heart failure, change in NYHA class, and change in patient global self-assessment, for the intention-to-treat population. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00538356. We enrolled 716 patients, of whom 664 were randomly assigned (333 to telemonitoring, 331 to control). Mean age was 65·5 years and mean ejection fraction was 26%. 285 (43%) of patients had NYHA functional class II and 378 (57%) had NYHA class III. Most patients received CRT-Ds (390; 58·7%). At 1 year, 63 (18·9%) of 333 patients in the telemonitoring group versus 90 (27·2%) of 331 in the control group (p=0·013) had worsened composite score (odds ratio 0·63, 95% CI 0·43

  9. Impact of pharmaceutical care on the quality of life of patients with Chagas disease and heart failure: randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Gilberto M Sperandio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmaceutical care is the direct interaction between pharmacist and patient, in order to improve therapeutic compliance, promote adequate pharmacotherapeutic follow-up, and improve quality of life. Pharmaceutical care may be effective in reducing complications and in improving the quality of life of patients with chronic diseases, like Chagas heart disease, while bringing a positive impact on health system costs. The morbidity and mortality indexes for patients with Chagas heart disease are high, especially if this heart disease is complicated by heart failure. In this setting, we hypothesize that pharmaceutical care might be an important tool for the clinical management of these patients by improving their quality of life, as a better compliance to their treatment and the avoidance and prompt correction of drug-related problems will minimize their symptoms, improve their functional class, and decrease the number of hospital admissions. Therefore, the aim of this trial is to evaluate the contribution of pharmaceutical care to clinical treatment of patients with Chagas heart disease complicated by heart failure. Methods/design A prospective, single-center randomized clinical trial will be conducted in patients with Chagas heart disease complicated by heart failure. A total of 88 patients will be randomly assigned into two parallel groups: an intervention group will receive standard care and pharmaceutical care, and a control group will receive only standard care. Both groups will be subjected to a follow-up period of 12 months. The primary outcome of this trial is the evaluation of quality of life, measured by the 36-item short-form and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include drug-related problems, exercise tolerance as measured by the standard six-minute-walk test, and compliance. Discussion Patients with Chagas heart disease complicated by heart failure under pharmaceutical care are

  10. Effect of Educational Program on Quality of Life of Patients with Heart Failure: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khajegodary

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heart failure is one of the most common cardiovascular diseases which decrease the quality of life. Most of the factors influencing the quality of life can be modified with educational interventions. Therefore, this study examined the impact of a continuous training program on quality of life of patients with heart failure. Methods: This randomized clinical trial study was conducted during May to August 2011. Forty four participants with heart failure referred to Shahid Madani's polyclinics of Tabriz were selected through convenient sampling method and were randomly allocated to two groups. The intervention group (n = 22 received ongoing training including one-to-one teaching, counseling sessions and phone calls over 3 months. The control group (n = 22 received routine care program. Data on quality of life was collected using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire at baseline as well as three months later. Results: The statistical tests showed significant differences in the physical, emotional dimensions and total quality of life in intervention group. But in control group, no significant differences were obtained. There was not any significant association in demographic characteristics and quality of life. Conclusion: Ongoing training programs can be effective in improving quality of life of patients with heart failure. Hence applying ongoing educational program as a non-pharmacological intervention can help to improve the quality of life of these patients.

  11. Multiparametric comparison of CARvedilol, vs. NEbivolol, vs. BIsoprolol in moderate heart failure: the CARNEBI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, Mauro; Apostolo, Anna; Cattadori, Gaia; Paolillo, Stefania; Iorio, Annamaria; Bertella, Erika; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Alimento, Marina; Farina, Stefania; Palermo, Pietro; Loguercio, Monica; Mantegazza, Valentina; Karsten, Marlus; Sciomer, Susanna; Magrì, Damiano; Fiorentini, Cesare; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2013-10-03

    Several β-blockers, with different pharmacological characteristics, are available for heart failure (HF) treatment. We compared Carvedilol (β1-β2-α-blocker), Bisoprolol (β1-blocker), and Nebivolol (β1-blocker, NO-releasing activity). Sixty-one moderate HF patients completed a cross-over randomized trial, receiving, for 2 months each, Carvedilol, Nebivolol, Bisoprolol (25.6 ± 12.6, 5.0 ± 2.4 and 5.0 ± 2.4 mg daily, respectively). At the end of each period, patients underwent: clinical evaluation, laboratory testing, echocardiography, spirometry (including total DLCO and membrane diffusion), O2/CO2 chemoreceptor sensitivity, constant workload, in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2=16%), and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. No significant differences were observed for clinical evaluation (NYHA classification, Minnesota questionnaire), laboratory findings (including kidney function and BNP), echocardiography, and lung mechanics. DLCO was lower on Carvedilol (18.3 ± 4.8*mL/min/mmHg) compared to Nebivolol (19.9 ± 5.1) and Bisoprolol (20.0 ± 5.0) due to membrane diffusion 20% reduction (*=p<0.0001). Constant workload exercise showed in hypoxia a faster VO2 kinetic and a lower ventilation with Carvedilol. Peripheral and central sensitivity to CO2 was lower in Carvedilol while response to hypoxia was higher in Bisoprolol. Ventilation efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope) was 26.9 ± 4.1* (Carvedilol), 28.8 ± 4.0 (Nebivolol), and 29.0 ± 4.4 (Bisoprolol). Peak VO2 was 15.8 ± 3.6*mL/kg/min (Carvedilol), 16.9 ± 4.1 (Nebivolol), and 16.9 ± 3.6 (Bisoprolol). β-Blockers differently affect several cardiopulmonary functions. Lung diffusion and exercise performance, the former likely due to lower interference with β2-mediated alveolar fluid clearance, were higher in Nebivolol and Bisoprolol. On the other hand, Carvedilol allowed a better ventilation efficiency during exercise, likely via a different chemoreceptor modulation. Results from this study represent the basis for

  12. New medicinal products for chronic heart failure : Advances in clinical trial design and efficacy assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cowie, Martin R.; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Garcia, Maria de los Angeles Alonso; Anker, Stefan D.; Baczynska, Anna; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; Borentain, Maria; Slot, Karsten Bruins; Cronin, Maureen; Doevendans, Pieter A.; El-Gazayerly, Amany; Gimpelewicz, Claudio; Honarpour, Narimon; Janmohamed, Salim; Janssen, Heidi; Kim, Albert M.; Lautsch, Dominik; Laws, Ian; Lefkowitz, Martin; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Lyon, Alexander R.; Malik, Fady I.; McMurray, John J. V.; Metra, Marco; Perez, Santiago Figueroa; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Pocock, Stuart J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Prasad, Krishna; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle; Roessig, Lothar; Rosano, Giuseppe M. C.; Sherman, Warren; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Swedberg, Karl; Tyl, Benoit; Zannad, Faiez; Boulton, Caroline; De Graeff, Pieter

    Despite the availability of a number of different classes of therapeutic agents with proven efficacy in heart failure, the clinical course of heart failure patients is characterized by a reduction in life expectancy, a progressive decline in health-related quality of life and functional status, as

  13. Effect of Visit-to-Visit Variation of Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure on Outcomes in Chronic Systolic Heart Failure: Results From the Systolic Heart Failure Treatment With the If Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial (SHIFT) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Robertson, Michele; Borer, Jeffrey; Ford, Ian; Komajda, Michel; Mahfoud, Felix; Ewen, Sebastian; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2016-02-12

    Elevated resting heart rate (HR) and low systolic blood pressure (SBP) are related to poor outcomes in heart failure (HF). The association between visit-to-visit variation in SBP and HR and risk in HF is unknown. In Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the If inhibitor ivabradine Trial (SHIFT) patients, we evaluated relationships between mean HR, mean SBP, and visit-to-visit variations (coefficient of variation [CV]=SD/mean×100%) in SBP and HR (SBP-CV and HR-CV, respectively) and primary composite endpoint (cardiovascular mortality or HF hospitalization), its components, all-cause mortality, and all-cause hospitalization. High HR and low SBP were closely associated with risk for primary endpoint, all-cause mortality, and HF hospitalization. The highest number of primary endpoint events occurred in the highest HR tertile (38.8% vs 16.4% lowest tertile; PHeart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  14. Effect of Fish Oil Supplementation and Aspirin Use on Arteriovenous Fistula Failure in Patients Requiring Hemodialysis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, Ashley B; Viecelli, Andrea K; Hawley, Carmel M; Hooi, Lai-Seong; Pascoe, Elaine M; Paul-Brent, Peta-Anne; Badve, Sunil V; Mori, Trevor A; Cass, Alan; Kerr, Peter G; Voss, David; Ong, Loke-Meng; Polkinghorne, Kevan R

    2017-02-01

    Vascular access dysfunction is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients requiring hemodialysis. Arteriovenous fistulae are preferred over synthetic grafts and central venous catheters due to superior long-term outcomes and lower health care costs, but increasing their use is limited by early thrombosis and maturation failure. ω-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish oils) have pleiotropic effects on vascular biology and inflammation and aspirin impairs platelet aggregation, which may reduce access failure. To determine whether fish oil supplementation (primary objective) or aspirin use (secondary objective) is effective in reducing arteriovenous fistula failure. The Omega-3 Fatty Acids (Fish Oils) and Aspirin in Vascular Access Outcomes in Renal Disease (FAVOURED) study was a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial that recruited participants with stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease from 2008 to 2014 at 35 dialysis centers in Australia, Malaysia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom. Participants were observed for 12 months after arteriovenous fistula creation. Participants were randomly allocated to receive fish oil (4 g/d) or matching placebo. A subset (n = 406) was also randomized to receive aspirin (100 mg/d) or matching placebo. Treatment started 1 day prior to surgery and continued for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was fistula failure, a composite of fistula thrombosis and/or abandonment and/or cannulation failure, at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included the individual components of the primary outcome. Of 1415 eligible participants, 567 were randomized (359 [63%] male, 298 [53%] white, 264 [47%] with diabetes; mean [SD] age, 54.8 [14.3] y). The same proportion of fistula failures occurred in the fish oil and placebo arms (128 of 270 [47%] vs 125 of 266 [47%]; relative risk [RR] adjusted for aspirin use, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.86-1.23; P = .78). Fish oil did not reduce fistula thrombosis (60 [22%] vs 61 [23%]; RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0

  15. Home-based telerehabilitation is not inferior to a centre-based program in patients with chronic heart failure: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Hwang

    2017-04-01

    Trial registration: ACTRN12613000390785. [Hwang R, Bruning J, Morris NR, Mandrusiak A, Russell T (2017 Home-based telerehabilitation is not inferior to a centre-based program in patients with chronic heart failure: a randomised trial. Journal of Physiotherapy 63: 101–107

  16. Prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies and consequences for a clinical trial of gene transfer for advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, B; Butler, J; Felker, G M; Ponikowski, P; Voors, A A; Pogoda, J M; Provost, R; Guerrero, J; Hajjar, R J; Zsebo, K M

    2016-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) has many advantages as a gene therapy vector, but the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is an important limitation. This study was designed to determine: (1) characteristics of AAV NAbs in human subjects, (2) prevalence of AAV1 NAbs in heart failure patients and (3) utility of aggressive immunosuppressive therapy in reducing NAb seroconversion in an animal model. NAb titers were assessed in a cohort of heart failure patients and in patients screened for a clinical trial of gene therapy with AAV1 carrying the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase gene (AAV1/SERCA2a). AAV1 NAbs were found in 59.5% of 1552 heart failure patients. NAb prevalence increased with age (P=0.001) and varied geographically. The pattern of NAb titers suggested that exposure is against AAV2, with AAV1 NAb seropositivity due to crossreactivity. The effects of immunosuppression on NAb formation were tested in mini-pigs treated with immunosuppressant therapy before, during and after a single AAV1/SERCA2a infusion. Aggressive immunosuppression did not prevent formation of AAV1 NAbs. We conclude that immunosuppression is unlikely to be a viable solution for repeat AAV1 dosing. Strategies to reduce NAbs in heart failure patients are needed to increase eligibility for gene transfer using AAV vectors.

  17. Effects of Family-Center Empowerment Model on the Lifestyle of Heart Failure Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Rakhshan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Cardiovascular diseases are the most prevalent disorders in developed countries and heart failure is the major one among them. This disease is caused by numerous factors and one of the most considerable risk factors is unhealthy lifestyle. So the aim of this research was to study the effect of family-center empowerment model on the lifestyle of heart failure patients. Methods: This is a randomized controlled clinical trial on 70 heart failure patients referring to Hazrate Fatemeh heart clinic in Shiraz. After convenience sampling the patients were divided into two control and intervention groups using block randomization Method. The intervention based on family-center empowerment model was performed during 5 sessions. Research tools are lifestyle and demographic information questionnaires. Results: Both intervention and control groups were similar regarding their demographic information (P>0.001.Before the intervention on lifestyle, all measures of the two groups were equal (P>0.001 but after the intervention; statistically significant differences were reported in all dimensions of lifestyle, the total lifestyle score in the intervention group was 70.09±16.38 and in the control group -6.03±16.36 (P<0.001. Conclusion: Performing the family-center empowerment model for heart failure patients is practically possible, leading to improvement or refinement of their and their families’ lifestyle.

  18. Pregnancy in HIV clinical trials in Sub Saharan Africa: failure of consent or contraception?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Ssali

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Higher than expected pregnancy rates have been observed in HIV related clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa. We designed a qualitative study to explore the factors contributing to high pregnancy rates among participants in two HIV clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: Female and male participants enrolled in one of two clinical HIV trials in south-west Uganda were approached. The trials were a phase III microbicide efficacy trial among HIV negative women using vaginal gel (MDP; and a trial of primary prevention prophylaxis for invasive cryptococcal disease using fluconazole among HIV infected men and women in Uganda (CRYPTOPRO. 14 focus group discussions and 8 in-depth interviews were conducted with HIV positive and negative women and their male partners over a six month period. Areas explored were their experiences about why and when one should get pregnant, factors affecting use of contraceptives, HIV status disclosure and trial product use. RESULTS: All respondents acknowledged being advised of the importance of avoiding pregnancy during the trial. Factors reported to contribute to pregnancy included; trust that the investigational product (oral capsules/vaginal gel would not harm the baby, need for children, side effects that led to inconsistent contraceptive use, low acceptance of condom use among male partners. Attitudes towards getting pregnant are fluid within couples over time and the trials often last for more than a year. Researchers need to account for high pregnancy rates in their sample size calculations, and consider lesser used female initiated contraceptive options e.g. diaphragm or female condoms. In long clinical trials where there is a high fetal or maternal risk due to investigational product, researchers and ethics committees should consider a review of participants contraceptive needs/pregnancy desire review after a fixed period, as need for children, partners and health status of participants may

  19. Iron deficiency and anaemia in heart failure: understanding the FAIR-HF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Costello, José; Comín-Colet, Josep

    2010-11-01

    Treatment of anaemia in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction has traditionally focused on erythropoietin-stimulating agents. However, recent studies have shown that treatment with intravenous (IV) iron can improve the symptoms and quality of life in patients with CHF and iron deficiency (ID), with or without anaemia. The management of ID is becoming an important therapeutic target in patients with CHF, and in this article, we will review iron metabolism in the context of anaemia and heart failure. We will also focus on the importance of diagnosing and treating ID, preferably with IV iron preparations, in patients with CHF.

  20. Effect of Early Vasopressin vs Norepinephrine on Kidney Failure in Patients With Septic Shock: The VANISH Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Anthony C; Mason, Alexina J; Thirunavukkarasu, Neeraja; Perkins, Gavin D; Cecconi, Maurizio; Cepkova, Magda; Pogson, David G; Aya, Hollmann D; Anjum, Aisha; Frazier, Gregory J; Santhakumaran, Shalini; Ashby, Deborah; Brett, Stephen J

    2016-08-02

    Norepinephrine is currently recommended as the first-line vasopressor in septic shock; however, early vasopressin use has been proposed as an alternative. To compare the effect of early vasopressin vs norepinephrine on kidney failure in patients with septic shock. A factorial (2×2), double-blind, randomized clinical trial conducted in 18 general adult intensive care units in the United Kingdom between February 2013 and May 2015, enrolling adult patients who had septic shock requiring vasopressors despite fluid resuscitation within a maximum of 6 hours after the onset of shock. Patients were randomly allocated to vasopressin (titrated up to 0.06 U/min) and hydrocortisone (n = 101), vasopressin and placebo (n = 104), norepinephrine and hydrocortisone (n = 101), or norepinephrine and placebo (n = 103). The primary outcome was kidney failure-free days during the 28-day period after randomization, measured as (1) the proportion of patients who never developed kidney failure and (2) median number of days alive and free of kidney failure for patients who did not survive, who experienced kidney failure, or both. Rates of renal replacement therapy, mortality, and serious adverse events were secondary outcomes. A total of 409 patients (median age, 66 years; men, 58.2%) were included in the study, with a median time to study drug administration of 3.5 hours after diagnosis of shock. The number of survivors who never developed kidney failure was 94 of 165 patients (57.0%) in the vasopressin group and 93 of 157 patients (59.2%) in the norepinephrine group (difference, -2.3% [95% CI, -13.0% to 8.5%]). The median number of kidney failure-free days for patients who did not survive, who experienced kidney failure, or both was 9 days (interquartile range [IQR], 1 to -24) in the vasopressin group and 13 days (IQR, 1 to -25) in the norepinephrine group (difference, -4 days [95% CI, -11 to 5]). There was less use of renal replacement therapy in the vasopressin group

  1. Updated Results and Patterns of Failure in a Randomized Hypofractionation Trial for High-risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Gomellini, Sara; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Pinnaro, Paola; Pinzi, Valentina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio, E-mail: arcangeli.gio@tiscali.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results and patterns of failure after conventional and hypofractionated radiation therapy in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This randomized phase III trial compared conventional fractionation (80 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 8 weeks) vs hypofractionation (62 Gy at 3.1 Gy per fraction in 5 weeks) in combination with 9-month androgen deprivation therapy in 168 patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from local failure (FFLF), and freedom from distant failure (FFDF) were analyzed. Results: In a median follow-up of 70 months, biochemical failure (BF) occurred in 35 of the 168 patients (21%) in the study. Among these 35 patients, local failure (LF) only was detected in 11 (31%), distant failure (DF) only in 16 (46%), and both LF and DF in 6 (17%). In 2 patients (6%) BF has not yet been clinically detected. The risk reduction by hypofractionation was significant in BF (10.3%) but not in LF and DF. We found that hypofractionation, with respect to conventional fractionation, determined only an insignificant increase in the actuarial FFBF but no difference in FFLF and FFDF, when considering the entire group of patients. However, an increase in the 5-year rates in all 3 endpoints-FFBF, FFLF, and FFDF-was observed in the subgroup of patients with a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) level of 20 ng/mL or less. On multivariate analysis, the type of fractionation, iPSA level, Gleason score of 4+3 or higher, and T stage of 2c or higher have been confirmed as independent prognostic factors for BF. High iPSA levels and Gleason score of 4+3 or higher were also significantly associated with an increased risk of DF, whereas T stage of 2c or higher was the only independent variable for LF. Conclusion: Our results confirm the isoeffectiveness of the 2 fractionation schedules used in this study, although a benefit in favor of hypofractionation cannot be excluded in the subgroup of

  2. Sudden Cardiac Death in Patients With Ischemic Heart Failure Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: Results From the STICH Randomized Clinical Trial (Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Meena P; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Pokorney, Sean D; She, Lilin; Romanov, Alexander; Nicolau, Jose C; Lee, Kerry L; Carson, Peter; Selzman, Craig H; Stepinska, Janina; Cleland, John G F; Tungsubutra, Wiwun; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice M; Sueta, Carla A; Siepe, Matthias; Lang, Irene; Feldman, Arthur M; Yii, Michael; Rouleau, Jean L; Velazquez, Eric J

    2017-03-21

    The risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with heart failure after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) has not been examined in a contemporary clinical trial of surgical revascularization. This analysis describes the incidence, timing, and clinical predictors of SCD after CABG. Patients enrolled in the STICH trial (Surgical Treatment of Ischemic Heart Failure) who underwent CABG with or without surgical ventricular reconstruction were included. We excluded patients with prior implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and those randomized only to medical therapy. The primary outcome was SCD as adjudicated by a blinded committee. A Cox model was used to examine and identify predictors of SCD. The Fine and Gray method was used to estimate the incidence of SCD accounting for the competing risk of other deaths. Over a median follow-up of 46 months, 113 of 1411 patients who received CABG without (n = 934) or with (n = 477) surgical ventricular reconstruction had SCD; 311 died of other causes. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction at enrollment was 28±9%. The 5-year cumulative incidence of SCD was 8.5%. Patients who had SCD and those who did not die were younger and had fewer comorbid conditions than did those who died of causes other than SCD. In the first 30 days after CABG, SCD (n=5) accounted for 7% of all deaths. The numerically greatest monthly rate of SCD was in the 31- to 90-day time period. In a multivariable analysis including baseline demographics, risk factors, coronary anatomy, and left ventricular function, end-systolic volume index and B-type natriuretic peptide were most strongly associated with SCD. The monthly risk of SCD shortly after CABG among patients with a low left ventricular ejection fraction is highest between the first and third months, suggesting that risk stratification for SCD should occur early in the postoperative period, particularly in patients with increased preoperative end-systolic volume index or B

  3. Laparoscopic ovarian diathermy after clomiphene failure in polycystic ovary syndrome: is it worthwhile? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Hashim, Hatem; Foda, Osama; Ghayaty, Essam; Elawa, Ahmed

    2011-11-01

    Laparoscopic ovarian diathermy (LOD) represents a successful treatment option for women with clomiphene citrate (CC)-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, in case of CC failure PCOS, LOD offers several theoretical advantages. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of LOD versus continuation of CC up to six further cycles in PCOS patients who failed to achieve pregnancy despite the previous successful CC induced ovulation. One hundred and seventy six infertile women with CC failure PCOS were selected in this randomized controlled trial. Patients (n = 87) underwent LOD with 6 months follow-up or received CC (n = 89) up to six cycles. Outcome measures were; clinical pregnancy rate, midcycle endometrial thickness, cycle length, miscarriage and live birth rates. The clinical pregnancy rate per patient and the cumulative pregnancy rate after six cycles were comparable in both groups (39 vs. 33.7% and 47 vs. 39.2%, respectively). Four twin pregnancies occurred in CC group and none in LOD group and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). No significant difference in midcycle endometrial thickness was observed (8.8 ± 1.2 mm vs. 7.7 ± 1.1 mm). Improvement in cycle length, miscarriage and live birth rates were comparable in both groups. No cases of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome occurred in either group. LOD during the 6 months follow-up period and CC for up to six further cycles are equally effective for achieving pregnancy in CC failure PCOS patients.

  4. PROspective MEmory Training to improve HEart failUre Self-care (PROMETHEUS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jan; Rendell, Peter G; Ski, Chantal F; Kure, Christina E; McLennan, Skye N; Rose, Nathan S; Prior, David L; Thompson, David R

    2015-04-29

    Cognitive impairment is seen in up to three quarters of heart failure (HF) patients and has a significant negative impact on patients' health outcomes. Prospective memory, which is defined as memory to carry out future intentions, is important for functional independence in older adults and involves application of multiple cognitive processes that are often impaired in HF patients. The objective of this study is to examine the effects of prospective memory training on patients' engagement in HF self-care and health outcomes, carer strain and quality of life. The proposed study is a randomised, controlled trial in which 200 patients diagnosed with HF, and their carers will be recruited from 3 major hospitals across Melbourne. Eligible patients with HF will be randomised to receive either: 1) The Virtual Week Training Program - a computerised prospective memory (PM) training program (intervention) or 2) non-adaptive computer-based word puzzles (active control). HF patients' baseline cognitive function will be compared to a healthy control group (n = 60) living independently in the community. Patients will undergo a comprehensive assessment of PM, neuropsychological functioning, self-care, physical, and emotional functioning. Assessments will take place at baseline, 4 weeks and 12 months following intervention. Carers will complete measures assessing quality of life, strain, perceived control in the management of the patients' HF symptoms, and ratings of the patients' level of engagement in HF self-care behaviours. If the Virtual Week Training Program is effective in improving: 1) prospective memory; 2) self-care behaviours, and 3) wellbeing in HF patients, this study will enhance our understanding of impaired cognitive processes in HF and potentially is a mechanism to reduce healthcare costs. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry #366376; 27 May 2014. https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366376&isClinicalTrial=False .

  5. A multicentre randomized controlled trial of moderate hypothermia to prevent intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Murphy, Nicholas; Brown, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Animal models and human case series of acute liver failure (ALF) suggest moderate hypothermia (MH) to have protective effects against cerebral oedema (CO) development and intracranial hypertension (ICH). However, the optimum temperature for patient management is unknown. In a p...

  6. Heart failure and statins - Why do we need a clinical trial?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohm, M; Hjalmarson, A; Kjekshus, J; Laufs, U; McMurray, J; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    2005-01-01

    The effect of statins to reduce mortality and morbiditiy in primary and secondary prevention as well as in acute coronary syndroms is well established. Recent data show that pleiotropic effects might also have direct effects on the myocardial cell. However, in chronic heart failure the outcome is in

  7. Learning from failure - rationale and design for a study about discontinuation of randomized trials (DISCO study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasenda Benjamin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs may be discontinued because of apparent harm, benefit, or futility. Other RCTs are discontinued early because of insufficient recruitment. Trial discontinuation has ethical implications, because participants consent on the premise of contributing to new medical knowledge, Research Ethics Committees (RECs spend considerable effort reviewing study protocols, and limited resources for conducting research are wasted. Currently, little is known regarding the frequency and characteristics of discontinued RCTs. Methods/Design Our aims are, first, to determine the prevalence of RCT discontinuation for specific reasons; second, to determine whether the risk of RCT discontinuation for specific reasons differs between investigator- and industry-initiated RCTs; third, to identify risk factors for RCT discontinuation due to insufficient recruitment; fourth, to determine at what stage RCTs are discontinued; and fifth, to examine the publication history of discontinued RCTs. We are currently assembling a multicenter cohort of RCTs based on protocols approved between 2000 and 2002/3 by 6 RECs in Switzerland, Germany, and Canada. We are extracting data on RCT characteristics and planned recruitment for all included protocols. Completion and publication status is determined using information from correspondence between investigators and RECs, publications identified through literature searches, or by contacting the investigators. We will use multivariable regression models to identify risk factors for trial discontinuation due to insufficient recruitment. We aim to include over 1000 RCTs of which an anticipated 150 will have been discontinued due to insufficient recruitment. Discussion Our study will provide insights into the prevalence and characteristics of RCTs that were discontinued. Effective recruitment strategies and the anticipation of problems are key issues in the planning and evaluation of trials

  8. Rationale and methods of the multicenter randomised trial of a heart failure management programme among geriatric patients (HF-Geriatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casado Jose

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease management programmes (DMPs have been shown to reduce hospital readmissions and mortality in adults with heart failure (HF, but their effectiveness in elderly patients or in those with major comorbidity is unknown. The Multicenter Randomised Trial of a Heart Failure Management Programme among Geriatric Patients (HF-Geriatrics assesses the effectiveness of a DMP in elderly patients with HF and major comorbidity. Methods/Design Clinical trial in 700 patients aged ≥ 75 years admitted with a primary diagnosis of HF in the acute care unit of eight geriatric services in Spain. Each patient should meet at least one of the following comorbidty criteria: Charlson index ≥ 3, dependence in ≥ 2 activities of daily living, treatment with ≥ 5 drugs, active treatment for ≥ 3 diseases, recent emergency hospitalization, severe visual or hearing loss, cognitive impairment, Parkinson's disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, anaemia, or constitutional syndrome. Half of the patients will be randomly assigned to a 1-year DMP led by a case manager and the other half to usual care. The DMP consists of an educational programme for patients and caregivers on the management of HF, COPD (knowledge of the disease, smoking cessation, immunizations, use of inhaled medication, recognition of exacerbations, diabetes (knowledge of the disease, symptoms of hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia, self-adjustment of insulin, foot care and depression (knowledge of the disease, diagnosis and treatment. It also includes close monitoring of the symptoms of decompensation and optimisation of treatment compliance. The main outcome variables are quality of life, hospital readmissions, and overall mortality during a 12-month follow-up. Discussion The physiological changes, lower life expectancy, comorbidity and low health literacy associated with aging may influence the effectiveness of DMPs in HF. The HF-Geriatrics study

  9. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade with carvedilol on cachexia in severe chronic heart failure: results from the COPERNICUS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew L; Coats, Andrew J S; Krum, Henry; Katus, Hugo A; Mohacsi, Paul; Salekin, Damien; Schultz, Melissa K; Packer, Milton; Anker, Stefan D

    2017-08-01

    Cardiac cachexia frequently accompanies the progression of heart failure despite the use of effective therapies for left ventricular dysfunction. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of weight loss, but the effects of sympathetic antagonism on cachexia are not well defined. We prospectively evaluated changes in body weight in 2289 patients with heart failure who had dyspnoea at rest or on minimal exertion and a left ventricular ejection fraction COPERNICUS trial). Patients were not enrolled if they had signs of clinically significant fluid retention due to heart failure. Patients in the carvedilol group were 33% less likely than patients in the placebo group to experience a further significant loss of weight (>6%) (95% confidence interval: 14-48%, P = 0.002) and were 37% more likely to experience a significant gain in weight (≥5%) (95% confidence interval: 12-66%, P = 0.002). Carvedilol's ability to prevent weight loss was most marked in patients with increased body mass index at baseline, whereas its ability to promote weight gain was most marked in patients with decreased body mass index at baseline. Increases in weight were not accompanied by evidence of fluid retention. Baseline values for body mass index and change in body weight were significant predictors of survival regardless of treatment. Carvedilol attenuated the development and promoted a partial reversal of cachexia in patients with severe chronic heart failure, supporting a role for prolonged sympathetic activation in the genesis of weight loss. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  10. Influenza vaccine efficacy trials: a simulation approach to understand failures from the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Anne; Legrand, Catherine; Dewé, Walthère

    2015-01-01

    The success of a seasonal influenza vaccine efficacy trial depends not only upon the design but also upon the annual epidemic characteristics. In this context, simulation methods are an essential tool in evaluating the performances of study designs under various circumstances. However, traditional methods for simulating time-to-event data are not suitable for the simulation of influenza vaccine efficacy trials because of the seasonality and heterogeneity of influenza epidemics. Instead, we propose a mathematical model parameterized with historical surveillance data, heterogeneous frailty among the subjects, survey-based heterogeneous number of daily contact, and a mixed vaccine protection mechanism. We illustrate our methodology by generating multiple-trial data similar to a large phase III trial that failed to show additional relative vaccine efficacy of an experimental adjuvanted vaccine compared with the reference vaccine. We show that small departures from the designing assumptions, such as a smaller range of strain protection for the experimental vaccine or the chosen endpoint, could lead to smaller probabilities of success in showing significant relative vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The-first-in-man randomized trial of a beta3 adrenoceptor agonist in chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Henning; Axelsson, Anna; Hartvig Thomsen, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The third isotype of beta adrenergic receptors (β3 ARs) has distinctly different effects on cardiomyocytes compared with β1 and β2 ARs. Stimulation of β3 ARs may reduce cardiomyocyte Na(+) overload and reduce oxidative stress in heart failure (HF). We examined if treatment with the β3 AR...... agonist mirabegron increases LVEF in patients with HF. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a double-blind trial we randomly assigned 70 patients with NYHA class II-III HF and LVEF therapy. The primary......, there was interaction between baseline LVEF and change in LVEF in the entire group of patients treated with mirabegron (R(2)  = 0.40, β  = -0.63, P generally well tolerated. Three patients in each group had fatal or life...

  12. Pretreatment HIV Drug Resistance and HIV-1 Subtype C Are Independently Associated With Virologic Failure: Results From the Multinational PEARLS (ACTG A5175) Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Rami; Smeaton, Laura; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Wallis, Carol L.; Tripathy, Srikanth; Morgado, Mariza G.; Saravanan, Shanmugham; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Reitsma, Marissa; Hart, Stephen; Mellors, John W.; Halvas, Elias; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; La Rosa, Alberto; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Lama, Javier R.; Rassool, Mohammed; Santos, Breno R.; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Hakim, James; Flanigan, Timothy; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Campbell, Thomas B.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Evaluation of pretreatment HIV genotyping is needed globally to guide treatment programs. We examined the association of pretreatment (baseline) drug resistance and subtype with virologic failure in a multinational, randomized clinical trial that evaluated 3 antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens and included resource-limited setting sites. Methods. Pol genotyping was performed in a nested case-cohort study including 270 randomly sampled participants (subcohort), and 218 additional participants failing ART (case group). Failure was defined as confirmed viral load (VL) >1000 copies/mL. Cox proportional hazards models estimated resistance–failure association. Results. In the representative subcohort (261/270 participants with genotypes; 44% women; median age, 35 years; median CD4 cell count, 151 cells/µL; median VL, 5.0 log10 copies/mL; 58% non-B subtypes), baseline resistance occurred in 4.2%, evenly distributed among treatment arms and subtypes. In the subcohort and case groups combined (466/488 participants with genotypes), used to examine the association between resistance and treatment failure, baseline resistance occurred in 7.1% (9.4% with failure, 4.3% without). Baseline resistance was significantly associated with shorter time to virologic failure (hazard ratio [HR], 2.03; P = .035), and after adjusting for sex, treatment arm, sex–treatment arm interaction, pretreatment CD4 cell count, baseline VL, and subtype, was still independently associated (HR, 2.1; P = .05). Compared with subtype B, subtype C infection was associated with higher failure risk (HR, 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–2.35), whereas non-B/C subtype infection was associated with longer time to failure (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, .22–.98). Conclusions. In this global clinical trial, pretreatment resistance and HIV-1 subtype were independently associated with virologic failure. Pretreatment genotyping should be considered whenever feasible. Clinical Trials

  13. Home telemonitoring study for Japanese patients with heart failure (HOMES-HF): protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotooka, Norihiko; Asaka, Machiko; Sato, Yasunori; Kinugasa, Yoshiharu; Nochioka, Kotaro; Mizuno, Atsushi; Nagatomo, Daisuke; Mine, Daigo; Yamada, Yoko; Eguchi, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Hideki; Inomata, Takayuki; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Masuyama, Tohru; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Inoue, Teruo; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Seino, Yoshihiko; Node, Koichi

    2013-06-20

    Despite the encouraging results from several randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses, the ability of home telemonitoring for heart failure (HF) to improve patient outcomes remains controversial as a consequence of the two recent large-scale RCTs. However, it has been suggested that there is a subgroup of patients with HF who may benefit from telemonitoring. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether an HF management programme using telemonitoring could improve outcomes in patients with HF under the Japanese healthcare system. The Home Telemonitoring Study for Japanese Patients with Heart Failure (HOMES-HF) study is a prospective, multicentre RCT to investigate the effectiveness of home telemonitoring on the primary composite endpoint of all-cause death and rehospitalisation due to worsening HF in recently admitted HF patients (aged 20 and older, New York Heart Association classes II-III). The telemonitoring system is an automated physiological monitoring system including body weight, blood pressure and pulse rate by full-time nurses 7 days a week. Additionally, the system was designed to make it a high priority to support patient's self-care instead of an early detection of HF decompensation. A total sample size of 420 patients is planned according to the Schoenfeld and Richter method. Eligible patients are randomly assigned via a website to either the telemonitoring group or the usual care group by using a minimisation method with biased-coin assignment balancing on age, left ventricular ejection fraction and a history of ischaemic heart disease. Participants will be enrolled until August 2013 and followed until August 2014. Time to events will be estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and HRs and 95% CIs will be calculated using the Cox proportional hazards models with stratification factors. The study is registered at UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN000006839).

  14. Long-Term Effects and Prognosis in Acute Heart Failure Treated with Tolvaptan: The AVCMA Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diuresis is a major therapy for the reduction of congestive symptoms in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF patients. We previously reported the efficacy and safety of tolvaptan compared to carperitide in hospitalized patients with ADHF. There were some reports of cardio- and renal-protective effects in carperitide; therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the long-term effects of tolvaptan and carperitide on cardiorenal function and prognosis. Methods and Results. One hundred and five ADHF patients treated with either tolvaptan or carperitide were followed after hospital discharge. Levels of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide, serum sodium, potassium, creatinine, and estimated glomerular filtration rate were measured before administration of tolvaptan or carperitide at baseline, the time of discharge, and one year after discharge. These data between tolvaptan and carperitide groups were not different one year after discharge. Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrated that the event-free rate regarding all events, cardiac events, all cause deaths, and rehospitalization due to worsening heart failure was not significantly different between tolvaptan and carperitide groups. Conclusions. We demonstrated that tolvaptan had similar effects on cardiac and renal function and led to a similar prognosis in the long term, compared to carperitide.

  15. Rationale and Design of the ATHENA-HF Trial: Aldosterone Targeted Neurohormonal Combined With Natriuresis Therapy in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Javed; Hernandez, Adrian F; Anstrom, Kevin J; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas; Redfield, Margaret M; Konstam, Marvin A; Tang, W H Wilson; Felker, G Michael; Shah, Monica R; Braunwald, Eugene

    2016-09-01

    Although therapy with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) is recommended for patients with chronic heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction and in post-infarction HF, it has not been studied well in acute HF (AHF) despite being commonly used in this setting. At high doses, MRA therapy in AHF may relieve congestion through its natriuretic properties and mitigate the effects of adverse neurohormonal activation associated with intravenous loop diuretics. The ATHENA-HF (Aldosterone Targeted Neurohormonal Combined with Natriuresis Therapy in Heart Failure) trial is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the safety and efficacy of 100 mg/day spironolactone versus placebo (or continued low-dose spironolactone use in participants who are already receiving spironolactone at baseline) in 360 patients hospitalized for AHF. Patients are randomized within 24 h of receiving the first dose of intravenous diuretics. The primary objective is to determine if high-dose spironolactone, compared with standard care, will lead to greater reductions in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels from randomization to 96 h. The secondary endpoints include changes in the clinical congestion score, dyspnea relief, urine output, weight change, loop diuretic dose, and in-hospital worsening HF. Index hospital length of stay and 30-day clinical outcomes will be assessed. Safety endpoints include risk of hyperkalemia and renal function. Differences among patients with reduced versus preserved ejection fraction will be determined. (Study of High-dose Spironolactone vs. Placebo Therapy in Acute Heart Failure [ATHENA-HF]; NCT02235077).

  16. Risk of Stroke in Chronic Heart Failure Patients Without Atrial Fibrillation: Analysis of the Controlled Rosuvastatin in Multinational Trial Heart Failure (CORONA) and the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca-Heart Failure (GISSI-HF) Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Perez, Ana-Cristina; Fulton, Rachael L; Jhund, Pardeep S; Latini, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Wikstrand, John; Kjekshus, John; Lip, Gregory Y H; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Lees, Kennedy R; McMurray, John J V

    2015-04-28

    Our aim was to describe the incidence and predictors of stroke in patients who have heart failure without atrial fibrillation (AF). We pooled 2 contemporary heart failure trials, the Controlled Rosuvastatin in Multinational Trial Heart Failure (CORONA) and the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza cardiaca-Heart Failure trial (GISSI-HF). Of the 9585 total patients, 6054 did not have AF. Stroke occurred in 165 patients (4.7%) with AF and in 206 patients (3.4%) without AF (rates 16.8/1000 patient-years and 11.1/1000 patient-years, respectively). Using Cox proportional-hazards models, we identified the following independent predictors of stroke in patients without AF (ranked by χ(2) value): age (hazard ratio, 1.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.63 per 10 years), New York Heart Association class (1.60, 1.21-2.12 class III/IV versus II), diabetes mellitus treated with insulin (1.87, 1.22-2.88), body mass index (0.74, 0.60-0.91 per 5 kg/m(2) up to 30), and previous stroke (1.81, 1.19-2.74). N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (available in 2632 patients) was also an independent predictor of stroke (hazard ratio, 1.31; 1.11-1.57 per log unit) when added to this model. With the use of a risk score formulated from these predictors, we found that patients in the upper third of risk had a rate of stroke that approximated the risk in patients with AF. A small number of demographic and clinical variables identified a subset of patients who have heart failure without AF at a high risk of stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Effects of renal denervation on vascular remodelling in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: A randomised control trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Carl; Keegan, Jennifer; Gatehouse, Peter D; Rajani, Ronak; Khattar, Rajdeep S; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Rosen, Stuart D; Lyon, Alexander R; di Mario, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of renal denervation (RDT) on micro- and macro-vascular function in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Design A prospective, randomised, open-controlled trial with blinded end-point analysis. Setting A single-centre London teaching hospital. Participants Twenty-five patients with HFpEF who were recruited into the RDT-PEF trial. Main outcome measures Macro-vascular: 24-h ambulatory pulse pressure, aorta distensibilty (from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), aorta pulse wave velocity (CMR), augmentation index (peripheral tonometry) and renal artery blood flow indices (renal MR). Micro-vascular: endothelial function (peripheral tonometry) and urine microalbuminuria. Results At baseline, 15 patients were normotensive, 9 were hypertensive and 1 was hypotensive. RDT did not lower any of the blood pressure indices. Though there was evidence of abnormal vascular function at rest, RDT did not affect these at 3 or 12 months follow-up. Conclusions RDT did not improve markers of macro- and micro-vascular function. PMID:28228942

  18. Colchicine failure in familial Mediterranean fever and potential alternatives: embarking on the anakinra trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Livneh, Avi

    2014-05-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a genetic auto-inflammatory disease characterized by spontaneous short attacks of fever, elevated acute-phase reactants, and serositis. Approximately 5%-10% of FMF patients do not respond to colchicine treatment and another 5% are intolerant to colchicine because of side effects. Recently, following the discovery of the inflammasome and recognition of the importance of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) as the major cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of FMF, IL-1beta blockade has been suggested and tried sporadically to treat FMF, with good results. To date, case reports and small case series involving colchicine-resistant FMF patients and showing high efficacy of IL-1beta blockade have been reported. At the Israel Center for FMF at the Sheba Medical Centerthe first double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial of anakinra in FMF patients who are resistant or intolerant to colchicines is underway. In this report we discuss the mechanism of colchicine resistance in FMF patients, the data in the literature on IL1beta blockade in these patients, and the anakinra trial inclusion criteria and study protocol.

  19. Telemonitoring Adherence to Medications in Heart Failure Patients (TEAM-HF): A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Benjamin D; Moise, Nathalie; Haerizadeh, Mytra; Ye, Siqin; Medina, Vivian; Kronish, Ian M

    2017-04-01

    Medication nonadherence contributes to hospitalizations in recently discharged patients with heart failure (HF). We aimed to test the feasibility of telemonitoring medication adherence in patients with HF. We randomized 40 patients (1:1) hospitalized for HF to 30 days of loop diuretic adherence monitoring with telephonic support or to passive adherence monitoring alone. Eighty-three percent of eligible patients agreed to participate. The median age of patients was 64 years, 25% were female, and 45% were Hispanic. Overall, 67% of patients were nonadherent (percentage of days that the correct number of doses were taken telemonitoring was acceptable to most patients with HF. Diuretic nonadherence was common even when patients knew they were being monitored. Future studies should assess whether adherence telemonitoring can improve adherence and reduce readmissions among patients with HF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Supplemental benefit of an angiotensin receptor blocker in hypertensive patients with stable heart failure using olmesartan (SUPPORT) trial--rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Yasuhiko; Nochioka, Kotaro; Miura, Masanobu; Takada, Tsuyoshi; Tadaki, Soichiro; Miyata, Satoshi; Shiba, Nobuyuki; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2013-07-01

    Although angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are now one of the first-line drug classes for the management of hypertension, recommendations for the management of chronic heart failure (CHF) are limited. The supplemental benefit of angiotensin receptor blocker in hypertensive patients with stable heart failure using olmesartan (SUPPORT) trial investigates whether an additive treatment with an ARB, olmesartan, reduces the mortality and morbidity in hypertensive patients with stable chronic heart failure. The SUPPORT trial is a prospective randomized open-label blinded endpoint study. Between October 2006 and March 2010, 1147 stable CHF patients treated with evidence-based medications were successfully randomized to either olmesartan or control group. In the olmesartan group, the ARB was initiated at the dose of 5.0-10mg, and was then increased up to 40mg/day, when possible. No ARBs were allowed in the control group. Primary outcome measure in the SUPPORT trial is the composite of all-cause death, non-fatal acute myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke and hospital admission due to worsening heart failure. The participants will be followed for at least 3 years until March 2013. The SUPPORT trial will elucidate the supplemental benefits of an ARB, olmesartan, in hypertensive patients with CHF. Copyright © 2013 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of home telemonitoring to support multidisciplinary care of heart failure patients in Finland: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Anna-Leena; Leppänen, Juha; Kaijanranta, Hannu; Kulju, Minna; Heliö, Tiina; van Gils, Mark; Lähteenmäki, Jaakko

    2014-12-11

    Heart failure (HF) patients suffer from frequent and repeated hospitalizations, causing a substantial economic burden on society. Hospitalizations can be reduced considerably by better compliance with self-care. Home telemonitoring has the potential to boost patients' compliance with self-care, although the results are still contradictory. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in order to study whether the multidisciplinary care of heart failure patients promoted with telemonitoring leads to decreased HF-related hospitalization. HF patients were eligible whose left ventricular ejection fraction was lower than 35%, NYHA functional class ≥2, and who needed regular follow-up. Patients in the telemonitoring group (n=47) measured their body weight, blood pressure, and pulse and answered symptom-related questions on a weekly basis, reporting their values to the heart failure nurse using a mobile phone app. The heart failure nurse followed the status of patients weekly and if necessary contacted the patient. The primary outcome was the number of HF-related hospital days. Control patients (n=47) received multidisciplinary treatment according to standard practices. Patients' clinical status, use of health care resources, adherence, and user experience from the patients' and the health care professionals' perspective were studied. Adherence, calculated as a proportion of weekly submitted self-measurements, was close to 90%. No difference was found in the number of HF-related hospital days (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=0.812, P=.351), which was the primary outcome. The intervention group used more health care resources: they paid an increased number of visits to the nurse (IRR=1.73, Ptelemonitoring did not reduce the number of patients' HF-related hospital days and did not improve the patients' clinical condition. Patients in the telemonitoring group contacted the Cardiology Outpatient Clinic more frequently, and on this way increased the use of health care resources

  2. Randomised trial of low-dose amiodarone in severe congestive heart failure. Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina (GESICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doval, H C; Nul, D R; Grancelli, H O; Perrone, S V; Bortman, G R; Curiel, R

    1994-08-20

    In severe heart failure many deaths are sudden and are presumed to be due to ventricular arrhythmias. The GESICA trial evaluated the effect of low-dose amiodarone on two-year mortality in patients with severe heart failure. Our prospective multicentre trial included 516 patients on optimal standard treatment for heart failure. Patients were randomised to 300 mg/day amiodarone (260) or to standard treatment (256). Intention-to-treat analysis showed 87 deaths in the amiodarone group (33.5%) compared with 106 in the control group (41.4%) (risk reduction 28%; 95% CI 4%-45%; log rank test p = 0.024). There were reductions in both sudden death (risk reduction 27%; p = 0.16) and death due to progressive heart failure (risk reduction 23%; p = 0.16). Fewer patients in the amiodarone group died or were admitted to hospital due to worsening heart failure (119 versus 149 in the control group; risk reduction 31%; 95% CI 13-46%; p = 0.0024). The decrease in mortality and hospital admission was present in all subgroups examined and independent of the presence of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. Side-effects were reported in 17 patients (6.1%); amiodarone was withdrawn in 12. Low-dose amiodarone proved to be an effective and reliable treatment, reducing mortality and hospital admission in patients with severe heart failure independently of the presence of complex ventricular arrhythmias.

  3. Fluid status telemedicine alerts for heart failure: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Drexler, Helmut; Oswald, Hanno; Rybak, Karin; Bosch, Ralph; Butter, Christian; Klein, Gunnar; Gerritse, Bart; Monteiro, Joao; Israel, Carsten; Bimmel, Dieter; Käab, Stefan; Huegl, Burkhard; Brachmann, Johannes

    2016-11-01

    Hospital admissions are frequently preceded by increased pulmonary congestion in heart failure (HF) patients. This study evaluated whether early automated fluid status alert notification via telemedicine improves outcome in HF patients. Patients recently implanted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) with or without cardiac resynchronization therapy were eligible if one of three conditions was met: prior HF hospitalization, recent diuretic treatment, or recent brain natriuretic peptide increase. Eligible patients were randomized (1:1) to have fluid status alerts automatically transmitted as inaudible text message alerts to the responsible physician or to receive standard care (no alerts). In the intervention arm, following a telemedicine alert, a protocol-specified algorithm with remote review of device data and telephone contact was prescribed to assess symptoms and initiate treatment. The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause death and cardiovascular hospitalization. We followed 1002 patients for an average of 1.9 years. The primary endpoint occurred in 227 patients (45.0%) in the intervention arm and 239 patients (48.1%) in the control arm [hazard ratio, HR, 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-1.04; P = 0.13]. There were 59 (11.7%) deaths in the intervention arm and 63 (12.7%) in the control arm (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.62-1.28; P = 0.52). Twenty-four per cent of alerts were not transmitted and 30% were followed by a medical intervention. Among ICD patients with advanced HF, fluid status telemedicine alerts did not significantly improve outcomes. Adherence to treatment protocols by physicians and patients might be challenge for further developments in the telemedicine field. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A randomized controlled trial to assess effectiveness of a nurse-led home-based heart failure management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamata Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing in India. It is a chronic condition, and poor management can increase the risk and frequency of acute episodes resulting in poor quality of life (QOL, frequent hospital admissions, and mortality. Disease management programs can improve medication adherence and patient's QOL. Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of nurse-led home-based heart failure management program (HOME-N. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted among fifty outpatient heart failure (HF patients visiting a tertiary care hospital. The control group received usual routine care, whereas the experimental group received HOME-N, which included formal health teaching, a HF checklist (Hriday card, telemonitoring of vital parameters (blood pressure, heart rate, and weight weekly through a mobile application named as “Dhadkan” and telephonic follow-up for 3 months. Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ and adherence to refills and medications scale were used to assess QOL and drug adherence, respectively, in the study patients. The outcome measures were the QOL, drug compliance, hospitalization, and mortality rate. Results: At baseline, the demographic and morbidity profile, and QOL and drug compliance scores of both groups were comparable. After intervention, the QOL domain score of KCCQ as well as drug compliance improved significantly both within the experimental group (P = 0.001, P = 0.001 and as compared to control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.004, respectively. Conclusion: The HOME-N was significantly effective in improving QOL and drug compliance in HF patients.

