WorldWideScience

Sample records for failed native dialysis

  1. Native kidney reincarnation following a failed transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansberg, R.; Roberts, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 51-year-old woman with end stage renal failure secondary to Haemolytic Uraemic syndrome underwent a cadaveric renal transplant. A routine post transplant DTPA scan was performed which demonstrated satisfactory renal transplant perfusion and function. Incidental note was made of tracer uptake in the pelvis in the mid-line, which was suspected to be a uterine fibroid. This was confirmed on ultrasonography and at surgery. One week post transplantation the patient became acutely unwell and at laparotomy a perforated diverticular abscess was drained. Intraoperatively the transplant kidney was examined and the surgeon thought there was a area of infarction. This was confirmed on biopsy. As the patient's creatinine was rising a repeat DTPA study was performed. Perfusion and function of the transplant kidney was virtually absent while Doppler studies showed no flow. The patient however continued to produce urine and the creatinine was stable. Subsequently a mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG) 3 study was performed which again confirmed absent perfusion and function by the the transplanted kidney as well as the previous noted uterine fibroid. The native kidneys however demonstrated good perfusion and function. The patient's renal function remained stable and she did not require dialysis. A necrotic infarcted transplant kidney was removed uneventfully. This case illustrates the importance of imaging the native kidneys as well as the transplant kidney when there are puzzling clinical features. The presumed cause of the recovery of native renal function was the immunosuppression given for the transplant. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  2. Endovascular recanalization of native chronic total occlusions in patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Clinton W; Vance, Ansar; Niesen, Timothy; Grilli, Christopher; Velez, J Daniel; Agriantonis, Demetrios J; Kimbiris, George; Garcia, Mark J; Leung, Daniel A

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility, safety, and outcome of endovascular recanalization of native chronic total occlusions (CTOs) in patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts. Retrospective review of 19 limbs in 18 patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts that underwent recanalization of native arterial occlusions between February 2009 and April 2013 was performed. Nine of the limbs presented with acute ischemia and 10 presented with chronic ischemia, including eight with critical limb ischemia and two with disabling claudication. The mean patency of the failed bypass grafts (63% venous) was 27 months. All limbs had Transatlantic Inter-Society Consensus class D lesions involving the native circulation. Technical success of the endovascular recanalization procedure was achieved in all but one limb (95%). The mean ankle brachial indices before and after treatment were 0.34 and 0.73, respectively. There were no major complications or emergency amputations. Mean patient follow-up was 64 weeks, and two patients were lost to follow-up. Primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 87%, 48%, and 16%, respectively. Successful secondary procedures were performed in seven patients, with secondary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months of 88%, 73%, and 44%, respectively. Limb salvage rates at 12 and 24 months were 94% and 65%, and amputation-free survival rates at 12 and 24 months were 87% and 60%, respectively. Endovascular recanalization of native CTOs in patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts is technically feasible and safe and results in acceptable limb salvage. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Percutaneous treatment of thrombosed native arteriovenous dialysis fistula insufficiency: efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy with using the stone basket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Ko, Sung Min; Kim, Mi Jung; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Sohn, Cheol Ho; Choi, Jin Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Kim, Yong Joo

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the procedural success after percutaneous treatment of thrombosed native arteriovenous dialysis fistula insufficiency and the efficacy of performing mechanical thrombectomy with using the stone basket. From March 2004 to June 2005, 36 thrombosed native hemodialysis access shunts in the upper limbs (brachiocephalic fistulas: 16 and radiocephalic fistulas: 20) were percutaneously treated in 30 patients. Declotting procedures were performed with using urokinase (100,00-200,000 unit) and manual catheter-directed thrombo-aspiration in all the patients. Angioplasty (6 mm in diameter and 4 cm in length) was performed at the identified area of the stenosis and /or with maceration of the thrombus. In 14 cases with massive thrombosis that was refractory to the above mentioned declotting procedures, mechanical thrombectomy with using a Wittich nitinol stone basket (Cook, Bloomington, IN) was performed. Data regarding the procedural success rate and the patency rate were analyzed by means of Fischer's exact test, and the Kaplan-Meier method with the Log-rank test was used for statistical inter-group comparisons between the brachiocephalic and radiocephalic fistulas. Successful declotting and restoration of thrill were achieved in 30 of 36 procedures (83%). Reestablishment of normal dialysis for at least one session was achieved in 29 of 36 procedures (81%). The procedural success rate for the brachiocephalic fistulas was 94% compared with 70% for the radiocephalic fistulas, but the difference was not statistically significant (ρ = 0.104). In the cases with performing mechanical thrombectomy and using the stone basket, procedural success was achieved in 93% (13/14). The expected patency rates at 3, 6 and 12 months were 78%, 61% and 51%, respectively. The patency rates after declotting procedures were not significantly different between the brachiocephalic and radiocephlaic fistulas (ρ = 0.871). Percutaneous treatment of thrombosed native arteriovenous

  4. Percutaneous treatment of thrombosed native arteriovenous dialysis fistula insufficiency: efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy with using the stone basket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Ko, Sung Min; Kim, Mi Jung; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Sohn, Cheol Ho; Choi, Jin Soo; Park, Kyung Sik [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Joo [Andong General Hospital, Andon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We wanted to evaluate the procedural success after percutaneous treatment of thrombosed native arteriovenous dialysis fistula insufficiency and the efficacy of performing mechanical thrombectomy with using the stone basket. From March 2004 to June 2005, 36 thrombosed native hemodialysis access shunts in the upper limbs (brachiocephalic fistulas: 16 and radiocephalic fistulas: 20) were percutaneously treated in 30 patients. Declotting procedures were performed with using urokinase (100,00-200,000 unit) and manual catheter-directed thrombo-aspiration in all the patients. Angioplasty (6 mm in diameter and 4 cm in length) was performed at the identified area of the stenosis and /or with maceration of the thrombus. In 14 cases with massive thrombosis that was refractory to the above mentioned declotting procedures, mechanical thrombectomy with using a Wittich nitinol stone basket (Cook, Bloomington, IN) was performed. Data regarding the procedural success rate and the patency rate were analyzed by means of Fischer's exact test, and the Kaplan-Meier method with the Log-rank test was used for statistical inter-group comparisons between the brachiocephalic and radiocephalic fistulas. Successful declotting and restoration of thrill were achieved in 30 of 36 procedures (83%). Reestablishment of normal dialysis for at least one session was achieved in 29 of 36 procedures (81%). The procedural success rate for the brachiocephalic fistulas was 94% compared with 70% for the radiocephalic fistulas, but the difference was not statistically significant ({rho} = 0.104). In the cases with performing mechanical thrombectomy and using the stone basket, procedural success was achieved in 93% (13/14). The expected patency rates at 3, 6 and 12 months were 78%, 61% and 51%, respectively. The patency rates after declotting procedures were not significantly different between the brachiocephalic and radiocephlaic fistulas ({rho} = 0.871). Percutaneous treatment of thrombosed native

  5. Speciation of native cations and added radionuclides in raw bovine milk. I. membraneless dialysis in aqueous biphasic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macasek, F.; Gerhart, P.; Malovikova, A.; Celkova, A.

    1996-01-01

    Partition of native sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium and radioisotopes of cesium, strontium and europium was investigated in the aqueous liquid-liquid systems formed after agitation of fresh pasteurized skim bovine milk with 4% w/w water solution of pectin of various degree of esterification (60-93%). The partition of the ions in the 'membraneless dialysis' was described by Donnan equilibria and ion-exchange in the macro-and microheterogenous systems and, within uncertainty of results, does not depend on the degree of esterification. Strong negative non-ideality of Sr and Eu in milk phase is attributed to binding with proteins, casein particles in particular, and complexation with low molecular ligands. Separation factor α = D(Sr)/D(Ca) is 0.70 ±0.06, in favor of strontium concentration in pectin phase. While>96% of cesium is diffusible to pectin phase, only 43-56% (depending on physico-chemical model of dialysis) of strontium behaves in that way, and in original milk phase the percent of strontium cationic from may be as low as 13%. (author). 24 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Assessing plant community composition fails to capture impacts of white-tailed deer on native and invasive plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Victoria; Dávalos, Andrea; Blossey, Bernd

    2017-07-01

    Excessive herbivory can have transformative effects on forest understory vegetation, converting diverse communities into depauperate ones, often with increased abundance of non-native plants. White-tailed deer are a problematic herbivore throughout much of eastern North America and alter forest understory community structure. Reducing (by culling) or eliminating (by fencing) deer herbivory is expected to return understory vegetation to a previously diverse condition. We examined this assumption from 1992 to 2006 at Fermilab (Batavia, IL) where a cull reduced white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus ) abundance in 1998/1999 by 90 % from 24.6 to 2.5/km 2 , and at West Point, NY, where we assessed interactive effects of deer, earthworms, and invasive plants using 30 × 30 m paired fenced and open plots in 12 different forests from 2009 to 2012. We recorded not only plant community responses (species presence and cover) within 1 m 2 quadrats, but also responses of select individual species (growth, reproduction). At Fermilab, introduced Alliaria petiolata abundance initially increased as deer density increased, but then declined after deer reduction. The understory community responded to the deer cull by increased cover, species richness and height, and community composition changed but was dominated by early successional native forbs. At West Point plant community composition was affected by introduced earthworm density but not deer exclusion. Native plant cover increased and non-native plant cover decreased in fenced plots, thus keeping overall plant cover similar. At both sites native forb cover increased in response to deer reduction, but the anticipated response of understory vegetation failed to materialize at the community level. Deer-favoured forbs ( Eurybia divaricata , Maianthemum racemosum , Polygonatum pubescens and Trillium recurvatum ) grew taller and flowering probability increased in the absence of deer. Plant community monitoring fails to capture

  7. A spontaneous pre-anastomotic occlusion does not necessarily impair forearm native dialysis fistulas: echo-Doppler, 3D MR angiographic and digital subtraction angiographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, N; Pillet, J C; Prospert, E; McLntyre, D; Lamy, S

    2013-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the choice treatment of end-stage renal disease. When it is not indicated or not immediately feasible, hemodialysis must be performed, preferably via a native arteriovenous fistula in the forearm. A pre-anastomotic occlusion of this type of fistula is often accompanied by a thrombosis of its draining vein. In some instances, the venous segment may remain permeable thanks to the development of arterial collateral pathways and may even allow efficient dialysis without any clinical syndrome of distal steal. We present the echo-Doppler, magnetic and angiographic characteristics of three of these collateralized shunts that have remained functional, in one of the cases following a percutaneous dilation.

  8. Drug-eluting versus plain balloon angioplasty for the treatment of failing dialysis access: Final results and cost-effectiveness analysis from a prospective randomized controlled trial (NCT01174472)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitrou, Panagiotis M., E-mail: panoskitrou@gmail.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Rion 26504 (Greece); Katsanos, Konstantinos [Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy' s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, King' s Health Partners, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Siablis, Dimitris [Department of Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Rion 26504 (Greece)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •1-Year target lesion primary patency significantly higher after PCB application compared to plain balloon angioplasty in the failing dialysis access. •Significant difference in favor of PCB in cumulative primary patency of AVGs at 1 year. •No significant difference in cumulative primary patency of AVFs treated with PCB at 1 year. •Cost effectiveness analysis performed. •Paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty proves to be a cost-effective option for treating dialysis access. -- Abstract: Objective: To report the final results and cost-effectiveness analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial investigating drug-eluting balloon (DEB) versus plain balloon angioplasty (BA) for the treatment of failing dialysis access ( (NCT01174472)). Methods: 40 patients were randomized to angioplasty with either DEB (n = 20) or BA (n = 20) for treatment of significant venous stenosis causing a failing dialysis access. Both arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) and synthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVG) were included. Angiographic follow up was scheduled every two months. Primary endpoints were technical success and target lesion primary patency at 1 year. Cumulative and survival analysis was performed. Incremental net benefit (INB) and incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated and the cost-effectiveness acceptability curve (CEAC) was drawn. Results: Baseline variables were equally distributed between the two groups. At 1 year, cumulative target lesion primary patency was significantly higher after DEB application (35% vs. 5% after BA, p < 0.001). Overall, median primary patency was 0.64 years in case of DEB vs. 0.36 years in case of BA (p = 0.0007; unadjusted HR = 0.27 [95%CI: 0.13–0.58]; Cox adjusted HR = 0.23 [95%CI: 0.10–0.50]). ICER was 2198 Euros (€) per primary patency year of dialysis access gained. INB was 1068€ (95%CI: 31–2105€) for a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of 5000€ (corresponding acceptability probability >97

  9. Peritoneal Dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Infections. An infection of the abdominal lining (peritonitis) is a common complication of peritoneal dialysis. An ... day. You might have a lower risk of peritonitis because you connect and disconnect to the dialysis ...

  10. Equilibrium Dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    context of antimicrobial therapy in malnutrition. Dialysis has in the past presented technical problems, being complicated and time-consuming. A new dialysis system based on the equilibrium technique has now become available, and it is the principles and practical application of this apparatus (Kontron Diapack; Kontron.

  11. Failing Failed States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Hans-Henrik

    2002-01-01

    coverage. A Danish survey of newsrooms shows that the national world-view and prevalent news criteria prevent consistent coverage. It is argued that politicians are the ones who determine national agendas: it is from political initiatives, rather than media coverage, that failing states and humanitarian......When states are failing, when basic state functions are no longer carried out, and when people have no security, humanitarian crises erupt. In confronting this problem, the stronger states have followed an ad hoc policy of intervention and aid. In some cases, humanitarian disasters have resulted...... from inaction. Often, the media are blamed. Politicians complain about the media when they interfere (the CNN effect), and when they do not. This article looks at how the media do cover failing states. Sierra Leone and Congo are used as examples. The analysis shows that there is little independent...

  12. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidneys - dialysis centers; Dialysis - what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers; End-stage renal disease - dialysis ... to a tube that connects to the dialysis machine. Your blood will flow through the tube, into ...

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in the Treatment of Pure Aortic Regurgitation in Native Valves and Failing Surgical Bioprostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawaya, Fadi J; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Seiffert, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    %, respectively). Independent predictors of 30-day mortality were body mass index 8%, major vascular or access complication, and moderate to severe AR. In the failing SHV group, device success, early safety, and clinical efficacy were 71%, 90%, and 77%, respectively...

  14. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  15. Critical Care Dialysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Organon Teknika Corporation's REDY 2000 dialysis machine employs technology originally developed under NASA contract by Marquardt Corporation. The chemical process developed during the project could be applied to removing toxic waste from used dialysis fluid. This discovery led to the development of a kidney dialysis machine using "sorbent" dialysis, a method of removing urea from human blood by treating a dialysate solution. The process saves electricity and, because the need for a continuous water supply is eliminated, the patient has greater freedom.

  16. Myths in peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin B; Bargman, Joanne M

    2016-11-01

    To clarify misconceptions about the feasibility and risks of peritoneal dialysis that unnecessarily limit peritoneal dialysis uptake or continuation in patients for whom peritoneal dialysis is the preferred dialysis modality. The inappropriate choice of haemodialysis as a result of these misconceptions contributes to low peritoneal dialysis penetrance, increases transfer from peritoneal dialysis to haemodialysis, increases expenditure on haemodialysis and compromises quality of life for these patients. Peritoneal dialysis is an excellent renal replacement modality that is simple, cost-effective and provides comparable clinical outcomes to conventional in-centre haemodialysis. Unfortunately, many patients are deemed unsuitable to start or continue peritoneal dialysis because of false or inaccurate beliefs about peritoneal dialysis. Here, we examine some of these 'myths' and critically review the evidence for and against each of them. We review the feasibility and risk of peritoneal dialysis in patients with prior surgery, ostomies, obesity and mesh hernia repairs. We examine the fear of mediastinitis with peritoneal dialysis after coronary artery bypass graft surgery and the belief that the use of hypertonic glucose dialysate causes peritoneal membrane failure. By clarifying common myths about peritoneal dialysis, we hope to reduce overly cautious practices surrounding this therapy.

  17. Patients with a failed renal transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcén, R; Teruel Briones, J L

    2011-03-01

    Despite the advances in the care of recipients and in immunosuppression, long-term graft survival has experienced little improvement in the last 10 years. An important number of recipients present progressive loss of graft function and have to be readmitted on dialysis therapy. Before starting dialysis, these patients are re-exposed to the complications of chronic renal failure but there are no specific guidelines for their treatment. The Kidney Disease Quality Initiative Advisory Board clinical practice guidelines given for the non-transplant chronic kidney disease patients have been recommended for ameliorating their clinical situation and the rate of progression of graft failure. The time when dialysis has to be restarted and the type of dialysis procedure, hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, are under discusion. But there is no evidence about the superiority of either type of dialysis procedure. Systematic graft nephrectomy has been considered to improve the inflammatory status of the patients with a failed graft which could contribute to a worse control of some complications such as anemia and to the increased rates of cardiovascular mortality. As in the patients with primary end-stage renal disease, retransplantation is the best treatment for a patient with a failed graft. Due to the shortage of organs for transplantation the number of patients who are retransplanted has remained stable. Recurrent diseases such as glomerulonephritis, lyphoproliferative diseases, BK virus nephopathy and previous non-adherence to the treatment do not necessarily preclude retransplantation.

  18. Effectiveness of peritonaeal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Nataša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the last few years, an increasing number of patients suffering from terminal renal disease of various leading causes was treated with renal replacement therapy. Peritonaeal dialysis involves an exchange of water and solutes between blood in the peritonaeal capillaries and dialysate in the peritonaeal cavum throughout the peritonaeum. Effective dialysis treatment should provide good quality of life, decrease the number of physical complaints, and bring the incidence of morbidity and mortality closer to the incidence of morbidity and mortality in the healthy population. Aim. The aim of this study was the evaluation of peritonaeal transport characteristics and dialysis effectiveness in 58 patients affected by terminal renal disease who underwent peritonaeal dialysis treatment during August 2003 at the Clinic of Nephrology of the Clinical Centre of Serbia. Method. We examined 30 male and 28 female patients, with an average age of 52 years (range 26 to 78 years. The average duration of peritoneal dialysis treatment was 20 months (ranging from 2 to 66 months, and the end-stage renal failure was caused by different leading disease in our patients. We applied different dialysis modalities: continuous ambulatory peritonaeal dialysis (CAPD with three to five 2- or 3-litre exchanges daily, cyclic peritonaeal dialysis (CCPD, intermittent peritonaeal dialysis (IPD, or automatic peritonaeal dialysis (APD, according to the transport characteristics of the peritonaeal membrane, the residual renal function (RRF, and the clinical status of the patients, in order to perform adequate depuration as suggested by the new international criteria. A peritonaeal equilibrium test (PET was performed according to the new international advice; urea and creatinine clearances (Kt/V and Ccr as well as RRF were calculated using the internationally suggested formulas. Results. Most of our patients received effective dialysis treatment, thanks to the modulation of

  19. Advances in peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, R. T.

    2007-01-01

    New peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients have a better survival than new haemodialysis (HD) patients in the first years on dialysis. During long-term treatment, this changes into a survival advantage for HD. The superior initial survival on PD is related to a better preservation of residual renal

  20. Amyloidosis associated with dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schadmand, S.; Klose, K.J.; Wandel, E.

    1991-01-01

    Amongst the complications of dialysis, amyloid osteopathy is getting increasingly significant. It is due to deposition of β2-microglobulin. To determine the incidence and time of development of this complication, the skeletal radiographs of 185 patients undergoing dialysis, some for up to ten years, were analysed retrospectively. In about 10% of patients, the presence of β2-microglobulin osteopathy may be expected. The radiological features, sites of predilection and differential diagnosis of amyloid osteopathy and of other skeletal changes due to dialysis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. Failing Decision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Recently the Danish subway trains have begun to announce “on time” when they arrive at a station on time. This action reflects a worrying acceptance of the normality of failure. If trains were generally expected to be on time, there would be no reason to – triumphantly – announce it. This chapter...... by an interest in failure as one way of improving understanding of present-day decision making in organizations.......Recently the Danish subway trains have begun to announce “on time” when they arrive at a station on time. This action reflects a worrying acceptance of the normality of failure. If trains were generally expected to be on time, there would be no reason to – triumphantly – announce it. This chapter...... deals not with traffic delays, but with failing decisions in organizations. The assumption of this chapter is that failing decisions today are as normal as delayed trains. Instead of being the exception, failure is part of the everyday reproduction of organizations – as an uncontrolled effect but also...

  2. Risky business for dialysis services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schohl, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    When self-insured health plans and their third-party administrators pay an artificially low out-of-network rate for dialysis services, they could be liable for the difference between that rate and the reimbursement level provided for by their health plan. Paying a rate that the repricers advised them to pay does not relieve self-insured health plans and third-party administrators of that obligation; only where the repricer has legitimately secured a negotiated contract rate is a lower payment justified. [Editor's note: The term "repricer" has no universally-accepted or formal definition, but it will be used here to describe those companies formed to act as middlemen between health care payers-like self-insured employer plans and TPAs working on behalf of such plans-and health care providers.] Failing to adhere to this will result in lawsuits against self-insured health plans and third-party administrators where they will be forced to defend the repricers' recommended payment amounts, while the repricers try to get themselves dismissed. A better option for plan holders and third-party administrators would be to negotiate directly with the dialysis providers and agree upon a mutually acceptable rate.

  3. Peritoneal Dialysis in Children*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-06-02

    Jun 2, 1971 ... efficiency due to vasodilatation of the peritoneal vessels.' DIALYSIS ... osmotic load in the face of a decreasing blood urea and may thus help ... infection, heart failure, sodium and volume de- depletion; ..... around the catheter.

  4. Dialysis Extraction for Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnsen, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    Chromatographic-sample pretreatment by dialysis detects traces of organic contaminants in water samples analyzed in field with minimal analysis equipment and minimal quantities of solvent. Technique also of value wherever aqueous sample and solvent must not make direct contact.

  5. Dialysis Facility Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Dialysis Facility Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data...

  6. Your Dialysis Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z Health Guide Your Dialysis Care Team Tweet Share Print Email Good health care is ... dialyzers (artificial kidneys) for reuse. Vascular Access Care Team If you are a hemodialysis patient, another group ...

  7. Dialysis and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, Sameh K.; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Webb, Judith A.W.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  8. Dialysis access, infections, and hospitalisations in unplanned dialysis start patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machowska, Anna; Alscher, Mark Dominik; Vanga, Satyanarayana Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Unplanned dialysis start (UPS) associates with worse clinical outcomes, higher utilisation of healthcare resources, lower chances to select dialysis modality and UPS patients typically commenced in-centre haemodialysis (HD) with central venous catheter (CVC). We evaluated patient ou...

  9. Phosphate control in dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cupisti A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Adamasco Cupisti,1 Maurizio Gallieni,2 Maria Antonietta Rizzo,2 Stefania Caria,3 Mario Meola,4 Piergiorgio Bolasco31Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Milan, Italy; 3Territorial Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, ASL Cagliari, Italy; 4Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyAbstract: Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source

  10. Osteoarthropathy in dialysis amyloidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldrati, L.; Feletti, C.; Capponcini, C.; Docci, D.; Rocchi, A.; Balbi, B.; Bonsanto, R.; Mughetti, M.; Pasini, A.

    1991-01-01

    Many long-term (>60 months) hemodialysis patients develop a severe osteoarticular disease, called 'dialysis arthropathy', which is characterized by the deposition in bone and synovia of a new type of amyloid made mainly of β 2 -microglobulin. In the present study, 31 patients (17 males, 14 females; age 54.1±13 years) undergoing chronic hemodialysis arthropathy by means of clinics and of radiological investigations (conventional radiography and computed tomography). Sixteen patients (51.6%) had radiographic evidence of dialysis arthropathy: geodes (shoulders, 12 cases; wrists, 11; hips, 2; knees, 2) and/or destructive arthropathies (cervical spine, 13 cases; dorsolumbar spine, 2; hands, 2; hips, 1). Within 24 months, these lesions were found to progress slowly in the majoriry of cases. In the diagnostic process, CT should be employed in the study of spine, shoulders and hips when the lesions have not been sufficiently demonstrated by conventional radiography in the presence of evident clinical signs. Patients with dialysis arthropathy had undergone dialysis for longer periods than those without it (p<0.005) and showed a significantly higher incidence of both carpal tunnel syndrome (p<0.0005) and shoulder pain (p<0.005). Our findings confirm the high incidence and clinical importance of dialysis arthropathy in long-term hemodialysis patients end the value of diagnostic imaging in screening such patients for those lesions

  11. Filtering Dialysis Myths from Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to work. Fact: Many dialysis patients continue to work, go to school, or volunteer . Some take time off when they first start dialysis treatment and back to work or school after they have gotten used to ...

  12. Peritoneal Dialysis in Children*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-06-02

    Jun 2, 1971 ... cellular fluid' into the peritoneal cavity allows both the removal of excess fluid ... occur. In adults the maximum peritoneal urea clearance is ob- tained with a dialysis ..... and Records. Pulse and respiration rates, temperature and blood .... diffusion of urea out of the brain cells, with consequent movement of ...

  13. Peritoneal Dialysis Dose and Adequacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infused dialysis solution and how much urea and creatinine have entered into the solution during a 4-hour dwell. The peritoneal transport rate varies from person to person. People who have a high rate of transport absorb dextrose from the dialysis ...

  14. Peritoneal Dialysis in Western Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, Dirk G.

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) for the treatment of end-stage renal failure was introduced in the 1960s. Nowadays it has evolved to an established therapy that is complementary to hemodialysis (HD), representing 11% of all patients treated worldwide with dialysis. Despite good clinical outcomes and

  15. Metabolic alterations in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drechsler, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Assessing metabolic risk in dialysis patients, three main aspects are important: a) the pathophysiologic effects of metabolic disturbances as known from the general population are unlikely to completely reverse once patients reach dialysis. b) Specific additional problems related to chronic kidney

  16. Peritoneal Dialysis in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Vickie Wai-Ki; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing demand of dialysis in Asia for end-stage renal failure patients. Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure in many countries in Asia. The growth of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in Asia is significant and seeing a good trend. With the enhanced practices of PD, the quality of care in PD in Asia is also improved. Overall, PD and hemodialysis (HD) are comparable in clinical outcome. There is a global trend in the reduction of peritonitis rates and Asian countries also witness such improvement. The socio-economic benefits of PD for end-stage renal failure patients in both urban and rural areas in the developed and developing regions of Asia are an important consideration. This can help to reduce the financial burden of renal failure in addressing the growing demand of patients on dialysis. Initiatives should be considered to further drive down the cost of PD in Asia. Growing demand for dialysis by an increasing number of end-stage renal failure patients requires the use of a cost-effective quality dialysis modality. PD is found to be comparable to HD in outcome and quality. In most countries in Asia, PD should be more cost-effective than HD. A 'PD-first' or a 'PD as first considered therapy' policy can be an overall strategy in many countries in Asia in managing renal failure patients, taking the examples of Hong Kong and Thailand. (1) PD is cheaper than HD and provides a better quality of life worldwide, but its prevalence is significantly lower than that of HD in all countries, with the exception of Hong Kong. Allowing reimbursement of PD but not HD has permitted to increase the use of PD over HD in many Asian countries like Hong Kong, Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, as well as in New Zealand and Australia over the last years. In the Western world, however, HD is still promoted, and the proportion of patients treated with PD decreases. Japan remains an exception in Asia where PD penetration is very low. Lack of adequate education of

  17. Systems Thinking and Leadership: How Nephrologists Can Transform Dialysis Safety to Prevent Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Leslie P

    2018-04-06

    Infections are the second leading cause of death for patients with ESKD. Despite multiple efforts, nephrologists have been unable to prevent infections in dialysis facilities. The American Society of Nephrology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have partnered to create Nephrologists Transforming Dialysis Safety to promote nephrologist leadership and engagement in efforts to "Target Zero" preventable dialysis infections. Because traditional approaches to infection control and prevention in dialysis facilities have had limited success, Nephrologists Transforming Dialysis Safety is reconceptualizing the problem in the context of the complexity of health care systems and organizational behavior. By identifying different parts of a problem and attempting to understand how these parts interact and produce a result, systems thinking has effectively tackled difficult problems in dynamic settings. The dialysis facility is composed of different physical and human elements that are interconnected and affect not only behavior but also, the existence of a culture of safety that promotes infection prevention. Because dialysis infections result from a complex system of interactions between caregivers, patients, dialysis organizations, and the environment, attempts to address infections by focusing on one element in isolation often fail. Creating a sense of urgency and commitment to eradicating dialysis infections requires leadership and motivational skills. These skills are not taught in the standard nephrology or medical director curriculum. Effective leadership by medical directors and engagement in infection prevention by nephrologists are required to create a culture of safety. It is imperative that nephrologists commit to leadership training and embrace their potential as change agents to prevent infections in dialysis facilities. This paper explores the systemic factors contributing to the ongoing dialysis infection crisis in the United States and the role

  18. A meta-analysis of the association between diabetic patients and AVF failure in dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Ye, Dan; Yang, Liu; Ye, Wen; Zhan, Dandan; Zhang, Li; Xiao, Jun; Zeng, Yan; Chen, Qinkai

    2018-11-01

    The most preferable vascular access for patients with end-stage renal failure needing hemodialysis is native arteriovenous fistula (AVF) on account of its access longevity, patient morbidity, hospitalization costs, lower risks of infection and fewer incidence of thrombotic complications. Meanwhile, according to National Kidney Foundation (NKF)̸Dialysis Out-comes Quality Initiative (DOQI) guidelines, AVF is more used than before. However, a significant percentage of AVF fails to support dialysis therapy due to lack of adequate maturity. Among all factors, the presence of diabetes mellitus was shown to be one of the risk factors for the development of vascular access failure by some authors. Therefore, this review evaluates the current evidence concerning the correlation of diabetes and AVF failure. A search was conducted using MEDLINE, SCIENCE DIRECT, SPRINGER, WILEY-BLACKWELL, KARGER, EMbase, CNKI and WanFang Data from the establishment time of databases to January 2016. The analysis involved studies that contained subgroups of diabetic patients and compared their outcomes with those of non-diabetic adults. In total, 23 articles were retrieved and included in the review. The meta-analysis revealed a statistically significantly higher rate of AVF failure in diabetic patients compared with non-diabetic patients (OR = 1.682; 95% CI, 1.429-1.981, Test of OR = 1: z = 6.25, p <.001). This review found an increased risk of AVF failure in diabetes patients. If confirmed by further prospective studies, preventive measure should be considered when planning AVF in diabetic patients.

  19. Peritoneal dialysis in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, I K

    1996-01-01

    The socioeconomic status of Asian countries is diverse, and government reimbursement policies for treatment of patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vary greatly from one country to another. Both of these factors have a major impact not only on the choice of treatment for ESRD but also on the utilization of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in this region. Based on the data collected from 11 representative Asian countries, several observations can be made. First, the treatment rates for ESRD in these countries correlated closely with their gross domestic product (GDP) per capita income. Second, the PD utilization rate appeared to have a biphasic relationship with the GDP per capita income and treatment rate, in that countries with the highest and the lowest treatment rates tended to have lower PD utilization rates, whereas countries with modest treatment rates tended to have higher PD utilization rates. The reason for low PD utilization in countries with the highest treatment rates differs from that in countries with low treatment rates. In the former, because of full government reimbursement, there is little physician incentive to introduce PD as an alternative form of ESRD treatment to in-center hemodialysis (HD), whereas in the latter, the complete lack of government reimbursement prevents the introduction of PD as a form of treatment. This pattern is likely to change in the future because, of the 11 countries surveyed, all except Thailand have recorded a growth rate which is higher for PD than HD over the last three years. The rate of utilization of different PD systems varies greatly among different Asian countries. Automated PD has yet to gain popularity in Asia. Conventional straight-line systems remain the dominant PD systems in use in Hong Kong, Korea, Thailand, and the Philippines, while in Malaysia and Singapore UV germicidal connection devices are most popular. However, in all these countries there has been a progressive shift over the last

  20. What's the Deal with Dialysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dialysis Work? Other Options Print Don't you love swimming in a cool, blue pool? Splashing around ... dialysate cleanses the blood and rebalances the blood's chemistry. After about an hour, the machine drains the ...

  1. Engaging Future Failing States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    military missions in the Middle East, the Balkans, Africa, Asia , and South America. There is an increasing proliferation of failed and failing states...disparity, overpopulation , food security, health services availability, migration pressures, environmental degradation, personal and 22 community

  2. Toward dialysis "a la carte".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funck-Brentano, J L

    1987-12-01

    From the very beginning, the artificial kidney postponed the death of patients with end-stage renal failure. For years, owing to the performance of the machine, the patient was obliged to follow a severe diet in order to maintain good humoral and circulatory status. Now technological improvements allow "dialysis à la carte," whereby each individual achieves a better clinical status. The next step will be automation of the procedure to improve its security, mainly for dialysis performed at home.

  3. The dialysis catheter and infectious peritonitis in intermittent peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Hemmeløff Andersen, Karl Erik; Hansen, Lise

    1984-01-01

    118 episodes of infectious peritonitis registered among 156 patients treated with intermittent peritoneal dialysis over a 5-yr period were analysed with special reference to potential routes of infection associated with the dialysis catheter. Peritonitis was randomly distributed among the patients......, and the change of keeping free of peritonitis declined exponentially with time. The main factor determining the individual number of episodes was the total space of time, in which a patient had been wearing a dialysis catheter, whereas the number of catheter disconnections played no significant role. A relative...... preponderance of cases due to Enterobacteriaceae was noted within the first week after catheter implantation. In contrast with this, peritonitis with skin microorganisms was not associated with the implantation of catheters....

  4. Application of single-incision transvaginal mesh in a woman undergoing peritoneal dialysis and suffering from refractory advanced stage pelvic organ prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Sun

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: Patients with POP at an advanced stage during peritoneal dialysis who failed to be treated conservatively may require a surgical intervention. Uterus-sparing transvaginal mesh was a feasible minimal invasive option.

  5. Postprocedural Aspiration Test to Predict Adequacy of Dialysis Following Tunneled Catheter Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jason C.; Sullivan, Kevin L.; Michael, Beckie

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if a timed aspiration technique with a 20-ml syringe can be used to predict adequacy of blood flow in tunneled dialysis catheters. Sixteen patients referred for de novo placement or manipulation of failing tunneled hemodialysis catheters had the time it takes to fill a 20-ml syringe with the plunger fully withdrawn measured to the nearest tenth of a second. These measurements were correlated with flow rates recorded in dialysis just prior to (if failed catheter) and in the following dialysis session with adequacy determined as at least 300 ml/min. Syringe-filling time (22 catheters in 16 patients) was plotted against adequacy of dialysis. The mean time to fill a 20-ml syringe was 2.2 sec, with a range of 1.0-4.7 sec. The mean time to fill syringes for catheters with adequate dialysis was 1.7 ± 0.5 sec, and for inadequate catheters, it was 2.8 ± 0.8 sec. These differences are statistically significant (p < 0.001). Using a filling time of greater than or equal to 2 sec as a threshold gives the highest sensitivity (100%) for predicting inadequate dialysis while maintaining high specificity (75%). To achieve a specificity of 100%, a 3-sec cutoff would be necessary, but would lead to a sensitivity of only 20%. A simple and objective aspiration technique can be performed at the time of tunneled dialysis catheter placement/manipulation to reasonably predict adequacy of subsequent dialysis

  6. Dialysis: Reducing Infections and Changing Culture

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is an account from an infection preventionist about the challenges and successes with engaging dialysis care teams to focus on "Zero Preventable Infections" in outpatient dialysis facilities.

  7. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connect the bags of dialysis solution place the drain tube If you choose automated peritoneal dialysis, you also ... from the new bag of solution into the drain bag. Clamp the tube that goes to the drain bag. Open or ...

  8. Native excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, T.

    1992-01-01

    Syncrude Canada Ltd., operator of the oil sands mine and processing plant near Fort McMurray, Alberta, produces 11% of Canada's crude oil and is the country's largest private-sector employer of native Canadians. Syncrude has the goal of employing about 10% native Canadians, which is about the percentage of natives in the regional population. Examples are presented of successful native employment and entrepreneurship at Syncrude. Doreen Janvier, once employed at Syncrude's mine wash bays, was challenged to form her own company to contract out labor services. Her company, DJM Enterprises, now has a 2-year contract to operate three highly sophisticated wash bays used to clean mining equipment, and is looking to bid on other labor contracts. Mabel Laviolette serves as liaison between the oil containment and recovery team, who recover oil skimmed off Syncrude's tailings basin, and the area manager. The team approach and the seasonal nature of the employment fit in well with native cultural patterns. The excellence of native teamwork is also illustrated in the mine rescue team, one unit of which is entirely native Canadian. Part of Syncrude's aboriginal policy is to encourage development of aboriginal enterprises, such as native-owned Clearwater Welding and Fabricating Ltd., which has held welding and fabricating contracts with most major companies in the region and is a major supplier of skilled tradesmen to Syncrude. Syncrude also provides employment and training, encourages natives to continue their education, and promotes local community development. 4 figs

  9. (HIV) seropositive Nigerian patients undergoing dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most dialysis centres in Nigeria currently do not accept HIV positive patients for dialysis therapy for many reasons. The prevailing high level of stigmatization of HIV positive patients and the lack of job security for infected staff are two major reasons for the non-acceptance of HIV infected patients for dialysis by these centres.