  5. A comparative analysis of the results from 4 trials of beta-blocker therapy for heart failure: BEST, CIBIS-II, MERIT-HF, and COPERNICUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Michael J; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Massie, Barry M; Deedwania, Prakash; Follmann, Dean; Kovar, David; Murray, David; Oren, Ron; Rosenberg, Yves; Young, James; Zile, Michael; Eichhorn, Eric

    2003-10-01

    Recent large randomized, controlled trials (BEST [Beta-blocker Evaluation of Survival Trial], CIBIS-II [Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Trial II], COPERNICUS [Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival Study], and MERIT-HF [Metoprolol Randomized Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure]) have addressed the usefulness of beta-blockade in the treatment of advanced heart failure. CIBIS-II, COPERNICUS, and MERIT-HF have shown that beta-blocker treatment with bisoprolol, carvedilol, and metoprolol XL, respectively, reduce mortality in advanced heart failure patients, whereas BEST found a statistically nonsignificant trend toward reduced mortality with bucindolol. We conducted a post hoc analysis to determine whether the response to beta-blockade in BEST could be related to differences in the clinical and demographic characteristics of the study populations. We generated a sample from BEST to resemble the patient cohorts studied in CIBIS-II and MERIT-HF to find out whether the response to beta-blocker therapy was similar to that reported in the other trials. These findings are further compared with COPERNICUS, which entered patients with more severe heart failure. To achieve conformity with the entry criteria for CIBIS-II and MERIT-HF, the BEST study population was adjusted to exclude patients with systolic blood pressure 80 years (exclusion criteria employed in those trials). The BEST comparison subgroup (BCG) was further modified to more closely reflect the racial demographics reported for patients enrolled in CIBIS-II and MERIT-HF. The association of beta-blocker therapy with overall survival and survival free of cardiac death, sudden cardiac death, and progressive pump failure in the BCG was assessed. In the BCG subgroup, bucindolol treatment was associated with significantly lower risk of death from all causes (hazard ratio (HR)=0.77 [95% CI=0.65, 0.92]), cardiovascular death (HR=0.71 [0.58, 0.86]), sudden death (HR=0.77 [0.59, 0.999]), and pump

  6. Renin angiotensin system inhibitors for patients with stable coronary artery disease without heart failure: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakheri, Robert; Wandel, Simon; Toklu, Bora; Wandel, Jasmin; Messerli, Franz H

    2017-01-01

    Objective To critically evaluate the efficacy of renin angiotensin system inhibitors (RASi) in patients with coronary artery disease without heart failure, compared with active controls or placebo. Design Meta-analysis of randomized trials. Data sources PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases until 1 May 2016. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomized trials of RASi versus placebo or active controls in patients with stable coronary artery disease without heart failure (defined as left ventricular ejection fraction ≥40% or without clinical heart failure). Each trial had to enroll at least 100 patients with coronary artery disease without heart failure, with at least one year’s follow-up. Studies were excluded if they were redacted or compared use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors with angiotensin receptor blockers. Outcomes were death, cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, heart failure, revascularization, incident diabetes, and drug withdrawal due to adverse effects. Results 24 trials with 198 275 patient years of follow-up were included. RASi reduced the risk of all cause mortality (rate ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.72 to 0.98), cardiovascular mortality (0.74, 0.59 to 0.94), myocardial infarction (0.82, 0.76 to 0.88), stroke (0.79, 0.70 to 0.89), angina, heart failure, and revascularization when compared with placebo but not when compared with active controls (all cause mortality, 1.05, 0.94 to 1.17; Pinteraction=0.006; cardiovascular mortality, 1.08, 0.93 to 1.25, Pinteraction14.10 deaths and >7.65 cardiovascular deaths per 1000 patient years) but not in those with low control event rates. Conclusions In patients with stable coronary artery disease without heart failure, RASi reduced cardiovascular events and death only when compared with placebo but not when compared with active controls. Even among placebo controlled trials in this study, the benefit of RASi was mainly seen in trials with higher

  7. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or Angiotensin Receptor Blockers in Patients Without Heart Failure? Insights From 254,301 Patients From Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangalore, Sripal; Fakheri, Robert; Toklu, Bora; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Weintraub, Howard; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in patients without heart failure. Meta-analysis of randomized trials identified using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials searches from January 1, 1980, through April 13, 2015, of ACEis and ARBs compared with placebo or active controls and corroborated with head-to-head trials of ARBs vs ACEis. Outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction (MI), angina, stroke, heart failure, revascularization, and new-onset diabetes. Our search yielded 106 randomized trials that enrolled 254,301 patients. Compared with placebo, ACEis but not ARBs reduced the outcomes of all-cause mortality (ACEis vs placebo: relative risk [RR], 0.89; 95% CI, 0.80-1.00; ARBs vs placebo: RR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.96-1.06; Pinteraction=.04), cardiovascular death (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.70-0.99 and RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.92-1.14; Pinteraction=.05), and MI (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.78-0.90 and RR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.85-1.03; Pinteraction=.06). The meta-regression analysis revealed that the difference between ACEis and ARBs compared with placebo was due to a higher placebo event rate in the ACEis trials (most of these trials were conducted a decade earlier than the ARB trials) for the outcome of all-cause mortality (P=.001), cardiovascular death (PACEis vs placebo and ARBs vs placebo (Pinteraction>.05). Head-to-head comparison trials of ARBs vs ACEis exhibited no difference in outcomes except for a lower risk of drug withdrawal due to adverse effects with ARBs (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.65-0.81). In patients without heart failure, evidence from placebo-controlled trials (restricted to trials after 2000), active controlled trials, and head-to-head randomized trials all suggest ARBs to be as efficacious and safe as ACEis, with the added advantage of better tolerability. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research

  8. Dementia-related adverse events in PARADIGM-HF and other trials in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jane A; Shen, Li; Jhund, Pardeep S; Kristensen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Chen, Fabian; Gong, Jianjian; Lefkowitz, Martin P; Rouleau, Jean L; Shi, Victor C; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R; Solomon, Scott D; Packer, Milton; McMurray, John J V

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of neprilysin, an enzyme degrading natriuretic and other vasoactive peptides, is beneficial in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), as shown in PARADIGM-HF which compared the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) sacubitril/valsartan with enalapril. As neprilysin is also one of many enzymes clearing amyloid-β peptides from the brain, there is a theoretical concern about the long-term effects of sacubitril/valsartan on cognition. Therefore, we have examined dementia-related adverse effects (AEs) in PARADIGM-HF and placed these findings in the context of other recently conducted HFrEF trials. In PARADIGM-HF, patients with symptomatic HFrEF were randomized to sacubitril/valsartan 97/103 mg b.i.d. or enalapril 10 mg b.i.d. in a 1:1 ratio. We systematically searched AE reports, coded using the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA), using Standardized MedDRA Queries (SMQs) with 'broad' and 'narrow' preferred terms related to dementia. In PARADIGM-HF, 8399 patients aged 18-96 years were randomized and followed for a median of 2.25 years (up to 4.3 years). The narrow SMQ search identified 27 dementia-related AEs: 15 (0.36%) on enalapril and 12 (0.29%) on sacubitril/valsartan [hazard ratio (HR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33-1.59]. The broad search identified 97 (2.30%) and 104 (2.48%) AEs (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.75-1.37), respectively. The rates of dementia-related AEs in both treatment groups in PARADIGM-HF were similar to those in three other recent trials in HFrEF. We found no evidence that sacubitril/valsartan, compared with enalapril, increased dementia-related AEs, although longer follow-up may be necessary to detect such a signal and more sensitive tools are needed to detect lesser degrees of cognitive impairment. Further studies to address this question are warranted. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of

  9. Treatment of atrial fibrillation with a dual defibrillator in heart failure patients (TRADE HF: protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandinetti Giuseppe

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure(HF and atrial fibrillation(AF frequently coexist in the same patient and are associated with increased mortality and frequent hospitalizations. As the concomitance of AF and HF is often associated with a poor prognosis, the prompt treatment of AF in HF patients may significantly improve outcome. Methods/design Recent implantable cardiac resynchronization (CRT devices allow electrical therapies to treat AF automatically. TRADE-HF (trial registration: NCT00345592; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov is a prospective, randomized, double arm study aimed at demonstrating the efficacy of an automatic, device-based therapy for treatment of atrial tachycardia and fibrillation(AT/AF in patients indicated for CRT. The study compares automatic electrical therapy to a traditional more usual treatment of AT/AF: the goal is to demonstrate a reduction in a combined endpoint of unplanned hospitalizations for cardiac reasons, death from cardiovascular causes or permanent AF when using automatic atrial therapy as compared to the traditional approach involving hospitalization for symptoms and in-hospital treatment of AT/AF. Discussion CRT pacemaker with the additional ability to convert AF as well as ventricular arrhythmias may play a simultaneous role in rhythm control and HF treatment. The value of the systematic implantation of CRT ICDs with the capacity to deliver atrial therapy in HF patients at risk of AF has not yet been explored. The TRADE-HF study will assess in CRT patients whether a strategy based on automatic management of atrial arrhythmias might be a valuable option to reduce the number of hospital admission and to reduce the progression the arrhythmia to a permanent form. Trial registration NCT00345592

  10. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing isolated left ventricular and biventricular pacing in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yixiu; Pan, Wenzhi; Su, Yangang; Ge, Junbo

    2011-10-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been mostly achieved by biventricular pacing (BVP) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), although it can also be provided by left ventricular pacing (LVP). The superiority of BVP over LVP remains uncertain. The present meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was performed to compare the effects of LVP to BVP in patients with CHF. Outcomes analyzed included clinical status (6-minute walk distance, peak oxygen consumption, quality of life, New York Heart Association class), LV function (LV ejection fraction), and LV remodeling (LV end-systolic volume). Five trials fulfilled criteria for inclusion in analysis, which included 574 patients with CHF indicated for CRT. After a midterm follow-up, pooled analysis demonstrated that LVP resulted in similar improvements in 6-minute walk distance (weighted mean difference [WMD] 11.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] -12.39 to 34.90, p = 0.35), quality of life (WMD 0.34, 95% CI -3.72 to 4.39, p = 0.87), peak oxygen consumption (WMD 1.00, 95% CI -0.84 to 2.85, p = 0.29), and New York Heart Association class (WMD -0.19, 95% CI -0.79 to 0.42, p = 0.54). There was a trend toward a superiority of BVP over LVP for LV ejection fraction (WMD 1.28, 95% CI -0.11 to 2.68, p = 0.07) and LV end-systolic volume (WMD -5.73, 95% CI -11.86 to 0.39, p = 0.07). In conclusion, LVP achieves similar improvement in clinical status as BVP in patients with CHF, whereas there was a trend toward superiority of BVP over LVP for LV reverse modeling and systolic function.

  11. A theory-based exercise intervention in patients with heart failure: A protocol for randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajati, Fatemeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Sadeghi, Masoomeh; Tavakol, Kamran; Feizi, Awat; Pashaei, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Regular exercise has been associated with improved quality of life (QoL) in patients with heart failure (HF). However, less is known on the theoretical framework, depicting how educational intervention on psychological, social, and cognitive variables affects physical activity (PA). The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a social cognitive theory-based (SCT-based) exercise intervention in patients with HF. Materials and Methods: This is a randomized controlled trial, with measurements at baseline, immediately following the intervention, and at 1, 3, and 6 months follow-up. Sixty patients who are referred to the cardiac rehabilitation (CR) unit and meet the inclusion criteria will be randomly allocated to either an intervention group or a usual-care control group. Data will be collected using various methods (i.e., questionnaires, physical tests, paraclinical tests, patients’ interviews, and focus groups). The patients in the intervention group will receive eight face-to-face counseling sessions, two focus groups, and six educational sessions over a 2-month period. The intervention will include watching videos, using book and pamphlets, and sending short massage services to the participants. The primary outcome measures are PA and QoL. The secondary outcome measures will be the components of SCT, heart rate and blood pressure at rest, body mass index, left ventricular ejection fraction, exercise capacity, and maximum heart rate. Conclusion: The findings of this trial may assist with the development of a theoretical model for exercise intervention in CR. The intervention seems to be promising and has the potential to bridge the gap of the usually limited and incoherent provision of educational care in the CR setting. PMID:24379841

  12. Impaired left ventricular global longitudinal strain in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: insights from the RELAX trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Adam D; McNulty, Steven; Alenezi, Fawaz; Ersboll, Mads; Vader, Justin M; Oh, Jae K; Lin, Grace; Redfield, Margaret M; Lewis, Gregory; Semigran, Marc J; Anstrom, Kevin J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Velazquez, Eric J

    2017-07-01

    While abnormal left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) has been described in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), its prevalence and clinical significance are poorly understood. Patients enrolled in the RELAX trial of sildenafil in HFpEF (LV ejection fraction ≥50%) in whom two-dimensional, speckle-tracking LV GLS was possible (n = 187) were analysed. The distribution of LV GLS and its associations with clinical characteristics, LV structure and function, biomarkers, exercise capacity and quality of life were assessed. Baseline median LV GLS was -14.6% (25th and 75th percentile, -17.0% and -11.9%, respectively) and abnormal (≥ - 16%) in 122/187 (65%) patients. Patients in the tertile with the best LV GLS had lower N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) [median 505 pg/mL (161, 1065) vs. 875 pg/mL (488, 1802), P = 0.008) and lower collagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) levels [median 6.7 µg/L (5.1, 8.1) vs. 8.1 µg/L (6.5, 10.5), P = 0.001] compared with the tertile with the worst LV GLS. There was also a modest linear relationship with LV GLS and log-transformed NT-proBNP and PIIINP (r = 0.29, P < 0.001 and r = 0.19, P = 0.009, respectively). We observed no linear association of LV GLS with Minnesota Living with Heart Failure scores, 6-min walk distance, peak oxygen consumption, or expiratory minute ventilation/carbon dioxide excretion slope. Impaired LV GLS is common among HFpEF patients, indicating the presence of covert systolic dysfunction despite normal LV ejection fraction. Impaired LV GLS was associated with biomarkers of wall stress and collagen synthesis and diastolic dysfunction but not with quality of life or exercise capacity, suggesting other processes may be more responsible for these aspects of the HFpEF syndrome. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  13. Home-based exercise rehabilitation in addition to specialist heart failure nurse care: design, rationale and recruitment to the Birmingham Rehabilitation Uptake Maximisation study for patients with congestive heart failure (BRUM-CHF: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingram Jackie T

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise has been shown to be beneficial for selected patients with heart failure, but questions remain over its effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and uptake in a real world setting. This paper describes the design, rationale and recruitment for a randomised controlled trial that will explore the effectiveness and uptake of a predominantly home-based exercise rehabilitation programme, as well as its cost-effectiveness and patient acceptability. Methods/design Randomised controlled trial comparing specialist heart failure nurse care plus a nurse-led predominantly home-based exercise intervention against specialist heart failure nurse care alone in a multiethnic city population, served by two NHS Trusts and one primary care setting, in the United Kingdom. 169 English speaking patients with stable heart failure, defined as systolic impairment (ejection fraction ≤ 40%. with one or more hospital admissions with clinical heart failure or New York Heart Association (NYHA II/III within previous 24-months were recruited. Main outcome measures at 1 year: Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, incremental shuttle walk test, death or admission with heart failure or myocardial infarction, health care utilisation and costs. Interviews with purposive samples of patients to gain qualitative information about acceptability and adherence to exercise, views about their treatment, self-management of their heart failure and reasons why some patients declined to participate. The records of 1639 patients managed by specialist heart failure services were screened, of which 997 (61% were ineligible, due to ejection fraction>40%, current NYHA IV, no admission or NYHA II or more within the previous 2 years, or serious co-morbidities preventing physical activity. 642 patients were contacted: 289 (45% declined to participate, 183 (39% had an exclusion criterion and 169 (26% agreed to randomisation. Discussion Due to safety considerations

  14. Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study - congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, A.C.; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Thayssen, P.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease. The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether...... repeated infusions would have additional positive effects. AIMS: To assess whether two treatments of intracoronary infusion of bone marrow stem cells, administered 4 months apart, could improve left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure. METHODS: The study......, NYHA class improved (pstem cell treatment in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  15. A phase I/II trial of Erlotinib in higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia after azacitidine failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thepot, Sylvain; Boehrer, Simone; Seegers, Valérie; Prebet, Thomas; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Wattel, Eric; Delaunay, Jacques; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Hunault, Mathilde; Jourdan, Eric; Chermat, Fatiha; Sebert, Marie; Kroemer, Guido; Fenaux, Pierre; Adès, Lionel

    2014-12-01

    Survival after azacitidine (AZA) failure in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is poor and new treatment options are needed. Erlotinib, an oral inhibitor of the epidermal-growth-factor-receptor (EGFR), has shown in preclinical models some efficacy in higher risk MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this phase I/II trial, 30 patients received 100mg/day (n=5) or 150mg/day (n=25) of Erlotinib orally after primary or secondary resistance to AZA treatment. Eighteen MDS and 12 AML patients were treated. This outpatient treatment was well tolerated with limited grade III-IV extra hematological toxicities (skin (n=1), and diarrhea (n=3). Response was observed in 6 patients (20%) including 1 complete remission (CR), 1 marrow CR and 4 hematological improvement (2 erythroid and 2 on platelets). Median duration of response was 5 months. Erlotinib appears to induce a significant number of responses in higher risk MDS/AML having failed AZA treatment. Given the good safety profile of Erlotinib, its combination with other drugs could be tested in the future in MDS and AML.

  16. Effects of self-management intervention on health outcomes of patients with heart failure: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holroyd-Leduc Jayna M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization among adults over 65. Over 60% of patients die within 10 years of first onset of symptoms. The objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of self-management interventions on hospital readmission rates, mortality, and health-related quality of life in patients diagnosed with heart failure. Methods The study is a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. The following data sources were used: MEDLINE (1966-11/2005, EMBASE (1980-11/2005, CINAHL (1982-11/2005, the ACP Journal Club database (to 11/2005, the Cochrane Central Trial Registry and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (to 11/2005; article reference lists; and experts in the field. We included randomized controlled trials of self-management interventions that enrolled patients 18 years of age or older who were diagnosed with heart failure. The primary outcomes of interest were all-cause hospital readmissions, hospital readmissions due to heart failure, and mortality. Secondary outcomes were compliance with treatment and quality of life scores. Three reviewers independently assessed the quality of each study and abstracted the results. For each included study, we computed the pooled odds ratios (OR for all-cause hospital readmission, hospital readmission due to heart failure, and death. We used a fixed effects model to quantitatively synthesize results. We were not able to pool effects on health-related quality of life and measures of compliance with treatment, but we summarized the findings from the relevant studies. We also summarized the reported cost savings. Results From 671 citations that were identified, 6 randomized trials with 857 patients were included in the review. Self-management decreased all-cause hospital readmissions (OR 0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.44 to 0.80, P = 0.001 and heart failure readmissions (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.71, P = 0.001. The effect on

  17. Treatment with verapamil and trandolapril in patients with congestive heart failure and angina pectoris or myocardial infarction. The DAVIT Study Group. Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F; Hagerup, L; Sigurd, B

    1997-01-01

    In a double-blind, randomized trial in a consecutive group of postinfarct patients in treatment with diuretic agents for congestive heart failure, the 3 month rate of cardiac events (i.e., death, repeat infarction, unstable angina pectoris, or repeat admission because of heart failure) was 14......% in patients treated with verapamil and trandolapril and 35% in patients treated with trandolapril (p = 0.01). In another study of patients with angina pectoris and left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40%, trandolapril plus verapamil improved exercise duration and left ventricular ejection fraction...

  18. Late outcome of a controlled trial of enalapril treatment in progressive chronic renal failure. Hard end-points and influence of proteinuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Strandgaard, S; Leyssac, P P

    1995-01-01

    .5-39.5%). The influence of baseline proteinuria on clinical outcome was analysed. In the original control group, baseline renal clearances of albumin (Calb) and immunoglobulin G (CIgG) were significantly lower in patients surviving without renal replacement therapy at follow-up than in patients who ultimately developed...... end-stage renal failure (ESRF) (P CIgG were negatively correlated with the rate of change in GFR during the controlled trial (r = -0.37, P

  19. Baseline characteristics and treatment of patients in prospective comparison of ARNI with ACEI to determine impact on global mortality and morbidity in heart failure trial (PARADIGM-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, John J V; Packer, Milton; Desai, Akshay S; Gong, Jianjian; Lefkowitz, Martin; Rizkala, Adel R; Rouleau, Jean L; Shi, Victor C; Solomon, Scott D; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R

    2014-07-01

    To describe the baseline characteristics and treatment of the patients randomized in the PARADIGM-HF (Prospective comparison of ARNi with ACEi to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and morbidity in Heart Failure) trial, testing the hypothesis that the strategy of simultaneously blocking the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and augmenting natriuretic peptides with LCZ696 200 mg b.i.d. is superior to enalapril 10 mg b.i.d. in reducing mortality and morbidity in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. Key demographic, clinical and laboratory findings, along with baseline treatment, are reported and compared with those of patients in the treatment arm of the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD-T) and more contemporary drug and device trials in heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. The mean age of the 8442 patients in PARADIGM-HF is 64 (SD 11) years and 78% are male, which is similar to SOLVD-T and more recent trials. Despite extensive background therapy with beta-blockers (93% patients) and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (60%), patients in PARADIGM-HF have persisting symptoms and signs, reduced health related quality of life, a low LVEF (mean 29 ± SD 6%) and elevated N-terminal-proB type-natriuretic peptide levels (median 1608 inter-quartile range 886-3221 pg/mL). PARADIGM-HF will determine whether LCZ696 is more beneficial than enalapril when added to other disease-modifying therapies and if further augmentation of endogenous natriuretic peptides will reduce morbidity and mortality in heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  20. Phase 3 trial of defibrotide for the treatment of severe veno-occlusive disease and multi-organ failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riches, Marcie L.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Brochstein, Joel A.; Mineishi, Shin; Termuhlen, Amanda M.; Arai, Sally; Grupp, Stephan A.; Guinan, Eva C.; Martin, Paul L.; Steinbach, Gideon; Krishnan, Amrita; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Giralt, Sergio; Rodriguez, Tulio; Duerst, Reggie; Doyle, John; Antin, Joseph H.; Smith, Angela; Lehmann, Leslie; Champlin, Richard; Gillio, Alfred; Bajwa, Rajinder; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Massaro, Joseph; Warren, Diane; Miloslavsky, Maja; Hume, Robin L.; Iacobelli, Massimo; Nejadnik, Bijan; Hannah, Alison L.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also called sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), is a potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Untreated hepatic VOD/SOS with multi-organ failure (MOF) is associated with >80% mortality. Defibrotide has shown promising efficacy treating hepatic VOD/SOS with MOF in phase 2 studies. This phase 3 study investigated safety and efficacy of defibrotide in patients with established hepatic VOD/SOS and advanced MOF. Patients (n = 102) given defibrotide 25 mg/kg per day were compared with 32 historical controls identified out of 6867 medical charts of HSCT patients by blinded independent reviewers. Baseline characteristics between groups were well balanced. The primary endpoint was survival at day +100 post-HSCT; observed rates equaled 38.2% in the defibrotide group and 25% in the controls (23% estimated difference; 95.1% confidence interval [CI], 5.2-40.8; P = .0109, using a propensity-adjusted analysis). Observed day +100 complete response (CR) rates equaled 25.5% for defibrotide and 12.5% for controls (19% difference using similar methodology; 95.1% CI, 3.5-34.6; P = .0160). Defibrotide was generally well tolerated with manageable toxicity. Related adverse events (AEs) included hemorrhage or hypotension; incidence of common hemorrhagic AEs (including pulmonary alveolar [11.8% and 15.6%] and gastrointestinal bleeding [7.8% and 9.4%]) was similar between the defibrotide and control groups, respectively. Defibrotide was associated with significant improvement in day +100 survival and CR rate. The historical-control methodology offers a novel, meaningful approach for phase 3 evaluation of orphan diseases associated with high mortality. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00358501. PMID:26825712

  1. Diuretic Strategies in Acute Heart Failure and Renal Dysfunction: Conventional vs Carbohydrate Antigen 125-guided Strategy. Clinical Trial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Blas, Sergio; Bonanad, Clara; Llàcer, Pau; Ventura, Silvia; Núñez, José María; Sánchez, Ruth; Chamorro, Carlos; Fácila, Lorenzo; de la Espriella, Rafael; Vaquer, Juana María; Cordero, Alberto; Roqué, Mercè; Ortiz, Víctor; Racugno, Paolo; Bodí, Vicent; Valero, Ernesto; Santas, Enrique; Moreno, María Del Carmen; Miñana, Gema; Carratalá, Arturo; Bondanza, Lourdes; Payá, Ana; Cardells, Ingrid; Heredia, Raquel; Pellicer, Mauricio; Valls, Guillermo; Palau, Patricia; Bosch, María José; Raso, Rafael; Sánchez, Andrés; Bertomeu-González, Vicente; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Montagud-Balaguer, Vicente; Albiach-Montañana, Cristina; Pendás-Meneau, Jezabel; Marcaida, Goitzane; Cervantes-García, Sonia; San Antonio, Rodolfo; de Mingo, Elisabet; Chorro, Francisco J; Sanchis, Juan; Núñez, Julio

    2017-03-21

    The optimal treatment of patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and cardiorenal syndrome type 1 (CRS-1) is far from being well-defined. Arterial hypoperfusion in concert with venous congestion plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CRS-I. Plasma carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) has emerged as a surrogate of fluid overload in AHF. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of CA125 for tailoring the intensity of diuretic therapy in patients with CRS-1. Multicenter, open-label, parallel clinical trial, in which patients with AHF and serum creatinine ≥ 1.4mg/dL on admission will be randomized to: a) standard diuretic strategy: titration-based on conventional clinical and biochemical evaluation, or b) diuretic strategy based on CA125: high dose if CA125 > 35 U/mL, and low doses otherwise. The main endpoint will be renal function changes at 24 and 72hours after therapy initiation. Secondary endpoints will include: a) clinical and biochemical changes at 24 and 72hours, and b) renal function changes and major clinical events at 30 days. The results of this study will add important knowledge on the usefulness of CA125 for guiding diuretic treatment in CRS-1. In addition, it will pave the way toward a better knowledge of the pathophysiology of this challenging situation. We hypothesize that higher levels of CA125 will identify a patient population with CRS-1 who could benefit from the use of a more intense diuretic strategy. Conversely, low levels of this glycoprotein could select those patients who would be harmed by high diuretic doses. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Phase 3 trial of defibrotide for the treatment of severe veno-occlusive disease and multi-organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Paul G; Riches, Marcie L; Kernan, Nancy A; Brochstein, Joel A; Mineishi, Shin; Termuhlen, Amanda M; Arai, Sally; Grupp, Stephan A; Guinan, Eva C; Martin, Paul L; Steinbach, Gideon; Krishnan, Amrita; Nemecek, Eneida R; Giralt, Sergio; Rodriguez, Tulio; Duerst, Reggie; Doyle, John; Antin, Joseph H; Smith, Angela; Lehmann, Leslie; Champlin, Richard; Gillio, Alfred; Bajwa, Rajinder; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Massaro, Joseph; Warren, Diane; Miloslavsky, Maja; Hume, Robin L; Iacobelli, Massimo; Nejadnik, Bijan; Hannah, Alison L; Soiffer, Robert J

    2016-03-31

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also called sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), is a potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Untreated hepatic VOD/SOS with multi-organ failure (MOF) is associated with >80% mortality. Defibrotide has shown promising efficacy treating hepatic VOD/SOS with MOF in phase 2 studies. This phase 3 study investigated safety and efficacy of defibrotide in patients with established hepatic VOD/SOS and advanced MOF. Patients (n = 102) given defibrotide 25 mg/kg per day were compared with 32 historical controls identified out of 6867 medical charts of HSCT patients by blinded independent reviewers. Baseline characteristics between groups were well balanced. The primary endpoint was survival at day +100 post-HSCT; observed rates equaled 38.2% in the defibrotide group and 25% in the controls (23% estimated difference; 95.1% confidence interval [CI], 5.2-40.8;P= .0109, using a propensity-adjusted analysis). Observed day +100 complete response (CR) rates equaled 25.5% for defibrotide and 12.5% for controls (19% difference using similar methodology; 95.1% CI, 3.5-34.6;P= .0160). Defibrotide was generally well tolerated with manageable toxicity. Related adverse events (AEs) included hemorrhage or hypotension; incidence of common hemorrhagic AEs (including pulmonary alveolar [11.8% and 15.6%] and gastrointestinal bleeding [7.8% and 9.4%]) was similar between the defibrotide and control groups, respectively. Defibrotide was associated with significant improvement in day +100 survival and CR rate. The historical-control methodology offers a novel, meaningful approach for phase 3 evaluation of orphan diseases associated with high mortality. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #.

  3. Telomere length and outcomes in ischaemic heart failure : Data from the COntrolled ROsuvastatin multiNAtional Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haver, Vincent G.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Kjekshus, John; Fox, Jayne C.; Wedel, Hans; Wikstrand, John; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; McMurray, John J. V.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Harst, Pim

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Leucocyte telomere length is considered a marker of biological ageing and has been suggested to be shorter in patients with CAD and heart failure compared with healthy controls. The aim of this study was to determine whether telomere length is associated with clinical outcomes in patients with

  4. Clinical Trials Update: CAPRICORN, COPERNICUS, MIRACLE, STAF, RITZ-2, RECOVER and RENAISSANCE and cachexia and cholesterol in heart failure. Highlights of the Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, A; Cleland, J G; Crabbe, S; Ford, S; Thackray, S; Houghton, T; Clark, A

    2001-06-01

    This is a synopsis of presentations made at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) in 2001 summarising recent research developments relating to heart failure. Clinical studies of particular interest to physicians with an interest in heart failure and its prevention are reviewed. The COPERNICUS trial lends further support to the use of the beta-blocker, carvedilol, in severe heart failure and the CAPRICORN trial to its use in patients with post-infarction left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The MIRACLE study reinforces the evidence from three smaller trials that cardiac resynchronisation therapy is an effective treatment for the relief of symptoms in patients with severe heart failure and cardiac dyssynchrony. The STAF trial casts further doubt on the wisdom of cardioversion as a routine strategy for the management of chronic atrial fibrillation. The RITZ-2 trial suggests that an intravenous, non-selective endothelin antagonist is effective in improving haemodynamics and symptoms and possibly in reducing morbidity in severe heart failure. Observational studies in heart failure suggest that a moderate excess of body fat and elevated blood cholesterol may be desirable in patients with heart failure, challenging the current non-evidenced-based vogue for cholesterol lowering therapy in heart failure. The RENAISSANCE and RECOVER outcome studies of etanercept, a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor analogue that blocks the effect of TNF, were stopped because of lack of evidence of benefit shortly after the ACC.

  5. The EARLY ALLIANCE prevention trial: a dual design to test reduction of risk for conduct problems, substance abuse, and school failure in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, R J; Dumas, J E; Smith, E P; Laughlin, J E

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes a preventive intervention trial called EARLY ALLIANCE which is aimed at reducing risk for three adverse outcomes in childhood and adolescence: conduct problems, substance abuse, and school failure. The structure of the prevention trial is unique because two linked designs are being implemented concurrently. The primary design focuses on children at elevated risk for adverse outcomes, and compares a targeted, multicontextual preventive intervention with family, classroom, peer relational, and academic components to a universal, schoolwide preventive intervention that emphasizes peaceful conflict management and serves as a "usual care" control condition. The secondary design focuses on children at lower risk for adverse outcomes and compares a universally administered classroom program to the control condition. The paper describes the theoretical foundation for EARLY ALLIANCE, the goals of the prevention trial, the rationale for design choices, and the methods employed.

  6. Clinical trials in acute heart failure: simpler solutions to complex problems. Consensus document arising from a European Society of Cardiology cardiovascular round-table think tank on acute heart failure, 12 May 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Komajda, Michel; Maggioni, Aldo P; Zannad, Faiez; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Metra, Marco; Dargie, Henry J

    2011-12-01

    This European consensus document aims to identify the main reasons for the apparent lack of progress in the introduction of new medicines for acute heart failure. Relevant issues include not only the heterogeneity of the patient group but also the pharmacology of the medicines themselves and the design of the trials. Above all, this document attempts to provide some pragmatic solutions to this complex syndrome to simplify the execution of meaningful therapeutic endeavours in this area of undoubted unmet clinical need in the future.

  7. Renal denervation in heart failure with normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Rationale and design of the DIASTOLE (DenervatIon of the renAl Sympathetic nerves in hearT failure with nOrmal Lv Ejection fraction) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloop, Willemien L; Beeftink, Martine M A; Nap, Alex; Bots, Michiel L; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Appelman, Yolande E; Cramer, Maarten-Jan; Agema, Willem R P; Scholtens, Asbjorn M; Doevendans, Pieter A; Allaart, Cor P; Voskuil, Michiel

    2013-12-01

    Aim Increasing evidence suggests an important role for hyperactivation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the clinical phenomena of heart failure with normal LVEF (HFNEF) and hypertension. Moreover, the level of renal sympathetic activation is directly related to the severity of heart failure. Since percutaneous renal denervation (pRDN) has been shown to be effective in modulating elevated SNS activity in patients with hypertension, it can be hypothesized that pRDN has a positive effect on HFNEF. The DIASTOLE trial will investigate whether renal sympathetic denervation influences parameters of HFNEF. Methods DIASTOLE is a multicentre, randomized controlled trial. Sixty patients, diagnosed with HFNEF and treated for hypertension, will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to undergo renal denervation on top of medical treatment (n = 30) or to maintain medical treatment alone (n = 30). The primary objective is to investigate the efficacy of pRDN by means of pulsed wave Doppler echocardiographic parameters. Secondary objectives include safety of pRDN and a comparison of changes in the following parameters after pRDN: LV mass, LV volume, LVEF, and left atrial volume as determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Also, MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) uptake and washout, BNP levels, blood pressure, heart rate variability, exercise capacity, and quality of life will be assessed. Perspective DIASTOLE is a randomized controlled trial evaluating renal denervation as a treatment option for HFNEF. The results of the current trial will provide important information regarding the treatment of HFNEF, and therefore may have major impact on future therapeutic strategies. Trail registration NCT01583881.

  8. The real world mental health needs of heart failure patients are not reflected by the depression randomized controlled trial evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip J Tully

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: International depression screening guidelines in heart failure (HF are partly based on depression treatment efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Our aim was to test the external validity of depression RCT criteria in a sample of real-world HF patients. METHODS: HF patients admitted to 3 hospitals in South Australia were referred to a HF psychologist if not already receiving current psychiatric management by psychologist or psychiatrist elsewhere. Screening and referral protocol consisted of the following; (a. Patient Health Questionnaire ≥ 10; (b. Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ≥ 7; (c. positive response to 1 item panic attack screener; (d. evidence of suicidality. Patients were evaluated against the most common RCT exclusion criteria personality disorder, high suicide risk, cognitive impairment, psychosis, alcohol or substance abuse or dependency, bi-polar depression. RESULTS: Total 81 HF patients were referred from 404 HF admissions, and 73 were assessed (age 60.6 ± 13.4, 47.9% female. Nearly half (47% met at least 1 RCT exclusion criterion, most commonly personality disorder (28.5%, alcohol/substance abuse (17.8% and high suicide risk (11.0%. RCT ineligibility criteria was more frequent among patients with major depression (76.5% vs. 46.2%, p<.01 and dysthymia (26.5% vs. 7.7%, p = .03 but not significantly associated with anxiety disorders. RCT ineligible patients reported greater severity of depression (M = 16.6 ± 5.0 vs. M = 12.9 ± 7.2, p = .02 and were higher consumers of HF psychotherapy services (M = 11.5 ± 4.7 vs. M = 8.5 ± 4.8, p = .01. CONCLUSION: In this real-world sample comparable in size to recent RCT intervention arms, patients with depression disorders presented with complex psychiatric needs including comorbid personality disorders, alcohol/substance use and suicide risk. These findings suggest external validity of depression screening and RCTs could serve as a basis for

  9. A Mobile Health Intervention Supporting Heart Failure Patients and Their Informal Caregivers: A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D; Striplin, Dana; Marinec, Nicolle; Chen, Jenny; Trivedi, Ranak B; Aron, David C; Fisher, Lawrence; Aikens, James E

    2015-06-10

    Mobile health (mHealth) interventions may improve heart failure (HF) self-care, but standard models do not address informal caregivers' needs for information about the patient's status or how the caregiver can help. We evaluated mHealth support for caregivers of HF patients over and above the impact of a standard mHealth approach. We identified 331 HF patients from Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient clinics. All patients identified a "CarePartner" outside their household. Patients randomized to "standard mHealth" (n=165) received 12 months of weekly interactive voice response (IVR) calls including questions about their health and self-management. Based on patients' responses, they received tailored self-management advice, and their clinical team received structured fax alerts regarding serious health concerns. Patients randomized to "mHealth+CP" (n=166) received an identical intervention, but with automated emails sent to their CarePartner after each IVR call, including feedback about the patient's status and suggestions for how the CarePartner could support disease care. Self-care and symptoms were measured via 6- and 12-month telephone surveys with a research associate. Self-care and symptom data also were collected through the weekly IVR assessments. Participants were on average 67.8 years of age, 99% were male (329/331), 77% where white (255/331), and 59% were married (195/331). During 15,709 call-weeks of attempted IVR assessments, patients completed 90% of their calls with no difference in completion rates between arms. At both endpoints, composite quality of life scores were similar across arms. However, more mHealth+CP patients reported taking medications as prescribed at 6 months (8.8% more, 95% CI 1.2-16.5, P=.02) and 12 months (13.8% more, CI 3.7-23.8, PmHealth+CP patients reported talking with their CarePartner at least twice per week at the 6-month follow-up (P=.048). mHealth+CP patients were less likely to report negative emotions during those

  10. The antioxidant acetylcysteine reduces cardiovascular events in patients with end-stage renal failure: a randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tepel, Martin; van der Giet, Markus; Statz, Mario;

    2003-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal failure have increased oxidative stress and show elevated cardiovascular mortality. Whether increased cardiovascular events can be prevented by the administration of antioxidants is unknown.......Patients with end-stage renal failure have increased oxidative stress and show elevated cardiovascular mortality. Whether increased cardiovascular events can be prevented by the administration of antioxidants is unknown....

  11. Class III antiarrhythmic agents in cardiac failure: lessons from clinical trials with a focus on the Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina (GESICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doval, H C

    1999-11-04

    The results of previous clinical trials, in a variety of clinical settings, showed that class I agents may consistently increase mortality in sharp contrast to the effects of beta blockers. Attention has therefore shifted to class III compounds for potential beneficial effects on long-term mortality among patients with underlying cardiac disease. Clinical trials with d-sotalol, the dextro isomer (devoid of beta blockade) of sotalol, showed increased mortality in patients with low ejection fraction after myocardial infarction and in those with heart failure; whereas in the case of dofetilide, the impact on mortality was neutral. Because of the complex effects of its actions as an alpha-adrenergic blocker and a class III agent, the impact on mortality of amiodarone in patients with heart failure is of particular interest. A meta-analysis of 13 clinical trials revealed significant reductions in all-cause and cardiac mortality among patients with heart failure or previous myocardial infarction. Among these were 5 controlled clinical trials that investigated the effects of amiodarone on mortality among patients with heart failure. None of these trials was large relative to the beta-blocker trials in the postinfarction patients. However, the larger 2 of the 5 amiodarone trials produced discordant effects on mortality, neutral in one and significantly positive in the other. Some of the differences may be accounted for by the differences in eligibility criteria and baseline characteristics. Future trials that may be undertaken to resolve the discrepancies may need to allow for the newer findings on the effects of concomitant beta blockers, implantable devices, and possibly, spironolactone. All these modalities of treatment have been shown in controlled clinical trials to augment survival in patients with impaired ventricular function or manifest heart failure. Additional trials, some of which are currently in progress, compare amiodarone with implantable devices and other

  12. Evaluation of costs associated with tolvaptan-mediated length-of-stay reduction among heart failure patients with hyponatremia in the US, based on the EVEREST trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiong, Jun R; Kim, Sonnie; Lin, Jay; Christian, Rudell; Dasta, Joseph F

    2012-01-01

    The Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure Outcome Study with Tolvaptan (EVEREST) trial showed that tolvaptan use improved heart failure (HF) signs and symptoms without serious adverse events. To evaluate the potential cost savings associated with tolvaptan usage among hospitalized hyponatremic HF patients. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) 2008 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database was used to estimate hospital cost and length of stay (LOS), for diagnosis-related group (DRG) hospitalizations of adult (age ≥18 years) HF patients with complications and comorbidities or major complications and comorbidities. EVEREST trial data for patients with hyponatremia were used to estimate tolvaptan-associated LOS reductions. A cost offset model was constructed to evaluate the impact of tolvaptan on hospital cost and LOS, with univariate and multivariate Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses. Tolvaptan use among hyponatremic EVEREST trial HF patients was associated with shorter hospital LOS than placebo patients (9.72 vs 11.44 days, respectively); 688,336 hospitalizations for HF DRGs were identified from the HCUP NIS database, with a mean LOS of 5.4 days and mean total hospital costs of $8415. Using an inpatient tolvaptan treatment duration of 4 days with a wholesale acquisition cost of $250 per day, the cost offset model estimated a LOS reduction among HF hospitalizations of 0.81 days and an estimated total cost saving of $265 per admission. Univariate and multivariate sensitivity analysis demonstrated that cost reduction associated with tolvaptan usage is consistent among variations of model variables. The estimated LOS reduction and cost savings projected by the cost offset model suggest a clinical and economic benefit to tolvaptan use in hyponatremic HF patients. The EVEREST trial data may not generalize well to the US population. Clinical trial patient profiles and relative LOS reductions may not be applicable to real-world patient

  13. International differences in clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes in acute heart failure patients : better short-term outcomes in patients enrolled in Eastern Europe and Russia in the PROTECT trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentz, Robert J.; Cotter, Gad; Cleland, John G. F.; Stevens, Susanna R.; Chiswell, Karen; Davison, Beth A.; Teerlink, John R.; Metra, Marco; Voors, Adriaan A.; Grinfeld, Liliana; Ruda, Mikhail; Mareev, Viacheslav; Lotan, Chaim; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; Fiuzat, Mona; Givertz, Michael M.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Massie, Barry M.; O'Connor, Christopher M.

    AimsThe implications of geographical variation are unknown following adjustment for hospital length of stay (LOS) in heart failure (HF) trials that included patients whether or not they had systolic dysfunction. We investigated regional differences in an international acute HF trial. Methods and

  14. Prognostic Impact of Diabetes and Prediabetes on Survival Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: A Post-Hoc Analysis of the GISSI-HF (Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nella Insufficienza Cardiaca-Heart Failure) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauriz, Marco; Targher, Giovanni; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Lucci, Donata; Gonzini, Lucio; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Marchioli, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Latini, Roberto; Cosmi, Franco; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro

    2017-07-05

    The independent prognostic impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) and prediabetes mellitus (pre-DM) on survival outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure has been investigated in observational registries and randomized, clinical trials, but the results have been often inconclusive or conflicting. We examined the independent prognostic impact of DM and pre-DM on survival outcomes in the GISSI-HF (Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nella Insufficienza Cardiaca-Heart Failure) trial. We assessed the risk of all-cause death and the composite of all-cause death or cardiovascular hospitalization over a median follow-up period of 3.9 years among the 6935 chronic heart failure participants of the GISSI-HF trial, who were stratified by presence of DM (n=2852), pre-DM (n=2013), and non-DM (n=2070) at baseline. Compared with non-DM patients, those with DM had remarkably higher incidence rates of all-cause death (34.5% versus 24.6%) and the composite end point (63.6% versus 54.7%). Conversely, both event rates were similar between non-DM patients and those with pre-DM. Cox regression analysis showed that DM, but not pre-DM, was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.28-1.60) and of the composite end point (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.13-1.32), independently of established risk factors. In the DM subgroup, higher hemoglobin A1c was also independently associated with increased risk of both study outcomes (all-cause death: adjusted hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.02-1.43; and composite end point: adjusted hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.01-1.29, respectively). Presence of DM was independently associated with poor long-term survival outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00336336. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  15. A randomised trial of a pre-synaptic stimulator of DA2-dopaminergic and alpha2-adrenergic receptors on morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Carlsen, Jan E;

    2008-01-01

    Background: By pre-synaptic stimulation of DA(2)-dopaminergic and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors, nolomirole inhibits norepinephrine secretion from sympathetic nerve endings. We performed a clinical study with nolomirole in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: The study was designed as a mul......Background: By pre-synaptic stimulation of DA(2)-dopaminergic and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors, nolomirole inhibits norepinephrine secretion from sympathetic nerve endings. We performed a clinical study with nolomirole in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: The study was designed...... as a multicentre, double blind, parallel group trial of 5 mg b.i.d. of nolomirole (n=501) versus placebo (n=499) in patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, recently in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III/IV. The primary endpoint was time to all cause death or hospitalisation for HF...

  16. Impact of Baseline Systolic Blood Pressure and Long-Term Outcomes in Patients with Advanced Chronic Systolic Heart Failure (Insights from the BEST Trial)

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The impact of baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) on outcomes in advanced chronic systolic heart failure (HF) patients has not been studied using propensity-matched design. Of the 2706 Beta-Blocker Evaluation of Survival Trial (BEST) participants with chronic HF, New York Heart Association class III–IV symptoms and left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%, 1751 had SBP ≤120 (median, 108; range, 70–120) mm Hg and 955 had SBP >120 (median, 134; range 121–192) mm Hg. Propensity scores for SBP ...

  17. No benefits of statins for sudden cardiac death prevention in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hai-Ha; Fall, Mor; Gueyffier, François; Burnand, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Statins showed mixed results in heart failure (HF) patients. The benefits in major HF outcomes, including all-cause mortality and sudden cardiac death (SCD), have always been discordant across systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We intended to systematically identify and appraise the available evidence that evaluated the effectiveness of statins in clinical outcomes for HF patients. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Data sources We searched, until April 28, 2016: Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science and EBM reviews (Cochrane DSR, ACP journal club, DARE, CCTR, CMR, HTA, and NHSEED), checked clinicaltrials.gov for ongoing trials and manually searched references of included studies. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies We identified 24 randomized clinical trials that evaluated the efficacy of statins for HF patients. All randomized clinical trials were assessed for risk of bias and pooled together in a meta-analysis. Pre-specified outcomes were sudden cardiac death, all-cause mortality, and hospitalization for worsening heart failure. Results Statins did not reduce sudden cardiac death (SCD) events in HF patients [relative risk (RR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70 to 1.21], all-cause mortality [RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.02] but significantly reduced hospitalization for worsening heart failure (HWHF) although modestly [RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.94]. Nevertheless, estimated predictive intervals were insignificant in SCD, all-cause mortality and HWHF [RR, 0.54 to 1.63, 0.64 to 1.19, and 0.54 to 1.15], respectively. An important finding was the possible presence of publication bias, small-study effects and heterogeneity of the trials conducted in HF patients. Conclusions Statins do not reduce sudden cardiac death, all-cause mortality, but may slightly decrease hospitalization for worsening heart failure in HF patients. The evaluation of the risk of biases suggested moderate quality of the published results. Until new

  18. Validation of Heart Failure Events in the Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT Participants Assigned to Doxazosin and Chlorthalidone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leenen Frans HH

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT is a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trial designed to compare the rate of coronary heart disease events in high-risk hypertensive participants initially randomized to a diuretic (chlorthalidone versus each of three alternative antihypertensive drugs: alpha-adrenergic blocker (doxazosin, ACE-inhibitor (lisinopril, and calcium-channel blocker (amlodipine. Combined cardiovascular disease risk was significantly increased in the doxazosin arm compared to the chlorthalidone arm (RR 1.25; 95% CI, 1.17–1.33; P P Methods and Results Baseline characteristics (age, race, sex, blood pressure did not differ significantly between treatment groups (P P = 0.83. Conclusion Results of the validation process supported findings of increased heart failure in the ALLHAT doxazosin treatment arm compared to the chlorthalidone treatment arm.

  19. The EARLY ALLIANCE prevention trial: an integrated set of interventions to promote competence and reduce risk for conduct disorder, substance abuse, and school failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, J E; Prinz, R J; Smith, E P; Laughlin, J

    1999-03-01

    Describes the EARLY ALLIANCE interventions, an integrated set of four programs designed to promote competence and reduce risk for early-onset conduct disorder, substance abuse, and school failure. These interventions are evaluated as part of a prevention trial that begins at school entry and targets child functioning and socializing practices across multiple contexts (school, peer group, family) and multiple domains (affective, social, and achievement coping-competence). The paper presents the conceptual foundation of the four interventions, including a synopsis of the risk and protective factors associated with conduct disorder and related outcomes, and of the coping-competence model driving EARLY ALLIANCE. The developmental rationale, intended impact, and procedures are described for each intervention: a universally administered classroom program and indicated, peer, reading-mentoring, and family programs. Interventions are currently being tested in a prevention trial, which is briefly summarized.

  20. Multicenter clinical trial of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I in patients with acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, R; Kopple, J; Lipsett, P; Benjamin, E; Minei, J; Albertson, T; Munger, M; Metzler, M; Zaloga, G; Murray, M; Lowry, S; Conger, J; McKeown, W; O'shea, M; Baughman, R; Wood, K; Haupt, M; Kaiser, R; Simms, H; Warnock, D; Summer, W; Hintz, R; Myers, B; Haenftling, K; Capra, W

    1999-06-01

    Patients with acute renal failure (ARF) have high morbidity and mortality rates, particularly if they have serious comorbid conditions. Several studies indicate that in rats with ARF caused by ischemia or certain nephrotoxins, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) enhances the recovery of renal function and suppresses protein catabolism. Our objective was to determine whether injections of recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I) would enhance the recovery of renal function and is safe in patients with ARF. The study was designed as a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in intensive care units in 20 teaching hospitals. Seventy-two patients with ARF were randomized to receive rhIGF-I (35 patients) or placebo (37 patients). The most common causes of ARF in the rhIGF-I and placebo groups were, respectively, sepsis (37 and 35% of patients) and hypotension or hemodynamic shock (42 and 27% of patients). At baseline, the mean (+/- SD) APACHE II scores in the rhIGF-I and placebo-treated groups were 24 +/- 5 and 25 +/- 8, respectively. In the rhIGF-I and placebo groups, the mean (median) urine volume and urinary iothalamate clearances (glomerular filtration rate) were 1116 +/- 1037 (887) and 1402 +/- 1183 (1430) ml/24 hr and 6.4 +/- 5.9 (4.3) and 8.7 +/- 7.2 (4.4) ml/min and did not differ between the two groups. Patients were injected subcutaneously every 12 hours with rhIGF-I, 100 microgram/kg desirable body weight, or placebo for up to 14 days. Injections were started within six days of the onset of ARF. The primary end-point was a change in glomerular filtration rate from baseline. Other end points included changes from baseline in urine volume, creatinine clearance and serum urea, creatinine, albumin and transferrin, frequency of hemodialysis or ultrafiltration, and mortality rate. During the treatment period, which averaged 10.7 +/- 4.1 and 10.6 +/- 4.5 days in the rhIGF-I and placebo groups, there were no differences in the changes from baseline values of the

  1. Disease management in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure who have universal access to health care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Freimark, Dov; Freedman, Laurence S; Kaufman, Galit; Ziv, Arnona; Murad, Havi; Benderly, Michal; Silverman, Barbara G; Friedman, Nurit; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Asher, Elad; Grupper, Avishay; Goldman, Dorit; Amitai, Miriam; Matetzky, Shlomi; Shani, Mordechai; Silber, Haim

    2017-05-01

    The efficacy of disease management programs in improving the outcome of heart failure patients remains uncertain and may vary across health systems. This study explores whether a countrywide disease management program is superior to usual care in reducing adverse health outcomes and improving well-being among community-dwelling adult patients with moderate-to-severe chronic heart failure who have universal access to advanced health-care services and technologies. In this multicenter open-label trial, 1,360 patients recruited after hospitalization for heart failure exacerbation (38%) or from the community (62%) were randomly assigned to either disease management or usual care. Disease management, delivered by multi-disciplinary teams, included coordination of care, patient education, monitoring disease symptoms and patient adherence to medication regimen, titration of drug therapy, and home tele-monitoring of body weight, blood pressure and heart rate. Patients assigned to usual care were treated by primary care practitioners and consultant cardiologists. The primary composite endpoint was the time elapsed till first hospital admission for heart failure exacerbation or death from any cause. Secondary endpoints included the number of all hospital admissions, health-related quality of life and depression during follow-up. Intention-to-treat comparisons between treatments were adjusted for baseline patient data and study center. During the follow-up, 388 (56.9%) patients assigned to disease management and 387 (57.1%) assigned to usual care had a primary endpoint event. The median (range) time elapsed until the primary endpoint event or end of study was 2.0 (0-5.0) years among patients assigned to disease management, and 1.8 (0-5.0) years among patients assigned to usual care (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.908; 95% confidence interval, 0.788 to 1.047). Hospital admissions were mostly (70%) unrelated to heart failure. Patients assigned to disease management had a better

  2. Supporting Heart Failure Patient Transitions From Acute to Community Care With Home Telemonitoring Technology: A Protocol for a Provincial Randomized Controlled Trial (TEC4Home).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-18

    Seniors with chronic diseases such as heart failure have complex care needs. They are vulnerable to their condition deteriorating and, without timely intervention, may require multiple emergency department visits and/or repeated hospitalizations. Upon discharge, the transition from the emergency department to home can be a vulnerable time for recovering patients with disruptions in the continuity of care. Remote monitoring of heart failure patients using home telemonitoring, coupled with clear communication protocols between health care professionals, can be effective in increasing the safety and quality of care for seniors with heart failure discharged from the emergency department. The aim of the Telehealth for Emergency-Community Continuity of Care Connectivity via Home Telemonitoring (TEC4Home) study is to generate evidence through a programmatic evaluation and a clinical trial to determine how home telemonitoring may improve care and increase patient safety during the transition of care and determine how it is best implemented to support patients with heart failure within this context. This 4-year project consists of 3 studies to comprehensively evaluate the outcomes and effectiveness of TEC4Home. Study 1 is a feasibility study with 90 patients recruited from 2 emergency department sites to test implementation and evaluation procedures. Findings from the feasibility study will be used to refine protocols for the larger trial. Study 2 is a cluster randomized controlled trial that will include 30 emergency department sites and 900 patients across British Columbia. The primary outcome of the randomized controlled trial will be emergency department revisits and hospital readmission rates. Secondary outcomes include health care resource utilization/costs, communication between members of the care team, and patient quality of life. Study 3 will run concurrently to study 2 and test the effectiveness of predictive analytic software to detect patient deterioration

  3. Cardiopoietic cell therapy for advanced ischaemic heart failure: results at 39 weeks of the prospective, randomized, double blind, sham-controlled CHART-1 clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Beth A.; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Radovanovic, Slavica; Beleslin, Branko; Merkely, Bela; Musialek, Piotr; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Andreka, Peter; Horvath, Ivan G.; Katz, Amos; Dolatabadi, Dariouch; El Nakadi, Badih; Arandjelovic, Aleksandra; Edes, Istvan; Seferovic, Petar M.; Obradovic, Slobodan; Vanderheyden, Marc; Jagic, Nikola; Petrov, Ivo; Atar, Shaul; Halabi, Majdi; Gelev, Valeri L.; Shochat, Michael K.; Kasprzak, Jaroslaw D.; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Heyndrickx, Guy R.; Nyolczas, Noémi; Legrand, Victor; Guédès, Antoine; Heyse, Alex; Moccetti, Tiziano; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Hernandez-Garcia, Jose Maria; Ribichini, Flavio; Gruchala, Marcin; Waldman, Scott A.; Teerlink, John R.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Povsic, Thomas J.; Henry, Timothy D.; Metra, Marco; Hajjar, Roger J.; Tendera, Michal; Behfar, Atta; Alexandre, Bertrand; Seron, Aymeric; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Sherman, Warren; Cotter, Gad; Wijns, William

    2017-01-01

    Aims Cardiopoietic cells, produced through cardiogenic conditioning of patients’ mesenchymal stem cells, have shown preliminary efficacy. The Congestive Heart Failure Cardiopoietic Regenerative Therapy (CHART-1) trial aimed to validate cardiopoiesis-based biotherapy in a larger heart failure cohort. Methods and results This multinational, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study was conducted in 39 hospitals. Patients with symptomatic ischaemic heart failure on guideline-directed therapy (n = 484) were screened; n = 348 underwent bone marrow harvest and mesenchymal stem cell expansion. Those achieving > 24 million mesenchymal stem cells (n = 315) were randomized to cardiopoietic cells delivered endomyocardially with a retention-enhanced catheter (n = 157) or sham procedure (n = 158). Procedures were performed as randomized in 271 patients (n = 120 cardiopoietic cells, n = 151 sham). The primary efficacy endpoint was a Finkelstein–Schoenfeld hierarchical composite (all-cause mortality, worsening heart failure, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire score, 6-min walk distance, left ventricular end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction) at 39 weeks. The primary outcome was neutral (Mann–Whitney estimator 0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47–0.61 [value > 0.5 favours cell treatment], P = 0.27). Exploratory analyses suggested a benefit of cell treatment on the primary composite in patients with baseline left ventricular end-diastolic volume 200–370 mL (60% of patients) (Mann–Whitney estimator 0.61, 95% CI 0.52–0.70, P = 0.015). No difference was observed in serious adverse events. One (0.9%) cardiopoietic cell patient and 9 (5.4%) sham patients experienced aborted or sudden cardiac death. Conclusion The primary endpoint was neutral, with safety demonstrated across the cohort. Further evaluation of cardiopoietic cell therapy in patients with elevated end-diastolic volume is warranted. PMID:28025189

  4. Assessing the reliability of self-reported weight for the management of heart failure: application of fraud detection methods to a randomised trial of telemonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steventon, Adam; Chaudhry, Sarwat I; Lin, Zhenqiu; Mattera, Jennifer A; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2017-04-18

    Since clinical management of heart failure relies on weights that are self-reported by the patient, errors in reporting will negatively impact the ability of health care professionals to offer timely and effective preventive care. Errors might often result from rounding, or more generally from individual preferences for numbers ending in certain digits, such as 0 or 5. We apply fraud detection methods to assess preferences for numbers ending in these digits in order to inform medical decision making. The Telemonitoring to Improve Heart Failure Outcomes trial tested an approach to telemonitoring that used existing technology; intervention patients (n = 826) were asked to measure their weight daily using a digital scale and to relay measurements using their telephone keypads. First, we estimated the number of weights subject to end-digit preference by dividing the weights by five and comparing the resultant distribution with the uniform distribution. Then, we assessed the characteristics of patients reporting an excess number of weights ending in 0 or 5, adjusting for chance reporting of these values. Of the 114,867 weight readings reported during the trial, 18.6% were affected by end-digit preference, and the likelihood of these errors occurring increased with the number of days that had elapsed since trial enrolment (odds ratio per day: 1.002, p telemonitoring system over the six-month trial period (95% CI, 2.3 to 3.5), compared with 2.3 for other patients (95% CI, 2.2 to 2.5). As well as overshadowing clinically meaningful changes in weight, end-digit preference can lead to false alerts to telemonitoring systems, which may be associated with unnecessary treatment and alert fatigue. In this trial, end-digit preference was common and became increasingly so over time. By applying fraud detection methods to electronic medical data, it is possible to produce clinically significant information that can inform the design of initiatives to improve the accuracy of

  5. GFR Decline as an Alternative End Point to Kidney Failure in Clinical Trials : A Meta-analysis of Treatment Effects From 37 Randomized Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inker, Lesley A.; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.; Mondal, Hasi; Schmid, Christopher H.; Tighiouart, Hocine; Noubary, Farzad; Coresh, Josef; Greene, Tom; Levey, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is increased interest in using alternative end points for trials of kidney disease progression. The currently established end points of end-stage renal disease and doubling of serum creatinine level, equivalent to a 57% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), are

  6. Impact of dopamine infusion on renal function in hospitalized heart failure patients: results of the Dopamine in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (DAD-HF) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamouzis, Gregory; Butler, Javed; Starling, Randall C; Karayannis, George; Nastas, John; Parisis, Charalambos; Rovithis, Dimitrios; Economou, Dimitrios; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Kirlidis, Themistoklis; Tsaknakis, Themistoklis; Skoularigis, John; Westermann, Dirk; Tschöpe, Carsten; Triposkiadis, Filippos

    2010-12-01

    Worsening renal function (WRF) and hypokalemia related to diuretic use for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) are common and associated with poor prognosis. Low-dose dopamine infusion improves renal perfusion; its effect on diuresis or renal function specifically in ADHF is not known. Sixty consecutive ADHF patients (age 75.7 ± 11.2 years; 51.7% female; left ventricular ejection fraction 35.3 ± 12.1%) were randomized, after receiving a 40 mg intravenous furosemide bolus, to either high-dose furosemide (HDF, 20 mg/h continuous infusion for 8 hours) or low-dose furosemide combined with low-dose dopamine (LDFD, furosemide 5 mg/h plus dopamine 5 μg kg(-1) min(-1) continuous infusion for 8 hours). Both strategies were compared for total diuresis, WRF (defined as a rise in serum creatinine of >0.3 mg/dL from baseline to 24 hours), electrolyte balance, and 60-day postdischarge outcomes. Mean hourly excreted urine volume (272 ± 149 mL in HDF vs 278 ± 186 mL in LDFD group; P = .965) and changes in dyspnea score (Borg index: -4.4 ± 2.1 in HDF group vs -4.7 ± 2.0 in LDFD group; P = .575) during the 8 hours of protocol treatment were similar in the two groups. WRF was more frequent in the HDF (n = 9; 30%) than in the LDFD group (n = 2; 6.7%; P = .042). Serum potassium changed from 4.3 ± 0.5 to 3.9 ± 0.4 mEq/L at 24 hours (P = .003) in the HDF group and from 4.4 ± 0.5 to 4.2 ± 0.5 mEq/L at 24 hours (P = .07) in the LDFD group. Length of stay and 60-day mortality or rehospitalization rates (all-cause, cardiovascular, and worsening HF) were similar in the two groups. In ADHF patients, the combination of low-dose furosemide and low-dose dopamine is equally effective as high-dose furosemide but associated with improved renal function profile and potassium homeostasis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy and safety of calcium channel blockers in heart failure : Focus on recent trials with second-generation dihydropyridines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, RJM; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Dunselman, PHJM

    2000-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) has high morbidity and mortality rates despite treatment with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, and digoxin. Adjunctive-vasodilation through calcium channel blockade has been suggested as potentially useful, However, the first-generation calc

  8. Serelaxin in acute heart failure patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction : results from the RELAX-AHF trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filippatos, Gerasimos; Teerlink, John R.; Farmakis, Dimitrios; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Felker, G. Michael; Greenberg, Barry H.; Hua, Tsushung; Ponikowski, Piotr; Severin, Thomas; Unemori, Elaine; Voors, Adriaan A.; Metra, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Aims Serelaxin is effective in relieving dyspnoea and improving multiple outcomes in acute heart failure (AHF). Many AHF patients have preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Given the lack of evidence-based therapies in this population, we evaluated the effects of serelaxin according to EF in RELAX-AH

  9. Efficacy and safety of nebivolol in elderly heart failure patients with impaired renal function : insights from the SENIORS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Solal, Alain; Kotecha, Dipak; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Babalis, Daphne; Boehm, Michael; Coats, Andrew J.; Roughton, Michael; Poole-Wilson, Philip; Tavazzi, Luigi; Flather, Marcus

    To determine the safety and efficacy of nebivolol in elderly heart failure (HF) patients with renal dysfunction. SENIORS recruited patients aged 70 years or older with symptomatic HF, irrespective of ejection fraction, and randomized them to nebivolol or placebo. Patients (n = 2112) were divided by

  10. A prospective randomized trial of open surgery versus endourological stone removal in patients of staghorn stones with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Conclusion: In view of the better clearance rate and lesser cost of treatment, open surgery still has a place in the management of staghorn stones with chronic renal failure even in a tertiary urological center. However postoperative pain and a larger scar cannot be ignored.