  10. Native listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.

    2002-01-01

    Becoming a native listener is the necessary precursor to becoming a native speaker. Babies in the first year of life undertake a remarkable amount of work; by the time they begin to speak, they have perceptually mastered the phonological repertoire and phoneme co-occurrence probabilities of the

  11. Differences in survival on chronic dialysis treatment between ethnic groups in Denmark: a population-wide, national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Beukel, Tessa O; Hommel, Kristine; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Heaf, James G; Siegert, Carl E H; Honig, Adriaan; Jager, Kitty J; Dekker, Friedo W; Norredam, Marie

    2016-07-01

    In Western countries, black and Asian dialysis patients experience better survival compared with white patients. The aim of this study is to compare the survival of native Danish dialysis patients with that of dialysis patients originating from other countries and to explore the association between the duration of residence in Denmark before the start of dialysis and the mortality on dialysis. We performed a population-wide national cohort study of incident chronic dialysis patients in Denmark (≥18 years old) who started dialysis between 1995 and 2010. In total, 8459 patients were native Danes, 344 originated from other Western countries, 79 from North Africa or West Asia, 173 from South or South-East Asia and 54 from sub-Saharan Africa. Native Danes were more likely to die on dialysis compared with the other groups (crude incidence rates for mortality: 234, 166, 96, 110 and 53 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Native Danes had greater hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality compared with the other groups {HRs for mortality adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics: 1.32 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-1.54]; 2.22 [95% CI 1.51-3.23]; 1.79 [95% CI 1.41-2.27]; 2.00 [95% CI 1.10-3.57], respectively}. Compared with native Danes, adjusted HRs for mortality for Western immigrants living in Denmark for ≤10 years, >10 to ≤20 years and >20 years were 0.44 (95% CI 0.27-0.71), 0.56 (95% CI 0.39-0.82) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.70-1.04), respectively. For non-Western immigrants, these HRs were 0.42 (95% CI 0.27-0.67), 0.52 (95% CI 0.33-0.80) and 0.48 (95% CI 0.35-0.66), respectively. Incident chronic dialysis patients in Denmark originating from countries other than Denmark have a better survival compared with native Danes. For Western immigrants, this survival benefit declines among those who have lived in Denmark longer. For non-Western immigrants, the survival benefit largely remains over time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on

  12. Residual Renal Function in Children Treated with Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Roszkowska-Blaim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual renal function (RRF in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD receiving renal replacement therapy is defined as the ability of native kidneys to eliminate water and uremic toxins. Preserved RRF improves survival and quality of life in adult ESRD patients treated with peritoneal dialysis. In children, RRF was shown not only to help preserve adequacy of renal replacement therapy but also to accelerate growth rate, improve nutrition and blood pressure control, reduce the risk of adverse myocardial changes, facilitate treatment of anemia and calcium-phosphorus balance abnormalities, and result in reduced serum and dialysate fluid levels of advanced glycation end-products. Factors contributing to RRF loss in children treated with peritoneal dialysis include the underlying renal disease such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome and hereditary nephropathy, small urine volume, severe proteinuria at the initiation of renal replacement therapy, and hypertension. Several approaches can be suggested to decrease the rate of RRF loss in pediatric patients treated with chronic peritoneal dialysis: potentially nephrotoxic drugs (e.g., aminoglycosides, episodes of hypotension, and uncontrolled hypertension should be avoided, urinary tract infections should be treated promptly, and loop diuretics may be used to increase salt and water excretion.

  13. Conflict when making decisions about dialysis modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nien-Hsin; Lin, Yu-Ping; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Tung, Heng-Hsin; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Wang, Tsae-Jyy

    2018-01-01

    To explore decisional conflict and its influencing factors on choosing dialysis modality in patients with end-stage renal diseases. The influencing factors investigated include demographics, predialysis education, dialysis knowledge, decision self-efficacy and social support. Making dialysis modality decisions can be challenging for patients with end-stage renal diseases; there are pros and cons to both haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Patients are often uncertain as to which one will be the best alternative for them. This decisional conflict increases the likelihood of making a decision that is not based on the patient's values or preferences and may result in undesirable postdecisional consequences. Addressing factors predisposing patients to decisional conflict helps to facilitate informed decision-making and then to improve healthcare quality. A predictive correlational cross-sectional study design was used. Seventy patients were recruited from the outpatient dialysis clinics of two general hospitals in Taiwan. Data were collected with study questionnaires, including questions on demographics, dialysis modality and predialysis education, the Dialysis Knowledge Scale, the Decision Self-Efficacy scale, the Social Support Scale, and the Decisional Conflict Scale. The mean score on the Decisional Conflict Scale was 29.26 (SD = 22.18). Decision self-efficacy, dialysis modality, predialysis education, professional support and dialysis knowledge together explained 76.4% of the variance in decisional conflict. Individuals who had lower decision self-efficacy, did not receive predialysis education on both haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, had lower dialysis knowledge and perceived lower professional support reported higher decisional conflict on choosing dialysis modality. When providing decisional support to predialysis stage patients, practitioners need to increase patients' decision self-efficacy, provide both haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis

  14. Children of home dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaltas, M O

    1976-12-13

    Fifteen children of six families in which one parent was undergoing home dialysis were examined by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, human figure drawings, and family interviews. All the children were found to be clinically depressed, and two thirds had a history of being referred by teachers to school counselors and psychiatrists for behavioral problems in school. Of these referred children, all showed disorders of psychomotor activity and reduced academic achievement. There was no clear-cut evidence that these children were depressed because of exposure to home dialysis per se. The most disturbed children seemed to be responding to depressed parents or to partial object loss. A controlled, prospective study is planned to clarify this question.

  15. Dams designed to fail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penman, A. [Geotechnical Engineering Consultants, Harpenden (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-01

    New developments in geotechnical engineering have led to methods for designing and constructing safe embankment dams. Failed dams can be categorized as those designed to fail, and those that have failed unexpectedly. This presentation outlined 3 dam failures: the 61 m high Malpasset Dam in France in 1959 which killed 421; the 71 m high Baldwin Hills Dam in the United States in 1963 which killed 5; and, the Vajont Dam in Italy in 1963 which killed 2,600 people. Following these incidents, the International Commission for Large Dams (ICOLD) reviewed regulations on reservoir safety. The 3 dams were found to have inadequate spillways and their failures were due to faults in their design. Fuse plug spillways, which address this problem, are designed to fail if an existing spillway proves inadequate. They allow additional discharge to prevent overtopping of the embankment dam. This solution can only be used if there is an adjacent valley to take the additional discharge. Examples of fuse gates were presented along with their effect on dam safety. A research program is currently underway in Norway in which high embankment dams are being studied for overtopping failure and failure due to internal erosion. Internal erosion has been the main reason why dams have failed unexpectedly. To prevent failures, designers suggested the use of a clay blanket placed under the upstream shoulder. However, for dams with soft clay cores, these underblankets could provide a route for a slip surface and that could lead to failure of the upstream shoulder. It was concluded that a safe arrangement for embankment dams includes the use of tipping gates or overturning gates which always fail at a required flood water level. Many have been installed in old and new dams around the world. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  16. Failed endotracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheykhol Islami V

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of failed intubation is higher in obstetric than other surgical patients. Failed intubation was the 2nd commonest cause of mortality during anesthesia. Bearing in mind that failre to intubate may be unavoidable in certain circumstances, it is worth reviewing. The factors, which may contribute to a disastrous out come. Priorities of subsequent management must include maintaining oxygenation and preventing aspiration of gastric contents. Fiber optic intubation is now the technique of choice with a high success rate and with least trauma to the patient.

  17. Nutrition and the dialysis prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertow, G M; Bullard, A; Lazarus, J M

    1996-01-01

    Malnutrition is common among patients with acute and chronic renal failure. The efficiency of modern dialytic techniques has allowed for more liberal administration of nutrients to patients with renal failure, particularly with regard to protein and amino acids. Protein restriction is not indicated for patients on dialysis, and should be employed cautiously, if at all, in patients with renal insufficiency. The 'nutrition prescription' should be considered a vital part of the comprehensive medical, surgical, and dialytic care provided to patients with renal disease.

  18. Anxiety disorders in dialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Novaković Milan

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. Anxiety, as a primary symptom, includes all conditions of indefinite fear and psychic disorders dominated by fear. All dialysis patients suffer from anxiety as an independent phenomenon, or as part of another disease. Material and Methods. This study included 753 patients on chronic hemodialysis in Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) in the period 1999-2004. The patients were divided into two groups: the first group included 348 patients with Balkan Endemic Nephropathy (BEN), and t...

  19. Prophylactic dialysis in non-dialysis-dependent patients with renal failure after CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayyeh Borji

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: According the results of this study, prophylactic dialysis, before conduct-ing CABG, does not have any significant effect on mortality and other complications. The only exception is lung complications in non-dialysis-dependent patients with renal failure.

  20. Hemodynamic Simulations in Dialysis Access Fistulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Riley, James; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide adequate access for dialysis in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease. It has long been hypothesized that the hemodynamic and mechanical forces (such as wall shear stress, wall stretch, or flow- induced wall vibrations) constitute the primary external influence on the remodeling process. Given that nearly 50% of fistulae fail after one year, understanding fistulae hemodynamics is an important step toward improving patency in the clinic. We perform numerical simulations of the flow in patient-specific models of AV fistulae reconstructed from 3D ultrasound scans with physiologically-realistic boundary conditions also obtained from Doppler ultrasound. Comparison of the flow features in different geometries and configurations e.g. end-to-side vs. side-to-side, with the in vivo longitudinal outcomes will allow us to hypothesize which flow conditions are conducive to fistulae success or failure. The flow inertia and pulsatility in the simulations (mean Re 700, max Re 2000, Wo 4) give rise to complex secondary flows and coherent vortices, further complicating the spatio- temporal variability of the wall pressure and shear stresses. Even in mature fistulae, the anastomotic regions are subjected to non-physiological shear stresses (>10.12pcPa) which may potentially lead to complications.

  1. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martucci, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    A failed fuel detection apparatus is described for a nuclear reactor having a liquid cooled core comprising a gas collection hood adapted to engage the top of the suspect assembly and means for delivering a stripping gas to the vicinity of the bottom of the suspect fuel assembly. (U.S.)

  2. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally...

  3. Who Really Failed? Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Katherine M.; Leon, Raul A.

    2012-01-01

    Scott Jaschik's (2010) article "Who Really Failed?" details the experience of Dominique Homberger, a tenured faculty member at Louisiana State University (LSU) who was removed from teaching her introductory biology course citing student complaints in regards to "the extreme nature" of the grading policy. This removal has…

  4. FAILED FUEL DISPOSITION STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2004-12-20

    In May 2004 alpha contamination was found on the lid of the pre-filter housing in the Sodium Removal Ion Exchange System during routine filter change. Subsequent investigation determined that the alpha contamination likely came from a fuel pin(s) contained in an Ident-69 (ID-69) type pin storage container serial number 9 (ID-69-9) that was washed in the Sodium Removal System (SRS) in January 2004. Because all evidence indicated that the wash water interacted with the fuel, this ID49 is designated as containing a failed fuel pin with gross cladding defect and was set aside in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell until it could be determined how to proceed for long term dry storage of the fuel pin container. This ID49 contained fuel pins from the driver fuel assembly (DFA) 16392, which was identified as a Delayed Neutron Monitor (DNM) leaker assembly. However, this DFA was disassembled and the fuel pin that was thought to be the failed pin was encapsulated and was not located in this ID49 container. This failed fuel disposition study discusses two alternatives that could be used to address long term storage for the contents of ID-69-9. The first alternative evaluated utilizes the current method of identifying and storing DNM leaker fuel pin(s) in tubes and thus, verifying that the alpha contamination found in the SRS came from a failed pin in this pin container. This approach will require unloading selected fuel pins from the ID-69, visually examining and possibly weighing suspect fuel pins to identify the failed pin(s), inserting the failed pin(s) in storage tubes, and reloading the fuel pins into ID49 containers. Safety analysis must be performed to revise the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (Reference 1) for this fuel configuration. The second alternative considered is to store the failed fuel as-is in the ID-69. This was evaluated to determine if this approach would comply with storage requirements. This

  5. FAILED FUEL DISPOSITION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    In May 2004 alpha contamination was found on the lid of the pre-filter housing in the Sodium Removal Ion Exchange System during routine filter change. Subsequent investigation determined that the alpha contamination likely came from a fuel pin(s) contained in an Ident-69 (ID-69) type pin storage container serial number 9 (ID-69-9) that was washed in the Sodium Removal System (SRS) in January 2004. Because all evidence indicated that the wash water interacted with the fuel, this ID49 is designated as containing a failed fuel pin with gross cladding defect and was set aside in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell until it could be determined how to proceed for long term dry storage of the fuel pin container. This ID49 contained fuel pins from the driver fuel assembly (DFA) 16392, which was identified as a Delayed Neutron Monitor (DNM) leaker assembly. However, this DFA was disassembled and the fuel pin that was thought to be the failed pin was encapsulated and was not located in this ID49 container. This failed fuel disposition study discusses two alternatives that could be used to address long term storage for the contents of ID-69-9. The first alternative evaluated utilizes the current method of identifying and storing DNM leaker fuel pin(s) in tubes and thus, verifying that the alpha contamination found in the SRS came from a failed pin in this pin container. This approach will require unloading selected fuel pins from the ID-69, visually examining and possibly weighing suspect fuel pins to identify the failed pin(s), inserting the failed pin(s) in storage tubes, and reloading the fuel pins into ID49 containers. Safety analysis must be performed to revise the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (Reference 1) for this fuel configuration. The second alternative considered is to store the failed fuel as-is in the ID-69. This was evaluated to determine if this approach would comply with storage requirements. This

  6. Testosterone deficiency in dialysis patients: Differences according to the dialysis techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secundino Cigarrán

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Circulating testosterone levels in men on dialysis were independently associated with HD technique. It can be concluded that a new factor—namely the dialysis technique—may be associated with falling testosterone levels and the associated loss of muscle mass and inflammation. Further studies are needed to establish whether the dialysis technique itself triggers testosterone elimination.

  7. Protein binding studies with radiolabeled compounds containing radiochemical impurities. Equilibrium dialysis versus dialysis rate determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    1987-01-01

    The influence of radiochemical impurities in dialysis experiments with high-affinity ligands is investigated. Albumin binding of labeled decanoate (97% pure) is studied by two dialysis techniques. It is shown that equilibrium dialysis is very sensitive to the presence of impurities resulting...

  8. Failed fuel detection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To detect failed fuel element in a reactor with high precision by measuring the radioactivity concentrations for more than one nuclides of fission products ( 131 I and 132 I, for example) contained in each sample of coolant in fuel channel. Method: The radioactivity concentrations in the sampled coolant are obtained from gamma spectra measured by a pulse height analyser after suitable cooling periods according to the half-lives of the fission products to be measured. The first measurement for 132 I is made in two hours after sampling, and the second for 131 I is started one day after the sampling. Fuel element corresponding to the high radioactivity concentrations for both 131 I and 132 I is expected with certainty to have failed

  9. Failed fuel detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Takayuki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable early and sure detection of failed fuels by automatically changing the alarm set value depending on the operation states of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: Gaseous fission products released into coolants are transferred further into cover gases and then introduced through a pipeway to a failed fuel detector. The cover gases introduced from the pipeway to the pipeway or chamber within the detection device are detected by a radiation detector for the radiation dose of the gaseous fission products contained therein. The detected value is converted and amplified as a signal and inputted to a comparator. While on the other hand, a signal corresponding to the reactor power is converted by an alarm setter into a set value and inputted to the comparator. In such a structure, early and sure detection can be made for the fuel failures. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Failed fuel rod detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Katsuya; Matsuda, Yasuhiko

    1984-05-02

    The purpose of the project is to enable failed fuel rod detection simply with no requirement for dismantling the fuel assembly. A gamma-ray detection section is arranged so as to attend on the optional fuel rods in the fuel assembly. The fuel assembly is adapted such that a gamma-ray shielding plate is detachably inserted into optional gaps of the fuel rods or, alternatively, the fuel assembly can detachably be inserted to the gamma-ray shielding plate. In this way, amount of gaseous fission products accumulated in all of the plenum portions in the fuel rods as the object of the measurement can be determined without dismantling the fuel assembly. Accordingly, by comparing the amounts of the gaseous fission products, the failed fuel rod can be detected.

  11. Variation in fistula use across dialysis facilities: is it explained by case-mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangri, Navdeep; Moorthi, Ranjani; Tighiouhart, Hocine; Meyer, Klemens B; Miskulin, Dana C

    2010-02-01

    Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) remain the preferred vascular access for hemodialysis patients. Dialysis facilities that fail to meet Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services goals cite patient case-mix as a reason for low AVF prevalence. This study aimed to determine the magnitude of the variability in AVF usage across dialysis facilities and the extent to which patient case-mix explains it. The vascular access used in 10,112 patients dialyzed at 173 Dialysis Clinic Inc. facilities from October 1 to December 31, 2004, was evaluated. The access in use was considered to be an AVF if it was used for >70% of hemodialysis treatments. Mixed-effects models with a random intercept for dialysis facilities evaluated the effect of facilities on AVF usage. Sequentially adjusted multivariate models measured the extent to which patient factors (case-mix) explain variation across facilities in AVF rates. 3787 patients (38%) were dialyzed using AVFs. There was a significant facility effect: 7.6% of variation in AVF use was attributable to facility. This was reduced to 7.1% after case-mix adjustment. There were no identified specific facility-level factors that explained the interfacility variation. AVF usage varies across dialysis facilities, and patient case-mix did not reduce this variation. In this study, 92% of the total variation in AVF usage was due to patient factors, but most were not measurable. A combination of patient factors and process indicators should be considered in adjudicating facility performance for this quality indicator.

  12. Dialysis: Reducing Infections and Changing Culture

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-03-19

    This podcast is an account from an infection preventionist about the challenges and successes with engaging dialysis care teams to focus on “Zero Preventable Infections” in outpatient dialysis facilities.  Created: 3/19/2018 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/19/2018.

  13. Update on dialysis economics in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Adnan; Baboolal, Keshwar

    2011-03-01

    The burgeoning population of patients requiring renal replacement therapy contributes a disproportionate strain on National Health Service resources. Although renal transplantation is the preferred treatment modality for patients with established renal failure, achieving both clinical and financial advantages, limitations to organ donation and clinical comorbidities will leave a significant proportion of patients with established renal failure requiring expensive dialysis therapy in the form of either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. An understanding of dialysis economics is essential for both healthcare providers and clinical leaders to establish clinically efficient and cost-effective treatment modalities that maximize service provision. In light of changes to the provision of healthcare funds in the form of "Payment by Results," it is imperative for UK renal units to adopt clinically effective and financially accountable dialysis programs. This article explores the role of dialysis economics and implications for UK renal replacement therapy programs.

  14. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogure, Sumio; Seya, Toru; Watanabe, Masaaki.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To enhance the reliability of a failed fuel detector which detects radioactivity of nuclear fission products leaked out from fuel elements in cooling water. Constitution: Collected specimen is introduced into a separator and co-existing material considered to be an impediment is separated and removed by ion exchange resins, after which this specimen is introduced into a container housing therein a detector to systematically measure radioactivity. Thereby, it is possible to detect a signal lesser in variation in background, and inspection work also becomes simple. (Kawakami, Y.)

  15. Application of single-incision transvaginal mesh in a woman undergoing peritoneal dialysis and suffering from refractory advanced stage pelvic organ prolapse

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yi-Hung; Kan, Wei-Chih; Wu, Ming-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We would like to provide an option of minimal invasive surgical intervention for a patient with end-stage renal disease undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, who was at the advanced-stage pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and who also failed to be treated conservatively. Materials and method: We present a case of uterine prolapse stage IV in a woman who underwent continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis due to end-stage renal disease. Her severity of POP had only limi...

  16. Adequacy in dialysis: intermittent versus continuous therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, M; Nolph, K D

    2000-01-01

    A vital conceptual difference between intermittent and continuous dialysis therapies is the difference in the relationship between Kt/V urea and dietary protein intake. For a given level of protein intake the intermittent therapies require a higher Kt/V urea due to the reasons mentioned above. The recently released adequacy guidelines by DOQI for intermittent and continuous therapies are based on these assumptions. The link between adequacy targets and patient survival is well documented for an intermittent therapy like HD. For a continuous therapy like CAPD however, the evidence linking improved peritoneal clearance to better survival is not as direct. However, present consensus allows one to extrapolate results based on HD. The concept of earlier and healthier initiation of dialysis is gaining hold and incremental dialysis forms an integral aspect of the whole concept. Tools like urea kinetic modeling give us valuable insight in making mathematical projections about the timing as well as dosing of dialysis. Daily home hemodialysis is still an underutilized modality despite offering best survival figures. Hopefully, with increasing availability of better and simpler machines its use will increase. Still several questions remain unanswered. Despite availability of data in hemodialysis patients suggesting that an increased dialysis prescription leads to a better survival, optimal dialysis dose is yet to be defined. Concerns regarding methodology of such studies and conclusions thereof has been raised. Other issues relating to design of the studies, variation in dialysis delivery, use of uncontrolled historical standards and lack of patient randomization etc also need to be considered when designing such trials. Hopefully an ongoing prospective randomized trial, namely the HEMO study, looking at two precisely defined and carefully maintained dialysis prescriptions will provide some insight into adequacy of dialysis dose and survival. In diabetic patients, the

  17. Failed fuel detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Hayashida, Yoshihisa; Niidome, Jiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent intrusion of background neutrons to neutron detectors thereby improve the S/N ratio of the detectors in the failed fuel detection device of LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: Neutrons from the reactor core pass through the gaps around the penetration holes in which the primary pipeways pass through the concrete shielding walls and pass through the gaps between the thermal shielding members and the neutron moderating shielding members of the failed fuel detection device and then intrude into the neutron detectors. In view of the above, inner neutron moderating shielding members and movable or resilient neutron shielding members are disposed to the inside of the neutron moderating shielding member. Graphite or carbon hydrides such as paraffin or synthetic resin with a large neutron moderation effect are used as the outer moderating shielding member and materials such as boron or carbon are used for the inner members. As a result, the background neutrons are shielded by the inner neutron moderating shielding members and the resilient neutron shielding members, by which the S/N ratio of the neutron detectors can be increased to 2 - 4 times. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Failing by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Rita Gunther

    2011-04-01

    It's hardly news that business leaders work in increasingly uncertain environments, where failures are bound to be more common than successes. Yet if you ask executives how well, on a scale of one to 10, their organizations learn from failure, you'll often get a sheepish "Two-or maybe three" in response. Such organizations are missing a big opportunity: Failure may be inevitable but, if managed well, can be very useful. A certain amount of failure can help you keep your options open, find out what doesn't work, create the conditions to attract resources and attention, make room for new leaders, and develop intuition and skill. The key to reaping these benefits is to foster "intelligent failure" throughout your organization. McGrath describes several principles that can help you put intelligent failure to work. You should decide what success and failure would look like before you start a project. Document your initial assumptions, test and revise them as you go, and convert them into knowledge. Fail fast-the longer something takes, the less you'll learn-and fail cheaply, to contain your downside risk. Limit the number of uncertainties in new projects, and build a culture that tolerates, and sometimes even celebrates, failure. Finally, codify and share what you learn. These principles won't give you a means of avoiding all failures down the road-that's simply not realistic. They will help you use small losses to attain bigger wins over time.

  19. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Koichi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability of detecting the failure of a fuel rod by imparting a wire disconnection detecting function to a central electrode at the center of a failure mode thereto. Constitution: A wire disconnection detecting terminal is provided at the terminal opposite to the signal output terminal of a central electrode in a failed fuel detector used for detecting the failure of a fuel rod in an atomic power plant using liquid metal as a coolant, and a voltage monitor for monitoring the terminal voltage is connected to the terminal. The disconnection of the central electrode is detected by the failure of the output of the voltage monitor, and an alarm is thus generated. (Aizawa, K.)

  20. An Assessment of Dialysis Provider's Attitudes towards Timing of Dialysis Initiation in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikaramjit S Mann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physicians' perceptions and opinions may influence when to initiate dialysis. Objective: To examine providers' perspectives and opinions regarding the timing of dialysis initiation. Design: Online survey. Setting: Community and academic dialysis practices in Canada. Participants: A nationally-representative sample of dialysis providers. Measurements and Methods: Dialysis providers opinions assessing reasons to initiate dialysis at low or high eGFR. Responses were obtained using a 9-point Likert scale. Early dialysis was defined as initiation of dialysis in an individual with an eGFR greater than or equal to 10.5 ml/min/m 2 . A detailed survey was emailed to all members of the Canadian Society of Nephrology (CSN in February 2013. The survey was designed and pre-tested to evaluate duration and ease of administration. Results: One hundred and forty one (25% response rate physicians participated in the survey. The majority were from urban, academic centres and practiced in regionally administered renal programs. Very few respondents had a formal policy regarding the timing of dialysis initiation or formally reviewed new dialysis starts (N = 4, 3.1%. The majority of respondents were either neutral or disagreed that late compared to early dialysis initiation improved outcomes (85–88%, had a negative impact on quality of life (89%, worsened AVF or PD use (84–90%, led to sicker patients (83% or was cost effective (61%. Fifty-seven percent of respondents felt uremic symptoms occurred earlier in patients with advancing age or co-morbid illness. Half (51.8% of the respondents felt there was an absolute eGFR at which they would initiate dialysis in an asymptomatic patient. The majority of respondents would initiate dialysis for classic indications for dialysis, such as volume overload (90.1% and cachexia (83.7% however a significant number chose other factors that may lead them to early dialysis initiation including avoiding an emergency (28

  1. Being-in-dialysis: The experience of the machine-body for home dialysis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Rhonda

    2015-05-01

    New Zealand leads the world in rates of home dialysis use, yet little is known about the experience of home dialysis from the patient's perspective. This article contributes to the literature on the self-care of dialysis patients by examining the relevance of the concept of the machine-body and cyborg embodiment for the lived experience of people with end-stage renal failure. The article, which presents a discussion of 24 in-depth interviews undertaken between 2009 and 2012, shows that although dialysis therapy is disruptive of being and time, study participants experience home dialysis in terms of flexibility, control and independence. While they do not use the term machine-body as a descriptor, the concept resonates with felt experience. Data also indicate that positive experience of home dialysis is relative to socio-economic positioning and the lived relation of patients to others, necessitating further research to examine these factors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. The healthy ancestor: embodied inequality and the revitalization of native Hawaiian health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMullin, Juliet Marie

    2010-01-01

    "Native Americans, researchers increasingly worry, are disproportionately victims of epidemics and poor health because they "fail" to seek medical care, are "non-compliant" patients, or "lack immunity...

  3. Failed fuel detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention concerns a failed fuel detection device for a nuclear reactor, such as an FBR type reactor, using electroconductive coolants. A sampling port is disposed at the upper portion of the fuel assembly so as to cover the assembly, so that coolants in the fuel assembly are sampled to improve a device for detecting fuel failure. That is, when coolants in the fuel assembly are sampled from the sampling port, the flow of electroconductive coolants in an sampling tube is detected by a flowmeter, to control an electromagnetic pump. The flow of electroconductive coolants is stopped against the waterhead pressure and dynamic pressure of the conductive coolants, and a predetermined amount of the coolants is pumped up to the sampling tank. Gas is supplied to the pumped up coolants so that fissile products are transferred from the coolants to a gas phase. Radiation in the gas in a gas recycling system is measured to detect presence of fuel failure. (I.S.)

  4. Are Diuretics Underutilized in Dialysis Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Emilie; Bargman, Joanne M

    2016-09-01

    While oral diuretics are commonly used in patients with chronic kidney disease for the management of volume and blood pressure, they are often discontinued upon initiation of dialysis. We suggest that diuretics are considerably underutilized in peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis patients despite numerous potential benefits and few side effects. Moreover, when diuretics are used, optimal doses are not always prescribed. In peritoneal dialysis, the use of diuretics can improve volume status and minimize the need for higher glucose-containing solutions. In patients on haemodialysis, diuretics can help lessen interdialytic weight gain, resulting in decreased ultrafiltration rates and fewer episodes of intradialytic hypotension. This paper will review the mechanism of action of diuretics in patients with renal insufficiency, quantify the risk of side effects and elaborate on the potential advantages of diuretic use in peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis patients with residual kidney function. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Collagen markers in peritoneal dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Joffe, P; Fugleberg, S

    1995-01-01

    Possible relationships between the dialysate-to-plasma creatinine equilibration ratio (D/Pcreatinine 4 hour), duration of peritoneal dialysis treatment, number of peritonitis episodes, and mass appearance rates of three connective tissue markers [carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen...... (PICP), aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), and carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP)] were studied in 19 nondiabetic peritoneal dialysis patients. The absence of correlation between the mass appearance rates of the markers and the duration of dialysis treatment...... as well as the number of peritonitis episodes supports the concept that peritoneal dialysis does not cause persistent changes in the deposition and degradation rates of collagen. A correlation between the D/Pcreatinine 4 hr and the PICP mass appearance rates was found. Since it is unlikely...

  6. Dialysis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... access for hemodialysis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Dialysis updates by ... for hemodialysis Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Creatinine Kidney Cysts Kidney Failure Peritoneal Disorders National ...

  7. Intraperitoneal pressure in peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Pérez Díaz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The measure of intraperitoneal pressure in peritoneal dialysis is easy and provides clear therapeutic benefits. However it is measured only rarely in adult peritoneal dialysis units. This review aims to disseminate the usefulness of measuring intraperitoneal pressure. This measurement is performed in supine before initiating the drain of a manual exchange with “Y” system, by raising the drain bag and measuring from the mid-axillary line the height of the liquid column that rises from the patient. With typical values of 10–16 cm H2O, intraperitoneal pressure should never exceed 18 cm H2O. With basal values that depend on body mass index, it increases 1–3 cm H2O/L of intraperitoneal volume, and varies with posture and physical activity. Its increase causes discomfort, sleep and breathing disturbances, and has been linked to the occurrence of leaks, hernias, hydrothorax, gastro-esophageal reflux and enteric peritonitis. Less known and valued is its ability to decrease the effectiveness of dialysis significantly counteracting ultrafiltration and decreasing solute clearance to a smaller degree. Because of its easy measurement and potential utility, should be monitored in case of ultrafiltration failure to rule out its eventual contribution in some patients. Although not yet mentioned in the clinical practice guidelines for PD, its clear benefits justify its inclusion among the periodic measurements to consider for prescribing and monitoring peritoneal dialysis. Resumen: La medida de la presión intraperitoneal en diálisis peritoneal es muy sencilla y aporta claros beneficios terapéuticos. Sin embargo, su monitorización todavía no se ha generalizado en las unidades de diálisis peritoneal de adultos. Esta revisión pretende divulgar su conocimiento y la utilidad de su medida. Se realiza en decúbito antes de iniciar el drenaje de un intercambio manual con bolsa en Y, elevando la bolsa de

  8. Measured glomerular filtration rate at dialysis initiation and clinical outcomes of Indian peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal time for dialysis initiation remains controversial. Studies have failed to show better outcomes with early initiation of hemodialysis; even a few had shown increased adverse outcomes including poorer survival. Few studies have examined the same in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD. Measured glomerular filtration rate (mGFR not creatinine-based estimated GFR is recommended as the measure of kidney function in end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. The objective of this observational study was to compare the outcomes of Indian patients initiated on PD with different residual renal function (RRF as measured by 24-h urinary clearance method. A total of 352 incident patients starting on chronic ambulatory PD as the first modality of renal replacement therapy were followed prospectively. Patients were categorized into three groups as per mGFR at the initiation of PD (≤5, >5–10, and> 10 ml/min/1.73 m2. Patient survival and technique survival were compared among the three groups. Patients with GFR of ≤5 ml/min/1.73 m2 (hazard ratio [HR] - 3.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] - 1.85–6.30, P = 0.000 and> 5–10 ml/min/1.73 m2 (HR - 2.16, 95% CI - 1.26–3.71, P = 0.005 had higher risk of mortality as compared to those with GFR of> 10 ml/min/1.73 m2. Each increment of 1 ml/min/1.73 m2 in baseline GFR was associated with 10% reduced risk of death (HR - 0.90, 95% CI - 0.85–0.96, P = 0.002. Technique survival was poor in those with an initial mGFR of ≤5 ml/min/1.73 m2 as compared to other categories. RRF at the initiation was also an important factor predicting nutritional status at 1 year of follow-up. To conclude, initiation of PD at a lower baseline mGFR is associated with poorer patient and technique survival in Indian ESRD patients.

  9. Peritoneal Dialysis in Western Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijk, Dirk G

    2015-12-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) for the treatment of end-stage renal failure was introduced in the 1960s. Nowadays it has evolved to an established therapy that is complementary to hemodialysis (HD), representing 11% of all patients treated worldwide with dialysis. Despite good clinical outcomes and similar results in patient survival between PD and HD, the penetration of PD is decreasing in the Western world. First the major events in the history of the development of PD are described. Then important insights into the physiology of peritoneal transport are discussed and linked to the changes in time observed in biopsies of the peritoneal membrane. Furthermore, the developments in peritoneal access, more biocompatible dialysate solutions, automated PD at home, the establishment of parameters for dialysis adequacy and strategies to prevent infectious complications are mentioned. Finally non-medical issues responsible for the declining penetration in the Western world are analyzed. Only after introduction of the concept of continuous ambulatory PD by Moncrief and Popovich has this treatment evolved in time to a renal replacement therapy. Of all structures present in the peritoneal membrane, the capillary endothelium offers the rate-limiting hindrance for solute and water transport for the diffusive and convective transport of solutes and osmosis. The functional and anatomical changes in the peritoneal membrane in time can be monitored by the peritoneal equilibrium test. Peritonitis incidence decreased by introduction of the Y-set and prophylaxis using mupirocin on the exit site. The decrease in the proportion of patients treated with PD in the Western world can be explained by non-medical issues such as inadequate predialysis patient education, physician experience and training, ease of HD initiation, overcapacity of in-center HD, lack of adequate infrastructure for PD treatment, costs and reimbursement issues of the treatment. (1) PD is cheaper than HD and provides a

  10. Restless legs syndrome in patients on dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlJahdali, Hamdan H; AlQadhi, Waleed A; Khogeer, Haithm A; AlHejaili, Fayez F; Al Sayyari, Abdullah A; AlGhamdi, Saeed M

    2009-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is an extremely distressing problem experienced by patients on dialysis; the prevalence appears to be greater than in the general population, with a wide variation from 6.6% to 80%. The diagnosis of RLS is a clinical one, and its definition has been clarified and standardized by internationally recognized diagnostic criteria, published in 1995 by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG). This study was designed to find out the prevalence of RLS in Saudi patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance dialysis. This is a cross sectional study carried out between May and Sept 2007 at two centers, King Abdulaziz Medical City-King Fahad National Guard Hospital (KAMC-KFNGH), Riyadh and King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFHRC), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data were gathered on 227 Saudi patients on chronic maintenance hemodialysis or chronic peritoneal dialysis. The prevalence of RLS was measured using IRLSSG's RLS Questionnaire (RLSQ). Potential risk factors for RLS including other sleep disorders, underlying cause of chronic renal failure, duration on dialysis, dialysis shift, biochemical tests and demographic data were also evaluated. The overall prevalence of RLS was 50.22% including 53.7% males and 46.3% females. Their mean age was 55.7 + - 17.2 years and mean duration on dialysis 40.4 + - 37.8 months. Significant predictors of RLS were history of diabetes mellitus (DM), coffee intake, afternoon dialysis, gender and type of dialysis (P= 0.03, 0.01, < 0.001, 0.05 and 0.009 respectively). Patients with RLS were found to be at increased risk of having insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) (P= < 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Our study suggests that RLS is a very common problem in dialysis population and was significantly associated with other sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, and EDS. Optimal care of dialysis patient should include particular attention to the diagnosis and

  11. Restless legs syndrome in patients on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jahdali Hamdan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is an extremely distressing problem experienced by patients on dialysis; the prevalence appears to be greater than in the general population, with a wide variation from 6.6% to 80%. The diagnosis of RLS is a clinical one, and its definition has been clarified and standardized by internationally recognized diagnostic criteria, published in 1995 by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG. This study was designed to find out the prevalence of RLS in Saudi patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD on maintenance dialysis. This is a cross sectional study carried out between May and Sept 2007 at two centers, King Abdulaziz Medical City-King Fahad National Guard Hospital (KAMC-KFNGH, Riyadh and King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFHRC, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data were gathered on 227 Saudi patients on chronic maintenance hemodialysis or chronic peritoneal dialysis. The prevalence of RLS was measured using IRLSSG′s RLS Questionnaire (RLSQ. Potential risk factors for RLS including other sleep disorders, underlying cause of chronic renal failure, duration on dialysis, dialysis shift, biochemical tests and demographic data were also evaluated. The overall prevalence of RLS was 50.22% including 53.7% males and 46.3% females. Their mean age was 55.7 ± 17.2 years and mean duration on dialysis 40.4 ± 37.8 months. Significant predictors of RLS were history of diabetes mellitus (DM, coffee intake, afternoon dialysis, gender and type of dialysis (P= 0.03, 0.01, < 0.001, 0.05 and 0.009 respectively. Patients with RLS were found to be at increased risk of having insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS (P= < 0.001 and 0.001, respectively. Our study suggests that RLS is a very common problem in dialysis population and was significantly associated with other sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, and EDS. Optimal care of dialysis patient should include particular attention to the diagnosis

  12. Differences in survival on chronic dialysis treatment between ethnic groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Beukel, Tessa O.; Hommel, Kristine; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2016-01-01

    patients were native Danes, 344 originated from other Western countries, 79 from North Africa or West Asia, 173 from South or South-East Asia and 54 from sub-Saharan Africa. Native Danes were more likely to die on dialysis compared with the other groups (crude incidence rates for mortality: 234, 166, 96......, 110 and 53 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Native Danes had greater hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality compared with the other groups {HRs for mortality adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics: 1.32 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14–1.54]; 2.22 [95% CI 1.51–3.23]; 1.79 [95% CI...

  13. Native Americans with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  14. Performance measures for a dialysis setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji

    2018-03-01

    This study from Japan extracted performance measures for dialysis unit management and investigated their characteristics from professional views. Two surveys were conducted using self-administered questionnaires, in which dialysis managers/staff were asked to rate the usefulness of 44 performance indicators. A total of 255 managers and 2,097 staff responded. Eight performance measures were elicited from dialysis manager and staff responses: these were safety, operational efficiency, quality of working life, financial effectiveness, employee development, mortality, patient/employee satisfaction and patient-centred health care. These performance measures were almost compatible with those extracted in overall healthcare settings in a previous study. Internal reliability, content and construct validity of the performance measures for the dialysis setting were ensured to some extent. As a general trend, both dialysis managers and staff perceived performance measures as highly useful, especially for safety, mortality, operational efficiency and patient/employee satisfaction, but showed relatively low concerns for patient-centred health care and employee development. However, dialysis managers' usefulness perceptions were significantly higher than staff. Important guidelines for designing a holistic hospital/clinic management system were yielded. Performance measures must be balanced for outcomes and performance shaping factors (PSF); a common set of performance measures could be applied to all the healthcare settings, although performance indicators of each measure should be composed based on the application field and setting; in addition, sound causal relationships between PSF and outcome measures/indicators should be explored for further improvement. © 2017 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  15. Remote Patient Management for Home Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Wallace

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote patient management (RPM offers renal health care providers and patients with end-stage kidney disease opportunities to embrace home dialysis therapies with greater confidence and the potential to obtain better clinical outcomes. Barriers and evidence required to increase adoption of RPM by the nephrology community need to be clearly defined. Ten health care providers from specialties including nephrology, cardiology, pediatrics, epidemiology, nursing, and health informatics with experience in home dialysis and the use of RPM systems gathered in Vienna, Austria to discuss opportunities for, barriers to, and system requirements of RPM as it applies to the home dialysis patient. Although improved outcomes and cost-effectiveness of RPM have been demonstrated in patients with diabetes mellitus and heart disease, only observational data on RPM have been gathered in patients on dialysis. The current review focused on RPM systems currently in use, on how RPM should be integrated into future care, and on the evidence needed for optimized implementation to improve clinical and economic outcomes. Randomized controlled trials and/or large observational studies could inform the most effective and economical use of RPM in home dialysis. These studies are needed to establish the value of existing and/or future RPM models among patients, policy makers, and health care providers.

  16. Method for repairing failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Taketomi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To repair fuel elements that became failed during burnup in a reactor or during handling. Method: After the surface in the vicinity of a failed part of a fuel element is cleaned, a socket made of a shape-memory alloy having a ring form or a horseshoe form made by cutting a part of the ring form is inserted into the failed position according to the position of the failed fuel element. The shape memory alloy socket remembers a slightly larger inside diameter in its original phase (high-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube and also a slightly larger inside diameter of the socket in the martensite phase (low-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube, such that the socket can easily be inserted into the failed position. The socket, inserted into the failed part of the cladding tube, is heated by a heating jig. The socket recovers the original phase, and the shape also tends to recover a smaller diameter than the outside diameter of the cladding tube that has been remembered, and accordingly the failed part of the cladding tube is fastened with a great force and the failed part is fully closed with the socket, thus keeping radioactive materials from going out. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Administration of calcimimetics after dialysis: Same effectiveness, better gastrointestinal tolerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicent Esteve Simo

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Post-dialysis use of calcimimetic was effective in secondary hyperparathyroidism control, improved gastrointestinal tolerability and ameliorated patients’ satisfaction. Based on our findings, post-dialysis use of calcimimetics should be considered in selected patients with low therapeutic compliance.

  18. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook Eui Oh

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Our data indicate that dialysis patients might be at a greater risk of developing CDAD, which suggests that particular attention should be provided to CDAD when antibiotic treatment is administered to dialysis patients.

  19. Non-machinery dialysis that achieves blood purification therapy without using full-scale dialysis machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takaya; Onoda, Mistutaka; Matsuura, Tomohiko; Sugimura, Jun; Obara, Wataru; Sato, Toshiya; Takahashi, Mihoko; Chiba, Kenta; Abe, Tomiya

    2017-09-01

    An electrical or water supply and a blood purification machine are required for renal replacement therapy. There is a possibility that acute kidney injury can occur in large numbers and on a wide scale in the case of a massive earthquake, and there is the potential risk that the current supply will be unable to cope with acute kidney injury cases. However, non-machinery dialysis requires exclusive circuits and has the characteristic of not requiring the full-scale dialysis machines. We performed perfusion experiments that used non-machinery dialysis and recent blood purification machines in 30-min intervals, and the effectiveness of non-machinery dialysis was evaluated by the assessing the removal efficiency of potassium, which causes lethal arrhythmia during acute kidney injury. The non-machinery dialysis potassium removal rate was at the same level as continuous blood purification machines with a dialysate flow rate of 5 L/h after 15 min and continuous blood purification machines with a dialysate flow rate of 3 L/h after 30 min. Non-machinery dialysis required an exclusive dialysate circuit, the frequent need to replace bags, and new dialysate exchanged once every 30 min. However, it can be seen as an effective renal replacement therapy for crush-related acute kidney injury patients, even in locations or facilities not having the full-scale dialysis machines.

  20. Nutritional status of maintenance dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette Juul; Kromann, Charles Boy; Juliussen, Sophie Ryberg

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Maintenance dialysis patients are at increased risk of abnormal nutritional status due to numerous causative factors, both nutritional and non-nutritional. The present study assessed the current prevalence of protein-energy wasting, low lean bodymass index and obesity...... protein catabolic rate in order to assess the prevalence of protein-energy wasting, low lean body mass index and obesity in these patients. Results Seventy-nine eligible maintenance dialysis patients participated. The prevalence of proteinenergy wasted patients was 4%(95%CI: 2-12) as assessed......-energy wasting and obesity varied considerably, depending on nutritional assessment methodology. Conclusions Our data indicate that protein-energy wasting is uncommon, whereas low lean body mass index and obesity are frequent conditions among patients in maintenance dialysis. A focus on how to increase...

  1. Cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality among men and women starting dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrero, Juan J; de Jager, Dinanda J; Verduijn, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Although women have a survival advantage in the general population, women on dialysis have similar mortality to men. We hypothesized that this paired mortality risk during dialysis may be explained by a relative excess of cardiovascular-related mortality in women.......Although women have a survival advantage in the general population, women on dialysis have similar mortality to men. We hypothesized that this paired mortality risk during dialysis may be explained by a relative excess of cardiovascular-related mortality in women....

  2. Optimizing home dialysis: role of hemodiafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Enric; Farrington, Ken; Bates, Chris; Mumford, Carol; Greenwood, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 40 years the technical obstacles which prevented a convective contribution to diffusive dialysis have been overcome. Hemodiafiltration represents a natural evolution of intermittent extracorporeal blood purification and the technology is now available to offer this as standard treatment in-center. The first randomized control trial of dialysis dose (National Cooperative Dialysis Study) showed that for three times weekly dialysis a critical level of urea clearance was necessary to ensure complication-free survival, the effect being noticeable by 3 months. Following this, observational studies suggested that higher doses improved longer term outcome. In a second large randomized controlled study (HEMO), higher small molecule clearance did not further improve outcome, but high-flux membranes, which permitted enhanced clearance of middle molecules, appeared to confer survival benefit in patients who had already been on dialysis > 3.7 years. Recently, outcomes from the Membrane Permeability Outcome study confirmed a survival benefit of high-flux membranes in high-risk patients. These studies indicate that in the medium term survival is critically dependent on achieving a minimum level of small solute removal. However, longer term survival (measured in years or decades) not only requires better small solute clearance but also enhanced clearance of middle molecules, the toxicity of which manifest over longer time scales. The rationale for convective treatment is strongest, therefore in those patients who have the greatest potential for long-term survival. Patients who opt for self-care at home to allow frequent dialysis generally are constituents of this group. Hemodiafiltration is likely to become standard therapy in-center and in the home. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Acute hydrothorax from peritoneal dialysis successfully treated with new dialysis regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.T.S.; Thong, K.M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothorax is a rare and often unrecognized complication associated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). This is usually due to the presence of pleuroperitoneal fistula. Most nephrologist will choose to cease the peritoneal dialysis and rest the peritoneum. More than often surgical interventions include pleurodesis or thoracotomy will be required. In this report, we reported a patient who developed pleural effusion after starting continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. She was successfully managed by the use of low volume exchange during daytime with avoidance of conversion to haemodialysis or any surgical intervention. (author)

  4. Australian consumer perspectives on dialysis: first national census.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Marie J; Lauder, Lydia A; Mathew, Timothy H; Hawley, Carmel M; Fortnum, Debbie

    2012-11-01

    The percentage of people in Australia who undertake home dialysis has steadily decreased over the past 40 years and varies within Australia. Consumer factors related to this decline have not previously been determined. A 78-question survey was developed and piloted in 2008 and 2009. Survey forms were distributed to all adult routine dialysis patients in all Australian states and territories (except Northern Territory) between 2009 and 2010. Of 9223 distributed surveys, 3250 were completed and returned. 49% of respondents indicated they had no choice in the type of dialysis and 48% had no choice in dialysis location. Respondents were twice as likely to receive information about haemodialysis (85%) than APD (39%) or CAPD (41%). The provision of education regarding home modalities differed significantly between states, and decreased with increasing patient age. Additional nursing support and reimbursement of expenses increased the proportion of those willing to commence dialysis at home, from 13% to 34%. State differences in the willingness to consider home dialysis, the degree of choice in dialysis location, the desire to change current dialysis type and/or location, and the provision of information about dialysis were identified. The delivery of pre-dialysis education is variable, and does not support all options of dialysis for all individuals. State variances indicate that local policy and health professional teams significantly influence the operation of dialysis programs. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  5. Quality of life in automated and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, Wieneke M.; van Dijk, Sandra; Verduijn, Marion; le Cessie, Saskia; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Apperloo, A. J.; Bijlsma, J. A.; Boekhout, M.; Boer, W. H.; van der Boog, P. J. M.; Büller, H. R.; van Buren, M.; de Charro, F. Th; Doorenbos, C. J.; van den Dorpel, M. A.; van Es, A.; Fagel, W. J.; Feith, G. W.; de Fijter, C. W. H.; Frenken, L. A. M.; Grave, W.; van Geelen, J. A. C. A.; Gerlag, P. G. G.; Gorgels, J. P. M. C.; Huisman, R. M.; Jager, K. J.; Jie, K.; Koning-Mulder, W. A. H.; Koolen, M. I.; Kremer Hovinga, T. K.; Lavrijssen, A. T. J.; Luik, A. J.; van der Meulen, J.; Parlevliet, K. J.; Raasveld, M. H. M.; van der Sande, F. M.; Schonck, M. J. M.; Schuurmans, M. M. J.; Siegert, C. E. H.; Stegeman, C. A.; Stevens, P.; Thijssen, J. G. P.; Valentijn, R. M.; Vastenburg, G. H.; Verburgh, C. A.; Vincent, H. H.; Vos, P. F.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a lack of strong evidence, automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) is often prescribed on account of an expected better quality of life (QoL) than that expected with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Our aim was to analyze differences in QoL in patients starting dialysis on APD

  6. Dialysis-associated steal syndrome (DASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed S; Peden, Eric K

    2017-03-06

    In this article, we will review the clinical symptoms of dialysis access steal syndrome (DASS), evaluation, treatment options, and our approach and treatment algorithm. We reviewed the literature discussing different aspects of DASS including its epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, evaluation and management options. DASS is the most dreaded complication of access surgery. Although the incidence is low, all providers caring for dialysis patients should be aware of this problem. Symptoms can range from mild to limb threatening. Although various tests are available, the diagnosis of DASS remains a clinical one and requires thoughtful management to have the best outcomes. Multiple treatment options exist for steal. We present diagnostic evaluation and management algorithm.

  7. Wearable impedance monitoring system for dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, S; Bourgerette, A; Gharbi, S; Rubeck, C; Arkouche, W; Massot, B; McAdams, E; Montalibet, A; Jallon, P

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the development and the validation of a prototype wearable miniaturized impedance monitoring system for remote monitoring in home-based dialysis patients. This device is intended to assess the hydration status of dialysis patients using calf impedance measurements. The system is based on the low-power AD8302 component. The impedance calibration procedure is described together with the Cole parameter estimation and the hydric volume estimation. Results are given on a test cell to validate the design and on preliminary calf measurements showing Cole parameter variations during hemodialysis.

  8. Dialysis-related amyloidosis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarpioni R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available R Scarpioni, M Ricardi, V Albertazzi, S De Amicis, F Rastelli, L Zerbini Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Local (AUSL Hospital “Guglielmo da Saliceto”, Piacenza, Italy Abstract: Amyloidosis refers to the extracellular tissue deposition of fibrils composed of low-molecular-weight subunits of a variety of proteins. These deposits may result in a wide range of clinical manifestations depending upon their type, location, and the amount of deposition. Dialysis-related amyloidosis is a serious complication of long-term dialysis therapy and is characterized by the deposition of amyloid fibrils, principally composed of β2 microglobulins (β2M, in the osteoarticular structures and viscera. Most of the β2M is eliminated through glomerular filtration and subsequent reabsorption and catabolism by the proximal tubules. As a consequence, the serum levels of β2M are inversely related to the glomerular filtration rate; therefore, in end-stage renal disease patients, β2M levels increase up to 60-fold. Serum levels of β2M are also elevated in several pathological conditions such as chronic inflammation, liver disease, and above all, in renal dysfunction. Retention of amyloidogenic protein has been attributed to several factors including type of dialysis membrane, prolonged uremic state and/or decreased diuresis, advanced glycation end products, elevated levels of cytokines and dialysate. Dialysis treatment per se has been considered to be an inflammatory stimulus, inducing cytokine production (such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and complement activation. The released cytokines are thought to stimulate the synthesis and release of β2M by the macrophages and/or augment the expression of human leukocyte antigens (class I, increasing β2M expression. Residual renal function is probably the best determinant of β2M levels. Therefore, it has to be maintained as long as possible. In this article

  9. Non-Native & Native English Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrfan Tosuncuoglu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In many countries the primary (mother tongue language is not English but there is a great demand for English language teachers all over the world. The demand in this field is try to be filled largely by non-native English speaking teachers who have learned English in the country or abroad, or from another non native English peaking teachers. In some countries, particularly those where English speaking is a a sign of status, the students prefer to learn English from a native English speaker. The perception is that a non-native English speaking teacher is a less authentic teacher than a native English speaker and their instruction is not satifactory in some ways. This paper will try to examine the literature to explore whether there is a difference in instructional effectiveness between NNESTs and native English teachers.

  10. Exploring the association between macroeconomic indicators and dialysis mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Anneke; Stel, Vianda S; Caskey, Fergus J; Stengel, Benedicte; Elliott, Robert F; Covic, Adrian; Geue, Claudia; Cusumano, Ana; Macleod, Alison M; Jager, Kitty J

    2012-10-01

    Mortality on dialysis varies greatly worldwide, with patient-level factors explaining only a small part of this variation. The aim of this study was to examine the association of national-level macroeconomic indicators with the mortality of incident dialysis populations and explore potential explanations through renal service indicators, incidence of dialysis, and characteristics of the dialysis population. Aggregated unadjusted survival probabilities were obtained from 22 renal registries worldwide for patients starting dialysis in 2003-2005. General population age and health, macroeconomic indices, and renal service organization data were collected from secondary sources and questionnaires. Linear modeling with log-log transformation of the outcome variable was applied to establish factors associated with survival on dialysis. Two-year survival on dialysis ranged from 62.3% in Iceland to 89.8% in Romania. A higher gross domestic product per capita (hazard ratio=1.02 per 1000 US dollar increase), a higher percentage of gross domestic product spent on healthcare (1.10 per percent increase), and a higher intrinsic mortality of the dialysis population (i.e., general population-derived mortality risk of the dialysis population in that country standardized for age and sex; hazard ratio=1.04 per death per 10,000 person years) were associated with a higher mortality of the dialysis population. The incidence of dialysis and renal service indicators were not associated with mortality on dialysis. Macroeconomic factors and the intrinsic mortality of the dialysis population are associated with international differences in the mortality on dialysis. Renal service organizational factors and incidence of dialysis seem less important.

  11. The Green Dialysis Survey: Establishing a Baseline for Environmental Sustainability across Dialysis Facilities in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Katherine A; Gleeson, Alice; Holt, Stephen G; Agar, John Wm

    2017-11-02

    The Green Dialysis Survey aimed to 1) establish a baseline for environmental sustainability (ES) across Victorian dialysis facilities, and 2) guide future initiatives to reduce the environmental impact of dialysis delivery. Nurse unit managers of all Victorian public dialysis facilities received an online link to the survey, which asked 107 questions relevant to the ES of dialysis services. Responses were received from 71/83 dialysis facilities in Victoria (86%), representing 628/660 dialysis chairs (95%). Low energy lighting was present in 13 facilities (18%), 18 (25%) recycled reverse osmosis water and 7 (10%) reported use of renewable energy. Fifty-six facilities (79%) performed comingled recycling but only 27 (38%) recycled polyvinyl chloride plastic. A minority educated staff in appropriate waste management (n=30;42%) or formally audited waste generation and segregation (n=19;27%). Forty-four (62%) provided secure bicycle parking but only 33 (46%) provided shower and changing facilities. There was limited use of tele- or video-conferencing to replace staff meetings (n=19;27%) or patient clinic visits (n=13;18%). A minority considered ES in procurement decisions (n=28;39%) and there was minimal preparedness to cope with climate change. Only 39 services (49%) confirmed an ES policy and few had ever formed a green group (n=14; 20%) or were currently undertaking a green project (n=8;11%). Only 15 facilities (21%) made formal efforts to raise awareness of ES. This survey provides a baseline for practices that potentially impact the environmental sustainability of dialysis units in Victoria, Australia. It also identifies achievable targets for attention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hela Jebali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of tuberculosis (TB is high in patients undergoing chronic dialysis than it is in the general population. The diagnosis of TB is often difficult and extrapulmonary involvement is predominant. This study investigates the spectrum of clinical presentations and outcome in dialysis patients during a nine-year period. TB was diagnosed in 41 patients. Anti-TB drugs, adverse effects of therapy, and outcome were noted. Thirty-eight patients (92.6% were on hemodialysis and three were on peritoneal dialysis (7.3%. The mean age at diagnosis was 50.8 years and the male/female ratio was 1.16. Four patients had a history of pulmonary TB. Extrapulmonary involvement was observed in 32 (78 % patients. The bacteriological confirmation was made in 41.46% and histological confirmation was made in 26.83%, and in the rest, the diagnosis was retained on the criterion presumption. Nineteen patients (46.34% developed adverse effects of antitubercular drugs. Eight patients (19.51% died during the study from TB or adverse effects of treatment. Low urea reduction ratio and female sex were associated with poor prognosis in our study. The clinical manifestations of TB in patients on dialysis are quite nonspecific, making timely diagnosis difficult, and delaying the initiation of curative treatment, which is a major determinant of the outcome.

  13. The Manchester contribution to peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2011-01-01

    Two names emerge when considering the contribution of Manchester in the development of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The first is Ram Gokal; the second is icodextrin. As there will be a separate article on icodextrin, this one will focus more on other aspects of the activities performed by the Renal

  14. Fungal peritonitis in children on peritoneal dialysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, R.; Schroder, C.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Cornelissen, E.A.M.; Warris, A.

    2007-01-01

    Fungal peritonitis is a rare but serious complication in children on peritoneal dialysis (PD). In this study, risk factors were evaluated, and therapeutic measures were reviewed. A retrospective, multi-centre study was performed in 159 Dutch paediatric PD patients, between 1980 and 2005 (3,573

  15. [Evaluation of methods to calculate dialysis dose in daily hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduell, F; Gutiérrez, E; Navarro, V; Torregrosa, E; Martínez, A; Rius, A

    2003-01-01

    Daily dialysis has shown excellent clinical results because a higher frequency of dialysis is more physiological. Different methods have been described to calculate dialysis dose which take into consideration change in frequency. The aim of this study was to calculate all dialysis dose possibilities and evaluate the better and practical options. Eight patients, 6 males and 2 females, on standard 4 to 5 hours thrice weekly on-line hemodiafiltration (S-OL-HDF) were switched to daily on-line hemodiafiltration (D-OL-HDF) 2 to 2.5 hours six times per week. Dialysis parameters were identical during both periods and only frequency and dialysis time of each session were changed. Time average concentration (TAC), time average deviation (TAD), normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), Kt/V, equilibrated Kt/V (eKt/V), equivalent renal urea clearance (EKR), standard Kt/V (stdKt/V), urea reduction ratio (URR), hemodialysis product and time off dialysis were measured. Daily on-line hemodiafiltration was well accepted and tolerated. Patients maintained the same TAC although TAD decreased from 9.7 +/- 2 in baseline to a 6.2 +/- 2 mg/dl after six months, p time off dialysis was reduced to half. Dialysis frequency is an important urea kinetic parameter which there are to take in consideration. It's necessary to use EKR, stdKt/V or weekly URR to calculate dialysis dose for an adequate comparison between different frequency dialysis schedules.

  16. Introduction of Renal Key Performance Indicators Associated with Increased Uptake of Peritoneal Dialysis in a Publicly Funded Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Nigel D; McMahon, Lawrence P; Dowling, Gregory; Holt, Stephen G; Smith, Gillian; Safe, Maria; Knight, Richard; Fair, Kathleen; Linehan, Leanne; Walker, Rowan G; Power, David A

    2017-01-01

    ♦ BACKGROUND: Increased demand for treatment of end-stage kidney disease has largely been accommodated by a costly increase in satellite hemodialysis (SHD) in most jurisdictions. In the Australian State of Victoria, a marked regional variation in the uptake of home-based dialysis suggests that use of home therapies could be increased as an alternative to SHD. An earlier strategy based solely on increased remuneration had failed to increase uptake of home therapies. Therefore, the public dialysis funder adopted the incidence and prevalence of home-based dialysis therapies as a key performance indicator (KPI) for its health services to encourage greater uptake of home therapies. ♦ METHODS: A KPI data collection and bench-marking program was established in 2012 by the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services, with data provided monthly by all renal units in Victoria using a purpose-designed website portal. A KPI Working Group was responsible for analyzing data each quarter and ensuring indicators remained accurate and relevant and each KPI had clear definitions and targets. We present a prospective, observational study of all dialysis patients in Victoria over a 4-year period following the introduction of the renal KPI program, with descriptive analyses to evaluate the proportion of patients using home therapies as well as home dialysis modality survival. ♦ RESULTS: Following the introduction of the KPI program, the net growth of dialysis patient numbers in Victoria remained stable over 4 years, at 75 - 80 per year (approximately 4%). However, unlike the previous decade, about 40% of this growth was through an increase in home dialysis, which was almost exclusively peritoneal dialysis (PD). The increase was identified particularly in the young (20 - 49) and the elderly (> 80). Disappointingly, however, 67% of these incident patients ceased PD within 2 years of commencement, 46% of whom transferred to SHD. ♦ CONCLUSIONS: Introduction of a KPI program

  17. Native Health Research Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Indian Health Board) Welcome to the Native Health Database. Please enter your search terms. Basic Search Advanced ... To learn more about searching the Native Health Database, click here. Tutorial Video The NHD has made ...

  18. Biofeedback-driven dialysis: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Antonio; Ferramosca, Emiliana; Mancini, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The progressive increase in the mean age and the growing conditions of co-morbidity, especially of cardiovascular pathologies and diabetes, have significantly worsened the patients' clinical status and tolerance to the hemodialysis (HD) treatment. On the other hand, the demand for short treatment times enhances the risk for hemodynamic instability as well as for inadequate depuration. The traditional management of the dialysis session, setting of predefined treatment parameters, with active therapeutic interventions only in the event of complications, is definitely unsuitable for short-lasting treatments, often complicated by hemodynamic instability, especially in critical patients. The first step to improve the management of the dialysis session is the utilization of continuous and uninvasive monitoring systems for hemodynamic or biochemical parameters involved in the dialysis quality. Special sensors for the continuous measurement of blood volume, blood temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, electrolytes, have been realized throughout the last 10 years. As a second step, some of these devices have been implemented in the dialysis instrumentation, mainly with a view to preventing cardiocirculatory instability but also to control the dialysis efficiency (biofeedback control systems). The basic components of a biofeedback system are: the plant, the sensors, the actuators and the controller. The plant is the biological process that we need to control, while the sensors are the devices used for measuring the output variables. The actuators are the working arms of the controller. The controller is the mathematical model that continuously sets the measured output variable against the reference input and modifies the actuators in order to reduce any discrepancies. Yet, in practice there are a number of conceptual, physical and technological difficulties to be overcome. In particular, the behavior of what is to be controlled may be non-linear and time-varying, with

  19. ENZYMATIC DETERMINATION OF STARCH IN DOCE DE LEITE USING DIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEMIATE Ivo Motim

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of starch for the food industry makes it necessary to develop new, fast, economic and accurate methodologies for its quantification. In the present paper starch hydrolysis using commercial enzymes of industrial grade are studied aiming to develop an easy and cheap analysis, available to a greater number of industries and technicians. The proposed method is simple, divided in a first step where soluble sugars are eliminated from the samples by using dialysis, followed by starch hydrolysis of the retained fraction with a thermoresistent bacterial alfa-amylase (Termamyl 120L® and an amyloglucosidase (AMG 300L®. The hydrolysis conditions were those suggested by the enzyme producer. After the hydrolysis step the material was dialysed again for the extraction of glucose that was quantified by the glucose-oxidase colorimetric reactant. The results allowed the construction of calibration equations for starch determination on the analyzed samples. These samples were produced on a laboratory scale and native and acid-modified corn starches were added in known concentrations. By considering the final dilutions employed for glucose determination on the samples, it was possible to confirm that they were identical to that of the glucose-oxidase reactant calibration.

  20. A call to arms: economic barriers to optimal dialysis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, P A; Mendelssohn, D C

    2000-01-01

    Epidemic growth rates and the enormous cost of dialysis pressure end-stage renal disease (ESRD) delivery systems around the world. Payers of dialysis services can constrain costs through (1) limiting access to dialysis, (2) reducing the quality of dialysis, and (3) placing constraints on modality distribution. In order to secure the necessary resources for ESRD care, we propose that the nephrology community consider the following suggestions: First, future leaders in dialysis should acquire additional advanced training in innovative pathways such as health care economics, business and health care administration, and health care policy. Second, the international nephrology community must strongly engage in ongoing advocacy for accessible, high quality, cost-effective care.Third, efforts should be made to better define and then implement optimal dialysis modality distributions that maximize patient outcomes but limit unnecessary costs. Fourth, industry should be encouraged to lower the unit cost of dialysis, allowing for improved access to dialysis, especially in developing countries. Fifth, research should be encouraged that seeks to identify measures that will reduce dialysis costs but will not impair quality of care. Finally, early referral of patients with progressive renal disease to nephrology clinics, empowerment of informed patient choice of dialysis modality, and proper and timely access creation should be encouraged and can be expected to help limit overall expenditures. Ongoing efforts in these areas by the nephrology community will be essential if we are to overcome the challenges of ESRD growth in this new decade.

  1. Dialysis and Quality of Dialysate in Southeast Asian Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomotaka Naramura

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of dialysis patients has been increasing in Southeast Asia, but statistical data about these patients and on the quality of dialysates in Southeast Asian dialysis facilities are still imprecise. For this study, dialysis-related statistical data were collected in Southeast Asia. Methods: A survey of the quality of dialysates was carried out at 4 dialysis facilities in Vietnam and Cambodia. The dialysis patient survey included the numbers of dialysis facilities and patients receiving dialysis, a ranking of underlying diseases causing the initiation of dialysis, the number of patients receiving hemodialysis (HD/on-line hemodiafiltration/continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, the number of HD monitoring devices installed, the cost of each session of dialysis (in USD, the percentage of out-of-pocket payments, and the 1-year survival rates of the dialysis patients (in percent. The dialysate survey covered the endotoxin (ET level and bacterial count in tap water, in water filtered through a reverse osmosis system and in dialysate. Results: In each of the countries, the most frequent reason for the initiation of dialysis is diabetes mellitus. HD is usually carried out according to the ‘reuse' principle. The 1-year survival rates are 70% in Myanmar and about 90% in the Philippines and Malaysia. The ET levels in standard dialysates were satisfactory at 2 facilities. The bacterial counts in dialysates were not acceptable at any of the facilities investigated. Conclusion: There is an urgent need to teach medical workers involved in dialysis how to prepare sterile and ET-free dialysates.

  2. A prime determinant in selecting dialysis modality: peritoneal dialysis patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunwook Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD has rapidly increased, as has the cost of dialysis. Peritoneal dialysis (PD is an established treatment for ESRD patients worldwide; it has a variety of advantages, including autonomy and flexibility, as well as economic benefits in many countries compared to hemodialysis (HD. However, the long-term survival rate of PD remains poor. Although direct comparison of survival rate between the dialysis modalities by randomized controlled trials is difficult due to the ethical issues, it has always been a crucial point when deciding which dialysis modality should be recommended to patients. Recently, in many countries, including the United States, Brazil, Spain, Australia, and New Zealand, the survival rate in PD patients has significantly improved. PD patient survival in Korea has also improved, but Korean PD patients are known to have higher risk of mortality and major adverse cardiovascular, cerebrovascular events than HD patients. Herein, we further evaluate why Korean PD patients had worse outcomes; we suggest that special attention should be paid to patients with diabetes, coronary artery disease, or congestive heart failure when they choose PD as the first dialysis modality in order to reduce mortality risk.

  3. DECOFF Probabilities of Failed Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gintautas, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    A statistical procedure of estimation of Probabilities of Failed Operations is described and exemplified using ECMWF weather forecasts and SIMO output from Rotor Lift test case models. Also safety factor influence is investigated. DECOFF statistical method is benchmarked against standard Alpha-factor...

  4. Capacitive Neutralization Dialysis for Direct Energy Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Zhang, Yi; Ou-Yang, Wei; Bastos Sales, Bruno; Sun, Zhuo; Liu, Fei; Zhao, Ran

    2017-08-15

    Capacitive neutralization dialysis energy (CNDE) is proposed as a novel energy-harvesting technique that is able to utilize waste acid and alkaline solutions to produce electrical energy. CNDE is a modification based on neutralization dialysis. It was found that a higher NaCl concentration led to a higher open-circuit potential when the concentrations of acid and alkaline solutions were fixed. Upon closing of the circuit, the membrane potential was used as a driving force to move counter ions into the electrical double layers at the electrode-liquid interface, thereby creating an ionic current. Correspondingly, in the external circuit, electrons flow through an external resistor from one electrode to the other, thereby generating electrical energy directly. The influence of external resistances was studied to achieve greater energy extraction, with the maximum output of 110 mW/m 2 obtained by employing an external resistance of 5 Ω together with the AC-coated electrode.

  5. Dialysis Provision and Implications of Health Economics on Peritoneal Dialysis Utilization: A Review from a Malaysian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Manaf, Mohd Rizal; Surendra, Naren Kumar; Abdul Gafor, Abdul Halim; Seong Hooi, Lai; Bavanandan, Sunita

    2017-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is managed by either lifesaving hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) or a kidney transplant. In Malaysia, the prevalence of dialysis-treated ESRD patients has shown an exponential growth from 504 per million population (pmp) in 2005 to 1155 pmp in 2014. There were 1046 pmp patients on HD and 109 pmp patients on PD in 2014. Kidney transplants are limited due to lack of donors. Malaysia adopts public-private financing model for dialysis. Majority of HD patients were treated in the private sector but almost all PD patients were treated in government facilities. Inequality in access to dialysis is visible within geographical regions where majority of HD centres are scattered around developed areas. The expenditure on dialysis has been escalating in recent years but economic evaluations of dialysis modalities are scarce. Evidence shows that health policies and reimbursement strategies influence dialysis provision. Increased uptake of PD can produce significant economic benefits and improve patients' access to dialysis. As a result, some countries implemented a PD-First or Favored Policy to expand PD use. Thus, a current comparative costs analysis of dialysis is strongly recommended to assist decision-makers to establish a more equitable and economically sustainable dialysis provision in the future.

  6. Dialysis Provision and Implications of Health Economics on Peritoneal Dialysis Utilization: A Review from a Malaysian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Rizal Abdul Manaf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available End-stage renal disease (ESRD is managed by either lifesaving hemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD or a kidney transplant. In Malaysia, the prevalence of dialysis-treated ESRD patients has shown an exponential growth from 504 per million population (pmp in 2005 to 1155 pmp in 2014. There were 1046 pmp patients on HD and 109 pmp patients on PD in 2014. Kidney transplants are limited due to lack of donors. Malaysia adopts public-private financing model for dialysis. Majority of HD patients were treated in the private sector but almost all PD patients were treated in government facilities. Inequality in access to dialysis is visible within geographical regions where majority of HD centres are scattered around developed areas. The expenditure on dialysis has been escalating in recent years but economic evaluations of dialysis modalities are scarce. Evidence shows that health policies and reimbursement strategies influence dialysis provision. Increased uptake of PD can produce significant economic benefits and improve patients’ access to dialysis. As a result, some countries implemented a PD-First or Favored Policy to expand PD use. Thus, a current comparative costs analysis of dialysis is strongly recommended to assist decision-makers to establish a more equitable and economically sustainable dialysis provision in the future.

  7. Single Pass Albumin Dialysis in Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Ebadur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is the most appalling complication of acute or chronic liver disease with 90% mortality rate. Single pass albumin dialysis (SPAD can be considered as a noble liver support technique in HRS. Here, we present a case of a young healthy patient who developed hyperacute fulminant liver failure that progressed to HRS. The patient was offered SPAD as a bridge to liver transplantation, however, it resulted in an excellent recovery.

  8. Sacroiliac pain in a dialysis patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristano, Antonio G

    2009-01-01

    The case is reported of a 47-year-old man with a history of chronic renal failure, treated with peritoneal dialysis, who presented with acute sacroiliac joint pain secondary to a pelvic abscess. Initially a diagnosis of infectious sacroiliitis of the left sacroiliac joint was suspected, but following investigation a pain referable to the sacroiliac joint was suspected. The patient recovered with a combination of antibiotics for the pelvic abscess and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:21994518

  9. Counter-flow dialysis for microvolume desalting

    OpenAIRE

    Kalikavunkal, Prameen Chacko

    2015-01-01

    Some analytical techniques are not compatible with physiological salt concentrations. An array of desalting approaches exists, but the conventional implementation requires large sample volumes, which is not compatible with fingerprick blood samples for molecular diagnostics. With dialysis being identified as the most suitable method for on-chip microvolume desalting, the aim of this work was to develop a microvolume dialyser that can desalt biological samples to any required salt concentratio...

  10. Waste acid recycling via diffusion dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffani, C.

    1995-05-26

    Inorganic acids are commonly used for surface cleaning and finishing of metals. The acids become unuseable due to contamination with metals or diluted and weakened. Diffusion dialysis has become a way to recover the useable acid and allow separation of the metals for recovery and sale to refineries. This technique is made possible by the use of membranes that are strong enough to withstand low ph and have long service life.