  11. Anxiety sensitivity moderates prognostic importance of rhythm-control versus rate-control strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure: insights from the Atrial Fibrillation and Congestive Heart Failure Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Lespérance, François; Talajic, Mario; Khairy, Paul; Dorian, Paul; O'Meara, Eileen; Roy, Denis

    2012-05-01

    Patients with high anxiety sensitivity (AS) become extremely anxious with heart rate increases, palpitations, and symptoms of psychological arousal. AS predicts panic attacks. In atrial fibrillation (AF), AS correlates with symptom preoccupation and reduced quality of life. We assessed whether AS is associated with outcomes of rhythm-control versus rate-control in congestive heart failure (CHF) patients with AF. Before random assignment, 933 participants (172 women) in the Atrial Fibrillation and Congestive Heart Failure Trial completed the Anxiety Sensitivity Inventory (ASI). Cox proportional hazards models showed no main effects of treatment (P=0.61) or AS (P=0.72) for time to cardiovascular death, but these factors interacted significantly (P=0.020). High AS patients (upper quartile, ASI ≥33) randomly assigned to rhythm-control had significantly lower cardiovascular mortality than those receiving rate-control (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.93; P=0.022). With lower ASI scores (<33), treatments did not differ (hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.51; P=0.46). The interaction between treatment and dichotomized ASI scores remained significant (P=0.009) after adjustment for covariates including age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, creatinine, ejection fraction, time since first diagnosis of AF, New York Heart Association functional class, depression symptoms, marital status, and baseline β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, oral anticoagulants, and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure patients with high AS had better long-term prognosis with rhythm- than rate-control. If replicated, AS should be considered in treatment selection. Research is also needed concerning mechanisms and possible joint AS-AF treatments. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT88597077.

  12. Usefulness of the Sum of Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure and Right Atrial Pressure as a Congestion Index that Prognosticates Heart Failure Survival (from the Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tony S; Paniagua, David; Denktas, Ali E; Jneid, Hani; Kar, Biswajit; Chan, Wenyaw; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2016-09-15

    In the Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness (ESCAPE) trial, use of a pulmonary artery catheter did not significantly affect advanced heart failure outcomes. However, the success of achieving the targeted hemodynamic goals of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of 15 mm Hg and right atrial pressure (RAP) of 8 mm Hg and the association of these goals with clinical outcomes were not addressed. Furthermore, goals with 2 independent variables, PCWP and RAP, left room for uncertainties. We assessed the ability of a single hemodynamic target to achieve a threshold sum of PCWP and RAP as a predictor of all-cause mortality, death-or-transplantation (DT), or death-or-rehospitalization (DR) at 6 months in the pulmonary artery catheter-guided treatment arm of ESCAPE (n = 206). Patients with a posttreatment PCWP + RAP of <30 mm Hg had characteristics similar to those of the population who achieved the ESCAPE hemodynamic goals. This group had 8.7% mortality, 13.0% DT, and 58.7% DR at 6 months. The contrasting cohort with PCWP + RAP of ≥30 mm Hg had 45.3% mortality, 54.7% DT, and 84.9% DR at 6 months, with greater relative risk (RR) of death (RR 5.76), DT (RR 4.92), and DR (RR 1.80) and higher prevalence of jugular venous pulsation, edema, hepatomegaly, and ascites at admission and discharge. In conclusion, PCWP + RAP of 30 mm Hg posttreatment, obtained early in the index hospitalization, may represent as a simple congestion index that has prognostic value for heart failure survival and readmission rates at 6 months and as a warning signal for more aggressive intervention, thus warranting further validation.

  13. Percutaneous Hemodynamic Support (Impella) in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure and/or Cardiogenic Shock Not Eligible to PROTECT II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Mukku, Venkata Kishore; Gilani, Syed; Fujise, Ken; Barbagelata, Alejandro

    2013-12-01

    PROTECT I and II trials have tested the efficacy of Impella in patents with high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, patients with severe hemodynamic instability such as cardiac arrest, ST-segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI), or cardiogenic shock were excluded. The objective was to investigate the efficacy of Impella in sicker patient population who were not included in PROTECT trials. These patients merit high-risk PCI who had cardiogenic shock and unstable or decompensated heart failure (HF). From December 2010 to March 2012, 10 consecutive patients with extremely high surgical risk and hemodynamic instability underwent urgent PCI with Impella 2.5 support (Abiomed Inc., Danvers, MA). These patients were presented with advance HF and/or cardiogenic shock. Among the 10 included patients, 3 patients were with cardiac arrest and 1 patient was with acute myocardial infarction. All patients had successful Impella implantation and remained hemodynamically stable during high-risk PCI. Among the 10 patients 2 patients (20%) died within 1 month and 1 patient developed limb ischemia. In high-risk population nonrandomizable to PROTECT trials with advance HF/cardiogenic shock, Impella could be an important tool for hemodynamic support to PCI or could be a bridge to left ventricle assist device to achieve good recovery. Larger studies need to be conducted on this high-risk population.

  14. Effects of Endurance Exercise Training and Crataegus Extract WS® 1442 in Patients with Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Härtel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Impaired exercise capacity is the core symptom of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF. We assessed effects of exercise training and Crataegus extract WS 1442 in HFpEF and aimed to identify mechanisms of action in an exploratory trial (German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00000259. 140 sedentary HFpEF NYHA II patients on standard treatment received eight weeks of aerobic endurance training and half were randomized to WS 1442 900 mg/day. Symptoms, 2 km walking time (T2km, parameters of exercise tolerance, cardiac and vascular function, muscular efficiency and skeletal muscular haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2 measured during a treadmill protocol were captured at baseline and after eight weeks. Adverse events were recorded during the trial. Mechanisms of action were explored by correlation and path analyses of changes. Symptoms and exercise capacity improved with training, but correlations between improvements were low and path models were rejected. SO2 increased, decreased or undulated with increasing exercise intensity in individual patients and was not altered by training. WS 1442 improved T2km (-12.7% vs. -8.4%, p = 0.019, tended to improve symptoms and to pronounce SO2-decrease with increasing exercise, an indicator of oxygen utilisation. Endurance training and WS 1442 were safe and well tolerated in combination with standard drug treatment.

  15. Challenging aspects of treatment strategies in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: “Why did recent clinical trials fail?”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter; Moritz; Becher; Nina; Fluschnik; Stefan; Blankenberg; Dirk; Westermann

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure(HF) is the leading cause of hospitalization among older adults and the prevalence is growing with the aging populations in the Western countries. Epidemiologic reports suggest that approximately 50% of patients who have signs or symptoms of HF have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. This HF type predominantly affects women and the elderly with other co-morbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, and overt volume status. Most of the current treatment strategies are based on morbidity benefits such as quality of life and reduction of clinical HF symptoms. Treatment of patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction displayed disappointing results from several large randomized controlled trials. The heterogeneity of HF with preserved ejection fraction, understood as complex syndrome, seems to be one of the primary reasons. Here, we present an overview of the current management strategies with available evidence and new therapeutic approach from drugs currently in clinical trials, which target diastolic dysfunction, chronotropic incompetence, and risk factor management. We provide an outline and interpretation of recent clinical trials that failed to improve outcome and survival in patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction.

  16. Chinese herbal medicine for chronic heart failure: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangtao Luo

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: CHM treatment according to syndrome differentiation effectively improved the LVEF, TCM-SS, and NYHA-FC in patients with CHF and also appeared to be safe. Thus, CHM treatment could be used as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of CHF (Clinical trial registration: NCT01939236.

  17. Serelaxin in acute heart failure patients with and without atrial fibrillation : a secondary analysis of the RELAX-AHF trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filippatos, Gerasimos; Farmakis, Dimitrios; Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Felker, G. Michael; Greenberg, Barry H.; Hua, Tsushung A.; Pang, Peter S.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Qian, Min; Severin, Thomas A.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Teerlink, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a common comorbidity in HF and affects patients' outcome. We sought to assess the effects of serelaxin in patients with and without AFib. In a post hoc analysis of the RELAX-AHF trial, we compared the effects of serelaxin on efficacy end points, safety end points and bi

  18. Ten-Year Outcomes After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting According to Age in Patients With Heart Failure and Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction: An Analysis of the Extended Follow-Up of the STICH Trial (Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Mark C; Jhund, Pardeep S; She, Lilin; Adlbrecht, Christopher; Doenst, Torsten; Panza, Julio A; Hill, James A; Lee, Kerry L; Rouleau, Jean L; Prior, David L; Ali, Imtiaz S; Maddury, Jyotsna; Golba, Krzysztof S; White, Harvey D; Carson, Peter; Chrzanowski, Lukasz; Romanov, Alexander; Miller, Alan B; Velazquez, Eric J

    2016-11-01

    Advancing age is associated with a greater prevalence of coronary artery disease in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and with a higher risk of complications after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Whether the efficacy of CABG compared with medical therapy (MED) in patients with heart failure caused by ischemic cardiomyopathy is the same in patients of different ages is unknown. A total of 1212 patients (median follow-up, 9.8 years) with ejection fraction ≤35% and coronary disease amenable to CABG were randomized to CABG or MED in the STICH trial (Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure). Mean age at trial entry was 60 years; 12% were women; 36% were nonwhite; and the baseline ejection fraction was 28%. For the present analyses, patients were categorized by age quartiles: quartile 1, ≤54 years; quartile, 2 >54 and ≤60 years; quartile 3, >60 and ≤67 years; and quartile 4, >67 years. Older versus younger patients had more comorbidities. All-cause mortality was higher in older compared with younger patients assigned to MED (79% versus 60% for quartiles 4 and 1, respectively; log-rank P=0.005) and CABG (68% versus 48% for quartiles 4 and 1, respectively; log-rank P<0.001). In contrast, cardiovascular mortality was not statistically significantly different across the spectrum of age in the MED group (53% versus 49% for quartiles 4 and 1, respectively; log-rank P=0.388) or CABG group (39% versus 35% for quartiles 4 and 1, respectively; log-rank P=0.103). Cardiovascular deaths accounted for a greater proportion of deaths in the youngest versus oldest quartile (79% versus 62%). The effect of CABG versus MED on all-cause mortality tended to diminish with increasing age (Pinteraction=0.062), whereas the benefit of CABG on cardiovascular mortality was consistent over all ages (Pinteraction=0.307). There was a greater reduction in all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization with CABG versus MED in younger compared with older patients

  19. The ADOPT trial (Assessment of Efficacies of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapies (CRT-P/D for Heart Failure Patients in China: rationale, design, and end-points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu B

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bing Liu1*, Fu Yi1*, Hongwei Cai2, Wenyi Guo1, Weijie Li1, Min Shen1, Jielai Xia3, Liwen Liu4, Haichang Wang1, on behalf of The ADOPT Study Steering Committee and Investigators1Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, FMMU, Xi’an, China; 2Department of Information, School of Stomatology, FMMU, Xi’an, China; 3Department of Statistics, FMMU, Xi’an, China; 4Department of Ultrasound, Xijing Hospital, FMMU, Xi’an, ChinaClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01018667*Both authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT is a novel nonpharmacological treatment for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Some clinical trials conducted in Western countries have demonstrated that CRT could improve CHF patients’ symptoms and reduce mortality. However, due to the differences in economic and social conditions as well as inconsistencies in CHF etiologies between China and Western countries, there is an urgent need to conduct a large-scale CRT clinical study in Chinese patients with CHF. The ADOPT Trial (Assessment of Efficacies of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapies (CRT-P/D for Heart Failure Patients in China is designed to observe whether CRT can further improve syptoms and reduce mortality in Chinese patients in addition to optimal pharmalogical therapy.Methods: The ADOPT study is a prospective, nested, case-controlled, open-label clinical trial. About 40 centers across China participate in this study with a planned 800 Chinese cases to be enrolled. All patients will receive optimal medical treatment. Patients who have successful CRT-P/D implant will be assigned to the CRT group. According to the baseline evaluation, matched cases will be selected from the enrolled optimal pharmaceutical therapy alone group (Group for Selection. After successful match, the cases in Group for Selection enter into follow-up and become the control group. The unmatched cases in the Group for Selection will be removed. If patients

  20. Effect of fluid and dietary sodium restriction in the management of patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Almeida, Karina S M; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida R; Souza, Gabriela C; Trojahn, Melina M; Barilli, Sofia L S; Mansson, Jessica V; Biolo, Andreia; Rohde, Luis E P; Clausell, Nadine; Beck-da-Silva, Luís

    2014-09-04

    Although half of all patients with heart failure (HF) have a normal or near-normal ejection fraction and their prognosis differs little from that of patients with a reduced ejection fraction, the pathophysiology of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF) is still poorly understood, and its management poorly supported by clinical trials. Sodium and fluid restriction is the most common self-care measure prescribed to HF patients for management of congestive episodes. However, its role in the treatment of HF-PEF remains unclear. This trial seeks to compare the effects of a sodium- and fluid-restricted diet versus an unrestricted diet on weight loss, neurohormonal activation, and clinical stability in patients admitted for decompensated HF-PEF. This is a randomized, parallel trial with blinded outcome assessment. The sample will include adult patients (aged ≥18 years) with a diagnosis of HF-PEF admitted for HF decompensation. The patients will be randomized to receive a diet with sodium and fluid intake restricted to 0.8 g/day and 800 mL/day respectively (intervention group) or an unrestricted diet, with 4 g/day sodium and unlimited fluid intake (control group), and followed for 7 days or until hospital discharge. The primary outcome shall consist of weight loss at 7 days or discharge. The secondary outcome includes assessment of clinical stability, neurohormonal activation, daily perception of thirst and readmission rate at 30 days. Assessment of the effects of sodium and fluid restriction on neurohormonal activation and clinical course of HF-PEF can promote a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology and progression of this complex syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01896908 (date of registration: 8 August 2013).

  1. Effect of yangxinkang tablets on chronic heart failure: A multi-center randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Shao-xiang; Yang, Zhong-qi; Ren, Pei-hua; Ye, Xiao-han; Ye, Sui-lin; Wang, Qing-hai; Wang, Zhao-hui; Shen, Shu-jing; Huang, Xi-wen

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of yangxinkang tablets in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and syndrome of qi and yin deficiency, blood stasis, and water retention. In a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trail, 228 patients with CHF New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II or III in stage C were assigned by randomized block method to two groups in a 1:1 ratio to undergo either conventional Western treatment or conventional treatment plus yangxinkang tablets for 4 weeks. The outcome measure were effect of cardiac function, Chinese medicine (CM) syndromes, scores of symptoms, signs, and quality of life measured by Minnesota Living with heart failure questionnaire (MLHFQ) before and after the treatment. Totally 112 patients were analyzed in the treatment group and 109 in the control group. They were comparable in NYHA functional class, basic parameters and primary diseases before treatment. Cardiac function and CM syndromes were greatly ameliorated in both groups after treatment. Total effective rates of cardiac function and CM syndrome in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group (Pgasp, cough with phlegm, pulmonary rales and jugular vein engorgement between the two groups (P0.05). There was no obvious adverse reaction in either group noted during the study. Yangxinkang tablets were safe and efficacious in improving cardiac function, CM syndromes, symptoms, signs, and quality of life in patients with CHF class II or III in stage C on the base of conventional treatment.

  2. Cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure: insights from the warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction (WARCEF trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Graham

    Full Text Available We sought to determine whether cognitive function in stable outpatients with heart failure (HF is affected by HF severity. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from 2, 043 outpatients with systolic HF and without prior stroke enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF Trial. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between cognitive function measured using the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE and markers of HF severity (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class, and 6-minute walk distance. The mean (SD for the MMSE was 28.6 (2.0, with 64 (3.1% of the 2,043 patients meeting the cut-off of MMSE <24 that indicates need for further evaluation of cognitive impairment. After adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, 6-minute walk distance (β-coefficient 0.002, p<0.0001, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was independently associated with the MMSE as a continuous measure. Age, education, smoking status, body mass index, and hemoglobin level were also independently associated with the MMSE. In conclusion, six-minute walk distance, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was an important predictor of cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure.

  3. Cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure: insights from the warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction (WARCEF) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Susan; Ye, Siqin; Qian, Min; Sanford, Alexandra R; Di Tullio, Marco R; Sacco, Ralph L; Mann, Douglas L; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M; Freudenberger, Ronald S; Teerlink, John R; Mohr, J P; Labovitz, Arthur J; Lip, Gregory Y H; Estol, Conrado J; Lok, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; Thompson, John L P; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether cognitive function in stable outpatients with heart failure (HF) is affected by HF severity. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from 2, 043 outpatients with systolic HF and without prior stroke enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) Trial. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between cognitive function measured using the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and markers of HF severity (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class, and 6-minute walk distance). The mean (SD) for the MMSE was 28.6 (2.0), with 64 (3.1%) of the 2,043 patients meeting the cut-off of MMSE <24 that indicates need for further evaluation of cognitive impairment. After adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, 6-minute walk distance (β-coefficient 0.002, p<0.0001), but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was independently associated with the MMSE as a continuous measure. Age, education, smoking status, body mass index, and hemoglobin level were also independently associated with the MMSE. In conclusion, six-minute walk distance, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was an important predictor of cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure.

  4. A Randomized Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Local Endometrial Injury on the Clinical Pregnancy Rate of Frozen Embryo Transfer Cycles in Patients With Repeated Implantation Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensieh Shahrokh-Tehraninejad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Repeated implantation failure (RIF is a condition in which the embryos implantation decreases in the endometrium. So, our aim was to evaluate the effect of local endometrial injury on embryo transfer results.Materials and methods: In this simple randomized clinical trial (RCT, a total of 120 patients were selected. The participants were less than 40 years old, and they are in their minimum two cycles of vitro fertilization (IVF. Patients were divided randomly into two groups of LEI (Local endometrial injury and a control group (n = 60 in each group. The first group had four small endometrial injuries from anterior, posterior, and lateral uterus walls which were obtained from people who were in 21th day of their previous IVF cycle. The second group was the patients who have not received any intervention.Results: The experimental and control patients were matched in the following factors. Regarding the clinical pregnancy rate, there was no significant difference noted between the experimental and the control group.Conclusion: Local endometrial injury in a preceding cycle does not increase the clinical pregnancy rate in the subsequent FET cycle of patients with repeated implantation failure.

  5. Psychosocial predictors of non-adherence and treatment failure in a large scale multi-national trial of antiretroviral therapy for HIV: data from the ACTG A5175/PEARLS trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A Safren

    Full Text Available PEARLS, a large scale trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART for HIV (n = 1,571, 9 countries, 4 continents, found that a once-daily protease inhibitor (PI based regimen (ATV+DDI+FTC, but not a once-daily non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor/nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI/NRTI regimen (EFV+FTC/TDF, had inferior efficacy compared to a standard of care twice-daily NNRTI/NRTI regimen (EFV+3TC/ZDV. The present study examined non-adherence in PEARLS.Outcomes: non-adherence assessed by pill count and by self-report, and time to treatment failure. Longitudinal predictors: regimen, quality of life (general health perceptions  =  QOL-health, mental health  =  QOL-mental health, social support, substance use, binge drinking, and sexual behaviors. "Life-Steps" adherence counseling was provided.In both pill-count and self-report multivariable models, both once-a-day regimens had lower levels of non-adherence than the twice-a-day standard of care regimen; although these associations attenuated with time in the self-report model. In both multivariable models, hard-drug use was associated with non-adherence, living in Africa and better QOL-health were associated with less non-adherence. According to pill-count, unprotected sex was associated with non-adherence. According to self-report, soft-drug use was associated with non-adherence and living in Asia was associated with less non-adherence. Both pill-count (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.15, 2.09, p<.01 and self-report (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.13, p<.01 non-adherence were significant predictors of treatment failure over 72 weeks. In multivariable models (including pill-count or self-report nonadherence, worse QOL-health, age group (younger, and region were also significant predictors of treatment failure.In the context of a large, multi-national, multi-continent, clinical trial there were variations in adherence over time, with more simplified regimens generally being

  6. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Reduces Ventricular Arrhythmias in Primary but Not Secondary Prophylactic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients: Insight From the Resynchronization in Ambulatory Heart Failure Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, John L; Parkash, Ratika; Wells, George A; Yetisir, Elizabeth; Gardner, Martin J; Healey, Jeffrey S; Thibault, Bernard; Sterns, Laurence D; Birnie, David; Nery, Pablo B; Sivakumaran, Soori; Essebag, Vidal; Dorian, Paul; Tang, Anthony S L

    2017-03-01

    The RAFT (Resynchronization in Ambulatory Heart Failure Trial) demonstrated that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduced both mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with functional class II or III heart failure and widened QRS. We examined the influence of CRT on ventricular arrhythmias in patients with primary versus secondary prophylaxis defibrillator indications. All ventricular arrhythmias among RAFT study participants were downloaded and adjudicated by 2 blinded reviewers with an overreader for disagreements and committee review for remaining discrepancies. Incidence of ventricular arrhythmias among patients randomized to CRT-D versus implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) were compared within the groups of patients treated for primary prophylaxis and for secondary prophylaxis. Of 1798 enrolled patients, 1764 had data available for adjudication and were included. Of these, 1531 patients were implanted for primary prophylaxis, while 233 patients were implanted for secondary prophylaxis; 884 patients were randomized to ICD and 880 to CRT-D. During 5953.6 patient-years of follow-up, there were 11 278 appropriate ICD detections of ventricular arrhythmias. In the primary prophylaxis group, CRT-D significantly reduced incidence ventricular arrhythmias in comparison to ICD (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.99; P=0.044). This effect was not seen in the secondary prophylaxis group (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-1.58; P=0.45). CRT-D was not associated with significant differences in overall ventricular arrhythmia burden in either group. CRT reduced the rate of onset of new ventricular arrhythmias detected by ICDs in patients without a history of prior ventricular arrhythmias. This effect was not observed among patients who had prior ventricular arrhythmias. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00251251. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Influence of Cardiovascular and Noncardiovascular Co-morbidities on Outcomes and Treatment Effect of Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine in Stable Heart Failure (from the SHIFT Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Robertson, Michele; Ford, Ian; Borer, Jeffrey S; Komajda, Michel; Kindermann, Ingrid; Maack, Christoph; Lainscak, Mitja; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2015-12-15

    Incidence of chronic heart failure (HF) increases with age and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity. Co-morbidities increase hospitalization and mortality in HF, and non-CV co-morbidities may lead to preventable hospitalizations. We studied the impact of co-morbidities on mortality and morbidity in Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the I(f) Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial, and investigated whether the impact of ivabradine was affected by co-morbidities. We analyzed the Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the I(f) Inhibitor Ivabradine Trialpopulation, with moderate-to-severe HF and left ventricular dysfunction (in sinus rhythm with heart rate at rest ≥70 beats/min), according to co-morbidity: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, anemia, stroke, impaired renal function, myocardial infarction, hypertension, and peripheral artery disease. Co-morbidity load was classed as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4+ or 1 to 2 co-morbidities, or 3+ co-morbidities. Co-morbidities were evenly distributed between the placebo and ivabradine groups. Patients with more co-morbidities were likely to be older, women, had more advanced HF, were less likely to be on β blockers, with an even distribution on ivabradine 2.5, 5, or 7.5 mg bid and placebo at all co-morbidity loads. Number of co-morbidities was related to outcomes. Cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization events significantly increased (p 3 co-morbidities for both, ivabradine and placebo. There was no interaction between co-morbidity load and the treatment effects of ivabradine. Hospitalization rate was lower at all co-morbidity loads for ivabradine. In conclusion, cardiac and noncardiac co-morbidities significantly affect CV outcomes, particularly if there are >3 co-morbidities. The effect of heart rate reduction with ivabradine is maintained at all co-morbidity loads.

  8. Failure of the Nemo trial: bumetanide is a promising agent to treat many brain disorders but not newborn seizures

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    Yehezkel eBen-Ari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The diuretic bumetanide failed to treat acute seizures due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in newborn babies and was associated with hearing loss (NEMO trial; 1. On the other hand, clinical and experimental observations suggest that the diuretic might provide novel therapy for many brain disorders including autistic spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, Rett syndrome and Parkinson disease. Here, we discuss the differences between the pathophysiology of severe recurrent seizures in the neonates and neurological and psychiatric disorders stressing the uniqueness of severe seizures in newborn in comparison to other disorders.

  9. Failure of the Nemo Trial: Bumetanide Is a Promising Agent to Treat Many Brain Disorders but Not Newborn Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Damier, Philippe; Lemonnier, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The diuretic bumetanide failed to treat acute seizures due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborn babies and was associated with hearing loss (NEMO trial, Pressler et al., 2015). On the other hand, clinical and experimental observations suggest that the diuretic might provide novel therapy for many brain disorders including Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), schizophrenia, Rett syndrome, and Parkinson disease. Here, we discuss the differences between the pathophysiology of severe recurrent seizures in the neonates and neurological and psychiatric disorders stressing the uniqueness of severe seizures in newborn in comparison to other disorders.

  10. Computed tomographic coronary angiography for patients with heart failure (CTA-HF): a randomized controlled trial (IMAGE HF Project 1-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Benjamin J W; Green, Rachel E; Coyle, Doug; Laine, Mika; Hanninen, Helena; Leskinen, Hanna; Rajda, Miroslav; Larose, Eric; Hartikainen, Juha; Hedman, Marja; Mielniczuk, Lisa; O'Meara, Eileen; deKemp, Robert A; Klein, Ran; Paterson, Ian; White, James A; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Leber, Alex; Tandon, Vikas; Lee, Ting; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Hessian, Renee; Dowsley, Taylor; Kass, Malek; Kelly, Cathy; Garrard, Linda; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Knuuti, Juhani; Beanlands, Rob S; Wells, George A

    2013-12-26

    The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is rising in industrialized and developing countries. Though invasive coronary angiography (ICA) remains the gold standard for anatomical assessment of coronary artery disease in HF patients, alternatives are being sought. Computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTA) has emerged as an accurate non-invasive diagnostic tool for coronary artery disease (CAD) and has been demonstrated to have prognostic value. Whether or not CTA can be used in HF patients is unknown. Acknowledging the aging population, the growing prevalence of HF and the increasing financial burden of healthcare, we need to identify non-invasive diagnostic tests that are available, safe, accurate and cost-effective. The proposed study aims to provide insight into the efficacy of CTA in HF patients. A multicenter randomized controlled trial will enroll 250 HF patients requiring coronary anatomical definition. Enrolled patients will be randomized to either CTA or ICA (n = 125 per group) as the first test to define coronary anatomy. The primary outcomes will be collected to determine downstream resource utilization. Secondary outcomes will include the composite clinical events and major adverse cardiac events. In addition, the accuracy of CTA for detecting coronary anatomy and obstruction will be assessed in patients who subsequently undergo both CTA and ICA. It is expected that CTA will be a more cost-effective strategy for diagnosis: yielding similar outcomes with fewer procedural risks and improved resource utilization. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01283659. Team grant #CIF 99470.

  11. A study to improve communication between clinicians and patients with advanced heart failure: methods and challenges behind the working to improve discussions about defibrillator management trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Nathan E; Kalman, Jill; Kutner, Jean S; Fromme, Erik K; Hutchinson, Mathew D; Lipman, Hannah I; Matlock, Daniel D; Swetz, Keith M; Lampert, Rachel; Herasme, Omarys; Morrison, R Sean

    2014-12-01

    We report the challenges of the Working to Improve Discussions About Defibrillator Management trial, our novel, multicenter trial aimed at improving communication between cardiology clinicians and their patients with advanced heart failure (HF) who have implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). The study objectives are (1) to increase ICD deactivation conversations, (2) to increase the number of ICDs deactivated, and (3) to improve psychological outcomes in bereaved caregivers. The unit of randomization is the hospital, the intervention is aimed at HF clinicians, and the patient and caregiver are the units of analysis. Three hospitals were randomized to usual care and three to intervention. The intervention consists of an interactive educational session, clinician reminders, and individualized feedback. We enroll patients with advanced HF and their caregivers, and then we regularly survey them to evaluate whether the intervention has improved communication between them and their HF providers. We encountered three implementation barriers. First, there were institutional review board concerns at two sites because of the palliative nature of the study. Second, we had difficulty in creating entry criteria that accurately identified an HF population at high risk of dying. Third, we had to adapt our entry criteria to the changing landscape of ventricular assist devices and cardiac transplant eligibility. Here we present our novel solutions to the difficulties we encountered. Our work has the ability to enhance conduct of future studies focusing on improving care for patients with advanced illness.

  12. Effects of limiting fluid intake on clinical and laboratory outcomes in patients with heart failure. Results of a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchis, R; Baldi, C; Cioppa, C; Giasi, A; Fusco, A

    2016-02-01

    The guidelines of the Scientific Societies of Cardiology recommend limiting fluid intake as a nonpharmacological measure for the management of chronic heart failure (HF). However, many patients with HF may suffer from severe thirst. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of limiting fluid consumption based on various clinical and laboratory outcomes in patients with chronic HF. Only randomized controlled trials comparing liberal and restricted fluid oral intake in patients with HF were included. Primary outcomes were HF hospitalizations and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were the sensation of thirst, the duration of therapy with intravenous diuretics, and the serum levels of creatinine, sodium, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Significant heterogeneity was detected for the majority of outcomes. In 5 studies, patients with restricted fluid intake compared to patients with free consumption of beverages had similar rehospitalization and mortality rates. There were no differences regarding patients' sense of thirst (4 studies), duration of intravenous diuretic treatment (2 studies), serum creatinine levels (5 studies), and serum sodium levels (5 studies). Serum BNP levels were significantly higher in the group with free fluid intake (4 studies). In patients with HF, liberal fluid consumption does not seem to exert an unfavorable impact on HF rehospitalizations or all-cause mortality. Further randomized controlled trials are warranted to definitively confirm the present findings.

  13. Use of inotropic agents in patients with advanced heart failure: lessons from recent trials and hopes for new agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metra, Marco; Bettari, Luca; Carubelli, Valentina; Bugatti, Silvia; Dei Cas, Alessandra; Del Magro, Francesca; Lazzarini, Valentina; Lombardi, Carlo; Dei Cas, Livio

    2011-03-26

    Abnormalities of cardiac function, with high intraventricular filling pressure and low cardiac output, play a central role in patients with heart failure. Agents with inotropic properties are potentially useful to correct these abnormalities. However, with the exception of digoxin, no inotropic agent has been associated with favourable effects on outcomes. This is likely related to the mechanism of action of current agents, which is based on an increase in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate and calcium concentrations. Novel agents acting through different mechanisms, such as sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake, cardiac myosin and myocardial metabolism, have the potential to improve myocardial efficiency and lower myocardial oxygen consumption. These characteristics might allow a haemodynamic improvement in the absence of untoward effects on the clinical course and prognosis of the patients.

  14. Relation Between Dose of Loop Diuretics and Outcomes in a Heart Failure Population: Results of the ESCAPE Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselblad, Vic; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Shah, Monica R.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Califf, Robert M.; Adams, Kirkwood F.

    2007-01-01

    Background We examined the relation of maximal in-hospital diuretic dose to weight loss, changes in renal function, and mortality in hospitalised heart failure (HF) patients. Methods In ESCAPE, 395 patients received diuretics in-hospital. Weight was measured at baseline, discharge, and every other day before discharge. Weight loss was defined as the difference between baseline and last in-hospital weight. Mortality was assessed using a log-logistic model with non-zero background. Results Median weight loss: 2.8 kg (0.7, 6.1); mean: 3.7 kg (22% of values 300 mg/day. Dose remained a significant predictor of mortality after adjusting for baseline variables that significantly predicted mortality. Correlation between maximal dose and creatinine level change was not significant (r = 0.043; p = 0.412) Conclusions High diuretic doses during HF hospitalisation are associated with increased mortality and poor 6-month outcome. PMID:17719273

  15. Amiodarone therapy in chronic heart failure and myocardial infarction: a review of the mortality trials with special attention to STAT-CHF and the GESICA trials. Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, J V; Ramani, K; Neelagaru, S; Kown, M; Gheorghiade, M

    1997-01-01

    Amiodarone appears to reduce sudden death in patients with left ventricular dysfunction resulting from an acute MI or a primary dilated cardiomyopathy, particularly if complex ventricular arrhythmias are present. Amiodarone's beneficial effect on mortality in these patients could be unrelated to its antiarrhythmic effects. Multiple factors could account for the improvement in mortality such as the drug's antiischemic effects, neuromodulating effects, its effect on left ventricular function and on heart rate. Moreover, patients with LV dysfunction who have survived an episode of sudden death would potentially benefit from amiodarone therapy. Future trials are needed to determine the precise subsets(s) of patients who would benefit from the drug and the most efficacious dosing regimen for the drug. Based on available data, amiodarone is the only antiarrhythmic agent which has not been shown to increase mortality in patients with chronic heart failure.

  16. Effect of Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibition on Exercise Capacity and Clinical Status in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Margaret M; Chen, Horng H; Borlaug, Barry A; Semigran, Marc J.; Lee, Kerry L.; Lewis, Gregory; LeWinter, Martin M.; Rouleau, Jean L.; Bull, David A.; Mann, Douglas L.; Deswal, Anita; Stevenson, Lynne W.; Givertz, Michael M.; Ofili, Elizabeth O.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Felker, G. Michael; Goldsmith, Steven R.; Bart, Bradley A.; McNulty, Steven E; Ibarra, Jenny C.; Lin, Grace; Oh, Jae K.; Patel, Manesh R.; Kim, Raymond J.; Tracy, Russell P.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Mascette, Alice M.; Braunwald, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Importance Studies in experimental and human heart failure suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors may enhance cardiovascular function, and thus, exercise capacity in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Objective To determine the effect of the phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, sildenafil, in comparison to placebo on exercise capacity and clinical status in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Design, setting, and patients Multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design, randomized clinical trial of 216 stable outpatients with heart failure, ejection fraction ≥ 50%, elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide or elevated invasively-measured filling pressures, and reduced exercise capacity. Participants were randomized from October 2008 through February 2012 at 26 centers in the United States and Canada. Intervention Sildenafil (n=113) or placebo (n=103) administered orally at 20 mg three times daily for 12 weeks followed by 60 mg three times daily for 12 weeks. Main outcome measures Primary endpoint was change in peak oxygen consumption after 24 weeks of therapy. Secondary endpoints included change in six-minute walk distance and a three tier hierarchical composite clinical status score where patients were ranked (range 1-N) based on time to death, time to cardiovascular or cardiorenal hospitalization and change in quality of life for participants alive without cardiovascular or cardiorenal hospitalization at 24 weeks. Results Median age was 69 years and 48% of patients were female. At baseline, median peak oxygen consumption (11.7 ml/kg/min) and six-minute walk distance (308 meters) were reduced and median E/e′ (16), left atrial volume index (44 ml/m2) and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (41 mmHg) were consistent with chronically-elevated left ventricular filling pressures. At 24 weeks, median (interquartile range) changes in peak oxygen consumption (ml/kg/min) in patients who received placebo [−0

  17. Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental Retardation (MR is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for “agitated” TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  18. Changes in self-reported sleep and cognitive failures: a randomized controlled trial of a stress management intervention.

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    Dalgaard, Ligaya; Eskildsen, Anita; Carstensen, Ole; Willert, Morten Vejs; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Glasscock, David J

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a stress management intervention combining individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with a brief workplace intervention on self-reported measures of sleep and cognitive functioning among patients on sick leave due to work-related stress complaints. Participants were patients referred to the regional Department of Occupational Medicine. Inclusion criteria were (i) sick leave due to work-related stress complaints and (ii) a diagnosis of adjustment disorder/reactions to stress or mild depression. Participants (N=137) were randomized to either an intervention (N=57) or control (N=80) group. The intervention comprised six sessions with a psychologist and the offer of a small workplace intervention. Questionnaires were answered at baseline and after 4, and 10 months. Symptoms were significantly reduced over time in both groups but there was no significant treatment effect on sleep or cognitive outcomes at any time point. From 0-4 months, there was a tendency for larger improvements in the intervention group with regards to sleep and cognitive failures in distraction. Although neither was significant, the results came close to significance depicting a small effect size (Cohen's d) on sleep complaints and distractions (but not memory). The specific intervention was not superior to the control condition in reducing symptoms of sleep problems and cognitive difficulties at any time point during the 10-month follow-up period. Substantial improvements in symptoms over time were seen in both groups.

  19. Failure of a systemic lupus erythematosus response index developed from clinical trial data: lessons examined and learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbess, L J; Bresee, C; Wallace, D J; Weisman, M H

    2017-01-01

    Background Our primary goal was to create an outcome change score index similar to a standard rheumatoid arthritis (RA) model utilizing real-world data in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients that occurred during their phase 3 trials with a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug. Methods We utilized raw data from trials of belimumab for the treatment of SLE. Data were split 80/20 into training/validation sets. Index variables present in a majority of patients and with face validity were selected. Variables were scored for each patient as percentage improvement from baseline after one year. The percentage of placebo- and drug-treated patients considered improved after the application of various criteria was ascertained. Logistic regression was employed to determine the ability of the new index to predict treatment assignment. Results A total of 1693 subjects had data for analyses. Eight variables were chosen: arthritis, rash, physician global assessment, fatigue, anti-double stranded DNA antibodies, C3, C4 and C-reactive protein. In the training dataset, ≥20% improvement in ≥4 of eight variables produced the largest difference between placebo- and drug-treated patients (22.1%) with an acceptable rate of improved placebo-treated patients (25%). This resulted in an odds ratio for belimumab (10 mg/kg) vs placebo of 2.7 (95% CI: 2.0-3.6; p < 0.001). However, in the validate dataset the odds ratio was not significant at 1.3 (95% CI: 0.8-2.2; p = 0.863). Conclusions The index created from training data did not achieve statistical significance when tested in the validation set. We have speculated why this happened. Is the lack of success of therapeutics for SLE caused by ineffective medications, study design and outcome instruments that fail to inform us, or is the heterogeneity of the disease too daunting? The lessons learned here can help direct future endeavors intended to improve SLE outcome instruments.

  20. The Effect of Enhanced External Counterpulsation Therapy and Improvement of Functional Capacity in Chronic Heart Failure patients: a Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Starry H Rampengan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to investigate the efficacy of enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP therapy to improve functional capacity in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Methods: a double-blind random clinical trial was performed in 99 patients with CHF who had received EECP therapy at Jade Cardiovascular Clinic, Manado, North Sulawesi, Indonesia between January 2014 and June 2015. Subjects were categorized into 2 groups, i.e. 49 subjects had sham EECP therapy and 50 subjects had EECP therapy. All subjects performed six-minute walking test (6MWT before and after receiving EECP therapy. Results: there was no significant difference between both groups regarding the basic characteristics of patients with CHF. The 6MWT result before EECP therapy showed that there were 30 patients (61.2% with walk distance of <300 meter in the sham EECP group; while in the group receiving EECP therapy, we found 34 patients (68%; p=0.24. Post-EECP therapy, there were 33 patients (67.3% with walk distance of <300 meters in EECP sham group; while in the group receiving EECP alone, there was only 1 patient (2%; p <0.01.The 6MWT walk distance in sham group before EECP therapy was 252.65 (SD 97.55 meters and it was 243.65 (SD 86.96 meters following the EECP therapy; p=0.18. In EECP group, the 6MWT walk distance before therapy was 256.88 (SD 85.56 meters and after EECP therapy the walk distance was 449.46 (SD 92.08 meters; p<0.01. Conclusion: EECP therapy is effective to improve functional capacity in patients with CHF. Key words: chronic heart failure, six-minute walk test, enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP therapy.

  1. Outcome of children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) experiencing primary induction failure in the AIEOP AML 2002/01 clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarello, Paola; Fagioli, Franca; Basso, Giuseppe; Putti, Maria C; Berger, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Rizzari, Carmelo; Menna, Giuseppe; Masetti, Riccardo; Locatelli, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Paediatric patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) who fail induction due to primary resistance to chemotherapy account for a significant proportion of cases and have a particularly dismal prognosis. We report the clinical and biological data, and final outcome of 48 paediatric patients with primary-resistant AML enrolled in the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica AML 2002/01 clinical trial. These patients had a significantly higher white blood cell count at diagnosis compared to other AML patients. Cytogenetic and molecular features did not differ between patients with primary induction failure and patients allocated to the high-risk group. For the whole patient population, the probability of overall survival, event-free survival (EFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was 21·8% ± 6·2, 20·4% ± 5·9, and 49·5% ± 11·3, respectively. Twenty-eight (58%) patients received haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); 3 were autologous and 25 were allogeneic. Patients who underwent HSCT had improved EFS (31·2% vs. 5%, P < 0·0001). Only one of the 20 patients who did not receive HSCT is alive and disease free. The 19 patients in complete remission at time of HSCT showed significantly better DFS than the 9 with active disease (46% vs. 0%, P = 0·02). This study represents one of the largest series with long-term follow up of paediatric AML patients with primary refractory disease. Children who underwent transplantation had an encouraging long-term outcome. Disease recurrence remains the major cause of treatment failure; a better understanding of the disease biology is desirable to develop more effective treatment strategies.

  2. Clinical trials update from the Heart Failure Society of America Meeting 2009: FAST, IMPROVE-HF, COACH galectin-3 substudy, HF-ACTION nuclear substudy, DAD-HF, and MARVEL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainscak, Mitja; Coletta, Alison P; Sherwi, Nasser; Cleland, John G F

    2010-02-01

    This article presents findings and a commentary on late-breaking trials presented during the meeting of the Heart Failure Society of America in September 2009. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication. The FAST trial showed somewhat better performance of intrathoracic impedance for prediction of deterioration in patients with heart failure (HF) when compared with daily weighing. The IMPROVE-HF study reported the benefits of education on the management of patients with systolic HF. Galectin-3 appeared a useful method for improving risk stratification of patients with chronic HF in a substudy of the COACH trial. A nuclear substudy of the HF-ACTION trial failed to demonstrate that resting myocardial perfusion imaging, a measure of myocardial scar and viability, was clinically useful. A small randomized controlled trial (DAD-HF) suggested that the use of low-dose dopamine in patients with acutely decompensated HF was associated with less deterioration in renal function and less hypokalaemia. The MARVEL-1 trial raises further concerns about the safety of myoblast transplantation in ischaemic HF.

  3. Investigating a TELEmedicine solution to improve MEDication adherence in chronic Heart Failure (TELEMED-HF: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Widdershoven Jos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent rehospitalisations and poorer survival chances in heart failure (HF patients may partly be explained by poor medication adherence. There are multiple medication-related reasons for suboptimal adherence, but psychological reasons may also be important. A novel TELEmonitoring device may improve MEDication adherence in HF patients (TELEMED-HF. TELEMED-HF is a randomized, controlled clinical intervention trial designed to examine (1 the efficacy and cost-efficiency of an electronic medication adherence support system in improving and monitoring HF patients' medication adherence; (2 the effect of medication adherence on hospitalizations and health care consumption; as well as on (3 clinical characteristics, and Quality of Life (QoL; and (4 clinical, sociodemographic, and psychological determinants of medication adherence. Methods/Design Consecutive patients with chronic, systolic HF presenting to the outpatient clinic of the TweeSteden Hospital, The Netherlands, will be approached for study participation and randomly assigned (1:1 following blocked randomization procedures to the intervention (n = 200 or usual care arm (n = 200. Patients in the intervention arm use the medication support device for six months in addition to usual care. Post-intervention, patients return to usual care only and all patients participate in four follow-up occasions over 12 months. Primary endpoints comprise objective and subjective medication adherence, healthcare consumption, number of hospitalizations, and cost-effectiveness. Secondary endpoints include disease severity, physical functioning, and QoL. Discussion The TELEMED-HF study will provide us a comprehensive understanding of medication adherence in HF patients, and will show whether telemonitoring is effective and cost-efficient in improving adherence and preventing hospitalization in HF patients. Trial registration number NCT01347528.

  4. Quality of Anticoagulation Control in Preventing Adverse Events in Heart Failure Patients in Sinus Rhythm: A Warfarin Aspirin Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) Substudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Shunichi; Thompson, John L.P.; Qian, Min; Ye, Siqin; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Mann, Douglas L.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Graham, Susan; Mohr, J.P.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between time in therapeutic range (TTR) and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin. Methods and Results We used data from the Warfarin vs. Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) to assess the relationship of TTR with the WARCEF primary outcome (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or death); with death alone; ischemic stroke alone; major hemorrhage alone; and net clinical benefit (primary outcome and major hemorrhage combined). Multivariable Cox models were used to examine how the event risk changed with TTR and to compare the high TTR, low TTR, and aspirin patients, with TTR being treated as a time-dependent covariate. 2,217 patients were included in the analyses, among whom 1,067 were randomized to warfarin and 1,150 were randomized to aspirin. The median (IQR) follow-up duration was 3.6 (2.0–5.0) years. Mean (±SD) age was 61±11.3 years, with 80% being men. The mean (±SD) TTR was 57% (±28.5%). Increasing TTR was significantly associated with reduction in primary outcome (adjusted p<0.001), death alone (adjusted p=0.001), and improved net clinical benefit (adjusted p<0.001). A similar trend was observed for the other two outcomes but significance was not reached (adjusted p=0.082 for ischemic stroke, adjusted p=0.109 for major hemorrhage). Conclusions In HF patients in SR, increasing TTR is associated with better outcome and improved net clinical benefit. Patients in whom good quality anticoagulation can be achieved may benefit from the use of anticoagulants. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00041938. PMID:25850425

  5. Use of procalcitonin for the diagnosis of pneumonia in patients presenting with a chief complaint of dyspnoea: results from the BACH (Biomarkers in Acute Heart Failure) trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisel, Alan; Neath, Sean-Xavier; Landsberg, Judd; Mueller, Christian; Nowak, Richard M.; Peacock, W. Frank; Ponikowski, Piotr; Möckel, Martin; Hogan, Christopher; Wu, Alan H.B.; Richards, Mark; Clopton, Paul; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Di Somma, Salvatore; Anand, Inder; Ng, Leong L.; Daniels, Lori B.; Christenson, Robert H.; Potocki, Mihael; McCord, James; Terracciano, Garret; Hartmann, Oliver; Bergmann, Andreas; Morgenthaler, Nils G.; Anker, Stefan D.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Biomarkers have proven their ability in the evaluation of cardiopulmonary diseases. We investigated the utility of concentrations of the biomarker procalcitonin (PCT) alone and with clinical variables for the diagnosis of pneumonia in patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) with a chief complaint of shortness of breath. Methods and results The BACH trial was a prospective, international, study of 1641 patients presenting to EDs with dyspnoea. Blood samples were analysed for PCT and other biomarkers. Relevant clinical data were also captured. Patient outcomes were assessed at 90 days. The diagnosis of pneumonia was made using strictly validated guidelines. A model using PCT was more accurate [area under the curve (AUC) 72.3%] than any other individual clinical variable for the diagnosis of pneumonia in all patients, in those with obstructive lung disease, and in those with acute heart failure (AHF). Combining physician estimates of the probability of pneumonia with PCT values increased the accuracy to >86% for the diagnosis of pneumonia in all patients. Patients with a diagnosis of AHF and an elevated PCT concentration (>0.21 ng/mL) had a worse outcome if not treated with antibiotics (P = 0.046), while patients with low PCT values (<0.05 ng/mL) had a better outcome if they did not receive antibiotic therapy (P = 0.049). Conclusion Procalcitonin may aid in the diagnosis of pneumonia, particularly in cases with high diagnostic uncertainty. Importantly, PCT may aid in the decision to administer antibiotic therapy to patients presenting with AHF in which clinical uncertainty exists regarding a superimposed bacterial infection. Trial registration: NCT00537628 PMID:22302662

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of point-of-care testing for acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and thromboembolic events in primary care: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

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    Diemand Albert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence of the clinical benefit of 3-in-1 point-of-care testing (POCT for cardiac troponin T (cTnT, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and D-dimer in cardiovascular risk stratification at primary care level for diagnosing acute coronary syndromes (ACS, heart failure (HF and thromboembolic events (TE is very limited. The aim of this study is to analyse the diagnostic accuracy of POCT in primary care. Methods Prospective multicentre controlled trial cluster-randomised to POCT-assisted diagnosis and conventional diagnosis (controls. Men and women presenting in 68 primary care practices in Zurich County (Switzerland with chest pain or symptoms of dyspnoea or TE were consecutively included after baseline consultation and working diagnosis. A follow-up visit including confirmed diagnosis was performed to determine the accuracy of the working diagnosis, and comparison of working diagnosis accuracy between the two groups. Results The 218 POCT patients and 151 conventional diagnosis controls were mostly similar in characteristics, symptoms and pre-existing diagnoses, but differed in working diagnosis frequencies. However, the follow-up visit showed no statistical intergroup difference in confirmed diagnosis frequencies. Working diagnoses overall were significantly more correct in the POCT group (75.7% vs 59.6%, p = 0.002, as were the working diagnoses of ACS/HF/TE (69.8% vs 45.2%, p = 0.002. All three biomarker tests showed good sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion POCT confers substantial benefit in primary care by correctly diagnosing significantly more patients. Trial registration DRKS: DRKS00000709

  7. Efficacy of sacubitril/valsartan vs. enalapril at lower than target doses in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: the PARADIGM-HF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeny, Orly; Claggett, Brian; Packer, Milton; Zile, Michael R; Rouleau, Jean; Swedberg, Karl; Teerlink, John R; Desai, Akshay S; Lefkowitz, Martin; Shi, Victor; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2016-10-01

    In this analysis, we utilized data from PARADIGM-HF to test the hypothesis that participants who exhibited any dose reduction during the trial would have similar benefits from lower doses of sacubitril/valsartan relative to lower doses of enalapril. In a post-hoc analysis from PARADIGM-HF, we characterized patients by whether they received the maximal dose (200 mg sacubitril/valsartan or 10 mg enalapril twice daily) throughout the trial or had any dose reduction to lower doses (100/50/0 mg sacubitril/valsartan or 5/2.5/0 mg enalapril twice daily). The treatment effect for the primary outcome was estimated, stratified by dose level using time-updated Cox regression models. In the two treatment arms, participants with a dose reduction (43% of those randomized to enalapril and 42% of those randomized to sacubitril/valsartan) had similar baseline characteristics and similar baseline predictors of the need for dose reduction. In a time-updated analysis, any dose reduction was associated with a higher subsequent risk of the primary event [hazard ratio (HR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-2.7]. However, the treatment benefit of sacubitril/valsartan over enalapril following a dose reduction was similar (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.70-0.93, P PARADIGM-HF, study medication dose reduction identified patients at higher risk of a major cardiovascular event. The magnitude of benefit for patients on lower doses of sacubitril/valsartan relative to those on lower doses of enalapril was similar to that of patients who remained on target doses of both drugs. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  8. The Impact Exerted on Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Chronic Heart Failure by Aldosterone Receptor Antagonists: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchis, Renato; Cantatrione, Claudio; Mazzei, Damiana; Barone, Augusto; Maurea, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Background Aldosterone receptor antagonists (ARAs) have been associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFREF), but not in those with heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). With the aim to study this topic more deeply, we carried out a meta-analysis of selective and non-selective ARAs in HFREF and HFpEF. Methods We searched PubMed and Scopus databases. We decided to incorporate in the meta-analysis only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of ARAs in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) if they met the following criteria: experimental groups included patients with CHF treated with ARAs in addition to the conventional therapy; control groups included patients with CHF receiving conventional therapy without ARAs. Outcomes of interest were all-cause death, hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause, hyperkalemia, or gynecomastia. Results We detected 15 studies representing 15,671 patients. ARAs were associated with a reduced odds of all-cause death (odds ratio (OR): 0.79; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73 - 0.87) and hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause (OR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.61 - 0.89). However, subgroup analysis showed that these advantages were limited to HFREF (all-cause death: OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.69 - 0.84; hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause: OR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.51 - 0.85), but they did not affect the HFpEF group (all-cause death: OR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.76 - 1.1; hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause: OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.7 - 1.09). ARAs increased the risk of hyperkalemia (OR: 2.17; 95% CI: 1.88 - 2.5). Non-selective ARAs, but not selective ARAs, increased the risk of gynecomastia (OR: 8.22, 95% CI: 4.9 - 13.81 vs. OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.43 - 1.27). Conclusions ARAs reduced the risk of adverse cardiac events in HFREF but not HFpEF. In particular, ARA use in HFpEF patients is questionable, since in this CHF type, no significant

  9. Effect of vitamin D3 on asthma treatment failures in adults with symptomatic asthma and lower vitamin D levels: the VIDA randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mario; King, Tonya S; Kunselman, Susan J; Cabana, Michael D; Denlinger, Loren; Holguin, Fernando; Kazani, Shamsah D; Moore, Wendy C; Moy, James; Sorkness, Christine A; Avila, Pedro; Bacharier, Leonard B; Bleecker, Eugene; Boushey, Homer A; Chmiel, James; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gentile, Deborah; Hundal, Mandeep; Israel, Elliot; Kraft, Monica; Krishnan, Jerry A; LaForce, Craig; Lazarus, Stephen C; Lemanske, Robert; Lugogo, Njira; Martin, Richard J; Mauger, David T; Naureckas, Edward; Peters, Stephen P; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Que, Loretta G; Sheshadri, Ajay; Smith, Lewis; Solway, Julian; Sullivan-Vedder, Lisa; Sumino, Kaharu; Wechsler, Michael E; Wenzel, Sally; White, Steven R; Sutherland, E Rand

    2014-05-01

    In asthma and other diseases, vitamin D insufficiency is associated with adverse outcomes. It is not known if supplementing inhaled corticosteroids with oral vitamin D3 improves outcomes in patients with asthma and vitamin D insufficiency. To evaluate if vitamin D supplementation would improve the clinical efficacy of inhaled corticosteroids in patients with symptomatic asthma and lower vitamin D levels. The VIDA (Vitamin D Add-on Therapy Enhances Corticosteroid Responsiveness in Asthma) randomized, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled trial studying adult patients with symptomatic asthma and a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of less than 30 ng/mL was conducted across 9 academic US medical centers in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's AsthmaNet network, with enrollment starting in April 2011 and follow-up complete by January 2014. After a run-in period that included treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid, 408 patients were randomized. Oral vitamin D3 (100,000 IU once, then 4000 IU/d for 28 weeks; n = 201) or placebo (n = 207) was added to inhaled ciclesonide (320 µg/d). If asthma control was achieved after 12 weeks, ciclesonide was tapered to 160 µg/d for 8 weeks, then to 80 µg/d for 8 weeks if asthma control was maintained. The primary outcome was time to first asthma treatment failure (a composite outcome of decline in lung function and increases in use of β-agonists, systemic corticosteroids, and health care). Treatment with vitamin D3 did not alter the rate of first treatment failure during 28 weeks (28% [95% CI, 21%-34%] with vitamin D3 vs 29% [95% CI, 23%-35%] with placebo; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.9 [95% CI, 0.6-1.3]). Of 14 prespecified secondary outcomes, 9 were analyzed, including asthma exacerbation; of those 9, the only statistically significant outcome was a small difference in the overall dose of ciclesonide required to maintain asthma control (111.3 µg/d [95% CI, 102.2-120.4 µg/d] in the vitamin D3 group vs 126

  10. Prescribing Data in General Practice Demonstration (PDGPD project - a cluster randomised controlled trial of a quality improvement intervention to achieve better prescribing for chronic heart failure and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Margaret

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research literature consistently documents that scientifically based therapeutic recommendations are not always followed in the hospital or in the primary care setting. Currently, there is evidence that some general practitioners in Australia are not prescribing appropriately for patients diagnosed with 1 hypertension (HT and 2 chronic heart failure (CHF. The objectives of this study were to improve general practitioner’s drug treatment management of these patients through feedback on their own prescribing and small group discussions with peers and a trained group facilitator. The impact evaluation includes quantitative assessment of prescribing changes at 6, 9, 12 and 18 months after the intervention. Methods A pragmatic multi site cluster RCT began recruiting practices in October 2009 to evaluate the effects of a multi-faceted quality improvement (QI intervention on prescribing practice among Australian general practitioners (GP in relation to patients with CHF and HT. General practices were recruited nationally through General Practice Networks across Australia. Participating practices were randomly allocated to one of three groups: two groups received the QI intervention (the prescribing indicator feedback reports and small group discussion with each group undertaking the clinical topics (CHF and HT in reverse order to the other. The third group was waitlisted to receive the intervention 6 months later and acted as a “control” for the other two groups. De-identified data on practice, doctor and patient characteristics and their treatment for CHF and HT are extracted at six-monthly intervals before and after the intervention. Post-test comparisons will be conducted between the intervention and control arms using intention to treat analysis and models that account for clustering of practices in a Network and clustering of patients within practices and GPs. Discussion This paper describes the study protocol for a

  11. Impact of epoetin alfa on left ventricular structure, function, and pressure volume relations as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance: the heart failure preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) anemia trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Philip; Babu, Benson A; Teruya, Sergio; Helmke, Stephen; Prince, Martin; Maurer, Mathew S

    2013-01-01

    Anemia, a common comorbidity in older adults with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is associated with worse outcomes. The authors quantified the effect of anemia treatment on left ventricular (LV) structure and function as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. A prospective, randomized single-blind clinical trial (NCT NCT00286182) comparing the safety and efficacy of epoetin alfa vs placebo for 24 weeks in which a subgroup (n=22) had cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and after 3 and 6 months to evaluate changes in cardiac structure and function. Pressure volume (PV) indices were derived from MRI measures of ventricular volume coupled with sphygmomanometer-measured pressure and Doppler estimates of filling pressure. The end-systolic and end-diastolic PV relations and the area between them as a function of end-diastolic pressure, the isovolumic PV area (PVAiso), were calculated. Patients (75±10 years, 64% women) with HFPEF (EF=63%±15%) with an average hemoglobin of 10.3±1.1 gm/dL were treated with epoetin alfa using a dose-adjusted algorithm that increased hemoglobin compared with placebo (PHFPEF resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin, without evident change in LV structure, function, or pressure volume relationships as measured quantitatively using CMR imaging.

  12. Integrating decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory model and failure mode and effect analysis to determine the priority in solving production problems

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Cheng Lee; Wen-Hua Chu; Quan Chen; Sang-Bing Tsai; Jiangtao Wang; Weiwei Dong

    2016-01-01

    Failure mode and effect analysis has been applied in manufacturing and service industries but can still be improved. Failure mode and effect analysis is a common tool used to evaluate risk priority number; however, numerous scholars have doubted the effectiveness of failure mode and effect analysis and have thus proposed methods for correcting failure mode and effect analysis from its conventional formula. Because implemented actions can determine or influence resource allocation and its effe...

  13. Anal Carcinoma: Impact of TN Category of Disease on Survival, Disease Relapse, and Colostomy Failure in US Gastrointestinal Intergroup RTOG 98-11 Phase 3 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, Leonard L., E-mail: gunderson.leonard@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pedersen, John E. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Winter, Kathryn A. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Benson, Al B. [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Knight Cancer Institute/Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Mayer, Robert J. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Rich, Tyvin A. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The long-term update of US GI Intergroup RTOG 98-11 anal cancer trial found that concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) with fluorouracil (5-FU) plus mitomycin had a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with induction plus concurrent 5-FU plus cisplatin. The intent of the current analysis was to determine the impact of tumor node (TN) category of disease on survival (DFS and OS), colostomy failure (CF), and relapse (local-regional failure [LRF] and distant metastases [DM]) in this patient group. Methods and Materials: DFS and OS were estimated univariately by using the Kaplan-Meier method, and 6 TN categories were compared by the log–rank test (T2N0, T3N0, T4N0, T2N1-3, T3N1-3, and T4N1-3). Time to relapse and colostomy were estimated by the cumulative incidence method, and TN categories were compared using Gray's test. Results: Of 682 patients, 620 were analyzable for outcomes by TN category. All endpoints showed statistically significant differences among the TN categories of disease (OS, P<.0001; DFS, P<.0001; LRF, P<.0001; DM, P=.0011; CF, P=.01). Patients with the poorest OS, DFS, and LRF outcomes were those with T3-4N-positive (+) disease. CF was lowest for T2N0 and T2N+ (11%, 11%, respectively) and worst for the T4N0, T3N+, and T4N+ categories (26%, 27%, 24%, respectively). Conclusions: TN category of disease has a statistically significant impact on OS, DFS, LRF, DM, and CF in patients treated with CCRT and provides excellent prognostic information for outcomes in patients with anal carcinoma. Significant challenges remain for patients with T4N0 and T3-4N+ categories of disease with regard to survival, relapse, and CF and lesser challenges for T2-3N0/T2N+ categories.

  14. A randomized controlled trial to improve heart failure disparities: the Mālama Puʻuwai (caring for heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau MKLM

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Marjorie K Leimomi Mala Mau,1 Eunjung Lim,1 Joseph Keawe‘aimoku Kaholokula,1 Taylor MU Loui,1 Yongjun Cheng,1 Todd B Seto1,2 1Department of Native Hawaiian Health, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, John A. Burns School of Medicine, 2Queens Heart Physician Practice, Queens Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, USA Objective/Background: To conduct a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of a culturally tailored heart failure (HF education program, to reduce HF hospital readmissions and/or cardiovascular disease death (HF outcomes among Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (NHOPI patients with HF. Methods: One hundred fifty HF patients aged ≥21 years, NHOPI race, and discharged to home were enrolled and randomized to the Mālama Puʻuwai Program (MPP or the usual care (UC. The MPP group received a culturally tailored HF program, and the UC received similar standard HF education materials. Clinical and health behavior data were measured at baseline and 12 months. HF outcomes were monitored throughout the entire study period. Two-sample t-test, chi-square, and Cox proportional hazard modeling assessed the efficacy of intervention (MPP or UC on HF outcomes using an intention-to-treat approach. A sensitivity post hoc analysis was performed on patients who completed the full intervention (n=127. Results: Overall, 69% were men, mean age 54.4±13.4 years, 62% were Native Hawaiian, and 24% reported methamphetamine use. More UC participants reported methamphetamine use (32% vs. 16%, hypertension (81% vs. 63%, but less myocardial infarction (27% vs. 48%. HF outcomes were higher in UC (31% compared with MPP (19% with higher risk for HF outcomes (hazard ratio [HR] 1.74; 95% CI: 0.89–3.40. Sensitivity post hoc analysis of intervention compliance revealed that UC was at significantly higher risk for HF outcomes than MPP (HR 2.83; 95% CI: 1.19–6.72. Conclusions: Culturally tailored HF programs have the potential to reduce HF outcomes among

  15. Rationale and Design of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Multicenter Trial to Study Efficacy, Security, and Long Term Effects of Intermittent Repeated Levosimendan Administration in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure: LAICA study

    OpenAIRE

    García-González, Martín J.; de Mora-Martín, Manuel; López-Fernández, Silvia; López-Díaz, Javier; Martínez Sellés Oliveria Soares, Manuel; Romero-García, José; Cordero, Marco; Lara-Padrón, Antonio; Marrero-Rodríguez, Francisco; García-Saiz, María del Mar

    2013-01-01

    Background Advanced heart failure (HF) is associated with high morbidity and mortality; it represents a major burden for the health system. Episodes of acute decompensation requiring frequent and prolonged hospitalizations account for most HF-related expenditure. Inotropic drugs are frequently used during hospitalization, but rarely in out-patients. The LAICA clinical trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of monthly levosimendan infusion in patients with advanced HF to reduce th...

  16. Non-Ergot Dopamine Agonists Do Not Increase the Risk of Heart Failure in Parkinson’s Disease Patients: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchis, Renato; Cantatrione, Claudio; Mazzei, Damiana; Baldi, Cesare; Di Maio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, some observational studies suggested that pramipexole, a non-ergot dopamine agonist (DA) used for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD), may increase the risk of heart failure (HF). However, the limitations inherent in observational studies made it difficult to determine whether the excess of incident HF was related to the drug or to other determinants. Thus, some concerns remained regarding the increased putative HF risk associated with non-ergot DAs as a class or individually. Methods In our meta-analysis, primary endpoint was the risk of incident HF in patients with PD treated with non-ergot DAs compared to those treated with monotherapy with levodopa. Secondary outcome measures were all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events. For these purposes, only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were considered, provided that they offered complete outcome data pertaining to the incident HF, all-cause mortality and risk of cardiovascular events. Systematic searches were performed in the databases of PubMed, Embase and ClinicalTrial.gov up to May 2015. The effect size was estimated using the pooled relative risk (RR) of non-ergot DAs versus placebo on incident HF as well as on all-cause mortality or cardiovascular events. Results Six out of 27 RCTs reported at least one case of incident HF; therefore, we included them in the RR estimate, whereas 13 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis for mortality rates and 22 RCTs were included to evaluate cardiovascular events. Treatment with non-ergot DAs did not reveal an increase in the risk of incident HF as compared with the placebo group (pooled RR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.30 - 2.90; P = 0.893). Similarly, patients treated with non-ergot DAs did not show any significant differences compared to controls with regard to all-cause mortality (pooled RR: 0.617; 95% CI: 0.330 - 1.153; P = 0.13) as well as with regard to cardiovascular events (pooled RR: 1.067; 95% CI: 0.663 - 1.717; P = 0.789). Conclusions

  17. Improvement of primary care for patients with chronic heart failure: A study protocol for a cluster randomised trial comparing two strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensing Michel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients with chronic heart failure (CHF, a common condition with high morbidity and mortality rates, receive treatment in primary care. To improve the management of CHF in primary care, we developed an implementation programme comprised of educational and organisational components, with support by a practice visitor and focus both on drug treatment and lifestyle advice, and on organisation of care within the practice and collaboration with other healthcare providers. Tailoring has been shown to improve the success of implementation programmes, but little is known about what would be best methods for tailoring, specifically with respect to CHF in primary care. Methods/design We describe the study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of tailoring a CHF implementation programme to general practices compared to a standardised way of delivering a programme. The study population will consist of 60 general practitioners (GPs and the CHF patients they include. GPs are randomised in blocks of four, stratified according to practice size. With a tailored implementation programme GPs prioritise the issues that will form the bases of the support for the practice visits. These may comprise several issues, both educational and organizational. The primary outcome measures are patient's experience of receiving structured primary care for CHF (PACIC, a questionnaire related to the Chronic Care Model, patients' health-related utilities (EQ-5D, and drugs prescriptions using the guideline adherence index. Patients being clustered in practices, multilevel regression analyses will be used to explore the effect of practice size and type of intervention programme. In addition we will examine both changes within groups and differences at follow-up between groups with respect to drug dosages and advice on lifestyle issues. Furthermore, in interviews the feasibility of the programme and goal attainment

  18. Effect of aliskiren on post-discharge outcomes among diabetic and non-diabetic patients hospitalized for heart failure: insights from the ASTRONAUT trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Aldo P.; Greene, Stephen J.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Böhm, Michael; Zannad, Faiez; Solomon, Scott D.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Baschiera, Fabio; Hua, Tsushung A.; Gimpelewicz, Claudio R.; Lesogor, Anastasia; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ramos, Silvina; Luna, Alejandra; Miriuka, Santiago; Diez, Mirta; Perna, Eduardo; Luquez, Hugo; Pinna, Jorge Garcia; Castagnino, Jorge; Alvarenga, Pablo; Ibañez, Julio; Blumberg, Eduardo Salmon; Dizeo, Claudio; Guerrero, Rodolfo Ahuad; Schygiel, Pablo; Milesi, Rodolfo; Sosa, Carlos; Hominal, Miguel; Marquez, Lilia Lobo; Poy, Carlos; Hasbani, Eduardo; Vico, Marisa; Fernandez, Alberto; Vita, Nestor; Vanhaecke, Johan; De Keulenaer, Gilles; Striekwold, Harry; Vervoort, Geert; Vrolix, Mathias; Henry, Philippe; Dendale, Paul; Smolders, Walter; Marechal, Patrick; Vandekerckhove, Hans; Oliveira, Mucio; Neuenschwande, Fernando; Reis, Gilmar; Saraiva, Jose; Bodanese, Luiz; Canesin, Manoel; Greco, Oswaldo; Bassan, Roberto; Marino, Roberto Luis; Giannetti, Nadia; Moe, Gordon; Sussex, Bruce; Sheppard, Richard; Huynh, Thao; Stewart, Robert; Haddad, Haissam; Echeverria, Luis; Quintero, Adalberto; Torres, Adriana; Jaramillo, Mónica; Lopez, Mónica; Mendoza, Fernan; Florez, Noel; Cotes, Carlos; Garcia, Magali; Belohlavek, Jan; Hradec, Jaromir; Peterka, Martin; Gregor, Pavel; Monhart, Zdenek; Jansky, Petr; Kettner, Jiri; Reichert, Petr; Spinar, Jindrich; Brabec, Tomas; Hutyra, Martin; Solar, Miroslav; Pietilä, Mikko; Nyman, Kai; Pajari, Risto; Cohen, Ariel; Galinier, Michel; Gosse, Philippe; Livarek, Bernard; Neuder, Yannick; Jourdain, Patrick; Picard, François; Isnard, Richard; Hoppe, Uta; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Rosocha, Stefan; Prondzinsky, Roland; Felix, Stephan; Duengen, Hans-Dirk; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Fischer, Sven; Behrens, Steffen; Stawowy, Philipp; Kruells-Muench, Juergen; Knebel, Fabian; Nienaber, Christoph; Werner, Dierk; Aron, Wilma; Remppis, Bjoern; Hambrecht, Rainer; Kisters, Klaus; Werner, Nikos; Hoffmann, Stefan; Rossol, Siegbert; Geiss, Ernst; Graf, Kristof; Hamann, Frank; von Scheidt, Wolfgang; Schwinger, Robert; Tebbe, Ulrich; Costard-Jaeckle, Angelika; Lueders, Stephan; Heitzer, Thomas; Leutermann-Oei, Marie-Louise; Braun-Dullaeus, Ruediger; Roehnisch, Jens-Uwe; Muth, Gerhard; Goette, Andreas; Rotter, Achim; Ebelt, Henning; Olbrich, Hans-Georg; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian; Schellong, Sebastian; Zamolyi, Karoly; Vertes, Andras; Matoltsy, Andras; Palinkas, Attila; Herczeg, Bela; Apro, Dezso; Lupkovics, Geza; Tomcsanyi, Janos; Toth, Kalman; Mathur, Atul; Banker, Darshan; Bharani, Anil; Arneja, Jaspal; Khan, Aziz; Gadkari, Milind; Hiremath, Jagdish; Patki, Nitin; Kumbla, Makund; Santosh, M.J.; Ravikishore, A.G.; Abhaichand, Rajpal; Maniyal, Vijayakukmar; Nanjappa, Manjunath; Reddy, P. Naveen; Chockalingam, Kulasekaran; Premchand, Rajendra; Mahajan, Vijay; Lewis, Basil; Wexler, Dov; Shochat, Michael; Keren, Andre; Omary, Muhamad; Katz, Amos; Marmor, Alon; Lembo, Giuseppe; Di Somma, Salvatore; Boccanelli, Alessandro; Barbiero, Mario; Pajes, Giuseppe; De Servi, Stefano; Greco, Dott Cosimo; De Santis, Fernando; Floresta, Agata; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona; Piovaccari, Giancarlo; Cavallini, Claudio; Di Biase, Matteo; Masini, Dott Franco; Vassanelli, Corrado; Viecca, Maurizio; Cangemi, Dott Francesco; Pirelli, Salvatore; Borghi, Claudio; Volpe, Massimo; Branzi, Angelo; Percoco, Dott Giovanni; Severi, Silvia; Santini, Alberto; De Lorenzi, Ettore; Metra, Marco; Zacà, Valerio; Mortara, Andrea; Tranquilino, Francisco P.; Babilonia, Noe A.; Ferrolino, Arthur M.; Manlutac, Benjamin; Dluzniewski, Miroslaw; Dzielinska, Zofia; Nowalany-Kozie, Ewa; Mazurek, Walentyna; Wierzchowiecki, Jerzy; Wysokinski, Andrzej; Szachniewicz, Joanna; Romanowski, Witold; Krauze-Wielicka, Magdalena; Jankowski, Piotr; Berkowski, Piotr; Szelemej, Roman; Kleinrok, Andrzej; Kornacewicz-Jac, Zdzislawa; Vintila, Marius; Vladoianu, Mircea; Militaru, Constantin; Dan, Gheorghe; Dorobantu, Maria; Dragulescu, Stefan; Kostenko, Victor; Vishnevsky, Alexandr; Goloschekin, Boris; Tyrenko, Vadim; Gordienko, Alexander; Kislyak, Oxana; Martsevich, Sergey; Kuchmin, Alexey; Karpov, Yurii; Fomin, Igor; Shvarts, Yury; Orlikova, Olga; Ershova, Olga; Berkovich, Olga; Sitnikova, Maria; Pakhomova, Inna; Boldueva, Svetlana; Tyurina, Tatiana; Simanenkov, Vladimir; Boyarkin, Mikhail; Novikova, Nina; Tereschenko, Sergey; Zadionchenko, Vladimir; Shogenov, Zaur; Gordeev, Ivan; Moiseev, Valentin; Wong, Raymond; Ong, Hean Yee; Le Tan, Ju; Goncalvesova, Eva; Kovar, Frantisek; Skalina, Ivan; Kasperova, Viera; Hojerova, Silvia; Szentivanyi, Miroslav; Stancak, Branislav; Babcak, Marian; Kycina, Peter; Poliacik, Pavol; Toth, Peter; Sirotiakova, Jana; de Sa, Esteban Lopez; Bueno, Manuel Gomez; Selles, Manuel Martinez; Cabrera, Jose Angel; Freire, Ramon Bover; Gonzalez Juanatey, Jose Ramon; Comin, Josep; Soriano, FranciscoRidocci; Lopez, Alejandro; Vicho, Raul; Lama, Manuel Geraldia; Schaufelberger, Maria; Brunotte, Richard; Ullman, Bengt; Hagerman, Inger; Cizinsky, Stella; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Yu, Wen-Chung; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Ter; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Ural, Dilek; Badak, Ozer; Akin, Mustafa; Yigit, Zerrin; Yokusoglu, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Abaci, Adnan; Ebinc, Haksun; Perlman, Richard; Parish, David; Bergin, James; Burnham, Kenneth; Brown, Christopher; Lundbye, Justin; Williams, Celeste; Eisen, Howard; Juneman, Elizabeth; Joseph, Susan; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Peura, Jennifer; Gupta, Vishal; Habet, Kalim; French, William; Mody, Freny; Graham, Susan; Hazelrigg, Monica; Chung, Eugene; Dunlap, Stephanie; Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Najjar, Samer; Katz, Richard; Murali, Srinivas; Izzo, Joseph L.; Callister, Tracy; Phillips, Roland; Lippolis, Nicholas; Winterton, John; Meymandi, Sheba; Heilman, Karl; Oren, Ron; Zolty, Ronald; Brottman, Michael; Gunawardena, D.R.; Adams, Kirkwood; Barnard, Denise; Klapholz, Marc; Fulmer, James

    2013-01-01

    Aims The objective of the Aliskiren Trial on Acute Heart Failure Outcomes (ASTRONAUT) was to determine whether aliskiren, a direct renin inhibitor, would improve post-discharge outcomes in patients with hospitalization for heart failure (HHF) with reduced ejection fraction. Pre-specified subgroup analyses suggested potential heterogeneity in post-discharge outcomes with aliskiren in patients with and without baseline diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods and results ASTRONAUT included 953 patients without DM (aliskiren 489; placebo 464) and 662 patients with DM (aliskiren 319; placebo 343) (as reported by study investigators). Study endpoints included the first occurrence of cardiovascular death or HHF within 6 and 12 months, all-cause death within 6 and 12 months, and change from baseline in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) at 1, 6, and 12 months. Data regarding risk of hyperkalaemia, renal impairment, and hypotension, and changes in additional serum biomarkers were collected. The effect of aliskiren on cardiovascular death or HHF within 6 months (primary endpoint) did not significantly differ by baseline DM status (P = 0.08 for interaction), but reached statistical significance at 12 months (non-DM: HR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64–0.99; DM: HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.91–1.47; P = 0.03 for interaction). Risk of 12-month all-cause death with aliskiren significantly differed by the presence of baseline DM (non-DM: HR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50–0.94; DM: HR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.15–2.33; P < 0.01 for interaction). Among non-diabetics, aliskiren significantly reduced NT-proBNP through 6 months and plasma troponin I and aldosterone through 12 months, as compared to placebo. Among diabetic patients, aliskiren reduced plasma troponin I and aldosterone relative to placebo through 1 month only. There was a trend towards differing risk of post-baseline potassium ≥6 mmol/L with aliskiren by underlying DM status (non-DM: HR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.71–1.93; DM: HR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.30

  19. Rationale and study design of a patient-centered intervention to improve health status in chronic heart failure: The Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelman, David B; Allen, Larry A; Peterson, Jamie; Hattler, Brack; Havranek, Edward P; Fairclough, Diane L; McBryde, Connor F; Meek, Paula M

    2016-11-01

    While contemporary heart failure management has led to some improvements in morbidity and mortality, patients continue to report poor health status (i.e., burdensome symptoms, impaired function, and poor quality of life). The Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) trial is a NIH-funded, three-site, randomized clinical trial that examines the effect of the CASA intervention compared to usual care on the primary outcome of patient-reported health status at 6months in patients with heart failure and poor health status. The CASA intervention involves a nurse who works with patients to treat symptoms (e.g., shortness of breath, fatigue, pain) using disease-specific and palliative approaches, and a social worker who provides psychosocial care targeting depression and adjustment to illness. The intervention uses a collaborative care team model of health care delivery and is structured and primarily phone-based to enhance reproducibility and scalability. This article describes the rationale and design of the CASA trial, including several decision points: (1) how to design a patient-centered intervention to improve health status; (2) how to structure the intervention so that it is reproducible and scalable; and (3) how to systematically identify outpatients with heart failure most likely to need and benefit from the intervention. The results should provide valuable information to providers and health systems about the use of team care to manage symptoms and provide psychosocial care in chronic illness. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. NAT2 genotype guided regimen reduces isoniazid-induced liver injury and early treatment failure in the 6-month four-drug standard treatment of tuberculosis: a randomized controlled trial for pharmacogenetics-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Junichi; Ohno, Masako; Kubota, Ryuji; Yokota, Soichiro; Nagai, Takayuki; Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Okuda, Yasuhisa; Takashima, Tetsuya; Kamimura, Sayaka; Fujio, Yasushi; Kawase, Ichiro

    2013-05-01

    This study is a pharmacogenetic clinical trial designed to clarify whether the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) genotype-guided dosing of isoniazid improves the tolerability and efficacy of the 6-month four-drug standard regimen for newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. In a multicenter, parallel, randomized, and controlled trial with a PROBE design, patients were assigned to either conventional standard treatment (STD-treatment: approx. 5 mg/kg of isoniazid for all) or NAT2 genotype-guided treatment (PGx-treatment: approx. 7.5 mg/kg for patients homozygous for NAT2 4: rapid acetylators; 5 mg/kg, patients heterozygous for NAT2 4: intermediate acetylators; 2.5 mg/kg, patients without NAT2 4: slow acetylators). The primary outcome included incidences of 1) isoniazid-related liver injury (INH-DILI) during the first 8 weeks of therapy, and 2) early treatment failure as indicated by a persistent positive culture or no improvement in chest radiographs at the 8th week. One hundred and seventy-two Japanese patients (slow acetylators, 9.3 %; rapid acetylators, 53.5 %) were enrolled in this trial. In the intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, INH-DILI occurred in 78 % of the slow acetylators in the STD-treatment, while none of the slow acetylators in the PGx-treatment experienced either INH-DILI or early treatment failure. Among the rapid acetylators, early treatment failure was observed with a significantly lower incidence rate in the PGx-treatment than in the STD-treatment (15.0 % vs. 38 %). Thus, the NAT2 genotype-guided regimen resulted in much lower incidences of unfavorable events, INH-DILI or early treatment failure, than the conventional standard regimen. Our results clearly indicate a great potential of the NAT2 genotype-guided dosing stratification of isoniazid in chemotherapy for tuberculosis.

  1. Effect of If-channel inhibition on hemodynamic status and exercise tolerance in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmala, Wojciech; Holland, David J; Rojek, Aleksandra; Wright, Leah; Przewlocka-Kosmala, Monika; Marwick, Thomas H

    2013-10-08

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of treatment with ivabradine on exercise capacity and left ventricular filling in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Because symptoms of HFpEF are typically exertional, optimization of diastolic filling time by controlling heart rate may delay the onset of symptoms. Sixty-one patients with HFpEF were randomly assigned to ivabradine 5 mg twice daily (n = 30) or placebo (n = 31) for 7 days in this double-blind trial. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing with echocardiographic assessment of myocardial function and left ventricular filling were undertaken at rest and after exercise. The ivabradine group demonstrated significant improvement between baseline and follow-up exercise capacity (4.2 ± 1.8 METs vs. 5.7 ± 1.9 METs, p = 0.001) and peak oxygen uptake (14.0 ± 6.1 ml/min/kg vs. 17.0 ± 3.3 ml/min/kg, p = 0.001), with simultaneous reduction in exercise-induced increase in the ratio of peak early diastolic mitral flow velocity to peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (3.1 ± 2.7 vs. 1.3 ± 2.0, p = 0.004). Work load-corrected chronotropic response (the difference in heart rate at the same exercise time at the baseline and follow-up tests) showed a slower increase in heart rate during exercise than in the placebo-treated group. Therapy with ivabradine (β = 0.34, p = 0.04) and change with treatment in exertional increase in the ratio of peak early diastolic mitral flow velocity to peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (β = -0.30, p = 0.02) were independent correlates of increase in exercise capacity, and therapy with ivabradine (β = 0.32, p = 0.007) was independently correlated with increase in peak oxygen uptake. In patients with HFpEF, short-term treatment with ivabradine increased exercise capacity, with a contribution from improved left ventricular filling pressure response to exercise as reflected by the ratio of peak early diastolic mitral flow velocity to peak early

  2. Impact of telemonitoring home care patients with heart failure or chronic lung disease from primary care on healthcare resource use (the TELBIL study randomised controlled trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Lesende, Iñaki; Orruño, Estibalitz; Bilbao, Amaia; Vergara, Itziar; Cairo, M Carmen; Bayón, Juan Carlos; Reviriego, Eva; Romo, María Isabel; Larrañaga, Jesús; Asua, José; Abad, Roberto; Recalde, Elizabete

    2013-03-28

    There is growing evidence that home telemonitoring can be advantageous in societies with increasing prevalence of chronic diseases.The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of a primary care-based telemonitoring intervention on the number and length of hospital admissions. A randomised controlled trial was carried out across 20 health centres in Bilbao (Basque Country, Spain) to assess the impact of home telemonitoring on in-home chronic patients compared with standard care. The study lasted for one year. Fifty-eight in-home patients, diagnosed with heart failure (HF) and/or chronic lung disease (CLD), aged 14 or above and with two or more hospital admissions in the previous year were recruited. The intervention consisted of daily patient self-measurements of respiratory-rate, heart-rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, weight, body temperature and the completion of a health status questionnaire using PDAs. Alerts were generated when pre-established thresholds were crossed. The control group (CG) received usual care. The primary outcome measure was the number of hospital admissions that occurred at 12 months post-randomisation. The impact of telemonitoring on the length of hospital stay, use of other healthcare resources and mortality was also explored. The intervention group (IG) included 28 patients and the CG 30. Patient baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Of the 21 intervention patients followed-up for a year, 12 had some admissions (57.1%), compared to 19 of 22 controls (86.4%), being the difference statistically significant (p = 0.033, RR 0.66; 95%CI 0.44 to 0.99). The mean hospital stay was overall 9 days (SD 4.3) in the IG versus 10.7 (SD 11.2) among controls, and for cause-specific admissions 9 (SD 4.5) vs. 11.2 (SD 11.8) days, both without statistical significance (p = 0.891 and 0.927, respectively). Four patients need to be telemonitored for a year to prevent one admission (NNT). There were more telephone contacts in

  3. Day vs night : Does time of presentation matter in acute heart failure? A secondary analysis from the RELAX-AHF trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pang, Peter S.; Teerlink, John R.; Boer-Martins, Leandro; Gimpelewicz, Claudio; Davison, Beth A.; Wang, Yi; Voors, Adriaan A.; Severin, Thomas; Ponikowski, Piotr; Hua, Tsushung A.; Greenberg, Barry H.; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Felker, G. Michael; Cotter, Gad; Metra, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Signs and symptoms of heart failure can occur at any time. Differences between acute heart failure (AHF) patients who present at nighttime vs daytime and their outcomes have not been well studied. Our objective was to determine if there are differences in baseline characteristics and clin

  4. Prostate-specific antigen as a biomarker of condom failure: comparison of three laboratory assays and self-reported condom use problems in a randomized trial of female condom performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Terri; Warner, Lee; Macaluso, Maurizio; Frezieres, Ron; Snead, Margaret; Wraxall, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker for semen exposure, may provide a more objective measure of condom failure than subject self-reports. Methods for measuring PSA vary and their comparability with respect to assessing condom performance has not been adequately evaluated. This study compared results from three different PSA assays of vaginal samples collected by subjects in a randomized clinical trial which compared the performance of female condoms. We selected 30 pairs of pre- and post-coital vaginal samples from subjects who reported condom functionality problems or whose original PSA assay was positive. Samples were retested using three different PSA assays [quantitative enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA), rocket immune-electrophoresis (RIE) and chromatographic immunoassay (CIA)]. We compared the proportion of condom uses where the post-coital PSA result indicated semen exposure for each of the three assays. Despite varying levels of sensitivity, the results from all three assays were remarkably consistent. Self-reported condom failures did not correlate well with positive PSA results, suggesting that exclusive reliance on either PSA or user self-report may be inadequate for assessing condom functionality. In combination with user self-report of condom failure, PSA testing provides a reliable, objective marker of condom functionality. Studies based on PSA testing may improve on conventional contraceptive clinical trials by offering a more direct assessment of a condom product's ability to prevent semen exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prostate-specific antigen as a biomarker of condom failure: comparison of three laboratory assays and self-reported condom use problems in a randomized trial of female condom performance☆, ☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Terri; Warner, Lee; Macaluso, Maurizio; Frezieres, Ron; Snead, Margaret; Wraxall, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker for semen exposure, may provide a more objective measure of condom failure than subject self-reports. Methods for measuring PSA vary and their comparability with respect to assessing condom performance has not been adequately evaluated. This study compared results from three different PSA assays of vaginal samples collected by subjects in a randomized clinical trial which compared the performance of female condoms. Study Design We selected 30 pairs of pre- and post-coital vaginal samples from subjects who reported condom functionality problems or whose original PSA assay was positive. Samples were retested using three different PSA assays [quantitative enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA), rocket immune-electrophoresis (RIE) and chromatographic immunoassay (CIA)]. We compared the proportion of condom uses where the post-coital PSA result indicated semen exposure for each of the three assays. Results Despite varying levels of sensitivity, the results from all three assays were remarkably consistent. Self-reported condom failures did not correlate well with positive PSA results, suggesting that exclusive reliance on either PSA or user self-report may be inadequate for assessing condom functionality. Conclusion In combination with user self-report of condom failure, PSA testing provides a reliable, objective marker of condom functionality. Studies based on PSA testing may improve on conventional contraceptive clinical trials by offering a more direct assessment of a condom product's ability to prevent semen exposure. PMID:22386229

  6. Mechanisms of virologic failure in previously untreated HIV-infected patients from a trial of induction-maintenance therapy. Trilège (Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA 072) Study Team).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, D; Flandre, P; Calvez, V; Peytavin, G; Meiffredy, V; Collin, G; Delaugerre, C; Robert-Delmas, S; Bazin, B; Aboulker, J P; Pialoux, G; Raffi, F; Brun-Vézinet, F

    2000-01-12

    In the Trilège trial, following induction with a zidovudine, lamivudine, and indinavir regimen, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication was less suppressed by 2-drug maintenance therapy than by triple-drug therapy. To identify mechanisms of virologic failure in the 3 arms of the Trilège trial. Case-control study conducted from February to October 1998. Three urban hospitals in Paris, France. Fifty-eight case patients with virologic failure (HIV RNA rebound to >500 copies/mL in 2 consecutive samples) randomized to 3 therapy groups: triple drug (zidovudine, lamivudine, and indinavir), 8; zidovudine-lamivudine, 29; and zidovudine-indinavir, 21; the case patients were randomly matched with 58 control patients with sustained viral suppression. At virologic failure (S1 sample) and 6 weeks later (S2 sample), assessment of protease and reverse transcriptase gene mutations, plasma indinavir level, and degree of viral load rebound; pill count during induction and maintenance periods. Only 1 primary resistance mutation, M184V, was detected in S1 plasma samples from 4 of 6 patients in the triple-drug and in all 22 in the zidovudine-lamivudine therapy groups and in S2 plasma samples from 3 of 6 in the triple-drug and 20 of 21 in the zidovudine-lamivudine groups. Of controls, M184V was detected in 11 of 13 S1 plasma samples and in 10 of 11 S2 plasma samples. Indinavir levels were undetectable in all S1 samples but 2 in 7 triple-drug cases tested and in the expected range in 11 of 18 S1 and 5 of 12 S2 zidovudine-indinavir case plasma samples tested. Maintenance adherence rates were lower for cases vs controls for zidovudine (P = .05) and indinavir (P = .05). Low indinavir levels, lower adherence rates for zidovudine (P = .04) and lamivudine (P = .03), and rebound to near-baseline values suggested adherence as cause of early failure for 4 of 8 triple-drug cases. In the zidovudine-lamivudine arm, for which case and control adherence rates did not differ significantly (P

  7. Transcatheter Interatrial Shunt Device for the Treatment of Heart Failure Rationale and Design of the Randomized Trial to REDUCE Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Heart Failure (REDUCE LAP-HF I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman, Ted; Komtebedde, Jan; Burkhoff, Daniel; Massaro, Joseph; Maurer, Mathew S.; Leon, Martin B.; Kaye, David; Silvestry, Frank E.; Cleland, John G. F.; Kitzman, Dalane; Kubo, Spencer H.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kleber, Franz; Trochu, Jean-Noel; Auricchio, Angelo; Gustafsson, Finn; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Ponikowski, Piotr; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mauri, Laura; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a major public health problem with high morbidity and mortality rates, remains difficult to manage because of a lack of effective treatment options. Although HFpEF is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, elevated left atrial pressure-either at re

  8. Multicentre, parallel-group, comparative trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of sugammadex in patients with end-stage renal failure or normal renal function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staals, L.M.; Snoeck, M.M.J.; Driessen, J.J.; Flockton, E.A.; Heeringa, M.; Hunter, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sugammadex, a modified gamma-cyclodextrin, is the first selective relaxant binding agent that specifically encapsulates the steroidal neuromuscular blocking agent, rocuronium. The action of rocuronium is prolonged in patients with renal failure. As sugammadex is primarily cleared

  9. Rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of an exercise program to improve the quality of life of patients with heart failure in primary care: The EFICAR study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Torre Maria M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life (QoL decreases as heart failure worsens, which is one of the greatest worries of these patients. Physical exercise has been shown to be safe for people with heart failure. Previous studies have tested heterogeneous exercise programs using different QoL instruments and reported inconsistent effects on QoL. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a new exercise program for people with heart failure (EFICAR, additional to the recommended optimal treatment in primary care, to improve QoL, functional capacity and control of cardiovascular risk factors. Methods/Design Multicenter clinical trial in which 600 patients with heart failure in NYHA class II-IV will be randomized to two parallel groups: EFICAR and control. After being recruited, through the reference cardiology services, in six health centres from the Spanish Primary Care Prevention and Health Promotion Research Network (redIAPP, patients are followed for 1 year after the beginning of the intervention. Both groups receive the optimized treatment according to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines. In addition, the EFICAR group performs a 3 month supervised progressive exercise program with an aerobic (high-intensity intervals and a strength component; and the programme continues linked with community resources for 9 months. The main outcome measure is the change in health-related QoL measured by the SF-36 and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaires at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes considered are changes in functional capacity measured by the 6-Minute Walking Test, cardiac structure (B-type natriuretic peptides, muscle strength and body composition. Both groups will be compared on an intention to treat basis, using multi-level longitudinal mixed models. Sex, age, social class, co-morbidity and cardiovascular risk factors will be considered as potential confounding and predictor variables. Discussion

  10. Age is not a significant risk factor for failed trial of beta-blocker therapy in older patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Miles D; Gillespie, Neil D; Struthers, Allan D

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate how well older heart failure patients tolerate beta-blockers in everyday clinical practice. Retrospective casenote analysis. Specialist heart failure clinic in a large teaching hospital. 226 patients with a clinical diagnosis of heart failure and evidence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Data on age, sex, comorbid illness, other medications, duration of beta-blocker therapy, side-effects and reasons for discontinuation. Patients aged 75 years and over had a higher level of comorbid disease and worse New York Heart Association status. Despite this, 60.4% of those aged 75 or over had been tried on a beta-blocker (versus 69% of those aged side-effect recorded (versus 48% of those aged Heart Association status and worse left ventricular function, but importantly not age. A high proportion of older heart failure patients tolerate beta-blockers. Side-effects and failure rates are comparable to younger patients. Left ventricular function and worse New York Heart Association class, rather than age, predict low tolerability of therapy. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether frail patients with heart failure can improve their quality of life by taking beta-blockers.

  11. Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study--congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Møller, Jacob E; Thayssen, Per;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease. The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether...... repeated infusions would have additional positive effects. AIMS: To assess whether two treatments of intracoronary infusion of bone marrow stem cells, administered 4 months apart, could improve left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure. METHODS: The study...... was prospective and non-randomised, comprising an observational baseline period of 4 months followed by an interventional period of 12 months. Intracoronary bone marrow cell infusion was performed at the end of the baseline period and repeated 4 months later. RESULTS: 32 patients were included. LV ejection...

  12. Pathogenesis of sudden unexpected death in a clinical trial of patients with myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, or both

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Barkoudah, Ebrahim; Uno, Hajime;

    2010-01-01

    The frequency of sudden unexpected death is highest in the early post-myocardial infarction (MI) period; nevertheless, 2 recent trials showed no improvement in mortality with early placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator after MI....

  13. Pathogenesis of sudden unexpected death in a clinical trial of patients with myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, or both

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Barkoudah, Ebrahim; Uno, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    The frequency of sudden unexpected death is highest in the early post-myocardial infarction (MI) period; nevertheless, 2 recent trials showed no improvement in mortality with early placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator after MI....

  14. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ... patient with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ...

  15. Reassessing guidelines for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Drexler

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in the last few years in the management of heart failure. In particular several trials have given significant results. It has become apparent that heart failure may be prevented in some patients by treatment of risk factors such as coronary artery disease. Experience with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors has shown that the survival and symptomatic benefits do last in the long term, and confirm that they are the first-line treatment in heart failure. The results of a number of trials using the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs candesartan, valsartan and losartan are presented and discussed. There is also some experience now in the use of candesartan for patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular systolic function. The COMET trial compared the β-blockers carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate, and suggests that there may be differences in clinical effect between β-blockers. The selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone was evaluated in the EPHESUS trial in post-MI patients with signs of heart failure. Based on these clinical trials, heart failure guidelines are now being updated.

  16. Effects of low-dose oral enoximone administration on mortality, morbidity, and exercise capacity in patients with advanced heart failure: the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group ESSENTIAL trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metra, Marco; Eichhorn, Eric; Abraham, William T.; Linseman, Jennifer; Böhm, Michael; Corbalan, Ramon; DeMets, David; De Marco, Teresa; Elkayam, Uri; Gerber, Michael; Komajda, Michel; Liu, Peter; Mareev, Vyacheslev; Perrone, Sergio V.; Poole-Wilson, Philip; Roecker, Ellen; Stewart, Jennifer; Swedberg, Karl; Tendera, Michal; Wiens, Brian; Bristow, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Use of inotropic agents in patients with heart failure (HF) has been limited by adverse effects on outcomes. However, administration of positive inotropes at lower doses and concomitant treatment with beta-blockers might increase benefit–risk ratio. We investigated the effects of low doses of the positive inotrope enoximone on symptoms, exercise capacity, and major clinical outcomes in patients with advanced HF who were also treated with beta-blockers and other guideline-recommended background therapy. Methods and results The Studies of Oral Enoximone Therapy in Advanced HF (ESSENTIAL) programme consisted of two identical, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials that differed only by geographic location (North and South America: ESSENTIAL-I; Europe: ESSENTIAL-II). Patients with New York Heart Association class III–IV HF symptoms, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤30%, and one hospitalization or two ambulatory visits for worsening HF in the previous year were eligible for participation in the trials. The trials had three co-primary endpoints: (i) the composite of time to all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization, analysed in the two ESSENTIAL trials combined; (ii) the 6 month change from baseline in the 6 min walk test distance (6MWTD); and (iii) the Patient Global Assessment (PGA) at 6 months, both analysed in each trial separately. ESSENTIAL-I and -II randomized 1854 subjects at 211 sites in 16 countries. In the combined trials, all-cause mortality and the composite, first co-primary endpoint did not differ between the two treatment groups [hazard ratio (HR) 0.97; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80–1.17; and HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.86–1.12, respectively, for enoximone vs. placebo]. The two other co-primary endpoints were analysed separately in the two ESSENTIAL trials, as prospectively designed in the protocol. The 6MWTD increased with enoximone, compared with placebo, in ESSENTIAL-I (P = 0.025, not reaching, however, the pre

  17. Bisoprolol for congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J.; Gustafsson, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: beta-Blockers are a cornerstone in the treatment of systolic heart failure treatment, but not all beta-blockers are effective or in this setting. Objective: To define the role of bisoprolol, a highly selective beta(1)-antagonist in congestive heart failure due to systolic dysfunction....... Methods: Using the keywords 'bisoprolol' and 'heart failure' PubMed and BIOSIS databases were searched for information regarding pharmacology and relevant randomised clinical trials. Supplementary publications were acquired by scrutinising reference lists of relevant papers. Additional information...... was obtained from the FDA website. Conclusion: Bisoprolol is an effective and well-tolerated first-line beta-blocker for patients with systolic heart failure. The knowledge is primarily based on study patients with moderate-to-severe heart failure from the three CIBIS trials Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  18. Chronic Oral Study of Myosin Activation to Increase Contractility in Heart Failure (COSMIC-HF) : a phase 2, pharmacokinetic, randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerlink, John R.; Felker, G. Michael; McMurray, John J. V.; Solomon, Scott D.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Cleland, John G. F.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Goudev, Assen; Macdonald, Peter; Metra, Marco; Mitrovic, Veselin; Ponikowski, Piotr; Serpytis, Pranas; Spinar, Jindrich; Tomcsanyi, Janos; Vandekerckhove, Hans J.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Monsalvo, Maria Laura; Johnston, James; Malik, Fady I.; Honarpour, Narimon

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired contractility is a feature of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. We assessed the pharmacokinetics and eff ects on cardiac function and structure of the cardiac myosin activator, omecamtiv mecarbil. Methods In this randomised, double-blind study, done at 87 sites in 13

  19. Design of the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure (RED-HF) : a Phase III, anaemia correction, morbidity-mortality trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMurray, John J. V.; Anand, Inder S.; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P.; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Polu, Krishna R.; Solomon, Scott D.; Sun, Yan; Swedberg, Karl; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Wasserman, Scott M.; Young, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) and anaemia have greater functional impairment, worse symptoms, increased rates of hospital admission, and a higher risk of death, compared with non-anaemic HF patients. Whether correcting anaemia can improve outcomes is unknown. The Reduction of Events with Darbepoe

  20. Clinical benefits of eplerenone in patients with systolic heart failure and mild symptoms when initiated shortly after hospital discharge : analysis from the EMPHASIS-HF trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girerd, Nicolas; Collier, Tim; Pocock, Stuart; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J.; Swedberg, Karl; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Vincent, John; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cardiovascular hospitalization (CVH) in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with a high post-discharge rate of early re-admission and CV death. Eplerenone might be effective in reducing the incidence of these adverse clinical outcomes during this period. Methods and results The EMPHA

  1. Recent advances in treatment of heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kitai, Takeshi; Tang, WH Wilson

    2015-01-01

    With the total cases and economic burden of heart failure continuing to rise, there is an overwhelming need for novel therapies. Several drugs for heart failure have succeeded in preclinical and early-phase clinical trials, but most of them failed to show the real benefit in pivotal clinical trials. Meanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration recently approved two promising new drugs to treat heart failure: ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Furthermore, some of the newer agents in testi...

  2. Effects of statin therapy according to plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA): a retrospective analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, John J V; Kjekshus, John; Gullestad, Lars

    2009-01-01

    -generating study, we found a significant interaction between hs-CRP and the effect of rosuvastatin for most end points whereby rosuvastatin treatment was associated with better outcomes in patients with hs-CRP > or = 2.0 mg/L. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique...

  3. Rationale and design of the Multidisciplinary Approach to Novel Therapies in Cardiology Oncology Research Trial (MANTICORE 101 - Breast: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine if conventional heart failure pharmacotherapy can prevent trastuzumab-mediated left ventricular remodeling among patients with HER2+ early breast cancer using cardiac MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekowitz Justin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MANTICORE 101 - Breast (Multidisciplinary Approach to Novel Therapies in Cardiology Oncology Research is a randomized trial to determine if conventional heart failure pharmacotherapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or beta-blocker can prevent trastuzumab-mediated left ventricular remodeling, measured with cardiac MRI, among patients with HER2+ early breast cancer. Methods/Design One hundred and fifty-nine patients with histologically confirmed HER2+ breast cancer will be enrolled in a parallel 3-arm, randomized, placebo controlled, double-blind design. After baseline assessments, participants will be randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (perindopril, beta-blocker (bisoprolol, or placebo. Participants will receive drug or placebo for 1 year beginning 7 days before trastuzumab therapy. Dosages for all groups will be systematically up-titrated, as tolerated, at 1 week intervals for a total of 3 weeks. The primary objective of this randomized clinical trial is to determine if conventional heart failure pharmacotherapy can prevent trastuzumab-mediated left ventricular remodeling among patients with HER2+ early breast cancer, as measured by 12 month change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume using cardiac MRI. Secondary objectives include 1 determine the evolution of left ventricular remodeling on cardiac MRI in patients with HER2+ early breast cancer, 2 understand the mechanism of trastuzumab mediated cardiac toxicity by assessing for the presence of myocardial injury and apoptosis on serum biomarkers and cardiac MRI, and 3 correlate cardiac biomarkers of myocyte injury and extra-cellular matrix remodeling with left ventricular remodeling on cardiac MRI in patients with HER2+ early breast cancer. Discussion Cardiac toxicity as a result of cancer therapies is now recognized as a significant health problem of increasing prevalence. To our knowledge, MANTICORE will be the first

  4. The hot (invisible? hand: can time sequence patterns of success/failure in sports be modeled as repeated random independent trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gur Yaari

    Full Text Available The long lasting debate initiated by Gilovich, Vallone and Tversky in [Formula: see text] is revisited: does a "hot hand" phenomenon exist in sports? Hereby we come back to one of the cases analyzed by the original study, but with a much larger data set: all free throws taken during five regular seasons ([Formula: see text] of the National Basketball Association (NBA. Evidence supporting the existence of the "hot hand" phenomenon is provided. However, while statistical traces of this phenomenon are observed in the data, an open question still remains: are these non random patterns a result of "success breeds success" and "failure breeds failure" mechanisms or simply "better" and "worse" periods? Although free throws data is not adequate to answer this question in a definite way, we speculate based on it, that the latter is the dominant cause behind the appearance of the "hot hand" phenomenon in the data.