  11. Satisfaction with care in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgessner, J; Perera-Chang, M; Klinkner, G; Soley, I; Marcelli, D; Arkossy, O; Stopper, A; Kimmel, P L

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of dialysis care, only recently evaluated in clinical studies. We developed a tool to assess peritoneal dialysis (PD) customer satisfaction, and sought to evaluate and validate the Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), quantifying PD patient satisfaction. The CSQ included questions regarding administrative issues, Delivery Service, PD Training, Handling Requests, and transportation. The study was performed using interviews in all Hungarian Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers offering PD. CSQ results were compared with psychosocial measures to identify if patient satisfaction was associated with perception of social support and illness burden, or depression. We assessed CSQ internal consistency and validity. Factor analysis explored potential underlying dimensions of the CSQ. One hundred and thirty-three patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease for more than 3 months were interviewed. The CSQ had high internal consistency. There was high patient satisfaction with customer service. PD patient satisfaction scores correlated with quality of life (QOL) and social support measures, but not with medical or demographic factors, or depressive affect. The CSQ is a reliable tool to assess PD customer satisfaction. PD patient satisfaction is associated with perception of QOL. Efforts to improve customer satisfaction may improve PD patients' quantity as well as QOL.

  12. NATIVE VS NON-NATIVE ENGLISH TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masrizal Masrizal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of English language teachers worldwide are non-native English speakers (NNS, no research was conducted on these teachers until recently. A pioneer research by Peter Medgyes in 1994 took quite a long time until the other researchers found their interests in this issue. There is a widespread stereotype that a native speaker (NS is by nature the best person to teach his/her foreign language. In regard to this assumption, we then see a very limited room and opportunities for a non native teacher to teach language that is not his/hers. The aim of this article is to analyze the differences among these teachers in order to prove that non-native teachers have equal advantages that should be taken into account. The writer expects that the result of this short article could be a valuable input to the area of teaching English as a foreign language in Indonesia.

  13. Native American nurse leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Lee A

    2004-07-01

    To identify which characteristics, wisdom, and skills are essential in becoming an effective Native American nurse leader. This will lead to the development of a curriculum suitable for Native American nurses. A qualitative, descriptive design was used for this study. Focus groups were conducted in Polson, Montana. A total of 67 Native and non-Native nurses participated. Sixty-seven percent of them were members of Indian tribes. Data were content analyzed using Spradley's ethnographic methodology. Three domains of analysis emerged: point of reference for the leader (individual, family, community), what a leader is (self-actualized, wise, experienced, political, bicultural, recognized, quiet presence, humble, spiritual, and visionary), and what a leader does (mentors, role models, communicates, listens, demonstrates values, mobilizes, and inspires). Native nurse leaders lead differently. Thus, a leadership curriculum suitable for Native nurses may lead to increased work productivity and therefore improved patient care for Native Americans.

  14. Peritoneal dialysis in acute renal failure in canines: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Bhatt

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis is a technique whereby infusion of dialysis solution into the peritoneal cavity is followed by a variable dwell time and subsequent drainage. During peritoneal dialysis, solutes and fluids are exchanged between the capillary blood and the intraperitoneal fluid through a biologic membrane, the peritoneum. Inadequate renal function leads to disturbance in the removal of the extra fluid and waste products. It removes the waste product and extra fluid from the body in renal failure in small animal practice. Peritoneal dialysis is more accessible, more affordable and easier to administer to the small animal patient. The most common indication for peritoneal dialysis in dogs is acute renal failure (ARF. Peritoneal dialysis is an important therapeutic tool for mitigating clinical signs of uremia and giving the kidneys time to recover in cats with acute kidney injury when conventional therapy is no longer effective. [Vet. World 2011; 4(11.000: 517-521

  15. Spatial Analysis of Case-Mix and Dialysis Modality Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phirtskhalaishvili, Tamar; Bayer, Florian; Edet, Stephane; Bongiovanni, Isabelle; Hogan, Julien; Couchoud, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ♦ Health-care systems must attempt to provide appropriate, high-quality, and economically sustainable care that meets the needs and choices of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). France offers 9 different modalities of dialysis, each characterized by dialysis technique, the extent of professional assistance, and the treatment site. The aim of this study was 1) to describe the various dialysis modalities in France and the patient characteristics associated with each of them, and 2) to analyze their regional patterns to identify possible unexpected associations between case-mixes and dialysis modalities. ♦ The clinical characteristics of the 37,421 adult patients treated by dialysis were described according to their treatment modality. Agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis was used to aggregate the regions into clusters according to their use of these modalities and the characteristics of their patients. ♦ The gradient of patient characteristics was similar from home hemodialyis (HD) to in-center HD and from non-assisted automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) to assisted continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Analyzing their spatial distribution, we found differences in the patient case-mix on dialysis across regions but also differences in the health-care provided for them. The classification of the regions into 6 different clusters allowed us to detect some unexpected associations between case-mixes and treatment modalities. ♦ The 9 modalities of treatment available make it theoretically possible to adapt treatment to patients' clinical characteristics and abilities. However, although we found an overall appropriate association of dialysis modalities to the case-mix, major inter-region heterogeneity and the low rate of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home HD suggest that factors besides patients' clinical conditions impact the choice of dialysis modality. The French organization should now be evaluated in terms of patients' quality of

  16. Benfotiamine Protects against Peritoneal and Kidney Damage in Peritoneal Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kihm, Lars P.; Müller-Krebs, Sandra; Klein, Julia; Ehrlich, Gregory; Mertes, Laura; Gross, Marie-Luise; Adaikalakoteswari, Antonysunil; Thornalley, Paul J.; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Nawroth, Peter P.; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat

    2011-01-01

    Residual renal function and the integrity of the peritoneal membrane contribute to morbidity and mortality among patients treated with peritoneal dialysis. Glucose and its degradation products likely contribute to the deterioration of the remnant kidney and damage to the peritoneum. Benfotiamine decreases glucose-induced tissue damage, suggesting the potential for benefit in peritoneal dialysis. Here, in a model of peritoneal dialysis in uremic rats, treatment with benfotiamine decreased peri...

  17. Water soluble vitamins and peritoneal dialysis - State of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Magdalena; Lichodziejewska-Niemierko, Monika; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja; Małgorzewicz, Sylwia

    2017-12-01

    This review presents the results of a systematic literature search concerning water soluble vitamins and peritoneal dialysis modality. We provide an overview of the data available on vitamin requirements, dietary intake, dialysis related losses, metabolism and the benefits of supplementation. We also summarise the current recommendations concerning the supplementation of vitamins in peritoneal dialysis and discuss the safety of an administration of vitamins in pharmacological doses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Patients' Satisfaction with Their Dialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al Eissa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the degree of satisfaction among hemodialysis patients and the factors influencing this satisfaction. Methods. Patients were recruited from 3 Saudi dialysis centers. Demographic data was collected. Using 1 to 10 Likert scale, the patients were asked to rate the overall satisfaction with, and the overall impact of, their dialysis therapy on their lives and to rate the effect of the dialysis therapy on 15 qualities of life domains. Results. 322 patients were recruited (72.6% of the total eligible patients. The mean age was 51.7 years (±15.4; 58% have been on dialysis for >3 years. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index was 3.2 (±2, and Kt/V was 1.3 (±0.44. The mean satisfaction score was (7.41 ± 2.75 and the mean score of the impact of the dialysis on the patients' lives was 5.32 ± 2.55. Male patients reported worse effect of dialysis on family life, social life, energy, and appetite. Longer period since the commencement of dialysis was associated with adverse effect on finances and energy. Lower level of education was associated with worse dialysis effect on stress, overall health, sexual life, hobbies, and exercise ability. Conclusion. The level of satisfaction is affected by gender, duration on dialysis, educational level, and standard of care given.

  19. Effects of Physician Payment Reform on Provision of Home Dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Kevin F.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Patients with end-stage renal disease can receive dialysis at home or in-center. In 2004 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services reformed physician payment for in-center hemodialysis care from a capitated to a tiered fee-for-service model, augmenting physician payment for frequent in-center visits. We evaluated whether payment reform influenced dialysis modality assignment. Study Design Cohort study of patients starting dialysis in the US in the three years before and after payment reform. Methods We conducted difference-in-difference analyses comparing patients with Traditional Medicare coverage (who were affected by the policy) to others with Medicare Advantage (who were unaffected by the policy). We also examined whether the policy had a more pronounced influence on dialysis modality assignment in areas with lower costs of traveling to dialysis facilities. Results Patients with Traditional Medicare coverage experienced a 0.7% (95% CI 0.2%–1.1%; p=0.003) reduction in the absolute probability of home dialysis use following payment reform compared to patients with Medicare Advantage. Patients living in areas with larger dialysis facilities (where payment reform made in-center hemodialysis comparatively more lucrative for physicians) experienced a 0.9% (95% CI 0.5%–1.4%; ppayment model for dialysis care resulted in fewer patients receiving home dialysis. This area of policy failure highlights the importance of considering unintended consequences of future physician payment reform efforts. PMID:27355909

  20. Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, William L

    2018-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is an effective treatment modality for patients with end-stage renal disease. The relative use of peritoneal dialysis versus hemodialysis varies widely by country. Data from a 2004 survey reports the percentage of patients with end-stage renal disease treated with peritoneal dialysis to be 5%–10% in economically developed regions like the US and Western Europe to as much as 75% in Mexico. This disparity is probably related to the availability and access to hemodialysis, or in some cases patient preference for peritoneal over hemodialysis. Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis remains the major complication and primary challenge to the long-term success of peritoneal dialysis. Fifty years ago, with the advent of the Tenckhoff catheter, patients averaged six episodes of peritonitis per year on peritoneal dialysis. In 2016, the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis proposed a benchmark of 0.5 episodes of peritonitis per year or one episode every 2 years. Despite the marked reduction in peritonitis over time, peritonitis for the individual patient is problematic. The mortality for an episode of peritonitis is 5% and is a cofactor for mortality in another 16% of affected patients. Prevention of peritonitis and prompt and appropriate management of peritonitis is essential for the long-term success of peritoneal dialysis in all patients. In this review, challenges and solutions are addressed regarding the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis from the viewpoint of an infectious disease physician.

  1. Periodic Peritoneal Dialysis in End Stage Renal Disease: Is it Still ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    peritoneal dialysis (PD) in India has made renal replacement therapy out of reach of many patients with ... Keywords: Peritoneal dialysis, End stage renal disease, Renal replacement therapy ..... adherence to the dialysis program is often poor.

  2. Diggers failing to become diggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars

    Mining has in recent years emerged as a national discourse in Australia as the combined result of the mining boom and national anxieties over the GFC featured prominently in references to Australia as a failed competitive state (the folding of manufacturing, where the closure of car factories pla...... to the broader issue of how mining relates to the question of the society Australia wants to be – on the scale from ecological sanctuary to global quarry....

  3. Do immigrants improve the health of native workers?

    OpenAIRE

    Giuntella, Osea

    2014-01-01

    Public debate on immigration focuses on its effects on wages and employment, yet the discussion typically fails to consider the effects of immigration on working conditions that affect workers' health. There is growing evidence that immigrants are more likely than natives to work in risky jobs, as they are more inclined to take on physically intensive tasks. Recent studies show that as immigration rises, native workers are pushed into less demanding jobs. Such market adjustments have positive...

  4. MBS Native Plant Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data layer contains results of the Minnesota County Biological Survey (MCBS). It includes polygons representing the highest quality native plant communities...

  5. Decreasing dialysis catheter rates by creating a multidisciplinary dialysis access program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberry, Patricia M; Niederhaus, Silke V; Schweitzer, Eugene J; Leeser, David B

    2018-03-01

    Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have determined that chronic dialysis units should have 45%. A multidisciplinary program was established with goals of decreasing catheter rates in order to decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections, decrease mortality associated with central line-associated bloodstream infection, decrease hospital days, and provide savings to the healthcare system. We collected the catheter rates within three dialysis centers served over a 5-year period. Using published data surrounding the incidence and related costs of central line-associated bloodstream infection and mortality per catheter day, the number of central line-associated bloodstream infection events, the costs, and the related mortality could be determined prior to and after the initiation of the dialysis access program. An organized dialysis access program resulted in a 82% decrease in the number of central venous catheter days which lead to a concurrent reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infection and deaths. As a result of creating an access program, central venous catheter rates decreased from an average rate of 45% to 8%. The cost savings related to the program was calculated to be over US$5 million. The decrease in the number of mortalities is estimated to be between 13 and 27 patients. We conclude that a formalized access program decreases catheter rates, central line-associated bloodstream infection, and the resultant hospitalizations, mortality, and costs. Areas with high hemodialysis catheter rates should develop access programs to better serve their patient population.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Serum Levels of Aluminum and Lead in Dialysis Patients, Pre and post Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atieh Makhlough

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: Trace elements status in chronic kidney diseases patients is influenced by a renal function residual, size and dialyzer membrane surface. The water nature also is used for dialysis fluid preparation and composition. Trace elements in ESRD patients differed from healthy individuals. So this issue requires accurate studies on trace elements clinical aspects in ESRD patients.

  7. Peritoneal dialysis: a primary care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Ramesh; West, Cheryl

    2006-01-01

    As the population of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) grows at an alarming rate, primary care physicians will increasingly be involved in the management of these patients. Early recognition of CKD and timely referral to a nephrologist when glomerular filtration rate approaches 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) is extremely important to improve ESRD outcome and appropriate selection of dialysis modality. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) remains a viable treatment option for ESRD patients. PD is less expensive dialysis modality and may provide a survival advantages over hemodialysis in first 2 to 4 years of treatment. Preserving residual renal function (RRF) is of paramount importance to prolong the survival outcomes in PD patients. Thus preservation of RRF is an important goal in the management of PD patients. Every effort should be made to avoid nephrotoxic drugs like aminoglycosides and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and limit the use of radiocontrast agents in PD patients with RRF. Judicious use of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent peritonitis would further help to reduce morbidity from PD. Protecting peritoneal membrane from long-term toxic and metabolic effects of the conventional glucose-based solutions is another objective to further improve PD outcome. Development of new, more biocompatible PD solutions holds promise for the future. One such solution, icodextrin, is now approved for use in the United States. Although extremely safe to use, it is associated with unique metabolic effects that may concern primary care physicians. They include false elevation of blood glucose, a reversible increase in serum alkaline phosphatase and a false decline in serum amylase. Monitoring of glycemia by assays that use glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinoline quinone enzymes should be avoided and serum amylase alone should not be relied on in diagnosing pancreatitis in patients on icodextrin.

  8. Entropy of uremia and dialysis technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics applies with local exceptions to patient history and therapy interventions. Living things preserve their low level of entropy throughout time because they receive energy from their surroundings in the form of food. They gain their order at the expense of disordering the nutrients they consume. Death is the thermodynamically favored state: it represents a large increase in entropy as molecular structure yields to chaos. The kidney is an organ dissipating large amounts of energy to maintain the level of entropy of the organism as low as possible. Diseases, and in particular uremia, represent conditions of rapid increase in entropy. Therapeutic strategies are oriented towards a reduction in entropy or at least a decrease in the speed of entropy increase. Uremia is a process accelerating the trend towards randomness and disorder (increase in entropy). Dialysis is a factor external to the patient that tends to reduce the level of entropy caused by kidney disease. Since entropy can only increase in closed systems, energy and work must be spent to limit the entropy of uremia. This energy should be adapted to the system (patient) and be specifically oriented and personalized. This includes a multidimensional effort to achieve an adequate dialysis that goes beyond small molecular weight solute clearance. It includes a biological plan for recovery of homeostasis and a strategy towards long-term rehabilitation of the patient. Such objectives can be achieved with a combination of technology and innovation to answer specific questions that are still present after 60 years of dialysis history. This change in the individual bioentropy may represent a local exception to natural trends as the patient could be considered an isolated universe responding to the classic laws of thermodynamics. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. [Peritonitis in pediatric patients receiving peritoneal dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellouli, Manel; Ferjani, Meriem; Abidi, Kamel; Hammi, Yosra; Boutiba, Ilhem; Naija, Ouns; Zarrouk, Chokri; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Gargah, Tahar

    2015-12-01

    Peritonitis on catheter of dialysis represents the most frequent complication of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) in the pediatric population. It remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In this study, we investigated the risk factors for peritonitis in children. In this study, we retrospectively collected the records of 85 patients who were treated with PD within the past ten years in the service of pediatrics of the University Hospital Charles-Nicolle of Tunis. Peritonitis rate was 0.75 episode per patient-year. Notably, peritonitis caused by Gram-positive organisms were more common. Analysis of infection risk revealed three significant independent factors: the poor weight (P=0.0045), the non-automated PD (P=0.02) and the short delay from catheter insertion to starting PD (P=0.02). The early onset peritonitis was significantly associated with frequent peritonitis episodes (P=0.0008). The mean duration between the first and second episode of peritonitis was significantly shorter than between PD commencement and the first episode of peritonitis. We revealed a significant association between Gram-negative peritonitis and the presence of ureterostomy (0.018) and between Gram-positive peritonitis and the presence of exit-site and tunnel infections (0.02). Transition to permanent hemodialysis was needed in many children but no death occurred in patients with peritonitis. Considering the important incidence of peritonitis in our patients, it is imperative to establish a targeted primary prevention. Nutritional care must be provided to children to avoid poor weight. The automated dialysis has to be the modality of choice. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Unusual dialysate leakage complicating peritoneal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Jainn-Shiun; Yu, Fu-Chiu; Chen, Chiou-An; Wang, Yuh-Feng

    2006-01-01

    A 16-year-old female who had end-stage renal disease on 2-month continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) presented with perineal pain 4 days before admission. The physical examination revealed bilateral labial edema. Peritoneal scintigraphy was requested after infusing 2 L peritoneal dialysate with direct administration of 370 MBq (10mCi) technetium-99m diethylenetriamine pentra-acetic acid into peritoneal cavity via Tenckhoff catheter. Radioactive uptake from right inguinal to labial region was clearly demonstrated, and this indicated the site of peritoneal leakage. After surgical intervention unilaterally, she continued CAPD without any recurrence (au)

  11. Neurological complications of renal dialysis and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Kushan; Taube, David; Khalil, Nofal; Perry, Richard; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2018-04-01

    Neurological complications from renal replacement therapy contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in patients with renal failure. Such complications can affect either the central or peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological disturbances associated with the uraemic state do not respond fully to renal replacement therapy. There are also complications specifically associated with dialysis and transplantation. A multidisciplinary approach, involving both nephrologists and neurologists, is critical for the diagnosis and effective management of these disorders. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Water-Permeable Dialysis Membranes for Multi-Layered Micro Dialysis System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya eTo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of water-permeable dialysis membranes that are suitable for an implantable microdialysis system that does not use dialysis fluid. We developed a microdialysis system integrating microfluidic channels and nanoporous filtering membranes made of polyethersulfone (PES, aiming at a fully implantable system that drastically improves the quality of life of patients. Simplicity of the total system is crucial for the implantable dialysis system, where the pumps and storage tanks for the dialysis fluid pose problems. Hence, we focus on hemofiltration, which does not require the dialysis fluid but water-permeable membranes. We investigated the water-permeability of the PES membrane with respect to the concentrations of the PES, the additives, and the solvents in the casting solution. Sufficiently water-permeable membranes were found through in vitro experiments using whole bovine blood. The filtrate was verified to have the concentrations of low-molecular-weight molecules, such as sodium, potassium, urea, and creatinine, while proteins, such as albumin, were successfully blocked by the membrane. We conducted in vivo experiments using rats, where the system was connected to the femoral artery and jugular vein. The filtrate was successfully collected without any leakage of blood inside the system and it did not contain albumin but low-molecular-weight molecules whose concentrations were identical to those of the blood. The rat model with renal failure showed 100% increase of creatinine in 5 h, while rats connected to the system showed only a 7.4% increase, which verified the effectiveness of the proposed microdialysis system.

  13. A case of bacterial peritonitis caused by Roseomonas mucosa in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukuma, Yuta; Sugawara, Koji; Shimano, Shota; Yamada, Shunsuke; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kitazono, Takanari; Higashi, Harumichi

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial peritonitis remains a life-threatening complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Roseomonas is a bacterial genus of pink-pigmented, oxidized, gram-negative coccobacilli that was first named in 1993. Importantly, Roseomonas mucosa exhibits antibiotic resistance, with significant resistance to cephalosporin, which is often selected as an empirical antibiotic regimen for peritonitis in PD patients. We herein report the case of a PD patient with bacterial peritonitis caused by Roseomonas mucosa that was fortunately identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and successfully treated with ciprofloxacin. Given that Roseomonas demonstrates resistance to a variety of antibiotics. The administration of empiric antibiotic therapy based on the recommendation of the International Society of Peritoneal Dialysis guidelines occasionally fails, leading to the aggravation of bacterial peritonitis. Hence, nephrologists should consider Roseomonas as one of the potential causative organisms of peritonitis, especially when gram-negative bacilli are resistant to cephalosporin and cannot be identified using standard laboratory methods.

  14. Acute hydrothorax complicating peritoneal dialysis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganathan Dwarkanathan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute hydrothorax is an uncommon but a well-recognized complication of peritoneal dialysis. No single test is definitive for diagnosis. Although it is not a life-threatening condition, hydrothorax often requires abandonment of peritoneal dialysis. Delay in diagnosis can lead to worsening of the clinical status. Case Presentation A 33-year-old Caucasian woman with lupus, who was successfully treated with temporary peritoneal dialysis 17 years previously, presented with acute dyspnea and a right pleural effusion after recommencing peritoneal dialysis. Investigations eliminated infective, cardiac, and primary respiratory causes. Peritoneal dialysis-related hydrothorax was suggested by biochemistry, and a pleuroperitoneal leak was definitively confirmed by using a Tc-99 m DTPA (diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid scintigraphy scan. Subsequently, she underwent video-assisted thoracoscopy-guided talc pleurodesis and was able to return successfully to peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion Although our case is not the first report that describes the occurrence of acute hydrothorax in peritoneal dialysis, it is an important condition to recognize for the wider general medical community. Furthermore, this case demonstrates that peritoneal dialysis can be continued with a hydrothorax, provided the underlying cause can be corrected. We review the literature pertaining to the utility and reliability of different diagnostic approaches to hydrothorax.

  15. Cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality among patients starting dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jager, Dinanda J; Grootendorst, Diana C; Jager, Kitty J

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Cardiovascular mortality is considered the main cause of death in patients receiving dialysis and is 10 to 20 times higher in such patients than in the general population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if high overall mortality in patients starting dialysis is a consequence of increased cardiov...

  16. Haemodialysis at home: review of current dialysis machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Sabrina; Davenport, Andrew

    2018-04-26

    Only a minority of patients with chronic kidney disease treated by hemodialysis are currently treated at home. Until relatively recently, the only type of hemodialysis machine available for these patients was a slightly smaller version of the standard machines used for in-center dialysis treatments. Areas covered: There are now an alternative generation of dialysis machines specifically designed for home hemodialysis. The home dialysis patient wants a smaller machine, which is intuitive to use, easy to trouble shoot, robust and reliable, quick to setup and put away, requiring minimal waste disposal. The machines designed for home dialysis have some similarities in terms of touch-screen patient interfaces, and using pre-prepared cartridges to speed up setting up the machine. On the other hand, they differ in terms of whether they use slower or standard dialysate flows, prepare batches of dialysis fluid, require separate water purification equipment, or whether this is integrated, or use pre-prepared sterile bags of dialysis fluid. Expert commentary: Dialysis machine complexity is one of the hurdles reducing the number of patients opting for home hemodialysis and the introduction of the newer generation of dialysis machines designed for ease of use will hopefully increase the number of patients opting for home hemodialysis.

  17. Risk factors for peritoneal dialysis catheter failure in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC) failure still remains a common clinical problem in pediatric patients despite advancements in catheter placement and dialysis techniques. Our aim was to determine the risk factors that may lead to PDC failure, especially those factors that could be potentially modified to ...

  18. Predictors of chain acquisition among independent dialysis facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Alyssa S; Hirth, Richard A; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Wheeler, John R C

    2010-04-01

    To determine the predictors of chain acquisition among independent dialysis providers. Retrospective facility-level data combined from CMS Cost Reports, Medical Evidence Forms, Annual Facility Surveys, and claims for 1996-2003. Independent dialysis facilities' probability of acquisition by a dialysis chain (overall and by chain size) was estimated using a discrete time hazard rate model, controlling for financial and clinical performance, practice patterns, market factors, and other facility characteristics. The sample includes all U.S. freestanding dialysis facilities that report not being chain affiliated for at least 1 year between 1997 and 2003. Above-average costs and better quality outcomes are significant determinants of dialysis chain acquisition. Facilities in larger markets were more likely to be acquired by a chain. Furthermore, small dialysis chains have different acquisition strategies than large chains. Dialysis chains appear to employ a mix of turn-around and cream-skimming strategies. Poor financial health is a predictor of chain acquisition as in other health care sectors, but the increased likelihood of chain acquisition among higher quality facilities is unique to the dialysis industry. Significant differences among predictors of acquisition by small and large chains reinforce the importance of using a richer classification for chain status.

  19. Children's experiences of dialysis: a systematic review of qualitative studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjaden, Lidwien; Tong, Allison; Henning, Paul; Groothoff, Jaap; Craig, Jonathan C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe the experiences and perspectives of children and adolescents on dialysis. Design A systematic review of qualitative studies was conducted that explored the experiences of children on dialysis. Electronic databases and reference lists of relevant articles were searched to

  20. Patients in assisted automated peritoneal dialysis develop strategies for selfcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holch, Kirsten

      Patients in Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis develop strategies for self-care Background: Since 2000 a model for Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis (AAPD) in the patients own home has been developed at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. The patient group consists of physically...

  1. Dialysis and renal transplantation in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trullas, Joan Carles; Mocroft, Amanda; Cofan, Federico

    2010-01-01

    To determine prevalence and characteristics of end-stage renal diseases (ESRD) [dialysis and renal transplantation (RT)] among European HIV-infected patients.......To determine prevalence and characteristics of end-stage renal diseases (ESRD) [dialysis and renal transplantation (RT)] among European HIV-infected patients....

  2. Method of detecting failed fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Hideaki; Suzumura, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the settlement of the temperature of an adequate filling high temperature pure water by detecting the outlet temperature of a high temperature pure water filling tube to a fuel assembly to control the heating of the pure water and detecting the failed fuel due to the sampling of the pure water. Method: A temperature sensor is provided at a water tube connected to a sipping cap for filling high temperature pure water to detect the temperature of the high temperature pure water at the outlet of the tube, and the temperature is confirmed by a temperature indicator. A heater is controlled on the basis of this confirmation, an adequate high temperature pure water is filled in the fuel assembly, and the pure water is replaced with coolant. Then, it is sampled to settle the adequate temperature of the high temperature coolant used for detecting the failure of the fuel assembly. As a result, the sipping effect does not decrease, and the failed fuel can be precisely detected. (Yoshihara, H.)

  3. Determinants of Adherence to Living on Dialysis for Mexican Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley A. Wells

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores perceptions that affect adherence behaviors among Mexican Americans living with dialysis. In-depth narrative interviews were conducted with 15 Mexican Americans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD living on dialysis, 15 family members, and 6 health care personnel who provided care to them. Four themes emerged: (a positive influences to adherence, (b obstacles to adherence, (c daily activity losses, and (d fears about living with dialysis. From the findings, the perceptions given for non-adherence with the dialysis regimen ranged from denial of the condition, lack of pre-education, to cultural factors. Those given for adherence included prolonged life, family, and hope of getting a transplant. Health care providers were the reminder to adhere. Several cultural factors influenced their adherence perceptions. Strategies to enhance adherence behaviors should focus on knowledge about dialysis, use of the collective efficacy of the family, and the inclusion of cultural values.

  4. Psychosocial adjustment and adherence to dialysis treatment regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownbridge, G; Fielding, D M

    1994-12-01

    Sixty children and adolescents in end-stage renal failure who were undergoing either haemodialysis or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis at one of five United Kingdom dialysis centres were assessed on psychosocial adjustment and adherence to their fluid intake, diet and medication regimes. Parental adjustment was also measured and data on sociodemographic and treatment history variables collected. A structured family interview and standardised questionnaire measures of anxiety, depression and behavioural disturbance were used. Multiple measures of treatment adherence were obtained, utilising children's and parents' self-reports, weight gain between dialysis, blood pressure, serum potassium level, blood urea level, dietitians' surveys and consultants' ratings. Correlational analyses showed that low treatment adherence was associated with poor adjustment to diagnosis and dialysis by children and parents (P adherence than younger children, P dialysis (P treatment of this group of children. Future research should develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions aimed at improving treatment adherence.

  5. Listen to the Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensky, Marc

    2006-01-01

    "Digital natives" refer to today's students because they are native speakers of technology, fluent in the digital language of computers, video games, and the Internet. Those who were not born into the digital world are referred to as digital immigrants. Educators, considered digital immigrants, have slid into the 21st century--and into the digital…

  6. Home Dialysis in the Prospective Payment System Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Cheng, Xingxing S; Chin, Kuo-Kai; Zubair, Talhah; Chertow, Glenn M; Bendavid, Eran; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2017-10-01

    The ESRD Prospective Payment System introduced two incentives to increase home dialysis use: bundling injectable medications into a single payment for treatment and paying for home dialysis training. We evaluated the effects of the ESRD Prospective Payment System on home dialysis use by patients starting dialysis in the United States from January 1, 2006 to August 31, 2013. We analyzed data on dialysis modality, insurance type, and comorbidities from the United States Renal Data System. We estimated the effect of the policy on home dialysis use with multivariable logistic regression and compared the effect on Medicare Parts A/B beneficiaries with the effect on patients with other types of insurance. The ESRD Prospective Payment System associated with a 5.0% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 4.0% to 6.0%) increase in home dialysis use by the end of the study period. Home dialysis use increased by 5.8% (95% CI, 4.3% to 6.9%) among Medicare beneficiaries and 4.1% (95% CI, 2.3% to 5.4%) among patients covered by other forms of health insurance. The difference between these groups was not statistically significant (1.8%; 95% CI, -0.2% to 3.8%). Conversely, in both populations, the training add-on did not associate with increases in home dialysis use beyond the effect of the policy. The ESRD Prospective Payment System bundling, but not the training add-on, associated with substantial increases in home dialysis, which were identical for both Medicare and non-Medicare patients. These spill-over effects suggest that major payment changes in Medicare can affect all patients with ESRD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Khan, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease presenting for the first time for dialysis in uremic condition. Study Design: Cross sectional Study. Place and Duration of the Study: Outpatient department of Nephrology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore from 1 st Jan 2012 to 31 st December 2012. Patients and Methods: Patients of CKD due to any cause presenting with uremia for the first time for dialysis were included in the study. History and physical examination was done and demographic data was collected in pre designed form. Patients were offered for dialysis while explaining to them the advantages of getting and disadvantages of not getting dialysis. Patient's response on the offer was recorded and the reason for the refusal were noted. Results: According to the criteria 150 patients were included in the study. Most of the patients were male 92 (61.3%) and illiterate 78 (52.0%). Major cause of CKD was diabetes mellitus 58 (38.7%) followed by hypertension 38 (25.3%). Mean age of the patients was 42.59 ± 13.72 year and income of themost of the patients 126 (84%) was less than US$100/-month. Most of the patients 126 (77.0%) were asked about the need of dialysis in less than three months, 61 (41.3%) offered for the first time and amongst them 85 (54.0%) were offered dialysis already. Majority of the patients 101 (67.3%) refused dialysis when it was offered to them for the first time. Major reason of the refusal was fear of dialysis procedure in 76 (76%) patients followed by treatment by spiritual 14 (14%) and alternative ways and others 11 (11 %). Middle age persons refused dialysis significantly. (author)

  8. Native SAD is maturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, John P; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Weiss, Manfred S

    2015-07-01

    Native SAD phasing uses the anomalous scattering signal of light atoms in the crystalline, native samples of macromolecules collected from single-wavelength X-ray diffraction experiments. These atoms include sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, potassium and calcium. Native SAD phasing is challenging and is critically dependent on the collection of accurate data. Over the past five years, advances in diffraction hardware, crystallographic software, data-collection methods and strategies, and the use of data statistics have been witnessed which allow 'highly accurate data' to be routinely collected. Today, native SAD sits on the verge of becoming a 'first-choice' method for both de novo and molecular-replacement structure determination. This article will focus on advances that have caught the attention of the community over the past five years. It will also highlight both de novo native SAD structures and recent structures that were key to methods development.

  9. Dialysis Malnutrition and Malnutrition Inflammation Scores: screening tools for prediction of dialysis-related protein-energy wasting in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvinder, Gilcharan Singh; Swee, Winnie Chee Siew; Karupaiah, Tilakavati; Sahathevan, Sharmela; Chinna, Karuthan; Ahmad, Ghazali; Bavanandan, Sunita; Goh, Bak Leong

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is highly prevalent in Malaysian dialysis patients and there is a need for a valid screening tool for early identification and management. This cross-sectional study aims to examine the sensitivity of the Dialysis Malnutrition Score (DMS) and Malnutrition Inflammation Score (MIS) tools in predicting protein-energy wasting (PEW) among Malaysian dialysis patients. A total of 155 haemodialysis (HD) and 90 peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients were screened for risk of malnutrition using DMS and MIS and comparisons were made with established guidelines by International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM) for PEW. MIS cut-off score of >=5 indicated presence of malnutrition in all patients. A total of 59% of HD and 83% of PD patients had PEW by ISRNM criteria. Based on DMS, 73% of HD and 71% of PD patients exhibited moderate malnutrition, whilst using MIS, 88% and 90%, respectively were malnourished. DMS and MIS correlated significantly in HD (r2=0.552, pmalnutrition classification were established (score >=5) for use amongst Malaysian dialysis patients. Both DMS and MIS are valid tools to be used for nutrition screening of dialysis patients especially those undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The DMS may be a more practical and simpler tool to be utilized in the Malaysian dialysis settings as it does not require laboratory markers.

  10. Association of education level with dialysis outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Muhammad; Sandhu, Gurprataap S; Desilva, Ranil; Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander S

    2012-01-01

    The impact of education on health care outcome has been studied in the past, but its role in the dialysis population is unclear. In this report, we evaluated this association. We used the United States Renal Data System data of end-stage renal disease patients aged 18 years. Education level at the time of end-stage renal disease onset was the primary variable of interest. The outcome of the study was patient mortality. We used four categories of education level: 0 = less than 12 years of education; 1 = high school graduate; 2 = some college; 3 = college graduate. Subgroups based on age, race, sex, donor type, and diabetic status were also analyzed. After adjustments for covariates in the Cox model, using individuals with less than 12 years of education as a reference, patients with college education showed decreased mortality with hazard ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.69–0.95), P = 0.010. In conclusion, we showed that higher education level is associated with improved survival of patients on dialysis.

  11. Modeling and control of dialysis systems

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book is the first text of its kind that presents both the traditional and the modern aspects of dialysis modeling and control in a clear, insightful and highly comprehensive writing style. It provides an in-depth analysis of the mathematical models and algorithms, and demonstrates their applications in real world problems of significant complexity. It explains concepts in a clear, matter-of-fact style. The material of this book will be useful to advanced undergraduate and graduate biomedical engineering students. Also, researchers and practitioners in the field of dialysis, control systems, soft computing will benefit from it. In order to make the reader aware of the applied side of the subject, the book includes:       Chapter openers with a chapter outline, chapter objectives, key terms list, and abstract.       Solved numerical examples to illustrate the application of a particular concept, and also to encourage good problem-solving skills.       More than 1000 questions to give the rea...

  12. Indications for vancomycin in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golper, T A; Schulman, G; D'Agata, E M

    2000-01-01

    Resistance to vancomycin has emerged among Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), and enterococci, and this emergence has particular prevalence in dialysis units. It has therefore become imperative that physicians use vancomycin judiciously. General recommendations regarding the appropriate use of vancomycin have been developed. Although in theory implementation of these guidelines should not be difficult, the medical community may be unable or unwilling to make the necessary adjustments in practice. The onslaught of cost constraints and bureaucratic encumbrance has occurred simultaneously with the increase in vancomycin resistance among pathogens commonly isolated among the dialysis population. When a patient responds to empiric antibiotic therapy and susceptibility data indicate that an antibiotic other than vancomycin would be appropriate, the clinician far too often does not make the change to this alternative. Previously there was no biological imperative to change the antibiotic. That complacency has infected an entire generation of physicians, and especially nephrologists. Furthermore, there is an active movement against change, driven by concerns such as malpractice accusations and frank errors in the interpretation of medical facts.