  5. The hot (invisible?) hand: can time sequence patterns of success/failure in sports be modeled as repeated random independent trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaari, Gur; Eisenmann, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    The long lasting debate initiated by Gilovich, Vallone and Tversky in [Formula: see text] is revisited: does a "hot hand" phenomenon exist in sports? Hereby we come back to one of the cases analyzed by the original study, but with a much larger data set: all free throws taken during five regular seasons ([Formula: see text]) of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Evidence supporting the existence of the "hot hand" phenomenon is provided. However, while statistical traces of this phenomenon are observed in the data, an open question still remains: are these non random patterns a result of "success breeds success" and "failure breeds failure" mechanisms or simply "better" and "worse" periods? Although free throws data is not adequate to answer this question in a definite way, we speculate based on it, that the latter is the dominant cause behind the appearance of the "hot hand" phenomenon in the data.

  6. Short-term vitamin D3 supplementation lowers plasma renin activity in patients with stable chronic heart failure : An open-label, blinded end point, randomized prospective trial (VitD-CHF trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroten, Nicolas F; Ruifrok, Willem P T; Kleijn, Lennaert; Dokter, Martin M; Silljé, Herman H; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kema, Ido; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans L; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2013-01-01

    Background Many chronic heart failure (CHF) patients have low vitamin D (VitD) and high plasma renin activity (PRA), which are both associated with poor prognosis. Vitamin D may inhibit renin transcription and lower PRA. We investigated whether vitamin D3 (VitD3) supplementation lowers PRA in CHF pa

  7. Systems failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Macleod, Anna

    1998-01-01

    Systems Failure A solo exhibition of new work by Anna Macleod developed in conversation with curator Liz Burns. The Dock, Carrick on Shannon, Co Leitrim. Ireland. 12th February – 17th April 2010. The works for the exhibition Systems Failure include drawings, prints and small constructions that examine the delicate balance that exists between need and aspects of failure rooted in the relationship between humanity and land use. The work seeks to question the relationship between scient...

  8. Clinical impacts of additive use of olmesartan in hypertensive patients with chronic heart failure: the supplemental benefit of an angiotensin receptor blocker in hypertensive patients with stable heart failure using olmesartan (SUPPORT) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Yasuhiko; Shiba, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Jun; Miyata, Satoshi; Nochioka, Kotaro; Miura, Masanobu; Takada, Tsuyoshi; Saga, Chiharu; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Masafumi; Nakagawa, Makoto; Sekiguchi, Nobuyo; Komaru, Tatsuya; Kato, Atsushi; Fukuchi, Mitsumasa; Nozaki, Eiji; Hiramoto, Tetsuya; Inoue, Kanichi; Goto, Toshikazu; Ohe, Masatoshi; Tamaki, Kenji; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Ishide, Nobumasa; Maruyama, Yukio; Tsuji, Ichiro; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2015-04-14

    We examined whether an additive treatment with an angiotensin receptor blocker, olmesartan, reduces the mortality and morbidity in hypertensive patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, β-blockers, or both. In this prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded endpoint study, a total of 1147 hypertensive patients with symptomatic CHF (mean age 66 years, 75% male) were randomized to the addition of olmesartan (n = 578) to baseline therapy vs. control (n = 569). The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause death, non-fatal acute myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, and hospitalization for worsening heart failure. During a median follow-up of 4.4 years, the primary endpoint occurred in 192 patients (33.2%) in the olmesartan group and in 166 patients (29.2%) in the control group [hazard ratio (HR) 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.96-1.46, P = 0.112], while renal dysfunction developed more frequently in the olmesartan group (16.8 vs. 10.7%, HR 1.64; 95% CI 1.19-2.26, P = 0.003). Subgroup analysis revealed that addition of olmesartan to combination of ACE inhibitors and β-blockers was associated with increased incidence of the primary endpoint (38.1 vs. 28.2%, HR 1.47; 95% CI 1.11-1.95, P = 0.006), all-cause death (19.4 vs. 13.5%, HR 1.50; 95% CI 1.01-2.23, P = 0.046), and renal dysfunction (21.1 vs. 12.5%, HR 1.85; 95% CI 1.24-2.76, P = 0.003). Additive use of olmesartan did not improve clinical outcomes but worsened renal function in hypertensive CHF patients treated with evidence-based medications. Particularly, the triple combination therapy with olmesartan, ACE inhibitors and β-blockers was associated with increased adverse cardiac events. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov-NCT00417222. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  9. Comparing the effect of hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 with balanced crystalloid solution on mortality and kidney failure in patients with severe sepsis (6S - Scandinavian Starch for Severe Sepsis/Septic Shock trial): Study protocol, design and rationale for a double-blinded, randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: By tradition colloid solutions have been used to obtain fast circulatory stabilisation in shock, but high molecular weight hydroxyethyl starch (HES) may cause acute kidney failure in patients with severe sepsis. Now lower molecular weight HES 130/0.4 is the preferred colloid...... in Scandinavian intensive care units (ICUs) and 1st choice fluid for patients with severe sepsis. However, HES 130/0.4 is largely unstudied in patients with severe sepsis. METHODS/DESIGN: The 6S trial will randomise 800 patients with severe sepsis in 30 Scandinavian ICUs to masked fluid resuscitation using either...... replacement therapy or ventilator support and 28-day and 1/2- and one-year mortality. The sample size will allow the detection of a 10% absolute difference between the two groups in the composite endpoint with a power of 80%. DISCUSSION: The 6S trial will provide important safety and efficacy data on the use...

  10. Rationale, design and conduct of a randomised controlled trial evaluating a primary care-based complex intervention to improve the quality of life of heart failure patients: HICMan (Heidelberg Integrated Case Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muth Christiane

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic congestive heart failure (CHF is a complex disease with rising prevalence, compromised quality of life (QoL, unplanned hospital admissions, high mortality and therefore high burden of illness. The delivery of care for these patients has been criticized and new strategies addressing crucial domains of care have been shown to be effective on patients' health outcomes, although these trials were conducted in secondary care or in highly organised Health Maintenance Organisations. It remains unclear whether a comprehensive primary care-based case management for the treating general practitioner (GP can improve patients' QoL. Methods/Design HICMan is a randomised controlled trial with patients as the unit of randomisation. Aim is to evaluate a structured, standardized and comprehensive complex intervention for patients with CHF in a 12-months follow-up trial. Patients from intervention group receive specific patient leaflets and documentation booklets as well as regular monitoring and screening by a prior trained practice nurse, who gives feedback to the GP upon urgency. Monitoring and screening address aspects of disease-specific self-management, (nonpharmacological adherence and psychosomatic and geriatric comorbidity. GPs are invited to provide a tailored structured counselling 4 times during the trial and receive an additional feedback on pharmacotherapy relevant to prognosis (data of baseline documentation. Patients from control group receive usual care by their GPs, who were introduced to guideline-oriented management and a tailored health counselling concept. Main outcome measurement for patients' QoL is the scale physical functioning of the SF-36 health questionnaire in a 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes are the disease specific QoL measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy questionnaire (KCCQ, depression and anxiety disorders (PHQ-9, GAD-7, adherence (EHFScBS and SANA, quality of care measured by an adapted

  11. Effects of exercise training on different quality of life dimensions in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: the Ex-DHF-P trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Kathleen; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Wachter, Rolf; Gelbrich, Götz; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Duvinage, André; Hoischen, Nadine; von Oehsen, Karima; Schwarz, Silja; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Halle, Martin; Pieske, Burkert; Edelmann, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Despite suffering from poor prognosis, progressive exercise intolerance, and impaired quality of life (QoL), effective therapeutic strategies in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) are sparse. Exercise training (ET) improves physical QoL in HFpEF, but the effects on other aspects of QoL are unknown. The multicentre, prospective, randomized, controlled Exercise training in Diastolic Heart Failure Pilot study included 64 HFpEF patients (65 ± 7 years, 56% female). They were randomized to supervised endurance/resistance training in addition to usual care (ET, n = 44) or usual care alone (UC, n = 20). At baseline and after 3 months, QoL was assessed (36-item Short-form Health Survey (SF-36), Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLWHFQ), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Exercise improved the following SF-36 dimensions: physical functioning (p general health perception (p general mental health (p =  0.002), vitality (p = 0.003), social functioning (p change with ET. With ET, also the PHQ-9 total score improved significantly (p = 0.004, p = 0.735 vs. UC). In patients with HFpEF, exercise training improved emotional status, physical and social dimensions of QoL as well as symptoms of depression from pre to post test. Physical dimensions of QoL and general health perception also improved significantly with exercise in comparison to usual care. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Acute right heart failure after hemorrhagic shock and trauma pneumonectomy-a management approach: A blinded randomized controlled animal trial using inhaled nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Andrea L; Sjoholm, Lars O; Goldberg, Amy; Pathak, Abhijit; Santora, Thomas; Sharp, Thomas E; Wallner, Markus; Berretta, Remus M; Poole, Lauren A; Wu, Jichuan; Wolfson, Marla R

    2017-02-01

    Hemorrhagic shock and pneumonectomy causes an acute increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). The increase in PVR and right ventricular (RV) afterload leads to acute RV failure, thus reducing left ventricular (LV) preload and output. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) lowers PVR by relaxing pulmonary arterial smooth muscle without remarkable systemic vascular effects. We hypothesized that with hemorrhagic shock and pneumonectomy, iNO can be used to decrease PVR and mitigate right heart failure. A hemorrhagic shock and pneumonectomy model was developed using sheep. Sheep received lung protective ventilatory support and were instrumented to serially obtain measurements of hemodynamics, gas exchange, and blood chemistry. Heart function was assessed with echocardiography. After randomization to study gas of iNO 20 ppm (n = 9) or nitrogen as placebo (n = 9), baseline measurements were obtained. Hemorrhagic shock was initiated by exsanguination to a target of 50% of the baseline mean arterial pressure. The resuscitation phase was initiated, consisting of simultaneous left pulmonary hilum ligation, via median sternotomy, infusion of autologous blood and initiation of study gas. Animals were monitored for 4 hours. All animals had an initial increase in PVR. PVR remained elevated with placebo; with iNO, PVR decreased to baseline. Echo showed improved RV function in the iNO group while it remained impaired in the placebo group. After an initial increase in shunt and lactate and decrease in SvO2, all returned toward baseline in the iNO group but remained abnormal in the placebo group. These data indicate that by decreasing PVR, iNO decreased RV afterload, preserved RV and LV function, and tissue oxygenation in this hemorrhagic shock and pneumonectomy model. This suggests that iNO may be a useful clinical adjunct to mitigate right heart failure and improve survival when trauma pneumonectomy is required.

  13. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial) - design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, A.D.O.; Schou, O.; Soja, A.M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Background Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. Study Design The DANish Cardiac REHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally ran...

  14. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial)--design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. STUDY DESIGN: The DANish Cardiac ReHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally r...

  15. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction: Rationale and Study Design of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, Patricia; Domínguez, Eloy; López, Laura; Heredia, Raquel; González, Jessika; Ramón, Jose María; Serra, Pilar; Santas, Enrique; Bodi, Vicente; Sanchis, Juan; Chorro, Francisco J; Núñez, Julio

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has become the most prevalent form of heart failure in developed countries. Regrettably, there is no evidence-based effective therapy for HFpEF. We seek to evaluate whether inspiratory muscle training, functional electrical stimulation, or a combination of both can improve exercise capacity as well as left ventricular diastolic function, biomarker profile, quality of life (QoL), and prognosis in patients with HFpEF. A total of 60 stable symptomatic patients with HFpEF (New York Heart Association class II-III/IV) will be randomized (1:1:1:1) to receive a 12-week program of inspiratory muscle training, functional electrical stimulation, a combination of both, or standard care alone. The primary endpoint of the study is change in peak exercise oxygen uptake; secondary endpoints are changes in QoL, echocardiogram parameters, and prognostic biomarkers. As of March 21, 2016, thirty patients have been enrolled. Searching for novel therapies that improve QoL and autonomy in the elderly with HFpEF has become a health care priority. We believe that this study will add important knowledge about the potential utility of 2 simple and feasible physical interventions for the treatment of advanced HFpEF.

  16. Genetic Variants Are Not Associated with Outcome in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction: Results of the Genetic Sub-study of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Arthur M.; She, Lilin; McNamara, Dennis M.; Mann, Douglas L.; Bristow, Michael R.; Maisel, Alan S.; Wagner, Daniel R.; Andersson, Bert; Chiariello, Luigi; Hayward, Christopher S.; Hendry, Paul; Parker, John D.; Racine, Normand; Selzman, Craig H.; Senni, Michele; Stepinska, Janina; Zembala, Marian; Rouleau, Jean; Velazquez, Eric J.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives and Background We evaluated the ability of 23 genetic variants to provide prognostic information in patients enrolled in the Genotype Sub-studies of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trials. Methods Patients in STICH Hypothesis 1 were randomized to medical therapy with or without CABG (Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting). Those in STICH Hypothesis 2 were randomized to CABG or CABG with left ventricular reconstruction. Results In patients assigned to STICH Hypothesis 2 (n=714), no genetic variant met the pre-specified Bonferroni-adjusted threshold for statistical significance (p<0.002); however, several met nominal prognostic significance: variants in the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (β2-AR Gln27Glu) and in the A1-adenosine receptor gene (A1-717 T/G) were associated with an increased risk of a subject dying or being hospitalized for a cardiac problem (p=0.027 and 0.031, respectively). These relationships remained nominally significant even after multivariable adjustment for prognostic clinical variables. However, none of the 23 genetic variants influenced all-cause mortality or the combination of death or cardiovascular hospitalization in the STICH Hypothesis 1 population (n=532) by either univariate or multivariable analysis. Conclusion We were unable to identify the predictive genotypes in optimally treated patients in these two ischemic heart failure populations. PMID:25592552

  17. Failure to Adhere to Protocol Specified Radiation Therapy Guidelines Was Associated With Decreased Survival in RTOG 9704 - A Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Patients with Resected Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Ross A.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Regine, William F.; Safran, Howard; Hoffman, John P.; Lustig, Robert; Konski, Andre A.; Benson, Al B.; Macdonald, John S.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In RTOG 9704, as previously published, patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma received continuous infusion 5-FU and concurrent radiotherapy (5FU-RT). 5FU-RT treatment was preceded and followed by randomly assigned chemotherapy, either 5-FU or gemcitabine. This analysis explored whether failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines influenced survival and/or toxicity. Methods and Materials RT requirements were protocol specified. Adherence was scored as per protocol (PP) or less than per protocol (trial analysis and without knowledge of individual patient treatment outcomes. Scoring was done for all tumor locations and for the subset of pancreatic head location. Results RT was scored for 416 patients: 216 PP and 200 failure (p=0.016) and, for gemcitabine patients, a trend toward reduced grade 4/5 non-hematologic toxicity (p=0.065). Conclusions This is the first phase III, multi-center, adjuvant protocol for pancreatic adenocarcinoma to evaluate the impact of adherence to specified RT protocol guidelines on protocol outcomes. Failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines was associated with reduced survival and, for patients receiving gemcitabine, trend toward increased non-hematologic toxicity. PMID:21277694

  18. Failure to Adhere to Protocol Specified Radiation Therapy Guidelines Was Associated With Decreased Survival in RTOG 9704-A Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Patients With Resected Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, Ross A., E-mail: Ross_a_abrams@rush.edu [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Regine, William F. [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Safran, Howard [Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Hoffman, John P. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lustig, Robert [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Wayne State Medical Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Benson, Al B. [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Macdonald, John S. [St. Vincent' s Cancer Care Center, New York, NY (United States); Rich, Tyvin A. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: In Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704, as previously published, patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma received continuous infusion 5-FU and concurrent radiotherapy (5FU-RT). 5FU-RT treatment was preceded and followed by randomly assigned chemotherapy, either 5-FU or gemcitabine. This analysis explored whether failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines influenced survival and/or toxicity. Methods and Materials: RT requirements were protocol specified. Adherence was scored as per protocol (PP) or less than per protocol (trial analysis and without knowledge of individual patient treatment outcomes. Scoring was done for all tumor locations and for the subset of pancreatic head location. Results: RT was scored for 416 patients: 216 PP and 200 failure (p = 0.016) and, for gemcitabine patients, a trend toward reduced Grade 4/5 nonhematologic toxicity (p = 0.065). Conclusions: This is the first Phase III, multicenter, adjuvant protocol for pancreatic adenocarcinoma to evaluate the impact of adherence to specified RT protocol guidelines on protocol outcomes. Failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines was associated with reduced survival and, for patients receiving gemcitabine, trend toward increased nonhematologic toxicity.

  19. [Heart failure and anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  20. Optimising exercise training in prevention and treatment of diastolic heart failure (OptimEx-CLIN): rationale and design of a prospective, randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchy, Christiane; Massen, Lilian; Rognmo, Oivind; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Beckers, Paul; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Linke, Axel; Adams, Volker; Wisløff, Ulrik; Pieske, Burkert; Halle, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF) currently affects more than seven million Europeans and is the only cardiovascular disease increasing in prevalence and incidence. No pharmacological agent has yet been shown to improve symptoms or prognosis. The most promising way to improve pathophysiology and deprived exercise-tolerance in HFpEF patients seems to be exercise training, but the optimal approach and dose of exercise is still unknown. The major objective of the optimising exercise training in prevention and treatment of diastolic heart failure study (OptimEx-CLIN) is to define the optimal dose of exercise training in patients with HFpEF. In order to optimise adherence, supervision and economic aspects of exercise training a novel telemedical approach will be introduced and investigated. In a prospective randomised multi-centre study, 180 patients with stable symptomatic HFpEF will be randomised (1:1:1) to moderate intensity continuous training, high intensity interval training, or a control group. The training intervention includes three months supervised followed by nine months of telemedically monitored home-based training. The primary endpoint is change in exercise capacity, defined as change in peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) after three months, assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Secondary endpoints include diastolic filling pressure (E/e') and further echocardiographic and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) parameters, biomarkers, quality of life and endothelial function. Training sessions and physical activity will be monitored and documented throughout the study with accelerometers and heart rate monitors developed on a telemedical platform for the OptimEx-CLIN study. Inclusion of patients started in July 2014, first results are expected in 2017. © Authors 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Influence of Baseline Characteristics, Operative Conduct and Postoperative Course on 30-day Outcomes of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting among Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction: Results from the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Krzysztof; Stevens, Susanna R.; Jones, Robert H.; Selzman, Craig H.; Lamy, Andre; Beaver, Thomas M.; Djokovic, Ljubomir T.; Wang, Nan; Velazquez, Eric J.; Sopko, George; Kron, Irving L.; DiMaio, J. Michael; Michler, Robert E.; Lee, Kerry L.; Yii, Michael; Leng, Chua Yeow; Zembala, Marian; Rouleau, Jean L.; Daly, Richard C.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, ischemic heart failure and coronary artery disease (CAD) suitable for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are at higher risk for surgical morbidity and mortality. Paradoxically, those patients with the most severe coronary artery disease and ventricular dysfunction who derive the greatest clinical benefit from CABG are also at the greatest operative risk, which makes decision-making regarding whether to proceed to surgery difficult in such patients. To better inform such decision-making, we analyzed the STICH CABG population for detailed information on perioperative risk and outcomes. Methods and Results In both STICH trials (hypotheses), 2136 patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 35% and coronary artery disease were allocated to medical therapy, CABG plus medical therapy or CABG with surgical ventricular reconstruction (SVR). Relationships of baseline characteristics and operative conduct with morbidity and mortality at 30 days were evaluated. There were a total of 1460 patients who received surgery, and 346 of them (roughly, one-quarter) of these high-risk patients developed a severe complication within 30 days. Worsening renal insufficiency, cardiac arrest with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and ventricular arrhythmias were the most frequent complications and those most commonly associated with death. Mortality at 30 days was 5.1% and was generally preceded by a serious complication (65 of 74 deaths). LV size, renal dysfunction, advanced age, and atrial fibrillation/flutter were significant preoperative predictors of mortality within 30 days. Cardiopulmonary bypass time was the only independent surgical variable predictive of 30-day mortality. Conclusions CABG can be performed with relatively low 30-day mortality in patients with LV dysfunction. Serious postoperative complications occurred in nearly 1 in 4 patients and were associated with mortality. Clinical Trial

  2. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008275 Relationship of calcineure in mRNA level in peripheral blood and cardiac muscle of patients with heart failure.WANG Mengmeng(王萌萌),et al.Dept Cardiol,Shandong Prov Hosp,Shandong Univ,Jinan 250021.Chin Cir J 2008;23(2):113-116.Objective To study the relationship of calcineurin mRNA level between peripheral lymphocytes and cardiac muscles of patients with chronic heart failure.Methods

  3. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008037 Factors associated with efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with congestive heart failure. SHI Haoying(史浩颖), et al. Dept Cardiol, Zhongshan Hosp Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Chin J Cardiol 2007;35(12):1099-1163. Objective The efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with congestive heart failure and the potential factors associated with responder or nonresponder were investigated. Methods Fifty

  4. Effects of tailored telemonitoring on heart failure patients' knowledge, self-care, self-efficacy and adherence: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyne, Josiane J J; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; De Weerd, Gerjan; Kragten, Johannes; Gorgels, Anton P M

    2014-06-01

    The education of patients with heart failure (HF) is an essential part of disease management. The perspectives of an increasing number of patients and a shortage of professionals force healthcare to explore new strategies in supporting patients to be better informed and more active. Three hundred and eighty-two patients with HF (age 71±SD 11.2 years) were randomly assigned to either a telemonitoring or a usual care group. Patients received four postal questionnaires to assess their levels of self-reported knowledge, self-care, self-efficacy and adherence. Generalized estimating equations analysis was performed to assess the effects of telemonitoring during the 1-year follow-up. Corrections for baseline were performed if needed. Baseline differences between groups were found for self-care (p=0.001) and self-efficacy (p=0.024). Knowledge of patients in the telemonitoring group significantly improved with 0.9 point on a 15-points scale (ptelemonitoring was found to educate patients with HF and to improve their self-care abilities and sense of self-efficacy.

  5. School failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, P H

    1989-04-01

    Numerous factors may contribute to a child's failure to learn. Certain causes of school failure, such as specific learning disabilities, mental retardation, sensory impairment, and chronic illness may be regarded as intrinsic characteristics of the child. Other causes, such as family dysfunction, social problems, and ineffective schooling, are characteristics of the child's environment. Still other influences on school performance, such as temperamental dysfunction, attention deficits, and emotional illness, may be viewed as the consequence of the interaction between the child and his or her environment. The reasons for a child's school failure must not be considered in isolation but rather within the context of social and environmental circumstances. Evaluation must consider the myriad of reasons for a child's school failure and attempt to identify "clusters" of adverse influences on school performance. Detailed information must be sought from the student, parents, and school system through the history and physical examination. Questionnaires are useful in data gathering. Ancillary methods of assessment that may be of value include neurodevelopmental screening and laboratory studies. Further investigations and referrals, particularly psychoeducational evaluation, are of major importance. Traditional roles of the pediatrician in school failure include the treatment of underlying medical conditions, counseling, the coordination of further investigations and referrals, and the facilitation of communication with community services and resources. Participation with other disciplines in the development of a child's educational plan is feasible and useful.

  6. Antioxidant therapy for chronic hepatitis C after failure of interferon: Results of phase Ⅱ randomized, double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety and efficacy of antioxidant therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. METHODS: One hundred chronic HCV infection patients failed in interferon treatment were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive combined intravenous and oral antioxidants or placebo, or oral treatment alone. Primary end points were liver enzymes, HCV-RNA levels and histology. RESULTS: Combined oral and intravenous antioxidant therapy was associated with a significant decline in ALT levels in 52% of patients who received antioxidant therapy vs 20% of patients who received placebo (P = 0.05). Histology activity index (HAI) score at the end of treatment was reduced in 48% of patients who received antioxidant therapy vs 26% of patients who received placebo (P = 0.21). HCV-RNA levels decreased by 1-log or more in 28% of patients who received antioxidant therapy vs 12% who received placebo (P = NS). In part Ⅱ of the trial, oral administration of antioxidants was not associated with significant alterations in any of the end points. CONCLUSION: Antioxidant therapy has a mild beneficial effect on the inflammatory response of chronic HCV infection patients who are non-responders to interferon. Combined antiviral and antioxidant therapy may be beneficial for these patients.

  7. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  8. Effect of Caloric Restriction or Aerobic Exercise Training on Peak Oxygen Consumption and Quality of Life in Obese Older Patients with Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzman, Dalane W.; Brubaker, Peter; Morgan, Timothy; Haykowsky, Mark; Hundley, Gregory; Kraus, William E.; Eggebeen, Joel; Nicklas, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance More than 80% of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), the most common form of HF among older persons, are overweight/obese. Exercise intolerance is the primary symptom of chronic HFPEF and a major determinant of reduced quality-of-life (QOL). Objective To determine whether caloric restriction (Diet), or aerobic exercise training (Exercise), improves exercise capacity and QOL in obese older HFPEF patients. Design Randomized, attention-controlled, 2x2 factorial trial conducted from February 2009 November 2014. Setting Urban academic medical center. Participants 100 older (67±5 years) obese (BMI=39.3±5.6kg/m2) women (n=81) and men (n=19) with chronic, stable HFPEF enrolled from 577 patients initially screened (366 excluded by inclusion / exclusion criteria, 31 for other reasons, 80 declined participation). Twenty-six participants were randomized to Exercise alone, 24 to Diet alone, 25 to Diet+Exercise, and 25 to Control; 92 completed the trial. Interventions 20 weeks of Diet and/or Exercise; Attention Control consisted of telephone calls every 2 weeks. Main Outcomes and Measures Exercise capacity measured as peak oxygen consumption (VO2, ml/kg/min; primary outcome) and QOL measured by the Minnesota Living with HF Questionnaire (MLHF) total score (co-primary outcome; score range: 0–105, higher scores indicate worse HF-related QOL). Results By main effects analysis, peak VO2 was increased significantly by both interventions: Exercise main effect 1.2 ml/kg/min (95%CI: 0.7,1.7; pExercise+Diet was additive (complementary) for peak VO2 (joint effect 2.5 ml/kg/min). The change in MLHF total score was non-significant with Exercise (main effect −1 unit; 95%CI: −8,5; p=0.70) and with Diet (main effect −6 units; 95%CI: −12,1; p=0.078). The change in peak VO2 was positively correlated with the change in percent lean body mass (r=0.32; p=0.003) and the change in thigh muscle/intermuscular fat ratio (r=0.27; p=0.02). There

  9. Perioperative acute renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahon, Padraig

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent biochemical evidence increasingly implicates inflammatory mechanisms as precipitants of acute renal failure. In this review, we detail some of these pathways together with potential new therapeutic targets. RECENT FINDINGS: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin appears to be a sensitive, specific and reliable biomarker of renal injury, which may be predictive of renal outcome in the perioperative setting. For estimation of glomerular filtration rate, cystatin C is superior to creatinine. No drug is definitively effective at preventing postoperative renal failure. Clinical trials of fenoldopam and atrial natriuretic peptide are, at best, equivocal. As with pharmacological preconditioning of the heart, volatile anaesthetic agents appear to offer a protective effect to the subsequently ischaemic kidney. SUMMARY: Although a greatly improved understanding of the pathophysiology of acute renal failure has offered even more therapeutic targets, the maintenance of intravascular euvolaemia and perfusion pressure is most effective at preventing new postoperative acute renal failure. In the future, strategies targeting renal regeneration after injury will use bone marrow-derived stem cells and growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor-1.

  10. QT variability index on 24-hour Holter independently predicts mortality in patients with heart failure: analysis of Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca (GISSI-HF) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Craig P; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Pinna, Gian Domenico; Goldstein, Robert; Olsen, Cara; Bernardinangeli, Marino; Veniani, Marco; Midi, Paolo; Tavazzi, Luigi; Haigney, Mark

    2011-08-01

    Increased temporal variability of repolarization, as reflected by QT interval variability measured over 10-15 minutes, predicted spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias and death in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients in mild to moderate heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that increased mean QT variability over 24 hours would be associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) mortality in a heterogeneous HF population. The Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca-Heart Failure trial prospectively enrolled subjects with HF of any cause. Twenty-four-hour Holter recordings from 268 subjects were analyzed using a template-matching, semiautomatic algorithm to measure QT and heart rate time series in sequential 5-minute epochs over 24 hours. The QT variability index (QTVI) was expressed as the log ratio of the normalized QT variance over normalized heart rate variance. Total and CV mortality were assessed as a function of continuous and dichotomous QTVI (>-0.84) in univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for significant clinical predictors. After a median of 47 months, there were 53 deaths, of which 44 were from CV causes. A significant association with the outcome was found for QTVI both as continuous and dichotomous variables after adjustment for clinical covariates (age >70, New York Heart Association class III-IV, left ventricular ejection fraction, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, creatinine): QTVI hazard ratio (HR) 4.0 (confidence interval [CI] 1.8-88; P = .008) for total and 4.4 (CI 1.9-10.1; P = .0006) for CV mortality; QTVI >-0.84 HR 2.0 (CI 1.1-3.6; P = .02) for total and 2.1 (CI 1.1-3.8; P = .02) for CV mortality. Increased repolarization lability, as reflected in QTVI measured over 24 hours, is associated with increased risk for total and CV mortality in a heterogeneous population with chronic HF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Xenotransplantation of Human Cardiomyocyte Progenitor Cells Does Not Improve Cardiac Function in a Porcine Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure. Results from a Randomized, Blinded, Placebo Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne J Jansen of Lorkeers

    Full Text Available Recently cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs were successfully isolated from fetal and adult human hearts. Direct intramyocardial injection of human CMPCs (hCMPCs in experimental mouse models of acute myocardial infarction significantly improved cardiac function compared to controls.Here, our aim was to investigate whether xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of fetal hCMPCs in a pig model of chronic myocardial infarction is safe and efficacious, in view of translation purposes.We performed a randomized, blinded, placebo controlled trial. Four weeks after ischemia/reperfusion injury by 90 minutes of percutaneous left anterior descending artery occlusion, pigs (n = 16, 68.5 ± 5.4 kg received intracoronary infusion of 10 million fetal hCMPCs or placebo. All animals were immunosuppressed by cyclosporin (CsA. Four weeks after infusion, endpoint analysis by MRI displayed no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end diastolic and left ventricular end systolic volumes between both groups. Serial pressure volume (PV-loop and echocardiography showed no differences in functional parameters between groups at any timepoint. Infarct size at follow-up, measured by late gadolinium enhancement MRI showed no difference between groups. Intracoronary pressure and flow measurements showed no signs of coronary obstruction 30 minutes after cell infusion. No premature death occurred in cell treated animals.Xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of hCMPCs is feasible and safe, but not associated with improved left ventricular performance and infarct size compared to placebo in a porcine model of chronic myocardial infarction.

  12. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970318 A study on evoked potentials in cor pul-monale patients with chronic respiratory failure.QIAO Hui(乔慧), et al. Beijing Neurosurg Instit,Beijing, 100050. Chin J Geriatr 1997; 16(1): 43-45. Objective: Evoked protential was used to detect thechange of brain function in cor pulmonale patients with

  13. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009170 Curcumin attenuates left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in rabbits with chronic heart failure. TANG Yanhong(唐艳红),et al.Dept Cardiol,Renmin Hosp,Wuhan Univ,Wuhan 430060.Chin J Cardiol,2009;37(3):262-267.

  14. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008411 Expression of S100B during heart failure in rats. JIANG Zhenni(蒋珍妮), et al. Dept Cardiol, 2nd Affili Hosp, Zhejiang Univ, Coll Med Hangzhou 310009. Chin J Emerg Med 2008;17(5):475-478. Objective To evaluate the value of S100B gene on cardiovascular remodeling in rats with abdominal aorta coarctation.

  15. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970284 Effects of enalapril on heart rate variabilityin patients with congestive heart failure. ZHANGYouhua(章友华), et a1. Dept Cardiol, Cardiovasc Instit& Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. ChinCir J 1996; 11(2): 729-732.

  16. Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K. P.; Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo;

    1999-01-01

    The present appendix contains the derivation of ten different limit state equations divided on three different failure modes. Five of the limit state equations can be used independently of the characteristics of the subsoil, whereas the remaining five can be used for either drained or undrained...

  17. Comparison of a one-time educational intervention to a teach-to-goal educational intervention for self-management of heart failure: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeWalt Darren A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure (HF is common, costly and associated with significant morbidity and poor quality of life, particularly for patients with low socioeconomic status. Self-management training has been shown to reduce HF related morbidity and hospitalization rates, but there is uncertainty about how best to deliver such training and what patients benefit. This study compares a single session self-management HF training program against a multiple session training intervention and examines whether their effects differ by literacy level. Methods/Design In this randomized controlled multi-site trial, English and Spanish-speaking patients are recruited from university-affiliated General Internal Medicine and Cardiology clinics at 4 sites across the United States. Eligible patients have HF with New York Heart Association class II-IV symptoms and are prescribed a loop diuretic. Baseline data, including literacy level, are collected at enrollment and follow-up surveys are conducted at 1, 6 and 12 months Upon enrollment, both the control and intervention groups receive the same 40 minute, literacy-sensitive, in-person, HF education session covering the 4 key self-management components of daily self assessment and having a plan, salt avoidance, exercise, and medication adherence. All participants also receive a literacy-sensitive workbook and a digital bathroom scale. After the baseline education was completed, patients are randomly allocated to return to usual care or to receive ongoing education and training. The intervention group receives an additional 20 minutes of education on weight and symptom-based diuretic self-adjustment, as well as periodic follow-up phone calls from the educator over the course of 1 year. These phone calls are designed to reinforce the education, assess participant knowledge of the education and address barriers to success. The primary outcome is the combined incidence of all cause hospitalization and death

  18. Effect of metoprolol on the prognosis for patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction and indirect signs of congestive heart failure (a subgroup analysis of the Göteborg Metoprolol Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlitz, J; Waagstein, F; Lindqvist, J; Swedberg, K; Hjalmarson, A

    1997-11-13

    The aim of this study is to describe the impact of early treatment with metoprolol on prognosis during 1 year of follow-up in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and indirect signs of congestive heart failure (CHF). Patients aged 40-74 years who presented within 48 hours of onset of symptoms raising suspicion of AMI were assessed for inclusion. All patients participated in the Göteborg Metoprolol Trial and had indirect indices of CHF according to various clinical criteria. As soon as possible after hospital admission, patients received either placebo or metoprolol (15 mg) divided into 3 intravenous injections, then oral treatment, 200 mg daily for 3 months. Thereafter, most patients in both treatment groups received metoprolol in an open manner. Among the 1,395 randomized patients, 262 (19%) had signs of mild-to-moderate CHF before randomization. Of these, 131 were randomized to metoprolol and 131 to placebo. During the first 3 months, mortality was 10% among patients randomized to metoprolol versus 19% among patients randomized to placebo (p = 0.036). The corresponding figures for the first year were 14% and 27%, respectively (p = 0.0099). Patients randomized to placebo who showed signs of CHF had a 1-year mortality rate of 28% compared with 10% among patients without such signs (p metoprolol markedly reduces mortality in patients having suspected AMI and signs of CHF.

  19. A failure to confirm the effectiveness of a brief group psychoeducational program for mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Masako Suzuki,1 Atsurou Yamada,1 Norio Watanabe,1 Tatsuo Akechi,1 Fujika Katsuki,2 Takeshi Nishiyama,3 Masayuki Imaeda,4 Taishi Miyachi,4 Kazuo Otaki,5 Yumiko Mitsuda,6 Akino Ota,6 Toshi A Furukawa7 1Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, Nagoya City University School of Nursing, Nagoya, Japan; 3Clinical Trial Management Center, Nagoya City University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Neonatology and Pediatrics, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 5Kazuo Mental Clinic, Toyohashi, Japan; 6Toyokawa Sakura Hospital, Toyokawa Japan; 7Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group psychoeducation to relieve the psychological distress of mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders (HFPDD and to improve the behaviors of the children. Methods: Seventy-two mothers of preschool outpatients with HFPDD were randomly assigned to a four-session brief group psychoeducational program (GP. The sessions were held every second week in addition to the usual treatment (GP + treatment as usual [TAU] group, or to a TAU-alone group. The primary outcome was self-reported symptoms of maternal mental health as assessed using the 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 at 21 weeks post-randomization (week 21. The GHQ-28 at the end of the intervention (week 7, Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC for the behavior of the children, the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI, and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 were carried out at weeks 7 and 21. We tested the group effects with the interaction between the intervention and the evaluation points. Results: The GHQ-28

  20. Renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930150 Epidermal growth factor and its recep-tor in the renal tissue of patients with acute re-nal failure and normal persons.LIU Zhihong(刘志红),et al.Jinling Hosp,Nanjing,210002.Natl Med J China 1992;72(10):593-595.Epidermal growth factor(EGF)and its receptor(EGF-R)were identified by immunohis-tochemical method(4 layer PAP)in the renaltissue specimens obtained from 11 normal kid-neys and 17 cases of acute renal failure(ARF).The quantitative EGF and EGF-R in the tissuewere expressed as positive tubules per mm~2.The amount of EGF and EGF-R in renal tissue

  1. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920647 Comparative effects of commonvasodilators on experimental cardiac fai-lure. LI Zhijian (李志坚), et al. Dept Cardiol,2nd Hosp, Tianjin Med Coll. Tianjin Med J1992; 20(8): 456-458. A 9×9 latin square design was employed forcomparing the effects of (1) placebo, (2) nitr-oprusside, (3) phentolamine, (4) isosorbide dini-trate. (5) captopril, (6) captopril-isosorbide

  2. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005186 The diagnostic application of bedside measurement of plasma brain natriuretic in patients with heart failure. SHAO Le-wen (邵乐文) , Advanced Ward Dept, 1st Hosp, Med Sch, Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310003. Chin J Intern Med, 2005;44(2): 99-101. Objective: To investigate differential diagnosis value of ultra-rapid bedside measurement of brain na-triuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with dyspnea.

  3. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010316 Tissue doppler imaging observation on effect of long-term use of gingko biloba tabtet on left ventricular function in patients with chronic heart failure. ZHANG Hui(张辉),et al. Dept Cardiovasc Med, 2nd Hosp, Hebei Med Univ,Shijiazhuang 050000. Chin J Integr Tradit & West Med 2010;30(5):478-481. Objective To quantitatively observe the effect of long-term

  4. Renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008463 Protective effect of recombination rat augmenter of liver regeneration on kidney in acute renal failure rats. TANG Xiaopeng(唐晓鹏), et al. Dept Nephrol, 2nd Affili Hosp Chongqing Med Univ, Chongqing 400010.Chin J Nephrol 2008;24(6):417-421. Objective To investigate the protective effects of recombination rat augmenter of liver regeneration (rrALR) on tubular cell injury and renal dysfunction

  5. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  6. New medications for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Jonathan S; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is common and results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Current guideline-based therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, including beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and aldosterone antagonists aim to interrupt deleterious neurohormonal pathways and have shown significant success in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heart failure. Continued efforts to further improve outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction have led to the first new-in-class medications approved for heart failure since 2005, ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Ivabradine targets the If channels in the sinoatrial node of the heart, decreasing heart rate. Sacubitril/valsartan combines a neprilysin inhibitor that increases levels of beneficial vasodilatory peptides with an angiotensin receptor antagonist. On a background of previously approved, guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure, these medications have shown improved clinical outcomes ranging from decreased hospitalizations in a select group of patients to a reduction in all-cause mortality across all pre-specified subgroups. In this review, we will discuss the previously established guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the translational research that led to the development of these new therapies, and the results from the major clinical trials of ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic versus diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure ...

  8. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ask ... Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  9. Effects of interleukin-1 blockade with anakinra on adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure after acute myocardial infarction [from the Virginia Commonwealth University-Anakinra Remodeling Trial (2) (VCU-ART2) pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Antonio; Van Tassell, Benjamin Wallace; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Kontos, Michael Christopher; Grizzard, John Dallas; Spillman, Debra Whittaker; Oddi, Claudia; Roberts, Charlotte Susan; Melchior, Ryan David; Mueller, George Herman; Abouzaki, Nayef Antar; Rengel, Lenore Rosemary; Varma, Amit; Gambill, Michael Lucas; Falcao, Raquel Appa; Voelkel, Norbert Felix; Dinarello, Charles Anthony; Vetrovec, George Wayne

    2013-05-15

    A first pilot study of interleukin-1 blockade in ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction showed improved remodeling. In the present second pilot study, we enrolled 30 patients with clinically stable ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction randomized to anakinra, recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, 100 mg/day for 14 days or placebo in a double-blind fashion. The primary end point was the difference in the interval change in left ventricular (LV) end-systolic volume index between the 2 groups within 10 to 14 weeks. The secondary end points included changes in the LV end-diastolic volume index, LV ejection fraction, and C-reactive protein levels. No significant changes in end-systolic volume index, LV end-diastolic volume index, or LV ejection fraction were seen in the placebo group. Compared to placebo, treatment with anakinra led to no measurable differences in these parameters. Anakinra significantly blunted the increase in C-reactive protein between admission and 72 hours (+0.8 mg/dl, interquartile range -6.4 to +4.2, vs +21.1 mg/dl, interquartile range +8.7 to +36.6, p = 0.002), which correlated with the changes in LV end-diastolic volume index and LV end-systolic volume index at 10 to 14 weeks (R = +0.83, p = 0.002, and R = +0.55, p = 0.077, respectively). One patient in the placebo group (7%) died. One patient (7%) in the anakinra group developed recurrent acute myocardial infarction. More patients were diagnosed with new-onset heart failure in the placebo group (4, 27%) than in the anakinra group (1, 7%; p = 0.13). When the data were pooled with those from the first Virginia Commonwealth University-Anakinra Remodeling Trial (n = 40), this difference reached statistical significance (30% vs 5%, p = 0.035). In conclusion, interleukin-1 blockade with anakinra blunted the acute inflammatory response associated with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. Although it failed to show a statistically significant

  10. A prospective comparison of alginate-hydrogel with standard medical therapy to determine impact on functional capacity and clinical outcomes in patients with advanced heart failure (AUGMENT-HF trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Stefan D; Coats, Andrew J S; Cristian, Gabriel; Dragomir, Dinu; Pusineri, Enrico; Piredda, Massimo; Bettari, Luca; Dowling, Robert; Volterrani, Maurizio; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mas, Jean-Louis; Danchin, Nicolas; Solomon, Scott D; Lee, Randall J; Ahmann, Frank; Hinson, Andy; Sabbah, Hani N; Mann, Douglas L

    2015-09-07

    AUGMENT-HF was an international, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and safety of a novel method of left ventricular (LV) modification with alginate-hydrogel. Alginate-hydrogel is an inert permanent implant that is directly injected into LV heart muscle and serves as a prosthetic scaffold to modify the shape and size of the dilated LV. Patients with advanced chronic heart failure (HF) were randomized (1 : 1) to alginate-hydrogel (n = 40) in combination with standard medical therapy or standard medical therapy alone (Control, n = 38). The primary endpoint of AUGMENT-HF was the change in peak VO2 from baseline to 6 months. Secondary endpoints included changes in 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, as well as assessments of procedural safety. Enrolled patients were 63 ± 10 years old, 74% in NYHA functional class III, had a LV ejection fraction of 26 ± 5% and a mean peak VO2 of 12.2 ± 1.8 mL/kg/min. Thirty-five patients were successfully treated with alginate-hydrogel injections through a limited left thoracotomy approach without device-related complications; the 30-day surgical mortality was 8.6% (3 deaths). Alginate-hydrogel treatment was associated with improved peak VO2 at 6 months-treatment effect vs. +1.24 mL/kg/min (95% confidence interval 0.26-2.23, P = 0.014). Also 6MWT distance and NYHA functional class improved in alginate-hydrogel-treated patients vs. Control (both P Alginate-hydrogel in addition to standard medical therapy for patients with advanced chronic HF was more effective than standard medical therapy alone for improving exercise capacity and symptoms. The results of AUGMENT-HF provide proof of concept for a pivotal trial. NCT01311791. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  11. Worsening Heart Failure Following Admission for Acute Heart Failure A Pooled Analysis of the PROTECT and RELAX-AHF Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, Beth A.; Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gad; Massie, Barry M.; Cleland, John G. F.; Dittrich, Howard C.; Edwards, Christopher; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Givertz, Michael M.; Greenberg, Barry; Ponikowski, Piotr; Voors, Adriaan A.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Teerlink, John R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES These studies conducted analyses to examine patient characteristics and outcomes associated with worsening heart failure (WHF). BACKGROUND WHF during an admission for acute heart failure (AHF) represents treatment failure and is a potential therapeutic target for clinical trials of AHF. M

  12. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930118 Facial or nasal mask pressure supportventilation in managing acute exacerbation ofchronic respiratory failure in COPD patients.CHEN Rongchang(陈荣昌),et al.GuangzhouInstit Respir Dis,Guangzhou 510120.Chin Tu-berc & Respir Dis 1992;15(5)285-287.Eleven COPD patients(age:65±9 yrs)withacute exacerbation of chronic respiratory failure(PaCO2 11.3±1.1kPa)were treated with maskpressure support ventilation,another 10 similarpatients(age:68±12yrs)served as controls.Bi-PAP ventilator was used with the followingmodifications:(1)Non-rehreathing valve set-in proximal to mask;(2)5 LPM oxygen flow de-livered into mask to reduce the dead space ef-fect.Mask ventilation was given 2-3 hours ev-ery time and 1-2 times daily for 7 days.Syn-

  13. The Impact of Tai Chi Exercise on Self-Efficacy, Social Support, and Empowerment in Heart Failure: Insights from a Qualitative Sub-Study from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Y Yeh

    Full Text Available To qualitatively explore perceived physical and psychosocial effects and overall patient experience associated with a 12-week tai chi (TC intervention and an education group in a clinical trial of patients with chronic heart failure (HF.We randomized 100 patients with chronic systolic HF (NYHA Class 1-3, ejection fraction≤40% to a 12-week group TC program or an education control. At 12-weeks, semi-structured interviews were conducted on a random subset (n = 32; n = 17 in TC, n = 15 in control, audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Two independent reviewers extracted information using grounded-theory methods for emergent themes. We explored similarities and differences in themes/sub-themes between the groups, and examined qualitative association with changes from baseline to post-intervention in previously reported quantitative measures (e.g., Minnesota Living with HF, Cardiac Exercise Self Efficacy and Profile of Mood States.The mean age (±SD of participants was 68±9 years, baseline ejection fraction 29±7%, and median New York Heart Association class 2 HF. We idenitifed themes related to the patient's experience of illness, perceptions of self, and relationship to others. Specific psychosocial and physical benefits were described. Common themes emerged from both groups including: social support and self-efficacy related to activity/exercise and diet. The tai chi group, however, also exhibited a more global empowerment and perceived control. Additional themes in TC included mindfulness/self-awareness, decreased stress reactivity, and renewed social role. These themes mirrored improvements in previously reported quantitative measures (quality-of-life, self-efficacy, and mood in TC compared to control. Patients in TC also reported physical benefits (e.g., decreased pain, improved energy, endurance, flexibility.Positive themes emerged from both groups, although there were qualitative differences in concepts of self-efficacy and perceived

  14. The Impact of Tai Chi Exercise on Self-Efficacy, Social Support, and Empowerment in Heart Failure: Insights from a Qualitative Sub-Study from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Gloria Y; Chan, Caroline W; Wayne, Peter M; Conboy, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    To qualitatively explore perceived physical and psychosocial effects and overall patient experience associated with a 12-week tai chi (TC) intervention and an education group in a clinical trial of patients with chronic heart failure (HF). We randomized 100 patients with chronic systolic HF (NYHA Class 1-3, ejection fraction≤40%) to a 12-week group TC program or an education control. At 12-weeks, semi-structured interviews were conducted on a random subset (n = 32; n = 17 in TC, n = 15 in control), audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Two independent reviewers extracted information using grounded-theory methods for emergent themes. We explored similarities and differences in themes/sub-themes between the groups, and examined qualitative association with changes from baseline to post-intervention in previously reported quantitative measures (e.g., Minnesota Living with HF, Cardiac Exercise Self Efficacy and Profile of Mood States). The mean age (±SD) of participants was 68±9 years, baseline ejection fraction 29±7%, and median New York Heart Association class 2 HF. We idenitifed themes related to the patient's experience of illness, perceptions of self, and relationship to others. Specific psychosocial and physical benefits were described. Common themes emerged from both groups including: social support and self-efficacy related to activity/exercise and diet. The tai chi group, however, also exhibited a more global empowerment and perceived control. Additional themes in TC included mindfulness/self-awareness, decreased stress reactivity, and renewed social role. These themes mirrored improvements in previously reported quantitative measures (quality-of-life, self-efficacy, and mood) in TC compared to control. Patients in TC also reported physical benefits (e.g., decreased pain, improved energy, endurance, flexibility). Positive themes emerged from both groups, although there were qualitative differences in concepts of self-efficacy and perceived control

  15. Advances in gene therapy for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Kenneth M; Ishikawa, Kiyotake

    2015-04-01

    Chronic heart failure is expected to increase its social and economic burden as a consequence of improved survival in patients with acute cardiac events. Cardiac gene therapy holds significant promise in heart failure treatment for patients with currently very limited or no treatment options. The introduction of adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene vector changed the paradigm of cardiac gene therapy, and now it is the primary vector of choice for chronic heart failure gene therapy in clinical and preclinical studies. Recently, there has been significant progress towards clinical translation in this field spearheaded by AAV-1 mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA2a) gene therapy targeting chronic advanced heart failure patients. Meanwhile, several independent laboratories are reporting successful gene therapy approaches in clinically relevant large animal models of heart failure and some of these approaches are expected to enter clinical trials in the near future. This review will focus on gene therapy approaches targeting heart failure that is in clinical trials and those close to its initial clinical trial application.

  16. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain proper fluid ... marrow and strengthen the bones. The term kidney (renal) failure describes a situation in which the kidneys have ...

  17. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  18. Living with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Failure Currently, heart failure has no cure. You'll ... avoid harmful side effects. Take Steps To Prevent Heart Failure From Getting Worse Certain actions can worsen your ...

  19. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Classes of Heart Failure Updated:Sep 28,2016 Doctors usually classify patients' ... Blood Pressure Tracker Find additional helpful resources here Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  20. About Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... talk about your health and the medicines About Heart Failure Heart failure is a disease where the heart cannot do ... very important for your health. common causes of heart failure are diseases or conditions that damage the heart. ...

  1. What Is Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  2. Acute Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out of balance. Acute kidney failure — also called acute renal failure or acute kidney injury — develops rapidly over ... 2015. Palevsky PM. Definition of acute kidney injury (acute renal failure). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April ...

  3. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF.

  4. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  5. [Is iron important in heart failure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murín, Ján; Pernický, Miroslav

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency is a frequent comorbidity in a patient with chronic heart failure, and it associates with a worse prognosis of that patient. Mainly worse quality of life and more rehospitalizations are in these iron deficient patients. Iron metabolism is rather complex and there is some new information concerning this complexity in heart failure. We distinquish an absolute and a functional iron deficiency in heart failure. It is this deficit which is important and not as much is anemia important here. Prevalence of anaemia in heart failure is about 30-50%, higher it is in patients suffering more frequently heart failure decompensations. Treatment of iron deficiency is important and it improves prognosis of these patients. Most experiences there are with i.v. iron treatment (FERRIC HF, FAIR HF and CONFIRM HF studies), less so with per oral treatment. There are no clinical trials which analysed mortality influences.

  6. Long-term survival results of a randomized phase III trial of vinflunine plus best supportive care versus best supportive care alone in advanced urothelial carcinoma patients after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmunt, J; Fougeray, R; Rosenberg, J E

    2013-01-01

    To compare long-term, updated overall survival (OS) of patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium (TCCU) treated with vinflunine plus best supportive care (BSC) or BSC alone, after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy....

  7. Role functioning before start of adjuvant treatment was an independent prognostic factor for survival and time to failure. A report from the Nordic adjuvant interferon trial for patients with high-risk melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandberg, Yvonne; Johansson, Hemming; Aamdal, Steinar

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) at randomization as independent prognostic factors for survival and time to failure, and to explore associations between HRQoL and treatment effects.......To investigate the role of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) at randomization as independent prognostic factors for survival and time to failure, and to explore associations between HRQoL and treatment effects....

  8. Rehabilitation Enablement in Chronic Heart Failure—a facilitated self-care rehabilitation intervention in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (REACH-HFpEF) and their caregivers: rationale and protocol for a single-centre pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C C; Smith, K; Jolly, K; Davis, R; Hayward, C; Wingham, J; Abraham, C; Green, C; Warren, F C; Britten, N; Greaves, C J; Doherty, P; Austin, J; Van Lingen, R; Singh, S; Buckingham, S; Paul, K; Taylor, R S; Dalal, H M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Rehabilitation EnAblement in CHronic Heart Failure in patients with Heart Failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (REACH-HFpEF) pilot trial is part of a research programme designed to develop and evaluate a facilitated, home-based, self-help rehabilitation intervention to improve self-care and quality of life (QoL) in heart failure patients and their caregivers. We will assess the feasibility of a definitive trial of the REACH-HF intervention in patients with HFpEF and their caregivers. The impact of the REACH-HF intervention on echocardiographic outcomes and bloodborne biomarkers will also be assessed. Methods and analysis A single-centre parallel two-group randomised controlled trial (RCT) with 1:1 individual allocation to the REACH-HF intervention plus usual care (intervention) or usual care alone (control) in 50 HFpEF patients and their caregivers. The REACH-HF intervention comprises a REACH-HF manual with supplementary tools, delivered by trained facilitators over 12 weeks. A mixed methods approach will be used to assess estimation of recruitment and retention rates; fidelity of REACH-HF manual delivery; identification of barriers to participation and adherence to the intervention and study protocol; feasibility of data collection and outcome burden. We will assess the variance in study outcomes to inform a definitive study sample size and assess methods for the collection of resource use and intervention delivery cost data to develop the cost-effectiveness analyses framework for any future trial. Patient outcomes collected at baseline, 4 and 6 months include QoL, psychological well-being, exercise capacity, physical activity and HF-related hospitalisation. Caregiver outcomes will also be assessed, and a substudy will evaluate impact of the REACH-HF manual on resting global cardiovascular function and bloodborne biomarkers in HFpEF patients. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the East of Scotland Research Ethics

  9. Predicting Subsequent Task Performance From Goal Motivation and Goal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Catherine Healy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated that the cognitive processes associated with goal pursuit can continue to interfere with unrelated tasks when a goal is unfulfilled. Drawing from the self-regulation and goal-striving literatures, the present study explored the impact of goal failure on subsequent cognitive and physical task performance. Furthermore, we examined if the autonomous or controlled motivation underpinning goal striving moderates the responses to goal failure. Athletes (75 male, 59 female, Mage = 19.90 years, SDage = 3.50 completed a cycling trial with the goal of covering a given distance in 8 minutes. Prior to the trial, their motivation was primed using a video. During the trial they were provided with manipulated performance feedback, thus creating conditions of goal success or failure. No differences emerged in the responses to goal failure between the primed motivation or performance feedback conditions. We make recommendations for future research into how individuals can deal with failure in goal striving.

  10. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Types of Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 Left-sided heart failure ... making. This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  11. Understanding chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Matthew; Burch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The key principles of chronic heart failure and the development of clinical management strategies are described. The physiological changes in chronic heart failure and the clinical management of children with heart failure are considered, but the treatment of heart failure related to congenital heart disease or the intensive care management of heart failure are not mentioned as both topics require consideration in their own right. A greater understanding of the maladaptive responses to chroni...

  12. Immune mediated liver failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capac...

  13. Understanding contraceptive failure

    OpenAIRE

    Trussell, James

    2009-01-01

    Contraceptive failure is a major source of unintended pregnancy. This chapter will review sources of data and measurement of contraceptive failure, summarize results from the literature on the risks of contraceptive failure during typical and perfect use for available methods of contraception, provide a tool for communicating risks of contraceptive failure to clients, examine determinants of contraceptive failure, and identify methodological pitfalls in the published literature.

  14. System failure analysis based on DEMATEL-ISM and FMECA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申桂香; 孙曙光; 张英芝; 王志琼; 陈炳锟; 马闯

    2014-01-01

    A new method of system failure analysis was proposed. First, considering the relationships between the failure subsystems, the decision making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) method was used to calculate the degree of correlation between the failure subsystems, analyze the combined effect of related failures, and obtain the degree of correlation by using the directed graph and matrix operations. Then, the interpretative structural modeling (ISM) method was combined to intuitively show the logical relationship of many failure subsystems and their influences on each other by using multilevel hierarchical structure model and obtaining the critical subsystems. Finally, failure mode effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) was used to perform a qualitative hazard analysis of critical subsystems, determine the critical failure mode, and clarify the direction of reliability improvement. Through an example, the result demonstrates that the proposed method can be efficiently applied to system failure analysis problems.

  15. Predicting survival in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocock, Stuart J; Ariti, Cono A; McMurray, John J V

    2012-01-01

    AimsUsing a large international database from multiple cohort studies, the aim is to create a generalizable easily used risk score for mortality in patients with heart failure (HF).Methods and resultsThe MAGGIC meta-analysis includes individual data on 39 372 patients with HF, both reduced...... and preserved left-ventricular ejection fraction (EF), from 30 cohort studies, six of which were clinical trials. 40.2% of patients died during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Using multivariable piecewise Poisson regression methods with stepwise variable selection, a final model included 13 highly significant...

  16. Defibrillator Implantation in Patients with Nonischemic Systolic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Thune, Jens J; Nielsen, Jens C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The benefit of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in patients with symptomatic systolic heart failure caused by coronary artery disease has been well documented. However, the evidence for a benefit of prophylactic ICDs in patients with systolic heart failure that is not d...... by Medtronic and others; DANISH ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00542945 .)....

  17. Erythropoietin therapy in patients with chronic renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinevich, A J; Petersen, J.

    1992-01-01

    Symptomatic anemia is a common complication of chronic renal failure. Treatment is now possible with the availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa). Previous experimental studies have suggested that correcting the anemia of chronic renal failure may be harmful in that renal failure may be accelerated. Although experience with this drug has been primarily restricted to its use in patients with end-stage renal disease, several recent trials have been reported in patients wi...

  18. Use of High-Sensitivity Troponin T to Identify Patients With Acute Heart Failure at Lower Risk for Adverse Outcomes An Exploratory Analysis From the RELAX-AHF Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pang, Peter S.; Teerlink, John R.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Greenberg, Barry H.; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Felker, G. Michael; Davison, Beth A.; Cotter, Gad; Kriger, Joshua; Prescott, Margaret F.; Hua, Tsushung A.; Severin, Thomas; Metra, Marco

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to determine if a baseline high-sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) value BACKGROUND Approximately 85% of patients who present to emergency departments with acute heart failure are admitted. Identification of patients at low risk might decrease unnecessary admissions.

  19. DOUBLE-BLIND PLACEBO-CONTROLLED STUDY OF IBOPAMINE AND DIGOXIN IN PATIENTS WITH MILD-TO-MODERATE HEART-FAILURE - RESULTS OF THE DUTCH IBOPAMINE MULTICENTER TRIAL (DIMT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; MANINTVELD, AJ; DUNSELMAN, PHJM; LOK, DJA; DOHMEN, HJM; POORTERMANS, JC; WITHAGEN, AJAM; PASTEUNING, WH; BROUWER, J; LIE, KI

    1993-01-01

    Objectives. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of long-term treatment with the orally active dopamine agonist ibopamine in patients with mild to moderate chronic congestive heart failure and to compare the results with those of treatment with digoxin and placebo. Backgroun

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pentoxifylline for heart failure: a systematic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heart failure, typically a progressive disease, now affects 22 ... frequency of hospitalisation and death rate in people with ... existed among selected trials, for example patients differed .... N = number of participants in a trial; NYHA = New York Heart Association; LVEF = left ventricular ejection fraction; TID = three times daily; ...

  1. Diastolic heart failure in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffrey H. Barsuk; William G. Cotts

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved left ventricular function is a common problem among elderly patients. Given that diastolic heart failure (DHF) occurs in up to 50% of all heart failure admissions, and that incidence increases with age, knowledge of current recommendations for its diagnosis and treatment are extremely important for the elderly population. Causes of DHF include the aging process itself, hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, aortic stenosis, and hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. The patient with DHF may present with signs and symptoms similar to those observed in systolic heart failure. Treatment goals for the patient with DHF include achieving normal volume status, improving relaxation of the left ventricle, regression of hypertrophy if possible, and management of any co-morbidities that may aggravate the clinical status of patients with DHF. Hopefully, in the future, further data from randomized clinical trials will allow a more defined approach to care in these patients.

  2. [Understanding heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, José Fernando Guadalajara

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a disease with several definitions. The term "heart failure" is used by has brougth about confusion in the terminology. For this reason, the value of the ejection fraction (< 0.40 or < 0.35) is used in most meganalyses on the treatment of heart failure, avoiding the term "heart failure" that is a confounding concept. In this paper we carefully analyze the meaning of contractility, ventricular function or performance, preload, afterload, heart failure, compensation mechanisms in heart failure, myocardial oxygen consumption, inadequate, adequate and inappropriate hypertrophy, systole, diastole, compliance, problems of relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction. Their definitions are supported by the original scientific descriptions in an attempt to clarify the concepts about ventricular function and heart failure and, in this way, use the same scientific language about the meaning of ventricular function, heart failure, and diastolic dysfunction.

  3. Real System Failures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This resource area contains descriptions of actual electronic systems failure scenarios with an emphasis on the diversity of failure modes and effects that can...

  4. Contraceptive failure in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duolao

    2002-09-01

    This study examines patterns and differentials of contraceptive failure rates by method and characteristics of users, using the Chinese Two-per-Thousand Fertility Survey data. The results show that contraceptive failure rates for modern methods including sterilization are some of the highest in the world. The first year failure rates are 4.2% for male sterilization, 0.7% for female sterilization, 10.3% for IUD, 14.5% for pill, and 19.0% for condom. There are also some differentials in contraceptive failure rates by users' sociodemographic and fertility characteristics. Contraceptive failure rate declines with women's age for all reversible methods. Rural women have higher sterilization, IUD, and condom contraceptive failure rates than urban women. Women with two or more children have a higher failure rate for sterilization methods but have lower failure rates for other methods.

  5. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Bjerring, Peter Nissen

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these.......Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these....

  6. In Support of Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Allison

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, I propose a concerted effort to begin devising a theory and pedagogy of failure. I review the discourse of failure in Western culture as well as in composition pedagogy, ultimately suggesting that failure is not simply a judgement or indication of rank but is a relational, affect-bearing concept with tremendous relevance to…

  7. Defibrillator Implantation in Patients with Nonischemic Systolic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Thune, Jens J; Nielsen, Jens C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The benefit of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in patients with symptomatic systolic heart failure caused by coronary artery disease has been well documented. However, the evidence for a benefit of prophylactic ICDs in patients with systolic heart failure that is not due.......6%) in the control group (P=0.29). CONCLUSIONS: In this trial, prophylactic ICD implantation in patients with symptomatic systolic heart failure not caused by coronary artery disease was not associated with a significantly lower long-term rate of death from any cause than was usual clinical care. (Funded...... to coronary artery disease has been based primarily on subgroup analyses. The management of heart failure has improved since the landmark ICD trials, and many patients now receive cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). METHODS: In a randomized, controlled trial, 556 patients with symptomatic systolic heart...

  8. Direct renin inhibition in addition to or as an alternative to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in patients with chronic systolic heart failure: rationale and design of the Aliskiren Trial to Minimize OutcomeS in Patients with HEart failuRE (ATMOSPHERE) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krum, Henry; Massie, Barry; Abraham, William T

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) represents a key therapeutic target in heart failure (HF) management. However, conventional agents that block this system induce a reflex increase in plasma renin activity (PRA), which may lead to RAAS 'escape'. Direct renin inhibitors (DRIs) ...

  9. Prognostic impact of plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in severe chronic congestive heart failure: a substudy of the Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Franz; Packer, Milton; Coats, Andrew J S; Fowler, Michael B; Krum, Henry; Mohacsi, Paul; Rouleau, Jean L; Tendera, Michal; Castaigne, Alain; Anker, Stefan D; Amann-Zalan, Ildiko; Hoersch, Silke; Katus, Hugo A

    2004-09-28

    The utility of N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) to predict the occurrence of death and hospitalization was prospectively evaluated in the COPERNICUS study, which enrolled patients with an ejection fraction COPERNICUS study and were randomized to placebo (n=506) or carvedilol (n=505). Values of NT-proBNP were markedly increased despite the requirement that patients be euvolemic before the start of treatment (mean+/-SD, 3235+/-4392 pg/mL; median, 1767 pg/mL). By univariate Cox regression analysis, NT-proBNP was found to be a powerful predictor of subsequent all-cause mortality (relative risk [RR], 2.7; 95% CI, 1.7 to 4.3; P=0.0001 for above versus below median) and all-cause mortality or hospitalization for heart failure (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.8 to 3.4; P=0.0001 for above versus below median). The predictive value of NT-proBNP was similar when both placebo and carvedilol patients were analyzed separately. No significant interaction was found between NT-proBNP and treatment group (P=0.93 for above- versus below-median NT-proBNP). NT-proBNP was consistently associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality and for all-cause mortality or hospitalization for heart failure in patients with severe congestive heart failure, even in those who were clinically euvolemic. This marker therefore may be a useful tool in risk stratification of patients with severe congestive heart failure.

  10. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaarsma, T.; Larsen, Torben; Stromberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    in this population and specialised heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialised home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure. Method: We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients......Introduction: Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis, and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted...... from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting. Results: In integrated home care for heart failure patients, it is advised to consider the following...

  11. Bone Marrow Failure Secondary to Cytokinesis Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    have assessed the role of FA pathway in mitosis and confirmed that murine FA-deficient hematopoietic stem cells exhibit p53- mediated growth defects...results suggest that bone marrow failure in FA may be caused, in part, by p53- mediated cellular defects and underscore the importance of... mediated apoptosis of HSCs due to cytokinesis failure. The major goal of the project was to assess whether the p53- mediated apoptosis due to

  12. Comparison of the rhythm control treatment strategy versus the rate control strategy in patients with permanent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation and heart failure treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy - a pilot study of Cardiac Resynchronization in Atrial Fibrillation Trial (Pilot-CRAfT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ciszewski, Jan; Maciag, Aleksander; Kowalik, Ilona; Syska, Pawel; Lewandowski, Michal; Farkowski, Michal M; Borowiec, Anna; Chwyczko, Tomasz; Pytkowski, Mariusz; Szwed, Hanna; Sterlinski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Background The only subgroups of patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation in which the efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy has been scientifically proven are patients with indications for right ventricular pacing and patients after atrioventricular junction ablation. However it is unlikely that atrioventricular junction ablation would be a standard procedure in the majority of the heart failure patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy and concomitant atrial fibrill...

  13. Recent advances in treatment of heart failure [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Takeshi Kitai; WH Wilson Tang

    2015-01-01

    With the total cases and economic burden of heart failure continuing to rise, there is an overwhelming need for novel therapies. Several drugs for heart failure have succeeded in preclinical and early-phase clinical trials, but most of them failed to show the real benefit in pivotal clinical trials. Meanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration recently approved two promising new drugs to treat heart failure: ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Furthermore, some of the newer agents in testi...

  14. The Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Eric J; Bristow, Michael R

    2001-01-01

    Previous trials (Metoprolol CR/XL Randomised Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure [MERIT-HF], Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Study [CIBIS] II) have demonstrated a mortality benefit of beta-adrenergic blockade in patients with mild to moderate heart failure. The recent Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS) trial has extended these results to a more advanced patient population. This trial did not, however, include patients who could not reach compensation, patients with far advanced heart failure symptoms, or a significant number of black patients. Future studies of beta-blockade may focus on these patients or patients with asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction.

  15. The Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bristow Michael R

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous trials (Metoprolol CR/XL Randomised Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure [MERIT-HF], Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Study [CIBIS] II have demonstrated a mortality benefit of β-adrenergic blockade in patients with mild to moderate heart failure. The recent Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS trial has extended these results to a more advanced patient population. This trial did not, however, include patients who could not reach compensation, patients with far advanced heart failure symptoms, or a significant number of black patients. Future studies of β-blockade may focus on these patients or patients with asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction.

  16. Effect of Administration of Single Dose GnRH Agonist in Luteal Phase on Outcome of ICSI-ET Cycles in Women with Previous History of IVF/ICSI Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafardoust, Simin; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Koroush; Mokhtar, Sara; Badehnoosh, Bita; Arjmand-Teymouri, Fatemeh; Fatemi, Farnaz; Mohammadzadeh, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background GnRH agonist administration in the luteal phase has been suggested to beneficially affect the outcome of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and embryo transfer (ET) cycles. This blind randomized controlled study evaluates the effect of GnRH (Gonadotropine Releasing Hormone) agonist administration on ICSI outcome in GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol in women with 2 or more previous IVF/ICSI-ET failures. Methods One hundred IVF failure women who underwent ICSI cycles and stimulated with GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol, were included in the study. Women were randomly assigned to intervention (received a single dose injection of GnRH agonist (0.1 mg of Decapeptil) subcutaneously 6 days after oocyte retrieval) and control (did not receive GnRH agonist) groups. Implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were the primary outcome measures. Results Although the age of women, the number of embryos transferred in the current cycle and the quality of the transferred embryos were similar in the two groups, there was a significantly higher rate of implantation (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.041) and pregnancy (32.6% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.030, OR = 3.3, 95%CI, 1.08 to 10.4) in the intervention group. Conclusion Our results suggested that, in addition to routine luteal phase support using progesterone, administration of 0.1 mg of Decapeptil 6 days after oocyte retrieval in women with previous history of 2 or more IVF/ICSI failures led to a significant improvement in implantation and pregnancy rates after ICSI following ovarian stimulation with GnRH antagonist protocol. PMID:25927026

  17. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  18. Bituminous Pavement Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajo Abubakar Wada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pavement deterioration is a serious problem for road and traffic sector in almost every country, the most affecting causes of bituminous pavement failures have been studied in this paper. The paper describes the lessons learnt from pavement failures and problems experienced. Failures of bituminous pavements are caused due to many reasons or combination of reasons. Application of correction in the existing surface will enhance the life of maintenance works as well as that of strengthening layer. Along with the maintenance techniques there are various methods for pavement preservation which will help in enhancing the life of pavement and delaying of its failure.This paper discusses the possible causes of pavement failures, and recommendbetter ways to minimize and hopefully eliminate the causes of failures in bituminous pavements.

  19. Failure Analysis Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-18

    47) described a method they called the "failure-experience matrix." This matrix was a three-dimensional array of cells , with failure modes along one...Russo, DFat ý , compiled by McDonnell-Dcuglas Astrovautics Cmpany, Huntington Beach, California, published by Metals and Ceramics Information Center...matrix." This matrix was a three dimensional array of cells , with failure modes along one axis, ryont "mechardcal function along a second axis and

  20. Ethics, Error, and Initial Trials of Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Hey, Spencer Phillips; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about the frequency of failure in late stage drug development have prompted a series of proposals for improving the positive predictivity of trials where clinical activity is first evaluated—typically phase 2 trials. However, many proposed reforms entail ethical and social tradeoffs that might not be immediately apparent. We argue that trial reforms aimed at boosting phase 2 positive predictivity have important repercussions for human subjects, as well as the capacity of the research...

  1. ACE inhibitors and calcium antagonists in the treatment of congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F

    1995-01-01

    The increased mortality after myocardial infarction is related to the risk of reinfarction, sudden death, and the development and progression of heart failure; in congestive heart failure it is due to the progression of heart failure and sudden death. ACE inhibitors have been proven to prevent...... cardiovascular events, especially the progression of heart failure, in postinfarct patients with reduced ejection fraction and heart failure in the SAVE and AIRE trials. In patients with congestive heart failure, ACE inhibitor treatment has prevented cardiovascular death and reduced morbidity due to progressive...... heart failure in the SOLVD trials. In post-myocardial infarction patients, the calcium antagonist nifedipine did not affect mortality or morbidity; diltiazem improved prognosis in patients without congestive heart failure and in patients with non-Q-wave infarction; and verapamil improved prognosis...

  2. Failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Scott D; Dubowitz, Howard

    2003-09-01

    Failure to thrive is a condition commonly seen by primary care physicians. Prompt diagnosis and intervention are important for preventing malnutrition and developmental sequelae. Medical and social factors often contribute to failure to thrive. Either extreme of parental attention (neglect or hypervigilance) can lead to failure to thrive. About 25 percent of normal infants will shift to a lower growth percentile in the first two years of life and then follow that percentile; this should not be diagnosed as failure to thrive. Infants with Down syndrome, intrauterine growth retardation, or premature birth follow different growth patterns than normal infants. Many infants with failure to thrive are not identified unless careful attention is paid to plotting growth parameters at routine checkups. A thorough history is the best guide to establishing the etiology of the failure to thrive and directing further evaluation and management. All children with failure to thrive need additional calories for catch-up growth (typically 150 percent of the caloric requirement for their expected, not actual, weight). Few need laboratory evaluation. Hospitalization is rarely required and is indicated only for severe failure to thrive and for those whose safety is a concern. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended when failure to thrive persists despite intervention or when it is severe.

  3. Clinical heterogeneity in autoimmune acute liver failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norberto C Chavez-Tapia; Julio Martinez-Salgado; Julio Granados; Misael Uribe; Felix I Tellez-Avila

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To describe the outcome and prognosis in a cohort of patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis without liver transplantation.METHODS:A retrospective trial was conducted in 11 patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis who attended the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Demographic,biochemical and severity indexes,and treatment and outcome were assessed.RESULTS: Among the 11 patients, with a median age of 31 years, 72% had inflammatory response syndrome, and six patients received corticosteroids.The mortality rate within four weeks was 56%, and the one-year survival was 27%. In the survivors, severity indexes were lower and 83% received corticosteroids.CONCLUSION:We observed a relatively high survival rate in patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis. This survival rate could be influenced by severity of the disease and/or use of corticosteroids.

  4. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  5. The effect of a randomized trial of home telemonitoring on medical costs, 30-day readmissions, mortality, and health-related quality of life in a cohort of community-dwelling heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kay; Gottlieb, Stephen S

    2014-07-01

    Telemonitoring has been advocated as a way of decreasing costs and improving outcomes, but no study has looked at true Medicare payments and 30-day readmission rates in a randomized group of well treated patients. The aim of this work was to analyze Medicare claims data to identify effects of home telemonitoring on medical costs, 30-day rehospitalization, mortality, and health-related quality of life. A total of 204 subjects were randomized to usual-care and monitored groups and evaluated with the SF-36 and Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHF). Hospitalizations, Medicare payments, and mortality were also assessed. Monitored subjects transmitted weight, blood pressure, and heart rate, which were monitored by an experienced heart failure nurse practitioner. Subjects were followed for 802 ± 430 days; 75 subjects in the usual-care group (316 hospitalizations) and 81 in the monitored group (327 hospitalizations) were hospitalized at least once (P = .51). There were no differences in Medicare payments for inpatient or emergency department visits, and length of stay was not different between groups. There was no difference in 30-day readmissions (P = .627) or mortality (P = .575). Scores for SF-36 and MLHF improved (P telemonitoring for the 1st year, but this did not persist. Telemonitoring did not result in lower total costs, decreased hospitalizations, improved symptoms, or improved mortality. A decrease in 30-day readmission rates for the 1st year did not result in decreased total cost or better outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. To fail or not to fail : clinical trials in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, Gijs Willem Eduard

    2008-01-01

    To fail or not to fail – Clinical trials in depression investigates the causes of the high failure rate of clinical trials in depression research. Apart from the difficulties in the search for new antidepressants during drug discovery, faulty clinical trial designs hinder their evaluation during dru

  7. Chronic heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    population, and up to 10% in people aged 75 years and older. It is also estimated that ... The first step in the development of heart failure is an injury to the myocardium ... treatment of heart failure by blocking the compensatory mechanisms with ... pulmonary disease, cognitive dysfunction, depression, chronic kidney disease ...

  8. Heart failure overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms) You feel a severe crushing chest pain Prevention Most cases of heart failure can be prevented by living a healthy lifestyle and taking steps aimed at reducing your risk for heart disease . . Alternative Names CHF; Congestive heart failure; Left-sided ...

  9. Failure of a patient-centered intervention to substantially increase the identification and referral for-treatment of ambulatory emergency department patients with occult psychiatric conditions: a randomized trial [ISRCTN61514736

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezami Wais A

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that a computerized psychiatric screening interview (the PRIME-MD can be used in the Emergency Department (ED waiting room to identify patients with mental illness. In that trial, however, informing the ED physician of the PRIME-MD results did not increase the frequency of psychiatric diagnosis, consultation or referral. We conducted this study to determine whether telling the patient and physician the PRIME-MD result would result in the majority of PRIME-MD-diagnosed patients being directed toward treatment for their mental illness. Methods In this single-site RCT, consenting patients with non-specific somatic chief complaints (e.g., fatigue, back pain, etc. completed the computerized PRIME-MD in the waiting room and were randomly assigned to one of three groups: patient and physician told PRIME-MD results, patient told PRIME-MD results, and neither told PRIME-MD results. The main outcome measure was the percentage of patients with a PRIME-MD diagnosis who received a psychiatric consultation or referral from the ED. Results 183 (5% of all ED patients were approached. 123 eligible patients consented to participate, completed the PRIME-MD and were randomized. 95 patients had outcomes recorded. 51 (54% had a PRIME-MD diagnosis and 8 (16% of them were given a psychiatric consultation or referral in the ED. While the frequency of consultation or referral increased as the intervention's intensity increased (tell neither = 11% (1/9, tell patient 15% (3/20, tell patient and physician 18% (4/22, no group came close to the 50% threshold we sought. For this reason, we stopped the trial after an interim analysis. Conclusion Patients willingly completed the PRIME-MD and 54% had a PRIME-MD diagnosis. Unfortunately, at our institution, informing the patient (and physician of the PRIME-MD results infrequently led to the patient being directed toward care for their psychiatric condition.

  10. Heart Failure in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrous, Hoda; Hummel, Scott L

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality in older adults and a growing public health problem placing a huge financial burden on the health care system. Many challenges exist in the assessment and management of HF in geriatric patients, who often have coexisting multimorbidity, polypharmacy, cognitive impairment, and frailty. These complex "geriatric domains" greatly affect physical and functional status as well as long-term clinical outcomes. Geriatric patients have been under-represented in major HF clinical trials. Nonetheless, available data suggest that guideline-based medical and device therapies improve morbidity and mortality. Nonpharmacologic strategies, such as exercise training and dietary interventions, are an active area of research. Targeted geriatric evaluation, including functional and cognitive assessment, can improve risk stratification and guide management in older patients with HF. Clinical trials that enroll older patients with multiple morbidities and HF and evaluate functional status and quality of life in addition to mortality and cardiovascular morbidity should be encouraged to guide management of this age group.

  11. Phenotypic Spectrum of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjiv J Shah; Katz, Daniel H.; Rahul C Deo

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a heterogeneous syndrome, with several underlying etiologic and pathophysiologic factors. While prior heart failure clinical trials have used a “one size fits all” approach, this approach has not proven successful for HFpEF. Furthermore, with the aging population and epidemics of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension, the prevalence of HFpEF will continue to grow over the foreseeable future. Coupled with the high morbidity and mortality ...

  12. Iron Deficiency in Heart Failure: Looking Beyond Anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher C Y; Ng, Austin C C; Kritharides, Leonard; Sindone, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient in many cellular processes. Iron deficiency, with or without anaemia, is common in patients with chronic heart failure. Observational studies have shown iron deficiency to be associated with worse clinical outcomes and mortality. The treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure patients using intravenous iron alone has shown promise in several clinical trials, although further studies which include larger populations and longer follow-up times are needed.

  13. Evaluation and management of early virological failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sax, Paul E

    2006-09-01

    To describe the causes, evaluation, and management of early virological failure in patients treated with their first antiretroviral regimen. Combination antiretroviral therapy predictably induces a rapid virological response, with the majority of patients achieving an undetectable HIV-RNA load by week 24. In clinical trials and cohorts, rates of virological suppression have improved over time. Poor adherence to therapy remains the most common cause of virological failure, and genotype resistance testing is a critical step in evaluating the optimal subsequent approach. Most studies suggest that transient HIV-RNA elevations do not warrant changing treatment, and may be a consequence of laboratory variation. For those who experience virological failure, resistance to individual components of the antiretroviral regimen is dependent on the initial choice of treatment. Once virological failure is confirmed and adherence issues addressed, a prompt change in treatment is warranted to limit the selection of further drug resistance. Resistance that occurs with early virological failure follows typical patterns, with limited resistance to most antiretroviral agents in the nucleoside reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor classes. The likelihood of achieving virological suppression with subsequent regimens should be high so long as adherence can be assured.

  14. [Heart failure and comorbidities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure is a frequent disease in the elderly. Its clinical presentation is less typical and the prognosis more severe than in younger subjects because heart failure occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities. A comprehensive geriatric assessment should therefore be performed to detect the vulnerabilities and manage the comorbidities. The main diseases associated with heart failure are dementia, depression, malnutrition, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, orthostatic hypotension, renal failure, anemia and iron deficiency. Comorbidities worsen heart failure and makes its treatment more difficult. The identification and treatment of comorbidities improve the prognosis in terms of mortality but especially in terms of quality of life. Caution with drugs is necessary because of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic changes related to aging and the comorbidities. In this context, clinical and laboratory monitoring should be increased, mostly during an acute event (acute heart failure, infection, dehydration, fall, new therapy…). Therefore, the follow-up of elderly patients with heart failure requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves close cooperation between cardiologists, geriatricians, general practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists.

  15. Effects of Rosuvastatin on Coronary Flow Reserve and Metabolic Mismatch in Patients With Heart Failure (from the CORONA Study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Tio, Rene A.; Dunselman, Peter H. J. M.; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.; van den Heuvel, Ad F. M.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    In patients with heart failure (HF), statin treatment might improve myocardial perfusion, but could also have detrimental effects on myocardial metabolism. A predefined substudy of the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA) trial sought to determine the effects of stat

  16. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  17. A Case of Treatment Resistant Depression and Alcohol Abuse in a Person with Mental Retardation: Response to Aripiprazole and Fluvoxamine Therapy upon Consideration of a Bipolar Diathesis after Repetitive Failure to Respond to Multiple Antidepressant Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Michele; Ciampa, Giovanni; Mosti, Nicola; Del Carlo, Alessandra; Ceraudo, Giuseppe; Colicchio, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Mental Retardation (MR) is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over) prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for "agitated" TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  18. Nutritional orientation, knowledge and quality of diet in heart failure: randomized clinical trial Orientación nutricional, conocimiento y calidad de la dieta en la insuficiencia cardíaca: ensayo aleatorizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Donner Alves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-pharmacological measures are recommended for heart failure patients. However, most studies evaluate low sodium diet, while little is known about the effects of interventions to improve adherence and knowledge of patients about diet content. Objective: To evaluate if a global nutritional orientation could affect nutritional knowledge, adherence to food guidelines, anthropometrics and quality of life in heart failure patients. Methods: Forty six patients were randomized to intervention or control group. Both groups received usual care with medical and nursing staff; the intervention group received additional nutritional guidance about diet and its relationship with disease, sources of nutrients, and reduction of dietary sodium and fats. Enforcement of the nutritional guidance was performed after 4 weeks. Both groups were evaluated at baseline, and after 6 weeks and 6 months. Evaluations included anthropometric parameters, sodium excretion in 24-hour urine, dietary recall, nutrition knowledge and quality of life questionnaires. Results: Mean age of included patients was 58 ± 10 years and 70% were male. After 6 months of follow-up, the nutritional knowledge of intervention group increased compared to control (p Introducción: Medidas no farmacológicas se recomiendan en la insuficiencia cardíaca. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los estudios evalúa dietas restrictas en sodio, mientras que poco se sabe sobre el efecto de intervenciones para mejorar la adherencia y el conocimiento sobre dieta. Objetivo: Evaluar si una orientación nutricional puede modificar la adherencia a la dieta, conocimiento nutricional, antropometría y calidad de la vida en pacientes con insuficiencia cardíaca. Métodos: 46 pacientes fueron aleatorizados al grupo control o intervención. Ambos recibieron el tratamiento habitual del equipo; el grupo intervención recibió además orientación sobre la dieta y su relación con la enfermedad, fuentes de alimentos y

  19. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clincal trials of oral Chinese medicine for treatment on chronic heart failure%口服中药治疗慢性心力衰竭随机对照实验的系统评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娟; 陈婵; 张鹏; 史琦; 杨易; 黄黎明; 王伟

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of oral Chinese medicine for chronic heart failure. Methods: Electronic and manual searches were conducted and the search ended in October 2009. This study include randomized clinical trials that used oral Chinese medicine plus Western-based treatment according to the newest Chronic Congestive Heart Failure Treatment Guidelines vs Western-based treatment, and random-effect modal of Meta-analysis was performed by using the statistical software RevMan5.0 on the basis of strict quality evaluation. Results: Sixty randomized trials (involving 5 344 patients) in 1 067 with various methodological quality were finally included. Observed indicators including: EF and 6-min walking test. The pooled results showed that Western-based treatment plus oral Chinese medicine are better than Western-based treatment, Western-based treatment plus placebo, Western-based treatment plus ACEI or P-blocker or cardilol in improving EF and 6-min walking test. Four trials in ten were observed among the oral Chinese medicine treatment, such as nausea, sickness, dizziness and so on, so using oral Chinese medicine is relatively safe. Conclusion: Oral Chinese medicine included in this review have effects in improving heart function and exercise endurance in patients with chronic heart failure, and more RCT should be conducted to accumulate evidence for the efficacy and safety of oral Chinese medicine.%目的:运用循证医学评价口服中药治疗慢性心力衰竭的疗效与安全性.方法:电子结合手工检索日期截止于2009年10月,纳入口服中药与单纯西医治疗比较的随机对照试验的文献,评价质量并做Meta分析.结果:纳入60个随机对照试验(5 344例患者),结局指标为超声心动图射血分数和6min步行实验.Meta分析结果:加用口服中药可以提高射血分数并延长6min步行距离,且不良反应轻微,使用相对安全.结论:加用口服中药在改善患者超声心功能和运动耐

  20. The Effectiveness of a Nurse-Led Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on the Quality of Life, Self-Esteem and Mood Among Filipino Patients Living With Heart Failure: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajanding, Ruff Joseph Macale

    2016-08-01

    The diagnosis and complications associated with heart failure (HF) have been very well established to adversely impact an individual's physical and psychosocial well-being, and interventions such as cognitive-behavioral techniques have demonstrated potential positive benefits among patients with HF. However, the effects of such interventions among Filipino HF patients have not been studied. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a nurse-led cognitive-behavioral intervention program on the quality of life, self-esteem and mood among Filipino patients with HF. A randomized control two-group design with repeated measures and collected data before and after the intervention was used in this study. Participants were assigned to either the control (n=48) or the intervention group (n=52). Control group participants received traditional care. Intervention participants underwent a 12-week nurse-led cognitive-behavioral intervention program focusing on patient education, self-monitoring, skills training, cognitive restructuring and spiritual development. Measures of quality of life, self-esteem and mood were obtained at baseline and after the intervention. At baseline, participants in both groups have poor quality of life, low self-esteem, and moderate depressive symptom scores. After the 12-week intervention period, participants in the intervention group had significant improvement in their quality of life, self-esteem and mood scores compared with those who received only standard care. Nurse-led cognitive-behavioral intervention is an effective strategy in improving the quality of life, self-esteem and mood among Filipino patients living with HF. It is recommended that this intervention be incorporated in the optimal care of patients with this cardiac condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patients and their doctors, making good decisions requires teamwork. Through shared decision making, doctors and patients consider ... Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options Planning Ahead Communicating With Your Healthcare Provider Overcoming Barriers to Shared ...

  2. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Disorders of potassium homeostasis can potentiate the already elevated risk of arrhythmia in heart failure. Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used. Acute treatment for hyperkalemia may not be tolerated in the long term. Recent data for patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate, used to treat and prevent high serum potassium levels on a more chronic basis, have sparked interest in the treatment of hyperkalemia, as well as the potential use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in patients who were previously unable to take these drugs or tolerated only low doses. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes of hyperkalemia in heart failure; provides an overview of traditional and novel ways to approach management of hyperkalemia; and discusses the need for further research to optimally treat heart failure.

  3. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are working and to measure your potassium levels. Beta Blockers Beta blockers slow your heart rate and decrease the strength ... muscle contracts in the short term. Long term beta blockers help keep your heart failure from becoming worse. ...

  4. Central oxygen pipeline failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic and critical care staff play a governing role in the comprehension of a ... complete central oxygen pipeline failure occurred throughout. Tygerberg Hospital. ..... emergency stations and at plant room emergency supply manifolds.

  5. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tandfonline.com/ ... When heart failure develops gradually, there is time for the compensatory ... of this can be seen in acute brain injury, some forms of takotsubo syndrome or .... reduce blood pressure in cases presenting with elevated blood pressure.

  6. Pathophysiology of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiariello, M; Perrone-Filardi, P

    1999-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Common etiology is mostly represented by ischemic and hypertensive heart disease. Clinically, heart failure can be defined as an impaired cardiac performance, unable to meet the energy requirements of the periphery. Pathophysiologically, the clinical onset of heart failure symptoms already represents an advanced stage of disease when compensatory mechanisms triggered by the underlying decrease in contractility are no longer capable of maintaining adequate cardiac performance during exercise and, subsequently, under resting conditions. Independent of its underlying etiology, cardiac failure is always characterized by an impairment in the intrinsic contractility of myocytes. As a consequence of reduced contractility, a number of central and peripheral compensatory mechanisms take place that are capable of effectively counteracting reduced intravascular intrinsic performance for a long period of time. Among them, recruitment of preload reserve, enhanced neurohormonal stimulation and cardiac hypertrophy are the most important. All of them, however, also carry unfavorable effects that contribute to further deterioration of cardiac function. In fact, increased end-diastolic volume determines increased wall stress that further reduces systolic performance; sympathetic and angiotensin stimulation increases peripheral resistance and contributes to increase volume expansion; hypertrophic myocytes demonstrate impaired intrinsic contractility and relaxation, and hypertrophy causes a clinically relevant deterioration of ventricular relaxation and compliance that substantially participates in increased end-diastolic pressure, and, therefore, to limited exercise performance. Diastolic dysfunction usually accompanies systolic dysfunction, although in some cases it may represent the prevalent mechanism of congestive heart failure in patients in whom systolic performance is preserved. Biological causes

  7. Renal failure (chronic)

    OpenAIRE

    Clase, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is characterised by a gradual and sustained decline in renal clearance or glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Continued progression of renal failure will lead to renal function too low to sustain healthy life. In developed countries, such people will be offered renal replacement therapy in the form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Requirement for dialysis or transplantation is termed end-stage renal disease (ESRD).Diabetes, glomerulonephritis, hypertension, pyelone...

  8. Lungs in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Apostolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung function abnormalities both at rest and during exercise are frequently observed in patients with chronic heart failure, also in the absence of respiratory disease. Alterations of respiratory mechanics and of gas exchange capacity are strictly related to heart failure. Severe heart failure patients often show a restrictive respiratory pattern, secondary to heart enlargement and increased lung fluids, and impairment of alveolar-capillary gas diffusion, mainly due to an increased resistance to molecular diffusion across the alveolar capillary membrane. Reduced gas diffusion contributes to exercise intolerance and to a worse prognosis. Cardiopulmonary exercise test is considered the “gold standard” when studying the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic adaptations to exercise in cardiac patients. During exercise, hyperventilation and consequent reduction of ventilation efficiency are often observed in heart failure patients, resulting in an increased slope of ventilation/carbon dioxide (VE/VCO2 relationship. Ventilatory efficiency is as strong prognostic and an important stratification marker. This paper describes the pulmonary abnormalities at rest and during exercise in the patients with heart failure, highlighting the principal diagnostic tools for evaluation of lungs function, the possible pharmacological interventions, and the parameters that could be useful in prognostic assessment of heart failure patients.

  9. Comparison of heparin to citrate as a catheter locking solution for non-tunneled central venous hemodialysis catheters in patients requiring renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure (VERROU-REA study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyère, Rémi; Soudry-Faure, Agnès; Capellier, Gilles; Binquet, Christine; Nadji, Abdelouaid; Torner, Stephane; Blasco, Gilles; Yannaraki, Maria; Barbar, Saber Davide; Quenot, Jean-Pierre

    2014-11-19

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) is estimated at 10 to 20% in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) and often requires renal replacement therapy (RRT). ICU mortality in AKI patients can exceed 50%. Venous catheters are the preferred vascular access method for AKI patients requiring RRT, but carry a risk of catheter thrombosis or infection. Catheter lock solutions are commonly used to prevent such complications. Heparin and citrate locks are both widely used for tunneled, long-term catheters, but few studies have compared citrate versus heparin for patients with short-term, non-tunneled catheters. We aim to compare citrate 4% catheter lock solution versus heparin in terms of event-free survival of the first non-tunneled hemodialysis catheter inserted in ICU patients with AKI requiring RRT. Secondary objectives are the rate of fibrinolysis, incidence of catheter thrombosis and catheter-related infection per 1,000 catheter days, length of stay in ICU and in-hospital and 28-day mortality. The VERROU-REA study is a randomized, prospective, multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group, controlled superiority study carried out in the medical, surgical and nephrological ICUs of two large university hospitals in eastern France. A catheter lock solution composed of trisodium citrate at 4% will be compared to unfractionated heparin at a concentration of 5,000 IU/mL. All consecutive adult patients with AKI requiring extracorporeal RRT, and in whom a first non-tunneled catheter is to be inserted by the jugular or femoral approach, will be eligible. Catheters inserted by the subclavian approach, patients with acute liver failure, thrombopenia or contraindication to systemic anticoagulation will be excluded. Patients will be followed up daily in accordance with standard practices for RRT until death or discharge. Data is scarce regarding the use of non-tunneled catheters in the ICU setting in patients with AKI. This study will provide an evidence base for

  10. Treatment of congestive heart failure a neuroendocrine disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M W S

    2003-04-01

    The understanding of heart failure is no longer based on a supply and demand model of pump failure. Rather, heart failure is seen as a complex pathophysiological process with activation of various neuroendocrine systems. The goals of treatment have changed towards modifying these counterproductive neuroendocrine systems and slowing myocardial maladaptation. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are the only licensed drugs in veterinary practice that have a direct effect on neurohormones in heart failure. The range of drug options in human medicine is greater and some of these drugs are also increasingly being used in veterinary cardiology practice. This review describes the neuroendocrine systems involved in heart failure and discusses the range of drugs available in human and veterinary medicine. In doing so, it concentrates on the evidence available from good quality randomised trials in both the veterinary field and, where relevant, the human medical field.

  11. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome.

  12. Brain natriuretic peptide and optimal management of heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Nan; WANG Jian-an

    2005-01-01

    Aside from the important role of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in diagnosis, and differential diagnosis of heart failure, this biological peptide has proved to be an independent surrogate marker of rehospitalization and death of the fatal disease.Several randomized clinical trials demonstrated that drugs such as beta blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, spironolactone and amiodarone have beneficial effects in decreasing circulating BNP level during the management of chronic heart failure. The optimization of clinical decision-making appeals for a representative surrogate marker for heart failure prognosis. The serial point-of-care assessments of BNP concentration provide a therapeutic goal of clinical multi-therapy and an objective guidance for optimal treatment of heart failure. Nevertheless new questions and problems in this area remain to be clarified. On the basis of current research advances, this article gives an overview of BNP peptide and its property and role in the management of heart failure.

  13. [Cell transplantation in heart failure management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilquin, Jean-Thomas; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Heart failure is becoming a major issue for public health in western countries and the effect of currently available therapies is limited. Therefore cell transplantation was developed as an alternative strategy to improve cardiac structure and function. This review describes the multiple cell types and clinical trials considered for use in this indication. Most studies have been developed in models of post-ischemic heart failure. The transplantation of fetal or neonatal cardiomyocytes has proven to be functionally successful, but ethical as well as immunological and technical reasons make their clinical use limited. Recent reports, however, suggested that adult autologous cardiomyocytes could be prepared from stem cells present in various tissues (bone marrow, vessels, adult heart itself, adipose tissue). Alternatively, endothelial progenitors originating from bone marrow or peripheral blood could promote the neoangiogenesis within the scar tissue. Hematopietic stem cells prepared from bone marrow or peripheral blood have been proposed but their differentiation ability seems limited. Finally, the transplantation of skeletal muscle cells (myoblasts) in the infarcted area improved myocardial function, in correlation with the development of skeletal muscle tissue in various animal models. The latter results paved the way for the development of a first phase I clinical trial of myoblast transplantation in patients with severe post-ischemic heart failure. It required the scale-up of human cell production according to good manufacturing procedures, started in june 2000 in Paris and was terminated in november 2001, and was followed by several others. The results were encouraging and prompted the onset of a blinded, multicentric phase II clinical trial for skeletal muscle cells transplantation. Meanwhile, phase I clinical trials also evaluate the safeness and efficacy of various cell types originating from the bone marrow or the peripheral blood. However, potential side

  14. Respiratory failure in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevransky, Jonathan E; Haponik, Edward F

    2003-02-01

    the physician focuses management on physiologic measurements, mechanical ventilator settings, and other technologic nuances of care [40]. Review of the literature suggests that the development of respiratory failure in patients with certain disease processes such as COPD, IPF, and ARDS in elderly patients may lead to worsened outcome but it appears that the disease process itself, rather than the age of the patient, is the major determinant of outcome. Additional studies suggest that other comorbid factors may be more important than age. Only when comorbid processes are taken into account should decisions be made about the efficacy of instituting mechanical ventilation. In addition, because outcome prediction appears to be more accurate for groups of patients rather than for individual patients a well-structured therapeutic trial of instituting mechanical ventilation, even if comorbidities are present, may be indicated in certain patients if appropriately informed patients wish to pursue this course. This approach requires careful and realistic definition of potential outcomes, focus on optimizing treatment of the reversible components of the illness, and continuous communication with the patient and family. Although many clinicians share a nihilistic view regarding the potential usefulness of mechanical ventilation in elderly patients few data warrant this negative prognostication and more outcome studies are needed to delineate the optimum application of this element of supportive care. As with other interventions individualization of the decision must take into account the patient's premorbid status, concomitant conditions, the nature of the precipitating illness and its prospects for improvement, and most important, patient preferences. In this determination pursuing the course most consistent with the patient's wishes is essential and it must be appreciated that caregivers' impressions regarding the vigor of support desired by the patient are often erroneous. The

  15. Reducing mortality with device therapy in heart failure patients without ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Deborah W; Lee, Hyeon-Joo; Kao, Chi-Wen; Friedmann, Erika; Thomas, Sue A; Anderson, Jill; Bardy, Gust H

    2008-09-01

    Use of device therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure is expanding on the basis of evidence from recent clinical trials. Three multicenter prospective clinical trials-Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure (SCD-HeFT); Comparison of Medical Therapy, Pacing, and Defibrillation in Heart Failure (COMPANION); and Cardiac Resynchronization-Heart Failure (CARE-HF)-were conducted to determine the effectiveness of devices in reducing mortality in patients with heart failure who did not have a history of ventricular arrhythmias. The 3 trials varied in the devices used, the population of patients included, and the study designs. In SCD-HeFT, implantable cardioverter defibrillators were more effective than pharmacological therapy in preventing mortality among patients with mild to moderate heart failure. In COMPANION, cardiac resynchronization therapy alone and cardiac resynchronization therapy plus an implantable cardioverter defibrillator were more effective than optimal drug treatment in reducing morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. In CARE-HF, cardiac resynchronization therapy alone was more effective than optimal drug treatment in reducing all-cause mortality in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. No direct comparison of the devices used has been done. These 3 clinical trials provide clear evidence that device therapy is beneficial for some patients with heart failure, even patients who do not have a history of ventricular arrhythmia.

  16. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Feb 15,2017 The ejection fraction ( ... failure This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  17. Gender and survival in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Doughty, Robert N; Poppe, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gender and survival of patients with heart failure, using data from both randomized trials and observational studies, and the relative contribution of age, left ventricular systolic function, aetiology, and diabetes to differences ...

  18. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  19. Ductile failure modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzerga, Ahmed Amine; Leblond, Jean Baptiste; Needleman, Alan

    2016-01-01

    anisotropy, or the influence of nonlocal effects that bring a material size scale into the models. Often the voids are not present in the material from the beginning, and realistic nucleation models are important. The final failure process by coalescence of neighboring voids is an issue that has been given......Ductile fracture of structural metals occurs mainly by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids. Here an overview of continuum models for this type of failure is given. The most widely used current framework is described and its limitations discussed. Much work has focused on extending void...... growth models to account for non-spherical initial void shapes and for shape changes during growth. This includes cases of very low stress triaxiality, where the voids can close up to micro-cracks during the failure process. The void growth models have also been extended to consider the effect of plastic...

  20. Failure of granular assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Welker, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates granular assemblies subjected to increasing external forces in the quasi-static limit. In this limit, the system’s evolution depends on static properties of the system, but is independent of the particles’ inertia. At the failure, which occurs at a certain value of the external forces, the particles’ motions increase quickly. In this thesis, the properties of granular systems during the weakening process and at the failure are investigated with the Discrete Element Meth...

  1. Modeling Epidemic Network Failures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Fagertun, Anna Manolova

    2013-01-01

    the SID model’s behavior and impact on the network performance, as well as the severity of the infection spreading. The simulations are carried out in OPNET Modeler. The model provides an important input to epidemic connection recovery mechanisms, and can due to its flexibility and versatility be used......This paper presents the implementation of a failure propagation model for transport networks when multiple failures occur resulting in an epidemic. We model the Susceptible Infected Disabled (SID) epidemic model and validate it by comparing it to analytical solutions. Furthermore, we evaluate...

  2. Modeling Epidemic Network Failures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Fagertun, Anna Manolova

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of a failure propagation model for transport networks when multiple failures occur resulting in an epidemic. We model the Susceptible Infected Disabled (SID) epidemic model and validate it by comparing it to analytical solutions. Furthermore, we evaluate...... the SID model’s behavior and impact on the network performance, as well as the severity of the infection spreading. The simulations are carried out in OPNET Modeler. The model provides an important input to epidemic connection recovery mechanisms, and can due to its flexibility and versatility be used...... to evaluate multiple epidemic scenarios in various network types....

  3. Automotive component failures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyes, AM

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available be expected[ 023 A[ M[ HEYES Fig[ 6[ Low magni_cation fractograph showing the seam defect "S#\\ fatigue area "F# and the brittle fracture area "B#[ Fig[ 7[ Fracture surface marked F in Fig[ 6\\ typical of a fatigue fracture surface in a high strength steel... Ltd[ All rights reserved[ Keywords] Accident investigation\\ automotive failures\\ decarburization\\ fatigue\\ weld fatigue[ 0[ INTRODUCTION Failure of automotive components is an occurrence which a}ects the life of almost every person at one stage...

  4. Lactulose and renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, B; Frey, F J

    1997-01-01

    The introduction of lactulose as a new therapeutic agent for treatment of hepatic encephalopathy was a major breakthrough in this field. It was hypothesized that lactulose might prevent postoperative renal impairment after biliary surgery in patients with obstructive jaundice. The presumable mechanism purported was the diminished endotoxinemia by lactulose. Unfortunately, such a reno-protective effect has not been shown conclusively until now in clinical studies. In chronic renal failure lactulose is known to promote fecal excretion of water, sodium, potassium, amonium, urea, creatinine and protons. Thus, lactulose could be useful for the treatment of chronic renal failure. However, compliance to the therapy represents a major problem.

  5. The war against heart failure: the Lancet lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2015-02-28

    Heart failure is a global problem with an estimated prevalence of 38 million patients worldwide, a number that is increasing with the ageing of the population. It is the most common diagnosis in patients aged 65 years or older admitted to hospital and in high-income nations. Despite some progress, the prognosis of heart failure is worse than that of most cancers. Because of the seriousness of the condition, a declaration of war on five fronts has been proposed for heart failure. Efforts are underway to treat heart failure by enhancing myofilament sensitivity to Ca(2+); transfer of the gene for SERCA2a, the protein that pumps calcium into the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the cardiomyocyte, seems promising in a phase 2 trial. Several other abnormal calcium-handling proteins in the failing heart are candidates for gene therapy; many short, non-coding RNAs--ie, microRNAs (miRNAs)--block gene expression and protein translation. These molecules are crucial to calcium cycling and ventricular hypertrophy. The actions of miRNAs can be blocked by a new class of drugs, antagomirs, some of which have been shown to improve cardiac function in animal models of heart failure; cell therapy, with autologous bone marrow derived mononuclear cells, or autogenous mesenchymal cells, which can be administered as cryopreserved off the shelf products, seem to be promising in both preclinical and early clinical heart failure trials; and long-term ventricular assistance devices are now used increasingly as a destination therapy in patients with advanced heart failure. In selected patients, left ventricular assistance can lead to myocardial recovery and explantation of the device. The approaches to the treatment of heart failure described, when used alone or in combination, could become important weapons in the war against heart failure.

  6. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiny Jaarsma

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted in this population and specialized heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialized home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure.Method: We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting.Results: In integrated home care for heart failure patients it is advised to consider the following components: integrated multi-disciplinary care, patient and partner participation, care plans with clear goals of care, patient education, self-care management, appropriate access to care and optimized treatment.Discussion: We summarized the state of the art of home based care for heart failure patients in Europe, described the typical content of such care to provide a guide for health care providers.

  7. Cardiac resynchronization therapy for chronic heart failure in China: guideline and practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Wei

    2010-01-01

    @@ The value of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT)in chronic heart failure has been well recognized around the world. Multi-center clinical trials have confirmed that CRT not only can improve cardiac function and quality of life, but also reduce mortality and improve the prognosis in patients with advanced heart failure and ventricular dyssynchrony.

  8. Natriuretic peptide-guided management in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioncel, Ovidiu; Collins, Sean P; Greene, Stephen J; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Macarie, Cezar; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that manifests from various cardiac and noncardiac abnormalities. Accordingly, rapid and readily accessible methods for diagnosis and risk stratification are invaluable for providing clinical care, deciding allocation of scare resources, and designing selection criteria for clinical trials. Natriuretic peptides represent one of the most important diagnostic and prognostic tools available for the care of heart failure patients. Natriuretic peptide testing has the distinct advantage of objectivity, reproducibility, and widespread availability.The concept of tailoring heart failure management to achieve a target value of natriuretic peptides has been tested in various clinical trials and may be considered as an effective method for longitudinal biomonitoring and guiding escalation of heart failure therapies with overall favorable results.Although heart failure trials support efficacy and safety of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy as compared with usual care, the relationship between natriuretic peptide trajectory and clinical benefit has not been uniform across the trials, and certain subgroups have not shown robust benefit. Furthermore, the precise natriuretic peptide value ranges and time intervals of testing are still under investigation. If natriuretic peptides fail to decrease following intensification of therapy, further work is needed to clarify the optimal pharmacologic approach. Despite decreasing natriuretic peptide levels, some patients may present with other high-risk features (e.g. elevated troponin). A multimarker panel investigating multiple pathological processes will likely be an optimal alternative, but this will require prospective validation.Future research will be needed to clarify the type and magnitude of the target natriuretic peptide therapeutic response, as well as the duration of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy in heart failure patients.