  13. Peritoneal Dialysis Tailored to Pediatric Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Schmitt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consideration of specific pediatric aspects is essential to achieve adequate peritoneal dialysis (PD treatment in children. These are first of all the rapid growth, in particular during infancy and puberty, which must be accompanied by a positive calcium balance, and the age dependent changes in body composition. The high total body water content and the high ultrafiltration rates required in anuric infants for adequate nutrition predispose to overshooting convective sodium losses and severe hypotension. Tissue fragility and rapid increases in intraabdominal fat mass predispose to hernia and dialysate leaks. Peritoneal equilibration tests should repeatedly been performed to optimize individual dwell time. Intraperitoneal pressure measurements give an objective measure of intraperitoneal filling, which allow for an optimized dwell volume, that is, increased dialysis efficiency without increasing the risk of hernias, leaks, and retrofiltration. We present the concept of adapted PD, that is, the combination of short dwells with low fill volume to promote ultrafiltration and long dwells with a high fill volume to improve purification within one PD session. The use of PD solutions with low glucose degradation product content is recommended in children, but unfortunately still not feasible in many countries.

  14. Biocompatible Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids: Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoungjee Cho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis (PD is a preferred home dialysis modality and has a number of added advantages including improved initial patient survival and cost effectiveness over haemodialysis. Despite these benefits, uptake of PD remains relatively low, especially in developed countries. Wider implementation of PD is compromised by higher technique failure from infections (e.g., PD peritonitis and ultrafiltration failure. These are inevitable consequences of peritoneal injury, which is thought to result primarily from continuous exposure to PD fluids that are characterised by their “unphysiologic” composition. In order to overcome these barriers, a number of more biocompatible PD fluids, with neutral pH, low glucose degradation product content, and bicarbonate buffer have been manufactured over the past two decades. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated their benefit in terms of improvement in host cell defence, peritoneal membrane integrity, and cytokine profile. This paper aims to review randomised controlled trials assessing the use of biocompatible PD fluids and their effect on clinical outcomes.

  15. Detector for failed fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masaru.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide automatic monitor for the separation or reactor water and sampling water, in a failed fuel element detector using a sipping chamber. Constitution: A positional detector for the exact mounting of a sipping chamber on a channel box and a level detector for the detection of complete discharge of cooling water in the sipping chamber are provided in the sipping chamber. The positional detector is contacted to the upper end of the channel box and operated when the sipping chamber is correctly mounted to the fuel assemblies. The level detector comprises a float and a limit switch and it is operated when the water in the sipping chamber is discharged by a predetermined amount. Isolation of reactor water and sampling water are automatically monitored by the signal from these two detectors. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Why good projects fail anyway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Nadim F; Ashkenas, Ronald N

    2003-09-01

    Big projects fail at an astonishing rate--more than half the time, by some estimates. It's not hard to understand why. Complicated long-term projects are customarily developed by a series of teams working along parallel tracks. If managers fail to anticipate everything that might fall through the cracks, those tracks will not converge successfully at the end to reach the goal. Take a companywide CRM project. Traditionally, one team might analyze customers, another select the software, a third develop training programs, and so forth. When the project's finally complete, though, it may turn out that the salespeople won't enter in the requisite data because they don't understand why they need to. This very problem has, in fact, derailed many CRM programs at major organizations. There is a way to uncover unanticipated problems while the project is still in development. The key is to inject into the overall plan a series of miniprojects, or "rapid-results initiatives," which each have as their goal a miniature version of the overall goal. In the CRM project, a single team might be charged with increasing the revenues of one sales group in one region by 25% within four months. To reach that goal, team members would have to draw on the work of all the parallel teams. But in just four months, they would discover the salespeople's resistance and probably other unforeseen issues, such as, perhaps, the need to divvy up commissions for joint-selling efforts. The World Bank has used rapid-results initiatives to great effect to keep a sweeping 16-year project on track and deliver visible results years ahead of schedule. In taking an in-depth look at this project, and others, the authors show why this approach is so effective and how the initiatives are managed in conjunction with more traditional project activities.

  17. Alterations of erythrocyte rheology and cellular susceptibility in end stage renal disease: Effects of peritoneal dialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Zeynep Ertan

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of peritoneal dialysis on hemorheological and hematological parameters and their relations with oxidant and antioxidant status of uremic patients. Hemorheological parameters (erythrocyte deformability, erythrocyte aggregation, osmotic deformability, blood and plasma viscosity were measured in patients with renal insufficiency undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD and volunteers. Erythrocyte deformability, osmotic deformability and aggregation in both autologous plasma and 3% dextran 70 were measured by laser diffraction ektacytometry. Enzyme activities of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase were studied in erythrocytes; lipid peroxidation was studied by measuring the amount of malondialdehyde in both erythrocytes and plasma samples. Blood viscosity at native hematocrit was significantly lower in PD patients at all measured shear rates compared to controls, but it was high in PD patients at corrected (45% hematocrit. Erythrocyte deformability did not show any difference between the two groups. Osmotic deformability was significantly lower in PD patients compared to controls. Aggregation index values were significantly high in PD patients in plasma Catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in erythrocytes were decreased in PD patients whereas superoxide dismutase activity was increased compared to controls. Malondialdehyde was significantly increased in erythrocytes and plasma samples of PD patients which also shows correlations with aggregation parameters. It has been concluded that erythrocytes in PD patients are more prone to aggregation and this tendency could be influenced by lipid peroxidation activity in patient's plasma. These results imply that uremic conditions, loss of plasma proteins and an increased risk of oxidative stress because of decreasing levels of antioxidant enzymes affect erythrocyte rheology during peritoneal dialysis. This level of distortion may have

  18. Specific opsonic activity for staphylococci in peritoneal dialysis effluent during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Espersen, F; Kharazmi, A

    1992-01-01

    In a prospective study of intraperitoneal opsonins in 30 patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), the IgG concentration, the fibronectin concentration, the specific antistaphylococcal antibody level, and the opsonic activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis were...... measured in peritoneal dialysis effluent from the initiation of CAPD and monthly for 6 months. Significant correlation was found between the four assays, but the interindividual and intraindividual variations were considerable. No statistically significant correlation was observed between susceptibility...... of the patients to CAPD-related infectious peritonitis and any of the above-mentioned parameters of humoral defense. We conclude that at the present time it is not feasible to use these assays for the establishment of prognosis with regard to peritonitis in CAPD....

  19. Aliskiren prevents the toxic effects of peritoneal dialysis fluids during chronic dialysis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pérez-Martínez

    Full Text Available The benefits of long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD in patients with end-stage renal failure are short-lived due to structural and functional changes in the peritoneal membrane. In this report, we provide evidence for the in vitro and in vivo participation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS in the signaling pathway leading to peritoneal fibrosis during PD. Exposure to high-glucose PD fluids (PDFs increases damage and fibrosis markers in both isolated rat peritoneal mesothelial cells and in the peritoneum of rats after chronic dialysis. In both cases, the addition of the RAAS inhibitor aliskiren markedly improved damage and fibrosis markers, and prevented functional modifications in the peritoneal transport, as measured by the peritoneal equilibrium test. These data suggest that inhibition of the RAAS may be a novel way to improve the efficacy of PD by preventing inflammation and fibrosis following peritoneal exposure to high-glucose PDFs.

  20. Periodontal treatment reduces chronic systemic inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siribamrungwong, Monchai; Yothasamutr, Kasemsuk; Puangpanngam, Kutchaporn

    2014-06-01

    Chronic systemic inflammation, a non traditional risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, is associated with increasing mortality in chronic kidney disease, especially peritoneal dialysis patients. Periodontitis is a potential treatable source of systemic inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients. Clinical periodontal status was evaluated in 32 stable chronic peritoneal dialysis patients by plaque index and periodontal disease index. Hematologic, blood chemical, nutritional, and dialysis-related data as well as highly sensitive C-reactive protein were analyzed before and after periodontal treatment. At baseline, high sensitive C-reactive protein positively correlated with the clinical periodontal status (plaque index; r = 0.57, P periodontal disease index; r = 0.56, P periodontal therapy, clinical periodontal indexes were significantly lower and high sensitivity C-reactive protein significantly decreased from 2.93 to 2.21 mg/L. Moreover, blood urea nitrogen increased from 47.33 to 51.8 mg/dL, reflecting nutritional status improvement. Erythropoietin dosage requirement decreased from 8000 to 6000 units/week while hemoglobin level was stable. Periodontitis is an important source of chronic systemic inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients. Treatment of periodontal diseases can improve systemic inflammation, nutritional status and erythropoietin responsiveness in peritoneal dialysis patients. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  1. Tanatophobia in the patients on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković Milan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Thanatophobia is an exaggerated, specific, structured fear of death. It appears in childhood and continues to grow over the years, and in the old age it is accompanied with nosophobia and other mental disorders. The aim of this study was to analyze thanatophobia in dialysed patients which was in the direct connection with a basic disorder, and the influence of this disorder on functioning and the quality of life of the patients on dialysis. Methods. In the study we examined 753 patients from the chronic program of haemodialysis in a period from 1999 to 2004. The patients were classified in two groups: 348 randomized patients with Balkan Endemic Nephropathy (BEN, and the control group (N18 of patients with terminal renal insufficiency, and other diagnoses (n = 405. Since the study was a comparative, cross-sectional one, the patients were tested by the appropriate questionnaires for anxiety, depression and general mental functioning. Statistical analysis was done by the standard descriptive and analytic statistic methods. Results. Based on socio-demographics data we revealed a highly significant difference regarding the place of living between the groups BEN and N18 (χ2 = 23.970; p < 0.01, the frequency of occurrence of renal comorbidity (χ2 = 23.970; p < 0.01, the frequency of family renal comorbidity in siblings (χ2 = 23.970; p < 0.01, and the frequency of migrationes (χ2 = 4.874; p < 0.01. According to psychiatry scales, the patients from the BEN group were significantly more anxious and depressive than those from the control group. Conclusion. The signs of thanatophobia were revealed in both examined groups, but significantly more in the patients with BEN than in those with other nephrologic diseases. Thanatophobia starts before dialysis, and dialysis structures it into fear of death which is in a direct connection with the basic disorder. This intensive fear may be connected with dementia and depression, but also with

  2. Comparative Analysis of Serum Levels of Aluminum and Lead in Dialysis Patients, Pre and post Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Atieh Makhlough; Mohammad Shokrzadeh; Maryam Shaliji; Siyavash Abedi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulation or deficiency of trace elements can occur in hemodialysis patients and it increases risk of cardiovascular or other organs disorders. Special ions levels such as sodium and bicarbonate in dialysis fluid are accurately regulated but the remaining elements are not regularly measured. Aluminum and lead belong to the biologic performance free heavy metals .They also has a tendency to accumulate in hemodialysis patients. This study aims to compare serum aluminum and lead l...

  3. Effects of physician payment reform on provision of home dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Kevin F; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Chertow, Glenn M; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2016-06-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease can receive dialysis at home or in-center. In 2004, CMS reformed physician payment for in-center hemodialysis care from a capitated to a tiered fee-for-service model, augmenting physician payment for frequent in-center visits. We evaluated whether payment reform influenced dialysis modality assignment. Cohort study of patients starting dialysis in the United States in the 3 years before and the 3 years after payment reform. We conducted difference-in-difference analyses comparing patients with traditional Medicare coverage (who were affected by the policy) to others with Medicare Advantage (who were unaffected by the policy). We also examined whether the policy had a more pronounced influence on dialysis modality assignment in areas with lower costs of traveling to dialysis facilities. Patients with traditional Medicare coverage experienced a 0.7% (95% CI, 0.2%-1.1%; P = .003) reduction in the absolute probability of home dialysis use following payment reform compared with patients with Medicare Advantage. Patients living in areas with larger dialysis facilities (where payment reform made in-center hemodialysis comparatively more lucrative for physicians) experienced a 0.9% (95% CI, 0.5%-1.4%; P home dialysis use following payment reform compared with patients living in areas with smaller facilities (where payment reform made in-center hemodialysis comparatively less lucrative for physicians). The transition from a capitated to a tiered fee-for-service payment model for in-center hemodialysis care resulted in fewer patients receiving home dialysis. This area of policy failure highlights the importance of considering unintended consequences of future physician payment reform efforts.

  4. High sensitivity pyrogen testing in water and dialysis solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Wendel, Albrecht; Hartung, Thomas; von Aulock, Sonja

    2008-07-20

    The dialysis patient is confronted with hundreds of litres of dialysis solution per week, which pass the natural protective barriers of the body and are brought into contact with the tissue directly in the case of peritoneal dialysis or indirectly in the case of renal dialysis (hemodialysis). The components can be tested for living specimens or dead pyrogenic (fever-inducing) contaminations. The former is usually detected by cultivation and the latter by the endotoxin-specific Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate Assay (LAL). However, the LAL assay does not reflect the response of the human immune system to the wide variety of possible pyrogenic contaminations in dialysis fluids. Furthermore, the test is limited in its sensitivity to detect extremely low concentrations of pyrogens, which in their sum result in chronic pathologies in dialysis patients. The In vitro Pyrogen Test (IPT) employs human whole blood to detect the spectrum of pyrogens to which humans respond by measuring the release of the endogenous fever mediator interleukin-1beta. Spike recovery checks exclude interference. The test has been validated in an international study for pyrogen detection in injectable solutions. In this study we adapted the IPT to the testing of dialysis solutions. Preincubation of 50 ml spiked samples with albumin-coated microspheres enhanced the sensitivity of the assay to detect contaminations down to 0.1 pg/ml LPS or 0.001 EU/ml in water or saline and allowed pyrogen detection in dialysis concentrates or final working solutions. This method offers high sensitivity detection of human-relevant pyrogens in dialysis solutions and components.

  5. Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block for Analgesia During Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Dialysis Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Emiko; Hamamoto, Kohei; Nagashima, Michio; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Okochi, Tomohisa; Tanno, Keisuke; Tanaka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access.Subjects and MethodsTwenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm. Two radiologists performed US-guided ABPB for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves before PTA. The patients’ pain scores were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) after PTA, and these were compared with previous sessions without US-guided ABPB. The patient’s motor/sensory paralysis after PTA was also examined.ResultsThe mean time required to achieve US-guided ABPB was 8 min. The success rate of this procedure was 100 %, and there were no significant complications. All 21 patients reported lower VAS with US-guided ABPB as compared to without the block (p < 0.01). All patients expressed the desire for an ABPB for future PTA sessions, if required. Transient motor paralysis occurred in 8 patients, but resolved in all after 60 min.ConclusionUS-guided ABPB is feasible and effective for analgesia in patients undergoing PTA for stenotic dialysis access sites.Level of EvidenceLevel 4 (case series).

  6. Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block for Analgesia During Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Dialysis Access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Emiko, E-mail: chibaemi23@comet.ocn.ne.jp; Hamamoto, Kohei, E-mail: hkouhei917@gmail.com [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Saitama Medical Center (Japan); Nagashima, Michio, E-mail: nagamic00@gmail.com [Asahikawa Medical University, Department of Emergency Medicine (Japan); Matsuura, Katsuhiko, E-mail: kmatsur@gmail.com; Okochi, Tomohisa, E-mail: t-shachi@dj8.so-net.ne.jp; Tanno, Keisuke, E-mail: tankichi1974@gmail.com; Tanaka, Osamu, E-mail: otanaka@omiya.jichi.ac.jp [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Saitama Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access.Subjects and MethodsTwenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm. Two radiologists performed US-guided ABPB for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves before PTA. The patients’ pain scores were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) after PTA, and these were compared with previous sessions without US-guided ABPB. The patient’s motor/sensory paralysis after PTA was also examined.ResultsThe mean time required to achieve US-guided ABPB was 8 min. The success rate of this procedure was 100 %, and there were no significant complications. All 21 patients reported lower VAS with US-guided ABPB as compared to without the block (p < 0.01). All patients expressed the desire for an ABPB for future PTA sessions, if required. Transient motor paralysis occurred in 8 patients, but resolved in all after 60 min.ConclusionUS-guided ABPB is feasible and effective for analgesia in patients undergoing PTA for stenotic dialysis access sites.Level of EvidenceLevel 4 (case series).

  7. Alaskan Native High School Dropouts: A Report Prepared for Project ANNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Desa

    Presented is a summary of the Alaskan Native high school dropouts. The data collected on 180 Native Alaskan high school dropouts was taken from the regional dormitories at Nome, Kodiak, Bethel and Boarding Home programs in Anchorage, Tok, Fairbanks, Dillingham, and Ketchikan. Students who terminated for academic reasons, failed to attend school,…

  8. Amyloidosis associated with dialysis. Dialyseassoziierte Amyloidosteopathie - radiologische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schadmand, S.; Klose, K.J. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische Strahlenkunde); Wandel, E. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). 1. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1991-06-01

    Amongst the complications of dialysis, amyloid osteopathy is getting increasingly significant. It is due to deposition of {beta}2-microglobulin. To determine the incidence and time of development of this complication, the skeletal radiographs of 185 patients undergoing dialysis, some for up to ten years, were analysed retrospectively. In about 10% of patients, the presence of {beta}2-microglobulin osteopathy may be expected. The radiological features, sites of predilection and differential diagnosis of amyloid osteopathy and of other skeletal changes due to dialysis are discussed. (orig.).

  9. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Kate; Sturt, Jackie; Adams, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when ...

  10. Glucose absorption in acute peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podel, J; Hodelin-Wetzel, R; Saha, D C; Burns, G

    2000-04-01

    During acute peritoneal dialysis (APD), it is known that glucose found in the dialysate solution contributes to the provision of significant calories. It has been well documented in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) that glucose absorption occurs. In APD, however, it remains unclear how much glucose absorption actually does occur. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether it is appropriate to use the formula used to calculate glucose absorption in CAPD (Grodstein et al) among patients undergoing APD. Actual measurements of glucose absorption (Method I) were calculated in 9 patients undergoing APD treatment for >24 hours who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Glucose absorption using the Grodstein et al formula (Method II) was also determined and compared with the results of actual measurements. The data was then further analyzed based on the factors that influence glucose absorption, specifically dwell time and concentration. The mean total amount of glucose absorbed was 43% +/- 15%. However, when dwell time and concentration were further examined, significant differences were noted. Method I showed a cumulative increase over time. Method II showed that absorption was fixed. This suggests that with the variation in dwell time commonly seen in the acute care setting, the use of Method II may not be accurate. In each of the 2 methods, a significant difference in glucose absorption was noted when comparing the use of 1.5% and 4.25% dialysate concentrations. The established formula designed for CAPD should not be used for calculating glucose absorption in patients receiving APD because variation in dwell time and concentration should be taken into account. Because of the time constraints and staffing required to calculate each exchange individually, combined with the results of the study, we recommend the use of the percentage estimate of 40% to 50%.

  11. Bladder perforation in a peritoneal dialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ounissi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dysfunction of the catheter in peritoneal dialysis (PD is a frequent compli-cation. However, perforation of organs are rare, particularly that of the urinary bladder. This re-quires an early diagnosis and prompt treatment of patients. We report here the case of a 38-year-old woman having end-stage renal disease due to autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease treated by PD since November 2000. Three years later, she was treated for Staphylococcal peritonitis. Four months later, she presented with a severe urge to urinate at the time of the fluid exchanges. The biochemical analysis of the fluid from the bladder showed that it was dialysis fluid. Injection of contrast through the catheter demonstrated the presence of a fistula between the bladder and the peritoneal cavity. She underwent cystoscopic closure of the fistulous tract and the PD catheter was removed. Subsequently, the patient was treated by hemodialysis. One month later, a second catheter was implanted surgically after confirming the closure of the fistula. Ten days later, she presented with pain at the catheter site and along the tunnel, which was found to be swollen along its track. The injection of contrast produced swelling of the subcutaneous tunnel but without extravasation of the dye. PD was withdrawn and the patient was put back on hemodialysis. Bladder fistula is a rare complication in PD and diagnosis should be suspected when patient complains of an urge to pass urine during the exchanges, which can be confirmed by contrast study showing presence of dye in the bladder. PD may be possible after the closure of the fistula, but recurrence may occur.

  12. Hypothyroidism and Mortality among Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Connie M.; Alexander, Erik K.; Bhan, Ishir

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hypothyroidism is highly prevalent among ESRD patients, but its clinical significance and the benefits of thyroid hormone replacement in this context remain unclear. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study examined the association between hypothyroidism and all-cause mortality among 2715 adult dialysis patients with baseline thyrotropin levels measured between April of 2005 and April of 2011. Mortality was ascertained from Social Security Death Master Index and local registration systems. The association between hypothyroidism (thyrotropin greater than assay upper limit normal) and mortality was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. To reduce the risk of observing reverse-causal associations, models included a 30-day lag between thyrotropin measurement and at-risk time. Results Among 350 (12.9%) hypothyroid and 2365 (87.1%) euthyroid (assay within referent range) patients, 917 deaths were observed during 5352 patient-years of at-risk time. Hypothyroidism was associated with higher mortality. Compared with thyrotropin in the low-normal range (0.4–2.9 mIU/L), subclinical hypothyroidism (thyrotropin >upper limit normal and ≤10.0 mIU/L) was associated with higher mortality; high-normal thyrotropin (≥3.0 mIU/L and ≤upper limit normal) and overt hypothyroidism (thyrotropin >10.0 mIU/L) were associated with numerically greater risk, but estimates were not statistically significant. Compared with spontaneously euthyroid controls, patients who were euthyroid while on exogenous thyroid replacement were not at higher mortality risk, whereas patients who were hypothyroid were at higher mortality risk. Sensitivity analyses indicated that effects on cardiovascular risk factors may mediate the observed association between hypothyroidism and death. Conclusions These data suggest that hypothyroidism is associated with higher mortality in dialysis patients, which may be ameliorated by thyroid hormone replacement

  13. Two years experience with tunneled dialysis catheters in patients requiring haemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raheem, A.; Rana, A. I.; Ramzan, M.; Shah, R. A.; Mehmood, S. N.; Naseem, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To look for survival rate and major reasons behind the failure of tunnelled dialysis catheters in patients on haemodialysis. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Interventional Radiology, Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, and comprised records of 100 consecutive subjects from a list of patients in whom tunnelled cuffed catheters were placed from February 2009 to January 2011 and were followed up for two years. Data was collected on a proforma from the hospital database and medical records of patients. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 122 catheters placed in 100 patients, 49(40.16%) were lost to follow-up. Of the remaining 73(59.83%) catheters, 38(52%) had achieved their desired function, while 35(48%) failed to achieve the target duration. Among the reasons of catheter failure, infection was the commonest at 13(37.14%) with infection rate of 0.24 per 1000 catheter days. According to Kaplan Meier analysis, catheter survival rates at 60, 90 and 180 days were 89%, 77% and 64% respectively. Mean effective duration of catheter was 129+-117 days. Conclusion: Tunnelled dialysis catheters can be safely used as vascular access till the maturation of fistula and may be an alternative to Arterio-Venous Fistula or graft for long-term vascular access if indicated. (author)

  14. The Effects Of The Use Of A High-Efficiency, High-Flux Dialysis Membrane On The Nutritional Status Of Patients Receiving Maintenance Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Min Hwang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is possible to observe improvement in the general state of patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis, including decreased joint symptoms, decreased pruritus, and better appetite, by using a high-efficiency, high-flux dialysis membrane. We aimed to determine the effects of the use of a high-flux dialysis membrane on improvement in the nutritional status of dialysis patients. Two months before the replacement with a high-efficiency, high-flux dialysis membrane and one, three, six, and twelve months after the replacement, the subjective global assessment (SGA, biochemical markers, and a Body Composition Analyzer was used to assess the nutritional status and determine hemodialysis adequacy, along with a biochemical test, in 25 stable patients (M: F=10:15, 54.5±12.7 (37∼80 yrs. Of all the patients, 3 got better results from SGA, 12 the same results, and 10 worse results, in the follow-up period. There was no significant increase or decrease after the replacement with a high-flux dialysis membrane in biochemical parameters and nutritional parameters. While there was also no improvement in body weight, fat mass, muscle mass, lean fat mass, visceral fat, or the degree of edema measured by the body composition analyzer after the replacement, basal metabolism was improved from 1179.2±143.5 kcal before the replacement to 1264.8±145.4, 1241±138.3, and 1201.0±317.0 kcal one, three, twelve months after the replacement, respectively, on the average (p<0.001, p=0.001, p=0.023; thus, the improvement was greatest one month after the replacement and, then, decreased over time. In conclusion, the use of a high-efficiency, high-flux dialysis membrane generally failed to improve the nutritional status of patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis but increased the indirect index of basal metabolism alone at its early stage.

  15. Determinants of Peritoneal Dialysis Technique Failure in Incident US Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Jenny I.; Mitani, Aya A.; Saxena, Anjali B.; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Objectives: Switching from peritoneal dialysis (PD) to hemodialysis (HD) is undesirable, because of complications from temporary vascular access, disruption of daily routine, and higher costs. Little is known about the role that social factors play in technique failure.

  16. Kidney Dialysis: When Is It Time to Stop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is it time to stop? My 82-year-old husband has been on kidney dialysis for a ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  17. Analysis of Why the Renal Dialysis Unit is Losing Money

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Leslie

    1997-01-01

    .... Despite efforts to remain competitive by procuring "state of the art" equipment intended to decrease treatment times and result in cost savings, the renal dialysis product line was losing money...

  18. Diabetic patients treated with dialysis: complications and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Mathiesen, E R; Watt, T

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of complications, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the influence of beliefs about control over health in diabetic dialysis patients. METHODS: Of 53 eligible diabetic patients on chronic dialysis during January 2004...... in our clinic, 38 (76%) completed a kidney-specific (Kidney Disease Quality of Life) and a generic (SF-36) questionnaire and were characterised in terms of cardiovascular diseases and diabetic complications. Matched groups of non-diabetic dialysis patients (n = 40) and diabetic patients with a long...... population (47 +/- 19). The diabetic dialysis patients had similar levels of kidney-specific quality of life and mental health compared with the control groups. Reduced physical health was predicted by the presence of end-stage renal disease, diabetes and short time spent in education. Among the diabetic...

  19. Pharmacokinetics of amikacin during hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regeur, L; Colding, H; Jensen, H

    1977-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of amikacin were examined in six bilaterally nephrectomized patients undergoing hemodialysis and in four patients with a minimal residual renal function undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The mean elimination half-life before the dialysis was 86.5 h in the anephric patients and 44...... renal function. During hemodialysis the half-life decreased to less than 10% (5.6 h) of the pretreatment value. The effectiveness of peritoneal dialysis was less as the half-life decreased to only about 30% (17.9 h) of the pretreatment value. During the dialyses a significant correlation between...... the half-life of amikacin and the decrease in blood urea and serum creatinine was demonstrated. The pharmacokinetic data were used to make dosage regimen recommendations for the treatment of patients undergoing intermittent hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis....

  20. Increasing fill volume reduces cardiac performance in peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivarsen, Per; Povlsen, Johan V; Jensen, Jens Dam

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is generally accepted that peritoneal dialysis (PD) affects systemic haemodynamics less than haemodialysis, but little is known about changes in haemodynamics during PD. It is unknown if increasing PD volume causes changes in cardiovascular haemodynamics possibly increasing...

  1. Peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients after renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakir, N; Surachno, S; Sluiter, WJ; Struijk, DG

    1998-01-01

    Background. The occurrence of peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients after renal transplantation during immunosuppression might increase morbidity and mortality. Hence the timing of catheter removal is still controversial. The associated risk factors of this complication have not been analyzed.

  2. Peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients after renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakir, N.; Surachno, S.; Sluiter, W. J.; Struijk, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    The occurrence of peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients after renal transplantation during immunosuppression might increase morbidity and mortality. Hence the timing of catheter removal is still controversial. The associated risk factors of this complication have not been analyzed. We

  3. Native Knowledge in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    1985-01-01

    Native American science is defined as activities of native peoples of the New World in observing physical phenomena and attempting to explain and control them. Problems in studying native science, ethnoscience and native science, archaeostronomy and ethnoastronomy, ethnobotany, agriculture, technology, and future directions are discussed. (JN)

  4. Time to Improve Informed Consent for Dialysis: An International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Frank; Stewart, Cameron; Burgess, Hannah; Davison, Sara N; Moss, Alvin H; Murtagh, Fliss E M; Germain, Michael; Tranter, Shelley; Brown, Mark

    2017-06-07

    The literature reveals that current nephrology practice in obtaining informed consent for dialysis falls short of ethical and legal requirements. Meeting these requirements represents a significant challenge, especially because the benefits and risks of dialysis have shifted significantly with the growing number of older, comorbid patients. The importance of informed consent for dialysis is heightened by several concerns, including: ( 1 ) the proportion of predialysis patients and patients on dialysis who lack capacity in decision making and ( 2 ) whether older, comorbid, and frail patients understand their poor prognosis and the full implications to their independence and functional status of being on dialysis. This article outlines the ethical and legal requirements for a valid informed consent to dialysis: ( 1 ) the patient was competent, ( 2 ) the consent was made voluntarily, and ( 3 ) the patient was given sufficient information in an understandable manner to make the decision. It then considers the application of these requirements to practice across different countries. In the process of informed consent, the law requires a discussion by the physician of the material risks associated with dialysis and alternative options. We argue that, legally and ethically, this discussion should include both the anticipated trajectory of the illness and the effect on the life of the patient with particular regard to the outcomes most important to the individual. In addition, a discussion should occur about the option of a conservative, nondialysis pathway. These requirements ensure that the ethical principle of respect for patient autonomy is honored in the context of dialysis. Nephrologists need to be open to, comfortable with, and skillful in communicating this information. From these clear, open, ethically, and legally valid consent discussions, a significant dividend will hopefully flow for patients, families, and nephrologists alike. Copyright © 2017 by the

  5. Graves′ disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C G Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves′ disease (GD are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis.

  6. Daily dialysis reduces pulse wave velocity in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Micco, Lucia; Torraca, Serena; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Tartaglia, Domenico; Di Iorio, Biagio

    2012-05-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Dialysis patients show cyclic changes in PWV related to their hydration status and blood pressure. Our aim is to assess the impact of daily dialysis on PWV. We performed a randomized crossover study of 60 patients who underwent standard hemodialysis (HD) three times per week for at least 6 months. Patients were classified into three groups according to their PWV values before (pre-) and after (post-) HD, with a cutoff value of 12 m s(-1), as follows: the low-low (LL) group had normal pre-HD and post-HD PWV; the high-low (HL) group had high pre-HD PWV and normal post-HD PWV; and the high-high (HH) group had high pre- and post-HD PWV. All patients continued standard HD for 2 weeks. A total of 10 patients from each group were randomly assigned to continue standard HD for 1 week and then underwent daily dialysis for 1 week. The remaining 10 patients underwent daily dialysis for 1 week and then underwent standard HD for 1 week. PWV values were measured before and 1 h after each dialysis session. With daily dialysis treatment, 2 of 20 patients (10%) moved from the PWV-HH group to the PWV-HL group, whereas 18 of 20 patients (90%) moved from the PWV-HL group to the PWV-LL group (P = 0.030). Daily dialysis reduces PWV in the ESRD patients. As PWV is a strong predictor of mortality in ESRD and has cyclic variations in patients who are on standard HD, we believe that daily dialysis may be used in patients with high PWV levels to reduce their mortality risk.

  7. Mathematical modeling of fluid and solute transport in peritoneal dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Waniewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Optimization of peritoneal dialysis schedule and dialysis fluid composition needs, among others, methods for quantitative assessment of fluid and solute transport. Furthermore, an integrative quantitative description of physiological processes within the tissue, which contribute to the net transfer of fluid and solutes, is necessary for interpretation of the data and for predictions of the outcome of possible intervention into the peritoneal transport system. The current pro...

  8. [Customization of hemodialysis therapy: dialysis is not a washing machine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, the population of chronic dialysis has grown in number but also in age and frequency of co-morbidies such as cardiac diseases, vascular pathologies, diabetes, etc. The majority of patients on chronic hemodialysis are over 70 years and, given the high number of comorbidities, they often exhibit poor tolerance to dialysis treatments. A non-tolerated dialytic treatment can have side-effects that would require an intensification of the dialysis sessions and many hospitalizations. Consequently, the problematic dialysis treatments, as well as harmful for the patient, become economically more detrimental than other treatments apparently more expensive but more tolerated ones In the current days we have, thanks to the huge developments in dialysis technology, powerful weapons to ensure effective and scarcely symptomatic dialysis treatments to the majority of the HD patients. New, highly biocompatible membranes with defined and modular cut-off and / or absorption capacity may allow us to provide adequate purification. Moreover the monitoring and biofeedback systems such as blood volume tracking, body temperature monitoring (BTM) and blood pressure (BPM) can be very useful in reducing the risk of intra-dialytic hypotension and symptoms. Therefore, the dialytic therapy, as well as all the pharmacological therapies for the chronic patient, must consider the specificity of the patient, basing on his metabolic problems, cardiovascular tolerance, residual renal function and on his dietary and general compliance. The central aim of the nephrologist is to formulate the better prescription for the individual patient, considering the dialysis modalities, the membrane type, the dry weight (ideal post-dialysis body weight), the frequency and the duration of the weekly sessions and the technological tools that can optimize the treatment. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  9. Transperitoneal transport of sodium during hypertonic peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Fugleberg, S; Brahm, J

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of transperitoneal sodium transport during hypertonic peritoneal dialysis were evaluated by kinetic modelling. A total of six nested mathematical models were designed to elucidate the presence or absence of diffusive, non-lymphatic convective and lymphatic convective solute transport....... Experimental results were obtained from 26 non-diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The model validation procedure demonstrated that only diffusive and non-lymphatic convective transport mechanisms were identifiable in the transperitoneal transport of sodium. Non-lymphatic convective sodium...

  10. Natural disasters and dialysis care in the Asia-Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nicholas A; Wolley, Martin; Liew, Adrian; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The impact of natural disasters on the provision of dialysis services has received increased attention in the last decade following Hurricane Katrina devastating New Orleans in 2005. The Asia-Pacific is particularly vulnerable to earthquakes, tsunami, typhoons (also known as cyclones and hurricanes) or storms and flooding. These events can seriously interrupt provision of haemodialysis with adverse effects for patients including missed dialysis, increased hospitalization and post-traumatic stress disorder. Furthermore, haemodialysis patients may need to relocate and experience prolonged periods of displacement from family and social supports. In contrast to haemodialysis, most literature suggests peritoneal dialysis in a disaster situation is more easily managed and supported. It has become apparent that dialysis units and patients should be prepared for a disaster event and that appropriate planning will result in reduced confusion and adverse outcomes should a disaster occur. Numerous resources are now available to guide dialysis units, patients and staff in preparation for a possible disaster. This article will examine the disaster experiences of dialysis units in the Asia-Pacific, the impact on patients and staff, methods employed to manage during the disaster and suggested plans for reducing the impact of future disasters. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  11. Pregnancy in chronic dialysis, late diagnosis, and other problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadani, S.; Nasution, A. T.; Nasution, S.; Lubis, H. R.

    2018-03-01

    The incidence of pregnancy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing hemodialysis is rare. Forpregnant patients with CKD undergoing regular hemodialysis, the effects of renal disease on the fetus should be noted and require specific strategies. A 30-year-old woman had no menstruation for 4 months. Abdominal ultrasound showed single fetus within 16 weeks of pregnancy. She had previously been in regular hemodialysis twice a week since 2015, then the frequency of hemodialysis was increased to thrice a week for 4 hours/dialysis. During pregnancy, she was given erythropoiesis stimulating agent, controlled protein nutrition (0.6-1.5g/kg/day) and routine pregnancy controls to an obstetrician. After 31-32 weeks gestation, thebaby was born alive with low birth weight (1800g). Maintaining pregnancy in women with regular hemodialysis is still challenging and difficult. Prolonged/intensive dialysis during pregnancy results in longer gestational periods, higher fetal weights, and a higher likelihood of survival. Based on a dialysis guideline for pregnancy in CKD, hemodialysis is performed at least 20 hours/week to maintain pre-dialysis of BUN≤50mg/dl hemoglobin should be at least 10-11g/dL. We reported a case of pregnancy in dialysis CKD patient undergoing hemodialysis thricea week (4 hours/dialysis). The baby was born alive with low birth weight (1800 g).