  9. Poverty and Aspirations Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, P.S.; Ghosal, S.; Mani, A.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework to study the psychology of poverty and 'aspirations failure'. In our framework, the rich and the poor share the same preferences - and also a behavioral bias in setting aspirations. Greater downside risks imposed by poverty exacerbates the effects of this behaviora

  10. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Lee, William M; Wendon, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades acute liver failure (ALF) has been transformed from a rare and poorly understood condition with a near universally fatal outcome, to one with a well characterized phenotype and disease course. Complex critical care protocols are now applied and emergency liver...

  11. Heart failure in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Frans Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    The main aim of the thesis was to assess the prevalence of heart failure in patients with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Furthermore, to explore diagnostic strategies (including natriuretic peptides and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR)) to identify heart

  12. Copeptin in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and mortality in the modern Western world and an increasing proportion of the population will be affected by HF in the future. Although HF management has improved quality of life and prognosis, mortality remains very high...

  13. Failure to thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by medical problems or factors in the child’s environment, such as abuse or neglect. There are many medical causes of failure to thrive. These include: Problems with genes, such as Down syndrome Organ problems Hormone problems Damage to the brain ...

  14. Equilibria with Coordination Failures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herings, P.J.J.; van der Laan, G.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends the recent literature on equilibria with coordination failures to arbitrary convex sets of admissible prices.We introduce a new equilibrium concept, called quantity constrained equilibrium (QCE), giving a uni.ed treatment to all cases considered in the literature so far.At a QCE

  15. Poverty and Aspirations Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, P.S.; Ghosal, S.; Mani, A.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework to study the psychology of poverty and 'aspirations failure'. In our framework, the rich and the poor share the same preferences - and also a behavioral bias in setting aspirations. Greater downside risks imposed by poverty exacerbates the effects of this behaviora

  16. Chronic heart failure and micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, K K; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G

    2001-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with weight loss, and cachexia is a well-recognized complication. Patients have an increased risk of osteoporosis and lose muscle bulk early in the course of the disease. Basal metabolic rate is increased in HF, but general malnutrition may play a part in the development of cachexia, particularly in an elderly population. There is evidence for a possible role for micronutrient deficiency in HF. Selective deficiency of selenium, calcium and thiamine can directly lead to the HF syndrome. Other nutrients, particularly vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, are antioxidants and may have a protective effect on the vasculature. Vitamins B6, B12 and folate all tend to reduce levels of homocysteine, which is associated with increased oxidative stress. Carnitine, co-enzyme Q10 and creatine supplementation have resulted in improved exercise capacity in patients with HF in some studies. In this article, we review the relation between micronutrients and HF. Chronic HF is characterized by high mortality and morbidity, and research effort has centered on pharmacological management, with the successful introduction of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-adrenergic antagonists into routine practice. There is sufficient evidence to support a large-scale trial of dietary micronutrient supplementation in HF.

  17. Managing first-line failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David A

    2014-01-01

    WHO standard of care for failure of a first regimen, usually 2N(t)RTI's and an NNRTI, consists of a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor with a change in N(t)RTI's. Until recently, there was no evidence to support these recommendations which were based on expert opinion. Two large randomized clinical trials, SECOND LINE and EARNEST both showed excellent response rates (>80%) for the WHO standard of care and indicated that a novel regimen of a boosted protease inhibitor with an integrase inhibitor had equal efficacy with no difference in toxicity. In EARNEST, a third arm consisting of induction with the combined protease and integrase inhibitor followed by protease inhibitor monotherapy maintenance was inferior and led to substantial (20%) protease inhibitor resistance. These studies confirm the validity of the current recommendations of WHO and point to a novel public health approach of using two new classes for second line when standard first-line therapy has failed, which avoids resistance genotyping. Notwithstanding, adherence must be stressed in those failing first-line treatments. Protease inhibitor monotherapy is not suitable for a public health approach in low- and middle-income countries.

  18. Managing first-line failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Cooper

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available WHO standard of care for failure of a first regimen, usually 2N(tRTI's and an NNRTI, consists of a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor with a change in N(tRTI's. Until recently, there was no evidence to support these recommendations which were based on expert opinion. Two large randomized clinical trials, SECOND LINE and EARNEST both showed excellent response rates (>80% for the WHO standard of care and indicated that a novel regimen of a boosted protease inhibitor with an integrase inhibitor had equal efficacy with no difference in toxicity. In EARNEST, a third arm consisting of induction with the combined protease and integrase inhibitor followed by protease inhibitor monotherapy maintenance was inferior and led to substantial (20% protease inhibitor resistance. These studies confirm the validity of the current recommendations of WHO and point to a novel public health approach of using two new classes for second line when standard first-line therapy has failed, which avoids resistance genotyping. Notwithstanding, adherence must be stressed in those failing first-line treatments. Protease inhibitor monotherapy is not suitable for a public health approach in low- and middle-income countries.

  19. Influence of diabetes mellitus on heart failure risk and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Belle Eric

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our aim is to summarize and discuss the recent literature linking diabetes mellitus with heart failure, and to address the issue of the optimal treatment for diabetic patients with heart failure. The studies linking diabetes mellitus (DM with heart failure (HF The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in heart failure populations is close to 20% compared with 4 to 6% in control populations. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an increased risk of heart failure in diabetics; moreover, in diabetic populations, poor glycemic control has been associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Various mechanisms may link diabetes mellitus to heart failure: firstly, associated comorbidities such as hypertension may play a role; secondly, diabetes accelerates the development of coronary atherosclerosis; thirdly, experimental and clinical studies support the existence of a specific diabetic cardiomyopathy related to microangiopathy, metabolic factors or myocardial fibrosis. Subgroup analyses of randomized trials demonstrate that diabetes is also an important prognostic factor in heart failure. In addition, it has been suggested that the deleterious impact of diabetes may be especially marked in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Treatment of heart failure in diabetic patients The knowledge of the diabetic status may help to define the optimal therapeutic strategy for heart failure patients. Cornerstone treatments such as ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers appear to be uniformly beneficial in diabetic and non diabetic populations. However, in ischemic cardiomyopathy, the choice of the revascularization technique may differ according to diabetic status. Finally, clinical studies are needed to determine whether improved metabolic control might favorably influence the outcome of diabetic heart failure patients.

  20. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  1. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study ...

  2. Birth Control in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J.; Beyer, B. K.; Chadwick, K.; De Schaepdrijver, L.; Desai, M.; Enright, B.; Foster, W.; Hui, J. Y.; Moffat, G. J.; Tornesi, B.; Van Malderen, K.; Wiesner, L.; Chen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives. PMID:27042398

  3. Time between failures model and failure analysis of CNC system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-bo; JIA Ya-zhou; ZHOU Guang-wen

    2007-01-01

    To provide basis for the reliability improvement design of CNC system, the failure data of a type of CNC system in one year are collected under field conditions in workshops. The distribution model parameters of time between failures are estimated by least square method and hypothesis testing is done by d-test method. It is proved that the time between failures of the CNC system follows Weibull distribution and the system has entered into the wear-out failure period. The failure positions and failure causes are analyzed further to indicate the weak subsystems of the CNC system. It can be found that servo unit, electrical system, detecting unit and power supply are principal failure positions and the main failure cause is breakage of components. The corresponding improvement measures are put forward. The paper provides a reference to reliability design and analysis of CNC system for the manufacturer and has great guidance to using and maintaining CNC system for the user.

  4. OBSTETRIC RENAL FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure in obstetrics is rare but important complication, associated with significant mortality and long term morbidity.1,2 It includes acute renal failure due to obstetrical complications or due to deterioration of existing renal disease. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the etiology and outcome of renal failure in obstetric patients. METHODS: We prospectively analyzed 30 pregnant and puerperal women with acute renal failure or pre-existing renal disease developing renal failure during pregnancy between November 2007 to sep-2009. Patients who presented/developed ARF during the hospital stay were included in this study. RESULTS: Among 30 patients, mean age was 23 years and 33 years age group. 12 cases (40% patients were primigravidae and 9(30% patients were multigravidae and 9 cases (30% presented in post-partum period. Eighteen cases (60% with ARF were seen in third trimester, followed by in postpartum period 9 cases (30%. Most common contributing factors to ARF were Pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome 60%, sepsis 56.6%, post abortal ARF 10%. DIC 40%. Haemorrhage as the aetiology for ARF was present 46%, APH in 20% and PPH in 26.6%. The type of ARF was renal in (63% and prerenal (36%; Oliguric seen in 10 patients (33% and high mortality (30%. Among the 20 pregnant patients with ARF, The average period of gestation was 33±2 weeks (30 -36 weeks, 5 cases (25% presented with intrauterine fetal demise and 18 cases (66% had preterm vaginal delivery and 2 cases (10% had induced abortion. And the average birth weight was 2±0.5 kg (1.5 kg. Eight cases (26% required dialysis. 80% of patients recovered completely of renal functions. 63% patients recovered without renal replacement therapy whereas 17% required dialysis. the maternal mortality was 20%, the main reason for mortality was septic shock and multi organ dysfunction (66%. CONCLUSION: ARF related pregnancy was seen commonly in the primigravidae and in the third trimester, the most

  5. Red blood cell oleic acid levels reflect olive oil intake while omega-3 levels reflect fish intake and the use of omega-3 acid ethyl esters: The Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Infarto Miocardico-Heart Failure trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William S; Masson, Serge; Barlera, Simona; Milani, Valentina; Pileggi, Silvana; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Marchioli, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Tavazzi, Luigi; Latini, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Infarto Miocardico-Heart Failure (GISSI-HF) study reported benefits of n-3 fatty acid (FA) treatment on cardiovascular (CV) events, but the effects of treatment on a putative CV disease risk factor, the red blood cell (RBC) n-3 FA level (the omega-3 index), have not been examined in this context. We hypothesized that treatment with prescription omega-3 acid ethyl esters (O3AEE) would increase the omega-3 index to the proposed cardioprotective value of 8%. RBCs were collected from a subset of patients participating in the GISSI-HF study (n=461 out of 6975 randomized), at baseline and after 3 months of treatment with either an olive oil placebo or O3AEE (1 g/d). RBC FA levels were expressed as a percentage of total FA. Patients also reported their typical olive oil and fish intakes. RBC oleic acid levels were directly correlated with reported frequency of olive oil consumption, and the omega-3 index was correlated with reported fish intake (P for trends omega-3 index increased from 4.8±1.7% to 6.7±1.9% but was unchanged in the placebo group (4.7±1.7 to 4.8±1.5%) (Pomega-3 index level of 8%-12% in the treated vs placebo group (22.6% vs. 1.3%, Pomega-3 index levels were ultimately achieved after four years in this trial are unknown.

  6. Effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on malignant ventricular arrhythmias in patients with chronic heart failure and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: A substudy of the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca (GISSI-HF) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzi, Andrea A; Latini, Roberto; Barlera, Simona; Rossi, Maria G; Ruggeri, Albarosa; Mezzani, Alessandro; Favero, Chiara; Franzosi, Maria G; Serra, Domenico; Lucci, Donata; Bianchini, Francesca; Bernasconi, Roberto; Maggioni, Aldo P; Nicolosi, Gianluigi; Porcu, Maurizio; Tognoni, Gianni; Tavazzi, Luigi; Marchioli, Roberto

    2011-02-01

    The antiarrhythmic effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFA) in ischemic heart disease have been demonstrated; however, studies in patients surviving malignant ventricular arrhythmias of different etiologies treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) have given conflicting results. The purpose of this study was to assess the antiarrhythmic effect of n-3PUFA versus placebo in 566 patients with heart failure enrolled in the GISSI-HF trial who received an ICD for secondary or primary prevention of ventricular fibrillation (VF) or tachycardia (VT). Clinical data and arrhythmic event recordings extracted from the device memory were obtained. We tested the treatment effect by a multivariate Cox model adjusting for all clinical parameters associated with the primary end point defined as time to first appropriate ICD discharge for VT/VF. In the 566 patients with at least one recorded follow-up visit, 1363 VT and 316 VF episodes were terminated by ICD pacing or shock over a median follow-up of 928 days. The incidence of the primary end point event was 27.3% in the n-3PUFA group and 34.0% in the placebo group (adjusted hazard rate = 0.80, 95% CI 0.59-1.09, P = .152). Patients who received 1, 2 to 3, or >3 ICD discharges were 8.9%, 7.1%, and 11.1% in the n-3PUFA group, compared with slightly higher rates of 11.1%, 10.7%, and 12.1% in the placebo group (overall P = .30). Patients with the highest 3-month increase in plasma n-3PUFA had a somewhat lower incidence of arrhythmic events. The results of this study, though not statistically significant, support prior evidences of an antiarrhythmic effect of n-3PUFA in patients with ICD, although they leave open the issue of whether this effect leads to a survival benefit. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Level of Automation and Failure Frequency Effects on Simulated Lunar Lander Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Jessica J.; Ramirez, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    A human-in-the-loop experiment was conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator, where instrument-rated pilots completed a simulated terminal descent phase of a lunar landing. Ten pilots participated in a 2 x 2 mixed design experiment, with level of automation as the within-subjects factor and failure frequency as the between subjects factor. The two evaluated levels of automation were high (fully automated landing) and low (manual controlled landing). During test trials, participants were exposed to either a high number of failures (75% failure frequency) or low number of failures (25% failure frequency). In order to investigate the pilots' sensitivity to changes in levels of automation and failure frequency, the dependent measure selected for this experiment was accuracy of failure diagnosis, from which D Prime and Decision Criterion were derived. For each of the dependent measures, no significant difference was found for level of automation and no significant interaction was detected between level of automation and failure frequency. A significant effect was identified for failure frequency suggesting failure frequency has a significant effect on pilots' sensitivity to failure detection and diagnosis. Participants were more likely to correctly identify and diagnose failures if they experienced the higher levels of failures, regardless of level of automation

  8. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... yield lines around the block leads to simple interaction formulas similar to other interaction formulas in the codes.......Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...

  9. [Nutrition and liver failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plauth, M

    2013-06-01

    In the critically ill liver patient, nutrition support is not very different from that given for other illnesses. In hyperacute liver failure, nutrition support is of less importance than in the other subtypes of acute liver failure that take a more protracted course. Nasoenteral tube feeding using a polymeric standard formula should be the first-line approach, while parenteral nutrition giving glucose, fat, amino acids, vitamins, and trace elements is initiated when enteral nutrition is insufficient or impracticable. In chronic liver disease, notably cirrhosis, there is frequently protein malnutrition indicating a poor prognosis and requiring immediate initiation of nutrition support. Enteral nutrition ensuring an adequate provision of energy and protein should be preferred. Particular care should be taken to avoid refeeding syndrome and to treat vitamin and trace element deficiency.

  10. Predicting Small Bank Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Heyliger, Wilton E.; Don P. Holdren

    1991-01-01

    There are many studies of bank performance and bank failure in the literature. Most of these studies used banking ratios as variables in their models without giving consideration to their appropriateness, nor was much consideration given to the stability of those ratios through time and across asset size. Many studies also failed to recognize that bank structure may differ by asset size. This study evaluates a large number of banking variables in order to identify stable ratios. These ratios ...

  11. LHC Magnet test failure

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "On Tueday, March 22, a Fermilab-built quadrupole magnet, one of an "inner triplet" of three focusing magnets, failed a high-pressure test at Point 5 in the tunnel of the LHC accelerator at CERN. Since Tuesday, teams at CERN and Fermilab have worked closely together to address the problem and have identified the cause of the failure. Now they are at work on a solution.:" (1 page)

  12. Peat slope failure in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Boylan, Noel; Jennings, Paul; Long, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Recent peat failures in Ireland in the autumn of 2003 at Pollatomish, County Mayo and Derrybrien, County Galway have focused attention on such events. However, peat failures are not a recent phenomenon with possible evidence of peat failures in Ireland having been identified as far back as the Early Bronze Age. This paper summarises the issues surrounding peat failures in Ireland that would be of interest to an engineer\\engineering geologist assessing this geohazard. The distri...

  13. The CYTONOX trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Christina; Mikus, Gerd; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In Denmark, it is estimated that 3-5% of children are obese. Obesity is associated with pathophysiological alterations that may lead to alterations in the pharmacokinetics of drugs. In adults, obesity was found to influence important drug-metabolising enzyme pathways. The impact......, CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 in obese and non-obese children. The results are expected to be used in the future as a basis for drug dosing recommendations in obese children. FUNDING: The study was funded by the Danish Regions' "Medicinpuljen". The funder had no role in study design, data collection and analysis...... of obesity-related alterations on drug metabolism and its consequences for drug dosing remains largely unknown in both children and adults. An altered drug metabolism may contribute significantly to therapeutic failure or toxicity. The aim of this trial is to investigate the in vivo activity of CYP3A4, CYP2E...

  14. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell treatment in patients with severe ischaemic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Jørgensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Regenerative treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been promising in patients with ischaemic heart failure but needs confirmation in larger randomized trials. We aimed to study effects of intra-myocardial autologous bone marrow-derived MSC treatment in patients with severe.......001). Compared with placebo, there were also significant improvements in LVEF of 6.2% (Pside effects were...... ischaemic heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: The MSC-HF trial is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were randomized 2 : 1 to intra-myocardial injections of MSC or placebo, respectively. The primary endpoint was change in left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV), measured...

  15. Treatment of Chronic Heart Failure by Shencao Tongmai Granule: a Multi-centered, Double-blinded,Randomized, Parallel Controlled Trial%参草通脉颗粒治疗慢性心力衰竭的多中心随机双盲平行对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王辰; 张艳; 宫丽鸿

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the clinical effects and safety of Shencao Tongmai Granule (STG) in treatment of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) (NYHA functional class Ⅱ - Ⅲ) of qi deficiency blood stasis and water retention syndrome (QDBSWRS). Methods This was a multi-centered, double blinded, randomized, and placebo parallel controlled study. A total of 280 CHF patients of QDBSWRS were randomly assigned to the trial group and the control group in the ratio of 1:1. All patients received Western medicine (WM) treatment such as ACEI, diuretics, Digoxin Elixirs, and so on. Additionally, patients in the trial group took STG while those in the control group took the placebo. The therapeutic course for all was twelve weeks. The NYHA functional classification, Chinese medicine (CM) syndrome integral, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were compared between the two groups. The safety assessment was also carried out. Results Totally 265 patients completed this trial (138 cases in the trial group and 127 cases in the control group). The effective rate of NYHA functional classification and CM syndrome integral were obviously higher in the trial group than in the control group (94. 20% vs 55.90%, 97.83% vs 70.08% respectively), showing statistical difference (P0.05). The LVEF both increased in the two groups when compared with before treatment (P<0.05). The post-treatment increment of LVEF was obviously higher in the trial group than in the control group (6. 55% ±6.23% vs 3.14% ±4.99%, P<0.05). The rate of adverse reaction was 0.71 % in the two groups (1/140). Conclusion STG showed good therapeutic effectiveness and safety in treating CMF patients of QDBSWRS.%目的 评价参草通脉颗粒治疗慢性心力衰竭[美国纽约心脏病学会(NYHA)分级Ⅱ、Ⅲ级]气虚血瘀水停证的有效性与安全性.方法 本研究为多中心、随机、双盲、安慰剂平行对照研究.280例气虚血瘀水停型慢性心力衰竭患者以1:1比例随机分为

  16. CRITERIA FOR ROCK ENGINEERING FAILURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUDeren; ZHANGYuzhuo

    1995-01-01

    A great number of underground rock projects are maintained in the rock mass which is subject to rock damage and failure development. In many cases, the rock. engineering is still under normal working conditions even though rock is already fails to some extent. This paper introduces two different concepts: rock failure and rock engineering failure. Rock failure is defined as a mechanical state under which an applicable characteristic is changed or lost.However, the rock engineering failure is an engineering state under which an applicable function is changed or lost. The failure of surrounding rocks is the major reason of rock engineering failure. The criterion of rock engineering failure depends on the limit of applicable functions. The rock engineering failure state possesses a corresponding point in rock failure state. In this paper, a description of rock engineering failure criterion is given by simply using a mechanical equation or expression. It is expected that the study of rock engineering failure criterion will be an optimal approach that combines research of rock mechanics with rock engineering problems.

  17. Novel therapies in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Licette Cécile Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical condition that is characterized by the inability of the heart to meet the oxygen requirements of peripheral tissues and organs, despite normal filling pressures. Despite recent developments in the treatment of heart failure, the prognosis of heart failure patients remains

  18. Novel therapies in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Licette Cécile Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical condition that is characterized by the inability of the heart to meet the oxygen requirements of peripheral tissues and organs, despite normal filling pressures. Despite recent developments in the treatment of heart failure, the prognosis of heart failure patients remains

  19. Exercise Training for Heart Failure Patients with and without Systolic Dysfunction: An Evidence-Based Analysis of How Patients Benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Smart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant benefits can be derived by heart failure patients from exercise training. This paper provides an evidence-based assessment of expected clinical benefits of exercise training for heart failure patients. Meta-analyses and randomized, controlled trials of exercise training in heart failure patients were reviewed from a search of PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Trial Registry (CCTR, CINAHL, and EMBASE. Exercise training improves functional capacity, quality of life, hospitalization, and systolic and diastolic function in heart failure patients. Heart failure patients with preserved systolic function (HFnEF participating in exercise training studies are more likely to be women and are 5–7 years older than their systolic heart failure (CHF counterparts. All patients exhibit low functional capacities, although in HFnEF patients this may be age related, therefore subtle differences in exercise prescriptions are required. Published works report that exercise training is beneficial for heart failure patients with and without systolic dysfunction.

  20. Recent advances in treatment of heart failure [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kitai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the total cases and economic burden of heart failure continuing to rise, there is an overwhelming need for novel therapies. Several drugs for heart failure have succeeded in preclinical and early-phase clinical trials, but most of them failed to show the real benefit in pivotal clinical trials. Meanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration recently approved two promising new drugs to treat heart failure: ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Furthermore, some of the newer agents in testing offer the potential for significant progress in addition to these drugs. Patiromer and zirconium cyclosilicate are attractive agents that are expected to prevent hyperkalemia during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition, and serelaxin and urodilatin are promising drugs in the treatment of acute heart failure. Future clinical trials with more appropriate study designs, optimal clinical endpoints, and proper patient selection are mandatory to assess the true efficacy of these attractive compounds in clinical practice.

  1. Resistance remains a problem in treatment failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Obermeier

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proven resistance against HIV drugs, either by phenotyping or genotyping is a rare event in clinical trials. The overall assumption of drug resistance disappearing is additionally driven by the recommendations to screen for transmitted drug resistance, leading to large numbers of examinations with relatively low rates of resistance. Goal of our analysis was to assess if drug resistance in treatment failure is also decreasing outside of clinical trials. Materials and Methods: The MIB database at timepoint of analysis consists of data from 2876 HIV infected patients. Besides various laboratory parameters, clinical data and treatment history is included. HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase sequences were analyzed using the HIV-GRADE drug resistance algorithm. As in only a small number of patients genotypic resistance testing for integrase inhibitors was performed, mainly due to reimbursement reasons, it was assumed that failing treatment on a previous integrase inhibitor containing regimen is equate to resistance. Results: Of the 2876 patients in the database, 220 had a treatment change due to treatment failure between 2009 and 2012, a genotypic resistance testing at an appropriate timepoint of maximum four weeks before treatment change and a treatment duration of at least six months before treatment failure. In 2009, 61% of patients showed no drug resistance while 39% showed resistance against one or more drug classes (two or more drug classes: 19.5%; three or more drug classes: 2.4%, four drug classes 2.4%. In 2012, no resistance was found in 52% of patients while resistance against three or more drug classes was found in nearly 14% of patients (one or more: 48%; two or more 23%; four classes: 4.5%. Conclusions: Treatment failure with viral load sufficiently high for drug resistance testing was not frequently observed in our database. Nevertheless, treatment failure was often associated with drug resistance against at least one

  2. Rationale and benefits of trimetazidine by acting on cardiac metabolism in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatin, Yuri M; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Fragasso, Gabriele; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Seferovic, Petar M; Gowdak, Luis Henrique W; Vinereanu, Dragos; Hamid, Magdy Abdel; Jourdain, Patrick; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2016-01-15

    Heart failure is a systemic and multiorgan syndrome with metabolic failure as a fundamental mechanism. As a consequence of its impaired metabolism, other processes are activated in the failing heart, further exacerbating the progression of heart failure. Recent evidence suggests that modulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation represents a promising approach to the treatment of patients with heart failure. Clinical trials have demonstrated that the adjunct of trimetazidine to the conventional medical therapy improves symptoms, cardiac function and prognosis in patients with heart failure without exerting negative hemodynamic effects. This review focuses on the rationale and clinical benefits of trimetazidine by acting on cardiac metabolism in heart failure, and aims to draw attention to the readiness of this agent to be included in all the major guidelines dealing with heart failure.

  3. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment, screening, diagnostic, prevention, and supportive care trials. Treatment Trials In treatment trials, researchers may gather information about experimental treatments, ...

  4. A critical review on telemonitoring in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurné, Olivier; Conraads, Viviane; Missault, Luc; Mullens, Wilfried; Vachierys, Jean-Luc; Van Mieghem, Walter; Droogne, Walter; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Troisfontaine, Pierre; Huez, Sandrine; Nellessens, Eric; Peperstraete, Beatrice; Blouardo, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Johan; Raes, David

    2012-08-01

    Morbidity and mortality remain high in heart failure despite considerable progress achieved with medical therapy and electrical devices. A multidisciplinary approach is actually strongly recommended. In order to provide optimal care to the ever-growing population of patients with heart failure, telemonitoring has been proposed as a modality to improve usual care. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the existing evidence on telemonitoring in HF. Despite two major meta-analyses with favourable results, two recent, large, multicentre, randomized controlled trials, one with a sophisticated technical remote telemonitoring approach (TIM-HF) in stable chronic HF and the other with a comprehensive telephone-based interactive voice-response monitoring (Tele-HF) in patients recently hospitalized for heart failure, have been performed and both failed to demonstrate a clinical benefit for telemonitoring. Newer technologies or other modalities, such as collaboration between a general practitioner and a heart failure clinic facilitated by telemonitoring should be further evaluated. Dedicated telemonitoring for heart failure may be a practical adjunct in selective centres and patients, on top of usual care, including education and a multidisciplinary approach. However, prior to being accepted as a standard of care, more evidence from large, randomized clinical trials is required.

  5. Obesity paradox in heart failure: a heavy matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Luke; Holland, Eric; Keeley, Ellen C.; Mazimba, Sula

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obesity and heart failure are two of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The relationship between obesity and cardiovascular diseases is complex and not fully understood. While the risk of developing heart failure has been shown to be higher in patients who are obese, there is a survival advantage for obese and overweight patients compared with normal weight or low weight patients. This phenomenon was first described by Horwich et al. and was subsequently confirmed in other large trials. The advantage exists irrespective of the type, aetiology, or stage of heart failure. Patients with morbid obesity (body mass index >40 kg/m2), however, do not have the same survival advantage of their obese counterparts. There are several alternative indices of obesity available that may be more accurate than body mass index. The role of weight loss in patients with heart failure is unclear; thus, providing sound clinical advice to patients remains difficult. Future prospective trials designed to evaluate the link between obesity and heart failure will help us understand more fully this complex relationship. PMID:27867523

  6. The Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jen

    2004-01-01

    Growing up in Flemington, New Jersey, put Jen Bryant in the heart of the lore behind the Lindbergh baby kidnapping. Family stories of the events of the day and extensive research led to "The Trial," a novel in verse. The first several parts of this novel are included here.

  7. Animation of boom failure processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, C. F.; Brown, H. M.; Goodman, R. H. [Imperial Oil Resources, Calgary, AB (Canada); Clavelle, E. J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1997-10-01

    Computer animations of oil boom failure mechanisms were discussed. The animations are useful in demonstrating the transient processes of boom failure. They consist of a series of images obtained from the graphical output of a computational fluid dynamics program, FLUENT, while the modeling is based on boom failure experiments carried out in flowing water channels. The animations can be viewed on a PC running under Windows `95. Three types of failures are presented, i. e. drainage failure, droplet entrainment and critical accumulation. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Hemodynamic Predictors of Heart Failure Morbidity and Mortality: Fluid or Flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lauren B; Mentz, Robert J; Stevens, Susanna R; Felker, G Michael; Lombardi, Carlo; Metra, Marco; Stevenson, Lynne W; O'Connor, Christopher M; Milano, Carmelo A; Patel, Chetan B; Rogers, Joseph G

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced heart failure may continue for prolonged times with persistent hemodynamic abnormalities; intermediate- and long-term outcomes of these patients are unknown. We used ESCAPE (Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness) trial data to examine characteristics and outcomes of patients with invasive hemodynamic monitoring during an acute heart failure hospitalization. Patients were stratified by final measurement of cardiac index (CI; L/min/m2) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP; mmHg) before catheter removal. The study groups were CI ≥ 2/PCWP heart failure. The ability to lower filling pressures appears to be more prognostically important than improving CI in the management of patients with advanced heart failure. ClinicalTrials.govIdentifier: NCT00000619. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Steam generator tube failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  10. Gene transfer for congestive heart failure: update 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tong; Hammond, H Kirk

    2013-04-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with increasing social and economic costs. There have been no new high impact therapeutic agents for this devastating disease for more than a decade. However, many pivotal regulators of cardiac function have been identified using cardiac-directed transgene expression and gene deletion in preclinical studies. Some of these increase function of the failing heart. Altering the expression of these pivotal regulators using gene transfer is now either being tested in clinical gene transfer trials, or soon will be. In this review, we summarize recent progress in cardiac gene transfer for clinical congestive heart failure.

  11. Acute Liver Failure and Hepatic Encephalopathy After Cleft Palate Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaaslan, Nihal Durmuş; Tuncer, Fatma Betul; Tutar, Engin; Celebiler, Ozhan

    2015-09-01

    Paracetamol is the most commonly used analgesic after cleft palate repair. It has rarely caused acute hepatic failure at therapeutic or supratherapeutic doses. Only one case of therapeutic paracetamol toxicity after cleft palate repair had been reported previously. Here, we present a similar patient who developed acute liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy after an uncomplicated cleft palate surgery. Lack of large prospective trials in young children due to ethical concerns increases the value of the case reports of acetaminophen toxicity at therapeutic doses. The dosing recommendations of paracetamol may need to be reconsidered after cleft palate surgery.

  12. Epidemiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is a common condition, and the prevalence is projected to increase further. Studies differ in the reported incidence and mortality associated with this condition, although there is agreement that between a third and one-half of all patients...... with heart failure have HFPEF. Although several consensus statements and guidelines have been published, some recent randomized clinical trials have reported low mortality, raising doubts about whether all patients diagnosed with HFPEF have HFPEF or whether the condition is heterogeneous in its cause...

  13. Renal Failure in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balofsky, Ari; Fedarau, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure during pregnancy affects both mother and fetus, and may be related to preexisting disease or develop secondary to diseases of pregnancy. Causes include hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, preeclampsia, thrombotic microangiopathies, and renal obstruction. Treatment focuses on supportive measures, while pharmacologic treatment is viewed as second-line therapy, and is more useful in mitigating harmful effects than treating the underlying cause. When supportive measures and pharmacotherapy prove inadequate, dialysis may be required, with the goal being to prolong pregnancy until delivery is feasible. Outcomes and recommendations depend primarily on the underlying cause.

  14. Influence of sex on treatment and outcome in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Clark, Andrew L; Ribeiro, Jorge P

    2012-06-01

    The population is aging, the prevalence of heart failure increases with age, and on average women live longer than men. There is evidence for sex-specific effects of individual, guideline-recommended drugs used for treatment of chronic heart failure. Women are underrepresented in most clinical trials and only a minority of drug applications to regulatory authorities have included sex analyses. The present review focuses on the potential female survival benefit in heart failure, the influence of sex on medical treatment in a broader sense, and the potential benefit to be derived from guideline recommended treatment and common adjunctive heart failure medication.

  15. What Are Clinical Trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Clinical ... conducted all the time. The Different Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials related to drugs are classified into ...

  16. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  17. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Usually, trial participants must show signs of the disease or condition before they can join this type of trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, ...

  18. Scaling of structural failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazant, Z.P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Er-Ping [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

  19. Heart Failure Readmission Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Joseph P; Smith, Donna A; Freiman, Paul C; Pursley, Janet; VanSlette, Jeffrey A; Smith, Timothy R

    Little is known regarding effectiveness of readmission reduction programs over time. The Heart Failure Management Program (HFMP) of St. John's Physician Group Practice (PGP) Demonstration provided an opportunity to assess outcomes over an extended period. Data from an electronic health record, an inpatient database, a disease registry, and the Social Security Death Master File were analyzed for patients admitted with heart failure (HF) for 5 years before (Period 1) and 5 years after (Period 2) inception of PGP. HF admissions decreased (Period 1, 58.3/month; Period 2, 52.4/month, P = .007). Thirty-day all-cause readmission rate dropped from Period 1 (annual average 18.8% [668/3545]) to year 1 of Period 2 (16.9% [136/804], P = .04) and remained stable thereafter (annual average 16.8% [589/3503]). Thirty-day mortality rate was flat throughout. HFMP was associated with decreased readmissions, primarily related to outpatient case management, while mortality remained stable.

  20. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-07

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  1. CoQ10治疗慢性心功能不全:一项随机、双盲、对照研究%Coenzye Q10 for chronic heart failure: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚秀萍; 李华; 高永艳; 董继红

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of coenzyme QlO(CoQlO) in patients with chronic cardiac dysfunction. Methods One hundred cases with New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class Ⅱ or Ⅲ heart failure were enrolled in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomly divided into CoQ10 group (n = 50) and control group (n = 50), and were administrated with 100 mg/day of oral CoQ10 or placebo respectively for 3 months. Results All patients completed the trial. After 3 months of treatment, NYHA class in CoQ10 group showed a significant improvement compared with control group (P = 0.01). There was a significant (P = 0.045) increase of the 6-min walk-test distance in CoQ10 group but no change in control group (P = 0.63). A tendency of increase of left ventricular ejection fraction was observed in CoQIO group (P = 0.059). There was a threefold increase of CoQIO level in CoQ10 group [(0.70 ± 0.06) vs (2.15 ± 0.26) mg/L], but no change was observed in control group. There was a significant decrease in the serum brain natriuretic peptide level in CoQIO group (P = 0.002), but not in control group (P = 0.31). Conclusions This pilot study suggests that CoQIO therapy improves cardiac function in patients with NYHA class Ⅱ or Ⅲ heart failure.%目的 探讨辅酶Q10 (CoQ10)对慢性心功能不全的疗效.方法 本研究为随机、双盲、对照研究.共完成Ⅱ~Ⅲ心功能不全(心功能纽约分级)病例100例,CoQ10组50例,口服CoQ10 100mg,每日一次;对照组50例,口服安慰剂100mg,1次/d;疗程3个月.结果 所有患者均完成试验.经过3个月治疗后,CoQ10组患者心功能纽约心脏病学会分级较对照组明显改善(P=0.01);CoQ10组患者6min步行距离较治疗前明显增加(P=0.045),而对照组患者6min试验步行距离无明显改善(P=0.63);CoQ10组患者左室射血分数较治疗前有增高趋势,但无统计学差异(P=0.059);CoQ10组患者血CoQ10水平较治疗前升高近3倍[(0.70±0.06) vs (2.15±0

  2. Role of continuous positive airway pressure in patients with combined sleep apnea syndrome without congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Farghaly

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: CPAP can be effective in combined obstructive and central apnea patients without heart failure with consideration of individual variability. A trial of CPAP titration should be done in those patients.

  3. Can NT-proBNP be used as a criterion for heart failure hospitalization in emergency room?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Cimilli Ozturk

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: NT-proBNP can be used as an easy diagnostic method for congestive heart failure. A certain cut-off value may be determined in further multi-centre controlled trials with larger patient groups.

  4. Regenerative cell therapy and pharmacotherapeutic intervention in heart failure Part 2 : Pharmacological targets, agents and intervention perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, C.; Schoemaker, R. G.; van Gilst, W. H.; Yu, B.; Roks, A. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Regenerative medicine represents a promising perspective on therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with cardiovascular disease, including heart failure. However, previous or ongoing clinical trials show ambiguous outcomes with respect to the benefit of regenerative therapy by means of bone marrow stem

  5. Regenerative cell therapy and pharmacotherapeutic intervention in heart failure Part 2 : Pharmacological targets, agents and intervention perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, C.; Schoemaker, R. G.; van Gilst, W. H.; Yu, B.; Roks, A. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Regenerative medicine represents a promising perspective on therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with cardiovascular disease, including heart failure. However, previous or ongoing clinical trials show ambiguous outcomes with respect to the benefit of regenerative therapy by means of bone marrow stem

  6. Renal sympathetic denervation for treatment of patients with heart failure: summary of the available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammas, Wail; Koistinen, Juhani; Paana, Tuomas; Karjalainen, Pasi P

    2017-02-10

    Heart failure syndrome results from compensatory mechanisms that operate to restore - back to normal - the systemic perfusion pressure. Sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in heart failure; norepinephrine contributes to maintenance of the systemic blood pressure and increasing preload. Cardiac norepinephrine spillover increases in patients with heart failure; norepinephrine exerts direct toxicity on cardiac myocytes resulting in a decrease of synthetic activity and/or viability. Importantly, cardiac norepinephrine spillover is a powerful predictor of mortality in patients with moderate to severe HF. This provided the rationale for trials that demonstrated survival benefit associated with the use of beta adrenergic blockers in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Nevertheless, the MOXCON trial demonstrated that rapid uptitration of moxonidine (inhibitor of central sympathetic outflow) in patients with heart failure was associated with excess mortality and morbidity, despite reduction of plasma norepinephrine. Interestingly, renal norepinephrine spillover was the only independent predictor of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure, in multivariable analysis. Recently, renal sympathetic denervation has emerged as a novel approach for control of blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. This article summarizes the available evidence for the effect of renal sympathetic denervation in the setting of heart failure. Key messages Experimental studies supported a beneficial effect of renal sympathetic denervation in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Clinical studies demonstrated improvement of symptoms, and left ventricular function. In heart failure and preserved ejection fraction, renal sympathetic denervation is associated with improvement of surrogate endpoints.

  7. Relationship between sponsorship and failure rate of dental implants: a systematic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Popelut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of dental implant treatments increases annually. Dental implants are manufactured by competing companies. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis have shown a clear association between pharmaceutical industry funding of clinical trials and pro-industry results. So far, the impact of industry sponsorship on the outcomes and conclusions of dental implant clinical trials has never been explored. The aim of the present study was to examine financial sponsorship of dental implant trials, and to evaluate whether research funding sources may affect the annual failure rate. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A systematic approach was used to identify systematic reviews published between January 1993 and December 2008 that specifically deal with the length of survival of dental implants. Primary articles were extracted from these reviews. The failure rate of the dental implants included in the trials was calculated. Data on publication year, Impact Factor, prosthetic design, periodontal status reporting, number of dental implants included in the trials, methodological quality of the studies, presence of a statistical advisor, and financial sponsorship were extracted by two independent reviewers (kappa = 0.90; CI(95% [0.77-1.00]. Univariate quasi-Poisson regression models and multivariate analysis were used to identify variables that were significantly associated with failure rates. Five systematic reviews were identified from which 41 analyzable trials were extracted. The mean annual failure rate estimate was 1.09%.(CI(95% [0.84-1.42]. The funding source was not reported in 63% of the trials (26/41. Sixty-six percent of the trials were considered as having a risk of bias (27/41. Given study age, both industry associated (OR = 0.21; CI(95% [0.12-0.38] and unknown funding source trials (OR = 0.33; (CI(95% [0.21-0.51] had a lower annual failure rates compared with non-industry associated trials. A conflict of interest statement was disclosed in 2

  8. Transcatheter Interatrial Shunt Device for the Treatment of Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldman, Ted; Komtebedde, Jan; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a major public health problem with high morbidity and mortality rates, remains difficult to manage because of a lack of effective treatment options. Although HFpEF is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, elevated left atrial pressure......-either at rest or with exertion-is a common factor among all forms of HFpEF and one of the primary reasons for dyspnea and exercise intolerance in these patients. On the basis of clinical experience with congenital interatrial shunts in mitral stenosis, it has been hypothesized that the creation of a left...... the rationale for a therapeutic transcatheter interatrial shunt device in HFpEF, and we describe the design of REDUCE Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Heart Failure (REDUCE LAP-HF I), the first randomized controlled trial of a device-based therapy to reduce left atrial pressure in HFpEF. CLINICAL TRIAL...

  9. Fluid removal in acute heart failure: diuretics versus devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Felker, G Michael

    2014-10-01

    Fluid removal and relief of congestion are central to treatment of acute heart failure. Diuretics have been the decongestive mainstay but their known limitations have led to the exploration of alternative strategies. This review compares diuretics with ultrafiltration and examines the recent evidence evaluating their use. Relevant recent studies are the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation trial (of diuretics) and the Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (of ultrafiltration). The Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation study evaluated strategies of loop diuretic use during acute heart failure (continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus and high dose versus low dose). After 72  h, there was no significant difference with either comparison for the coprimary end points. Patients treated with a high-dose strategy tended to have greater diuresis and more decongestion compared with low-dose therapy, at the cost of transient changes in renal function. The Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure study showed that in acute heart failure patients with persistent congestion and worsening renal function, ultrafiltration, as compared with a medical therapy, was associated with similar weight loss but greater increase in serum creatinine and more adverse events. Decongestion remains a major challenge in acute heart failure. Although recent studies provide useful data to guide practice, the relatively poor outcomes point to the continued need to identify better strategies for safe and effective decongestion.

  10. New product failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijksterhuis, Garmt Bernard

    2016-01-01

    When new consumer products are developed and later launched, 50 to 75 percent of them are removed from the market far short of meeting their projected financial targets. In short: they fail. We conclude that this failure is due to institutionalized insufficiencies in the use of the sciences...... these factors: (1) 'pillars' (too many different functions addressing different aspects of the consumers and of product development), (2) 'higher management focus' (not geared towards understanding consumer behaviour), (3) 'popular science books' (out-dated research directives resulting from a hierarchical...... that are best geared to understand and predict consumer behaviour, viz. the behavioural sciences. These are not necessarily the same as the marketing science that is performed by marketing departments. A scientific approach to understanding consumer behaviour appears to be lacking in many corporate research...

  11. Premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelling, Andrew N

    2010-11-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a common cause of infertility in women, and is characterised by amenorrhoea, hypo-oestrogenism and elevated gonadotrophin levels in women under the age of 40. Known causes include iatrogenic agents that cause permanent damage to the ovaries, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery, autoimmune conditions, X-chromosome abnormalities and autosomal genetic conditions. However, few genes have been identified that can explain a substantial proportion of cases of POF. Most women with POF are deeply upset by the diagnosis, partly due to the unexpected menopausal symptoms, but also due to infertility. Therefore, early detection would provide better opportunity for early intervention, and furthermore, the identification of specific gene defects will help to direct potential targets for future treatment.

  12. Iridium: failures & successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, CarissaBryce; Beard, Suzette

    2001-03-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the Iridium business venture in terms of the challenges faced, the successes achieved, and the causes of the ultimate failure of the venture — bankruptcy and system de-orbit. The paper will address technical, business, and policy issues. The intent of the paper is to provide a balanced and accurate overview of the Iridium experience, to aid future decision-making by policy makers, the business community, and technical experts. Key topics will include the history of the program, the objectives and decision-making of Motorola, the market research and analysis conducted, partnering strategies and their impact, consumer equipment availability, and technical issues — target performance, performance achieved, technical accomplishments, and expected and unexpected technical challenges. The paper will use as sources trade media and business articles on the Iridium program, technical papers and conference presentations, Wall Street analyst's reports, and, where possible, interviews with participants and close observers.

  13. Updating the FORECAST formative evaluation approach and some implications for ameliorating theory failure, implementation failure, and evaluation failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jason; Wandersman, Abraham; Goodman, Robert M; Griffin, Sarah; Wilson, Dawn K; Schillaci, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Historically, there has been considerable variability in how formative evaluation has been conceptualized and practiced. FORmative Evaluation Consultation And Systems Technique (FORECAST) is a formative evaluation approach that develops a set of models and processes that can be used across settings and times, while allowing for local adaptations and innovations. FORECAST integrates specific models and tools to improve limitations in program theory, implementation, and evaluation. In the period since its initial use in a federally funded community prevention project in the early 1990s, evaluators have incorporated important formative evaluation innovations into FORECAST, including the integration of feedback loops and proximal outcome evaluation. In addition, FORECAST has been applied in a randomized community research trial. In this article, we describe updates to FORECAST and the implications of FORECAST for ameliorating failures in program theory, implementation, and evaluation.

  14. Premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujović Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF is the occurrence of hypergonadotropic hypoestrogenic amenorrhea in women under the age of forty years. It is idiopathic in 74-90% patients. Known cases can be divided into primary and secondary POF. In primary POF genetic aberrations can involve the X chromosome (monosomy, trisomy, translocations, deletions or autosomes. Genetic mechanisms include reduced gene dosage and non-specific chromosome effects impairing meiosis, decreasing the pool of primordial follicles and increasing atresia due to apoptosis or failure of follicle maturation. Autoimmune ovarian damage is caused by alteration of T-cell subsets and T-cell mediated injury, increase of autoantibody producing B-cells, a low number of effector/cytotoxic lymphocyte, which decreases the number and activity of natural killer cells. Bilateral oophorectomy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and infections cause the secondary POF. Symptoms of POF include irritability, nervousness, loss of libido, depression, lack of concentration, hot flushes, weight gaining, dry skin, vaginal dryness, frequent infections etc. The diagnosis is confirmed by the level of FSH of over 40 IU/L and estradiol below 50 pmol/L in women aged below 40 years. Biochemical and other hormonal analysis (free thyroxin, TSH, prolactin, testosterone, karyotype (<30 years of age, ultrasound of the breasts and pelvis are advisable. Optimal therapy is combined estrogen progestagen therapy given in a sequential rhythm, after excluding absolute contraindications. Testosterone can be added to adnexectomized women and those with a low libido. Sequential estrogen progestagen replacement therapy is the first line therapy for ovulation induction in those looking for pregnancy and after that oocyte donation will be advised. Appropriate estro-progestagen therapy improves the quality of life and prevents complications such as cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, stroke etc.

  15. CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE TODAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetislav Kostić

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of chronic renal failure (CRF is already known for more than 150 years. Current research in this domain changed our understanding in epidemiology, aetiology, prevention of disease progression, classifications, definition, and adequate treatment of comorbid conditions in predialytic period. With data collection and registration on CRF patients it is obvious an increase in prevalence and incidence of patients with CRF in the world. The diabetic nephropathy is the most common disease leading in 40% of cases to terminal CRF. In the follow up of these patients the most important goal is slowing down the disease progression with low protein diet (0,6-0,8 g/kg BW/day and vigorous blood pressure control (target values: 120-135/75-85 mmHg. The adequate therapy of anaemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism including predialytic use of erythopoietin and vitamin D significantly slow down the progression of CRF and postpones the beginning of dialytic treatment. Numerous comorbid conditions present in predialytic period fasten the progression of CRF. The most common are of cardiovascular origin (congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease. Those cardiovascular comorbid conditions have an impact on CRF progresion as well as on the outcome in dialytic therapy. The most common causes of cardiovascular comorbidity are hypertension, anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism, all of which should be treated in predialytic period. Of special concern is use of nephrotoxic drugs, particularly nephrotoxic antibioticsaminoglycosides. The optimal timing of creation of permanent vascular access and vaccination against hepatitis B in predialytic period are cost-effective and have an impact on quality of dialysis.

  16. Characteristics of pediatric pulmonary hypertension trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awerbach, Jordan D; Krasuski, Richard A; Hill, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH) drugs has been identified as a high priority by the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH). Studying pediatric PH is challenging due to the rare and heterogeneous nature of the disease. We sought to define the pediatric PH clinical trials landscape, to evaluate areas of trial success or failure, and to identify potential obstacles to the study of pediatric PH drugs. Interventional pediatric (ages 0-17 years) PH trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov from June 2005 through December 2014 were analyzed. There were 45 pediatric PH trials registered during the study period. Median (IQR) projected trial enrollment was 40 (24-63), with seven trials (16%) targeting > 100 participants. Industry was the most common trial sponsor (n = 23, 50%), with only two (4.4%) NIH-sponsored trials. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors were the most frequently studied drug (n = 18, 39%). Single group study designs were used in 44% (n = 20) with an active comparator (parallel, factorial, or cross-over designs) in 25 trials, including 22 with randomization and ten that were double-blinded. Study outcomes varied markedly with inconsistent use of known surrogate and composite endpoints. One-third of trials (n = 15, 33%) were terminated, predominantly due to poor participant enrollment. Of the 17 completed trials, 11 had published results and only three efficacy trials met their primary endpoint. There are unique challenges to drug development in pediatric PH, including enrolling patients, identifying appropriate study endpoints, and conducting randomized, controlled, double-blind trials where the likelihood of meeting the study endpoint is optimized.

  17. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: emerging drug strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouein, Fouad A; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E; da Costa, Danielle V; Lindsey, Merry L; Kurdi, Mazen; Booz, George W

    2013-07-01

    Approximately half of heart failure patients have a normal ejection fraction, a condition designated as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). This heart failure subtype disproportionately affects women and the elderly and is commonly associated with other cardiovascular comorbidities, such as hypertension and diabetes. HFpEF is increasing at a steady rate and is predicted to become the leading cause of heart failure within a decade. HFpEF is characterized by impaired diastolic function, thought to be due to concentric remodeling of the heart along with increased stiffness of both the extracellular matrix and myofilaments. In addition, oxidative stress and inflammation are thought to have a role in HFpEF progression, along with endothelial dysfunction and impaired nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-protein kinase G signaling. Surprisingly a number of clinical studies have failed to demonstrate any benefit of drugs effective in heart failure with systolic dysfunction in HFpEF patients. Thus, HFpEF is one of the largest unmet needs in cardiovascular medicine, and there is a substantial need for new therapeutic approaches and strategies that target mechanisms specific for HFpEF. This conclusion is underscored by the recently reported disappointing results of the RELAX trial, which assessed the use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil for treating HFpEF. In animal models, endothelial nitric oxide synthase activators and If current inhibitors have shown benefit in improving diastolic function, and there is a rationale for assessing matrix metalloproteinase 9 inhibitors and nitroxyl donors. LCZ696, a combination drug of angiotensin II receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor, and the aldosterone receptor antagonist spironolactone are currently in clinical trial for treating HFpEF. Here we present an overview of the etiology and diagnosis of HFpEF that segues into a discussion of new therapeutic approaches emerging from basic research and

  18. A Failure Criterion for Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, N. S.

    1977-01-01

    A four-parameter failure criterion containing all the three stress invariants explicitly is proposed for short-time loading of concrete. It corresponds to a smooth convex failure surface with curved meridians, which open in the negative direction of the hydrostatic axis, and the trace in the devi......A four-parameter failure criterion containing all the three stress invariants explicitly is proposed for short-time loading of concrete. It corresponds to a smooth convex failure surface with curved meridians, which open in the negative direction of the hydrostatic axis, and the trace...

  19. A Failure Criterion for Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, N. S.

    1977-01-01

    A four-parameter failure criterion containing all the three stress invariants explicitly is proposed for short-time loading of concrete. It corresponds to a smooth convex failure surface with curved meridians, which open in the negative direction of the hydrostatic axis, and the trace in the devi......A four-parameter failure criterion containing all the three stress invariants explicitly is proposed for short-time loading of concrete. It corresponds to a smooth convex failure surface with curved meridians, which open in the negative direction of the hydrostatic axis, and the trace...

  20. Strategies of learning from failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Amy C

    2011-04-01

    Many executives believe that all failure is bad (although it usually provides Lessons) and that Learning from it is pretty straightforward. The author, a professor at Harvard Business School, thinks both beliefs are misguided. In organizational life, she says, some failures are inevitable and some are even good. And successful learning from failure is not simple: It requires context-specific strategies. But first leaders must understand how the blame game gets in the way and work to create an organizational culture in which employees feel safe admitting or reporting on failure. Failures fall into three categories: preventable ones in predictable operations, which usually involve deviations from spec; unavoidable ones in complex systems, which may arise from unique combinations of needs, people, and problems; and intelligent ones at the frontier, where "good" failures occur quickly and on a small scale, providing the most valuable information. Strong leadership can build a learning culture-one in which failures large and small are consistently reported and deeply analyzed, and opportunities to experiment are proactively sought. Executives commonly and understandably worry that taking a sympathetic stance toward failure will create an "anything goes" work environment. They should instead recognize that failure is inevitable in today's complex work organizations.

  1. Failure Mode/Mechanism Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    nsc. Modas /Mach Dist. Dist. Suurce(,%)/Detai19 Bolt, MahineSources :1 Brcikon 𔃺.1% 59.0% Broken Bolt(s) (25j01-(000,Qty:l) C25101-000,Qty:Ij., Part...Center (RAC) * 201 Mill St., Rome, NY 13440 * 315-337-0900 3-114 Failure Distribution Summaries FMD-91 ? art Failure Norm Fail Data Docm. Mode/Moch Dist... Deco . Mode/Mech Dist. Dist. Source(s)/Details Lamp,Bulb Sourcent 4 Lamp Failure 68.8% 53.8% Light Bulb Failure (23038-00l,Qty:3) (23038-004,Qty:l

  2. Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, C

    2016-07-01

    Accrual to cancer clinical trials (CCT) is imperative to safeguard continued improvement in cancer outcomes. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients (n=140) starting a new anti-cancer agent in a north Dublin cancer centre. This review was performed over a four-month period, beginning in November 2015. Only 29% (n=41) had a CCT option. The overall accrual rate to CCT was 5% (n=7), which is comparable to internationally reported figures. The main reasons for failure to recruit to CCT included the lack of a CCT option for cancer type (n=30, 23%), stage (n=25, 19%), and line of treatment (n=23, 17%). Over the last decade, the rate of accrual to CCTs has in fact doubled and the number of trials open to recruitment has tripled. Ongoing governmental and philanthropic support is necessary to continue this trend to further expand CCT patient options with a target accrual rate of 10%.