  12. Native fruit traits may mediate dispersal competition between native and non-native plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Aslan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Seed disperser preferences may mediate the impact of invasive, non-native plant species on their new ecological communities. Significant seed disperser preference for invasives over native species could facilitate the spread of the invasives while impeding native plant dispersal. Such competition for dispersers could negatively impact the fitness of some native plants. Here, we review published literature to identify circumstances under which preference for non-native fruits occurs. The importance of fruit attraction is underscored by several studies demonstrating that invasive, fleshy-fruited plant species are particularly attractive to regional frugivores. A small set of studies directly compare frugivore preference for native vs. invasive species, and we find that different designs and goals within such studies frequently yield contrasting results. When similar native and non-native plant species have been compared, frugivores have tended to show preference for the non-natives. This preference appears to stem from enhanced feeding efficiency or accessibility associated with the non-native fruits. On the other hand, studies examining preference within existing suites of co-occurring species, with no attempt to maximize fruit similarity, show mixed results, with frugivores in most cases acting opportunistically or preferring native species. A simple, exploratory meta-analysis finds significant preference for native species when these studies are examined as a group. We illustrate the contrasting findings typical of these two approaches with results from two small-scale aviary experiments we conducted to determine preference by frugivorous bird species in northern California. In these case studies, native birds preferred the native fruit species as long as it was dissimilar from non-native fruits, while non-native European starlings preferred non-native fruit. However, native birds showed slight, non-significant preference for non-native fruit

  13. Beyond the futility argument: the fair process approach and time-limited trials for managing dialysis conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Ann

    2013-11-01

    Futility is an ancient concept arising from Greek mythology that was resurrected for its medical application in the 1980s with the proliferation of many lifesaving technologies, including dialysis and renal transplantation. By that time, the domineering medical paternalism that characterized the pre-1960s physician-patient relationship morphed into assertive patient autonomy, and some patients began to claim the right to demand aggressive, high-technology interventions, despite physician disapproval. To counter this power struggle, the establishment of a precise definition of futility offered hope for a futility policy that would allow physicians to justify withholding or withdrawing treatment, despite patient and family objections. This article reviews the various attempts made to define medical futility and describes their limited applicability to dialysis. When futility concerns arise, physicians should recognize the opportunity to address conflict, using best practice communication skills. Physicians would also benefit from understanding the ethical principles of respect for patient autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and professional integrity that underlie medical decision-making. Also reviewed is the use of a fair process approach or time-limited trial when conflict resolution cannot be achieved. These topics are addressed in the Renal Physician Association's clinical practice guideline Shared Decision-Making in the Appropriate Initiation and Withdrawal from Dialysis, with which nephrologists should be well versed. A case presentation of intractable calciphylaxis in a new dialysis patient illustrates the pitfalls of physicians not fully appreciating the ethics of medical decision-making and failing to use effective conflict management approaches in the clinical practice guideline.

  14. Beyond the Futility Argument: The Fair Process Approach and Time-Limited Trials for Managing Dialysis Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Summary Futility is an ancient concept arising from Greek mythology that was resurrected for its medical application in the 1980s with the proliferation of many lifesaving technologies, including dialysis and renal transplantation. By that time, the domineering medical paternalism that characterized the pre-1960s physician–patient relationship morphed into assertive patient autonomy, and some patients began to claim the right to demand aggressive, high-technology interventions, despite physician disapproval. To counter this power struggle, the establishment of a precise definition of futility offered hope for a futility policy that would allow physicians to justify withholding or withdrawing treatment, despite patient and family objections. This article reviews the various attempts made to define medical futility and describes their limited applicability to dialysis. When futility concerns arise, physicians should recognize the opportunity to address conflict, using best practice communication skills. Physicians would also benefit from understanding the ethical principles of respect for patient autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and professional integrity that underlie medical decision-making. Also reviewed is the use of a fair process approach or time-limited trial when conflict resolution cannot be achieved. These topics are addressed in the Renal Physician Association’s clinical practice guideline Shared Decision-Making in the Appropriate Initiation and Withdrawal from Dialysis, with which nephrologists should be well versed. A case presentation of intractable calciphylaxis in a new dialysis patient illustrates the pitfalls of physicians not fully appreciating the ethics of medical decision-making and failing to use effective conflict management approaches in the clinical practice guideline. PMID:23868900

  15. Native American medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, K

    1998-11-01

    This article summarizes common principles, practices, and ethics of Native American healing, the traditional medicine of North America. Native American healing, spirituality, culture, and, in modern times, political, social, and economic concerns are closely intertwined. Intuition and spiritual awareness are a healer's most essential diagnostic tools. Therapeutic methods include prayer, music, ritual purification, herbalism, massage, ceremony, and personal innovations of individual healers. A community of friends, family, and helpers often participate in the healing intervention and help to alleviate the alienation caused by disease. A healthy patient has a healthy relationship with his or her community and, ultimately, with the greater community of nature known as "All Relations." The goal of Native American healing is to find wholeness, balance, harmony, beauty, and meaning. "Healing," making whole, is as important as curing disease; at times they are identical.

  16. Immigrants and Native Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Mette; Peri, Giovanni

    Using a database that includes the universe of individuals and establishments in Denmark over the period 1991-2008 we analyze the effect of a large inflow of non-European (EU) immigrants on Danish workers. We first identify a sharp and sustained supply-driven increase in the inflow of non......-EU immigrants in Denmark, beginning in 1995 and driven by a sequence of international events such as the Bosnian, Somalian and Iraqi crises. We then look at the response of occupational complexity, job upgrading and downgrading, wage and employment of natives in the short and long run. We find...... that the increased supply of non-EU low skilled immigrants pushed native workers to pursue more complex occupations. This reallocation happened mainly through movement across firms. Immigration increased mobility of natives across firms and across municipalities but it did not increase their probability...

  17. Prevalence of Cognitive Impairment Among Peritoneal Dialysis Patients, Impact on Peritonitis and Role of Assisted Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Yat Fung; Lam, Man Fai; Lee, Mi Suen Connie; Mok, Ming Yee Maggie; Lui, Sing-Leung; Yip, Terence P S; Lo, Wai Kei; Chu, Leung Wing; Chan, Tak-Mao

    2016-01-01

    ♦ Chronic renal failure and aging are suggested as risk factors for cognitive impairment (CI). We studied the prevalence of CI among peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients using Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), its impact on PD-related peritonitis in the first year, and the potential role of assisted PD. ♦ One hundred fourteen patients were newly started on PD between February 2011 and July 2013. Montreal Cognitive Assessment was performed in the absence of acute illness. Data on patient characteristics including demographics, comorbidities, blood parameters, dialysis adequacy, presence of helpers, medications, and the number PD-related infections were collected. ♦ The age of studied patients was 59±15.0 years, and 47% were female. The prevalence of CI was 28.9%. Patients older than 65 years old (odds ratio [OR] 4.88, confidence interval [CI] 1.79 - 13.28 p = 0.002) and with an education of primary level or below (OR 4.08, CI 1.30 - 12.81, p = 0.016) were independent risk factors for CI in multivariate analysis. Patients with PD-related peritonitis were significantly older (p peritonitis among self-care PD patients (OR 2.20, CI 0.65 - 7.44, p = 0.20). When we compared patients with MoCA-defined CI receiving self-care and assisted PD, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of age, MoCA scores, or comorbidities. There were also no statistically significant differences in 1-year outcome of PD-related peritonitis rates or exit-site infections. ♦ Cognitive impairment is common among local PD patients. Even with CI, peritonitis rate in self-care PD with adequate training is similar to CI patients on assisted PD. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  18. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Waniewski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During peritoneal dialysis (PD, the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21–87 years; median time on PD 19 (3–100 months underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS, fraction of ultrasmall pores (αu, osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG, and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters. Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters—rather than solute transport parameters—are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane.

  19. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21–87) years; median time on PD 19 (3–100) months) underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS), fraction of ultrasmall pores (α u), osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG), and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters). Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters—rather than solute transport parameters—are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:26989432

  20. Early Dialysis and Adverse Outcomes After Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Nicole; Finne, Kristen; Worrall, Chris; Jauregui, Maria; Thaweethai, Tanayott; Margolis, Gregg; Kelman, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Hemodialysis patients have historically experienced diminished access to care and increased adverse outcomes after natural disasters. Although "early dialysis" in advance of a storm is promoted as a best practice, evidence for its effectiveness as a protective measure is lacking. Building on prior work, we examined the relationship between the receipt of dialysis ahead of schedule before the storm (also known as early dialysis) and adverse outcomes of patients with end-stage renal disease in the areas most affected by Hurricane Sandy. Retrospective cohort analysis, using claims data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Datalink Project. Patients receiving long-term hemodialysis in New York City and the state of New Jersey, the areas most affected by Hurricane Sandy. Receipt of early dialysis compared to their usual treatment pattern in the week prior to the storm. Emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and 30-day mortality following the storm. Of 13,836 study patients, 8,256 (60%) received early dialysis. In unadjusted logistic regression models, patients who received early dialysis were found to have lower odds of ED visits (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.63-0.89; P=0.001) and hospitalizations (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.65-0.92; P=0.004) in the week of the storm and similar odds of 30-day mortality (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.58-1.09; P=0.2). In adjusted multivariable logistic regression models, receipt of early dialysis was associated with lower odds of ED visits (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67-0.96; P=0.01) and hospitalizations (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.66-0.94; P=0.01) in the week of the storm and 30-day mortality (OR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.52-0.997; P=0.048). Inability to determine which patients were offered early dialysis and declined and whether important unmeasured patient characteristics are associated with receipt of early dialysis. Patients who received early dialysis had significantly lower odds of having an ED visit and hospitalization in the week of the storm and of

  1. John Dique: dialysis pioneer and political advocate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Charles R P

    2016-02-01

    John Dique (1915-1995) epitomized the internationalism of medicine, the intellectual and manual dexterity of many pioneers of dialysis, and the social concern evinced by many nephrologists. Born in Burma of French, German, British and Indian ancestry; educated in India; an Anglo-Indian who described himself as British without ever having visited Britain; he moved to Australia in 1948 to escape the murderous inter-ethnic conflict that befell multicultural India as it and Pakistan became independent. Settling in Brisbane, he pioneered several novel medical techniques. After inventing some simple equipment to facilitate intravenous therapy, he established a neonatal exchange blood transfusion programme. Then, between 1954 and 1963, he personally constructed and operated two haemodialysis machines with which to treat patients suffering from acute renal failure, the first such treatment performed in Australasia. His patients survival results were, for the era, remarkable. He subsequently helped found the Royal Australasian College of Pathologists and went on to establish a successful private pathology practice. The latter years of his life, however, saw him become a social and political advocate. He fiercely opposed the emerging ideologies of multiculturalism and social liberalism that, he predicted, would seriously damage the national fabric of Western society. Public vilification ensued, his medical achievements disregarded. It does seem likely, however, that in none of the areas that he touched - whether medical, social, or political - has the last word yet been said.

  2. Infantile cystinosis: From dialysis to renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Jellouli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease characterised by the accumulation of the amino acid cystine in different organs and tissues. It is a multisystemic disease that can present with renal and extra-renal manifestations. In this report, we present the first case of transplanted nephropathic cystinosis in a Tunisian child. A 4-year-old Tunisian boy born to nonconsanguineous parents, was treated in our medical services in 1990 for cystinosis. Since the age of five months, he developed symptoms of severe weight loss, vomiting, dehydration, and polyuria. He manifested the Toni Debré Fanconi syndrome. Slit lamp examination of the anterior segment of both eyes revealed fine, shiny crystal-like deposits diffusely distributed in the corneal epithelium and the stroma. Our patient had renal failure. At the age of seven, he reached terminal chronic renal failure and was treated with peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis was started at the age of nine years. At the age of 13 years, he received a renal transplantation and was started on cysteamine 1999, five months after the renal transplantation. Currently, the patient is 28-year-old. The graft has survived 15 years after the transplantation. Renal functions were stable with a serum creatinine of 123 μmol/L at last follow-up.

  3. Examining Depression in Patients on Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadwell, Allison A

    2017-01-01

    This study measured the prevalence of depression in 39 patients on hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis in two urban outpatient facilities in the southeastern United States. Additionally, it evaluated the number of patients who sought and scheduled a mental health evaluation after screening and education. The prevalence of mild to severely depressed individuals among participants in this study was 36%, affirming previous findings of depressive symptoms in the ESRD population. Results suggest that patients with ESRD are at a higher risk for depression than the general population. The effects of depression may exacerbate ESRD symptoms, affect treatment adherence, and increase hospitalizations and morbidity. It is likely that screening, diagnosing, and treating depression will be associated with improvement in quality and quantity of life. The practicality of using the screening procedure may improve the detection of depression in this population. However, only a fraction of identified patients in this study pursued further mental health evaluation within the 45-day period. Continued research is needed to identify barriers to seeking mental health consultation and treatment in this community. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  4. Evaluation and treatment of failed shoulder instability procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anthony G; Gowda, Ashok L; Michael Wiater, J

    2016-09-01

    Management of the unstable shoulder after a failed stabilization procedure can be difficult and challenging. Detailed understanding of the native shoulder anatomy, including its static and dynamic restraints, is necessary for determining the patient's primary pathology. In addition, evaluation of the patient's history, physical exam, and imaging is important for identifying the cause for failure after the initial procedure. Common mistakes include under-appreciation of bony defects, failure to recognize capsular laxity, technical errors, and missed associated pathology. Many potential treatment options exist for revision surgery, including open or arthroscopic Bankart repair, bony augmentation procedures, and management of Hill Sachs defects. The aim of this narrative review is to discuss in-depth the common risk factors for post-surgical failure, components for appropriate evaluation, and the different surgical options available for revision stabilization. Level of evidence Level V.

  5. Knowledge and Practice of Hemodialysis Amongst Dialysis Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Dhiraj Narayan; Chhetri, Pramod Kumar; Poudel, Prakash; Baidya, Samir Keshari; Agrawaal, Krishna Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Dialysis nurses should have a good knowledge regarding hemodialysis treatment. The status of Nepalese dialysis nurses on this aspect is unknown. This study was done to assess the knowledge and practice on different aspects of the hemodialysis treatment. We distributed validated questionnaires to the participants in a biannual conference in Kathmandu on 24th September as most of the dialysis nurses attend the event. We calculated mean and standard deviation for continuous variables and frequencies and percentage for the responses and compared counseling with different parameters. Total 94 out of 116 participants who were giving care to dialysis patients were in the study. Total 39 (42%) received formal nursing training in hemodialysis and 71 (78%) respondents always counseled patients regarding fluid intake. A total of 37 (96%) trained nurses always counseled the importance of regular dialysis. Seventy-six (81.7%) respondents did counseling on vaccination against Hepatitis B. Counseling on vaccination against influenza and pneumococcus was 47 (50%). When comparing educational status, respondents below bachelor level did more frequent counseling than level above (P=0.03). All the respondents knew the importance of hand washing and BP monitoring during hemodialysis. Ninety-one (96.7%) respondents knew how to deal with BP changes during hemodialysis. Seventy-three (77.6%) respondents were very confident on managing complications. Only 31 (33%) respondents knew how to deal with patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Dialysis nurses have knowledge on basic procedures of hemodialysis but there is a space for improvement in dealing with complications to provide quality service to hemodialysis patients.

  6. The Native American Holocaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Russell

    1989-01-01

    Describes the American Indian "Holocaust," decimation of Indian populations following European discovery of the Americas. European and African diseases, warfare with Europeans, and genocide reduced native populations from 75 million to only a few million. Discusses population statistics and demographic effects of epidemics, continuing infection,…

  7. Coping Styles of Failing Brunei Vocational Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundia, Lawrence; Salleh, Sallimah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of two types of underachieving students (n = 246) (active failing (AF) and passive failing (PF)) in Brunei vocational and technical education (VTE) institutions and their patterns of coping. Design/methodology/approach: The field survey method was used to directly reach many…

  8. When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaschke, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Review of: James R. Taylor and Elizabeth J. Van Every / When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters. (New York: Routledge, 2014. 220 pp. ISBN: 978 0415741668)......Review of: James R. Taylor and Elizabeth J. Van Every / When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters. (New York: Routledge, 2014. 220 pp. ISBN: 978 0415741668)...

  9. Neglected City Narratives And Failed Rebranding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Locmele, Gunta

    2017-01-01

    Rīga, Latvia went through a failed rebranding process as the forerunner of its status as a European Capital of Culture (2014). The same thing happened in Aarhus, Denmark. Aarhus will be a European Capital of Culture (2017) and leading to this, it went through a failed rebranding process. Based on...

  10. Current state of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mohamed Amin Elzorkany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD continue to increase in number worldwide, especially in developing countries. Although continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD has comparable survival advantages as hemodialysis (HD, it is greatly underutilized in many regions worldwide. The prevalence of use of CAPD in Egypt is 0.29/million population in 2017. The aim of this study is to describe the current state and practice of CAPD in Egypt and included 22 adult patients who were treated by CAPD. All the study patients were switched to CAPD after treatment with HD failed due to vascular access problems. Patients were mainly female (68.2 % with the mean age of 49.77 ± 11.41 years. The average duration on CAPD was 1.76 ± 1.30 years. Hypertension was the main cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD constituting 36.4%, followed by diabetes (27.3 %, and toxic nephropathy (4.5%. Of importance is that about 31.8% of patients had ESRD of unknown etiology. The mean weekly Kt/V urea of patients on PD was 1.92 ± 0.18. The mean hemoglobin, serum calcium, phosphorus, parathormone, and albumin levels were 10.27 ± 1.98 g/dL, 8.36 ± 1.19 mg/dL, 5.70 ± 1.35 mg/dL, 541.18 ± 230.12 pg/mL, and 2.98 ± 0.73 g/dL, respectively. There was no significant difference between diabetic and nondiabetic CAPD patients regarding demographic and laboratory data. Our data indicate that there is continuing underutilization of CAPD in Egypt which may be related to nonavailability of CAPD fluid, patient factors (education and motivation, gradual decline of the efficiency of health-care professionals, and lack of a national program to start PD as the first modality for renal replacement therapy. It is advised to start an organized program to make CAPD widespread and encourage local production of PD fluids to reduce the cost of CAPD.

  11. Is journalism failing on climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    How can we build a reliable and affordable energy supply based on renewables? How rapidly do we need to cut greenhouse gas emissions to keep climate change within manageable bounds? What does it take to maintain a stable common currency of different nations? These are just a few examples of questions that are critical for our future and that require an understanding of complex systems—the energy system, the climate system, the financial system. Finding sound answers to these questions requires sophisticated scientific analysis and expert knowledge; a lay person's intuition will clearly not suffice. Yet, decisions in a democracy are (and should be!) taken by politicians and the voting public who are not usually scientific experts. Hence the well-being of our societies—and even more so the living conditions of future generations, which are defined by the decisions we take today—depends on the wider public being well informed about the state of scientific knowledge and discourse. The media are the most important means by which lay people obtain their information about science. Good science journalism is therefore a decisive factor for the long-term success of modern society. Good science journalism clearly must be critical journalism, and it requires journalists who know what is what, who can put things into a perspective, and who are able to make well-informed judgements. After all, the role of science journalism is not simply to act as a 'translator' who conveys the findings of scientists in a language understandable to lay people. Rather, good science journalism will provide the public with a realistic impression of what is well established in science and what are current 'hot topics', uncertainties and controversies. It will also discuss the methods and social context of the scientific endeavour. There is ample evidence that in the area of climate science, journalism too often is failing to deliver this realistic picture to its audience, despite many good

  12. Vitamins in dialysis: who, when and how much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmadakis, George; Da Costa Correia, Enrique; Carceles, Odette; Somda, Frederic; Aguilera, Didier

    2014-05-01

    Despite the significant technical evolution of the blood purification methods, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients is still several times higher than that observed in the general population. Vitamins are playing a crucial role in multiple key metabolic pathways. Due to multiple factors, dialysis patients present very often hypo- or hypervitaminosis for a broad range of vitamins. Dialysis in the context of renal replacement therapy is associated with a non-physiological potassium-sparing dietetic regime. Additionally, there is a non-selective intradialytic loss of micro- and macronutrients, deranged intracellular kinetics and gastrointestinal malabsorption due to uratemia. Frequent treatment with antibiotics due to infections associated with the acquired uremia-related immunosuppression may derange the vitamin-producing intestinal microflora. Certain agents prescribed in the context of renal failure or other conditions may reduce the absorption of vitamins from the gastrointestinal tract. These factors may deplete a dialysis patient from vitamins, especially the ones with antioxidant activity that may be associated with cardioprotective properties. In other cases, vitamins metabolized and excreted by the kidneys may be accumulated and exert toxic effects. The scope of this paper is to describe the main issues on vitamin therapy in dialysis patients in view of the ever contradictory opinions and practices.

  13. Reduction in slow intercompartmental clearance of urea during dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, D.J.; Krejcie, T.C.; Avram, M.J.; Chow, M.J.; Del Greco, F.; Atkinson, A.J. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of urea and inulin were analyzed in five anesthetized dogs during sequential 2-hour periods before, during, and after hemodialysis. The distribution of both compounds after simultaneous intravenous injection was characterized by three-compartment models, and the total volumes of urea (0.66 +/- 0.05 L/kg) and inulin (0.19 +/- 0.01 L/kg) distribution were similar to expected values for total body water and extravascular space, respectively. Intercompartmental clearances calculated before dialysis were used to estimate blood flows to the fast and slow equilibrating compartments. In agreement with previous results, the sum of these flows was similar to cardiac output, averaging 101% of cardiac output measured before dialysis (range 72% to 135%). Dialysis was accompanied by reductions in the slow intercompartmental clearances of urea (81%) and inulin (47%), which reflected a 90% attenuation in blood flow supplying the slow equilibrating compartments. This was estimated to result in a 10% average reduction in the efficiency with which urea was removed by dialysis (range 2.0% to 16.4%). Mean arterial pressure fell by less than 5% during dialysis, but total peripheral resistance increased by 47% and cardiac output fell by 35%. In the postdialysis period, total peripheral resistance and cardiac output returned toward predialysis values, but blood flow to the slow equilibrating peripheral compartment was still reduced by 80%. These changes parallel activation of the renin-angiotensin system, but further studies are required to establish causality

  14. Disruptive technological advances in vascular access for dialysis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Wee-Song; Ng, Qin Xiang

    2017-11-29

    End-stage kidney disease (ESKD), one of the most prevalent diseases in the world and with increasing incidence, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current available modes of renal replacement therapy (RRT) include dialysis and renal transplantation. Though renal transplantation is the preferred and ideal mode of RRT, this modality may not be available to all patients with ESKD. Moreover, renal transplant recipients are constantly at risk of complications associated with immunosuppression and immunosuppressant use, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Dialysis may be the only available modality in certain patients. However, dialysis has its limitations, which include issues associated with lack of vascular access, risks of infections and vascular thrombosis, decreased quality of life, and absence of biosynthetic functions of the kidney. In particular, the creation and maintenance of hemodialysis vascular access in children poses a unique set of challenges to the pediatric nephrologist owing to the smaller vessel diameters and vascular hyperreactivity compared with adult patients. Vascular access issues continue to be one of the major limiting factors prohibiting the delivery of adequate dialysis in ESKD patients and is the Achilles' heel of hemodialysis. This review aims to provide a critical overview of disruptive technological advances and innovations for vascular access. Novel strategies in preventing neointimal hyperplasia, novel bioengineered products, grafts and devices for vascular access will be discussed. The potential impact of these solutions on improving the morbidity encountered by dialysis patients will also be examined.

  15. Insomnia in chronic renal patients on dialysis in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Hejaili Fayez F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that insomnia is a common sleep disorder among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of insomnia in Saudi patients with ESRD who are on maintenance dialysis. Methods This was an observational cross-sectional study carried out over a period of five months in two hemodialysis centers in Saudi Arabia. To assess the prevalence of insomnia, we used the ICSD-2 definition. We also examined the association between insomnia and other sleep disorders, the underlying causes of renal failure, dialysis duration, dialysis shift, and other demographic data. Results Out of 227 enrolled patients, insomnia was reported by 60.8%. The mean patient age was 55.7 ± 17.2 years; 53.7% were male and 46.3% were female. Insomnia was significantly associated with female gender, afternoon hemodialysis, Restless Legs Syndrome, high risk for obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness (P-values: 0.05, 0.01, Conclusion Insomnia is common in dialysis patients and was significantly associated with other sleep disorders. Greater attention needs to be given to the care of dialysis patients with regard to the diagnosis and management of insomnia and associated sleep disorders.

  16. Intermittent Oral Versus Intravenous Alfacalcidol in Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitwalli Ahmed

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF on maintenance dialysis, commonly develop secondary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy (ROD. Alfacalcidol, taken orally or administered intravenously, is known to reverse these complications. In this study, 19 ESRF patients, who were on dialysis (13 on hemodialysis and six on peritoneal dialysis for longer than six months and having serum parathormone levels at least four times normal and serum calcium less than 2.1 mmol/L, were randomly allocated to treatment with oral or intravenous (i.v. alfacalcidol for a period of 12 months. There were six patients on hemodialysis (HD and three on peritoneal dialysis (PD in the oral treatment group while in the i.v. group there were seven patients on HD and three on PD. Clinical and serial biochemical assessments showed no statistically significant difference between the orally- and i.v.-treated patients in terms of suppressing secondary hyperparathyroidism and osteodystrophy. However, patients with features of mild ROD on bone histology, had more satisfactory changes in biochemistry when compared to others. Our results further support the use of intermittent oral alfacalcidol in ESRF patients because of its cost effectiveness, ease of administration and convenience, especially for peritoneal dialysis patients.

  17. Mineral Metabolic Abnormalities and Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Abe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The survival rate of dialysis patients, as determined by risk factors such as hypertension, nutritional status, and chronic inflammation, is lower than that of the general population. In addition, disorders of bone mineral metabolism are independently related to mortality and morbidity associated with cardiovascular disease and fracture in dialysis patients. Hyperphosphatemia is an important risk factor of, not only secondary hyperparathyroidism, but also cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, the risk of death reportedly increases with an increase in adjusted serum calcium level, while calcium levels below the recommended target are not associated with a worsened outcome. Thus, the significance of target levels of serum calcium in dialysis patients is debatable. The consensus on determining optimal parathyroid function in dialysis patients, however, is yet to be established. Therefore, the contribution of phosphorus and calcium levels to prognosis is perhaps more significant. Elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 levels have also been shown to be associated with cardiovascular events and death. In this review, we examine the associations between mineral metabolic abnormalities including serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone and mortality in dialysis patients.

  18. Effective flow performances and dialysis doses delivered with permanent catheters: a 24-month comparative study of permanent catheters versus arterio-venous vascular accesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaud, Bernard; Leray-Moragues, Hélène; Kerkeni, Nadia; Bosc, Jean-Yves; Martin, Katja

    2002-07-01

    Permanent venous catheters have emerged as a long-term vascular access option for renal replacement therapy in end-stage renal disease patients. The design and venous location of catheter devices bear intrinsic flow limitations that may negatively affect the adequacy of dialysis and the patient outcome. There is limited data comparing the long-term dialysis adequacy delivered with permanent catheters vs arterio-venous vascular accesses (AVA). To explore this problem, we conducted a prospective 24-month trial comparing the flow performances and dialysis dose (Kt/Vdp) deliveries of both access options in a group of 42 haemodialysis patients during two study phases. During the first 12 months the patients completed a treatment period by means of permanent dual silicone catheters (DualKT). Then they were transferred to an AVA (40 native arterio-venous fistulas and two PTFE grafts) and monitored for an additional 12-month period. Assessments of flow adequacy and dialysis quantification were performed monthly. Dialysis adequacy was achieved in all cases. No patient had to be transferred prematurely to the AVA because of catheter failure. Three catheters had to be replaced due to bacteraemia in three patients. The mean effective blood flow rates achieved were 316+/-3.5 ml/min and 340+/-3.3 ml/min with DualKT and AVA, respectively, for a pre-set machine blood flow of 348+/-2.2 ml/min. Recirculation rates evaluated with the 'slow blood flow' method were 8.6+/-0.6 and 12.1+/-0.8% for DualKT and AVA using mean values of the solute markers urea and creatinine. Due to the possibility of a comparison veno-venous vs arterio-venous blood circulation, a corrected arterio-venous access recirculation could be derived from the difference between the two, which was around 3%. The blood flow resistance of the DualKT was slightly higher than with AVA as indicated by venous pressure differences. Kt/Vdp delivered was 1.37+/-0.02 and 1.45+/-0.02 with DualKT and AVA access respectively. The

  19. Troubled Kingdoms, Restless Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Scott D.

    1989-01-01

    A recent study of deans in leading universities found that education deans had significantly weaker connections to practice in the field than their counterparts in law and architecture. School administration, unlike other professions, has failed to rely sufficiently on practice to generate theory. A professional studies approach offers new…

  20. Failed fuel action plan guidelines: Special report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a generic guideline that can be used to formulate a failed fuel action plan (FFAP) for specific application by a utility. This document is intended to be part of a comprehensive fuel reliability monitoring, management, and improvement program. The utilities may utilize this document as one resource in developing a failed fuel action plan. This document is not intended to be used as a failed fuel action plan standard. This document is intended to provide guidance on: management responsibilities; fuel performance parameters; cost/benefit analysis; action levels; long-term improvement methods; and data collection, analysis, and trending. 3 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Digital Natives or Digital Tribes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    This research builds upon the discourse surrounding digital natives. A literature review into the digital native phenomena was undertaken and found that researchers are beginning to identify the digital native as not one cohesive group but of individuals influenced by other factors. Primary research by means of questionnaire survey of technologies…

  2. Frailty in Chinese Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: Prevalence and Prognostic Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Kit-Chung Ng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies showed that frailty is prevalent in both pre-dialysis and dialysis patients. However, the prevalence and prognostic implication of frailty in Chinese peritoneal dialysis (PD patients remain unknown. Methods: We used a validated questionnaire to determine the Frailty Score of 193 unselected prevalent PD patients. All patients were then followed for 2 years for their need of hospitalization and mortality. Results: Amongst the 193 patients, 134 (69.4% met the criteria of being frail. Frailty Score significantly correlated with Charlson's comorbidity score (r = 0.40, p Conclusions: Frailty is prevalent among Chinese PD patients. Frail PD patients have a high risk of requiring hospitalization and their hospital stay tends to be prolonged. Early identification may allow timely intervention to prevent adverse health outcomes in this group of patients.

  3. Challenges of ECG monitoring and ECG interpretation in dialysis units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulikakos, Dimitrios; Malik, Marek

    Patients on hemodialysis (HD) suffer from high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to high rates of coronary artery disease and arrhythmias. Electrocardiography (ECG) is often performed in the dialysis units as part of routine clinical assessment. However, fluid and electrolyte changes have been shown to affect all ECG morphologies and intervals. ECG interpretation thus depends on the time of the recording in relation to the HD session. In addition, arrhythmias during HD are common, and dialysis-related ECG artifacts mimicking arrhythmias have been reported. Studies using advanced ECG analyses have examined the impact of the HD procedure on selected repolarization descriptors and heart rate variability indices. Despite the challenges related to the impact of the fluctuant fluid and electrolyte status on conventional and advanced ECG parameters, further research in ECG monitoring during dialysis has the potential to provide clinically meaningful and practically useful information for diagnostic and risk stratification purposes. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tailoring peritoneal dialysis fluid for optimal acid-base targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    Mild derangements of acid-base status are common features in peritoneal dialysis patients, metabolic acidosis being the most frequent alteration. One of the main tasks of dialysis is to correct these derangements and the target is the normalization of the acid-base parameters since they affect several organs and functions. Since factors affecting acid-base homeostasis are intrinsic characteristics of the individual patient (metabolic acid production, distribution space for bicarbonate, dialytic prescription, etc.), it is not surprising that only relatively few patients achieve the normal range. Only a certain modulation of buffer infusion by using different buffer concentrations in the dialysis fluid may ensure a good correction in a large percentage of patients.

  5. Examination of dialysis patients with the aminophenazone breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, H.G.; Adler, D.; Hornak, H.; Wuenschmann, H.J.; Mayer, W.K.

    1989-01-01

    In 12 endstage kidney disease patients (8 without and 4 with liver diseases) the activities of cytochrome P 450 -dependent mixed functional oxidases system (MFO) of the liver were studied by using the 14 C-aminophenazone breath test before and after dialysis. The results showed that uremia seems to have a pressing influence on MFO activity. The activity was only significantly increased after dialysis in the group of patients without liver diseases. The MFO activity was reduced in patients with liver diseases. This is a restriction of the hepatic metabolic demethylation capacity. It is unclear if the 14 C-aminophenazone breath test in dialysis patients is qualified to estimate metabolic capacity of the liver. Differentiation between the influence of uremia and of the liver disease on the alteration of MFO activity cannot be made. (author)

  6. Nonadherence in dialysis patients: prevalence, measurement, outcome, and psychological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sarah; Farrington, Ken; Chilcot, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Nonadherence to aspects of the management of End-Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD) is common. Estimates of nonadherence vary with assessment method. Whilst readily available and free from report bias, physiological proxies-frequently used as measures of adherence-are often confounded by clinical factors including residual kidney function and dialysis adequacy. Despite variation in estimates of its prevalence, it is clear that suboptimal adherence to dialysis prescriptions, medication and diet can lead to adverse clinical outcomes. Several factors can help explain nonadherence in ESKD including mood, self-efficacy, social support, illness, and treatment perceptions. Psychological interventions have been shown to improve ESKD adherence, yet achieving long-term behavior change remains challenging. Identifying individuals who struggle to adhere to aspects of the dialysis regime, and tailoring theory-led interventions to improve and support adherence is a clear clinical need requiring further empirical enquiry. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Comparison of outcomes for veterans receiving dialysis care from VA and non-VA providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demand for dialysis treatment exceeds its supply within the Veterans Health Administration (VA, requiring VA to outsource dialysis care by purchasing private sector dialysis for veterans on a fee-for-service basis. It is unclear whether outcomes are similar for veterans receiving dialysis from VA versus non-VA providers. We assessed the extent of chronic dialysis treatment utilization and differences in all-cause hospitalizations and mortality between veterans receiving dialysis from VA versus VA-outsourced providers. Methods We constructed a retrospective cohort of veterans in 2 VA regions who received chronic dialysis treatment financed by VA between January 2007 and December 2008. From VA administrative data, we identified veterans who received outpatient dialysis in (1 VA, (2 VA-outsourced settings, or (3 both (“dual” settings. In adjusted analyses, we used two-part and logistic regression to examine associations between dialysis setting and all-cause hospitalization and mortality one-year from veterans’ baseline dialysis date. Results Of 1,388 veterans, 27% received dialysis exclusively in VA, 47% in VA-outsourced settings, and 25% in dual settings. Overall, half (48% were hospitalized and 12% died. In adjusted analysis, veterans in VA-outsourced settings incurred fewer hospitalizations and shorter hospital stays than users of VA due to favorable selection. Dual-system dialysis patients had lower one-year mortality than veterans receiving VA dialysis. Conclusions VA expenditures for “buying” outsourced dialysis are high and increasing relative to “making” dialysis treatment within its own system. Outcomes comparisons inform future make-or-buy decisions and suggest the need for VA to consider veterans’ access to care, long-term VA savings, and optimal patient outcomes in its placement decisions for dialysis services.

  8. Comparison of outcomes for veterans receiving dialysis care from VA and non-VA providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Virginia; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Patel, Uptal D; Stechuchak, Karen M; Hynes, Denise M; Weinberger, Morris

    2013-01-18

    Demand for dialysis treatment exceeds its supply within the Veterans Health Administration (VA), requiring VA to outsource dialysis care by purchasing private sector dialysis for veterans on a fee-for-service basis. It is unclear whether outcomes are similar for veterans receiving dialysis from VA versus non-VA providers. We assessed the extent of chronic dialysis treatment utilization and differences in all-cause hospitalizations and mortality between veterans receiving dialysis from VA versus VA-outsourced providers. We constructed a retrospective cohort of veterans in 2 VA regions who received chronic dialysis treatment financed by VA between January 2007 and December 2008. From VA administrative data, we identified veterans who received outpatient dialysis in (1) VA, (2) VA-outsourced settings, or (3) both ("dual") settings. In adjusted analyses, we used two-part and logistic regression to examine associations between dialysis setting and all-cause hospitalization and mortality one-year from veterans' baseline dialysis date. Of 1,388 veterans, 27% received dialysis exclusively in VA, 47% in VA-outsourced settings, and 25% in dual settings. Overall, half (48%) were hospitalized and 12% died. In adjusted analysis, veterans in VA-outsourced settings incurred fewer hospitalizations and shorter hospital stays than users of VA due to favorable selection. Dual-system dialysis patients had lower one-year mortality than veterans receiving VA dialysis. VA expenditures for "buying" outsourced dialysis are high and increasing relative to "making" dialysis treatment within its own system. Outcomes comparisons inform future make-or-buy decisions and suggest the need for VA to consider veterans' access to care, long-term VA savings, and optimal patient outcomes in its placement decisions for dialysis services.

  9. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate McCarthy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when they approach these treatment decisions. Factors affecting patient treatment decisions are currently unknown. The objective of this article is to explore data from a wider study in specific relation to the types of vicarious learning experiences reported by pre-dialysis patients. Methods: A qualitative study utilised unstructured interviews and grounded theory analysis during the participant’s pre-dialysis year. The interview cohort comprised 20 pre-dialysis participants between 24 and 80 years of age. Grounded theory design entailed thematic sampling and analysis, scrutinised by secondary coding and checked with participants. Participants were recruited from routine renal clinics at two local hospitals when their estimated glomerular filtration rate was between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Results: Vicarious learning that contributed to treatment decision-making fell into three main categories: planned vicarious leaning, unplanned vicarious learning and historical vicarious experiences. Conclusion: Exploration and acknowledgement of service users’ prior vicarious learning, by healthcare professionals, is important in understanding its potential influences on individuals’ treatment decision-making. This will enable healthcare professionals to challenge heuristic decisions based on limited information and to encourage analytic thought processes.

  10. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kate; Sturt, Jackie; Adams, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when they approach these treatment decisions. Factors affecting patient treatment decisions are currently unknown. The objective of this article is to explore data from a wider study in specific relation to the types of vicarious learning experiences reported by pre-dialysis patients. A qualitative study utilised unstructured interviews and grounded theory analysis during the participant's pre-dialysis year. The interview cohort comprised 20 pre-dialysis participants between 24 and 80 years of age. Grounded theory design entailed thematic sampling and analysis, scrutinised by secondary coding and checked with participants. Participants were recruited from routine renal clinics at two local hospitals when their estimated glomerular filtration rate was between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Vicarious learning that contributed to treatment decision-making fell into three main categories: planned vicarious leaning, unplanned vicarious learning and historical vicarious experiences. Exploration and acknowledgement of service users' prior vicarious learning, by healthcare professionals, is important in understanding its potential influences on individuals' treatment decision-making. This will enable healthcare professionals to challenge heuristic decisions based on limited information and to encourage analytic thought processes.

  11. Phosphate binding therapy in dialysis patients: focus on lanthanum carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail A Mohammed

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ismail A Mohammed, Alastair J HutchisonManchester Institute of Nephrology and Transplantation, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, UKAbstract: Hyperphosphatemia is an inevitable consequence of end stage chronic kidney disease and is present in the majority of dialysis patients. Recent observational data has associated hyperphosphatemia with increased cardiovascular mortality among dialysis patients. Dietary restriction of phosphate and current dialysis prescription practices are not enough to maintain serum phosphate levels within the recommended range so that the majority of dialysis patients require oral phosphate binders. Unfortunately, conventional phosphate binders are not reliably effective and are associated with a range of limitations and side effects. Aluminium-containing agents are highly efficient but no longer widely used because of well established and proven toxicity. Calcium based salts are inexpensive, effective and most widely used but there is now concern about their association with hypercalcemia and vascular calcification. Sevelamer hydrochloride is associated with fewer adverse effects, but a large pill burden and high cost are limiting factors to its wider use. In addition, the efficacy of sevelamer as a monotherapy in lowering phosphate to target levels in severe hyperphosphatemia remains debatable. Lanthanum carbonate is a promising new non-aluminium, calcium-free phosphate binder. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated a good safety profile, and it appears well tolerated and effective in reducing phosphate levels in dialysis patients. Its identified adverse events are apparently mild to moderate in severity and mostly GI related. It appears to be effective as a monotherapy, with a reduced pill burden, but like sevelamer, it is significantly more expensive than calcium-based binders. Data on its safety profile over 6 years of treatment are now available.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, lanthanum

  12. Albumin Dialysis for Liver Failure: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipotis, Evangelos; Shuja, Asim; Jaber, Bertrand L

    2015-09-01

    Albumin dialysis is the best-studied extracorporeal nonbiologic liver support system as a bridge or destination therapy for patients with liver failure awaiting liver transplantation or recovery of liver function. We performed a systematic review to examine the efficacy and safety of 3 albumin dialysis systems (molecular adsorbent recirculating system [MARS], fractionated plasma separation, adsorption and hemodialysis [Prometheus system], and single-pass albumin dialysis) in randomized trials for supportive treatment of liver failure. PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, Cochrane's Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched. Two authors independently screened citations and extracted data on patient characteristics, quality of reports, efficacy, and safety end points. Ten trials (7 of MARS and 3 of Prometheus) were identified (620 patients). By meta-analysis, albumin dialysis achieved a net decrease in serum total bilirubin level relative to standard medical therapy of 8.0 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.6 to -5.4) but not in serum ammonia or bile acids. Albumin dialysis achieved an improvement in hepatic encephalopathy relative to standard medical therapy with a risk ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.16-2.08) but had no effect survival with a risk ratio of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.84-1.07). Because of inconsistency in the reporting of adverse events, the safety analysis was limited but did not demonstrate major safety concerns. Use of albumin dialysis as supportive treatment for liver failure is successful at removing albumin-bound molecules, such as bilirubin and at improving hepatic encephalopathy. Additional experience is required to guide its optimal use and address safety concerns. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Failed fuel detection and location of LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimoto, Yasuhide; Hukuda, Tooru; Nakamoto, Koichiro

    1974-01-01

    This is a summary report on Failed Fuel Detection and Location Methods of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors, and describes an outline of related research and development conducted by PNC. (auth.)

  14. Breaking the Failed-State Cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haims, Marla C; Gompert, David C; Treverton, Gregory F; Stearns, Brooke K

    2008-01-01

    In their research and field experience, the authors have observed a wide gulf separating the treatment of the security problems of failed states from the treatment of those states economic problems...

  15. How to preserve residual renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease and on dialysis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2006-01-01

    A review is given on various aspects of GFR in patients with chronic kidney disease and in dialysis patients. These include the measurement of GFR, measures to preserve GFR in chronic kidney disease and dialysis, the importance of residual GFR in dialysis patients and factors that influence GFR in

  16. Is protein-energy intake adequate during dialysis treatment in hemodialysis patients ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trudeke (G I. Struijk-Wielinga

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Protein and energy intake of hemodialysis patients is lower than their daily needs. On non dialysis days intake is even lower than on dialysis days. The meals consumed during dialysis treatment contain enough energy but not enough protein to meet requirements.

  17. Fate of patients during the first year of dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Siham El Khayat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Care in dialysis is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality during the first year. Knowledge of its magnitude and causes could improve the prognosis of these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival and morbidity during the first year of dialysis for patients who initiated their dialysis between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2009 and to study their possible correlation with baseline status at the beginning of treatment. A multi-center retrospective study was conducted in 11 dialysis centers. Clinical data at the beginning of dialysis and during the following year were collected. Mortality and morbidity risk factors were assessed by comparing different groups. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 11. This study involved 134 patients, 79 men and 55 women, of whom 132 were on hemodialysis and two patients were on peritoneal dialysis. The mean age at initiation of treatment was 54.37 ± 18.09 years. Initial causes of nephropathy were dominated by diabetes (44.02% and hypertension (11.19%. Among these patients, 39.55% had never received prior nephrological follow-up and 64.92% had started renal replacement therapy on an emergency basis. The initial clinical state was dominated by the presence of hypertension (50.74%, diabetes (44.02%, coronary insufficiency (13.43% and heart failure (7.46%. Only 26.86% of the incident patients showed no comorbidity. During the first year of follow-up, 37.31% of the patients experienced at least one episode of comorbidity. Hospitalization was necessary in about half of these cases (17.91% of all patients. The overall mortality rate was 14.17%. One patient received a kidney transplant. The mortality rate in the first year of dialysis was lower in our study than in other series. Regular nephrological follow-up of these patients before they reach end-stage could have a significant influence on survival in dialysis.

  18. Psychological distress and treatment adherence among children on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, J M; Asarnow, J R; Munford, P R; Koprowski, C M; Belin, T R; Salusky, I B

    1997-10-01

    Among 23 pediatric renal dialysis patients, we obtained self-reported assessments of psychological adjustment and biochemical and subjective ratings of adherence. Findings indicate elevated levels of depressive symptoms and substantial nonadherence. Depressive symptoms were associated with higher levels of hopelessness, more negative self-perceptions, and more depressogenic attributional style. The psychological adjustment measures did not significantly correlate with adherence. Nonsignificant associations among different measures of adherence underscore its multifaceted nature. Implications for monitoring the adjustment of children on dialysis, assessing adherence, and future research are discussed.

  19. Brain gamma-aminobutyric acid deficiency in dialysis encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, V P; Perry, T L; Price, J D; Reeve, C E; Godolphin, W J; Kish, S J

    1985-02-01

    We measured levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the CSF and in the autopsied brain of patients with dialysis encephalopathy. GABA concentrations were low in the CSF of three of five living patients. Mean GABA content was reduced by 30 to 50% in five brain regions (frontal, occipital, and cerebellar cortex, caudate nucleus, and medial dorsal thalamus) in five fatal cases. GABA content was normal in brain regions where GABA is characteristically reduced in Huntington's disease. Choline acetyltransferase activity was diminished (by 25 to 35%) in cerebral cortex of the dialysis encephalopathy patients.

  20. Peritoneal Dialysis Access Revision in Children: Causes, Interventions, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzych-Duzalka, Dagmara; Aki, T Fazil; Azocar, Marta; White, Colin; Harvey, Elizabeth; Mir, Sevgi; Adragna, Marta; Serdaroglu, Erkin; Sinha, Rajiv; Samaille, Charlotte; Vanegas, Juan Jose; Kari, Jameela; Barbosa, Lorena; Bagga, Arvind; Galanti, Monica; Yavascan, Onder; Leozappa, Giovanna; Szczepanska, Maria; Vondrak, Karel; Tse, Kei-Chiu; Schaefer, Franz; Warady, Bradley A

    2017-01-06

    Little published information is available about access failure in children undergoing chronic peritoneal dialysis. Our objectives were to evaluate frequency, risk factors, interventions, and outcome of peritoneal dialysis access revision. Data were derived from 824 incident and 1629 prevalent patients from 105 pediatric nephrology centers enrolled in the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network Registry between 2007 and 2015. In total, 452 access revisions were recorded in 321 (13%) of 2453 patients over 3134 patient-years of follow-up, resulting in an overall access revision rate of 0.14 per treatment year. Among 824 incident patients, 186 (22.6%) underwent 188 access revisions over 1066 patient-years, yielding an access revision rate of 0.17 per treatment year; 83% of access revisions in incident patients were reported within the first year of peritoneal dialysis treatment. Catheter survival rates in incident patients were 84%, 80%, 77%, and 73% at 12, 24, 36, and 48 months, respectively. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, risk of access revision was associated with younger age (odds ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 0.95; P<0.001), diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.59; P=0.02), coexisting ostomies (odds ratio, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.87; P=0.01), presence of swan neck tunnel with curled intraperitoneal portion (odds ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.63; P=0.02), and high gross national income (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.19; P=0.01). Main reasons for access revisions included mechanical malfunction (60%), peritonitis (16%), exit site infection (12%), and leakage (6%). Need for access revision increased the risk of peritoneal dialysis technique failure or death (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.65; P=0.003). Access dysfunction due to mechanical causes doubled the risk

  1. Peritoneal Dialysis Access Revision in Children: Causes, Interventions, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, T. Fazil; Azocar, Marta; White, Colin; Harvey, Elizabeth; Mir, Sevgi; Adragna, Marta; Serdaroglu, Erkin; Sinha, Rajiv; Samaille, Charlotte; Vanegas, Juan Jose; Kari, Jameela; Barbosa, Lorena; Bagga, Arvind; Galanti, Monica; Yavascan, Onder; Leozappa, Giovanna; Szczepanska, Maria; Vondrak, Karel; Tse, Kei-Chiu; Schaefer, Franz; Warady, Bradley A.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Little published information is available about access failure in children undergoing chronic peritoneal dialysis. Our objectives were to evaluate frequency, risk factors, interventions, and outcome of peritoneal dialysis access revision. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data were derived from 824 incident and 1629 prevalent patients from 105 pediatric nephrology centers enrolled in the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network Registry between 2007 and 2015. Results In total, 452 access revisions were recorded in 321 (13%) of 2453 patients over 3134 patient-years of follow-up, resulting in an overall access revision rate of 0.14 per treatment year. Among 824 incident patients, 186 (22.6%) underwent 188 access revisions over 1066 patient-years, yielding an access revision rate of 0.17 per treatment year; 83% of access revisions in incident patients were reported within the first year of peritoneal dialysis treatment. Catheter survival rates in incident patients were 84%, 80%, 77%, and 73% at 12, 24, 36, and 48 months, respectively. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, risk of access revision was associated with younger age (odds ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 0.95; P<0.001), diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.59; P=0.02), coexisting ostomies (odds ratio, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.87; P=0.01), presence of swan neck tunnel with curled intraperitoneal portion (odds ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.63; P=0.02), and high gross national income (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.19; P=0.01). Main reasons for access revisions included mechanical malfunction (60%), peritonitis (16%), exit site infection (12%), and leakage (6%). Need for access revision increased the risk of peritoneal dialysis technique failure or death (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1

  2. Reliability testing of failed fuel location system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental reliability tests performed in order to prove the reliability parameters for Failed Fuel Location System (FFLS), equipment used to detect in which channel of a particular heat transport loop a fuel failure is located, and to find in which channel what particular bundle pair is failed. To do so, D20 samples from each reactor channel are sequentially monitored to detect a comparatively high level of delayed neutron activity. 15 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Why Companies Fail? The Boiling Frog Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcan, Rasim

    2018-01-01

    Why nations fail? An answer is given by Acemoglu and Robinson (2012) by pointing out the importance of institutions for an economy that leads to innovations for economic growth. Christensen (2012) asks a similar question for a firm and diagnoses why companies fail. In this study, I relate Acemoglu and Robinson (2012) with Christensen (2012) in order to better understand how to make companies more prosperous, more powerful, healthier, and live longer via innovations.

  4. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2015, 240, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 60% more ...

  5. Promoting Optimal Native Outcomes (PONO) by Understanding Women's Stress Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Okihiro, May; Duke, Lisa; Goebert, Deborah; Ampolos, Lauren; Camacho, Casandra; Shanahan, Natasha; Hishinuma, Earl; Kaholokula, J. Keawe

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence links stress with mental illness and chronic disease. Existing scales of women's stress fail to capture the daily stressors of low-income, rural women. We explored the psychosocial stressors of local women residing in a rural Hawaii community with a large Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population. We recruited women, aged 18?35 years, at a community health center. We convened four focus groups to elicit information about women's stress. We identified key...

  6. Measurement and Correlation of Indices of Insulin Resistance in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Morris, Kelli R; Deger, Serpil Muge; Hung, Adriana M; Egbert, Phyllis Ann; Ellis, Charles D; Graves, Amy; Shintani, Ayumi; Ikizler, T Alp

    2016-01-01

    ♦ Insulin resistance (IR) is common in maintenance dialysis patients and is associated with excess mortality. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp (HEGC) is the gold standard for measuring IR. There are limited studies using HEGC for comparison to other indirect indices of IR in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, nor have there been direct comparisons between patients receiving PD and those on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) with regard to severity of IR, methods of measurement, or factors associated with the development of IR. ♦ This is a cross-sectional, single-center study performed in 10 prevalent PD patients of median age 48 years (range 41 - 54); 50% were female and 60% were African American. Insulin resistance was assessed by HEGC (glucose disposal rate [GDR]), homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR), HOMA-IR corrected by adiponectin (HOMA-AD), leptin adiponectin ratio (LAR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), McAuley's index, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at each time point for a total of 18 studies. Retrospective analysis compared this cohort to 12 hemodialysis patients who had previously undergone similar testing. ♦ The median GDR was 6.4 mg/kg/min (interquartile range [IQR] 6.0, 7.8) in the PD cohort compared with the MHD group, which was 5.7 mg/kg/min (IQR 4.3, 6.6). For both the PD and MHD cohorts, the best predictors of GDR by HEGC after adjusting for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI), were HOMA-AD (PD: r = -0.69, p = 0.01; MHD: r = -0.78, p = 0.03) and LAR (PD: r = -0.68, p failed to have strong predictive value. Eight of 10 PD patients had at least 1 abnormal OGTT, demonstrating impaired glucose tolerance. ♦ Insulin resistance is highly prevalent in PD patients. The adipokine based formulas, HOMA-AD and LAR, correlated well in both the PD and MHD populations in predicting GDR by HEGC, outperforming HOMA-IR. The use of these novel markers could be considered for large-scale, epidemiological outcome

  7. Utility of Covered Stents for Revision of Aging Failing Synthetic Hemodialysis Grafts: A Report of Three Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silas, Anne M.; Bettmann, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Three aging failing hemodialysis polytetrafluoroethylene bypass shunts, average age 44 months, previously percutaneously revised with balloon angioplasty, presented with pseudoaneurysms and recurrent thrombosis. All were treated with percutaneous covered stent placement within their affected limbs. One graft was ligated 1 month after treatment for infected overlying skin ulcer, though this graft was subsequently surgically revised with interposition graft and the covered stent portion remains functional at 19 month follow-up. The 18- and 13- month follow- up of the remaining 2 patients shows that the covered stents remained patent and they are functional and being successfully and routinely punctured for dialysis. In this elderly population, the use of covered stents may prolong the functional life of failing hemodialysis bypass grafts, reducing the number of percutaneous and surgical interventions and further sparing other vascular access sites

  8. Vitamin K antagonist use and mortality in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskamp, Pauline W.M.; Rookmaaker, Maarten B.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Ocak, Gurbey

    2018-01-01

    Background. The risk-benefit ratio of vitamin K antagonists for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in patients with end-stage renal disease treated with dialysis is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between vitamin K antagonist use and mortality for different CHA2DS2-VASc

  9. High fall incidence and fracture rate in elderly dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder-Bos, H. A.; Emmelot-Vonk, M. H.; Gansevoort, R. T.; Diepenbroek, A.; Gaillard, C. A. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although it is recognised that the dialysis population is ageing rapidly, geriatric complications such as falls are poorly appreciated, despite the many risk factors for falls in this population. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, complications and risk factors

  10. Peritoneal dialysis in an ageing population: a 10-year experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming increasingly prevalent and there are increasing numbers of older patients with advanced CKD. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a potential treatment. This study aims to compare PD outcomes in age-defined populations in the largest PD centre in the Republic of Ireland over 10 years.

  11. Detection of microorganisms, endotoxins and aluminum in mobile dialysis services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Rodrigues de Jesus

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis water and dialysates are fundamental in the treatment of kidney disease. During just one hemodialysis session, 120 liters of dialysate are consumed. Thus, it is essential that the parameters of chemical and microbiological quality of the fluids used in dialysis systems are carefully observed. In this study, water samples were collected at 12 hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The samples were obtained at three points of fluid reservoirs: pre-, post-osmosis and dialysis solution. After collection, colony forming units (CFU, total coliforms and Escherichia coli 100 mL-1 were quantified. Later, isolated colonies and endotoxin content were identified by biochemical assays. Data about total aluminum levels per sample (mg L-1 were also obtained. Samples of all mobile dialysis services and points of collection were contaminated above the levels set out by national laws, in particular by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Endotoxin levels were also above the recommended by current legislation (> 0.25 EU mL-1. Only three samples contained detectable levels of aluminum, which were found to be above the recommended values for the corresponding resolution (0.01 mg L-1. Finally, there were no observable amounts of total coliforms and E. coli 100 mL-1 sample. The data from this study are an important step forward in the standardization and control of chemical/microbiological quality of mobile dialysis services.

  12. Benfotiamine protects against peritoneal and kidney damage in peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihm, Lars P; Müller-Krebs, Sandra; Klein, Julia; Ehrlich, Gregory; Mertes, Laura; Gross, Marie-Luise; Adaikalakoteswari, Antonysunil; Thornalley, Paul J; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Nawroth, Peter P; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat

    2011-05-01

    Residual renal function and the integrity of the peritoneal membrane contribute to morbidity and mortality among patients treated with peritoneal dialysis. Glucose and its degradation products likely contribute to the deterioration of the remnant kidney and damage to the peritoneum. Benfotiamine decreases glucose-induced tissue damage, suggesting the potential for benefit in peritoneal dialysis. Here, in a model of peritoneal dialysis in uremic rats, treatment with benfotiamine decreased peritoneal fibrosis, markers of inflammation, and neovascularization, resulting in improved characteristics of peritoneal transport. Furthermore, rats treated with benfotiamine exhibited lower expression of advanced glycation endproducts and their receptor in the peritoneum and the kidney, reduced glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage, and less albuminuria. Increased activity of transketolase in tissue and blood contributed to the protective effects of benfotiamine. In primary human peritoneal mesothelial cells, the addition of benfotiamine led to enhanced transketolase activity and decreased expression of advanced glycation endproducts and their receptor. Taken together, these data suggest that benfotiamine protects the peritoneal membrane and remnant kidney in a rat model of peritoneal dialysis and uremia. Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Nephrology

  13. [Optimal use of peritoneal dialysis with multi-disciplinary management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elios Russo, Gaspare; Martinez, A; Mazzaferro, S; Nunzi, A; Testorio, M; Rocca, A R; Lai, S; Morgia, A; Borzacca, B; Gnerre Musto, T

    2013-01-01

    Considering the increasing incidence of chronic kidney disease and the increased use of peritoneal dialysis, we wanted to assess whether the multidisciplinary management of patients in peritoneal dialysis might produce improvement in the quality of patients' lives when compared to management by a routine team of operators. Our study observed 40 patients on peritoneal dialysis in our Department between 2010 and 2012. They were randomly assigned to either group A, the routine team which consisted of a nephrologist and a nurse, or group B, a multidisciplinary team comprising several medical specialists, a nurse, a psychologist and a social worker. Two tests, KDQOL-SF and MMPI-2, were administered to both groups. In group B, the number of days of hospitalization and day hospital were more than 88% lower when compared to group A. The multidisciplinary team achieved better results with the KDQOL-SF test with regards to both emotional and objective dimensions. The Pearson coefficient between the results of the two questionnaires shows how multidisciplinary management can positively influence the perceived well-being of the patient and his or her adherence to treatment. In a multidisciplinary team, each operator, in addition to his or her specific role, also contributes to the achievement of the overall objective, namely of ensuring an optimal quality of life to the patient on peritoneal dialysis thereby allowing these patients to continue their professional and social lives.

  14. Relative survival of peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James G; Wehberg, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Epidemiological studies consistently show an initial survival advantage for PD patients compared to HD. It has recently been suggested that this is due to the fact that many HD patients are referred late, and start dialysis on an acute, in-patient basis. The present study was perfor...

  15. Capnocytophaga cynodegmi peritonitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pers, Charlotte; Tvedegaard, Erling; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    The first reported case of peritonitis caused by Capnocytophaga cynodegmi is presented. The patient was treated with peritoneal dialysis and had contact with a cat. C. cynodegmi is part of the normal oral flora of dogs and cats but is very rarely isolated in clinical specimens from humans....

  16. Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis: Atypical and Resistant Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, Yeoungjee; Struijk, Dirk Gijsbert

    2017-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis remains to be one of the most frequent and serious complications of PD. In this study, existing literature has been reviewed on PD peritonitis caused by atypical organisms and antibiotic resistant organisms and their impact on patient outcomes. Although

  17. Quantification of free water transport in peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Watske; Struijk, Dirk G.; Ho-Dac-Pannekeet, Marja M.; Krediet, Raymond T.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In peritoneal dialysis (PD) total net ultrafiltration (NUF) is dependent on transport through small pores and through water channels in the peritoneum. These channels are impermeable to solutes, and therefore, crystalloid osmotic-induced free water transport occurs through them. Several

  18. Advances in peritoneal dialysis: towards improved efficacy and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The success of peritoneal dialysis on the short-term is mainly dependent on the prevention of infectious and technical complications. The mid-term results will to a large extent be determined by the ability to remove enough uraemic toxins to prevent uraemic complications and

  19. [Technological advances and micro-inflammation in dialysis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Giuseppe; Ravaglia, Fiammetta; Ferrari, Elisa; Romoli, Elena; Michelassi, Stefano; Caiani, David; Pizzarelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    As currently performed, on line hemodiafiltration reduces, but does not normalize, the micro-inflammation of uremic patients. Recent technological advances make it possible to further reduce the inflammation connected to the dialysis treatment. 
Short bacterial DNA fragments are pro-inflammatory and can be detected in the dialysis fluids. However, their determination is not currently within normal controls of the quality of the dialysate. The scenario may change once the analysis of these fragments yields reliable, inexpensive, quick and easy to evaluate the results. At variance with standard bicarbonate dialysate, Citrate dialysate induces far less inflammation both for the well-known anti-inflammatory effect of such buffer and also because it is completely acetate free, e.g. a definitely pro-inflammatory buffer. However, the extensive use of citrate dialysate in chronic dialysis is prevented because of concerns about its potential calcium lowering effect. In our view, high convective exchange on line hemodiafiltration performed with dialysate, whose sterility and a-pirogenicity is guaranteed by increasingly sophisticated controls and with citrate buffer whose safety is certified, can serve as the gold standard of dialysis treatments in future.

  20. [Patients' opinions and expectations about the dialysis care process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, M A; Escudero, M J; Suess, A; March, J C; Ruiz, A; Danet, A

    2011-01-01

    To determine the experiences and needs of patients on dialysis, in order to identify critical points of the care process and develop proposals for improvement. Qualitative study using semistructured interviews with 22 patients on hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, from the Andalusian Health Service. Discourse analysis, using the SERVQUAL model. Triangulation of results. The diagnostic stage is described as the hardest moment as it requires acceptance of the disease. During hemodialysis, we see both positive adaptation and the perception of a diminished quality of life. The technique of peritoneal dialysis is evaluated positively, enabling greater independence, despite requiring more responsibility for self care. The contact with patients' organizations or the provision of a counseling service are valued as an aid in the process. With respect to different dimensions of the SERVQUAL model, human treatment and professional competence are valued. The critical points are lack of coordination, malfunctioning of transportation and lack of transparency in the management of waiting lists. Shortcomings in dealing with informal caregivers and the level of knowledge of professionals from areas other than Nephrology, also appear as deficiencies. The main proposals for improving the dialysis process are: attention to psychosocial aspects, the improvement of organizational aspects such as transport, and greater attention to informal caregivers.

  1. [Automatic system control and its application in dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, A; Mancini, E; Ferramosca, E

    2007-01-01

    The progressive increase in the mean age of dialysis patients associated with increasing comorbidity factors such as the presence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes have significantly worsened patients' clinical status and tolerance to hemodialysis. On the other hand, the demand for short treatment times increases the risk of hemodynamic instability as well as inadequate depuration. The traditional management of the dialysis session by setting predefined treatment parameters and carrying out active therapeutic intervention only in the event of complications is definitely unsuitable for short-lasting treatments, which are often complicated by hemodynamic instability, especially in critically ill patients. The first step in improving the management of the dialysis session is the use of uninvasive systems for continuous monitoring of the hemodynamic and biochemical parameters that characterize dialysis quality. In the last decade, special sensors have been designed for continuous measurement of blood volume, blood temperature, blood pressure, heart rate and electrolytes. As a second step, some of these devices have been interfaced with the dialysis equipment, mainly with a view to preventing cardiocirculatory instability but also monitoring the efficiency of dialysis (biofeedback control systems). The basic components of a biofeedback system are the plant, the sensors, the actuators, and the controller. The plant is the biological process we need to control, while the sensors are the devices used for measuring the output variables. The actuators are the working arms of the controller. The controller is the mathematical model that continuously sets the measured output variable against the reference input and modifies the actuators in order to reduce any discrepancies. In actual practice, however, there are a number of conceptual, physical and technological difficulties to overcome. In particular, the behavior of what is to be controlled may be nonlinear and time

  2. Multicentre study of treatment outcomes in Australian adolescents and young adults commencing dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischock, Leah; Kennedy, Sean E; Hayen, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study is to improve the understanding of outcomes and complications of dialysis in adolescents and young adults (AYA) to inform decisions about dialysis modality in this patient population. Registry data on Australian AYA aged 13 to 20 years who commenced dialysis between 1/1/2000 and 31/12/2013 were retrieved from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplantation Registry and analyzed to determine associations between demographic characteristics, dialysis modality and outcomes. During the study period 300 AYA commenced dialysis at a median age of 17.2 years (IQR 15.6 to 18.6 years). Haemodialysis (HD) was the initial dialysis modality in 201 patients (67%). No significant differences between AYA receiving HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD) were noted in patient gender, age, race, primary renal disease, treating centre type, remoteness of residential area, lateness of referral or period of study. Mean haemoglobin levels were lower in the HD group (P = 0.005) and significantly fewer HD patients attended school full time compared to patients managed on PD (P = 0.002 first year; P = 0.05 second year). Dialysis modality choice does not appear to be influenced by patient characteristics nor dialysis outcomes. Future research is required to examine the reasons that HD is preferred over PD and to determine the optimal method of dialysis for this age group. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Aquatic macroinvertebrate responses to native and non-native predators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddaway N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-native species can profoundly affect native ecosystems through trophic interactions with native species. Native prey may respond differently to non-native versus native predators since they lack prior experience. Here we investigate antipredator responses of two common freshwater macroinvertebrates, Gammarus pulex and Potamopyrgus jenkinsi, to olfactory cues from three predators; sympatric native fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus, sympatric native crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes, and novel invasive crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus. G. pulex responded differently to fish and crayfish; showing enhanced locomotion in response to fish, but a preference for the dark over the light in response to the crayfish. P.jenkinsi showed increased vertical migration in response to all three predator cues relative to controls. These different responses to fish and crayfish are hypothesised to reflect the predators’ differing predation types; benthic for crayfish and pelagic for fish. However, we found no difference in response to native versus invasive crayfish, indicating that prey naiveté is unlikely to drive the impacts of invasive crayfish. The Predator Recognition Continuum Hypothesis proposes that benefits of generalisable predator recognition outweigh costs when predators are diverse. Generalised responses of prey as observed here will be adaptive in the presence of an invader, and may reduce novel predators’ potential impacts.

  4. Vasoactive Peptide Levels after Change of Dialysis Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Uhlin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Plasma concentrations of the N-terminal fragment of pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP are increased in end-stage renal disease. Improvement in hemodynamic stability has been reported when switching from hemodialysis (HD to on-line hemodiafiltration (ol-HDF. The aim of this study was to investigate plasma concentrations of NT-proBNP, BNP and neuropeptide Y (NPY during a 1-year follow-up, after a change from high-flux HD to postdilution ol-HDF. Additional variables were also studied, e.g. pulse wave velocity and ordinary clinical parameters. Method: We conducted a prospective, single-center study including 35 patients who were switched from HD to HDF. Plasma concentrations of NT-proBNP, BNP and NPY before and after dialysis were measured at baseline (i.e. HD and at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 12 months on HDF. Results: All three peptide levels decreased significantly during HD and HDF when comparing concentrations before and after dialysis. Mean absolute value (before/after and relative decrease (% before versus after dialysis was 13.697/9.497 ng/l (31% for NT-proBNP, 62/40 ng/ml (35% for BNP and 664/364 pg/l (45% for NPY. No significant differences were observed when comparing predialysis values over time. However, postdialysis NT-proBNP concentration showed a significant decrease of 48% over time after the switch to HDF. Conclusion: The postdialysis plasma levels of NT-proBNP, BNP and NPY decreased significantly during both dialysis modes when compared to before dialysis. The postdialysis lowering of NT-proBNP increased further over time after the switch to ol-HDF; the predialysis levels were unchanged, suggesting no effect on its production in the ventricles of the heart.

  5. Burnout Syndrome Among Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoc, Ayten; Yilmaz, Murvet; Alcalar, Nilufer; Esen, Bennur; Kayabasi, Hasan; Sit, Dede

    2016-11-01

    Burnout, a syndrome with 3 dimensions of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduction of personal accomplishment, is very common among hemodialysis nurses, while data are scarce regarding the prevalence of burnout syndrome (BS) among peritoneal dialysis (PD) nurses. This study aimed to assess and compare demographic and professional characteristics and burnout levels in hemodialysis and PD nurses, and to investigate factors that increase the level of burnout in dialysis nurses. A total of 171 nurses from 44 dialysis centers in Turkey were included in a cross-sectional survey study. Data were collected using a questionnaire defining the social and demographic characteristics and working conditions of the nurses as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory for assessment of burnout level. There was no significant difference in the level of burnout between the hemodialysis and PD nurses groups. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores were higher among the shift workers, nurses who had problems in interactions with the other team members, and those who wanted to leave the unit, as well as the nurses who would not attend training programs. In addition, male sex, younger age, limited working experience, more than 50 hours of working per week, and working in dialysis not by choice were associated with higher depersonalization scores. Personal accomplishment score was lower among the younger nurses who had problems in their interactions with the doctors, who would not regularly attend training programs, and who felt being medically inadequate. Improving working conditions and relations among colleagues, and also providing further dialysis education are necessary for minimizing burnout syndrome. Burnout reduction programs should mainly focus on younger professionals.

  6. Depression in hemodialysis patients: the role of dialysis shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Teles

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Depression is the most important neuropsychiatric complication in chronic kidney disease because it reduces quality of life and increases mortality. Evidence demonstrating the association between dialysis shift and depression is lacking; thus, obtaining such evidence was the main objective of this study. METHOD: This cross-sectional study included patients attending a hemodialysis program. Depression was diagnosed using Beck's Depression Inventory. Excessive daytime sleepiness was evaluated using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. RESULTS: A total of 96 patients were enrolled (55 males, age 48±14 years. Depression and excessive daytime sleepiness were observed in 42.7% and 49% of the patients, respectively. When comparing variables among the three dialysis shifts, there were no differences in age, dialysis vintage, employment status, excessive daytime sleepiness, hemoglobin, phosphorus levels, or albumin levels. Patients in the morning shift were more likely to live in rural areas (p<0.0001, although patients in rural areas did not have a higher prevalence of depression (p= 0.30. Patients with depression were more likely to be dialyzed during the morning shift (p= 0.008. Independent risk factors for depression were age (p<0.03, lower levels of hemoglobin (p<0.01 and phosphorus (p<0.01, and dialysis during the morning shift (p= 0.0009. The hospitalization risk of depressive patients was 4.5 times higher than that of nondepressive patients (p<0.008. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that depression is associated with dialysis shift, higher levels of phosphorus, and lower levels of hemoglobin. The results highlight the need for randomized trials to determine whether this association occurs by chance or whether circadian rhythm disorders may play a role.

  7. Rationale for a home dialysis virtual ward: design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Michael E; Bargman, Joanne M; Copland, Michael; Hladunewich, Michelle; Tennankore, Karthik K; Levin, Adeera; Oliver, Matthew; Pauly, Robert P; Perl, Jeffrey; Zimmerman, Deborah; Chan, Christopher T

    2014-02-14

    Home-based renal replacement therapy (RRT) [peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HHD)] offers independent quality of life and clinical advantages compared to conventional in-center hemodialysis. However, follow-up may be less complete for home dialysis patients following a change in care settings such as post hospitalization. We aim to implement a Home Dialysis Virtual Ward (HDVW) strategy, which is targeted to minimize gaps of care. The HDVW Pilot Study will enroll consecutive PD and HHD patients who fulfilled any one of our inclusion criteria: 1. following discharge from hospital, 2. after interventional procedure(s), 3. prescription of anti-microbial agents, or 4. following completion of home dialysis training. Clinician-led telephone interviews are performed weekly for 2 weeks until VW discharge. Case-mix (modified Charlson Comorbidity Index), symptoms (the modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale) and patient satisfaction are assessed serially. The number of VW interventions relating to eight pre-specified domains will be measured. Adverse events such as re-hospitalization and health-services utilization will be ascertained through telephone follow-up after discharge from the VW at 2, 4, 12 weeks. The VW re-hospitalization rate will be compared with a contemporary cohort (matched for age, gender, renal replacement therapy and co-morbidities). Our protocol has been approved by research ethics board (UHN: 12-5397-AE). Written informed consent for participation in the study will be obtained from participants. This report serves as a blueprint for the design and implementation of a novel health service delivery model for home dialysis patients. The major goal of the HDVW initiative is to provide appropriate and effective supports to medically complex patients in a targeted window of vulnerability. (NCT01912001).

  8. BODY COMPOSITION IN HEMODIALYSIS AND PERITONEAL DIALYSIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Ho Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioimpedance analysis is a reliable technique for determining post dialysis target weight. Using this technique, we can understand body fluid status easier and conveniently. Moreover this technique can be used for check nutrition status and nutritional status of dialysis patients. We compared the body fluid status and nutrition status between hemodialysis (HD patients and peritoneal dialysis (PD patients by BCM (Body composition monitor technique. We studied 48 (30 males and 18 females PD patients, 21 (10 males and 11 females HD patients. Body composition monitoring (BCM, Fesenitus Medical Care, Germany was used as a tool for the analysis of bioimpedance. Extracellular water, Total body water, Intracellular water, Overhydration, E/I, Lean tissue mass, Fat Tissue mass was measured and those results were compared between two groups. HD patients were more hydrated than PD patients (61.9% vs. 35.4% and nutritional status such as LTI was poorer than peritoneal dialysis patients (11.7±1.7 vs. 15.3±2.6. Although total body water is more abundant in peritoneal patients (29.4±5.5L vs. 35.9±6.2L, Extracellular water and intracellular water ratio was relatively higher in Hemodialysis patients (E/I 0.98±0.13 vs. 0.87±0.12. The nutrition status was better in PD patients by comparing the percent of lean tissue mass (LTM% between two groups (LTM% 52.1±10.6% vs. 66.8±11.3. In conclusions, Hemodialysis patients were more hydrated with poorer nutrition status than peritoneal dialysis patients, but, due to the significant difference of age between two groups, further study should be required.