  3. Increased mortality after dronedarone therapy for severe heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; McMurray, John J V;

    2008-01-01

    of death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure. RESULTS: After inclusion of 627 patients (310 in the dronedarone group and 317 in the placebo group), the trial was prematurely terminated for safety reasons, at the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, in accordance......BACKGROUND: Dronedarone is a novel antiarrhythmic drug with electrophysiological properties that are similar to those of amiodarone, but it does not contain iodine and thus does not cause iodine-related adverse reactions. Therefore, it may be of value in the treatment of patients with heart failure...... mortality was predominantly related to worsening of heart failure--10 deaths in the dronedarone group and 2 in the placebo group. The primary end point did not differ significantly between the two groups; there were 53 events in the dronedarone group (17.1%) and 40 events in the placebo group (12...

  4. Pegloticase and the patient with treatment-failure gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Amish J; Kelly, Victoria M; Krishnan, Eswar

    2012-09-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis characterized by sudden, painful inflammation. Gout can affect any joint in an asymmetric distribution. Gouty attacks may be isolated or can be followed by years of recurrent flares. Over time, elevated serum urate levels and tophaceous deposits can lead to deformity and disability from underlying bony erosion. The concept of 'treatment-failure gout' describes a unique population that has been either unable to tolerate allopurinol or who have not experienced normalization of serum urate levels on allopurinol. It is estimated that approximately 1-1.5% of the estimated 3-8 million people with gout in the USA have treatment-failure gout. Pegloticase is an US FDA-approved intravenous medication that is a mammalian recombinant uricase conjugated to monomethoxy polyethylene glycol. Two recent Phase III trials have found pegloticase to be effective in the management of treatment-failure gout. These studies also highlight safety concerns regarding the drug's immunogenicity.

  5. Public Choice, Market Failure, and Government Failure in Principles Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, Rosemarie; Gwartney, James

    2015-01-01

    Public choice uses the tools of economics to analyze how the political process allocates resources and impacts economic activity. In this study, the authors examine twenty-three principles texts regarding coverage of public choice, market failure, and government failure. Approximately half the texts provide coverage of public choice and recognize…

  6. Public Choice, Market Failure, and Government Failure in Principles Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, Rosemarie; Gwartney, James

    2015-01-01

    Public choice uses the tools of economics to analyze how the political process allocates resources and impacts economic activity. In this study, the authors examine twenty-three principles texts regarding coverage of public choice, market failure, and government failure. Approximately half the texts provide coverage of public choice and recognize…

  7. Nutritional Deficiency in Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Sciatti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Although evidence-based treatments have substantially improved outcomes, prognosis remains poor with high costs for health care systems. In patients with HF, poor dietary behaviors are associated with unsatisfactory quality of life and adverse outcome. The HF guidelines have not recommended a specific nutritional strategy. Despite the role of micronutrient deficiency, it has been extensively studied, and data about the efficacy of supplementation therapy in HF are not supported by large randomized trials and there is limited evidence regarding the outcomes. The aim of the present review is to analyze the state-of-the-art of nutritional deficiencies in HF, focusing on the physiological role and the prognostic impact of micronutrient supplementation.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Adding Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy to an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Among Patients With Mild Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woo, Christopher Y; Strandberg, Erika J; Schmiegelow, Michelle D;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with mild heart failure. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of adding CRT to an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) compared with implantable cardioverter......-defibrillator (ICD) alone among patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, prolonged intraventricular conduction, and mild heart failure. DESIGN: Markov decision model. DATA SOURCES: Clinical trials, clinical registries, claims data from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and Centers for Disease...

  9. New strategies for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: the importance of targeted therapies for heart failure phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senni, Michele; Paulus, Walter J; Gavazzi, Antonello; Fraser, Alan G; Díez, Javier; Solomon, Scott D; Smiseth, Otto A; Guazzi, Marco; Lam, Carolyn S P; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tschöpe, Carsten; Metra, Marco; Hummel, Scott L; Edelmann, Frank; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Stewart Coats, Andrew J; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Anker, Stefan D; Levy, Daniel; Pfeffer, Marc A; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Pieske, Burkert M

    2014-10-21

    The management of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) has improved significantly over the last two decades. In contrast, little or no progress has been made in identifying evidence-based, effective treatments for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Despite the high prevalence, mortality, and cost of HF-PEF, large phase III international clinical trials investigating interventions to improve outcomes in HF-PEF have yielded disappointing results. Therefore, treatment of HF-PEF remains largely empiric, and almost no acknowledged standards exist. There is no single explanation for the negative results of past HF-PEF trials. Potential contributors include an incomplete understanding of HF-PEF pathophysiology, the heterogeneity of the patient population, inadequate diagnostic criteria, recruitment of patients without true heart failure or at early stages of the syndrome, poor matching of therapeutic mechanisms and primary pathophysiological processes, suboptimal study designs, or inadequate statistical power. Many novel agents are in various stages of research and development for potential use in patients with HF-PEF. To maximize the likelihood of identifying effective therapeutics for HF-PEF, lessons learned from the past decade of research should be applied to the design, conduct, and interpretation of future trials. This paper represents a synthesis of a workshop held in Bergamo, Italy, and it examines new and emerging therapies in the context of specific, targeted HF-PEF phenotypes where positive clinical benefit may be detected in clinical trials. Specific considerations related to patient and endpoint selection for future clinical trials design are also discussed. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Sex differences in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examined differences between men and women with heart failure. First, it was shown that biological sex is a strong modulator in the clinical expression of various cardiomyopathies. In the general population it was shown that men are more likely to develop heart failure with reduced eject

  11. Failure Rates in Introductory Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard

    2007-01-01

    It is a common conception that CS1 is a very difficult course and that failure rates are high. However, until now there has only been anecdotal evidence for this claim. This article reports on a survey among institutions around the world regarding failure rates in introductory programming courses...

  12. Failure Engineered Heavy Metal Penetrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Failure Engineered Heavy Metal Penetrators, Phase I, SBIR ARL-CR-5· R. Cavalieri, W. Tiarn, and D. Nicholson prepared...REPORT DATE S. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED December 1992 Final Report-1/1/92 - 7/31/92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FAILURE ENGINEERED HEAVY METAL PENETRATORS

  13. Corrosion Failures in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Krishnan

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief description of typical marine environments and the most common form of corrosion of materials used in this environment. Some typical case histories of failures pertaining to pitting, bimetallic corrosion, dealloying, cavitation and stress corrosion cracking are illustrated as typical examples of corrosion failures.

  14. Test of Poisson Failure Assumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    o. ....... 37 00/ D itlr.: DVI r TEST OF POISSON FAILURE ASSUMPTION Chapter 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background. In stockage models... precipitates a regular failure pattern; it is also possible that the coding of scheduled vs unscheduled does not reflect what we would expect. Data

  15. Aging, telomeres and heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Liza S. M.; van der Harst, Pim; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Huzen, Jardi; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    During normal aging, the heart undergoes functional, morphological and cellular changes. Although aging per se does not lead to the expression of heart failure, it is likely that age-associated changes lower the threshold for the manifestation of signs and symptoms of heart failure. In patients, the

  16. Intestinal failure in obstructive jaundice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stelios F. Assimakopoulos; Constantine E. Vagianos; Aristides Charonis; Vassiliki N. Nikolopoulou; Chrisoula D. Scopa

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR We read with great interest the article by Ding LA and LiJS, which aimed to review the current knowledge on the physiology of normal intestinal barrier function and highlight the role of intestinal failure after various injurious insults in the development of septic complications or multiple organ failure with subsequent rapid clinical deterioration or even death.

  17. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000112.htm Heart failure - fluids and diuretics To use the sharing features on ... at Home When you have heart failure, your heart does not pump out enough blood. This causes fluids to build up in your body. If you ...

  19. Clinical Trial Risk in Hepatitis C: Endpoint Selection and Drug Action

    OpenAIRE

    Tillie, Nicole A.; Parker, Jayson L.; Jordan J. Feld

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. This study analyzed the risk of clinical trial failure of new drugs for hepatitis C between January 1998 and January 2015. Methods. Hepatitis C drug development trials that were in phases I–III of clinical trial testing were obtained from the publicly accessible clinical trial repository and other publicly available databases. Drug compounds were excluded from the study if they began their phase I testing before 1998, if they were not industry sponsored, or if they treate...

  20. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript.

  1. Chronic Renal Failure, Cachexia, and Ghrelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laviano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein energy wasting is frequently observed in patients with advanced chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease. Anorexia and reduced food intake are critical contributing factors and negatively impact on patients' survival. Ghrelin is a prophagic peptide produced by the stomach and acting at the hypothalamic level to increase the activity of orexigenic neurons. In patients with chronic renal disease, plasma levels are increased as a likely effect of reduced renal clearance. Nevertheless, patients' food intake is significantly reduced, suggesting inflammation-mediated resistance of hypothalamic nuclei to peripheral signals. A number of forms of evidence show that ghrelin resistance could be overcome by the administration of exogenous ghrelin. Therefore, ghrelin has been proposed as a potential strategy to improve food intake in chronic renal failure patients with protein energy wasting. Preliminary data are encouraging although larger prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm the results and to identify those patients who are likely to benefit most from the administration of exogenous ghrelin.

  2. Cell therapy in congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) has emerged as a major worldwide epidemic and its main causes seem to be the aging of the population and the survival of patients with post-myocardial infarction. Cardiomyocyte dropout (necrosis and apoptosis) plays a critical role in the progress of CHF; thus treatment of CHF by exogenous cell implantation will be a promising medical approach. In the acute phase of cardiac damage cardiac stem cells (CSCs) within the heart divide symmetrically and/or asymmetrically in response to the change of heart homeostasis, and at the same time homing of bone marrow stem cells (BMCs) to injured area is thought to occur, which not only reconstitutes CSC population to normal levels but also repairs the heart by differentiation into cardiac tissue. So far, basic studies by using potential sources such as BMCs and CSCs to treat animal CHF have shown improved ventricular remodelling and heart function. Recently, however, a few of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials demonstrated mixed results in heart failure with BMC therapy during acute myocardial infarction.

  3. Acute Heart Failure: Definition, Classification and Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmani, Sameer; Squire, Iain

    2017-08-07

    The purpose of this review is to describe the extent and scope of acute heart failure (AHF), place it within its clinical context and highlight some of the difficulties in defining it as a pathophysiological entity. A diagnosis of AHF is made when patients present acutely with signs and symptoms of heart failure, often with decompensation of pre-existing cardiomyopathy. The most current guidelines classify based on clinical features at initial presentation and are used to both risk stratify and guide the management of haemodynamic compromise. Despite this, AHF remains a diagnosis with a poor prognosis and there is no therapy proven to have long-term mortality benefits. We provide an introduction to AHF and discuss its definition, causes and precipitants. We also present epidemiological and demographic data to suggest that there is significant patient heterogeneity and that AHF is not a single pathology, but rather a range of pathophysiological entities. This poses a challenge when designing clinical trials and may, at least in part, explain why the results in this area have been largely disappointing.

  4. Chronic renal failure, cachexia, and ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, A; Krznaric, Z; Sanchez-Lara, K; Preziosa, I; Cascino, A; Rossi Fanelli, F

    2010-01-01

    Protein energy wasting is frequently observed in patients with advanced chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease. Anorexia and reduced food intake are critical contributing factors and negatively impact on patients' survival. Ghrelin is a prophagic peptide produced by the stomach and acting at the hypothalamic level to increase the activity of orexigenic neurons. In patients with chronic renal disease, plasma levels are increased as a likely effect of reduced renal clearance. Nevertheless, patients' food intake is significantly reduced, suggesting inflammation-mediated resistance of hypothalamic nuclei to peripheral signals. A number of forms of evidence show that ghrelin resistance could be overcome by the administration of exogenous ghrelin. Therefore, ghrelin has been proposed as a potential strategy to improve food intake in chronic renal failure patients with protein energy wasting. Preliminary data are encouraging although larger prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm the results and to identify those patients who are likely to benefit most from the administration of exogenous ghrelin.

  5. Sexual activity and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandras, Stacy A; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2007-10-01

    Little has been published about sexual function in chronic heart failure (CHF) and knowledge among clinicians in this regard is sparse. To review data regarding sexual function and dysfunction in patients with CHF, 2 of the authors (S.A.M. and P.A.U.) independently conducted a literature search using the MEDLINE database. English-language articles and cited bibliographies published between January 1996 and November 2006 were reviewed. Search terms included heart failure or CHF or ventricular dysfunction or heart disease in conjunction with sexual activity, erectile dysfunction, impotence, or sex. Articles were selected for inclusion if they had a primary focus on CHF and sexual function or dysfunction. Critical reviews of the literature, observational studies using self-reported patient surveys, and prospective, blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trials were included. Articles were not excluded on the basis of patient sample size but were excluded if the article concerned a broad aspect of cardiovascular disease rather than CHF. When properly screened and treated, most patients with CHF can safely engage in sexual activity and be treated for erectile dysfunction with sildenafil, provided that they do not have active ischemia and do not require treatment with nitrates. Clinicians should know the physiological requirements of sexual activity and the impact CHF has on sexual performance. Fear of a cardiac event during intercourse can interfere with patients' ability to perform and enjoy sex, and so it is important that the physician be able to counsel patients with CHF about sexual activity.

  6. [Diuretic therapy in acute heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luis; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Diuretics are widely recommended in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Unfortunately, despite their widespread use, limited data are available from randomized clinical trials to guide clinicians on the appropriate management of diuretic therapy. Loop diuretics are considered the first-line diuretic therapy, especially intravenous furosemide, but the best mode of administration (high-dose versus low-dose and continuous infusion versus bolus) is unclear. When diuretic resistance develops, different therapeutic strategies can be adopted, including combined diuretic therapy with thiazide diuretics and/or aldosterone antagonists. Low or "non-diuretic" doses (25-50mg QD) of aldosterone antagonists have been demonstrated to confer a survival benefit in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and consequently should be prescribed in all such patients, unless contraindicated by potassium and/or renal function values. There is less evidence on the use of aldosterone antagonists at higher or "diuretic" doses (≥ 100mg QD) but these drugs could be useful in relieving congestive symptoms in combination with furosemide. Thiazide diuretics can also be helpful as they have synergic effects with loop diuretics by inhibiting sodium reabsorption in distal parts of the nephron. The effect of diuretic therapy in AHF should be monitored with careful observation of clinical signs and symptoms of congestion. Serum electrolytes and kidney function should also be monitored during the use of intravenous diuretics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Types of Treatment: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Information Treatment Types of Treatment Clinical Trials Clinical Trials Clinical Trials SHARE: Print Glossary Taking part in a clinical ... for cancer are based on previous clinical trials. Clinical Trial Service: LLS provides personalized clinical trial navigation when ...

  8. Adult intestinal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J., E-mail: Jdavidson@doctors.org.u [Salford Royal Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom); Plumb, A.; Burnett, H. [Salford Royal Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Intestinal failure (IF) is the inability of the alimentary tract to digest and absorb sufficient nutrition to maintain normal fluid balance, growth, and health. It commonly arises from disease affecting the mesenteric root. Although severe IF is usually managed in specialized units, it lies at the end of a spectrum with degrees of nutritional compromise being widely encountered, but commonly under-recognized. Furthermore, in the majority of cases, the initial enteric insult occurs in non-specialist IF centres. The aim of this article is to review the common causes of IF, general principles of its management, some commoner complications, and the role of radiology in the approach to a patient with severe IF. The radiologist has a crucial role in helping provide access for feeding solutions (both enteral and parenteral) and controlling sepsis (via drainage of collections) in an initial restorative phase of treatment, whilst simultaneously mapping bowel anatomy and quality, and searching for disease complications to assist the clinicians in planning a later, restorative phase of therapy.

  9. Failure to recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laming, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical analysis shows that if the pattern of rehearsal in free-recall experiments (of necessity, the pattern observed when participants rehearse aloud) be continued without any further interruption by stimuli (as happens during recall), it terminates with the retrieval of the same 1 word over and over again. Such a terminal state is commonly reached before some of the words in the list have been retrieved even once; those words are not recalled. The 1 minute frequently allowed for recall in free-recall experiments is ample time for retrieval to seize up in this way. The author proposes a model that represents the essential features of the pattern of rehearsal; validates that model by reference to the overt rehearsal data from B. B. Murdock, Jr., and J. Metcalfe (1978) and the recall data from B. B. Murdock, Jr., and R. Okada (1970); demonstrates the long-term properties of continued sequences of retrievals and, also, a fundamental relation linking recall to the total time of presentation; and, finally, compares failure to recall in free-recall experiments with forgetting in general.

  10. Failure Criteria for Reinforced Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathkjen, Arne

    Failure of materials is often characterized as ductile yielding, brittle fracture, creep rupture, etc., and different criteria given in terms of different parameters have been used to describe different types of failure. Only criteria expressing failure in terms of stress are considered in what...... place until the matrix, the continuous component of the composite, fails. When an isotropic matrix is reinforced as described above, the result is an anisotropic composite material. Even if the material is anisotropic, it usually exhibits a rather high degree of symmetry and such symmetries place...... certain restrictions on the form of the failure criteria for anisotropic materials. In section 2, some failure criteria for homogenous materials are reviewed. Both isotropic and anisotropic materials are described, and in particular the constraints imposed on the criteria from the symmetries orthotropy...

  11. Nuclear cardiology and heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco [University of Brescia, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy); Milan, Elisa [Ospedale Di Castelfranco Veneto, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Metra, Marco [University of Brescia, Department of Cardiology, Brescia (Italy); Rodella, Carlo [Health Physics Department, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The prevalence of heart failure in the adult population is increasing. It varies between 1% and 2%, although it mainly affects elderly people (6-10% of people over the age of 65 years will develop heart failure). The syndrome of heart failure arises as a consequence of an abnormality in cardiac structure, function, rhythm, or conduction. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure and it accounts for this disorder in 60-70% of all patients affected. Nuclear techniques provide unique information on left ventricular function and perfusion by gated-single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Myocardial viability can be assessed by both SPECT and PET imaging. Finally, autonomic dysfunction has been shown to increase the risk of death in patients with heart disease and this may be applicable to all patients with cardiac disease regardless of aetiology. MIBG scanning has a very promising prognostic value in patients with heart failure. (orig.)

  12. Pulmonary vasodilation in acute and chronic heart failure: empiricism and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in heart failure is associated with exercise intolerance and adverse outcomes. With the availability of multiple drugs that cause pulmonary vasodilation and decrease pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary hypertension becomes an attractive therapeutic target. Out of several classes of medications, oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors emerge as the most promising in terms of symptomatic improvement, hemodynamic benefits, reverse cardiac remodeling, and functional capacity. Future trials will show whether the use of these drugs translates to decreased morbidity and mortality in heart failure.

  13. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Iron deficiency: an emerging therapeutic target in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Solal, Alain; Leclercq, Christophe; Deray, Gilbert; Lasocki, Sigismond; Zambrowski, Jean-Jacques; Mebazaa, Alexandre; de Groote, Pascal; Damy, Thibaud; Galinier, Michel

    2014-09-15

    In patients with heart failure, iron deficiency is frequent but overlooked, with a prevalence of 30%-50%. Since it contributes to cardiac and peripheral muscle dysfunction, iron deficiency is associated with poorer clinical outcomes and a greater risk of death, independent of haemoglobin level. Therefore, iron deficiency emerges as a new comorbidity and a therapeutic target of chronic heart failure in addition to chronic renal insufficiency, anaemia and diabetes. In a series of placebo-controlled, randomised studies in patients with heart failure and iron deficiency, intravenous iron had a favourable effect on exercise capacity, functional class, LVEF, renal function and quality of life. These clinical studies were performed in the context of a renewed interest in iron metabolism. During the past 10 years, knowledge about the transport, storage and homeostasis of iron has improved dramatically, and new molecules involved in iron metabolism have been described (eg, hepcidin, ferroportin, divalent metal transporter 1). Recent European guidelines recommend the monitoring of iron parameters (ie, serum ferritin, transferrin saturation) for all patients with heart failure. Ongoing clinical trials will explore the benefits of iron deficiency correction on various heart failure parameters.

  15. How do patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction die?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michelle M Y; Lam, Carolyn S P

    2013-06-01

    Understanding how patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) die provides insight into the natural history and pathophysiology of this complex syndrome, thereby allowing better prediction of response to therapy in designing clinical trials. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge surrounding mortality rates, modes of death, and prognostic factors in HFPEF. Despite the lack of uniform reporting, the following conclusions may be drawn from previous studies. The mortality burden of HFPEF is substantial, ranging from 10% to 30% annually, and higher in epidemiological studies than in clinical trials. Mortality rates compared with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF) appear to be strongly influenced by the type of study, but are clearly elevated compared with age- and co-morbidity-matched controls without heart failure. The majority of deaths in HFPEF are cardiovascular deaths, comprising 51-60% of deaths in epidemiological studies and ∼70% in clinical trials. Among cardiovascular deaths, sudden death and heart failure death are the leading cardiac modes of death in HFPEF clinical trials. Compared with HFREF, the proportions of cardiovascular deaths, sudden death, and heart failure deaths are lower in HFPEF. Conversely, non-cardiovascular deaths constitute a higher proportion of deaths in HFPEF than in HFREF, particularly in epidemiological studies, where this difference may be related to fewer coronary heart deaths in HFPEF. Key mortality risk factors, including age, gender, body mass index, burden of co-morbidities, and coronary artery disease, offer some explanation for the differences in mortality rates observed across studies.

  16. The Aliskiren Trial to Minimize OutcomeS in Patients with HEart failure trial (ATMOSPHERE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J V; Abraham, William T;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND METHODS: To: (i) describe the baseline characteristics of patients in ATMOSPHERE and the changes in the planned analysis of ATMOSPHERE resulting from the mandated discontinuation of study treatment in patients with diabetes; (ii) compare the baseline characteristics of patients in ATMOSP......AIMS AND METHODS: To: (i) describe the baseline characteristics of patients in ATMOSPHERE and the changes in the planned analysis of ATMOSPHERE resulting from the mandated discontinuation of study treatment in patients with diabetes; (ii) compare the baseline characteristics of patients...... body mass index and more co-morbidity, especially hypertension and coronary heart disease. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was slightly lower in those with diabetes compared with those without. CONCLUSION: ATMOSPHERE will determine whether patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction...

  17. Acute renal failure | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute renal fa...e under investigation E.1.2Version 16.0 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10001041 E.1.2Term Acute ren

  18. Failure probability under parameter uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, R; Tsanakas, A

    2011-05-01

    In many problems of risk analysis, failure is equivalent to the event of a random risk factor exceeding a given threshold. Failure probabilities can be controlled if a decisionmaker is able to set the threshold at an appropriate level. This abstract situation applies, for example, to environmental risks with infrastructure controls; to supply chain risks with inventory controls; and to insurance solvency risks with capital controls. However, uncertainty around the distribution of the risk factor implies that parameter error will be present and the measures taken to control failure probabilities may not be effective. We show that parameter uncertainty increases the probability (understood as expected frequency) of failures. For a large class of loss distributions, arising from increasing transformations of location-scale families (including the log-normal, Weibull, and Pareto distributions), the article shows that failure probabilities can be exactly calculated, as they are independent of the true (but unknown) parameters. Hence it is possible to obtain an explicit measure of the effect of parameter uncertainty on failure probability. Failure probability can be controlled in two different ways: (1) by reducing the nominal required failure probability, depending on the size of the available data set, and (2) by modifying of the distribution itself that is used to calculate the risk control. Approach (1) corresponds to a frequentist/regulatory view of probability, while approach (2) is consistent with a Bayesian/personalistic view. We furthermore show that the two approaches are consistent in achieving the required failure probability. Finally, we briefly discuss the effects of data pooling and its systemic risk implications. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  19. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial is to find out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will ... disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based on their phase. The ...

  20. Inability of positive phase II clinical trials of investigational treatments to subsequently predict positive phase III clinical trials in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob J; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Patel, Akash J; Cachia, David; Liu, Diane; Park, Minjeong; Yuan, Ying; A Kent, Thomas; de Groot, John F

    2017-07-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, but effective therapies are lacking. With the scarcity of positive phase III trials, which are increasing in cost, we examined the ability of positive phase II trials to predict statistically significant improvement in clinical outcomes of phase III trials. A PubMed search was conducted to identify phase III clinical trials performed in the past 25 years for patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma. Trials were excluded if they did not examine an investigational chemotherapy or agent, if they were stopped early owing to toxicity, if they lacked prior phase II studies, or if a prior phase II study was negative. Seven phase III clinical trials in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 4 phase III clinical trials in recurrent glioblastoma met the inclusion criteria. Only 1 (9%) phase III study documented an improvement in overall survival and changed the standard of care. The high failure rate of phase III trials demonstrates the urgent need to increase the reliability of phase II trials of treatments for glioblastoma. Strategies such as the use of adaptive trial designs, Bayesian statistics, biomarkers, volumetric imaging, and mathematical modeling warrant testing. Additionally, it is critical to increase our expectations of phase II trials so that positive findings increase the probability that a phase III trial will be successful.

  1. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: uncertainties and dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Böhm, Michael; Cleland, John G F; Paulus, Walter J S; Pieske, Burkert; Rapezzi, Claudio; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    Many uncertainties surround the syndrome of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which was the topic reviewed in an Expert Meeting at the University of Ferrara. This concluded that the absence of clear diagnostic clinical criteria was the major barrier to progress. There was general agreement that symptoms or signs of heart failure, normal LVEF despite an elevated plasma concentration of natriuretic peptides, and signs of abnormal LV relaxation, LV filling, LV hypertrophy, or left atrial enlargement, or diastolic dysfunction supported the diagnosis. However, HFpEF, like all heart failure syndromes, is heterogeneous in aetiology and pathophysiology, rather than being a single disease. HFpEF may account for about half of all patients with heart failure. The classical risk factors for developing HFpEF include age and co-morbidities, notably hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and the metabolic syndrome. When complicated by increasing congestion requiring hospital admission, the prognosis is poor; 30% or more of patients will die within 1 year (nearly two-thirds die from cardiovascular causes). Patients with chronic stable symptoms have a much better prognosis. Despite many clinical trials, there is no solid evidence that any treatment alters the natural history of HFpEF. Several treatments have shown promising early results and are now being tested in substantial randomized clinical trials. Further basic research is required to better characterize the disease and accelerate progress. Our review highlights the many difficulties encountered in performing randomized clinical trials in HFpEF, often due to difficulties in characterizing HFpEF itself.

  2. ST2 and patient prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Zhang, Yuhui; Ky, Bonnie

    2015-04-02

    Biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for diagnosis and prognosis, and the use of several biomarkers is now considered the standard of care. New markers continue to be developed, but few prove to be substantially better than established markers. Suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is a marker of cardiomyocyte stress and fibrosis that provides incremental value to natriuretic peptides for risk stratification of patients with a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of all available data, the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines now recommend measurement of ST2 for additive risk stratification in patients with acute or chronic ambulatory heart failure (HF). This report provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical studies that led to the endorsement of ST2 as a cardiovascular prognostic marker in chronic HF. The presented data suggest that the addition of ST2 to a model that includes established mortality risk factors, including natriuretic peptides, substantially improves the risk stratification for death and HF hospitalization in patients with HF. ST2's prognostic value remains strong even in the subset of patients with renal insufficiency and is superior to other remodeling-fibrosis biomarkers currently being evaluated. In conclusion, these results have been repeatedly validated; thus, ST2 could be rapidly incorporated into clinical practice for risk prediction. Indeed, the body of evidence supporting the use of ST2 in chronic HF stratification continues to grow, with consistent data from cohorts around the world in single-center (Barcelona, Brussels, and San Diego cohorts) and multicenter (Penn Heart Failure Study [PHFS] and Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiac [MUSIC]) studies and in post hoc studies from clinical trials (Prospective Randomized Amlodipine Survival Evaluation 2 [PRAISE-2], Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training [HF

  3. [Baroreflex failure after chemodectoma resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Esteban, J C; Boyero, S; Fernández, C; Sagasta, A; Pérez, T; Velasco, F; Allue, I; Lezcano, E; Zarranz, J J

    2004-10-01

    Baroreflex failure after chemodectoma resection We present a case of baroreflex failure secondary to a unilateral injury of the glossopharyngeal nerve. The patient was operated for a left-sided chemodectoma in the carotid body. Some months after surgery she started to report presyncopal episodes exacerbated by mental stress and when standing up. During these episodes, the patient presented hypertensive crises and tachycardia. However, blood pressure was below normal ranges at rest. The diagnosis was baroreflex failure secondary to unilateral injury of the glossopharyngeal nerve. The case reported herein illustrates the fact that the presence of a bilateral injury is not essential for the occurrence of this disorder.

  4. Cardiomyocytic apoptosis and heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanzhou Feng

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure is a major disease seriously threatening human health.Once left ventricular dysfunction develops,cardiac function usually deteriorates and progresses to congestive heart failure in several months or years even if no factors which accelerate the deterioration repeatedly exist.Mechanism through which cardiac function continually deteriorates is still unclear.Cardiomyocytic apoptosis can occur in acute stage of ischemic heart diseases and the compensated stage of cardiac dysfunction.In this review,we summarize recent advances in understanding the role of cardiomyocytic apoptosis in heart failure.

  5. Pediatric heart failure therapy with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Susan R; Canter, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Management of chronic heart failure in pediatrics has been altered by the adult literature showing improvements in mortality and hospitalization rates with the use of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (beta-blockers) for routine therapy of all classes of ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure. Many pediatric heart failure specialists have incorporated these agents into their routine management of pediatric heart failure related to dilated cardiomyopathy or ventricular dysfunction in association with congenital heart disease. Retrospective and small prospective case series have shown encouraging improvements in cardiac function and symptoms, but interpretation has been complicated by the high rate of spontaneous recovery in pediatric patients. A recently completed pediatric double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed no difference between placebo and two doses of carvedilol over a 6-month period of follow-up, with significant improvement of all three groups over the course of evaluation. Experience with adults has suggested that only certain beta-blockers, including carvedilol, bisoprolol, nebivolol, and metoprolol succinate, should be used in the treatment of heart failure and that patients with high-grade heart failure may derive the most benefit. Other studies surmise that early or prophylactic use of these medications may alter the risk of disease progression in some high-risk subsets, such as patients receiving anthracyclines or those with muscular dystrophy. This article reviews these topics using experience as well as data from all the recent pediatric studies on the use of beta-blockers to treat congestive heart failure, especially when related to systolic ventricular dysfunction.

  6. Wind Turbine Failures - Tackling current Problems in Failure Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, M. D.; Gonzalez, E.; Melero, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    The wind industry has been growing significantly over the past decades, resulting in a remarkable increase in installed wind power capacity. Turbine technologies are rapidly evolving in terms of complexity and size, and there is an urgent need for cost effective operation and maintenance (O&M) strategies. Especially unplanned downtime represents one of the main cost drivers of a modern wind farm. Here, reliability and failure prediction models can enable operators to apply preventive O&M strategies rather than corrective actions. In order to develop these models, the failure rates and downtimes of wind turbine (WT) components have to be understood profoundly. This paper is focused on tackling three of the main issues related to WT failure analyses. These are, the non-uniform data treatment, the scarcity of available failure analyses, and the lack of investigation on alternative data sources. For this, a modernised form of an existing WT taxonomy is introduced. Additionally, an extensive analysis of historical failure and downtime data of more than 4300 turbines is presented. Finally, the possibilities to encounter the lack of available failure data by complementing historical databases with Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) alarms are evaluated.

  7. Charting a roadmap for heart failure biomarker studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tariq; Fiuzat, Mona; Pencina, Michael J; Geller, Nancy L; Zannad, Faiez; Cleland, John G F; Snider, James V; Blankenberg, Stephan; Adams, Kirkwood F; Redberg, Rita F; Kim, Jae B; Mascette, Alice; Mentz, Robert J; O'Connor, Christopher M; Felker, G Michael; Januzzi, James L

    2014-10-01

    Heart failure is a syndrome with a pathophysiological basis that can be traced to dysfunction in several interconnected molecular pathways. Identification of biomarkers of heart failure that allow measurement of the disease on a molecular level has resulted in enthusiasm for their use in prognostication and selection of appropriate therapies. However, despite considerable amounts of information available on numerous biomarkers, inconsistent research methodologies and lack of clinical correlations have made bench-to-bedside translations rare and left the literature with countless publications of varied quality. There is a need for a systematic and collaborative approach aimed at definitively studying the clinical benefits of novel biomarkers. In this review, on the basis of input from academia, industry, and governmental agencies, we propose a systematized approach based on adherence to specific quality measures for studies looking to augment current prediction model or use biomarkers to tailor therapeutics. We suggest that study quality, rather than results, should determine publication and propose a system for grading biomarker studies. We outline the need for collaboration between clinical investigators and statisticians to introduce more advanced statistical methodologies into the field of biomarkers that would allow for data from a large number of variables to be distilled into clinically actionable information. Lastly, we propose the creation of a heart failure biomarker consortium that would allow for a comprehensive list of biomarkers to be concomitantly analyzed in a pooled sample of randomized clinical trials and hypotheses to be generated for testing in biomarker-guided trials. Such a consortium could collaborate in sharing samples to identify biomarkers, undertake meta-analyses on completed trials, and spearhead clinical trials to test the clinical utility of new biomarkers.

  8. The use of metoprolol CR/XL in the treatment of patients with diabetes and chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidio De Freitas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Ovidio De Freitas, Oliver Lenz, Alessia Fornoni, Barry J MatersonDivision of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USAAbstract: About 5 million Americans suffer from heart failure. Given the correlation of heart failure with age and the rising life expectancy, the prevalence of heart failure continues to increase in the general population. Sympathetic stimulation intensifies with progressive heart failure. The rationale to use β-blockers in individuals with impaired myocardial function is based on experimental evidence supporting the notion that prolonged α- and β-adrenergic stimulation leads to worsening heart failure. Until recently, safety concerns have precluded the use of β-blockers in patients with diabetes and heart failure. However, several large, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials such as Metoprolol Randomized Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure (MERIT-HF have shown that β-blockers can be safely used in patients with diabetes and heart failure. Moreover, β-blockers significantly improved morbidity and mortality in this population. Based on this evidence, it is now recommended to add β-blockers such as metoprolol CR/XL with an escalating dosage regimen to the treatment of patients with symptomatic heart failure who already are receiving a stable medical regimen including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, diuretics, vasodilators, or digitalis.Keywords: metoprolol, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, β-adrenergic blocking agents, MERITHF

  9. Creep-Fatigue Failure Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Holdsworth

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Failure diagnosis invariably involves consideration of both associated material condition and the results of a mechanical analysis of prior operating history. This Review focuses on these aspects with particular reference to creep-fatigue failure diagnosis. Creep-fatigue cracking can be due to a spectrum of loading conditions ranging from pure cyclic to mainly steady loading with infrequent off-load transients. These require a range of mechanical analysis approaches, a number of which are reviewed. The microstructural information revealing material condition can vary with alloy class. In practice, the detail of the consequent cracking mechanism(s can be camouflaged by oxidation at high temperatures, although the presence of oxide on fracture surfaces can be used to date events leading to failure. Routine laboratory specimen post-test examination is strongly recommended to characterise the detail of deformation and damage accumulation under known and well-controlled loading conditions to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of failure diagnosis.

  10. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... them know how you're doing. With good teamwork and communication, you can improve the quality of ... Failure Recognition and Knowing Your Options Planning Ahead Communicating with Your Healthcare Provider Overcoming Barriers to Shared ...

  11. Severe Obesity and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161011.html Severe Obesity and Heart Failure Study sees link even without ... 2016 FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Severe obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for ...

  12. Warning Signs of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of heart failure may not be cause for alarm. But if you have more than one of ... also causing fluid retention in the tissues. Tiredness, fatigue ...a tired feeling all the time and difficulty ...

  13. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Sep 30,2016 ... making your preferences known is called advance care planning. It allows you to speak for yourself, even ...

  14. Decongestion in acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentz, Robert J.; Kjeldsen, Keld; Rossi, Gian Paolo; Voors, Adriaan A.; Cleland, John G. F.; Anker, Stefan D.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Fiuzat, Mona; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram; O'Connor, Christopher; Felker, G. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Congestion is a major reason for hospitalization in acute heart failure (HF). Therapeutic strategies to manage congestion include diuretics, vasodilators, ultrafiltration, vasopressin antagonists, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and potentially also novel therapies such as gut sequesterants

  15. Predicting Failures in Power Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, Michael; Stepanov, Mikhail G

    2010-01-01

    Here we develop an approach to predict power grid weak points, and specifically to efficiently identify the most probable failure modes in load distribution for a given power network. This approach is applied to two examples: Guam's power system and also the IEEE RTS-96 system, both modeled within the static Direct Current power flow model. Our algorithm is a power network adaption of the worst configuration heuristics, originally developed to study low probability events in physics and failures in error-correction. One finding is that, if the normal operational mode of the grid is sufficiently healthy, the failure modes, also called instantons, are sufficiently sparse, i.e. the failures are caused by load fluctuations at only a few buses. The technique is useful for discovering weak links which are saturated at the instantons. It can also identify overutilized and underutilized generators, thus providing predictive capability for improving the reliability of any power network.

  16. Antibiotic managment in renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, R E

    1976-06-01

    This is a brief compilation of the work of many investigators. It includes facts about toxicity and recommendations about antibiotic management in patients with renal failure. As new data are accrued, changes in these recommendations will be necessary.

  17. [Does diastolic heart failure exist?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalajara Boo, José Fernando

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the concepts of systolic function, diastolic function, heart failure, diastolic dysfunction, and diastolic heart failure. We refer to the historic evolution of the concept of heart failure and the origin of the term diastolic heart failure. Based on the current concepts of the physiology of the heart and its pathophysiology, we discuss the inappropriateness of the term and to the confusion it has generated in clinical practice, treatment, and prognosis, as well as in numerous research papers (of which some examples are given) when terming as "heart failure" the diastolic dysfunction and using both terms indistinctively. We conclude that an increasing need has arisen, ever more imperative, to identify clearly the concepts of heart failure and diastolic dysfunction, emphasizing on their differences to recognize them as distinct clinical entities with their own personality and, hence, having different prognosis and treatment. This would be of great help to achieve more accuracy in the clinical guidelines, standards, and consensus, especially regarding treatment. Besides it would be useful to avoid, inconsistencies in the design of research, which appear in some of the publications just by the lack of a clear meaning of the terms. Finally, at present we have the necessary elements to conclude that the terms "diastolic heart failure" and "cardiac failure with preserved systolic function" are inexact, poorly gauged, and far away from the actual problem they try to define. Therefore, they should be substituted by the concept of Diastolic Dysfunction, which defines clearly the pathophysiology of the functional alteration, without having to state that "the heart is failing".

  18. Edge effects and delamination failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    The fundamental relationship between the morphology of a composite laminate and the resulting free edge effects is explored and related to delamination failures. Cross-ply, angle-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates are discussed in detail. It is shown that the local mismatch in elastic properties of adjacent layers and the global stacking sequence of a laminate both have a significant influence on the interlaminar stresses and delamination failures.

  19. The failure-tolerant leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farson, Richard; Keyes, Ralph

    2002-08-01

    "The fastest way to succeed," IBM's Thomas Watson, Sr., once said, "is to double your failure rate." In recent years, more and more executives have embraced Watson's point of view, coming to understand what innovators have always known: Failure is a prerequisite to invention. But while companies may grasp the value of making mistakes at the level of corporate practices, they have a harder time accepting the idea at the personal level. People are afraid to fail, and corporate culture reinforces that fear. In this article, psychologist and former Harvard Business School professor Richard Farson and coauthor Ralph Keyes discuss how companies can reduce the fear of miscues. What's crucial is the presence of failure-tolerant leaders--executives who, through their words and actions, help employees overcome their anxieties about making mistakes and, in the process, create a culture of intelligent risk-taking that leads to sustained innovation. Such leaders don't just accept productive failure, they promote it. Drawing from their research in business, politics, sports, and science, the authors identify common practices among failure-tolerant leaders. These leaders break down the social and bureaucratic barriers that separate them from their followers. They engage at a personal level with the people they lead. They avoid giving either praise or criticism, preferring to take a nonjudgmental, analytical posture as they interact with staff. They openly admit their own mistakes rather than trying to cover them up or shifting the blame. And they try to root out the destructive competitiveness built into most organizations. Above all else, failure-tolerant leaders push people to see beyond traditional definitions of success and failure. They know that as long as a person views failure as the opposite of success, rather than its complement, he or she will never be able to take the risks necessary for innovation.

  20. [Acute heart failure and cardiogenic shock - trends at the beginning of 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokyta, Richard

    2014-04-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a clinical syndrome of different etiology and several clinical presentations. Cardiogenic shock patients have highest long-term mortality. In contrast to chronic heart failure, we have no evidence of therapeutic benefit for any treatment strategy from randomized clinical trials. Search for new pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies is ongoing. Both causal and symptomatic treatment of AHF episode should be initiated as soon as possible. This review is focused on trends in acute heart failure therapy at the beginning of 21st century.

  1. Desktop software to identify patients eligible for recruitment into a clinical trial: using SARMA to recruit to the ROAD feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Treweek

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion An automated recruitment tool can support primary care trials in Scotland and has the potential to support recruitment in other jurisdictions. It offers a low-cost supplement to other trial recruitment methods and is likely to have a much lower screen failure rate than blanket approaches such as mailshots and newspaper campaigns.

  2. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS......:We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two......%). Heterogeneity was moderate (I(2) = 46%, p = 0.02) and unexplained by metaregression. INTERPRETATION:We provide empirical evidence for observer bias in randomized clinical trials with subjective measurement scale outcomes. A failure to blind assessors of outcomes in such trials results in a high risk...

  3. No Critical Peripheral Fatigue Threshold during Intermittent Isometric Time to Task Failure Test with the Knee Extensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyd, Christian; Beltrami, Fernando G.; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Noakes, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that group III and IV muscle afferents provide inhibitory feedback from locomotor muscles to the central nervous system, setting an absolute threshold for the development of peripheral fatigue during exercise. The aim of this study was to test the validity of this theory. Thus, we asked whether the level of developed peripheral fatigue would differ when two consecutive exercise trials were completed to task failure. Ten trained sport students performed two exercise trials to task failure on an isometric dynamometer, allowing peripheral fatigue to be assessed 2 s after maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) post task failure. The trials, separated by 8 min, consisted of repeated sets of 10 × 5-s isometric knee extension followed by 5-s rest between contractions. In each set, the first nine contractions were performed at a target force at 60% of the pre-exercise MVC, while the 10th contraction was a MVC. MVC and evoked force responses to supramaximal electrical femoral nerve stimulation on relaxed muscles were assessed during the trials and at task failure. Stimulations at task failure consisted of single stimulus (SS), paired stimuli at 10 Hz (PS10), paired stimuli at 100 Hz (PS100), and 50 stimuli at 100 Hz (tetanus). Time to task failure for the first trial (12.84 ± 5.60 min) was longer (P < 0.001) than for the second (5.74 ± 1.77 min). MVC force was significantly lower at task failure for both trials compared with the pre-exercise values (both P < 0.001), but there were no differences in MVC at task failure in the first and second trials (P = 1.00). However, evoked peak force for SS, PS100, and tetanus were all reduced more at task failure in the second compared to the first trial (P = 0.014 for SS, P < 0.001 for PS100 and tetanus). These results demonstrate that subjects do not terminate exercise at task failure because they have reached a critical threshold in peripheral fatigue. The present data therefore question the existence of a

  4. Circular RNAs in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, Yvan; Creemers, Esther E; Boon, Reinier A; Werfel, Stanislas; Thum, Thomas; Engelhardt, Stefan; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Squire, Iain

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease, and particularly heart failure, is still a serious health care issue for which novel treatments and biomarkers are needed. The RNA family comprises different subgroups, among which the small-sized microRNAs and the larger long non-coding RNAs have shown some potential to aid in moving personalized health care of heart failure patients a step forward. Here, members of the Cardiolinc network review the recent findings suggesting that the less well-known circular RNAs may constitute a novel reservoir of therapeutic targets and biomarkers of heart failure. The knowledge of the mode of biogenesis of circular RNAs will first be reported, followed by a description of different features that make these RNA molecules of interest for the heart failure community. The functions of circular RNAs in the heart will be described, with some emphasis given to their regulation in the failing heart. Circulating in the bloodstream, circular RNAs have appeared as potential biomarkers and recent findings associated with the use of circular RNAs as heart failure biomarkers will be discussed. Finally, some directions for future research will be provided. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Experimental methods for identifying failure mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental methods for identifying failure mechanisms in fibrous composites are studied. Methods to identify failure in composite materials includes interferometry, holography, fractography and ultrasonics.

  6. Common Cause Failures and Ultra Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    A common cause failure occurs when several failures have the same origin. Common cause failures are either common event failures, where the cause is a single external event, or common mode failures, where two systems fail in the same way for the same reason. Common mode failures can occur at different times because of a design defect or a repeated external event. Common event failures reduce the reliability of on-line redundant systems but not of systems using off-line spare parts. Common mode failures reduce the dependability of systems using off-line spare parts and on-line redundancy.

  7. Novel biomarkers in acute heart failure: MR-pro-adrenomedullin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, W Frank

    2014-10-01

    First isolated from human pheochromocytoma cells, adrenomedullin (ADM) is a peptide hormone with natriuretic, vasodilatory, and hypotensive effects mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), nitric oxide, and renal prostaglandin systems. ADM expression occurs in many tissues and organ systems, including cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, cerebrovascular, gastrointestinal, and endocrine tissues where it acts as a circulating hormone and a local autocrine and paracrine hormone. ADM plasma concentrations are increased in hypertension, chronic renal disease, and heart failure. As ADM is unstable in vitro, it is necessary to measure its mid-regional pro-hormone fragment, the levels of which correspond to ADM concentration (MR-proADM). The prognostic potential of MR-proADM was recently demonstrated in the Biomarkers in Acute Heart Failure (BACH) trial. In this trial of 568 acute heart failure patients, MR-proADM was superior to both brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and NT-proBNP in predicting mortality within 14 days. MR-proADM also provided significant additive incremental predictive value for 90-day mortality when added to BNP and NT-proBNP.

  8. Bioequivalence and Bioavailability Clinical Trials: A Status Report from the National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Stockmann, Chris; Spigarelli, Michael G.; Ampofo, Krow; Sherwin, Catherine MT

    2013-01-01

    Drug development is an expensive process that is marked by a high-failure rate. For this reason early stage bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic studies are essential in determining the fate of new drug products. In this study, we sought to systematically assess the current trends of ongoing and recently completed bioequivalence and bioavailability trials that have been registered within a national clinical trials registry. All bioequivalence and bioavailability studies registered in the United...

  9. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health Information > Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical studies depend on people ... vision research in the United States. Basics of Clinical Trials What is a clinical trial? Clinical trials are ...

  10. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical ... protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical Trial Protocol Each clinical trial has a master plan ...

  11. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, researchers study ways to reduce the risk of getting a disease or a specific medical problem. These trials find out if lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, ...

  12. Organ failure associated with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Jun Zhu; Jing-Sen Shi; Xue-Jun Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and organ failure.METHODS: Clinical data of 74 cases of SAP from Jan. 1993 to Dec. 2002 were retrospectively reviewed, and the relationship between organ failure and age, gender, etiology,extent of necrosis, infection of necrosis and mortality was analyzed.RESULTS: A total of 47 patients (63.5 %) showed organ failure, 20 patients (27.0 %) multiple organ failure, whereas 27 patients (36.5 %) with dysfunction of a single organ system. Pulmonary failure was the most common organ dysfunction (23.0 %) among single organ failures. There were no significant differences in age, gender and gallstone pancreatitis among patients with or without organ failure (P>0.05). The incidence of organ failure in infected necrosis was not higher compared with sterile necrosis, and patients with increased amount of necrosis did not have an increased prevalence of organ failure (P>0.05). Patients with organ failure had a higher mortality rate compared with those without organ failure (P<0.05). The death of SAP was associated with multiple organ failure (P<0.005), pulmonary failure (P<0.005), cardiovascular dysfunction (P<0.05) and gastrointestinal dysfunction (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Organ failure is common in patients with SAP, and patients with multiple organ failure and pulmonary failure have a higher mortality rate. Prevention and active treatment of organ failure can improve the outcome of patients with SAP.

  13. RECOVERY STRATEGIES FOR SERVICE FAILURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budeanu Andreea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Internationally, services represent the most important sector of the economy both in terms of economic performance and labor utilization. Becoming essential part of today society, they are considered the basis of a healthy economy, fact that has increased the importance of services and the research in the field.T hrough this work we intend to address a number of issues that require clarification and are relevant to this sector. Increased competition and customers higher demands lead to difficulties in service delivery, so managers of service organizations must work hard towards developing appropiate strategies that can lead to improved customers satisfaction and to increased efficiency. Because it is inevitably for service providers to face situations in which service failure occurs and their customers are not satisfied, understanding the nature of service failures and the ways in which an organization can recover after a failure are considered key factors for achieving customer satisfaction. Since the data suggests that over 50% of customers who are facing problems are not satisfied with the way they were resolved, we consider appropriate to approach this topic. We intend to draw attention to service providers to the importance of proper management of service failure. They can find ways to recover from these failures and even to turn them into some very pleasant situations that can contribute to customer loyalty. This paper begins by highlighting the various features specific to services which contribute to the increased chances of failure, it continues by presenting the concepts of service failure and service recovery and then it presents some links that exist between service recovery and other aspects of providing services that are demonstrated in the literature. We hope that this paper will significantly contribute to the knowledge and development of the sector under analysis and will highlight some practices that will lead to improved

  14. [Radiotherapy phase I trials' methodology: Features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoirard, R; Vallard, A; Langrand-Escure, J; Guy, J-B; Ben Mrad, M; Yaoxiong, X; Diao, P; Méry, B; Pigne, G; Rancoule, C; Magné, N

    2016-12-01

    In clinical research, biostatistical methods allow the rigorous analysis of data collection and should be defined from the trial design to obtain the appropriate experimental approach. Thus, if the main purpose of phase I is to determine the dose to use during phase II, methodology should be finely adjusted to experimental treatment(s). Today, the methodology for chemotherapy and targeted therapy is well known. For radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy phase I trials, the primary endpoint must reflect both effectiveness and potential treatment toxicities. Methodology should probably be complex to limit failures in the following phases. However, there are very few data about methodology design in the literature. The present study focuses on these particular trials and their characteristics. It should help to raise existing methodological patterns shortcomings in order to propose new and better-suited designs. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling biological rhythms in failure time data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myles James D

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human body exhibits a variety of biological rhythms. There are patterns that correspond, among others, to the daily wake/sleep cycle, a yearly seasonal cycle and, in women, the menstrual cycle. Sine/cosine functions are often used to model biological patterns for continuous data, but this model is not appropriate for analysis of biological rhythms in failure time data. Methods We adapt the cosinor method to the proportional hazards model and present a method to provide an estimate and confidence interval of the time when the minimum hazard is achieved. We then apply this model to data taken from a clinical trial of adjuvant of pre-menopausal breast cancer patients. Results The application of this technique to the breast cancer data revealed that the optimal day for pre-resection incisional or excisional biopsy of 28-day cycle (i. e. the day associated with the lowest recurrence rate is day 8 with 95% confidence interval of 4–12 days. We found that older age, fewer positive nodes, smaller tumor size, and experimental treatment were predictive of longer relapse-free survival. Conclusion In this paper we have described a method for modeling failure time data with an underlying biological rhythm. The advantage of adapting a cosinor model to proportional hazards model is its ability to model right censored data. We have presented a method to provide an estimate and confidence interval of the day in the menstrual cycle where the minimum hazard is achieved. This method is not limited to breast cancer data, and may be applied to any biological rhythms linked to right censored data.

  16. Gene therapy for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Barry

    2017-04-01

    Novel strategies are needed to treat the growing population of heart failure patients. While new drug and device based therapies have improved outcomes over the past several decades, heart failure patients continue to experience amongst the lowest quality of life of any chronic disease, high likelihood of being hospitalized and marked reduction in survival. Better understanding of many of the basic mechanisms involved in the development of heart failure has helped identify abnormalities that could potentially be targeted by gene transfer. Despite success in experimental animal models, translating gene transfer strategies from the laboratory to the clinic remains at an early stage. This review provides an introduction to gene transfer as a therapy for treating heart failure, describes some of the many factors that need to be addressed in order for it to be successful and discusses some of the recent studies that have been carried out in heart failure patients. Insights from these studies highlight both the enormous promise of gene transfer and the obstacles that still need to be overcome for this treatment approach to be successful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Failure to thrive: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sarah Z; Lanham, Jason S

    2011-04-01

    Failure to thrive in childhood is a state of undernutrition due to inadequate caloric intake, inadequate caloric absorption, or excessive caloric expenditure. In the United States, it is seen in 5 to 10 percent of children in primary care settings. Although failure to thrive is often defined as a weight for age that falls below the 5th percentile on multiple occasions or weight deceleration that crosses two major percentile lines on a growth chart, use of any single indicator has a low positive predictive value. Most cases of failure to thrive involve inadequate caloric intake caused by behavioral or psychosocial issues. The most important part of the outpatient evaluation is obtaining an accurate account of a child's eating habits and caloric intake. Routine laboratory testing rarely identifies a cause and is not generally recommended. Reasons to hospitalize a child for further evaluation include failure of outpatient management, suspicion of abuse or neglect, or severe psychosocial impairment of the caregiver. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment, including home nursing visits and nutritional counseling, has been shown to improve weight gain, parent-child relationships, and cognitive development. The long-term effects of failure to thrive on cognitive development and future academic performance are unclear.

  18. Everyday Attention Failures: An Individual Differences Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D.; Brewer, Gene A.; Spillers, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in everyday attention failures. Undergraduate students completed various cognitive ability measures in the laboratory and recorded everyday attention failures in a diary over the course of a week. The majority of attention failures were failures of distraction or mind wandering in educational…

  19. Epidemic Network Failures in Optical Transport Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Katsikas, Dimitrios; Fagertun, Anna Manolova

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a failure propagation model for transport networks which are affected by epidemic failures. The network is controlled using the GMPLS protocol suite. The Susceptible Infected Disabled (SID) epidemic model is investigated and new signaling functionality of GMPLS to support epid...... epidemic failure resolution is proposed. The results provide important input to service recovery mechanisms under epidemic failures....

  20. Everyday Attention Failures: An Individual Differences Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D.; Brewer, Gene A.; Spillers, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in everyday attention failures. Undergraduate students completed various cognitive ability measures in the laboratory and recorded everyday attention failures in a diary over the course of a week. The majority of attention failures were failures of distraction or mind wandering in educational…