  9. Method of detecting a failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumi; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To improve detection accuracy of a failed fuel by eliminating a coolant temperature distribution in a fuel assembly. Structure: A failed fuel is detected from contents of nuclear fission products in a coolant by shutting off an upper portion of a fuel assembly provided in the coolant and by sampling the coolant in the fuel assembly. Temperature distribution in the fuel assembly is eliminated, by injecting the higher temperature coolant than that of the coolant inside and outside the fuel assembly when sampling, and thereby replacing the existing coolant in the fuel assembly for the higher temperature coolant. The failed fuel is detected from contents of the fission products existing in the coolant, by sampling the higher temperature coolant of the fuel assembly after a temperature passed. (Moriyama, K.)

  10. Weeded Out? Gendered Responses to Failing Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Tanya; Penner, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    Although women graduate from college at higher rates than men, they remain underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. This study examines whether women react to failing a STEM weed-out course by switching to a non-STEM major and graduating with a bachelor's degree in a non-STEM field. While competitive courses designed to weed out potential STEM majors are often invoked in discussions around why students exit the STEM pipeline, relatively little is known about how women and men react to failing these courses. We use detailed individual-level data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS) Postsecondary Transcript Study (PETS): 1988-2000 to show that women who failed an introductory calculus course are substantially less likely to earn a bachelor's degree in STEM. In doing so, we provide evidence that weed-out course failure might help us to better understand why women are less likely to earn degrees.

  11. Standard on microbiological management of fluids for hemodialysis and related therapies by the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Hideki; Akiba, Takashi; Masakane, Ikuto; Tomo, Tadashi; Mineshima, Michio; Kawasaki, Tadayuki; Hirakata, Hideki; Akizawa, Tadao

    2009-04-01

    The Committee of Scientific Academy of the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy (JSDT) proposes a new standard on microbiological management of fluids for hemodialysis and related therapies. This standard is within the scope of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), which is currently under revision. This standard is to be applied to the central dialysis fluid delivery systems (CDDS), which are widely used in Japan. In this standard, microbiological qualities for dialysis water and dialysis fluids are clearly defined by endotoxin level and bacterial count. The qualities of dialysis fluids were classified into three levels: standard, ultrapure, and online prepared substitution fluid. In addition, the therapeutic application of each dialysis fluid is clarified. Since high-performance dialyzers are frequently used in Japan, the standard recommends that ultrapure dialysis fluid be used for all dialysis modalities at all dialysis facilities. It also recommends that the dialysis equipment safety management committee at each facility should validate the microbiological qualities of online prepared substitution fluid.

  12. Is Peritonitis Risk Increased in Elderly Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis? Report from the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry (RDPLF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquennoy, Simon; Béchade, Clémence; Verger, Christian; Ficheux, Maxence; Ryckelynck, Jean-Philippe; Lobbedez, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    ♦ This study was carried out to examine whether or not elderly patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) had an increased risk of peritonitis. ♦ This was a retrospective cohort study based on data from the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry. We analyzed 8,396 incident patients starting PD between January 2003 and December 2010. The end of the observation period was 31 December 2012. Patients were separated into 2 age groups: up to 75 and over of 75 years old. ♦ Among 8,396 patients starting dialysis there were 3,173 patients older than 75. When using a Cox model, no association was found between age greater than 75 years and increased risk of peritonitis (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.97 [0.88 - 1.07]). Diabetes (HR: 1.14 [1.01 - 1.28] and continuous ambulatory PD (HR: 1.13 [1.04 - 1.23]) were significantly associated with a higher risk of peritoneal infection whereas nurse-assisted PD was associated with a lower risk of peritonitis (HR: 0.85 [0.78 - 0.94]. In the analysis restricted to the 3,840 self-care PD patients, there was no association between age older than 75 years and risk of peritonitis. ♦ The risk of peritonitis is not increased in elderly patients on PD in a country where assisted PD is available. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  13. Why did the League of Nations fail?

    OpenAIRE

    Jari Eloranta

    2011-01-01

    Why did the League of Nations ultimately fail to achieve widespread disarmament, its most fundamental goal? This article shows that the failure of the League of Nations had two important dimensions: (1) the failure to provide adequate security guarantees for its members (like an alliance); (2) the failure of this organization to achieve the disarmament goals it set out in the 1920s and 1930s. Thus, it was doomed from the outset to fail, due to built-in institutional contradictions. It can als...

  14. De etiske journalister: Native Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Asger Bach; Jeppesen, Annika; Turunen, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    This project investigates the opinions about Native Advertising, among RUC-students who study journalism. In qualitative interviews a number of students point out advantages and disadvantages of Native Advertising as they see them, as well as they reflect upon if they eventually can see themselves work with Native Advertising.A selection of their responds are analysed with the use of a pragmatic argument analysis. The outcome of the analysis is the base of a discussion, which also include the...

  15. Introduced brown trout alter native acanthocephalan infections in native fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Rachel A; Townsend, Colin R; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2011-09-01

    1. Native parasite acquisition provides introduced species with the potential to modify native host-parasite dynamics by acting as parasite reservoirs (with the 'spillback' of infection increasing the parasite burdens of native hosts) or sinks (with the 'dilution' of infection decreasing the parasite burdens of native hosts) of infection. 2. In New Zealand, negative correlations between the presence of introduced brown trout (Salmo trutta) and native parasite burdens of the native roundhead galaxias (Galaxias anomalus) have been observed, suggesting that parasite dilution is occurring. 3. We used a multiple-scale approach combining field observations, experimental infections and dynamic population modelling to investigate whether native Acanthocephalus galaxii acquisition by brown trout alters host-parasite dynamics in native roundhead galaxias. 4. Field observations demonstrated higher infection intensity in introduced trout than in native galaxias, but only small, immature A. galaxii were present in trout. Experimental infections also demonstrated that A. galaxii does not mature in trout, although parasite establishment and initial growth were similar in the two hosts. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that trout may serve as an infection sink for the native parasite. 5. However, dynamic population modelling predicts that A. galaxii infections in native galaxias should at most only be slightly reduced by dilution in the presence of trout. Rather, model exploration indicates parasite densities in galaxias are highly sensitive to galaxias predation on infected amphipods, and to relative abundances of galaxias and trout. Hence, trout presence may instead reduce parasite burdens in galaxias by either reducing galaxias density or by altering galaxias foraging behaviour. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.

  16. Factors influencing access to education, decision making, and receipt of preferred dialysis modality in unplanned dialysis start patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machowska, Anna; Alscher, Mark Dominik; Reddy Vanga, Satyanarayana; Koch, Michael; Aarup, Michael; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Rutherford, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Unplanned dialysis start (UPS) leads to worse clinical outcomes than planned start, and only a minority of patients ever receive education on this topic and are able to make a modality choice, particularly for home dialysis. This study aimed to determine the predictive factors for patients receiving education, making a decision, and receiving their preferred modality choice in UPS patients following a UPS educational program (UPS-EP). The Offering Patients Therapy Options in Unplanned Start (OPTiONS) study examined the impact of the implementation of a specific UPS-EP, including decision support tools and pathway improvement on dialysis modality choice. Linear regression models were used to examine the factors predicting three key steps: referral and receipt of UPS-EP, modality decision making, and actual delivery of preferred modality choice. A simple economic assessment was performed to examine the potential benefit of implementing UPS-EP in terms of dialysis costs. The majority of UPS patients could receive UPS-EP (214/270 patients) and were able to make a decision (177/214), although not all patients received their preferred choice (159/177). Regression analysis demonstrated that the initial dialysis modality was a predictive factor for referral and receipt of UPS-EP and modality decision making. In contrast, age was a predictor for referral and receipt of UPS-EP only, and comorbidity was not a predictor for any step, except for myocardial infarction, which was a weak predictor for lower likelihood of receiving preferred modality. Country practices predicted UPS-EP receipt and decision making. Economic analysis demonstrated the potential benefit of UPS-EP implementation because dialysis modality costs were associated with modality distribution driven by patient preference. Education and decision support can allow UPS patients to understand their options and choose dialysis modality, and attention needs to be focused on ensuring equity of access to educational

  17. Native Speakers' Perception of Non-Native English Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Maysa; Hussein, Riyad F.

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the rating and intelligibility of different non-native varieties of English, namely French English, Japanese English and Jordanian English by native English speakers and their attitudes towards these foreign accents. To achieve the goals of this study, the researchers used a web-based questionnaire which…

  18. Exploring Native and Non-Native Intuitions of Word Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Norbert; Dunham, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    Asked native and nonnative speakers to give judgments of frequency for near synonyms in second-language lexical sets and compared those responses to modern corpus word counts. Native speakers were able to discern the core word in lexical sets either 77% or 85%, and nonnative speakers at 71% or 79%. (Author/VWL)

  19. Critical thinking: are the ideals of OBE failing us or are we failing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Critical thinking: are the ideals of OBE failing us or are we failing the ideals of OBE? K Lombard, M Grosser. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal of Education Vol. 28 (4) 2008: pp. 561-580. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  20. Underachievement, Failing Youth and Moral Panics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emma

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers contemporary "moral panics" around the underachievement of boys in school examinations in the UK and America. In the UK, in particular, the underachievement of boys is central to current "crisis accounts" about falling standards and failing pupils. "Underachievement" is a familiar word to those…

  1. The Art of Saving a Failing School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Les

    2012-01-01

    While the debate continues over whether to close failing schools or attempt fixing them, the author asserts that the solution most often lies in assigning strong leaders to them who will take definite and immediate action. Reviewing his own success turning around schools, he says creating a sense of urgency, unloading poor performing staff, and…

  2. Examination of a failed fifth wheel coupling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fernandes, PJL

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Examination of a fifth wheel coupling which had failed in service showed that it had been modified and that the operating handle had been moved from its original design position. This modification completely eliminated the safety device designed...

  3. Merger incentives and the failing firm defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouckaert, J.M.C.; Kort, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The merger incentives between profitable firms differ fundamentally from the incentives of a profitable firm to merge with a failing firm. We investigate these incentives under different modes of price competition and Cournot behavior. Our main finding is that firms strictly prefer exit of the

  4. Systems with randomly failing repairable components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Kiureghian, Armen; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Song, Junho

    2005-01-01

    Closed-form expressions are derived for the steady-state availability, mean rate of failure, mean duration of downtime and reliability of a general system with randomly and independently failing repairable components. Component failures are assumed to be homogeneous Poisson events in time and rep...

  5. Log-binomial models: exploring failed convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tyler; Eliasziw, Misha; Fick, Gordon Hilton

    2013-12-13

    Relative risk is a summary metric that is commonly used in epidemiological investigations. Increasingly, epidemiologists are using log-binomial models to study the impact of a set of predictor variables on a single binary outcome, as they naturally offer relative risks. However, standard statistical software may report failed convergence when attempting to fit log-binomial models in certain settings. The methods that have been proposed in the literature for dealing with failed convergence use approximate solutions to avoid the issue. This research looks directly at the log-likelihood function for the simplest log-binomial model where failed convergence has been observed, a model with a single linear predictor with three levels. The possible causes of failed convergence are explored and potential solutions are presented for some cases. Among the principal causes is a failure of the fitting algorithm to converge despite the log-likelihood function having a single finite maximum. Despite these limitations, log-binomial models are a viable option for epidemiologists wishing to describe the relationship between a set of predictors and a binary outcome where relative risk is the desired summary measure. Epidemiologists are encouraged to continue to use log-binomial models and advocate for improvements to the fitting algorithms to promote the widespread use of log-binomial models.

  6. I Failed the edTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranishi, Adam; Oyler, Celia

    2017-01-01

    In this article, co-written by a teacher and a professor, the authors examine possible explanations for why Adam (first author), a New York City public school special educator, failed the edTPA, a teacher performance assessment required by all candidates for state certification. Adam completed a yearlong teaching residency where he was the special…

  7. Dialysis Exercise Team: The Way to Sustain Exercise Programs in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Capitanini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients affected by end-stage renal disease (ESRD show quite lower physical activity and exercise capacity when compared to healthy individuals. In addition, a sedentary lifestyle is favoured by lack of a specific counseling on exercise implementation in the nephrology care setting. Increasing physical activity level should represent a goal for every dialysis patient care management. Three crucial elements of clinical care may contribute to sustain a hemodialysis exercise program: a involvement of exercise professionals, b real commitment of nephrologists and dialysis professionals, c individual patient adaptation of the exercise program. Dialysis staff have a crucial role to encourage and assist patients during intra-dialysis exercise, but other professionals should be included in the ideal “exercise team” for dialysis patients. Evaluation of general condition, comorbidities (especially cardiovascular, nutritional status and physical exercise capacity are mandatory to propose an exercise program, in either extra-dialysis or intra-dialysis setting. To this aim, nephrologist should lead a team of specialists and professionals including cardiologist, physiotherapist, exercise physiologist, renal dietician and nurse. In this scenario, dialysis nurses play a pivotal role since they guarantee a constant and direct approach. Unfortunately dialysis staff may often lack of information and formation about exercise management while they take care patients during the dialysis session. Building an effective exercise team, promoting the culture of exercise and increasing physical activity levels lead to a more complete and modern clinical care management of ESRD patients.

  8. Impact of global economic disparities on practices and outcomes of chronic peritoneal dialysis in children: insights from the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, Franz; Borzych-Duzalka, Dagmara; Azocar, Marta; Munarriz, Reyner Loza; Sever, Lale; Aksu, Nejat; Barbosa, Lorena Sànchez; Galan, Yajaira Silva; Xu, Hong; Coccia, Paula A.; Szabo, Attila; Wong, William; Salim, Rosana; Vidal, Enrico; Pottoore, Stephen; Warady, Bradley A.; Alconcher, L.; Sojo, E.; Coccia, P. A.; Suarez, A.; Valles, P. G.; Salim, R.; Salta, S. A.; van Hoeck, K.; Koch, V.; Feber, J.; Geary, D. A.; White, C.; Valenzuela, M.; Villagra, J.; Cano, F.; Contreras, M. A.; Vogel, A.; Zambrano, P.; Berrocal, P.; Tse, K. C.; Xu, H.; Vondrak, K.; Rönnholm, K.; Harambat, J.; Ranchin, B.; Roussey, G.; Ulinski, T.; Fischbach, M.; Büscher, R.; Kemper, M.; Pape, L.; Schaefer, F.; Borzych, D.; Groothoff, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND, OBJECTIVES, AND METHODS: The number of patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) is increasing rapidly on a global scale. We analyzed the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network (IPPN) registry, a global database active in 33 countries spanning a wide range in gross

  9. Native Music in College Curricula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Loran

    1986-01-01

    Culminating a 10-year effort to include the study of Native Americans and their music as it reflects cultural realities, life, thought, religion, and history as a choice in requirements for graduation, the elective course, "Native Music of North America," is now recognized at Washington State University as meeting both…

  10. Listening Natively across Perceptual Domains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langus, Alan; Seyed-Allaei, Shima; Uysal, Ertugrul; Pirmoradian, Sahar; Marino, Caterina; Asaadi, Sina; Eren, Ömer; Toro, Juan M.; Peña, Marcela; Bion, Ricardo A. H.; Nespor, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Our native tongue influences the way we perceive other languages. But does it also determine the way we perceive nonlinguistic sounds? The authors investigated how speakers of Italian, Turkish, and Persian group sequences of syllables, tones, or visual shapes alternating in either frequency or duration. We found strong native listening effects…

  11. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  12. Native American youth and justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Laurence A. French

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Youth and delinquency issues have long been problematic among Native Americans groups both on- and off-reservation. This phenomenon is further complicated by the cultural diversity among American Indians and Alaska Natives scattered across the United States. In address these issues, the paper begins with a historical overview of Native American youth. This history presents the long tradition of federal policies that, how well intended, have resulted in discriminatory practices with the most damages attacks being those directed toward the destruction of viable cultural attributes – the same attributes that make Native Americans unique within United States society. Following the historical material, the authors contrast the pervasive Native American aboriginal ethos of harmony with that of Protestant Ethic that dominates the ethos of the larger United States society. In addition to providing general information on Native American crime and delinquency, the paper also provides a case study of Native American justice within the Navajo Nation, the largest tribe, in both size and population, in the United States. The paper concludes with a discussion of issues specific to Native American youth and efforts to address these problems.

  13. Salvage of failed protein targets by reductive alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Kim, Youngchang; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Chhor, Gekleng; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Michalska, Karolina; Nocek, Boguslaw; An, Hao; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Bigelow, Lance; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Li, Hui; Mack, Jamey; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Maltseva, Natalia; Mulligan, Rory; Tesar, Christine; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The growth of diffraction-quality single crystals is of primary importance in protein X-ray crystallography. Chemical modification of proteins can alter their surface properties and crystallization behavior. The Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG) has previously reported how reductive methylation of lysine residues in proteins can improve crystallization of unique proteins that initially failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals. Recently, this approach has been expanded to include ethylation and isopropylation in the MCSG protein crystallization pipeline. Applying standard methods, 180 unique proteins were alkylated and screened using standard crystallization procedures. Crystal structures of 12 new proteins were determined, including the first ethylated and the first isopropylated protein structures. In a few cases, the structures of native and methylated or ethylated states were obtained and the impact of reductive alkylation of lysine residues was assessed. Reductive methylation tends to be more efficient and produces the most alkylated protein structures. Structures of methylated proteins typically have higher resolution limits. A number of well-ordered alkylated lysine residues have been identified, which make both intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The previous report is updated and complemented with the following new data; a description of a detailed alkylation protocol with results, structural features, and roles of alkylated lysine residues in protein crystals. These contribute to improved crystallization properties of some proteins.

  14. Salvage of Failed Protein Targets by Reductive Alkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Kim, Youngchang; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Chhor, Gekleng; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Michalska, Karolina; Nocek, Boguslaw; An, Hao; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Bigelow, Lance; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Li, Hui; Mack, Jamey; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Maltseva, Natalia; Mulligan, Rory; Tesar, Christine; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The growth of diffraction-quality single crystals is of primary importance in protein X-ray crystallography. Chemical modification of proteins can alter their surface properties and crystallization behavior. The Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG) has previously reported how reductive methylation of lysine residues in proteins can improve crystallization of unique proteins that initially failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals. Recently, this approach has been expanded to include ethylation and isopropylation in the MCSG protein crystallization pipeline. Applying standard methods, 180 unique proteins were alkylated and screened using standard crystallization procedures. Crystal structures of 12 new proteins were determined, including the first ethylated and the first isopropylated protein structures. In a few cases, the structures of native and methylated or ethylated states were obtained and the impact of reductive alkylation of lysine residues was assessed. Reductive methylation tends to be more efficient and produces the most alkylated protein structures. Structures of methylated proteins typically have higher resolution limits. A number of well-ordered alkylated lysine residues have been identified, which make both intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The previous report is updated and complemented with the following new data; a description of a detailed alkylation protocol with results, structural features, and roles of alkylated lysine residues in protein crystals. These contribute to improved crystallization properties of some proteins. PMID:24590719

  15. Vulnerability of freshwater native biodiversity to non-native ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods Non-native species pose one of the greatest threats to native biodiversity. The literature provides plentiful empirical and anecdotal evidence of this phenomenon; however, such evidence is limited to local or regional scales. Employing geospatial analyses, we investigate the potential threat of non-native species to threatened and endangered aquatic animal taxa inhabiting unprotected areas across the continental US. We compiled distribution information from existing publicly available databases at the watershed scale (12-digit hydrologic unit code). We mapped non-native aquatic plant and animal species richness, and an index of cumulative invasion pressure, which weights non-native richness by the time since invasion of each species. These distributions were compared to the distributions of native aquatic taxa (fish, amphibians, mollusks, and decapods) from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) database. We mapped the proportion of species listed by IUCN as threatened and endangered, and a species rarity index per watershed. An overlay analysis identified watersheds experiencing high pressure from non-native species and also containing high proportions of threatened and endangered species or exhibiting high species rarity. Conservation priorities were identified by generating priority indices from these overlays and mapping them relative to the distribution of protected areas across the US. Results/Conclusion

  16. Asymptomatic Effluent Protozoa Colonization in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões-Silva, Liliana; Correia, Inês; Barbosa, Joana; Santos-Araujo, Carla; Sousa, Maria João; Pestana, Manuel; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    Currently, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem. Considering the impaired immunity of CKD patients, the relevance of infection in peritoneal dialysis (PD), and the increased prevalence of parasites in CKD patients, protozoa colonization was evaluated in PD effluent from CKD patients undergoing PD. Overnight PD effluent was obtained from 49 asymptomatic stable PD patients. Protozoa analysis was performed microscopically by searching cysts and trophozoites in direct wet mount of PD effluent and after staining smears. Protozoa were found in PD effluent of 10.2% of evaluated PD patients, namely Blastocystis hominis, in 2 patients, and Entamoeba sp., Giardia sp., and Endolimax nana in the other 3 patients, respectively. None of these patients presented clinical signs or symptoms of peritonitis at the time of protozoa screening. Our results demonstrate that PD effluent may be susceptible to asymptomatic protozoa colonization. The clinical impact of this finding should be further investigated. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  17. Circulating thyroid hormone levels and adequacy of dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savdie, E; Stewart, J H; Mahony, J F; Hayes, J M; Lazarus, L; Simons, L A

    1978-02-01

    In vitro thyroid function tests were performed in three groups of patients with chronic renal failure who were receiving, on average, 15, 18 and 27 hours of maintenance hemodialysis per week. Total thyroxine levels were low and total triiodothyronine levels low to normal in those receiving the least dialysis (15 hours), and were significantly higher in those receiving longer dialysis. Free thyroxine levels, as measured by the effective thyroxine ratio, were normal and similar in all three groups, as were serum thyrotrophin levels. All patients were clinically euthyroid. As total hormone levels showed a significant inverse relationship to both urea and creatinine, this study suggests that there is a dialyzable metabolite retained in uremia which competes with thyroid hormones for protein-binding sites.

  18. [Just-in-time initiation of optimal dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Tom; Kooman, Jeroen P; van der Sande, Frank M

    2010-01-01

    The IDEAL trial shows that the decision to start renal replacement treatment should not depend on GFR alone, but should be taken on the basis of clinical parameters. Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaires and bio-impedance analysis are potential tools for detecting subtle changes in the predialysis clinic. Too early an initiation of dialysis may be deleterious for the patient and the healthcare system. We are convinced that ESRD patients should be informed about intensive haemodialysis (HD), especially nocturnal (home) HD, as the best available dialysis modality. There is substantial evidence which shows that intensive HD improves clinical, biochemical and biological parameters, and may even prolong survival. We believe that 'just-in-time delivery of intensive haemodialysis' may result in optimised QoL and reduced economic burden.

  19. Severe valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy successfully managed with peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amandeep; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2014-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used drug for epilepsy, psychiatric disorders and migraine and is frequently used in neurosurgical intensive care units. Though most of its side-effects are mild and transient, certain idiosyncratic side-effects have been attributed to VPA. Valproate induced hyperammonemia (VIH) is one such side-effect. VIH can produce symptoms of encephalopathy known as valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE). VIH and VHE usually respond to withdrawal of VPA. However, in some cases VHE can be unresponsive to supportive measures and severe enough to be life-threatening. In such cases, dialysis can be used to rapidly reverse hyperammonemia and VHE and can prove to be a lifesaving measure. We report such a case of VIH and life-threatening VHE in a postoperative neurosurgical patient that was managed successfully with peritoneal dialysis.

  20. Two Cases of Massive Hydrothorax Complicating Peritoneal Dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang Kyun; Yum, Ha Yong; Rim, Hark

    1994-01-01

    Massive hydrothorax complicating continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is relatively rare. A 67-year-old male and a 23-year-old female patients during CAPD presented massive pleural effusion, They have been performing peritoneal dialysis due to end-stage renal disease for 8 months and 2 weeks respectively. We injected '9 9m Tc-labelled radiopharmaceutical (phytate and MAA, respectively) into peritoneal cavity with the dialysate. The anterior, posterior and right lateral images were obtained. The studies reveal visible radioactivity in the right chest indicating the communication between the peritoneal and the pleural space. After sclerotherapy with tetracycline, the same studies reveal no radioactivity in the right chest suggesting successful therapy. We think nuclear imaging is a simple and noninvasive method for the differential diagnosis of pleural effusion in patients during CAPD and the evaluation of therapy.

  1. Sonographic evaluation of complications in patients with peritoneal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Won Don; Jho, O. K.; Kim, J. S.; Ko, B. H.; Park, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonography was performed prospectively in 20 patients who were undergoing continuous ambullatory peritoneal dialysis for evaluation of complications. We examined the abdominal wall along the course of catheter and the peritoneal cavity with special attention to the dialysate distribution, dialysate echogenecity, thickness of the peritoneum small bowel distribution and the position of the catheter tip. Peritonitis was the most common complication (n=7); sonographic findings were small bowel adhesion (n=5) multiseptated ascites(n=1), peritoneal thickening(n=4), and tunnel infection(n=1) and exith site infection(n=1). Our initial experience suggests that ultrasonography is useful for diagnosis of complications and monitoring of patient during long term peritoneal dialysis

  2. Abdominal aortic calcifications predict survival in peritoneal dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkelä, Satu M; Asola, Markku; Hadimeri, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial disease and vascular calcifications contribute significantly to the outcome of dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic role of severity of abdominal aortic calcifications and peripheral arterial disease on outcome of peritoneal...... dialysis (PD) patients using methods easily available in everyday clinical practice. METHODS: We enrolled 249 PD patients (mean age 61 years, 67% male) in this prospective, observational, multicenter study from 2009 to 2013. The abdominal aortic calcification score (AACS) was assessed using lateral lumbar.......9) in 17%, and high (> 1.3) in 34% of patients. Altogether 91 patients (37%) died during the median follow-up of 46 months. Only 2 patients (5%) with AACS 0 died compared with 50% of the patients with AACS ≥ 7 (p

  3. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Overview Information; Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program...

  4. Comparative clinical outcomes between pediatric and young adult dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Meredith A; Lestz, Rachel M; Fivush, Barbara A; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2011-12-01

    Published data on the comparative achievement of The Kidney Disease Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) recommended clinical performance targets between children and young adults on dialysis are scarce. To characterize the achievement of KDOQI targets among children (young adults (18-24 years) with prevalent end stage renal disease (ESRD), we performed a cross-sectional analysis of data collected by the Mid-Atlantic Renal Coalition, in conjunction with the 2007 and 2008 ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Projects. Data on all enrolled pediatric dialysis patients, categorized into three age groups (0-8, 9-12, 13-17 years), and on a random sample of 5% of patients ≥ 18 years in ESRD Network 5 were examined for two study periods: hemodialysis (HD) data were collected from October to December 2006 and from October to December 2007 and peritoneal dialysis (PD) data were collected from October 2006 to March 2007 and from October 2007 to March 2008. In total, 114 unique patients were enrolled the study, of whom 41.2% (47/114) were on HD and 58.8% (67/114) on PD. Compared to the pediatric patients, young adults were less likely to achieve the KDOQI recommended serum phosphorus levels and serum calcium × phosphorus product values, with less than one-quarter demonstrating values at or below each goal. Multivariate analysis revealed that both young adults and 13- to 17-year-olds were less likely to achieve target values for phosphorus [young adults: odds ratio (OR) 0.04, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.01-0.19, p young adults: OR 0.01, 95% CI 0.002-0.09, p young adult ESRD patients.

  5. Croatian Recommendations for Dialysis of HIV-Positive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulin Marijana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection may be associated with renal impairment since about 0.4% of all HIV-positive patients develop end-stage renal disease. The share of patients with HIV infection in hemodialysis centers throughout the world ranges from 0.3% to as high as 38%. In Croatia, renal replacement therapy was needed by 1% of all the HIV-positive patients from 1985 until the end of 2014. Healthcare professionals (HP should be aware of the risks of occupational exposure to blood-borne infections in their daily work. Performing dialysis in HIV-positive patients increases the risk of exposure to HIV during the extracorporeal circulation of the infected blood. However, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP with effective antiretroviral drugs significantly reduces the risk of infection after occupational exposure. On behalf of the Croatian Society of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, the authors of this paper have proposed recommendations for the management of HIVpositive patients on dialysis, which aim to prevent the transmission of HIV among patients and HPs. The important recommendations include the following: 1. when the need arises, it is necessary to provide HIV-positive patients with dialysis in the vicinity of their place of residence. 2. HIV-positive patients should be dialyzed with a separate hemodialysis machine in an isolated area. Alternatively, they can be dialyzed in an area for the hemodialysis of HCV-positive and/or HBVpositive patients. 3. Specialized and trained personnel should be provided during the hemodialysis procedure, together with strict compliance with the standard precautions for the prevention of blood-borne infections. 4. There should be a good and prompt cooperation with the National Referral Center for HIV infection.

  6. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality risk factors in peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dijana B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CVS morbidity and mortality in the endstage renal disease (ESRD patients on peritoneal dialysis therapy is 10-30 folds higher than in general population. The prevalence of well known traditional risk factors such as age, sex, race, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, smoking, physical inactivity is higher in the uraemic patients. Besides these, there are specific, nontraditional risk factors for dialysis patients. Mild inflammation present in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients which can be confirmed by specific inflammatory markers is the cause of CVS morbidity and mortality in these patients. Hypoalbuminaemia, hyperhomocysteinaemia and a higher level of leptin are important predictors of vascular complications as well as CVS events in the PD patients. Plasma norepinephrine, an indicator of sympathetic activity, is high in the ESRD patients and higher in the PD patients than in the patients on haemodialysis (HD. Therefore, norepinephrine may be a stronger risk factor in the PD patients. The same applies to asymmetric dimethylargine (ADMA, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, which is an important risk factor of CVS morbidity and mortality 15 % higher in the PD than the HD patients. Hyperphosphataemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism and high calcium x phosphate product have been associated with the progression of the coronary artery calcification and valvular calcifications and predict all-cause CVS mortality in the PD patients. Residual renal function (RRF declines with time on dialysis but is slower in the PD than the HD patients. RRF decline is associated with the rise of proinflammatory cytokines and the onset of hypervolaemia and hypertension which increase the risk of CVS diseases, mortality in general and CVS mortality. In conclusion, it is very important to establish all CVS risk factors in the PD patients to prevent CVS diseases and CVS mortality in this population.

  7. Exercising during dialysis: a reflection on environmental\\ud barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Meddick, Leighan

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that exercise provides several physical and psychological benefits for hemodialysis patients, which include increasing their quality of life. However, implementing intra-dialytic exercise into the patients’ care schemes often proves to be a difficult task for dialysis providers, and they often run into barriers. Some of the environmental barriers that are often experienced are discussed herein, in order to raise awareness and provide recommendations which may result ...

  8. High fall incidence and fracture rate in elderly dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinder-Bos, H A; Emmelot-Vonk, M H; Gansevoort, R T; Diepenbroek, A; Gaillard, C A J M

    2014-12-01

    Although it is recognised that the dialysis population is ageing rapidly, geriatric complications such as falls are poorly appreciated, despite the many risk factors for falls in this population. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, complications and risk factors for falls in an elderly dialysis population. A one-year observational study of chronic dialysis patients aged ≥ 70 years. At baseline, patient characteristics were noted and during follow-up the vital parameters and laboratory values were recorded. Patients were questioned weekly about falls, fall circumstances and consequences by trained nurses. 49 patients were included with a median age of 79.3 years (70-89 years). During follow-up 40 fall accidents occurred in 27 (55%) patients. Falls resulted in fractures in 15% of cases and in hospital admissions in 15%. In haemodialysis (HD) patients, the mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) before HD was lower in fallers compared with non-fallers (130 vs. 143 mmHg). Several patients in the lower blood pressure category received antihypertensive medication. For every 5 mmHg lower SBP (before HD) the fall risk increased by 30% (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.65, p = 0.03). Furthermore, fall risk increased by 22% for every 10 pmol/l rise of parathyroid hormone (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06-1.39, p = 0.004). Elderly dialysis patients have a high incidence of falls accompanied by a high fracture rate. Given the high complication rate, elderly patients at risk of falling should be identified and managed. Reduction of blood pressure-lowering medication might be a treatment strategy to reduce falls.

  9. Peritoneal dialysis peritonitis by anaerobic pathogens: a retrospective case series

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lee, Szu-Ying; Yang, Wei-Shun; Chen, Huei-Wen; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections account for most peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis episodes. However, anaerobic PD peritonitis is extremely rare and intuitively associated with intra-abdominal lesions. In this study, we examined the clinical characteristics of PD patients who developed anaerobic peritonitis. Methods We retrospectively identified all anaerobic PD peritonitis episodes from a prospectively collected PD registry at a single center between 1990 and 2010. Only patient...

  10. Adverse Effects of Sporadic Dialysis on Body Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workeneh, Biruh; Shypailo, Roman; DeCastro, Iris; Shah, Maulin; Guffey, Danielle; Minard, Charles G; Mitch, William E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the body composition of patients receiving emergent dialysis and compare their body cell mass (BCM) and fat-free mass (FFM) with those of normal subjects. The care of patients receiving sporadic, emergent dialysis treatment is a growing public health concern and the magnitude of muscle wasting that occurs in this population is not known. We used a cross-sectional design with matching to determine differences in total body potassium--an indicator of both BCM and FFM--between emergent dialysis patients and healthy normal subjects. We studied 22 subjects using a 40K counter that measures BCM and FFM and compared them to controls after matching with sex, height and weight. In the matched comparison, BCM and FFM were significantly lower in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Unadjusted BCM was 4.7 kg lower and FFM was 8.8 kg lower for those with ESRD compared to those without ESRD (p FFM (7.7 kg) in the ESRD subjects (p = 0.004). After adjusting for age, height, weight and gender, BCM and FFM were lower by 4.2 and 7.8 kg, respectively (p FFM loss over time was significant, with the ESRD subjects demonstrating 2.2 kg per year decline (p = 0.01). We conclude that among other consequences, muscle wasting indicated by decline in BCM and FFM is a significant concern in the growing emergent dialysis population. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Exploring the opinion of hemodialysis patients about their dialysis unit

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Farouk Donia; Mohamed Ahmed Elhadedy; Hanzada Mohamed El-Maghrabi; Mohamed Hamed Abbas; Mohamed Ashraf Foda

    2015-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients are subjected to a number of physical and mental stresses. Physicians might be unaware of some of these problems. We assessed our patients′ opinion about the service provided at the dialysis unit. Our unit has 89 patients on HD. A questionnaire exploring our patients′ opinion relative to the service provided was prepared. The patients were asked to fill-in the questionnaire in a confidential manner. Questionnaires were then collected and examined while unaware of pa...

  12. Efficacy of peritoneal dialysis during infusion and drainage procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczyski, Daniel; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Waniewski, Jacek; Nowak, Zbigniew; Wakowicz, Zofia

    2010-01-01

    Inadequate dialysis is still a major cause of technique failure in peritoneal dialysis (PD). Mathematical models provide the possibility of direct and precise assessment of peritoneal transport of urea and creatinine throughout the dwell and allow calculation of optimal schedules, dwell times, and predicted adequacy of a prescribed regimen. Kinetic modeling is particularly important for automated PD. If the effectiveness of uremic toxin removal that takes place during infusion and drainage of dialysis fluid is not taken into account, the predicted adequacy of the whole PD session may be underestimated. ♢ To estimate the efficacy of urea and creatinine removal during the dialysis fluid exchange procedure. ♢ 17 patients treated with PD were included in the study. PD effectiveness during dialysate exchange was defined as the quotient k of removed amount of creatinine/BUN during the infusion and drainage of dialysate and during a dwell of the same duration as the dialysate exchange. ♢ The effectiveness of creatinine and urea removal was reduced during the exchange procedure (k(creat) = 0.68 ± 0.43 and k(BUN) = 0.87 ± 0.44) and differed between these 2 solutes (p = 0.0009). The k coefficients for urea and creatinine were well correlated (R(2) = 0.83). ♢ The effectiveness of peritoneal transport of creatinine and BUN during the inflow/outflow phase was relatively high compared to that during the same dwell time (68% and 87% respectively). This real effectiveness of the dialysate exchange procedure should be taken into account in the process of planning automated PD sessions, otherwise the predicted overall efficacy of creatinine and urea removal throughout the session may be underestimated. This underestimation is proportional to the number of dwells per day.

  13. [Acid-base status in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katalinić, Lea; Blaslov, Kristina; Pasini, Eva; Kes, Petar; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina

    2014-04-01

    When compared to hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis is very simple yet low cost method of renal replacement therapy. Series of studies have shown its superiority in preserving residual renal function, postponing uremic complications, maintaining the acid-base balance and achieving better post-transplant outcome in patients treated with this method. Despite obvious advantages, its role in the treatment of chronic kidney disease is still not as important as it should be. Metabolic acidosis is an inevitable complication associated with progressive loss of kidney function. Its impact on mineral and muscle metabolism, residual renal function, allograft function and anemia is very complex but can be successfully managed. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficiency in preserving the acid-base balance in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis at Zagreb University Hospital Center. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. The mean time spent on the treatment was 32.39 ± 43.43 months. Only lactate-buffered peritoneal dialysis fluids were used in the treatment. Acid-base balance was completely maintained in 73.07% of patients; 11.54% of patients were found in the state of mild metabolic acidosis, and the same percentage of patients were in the state of mild metabolic alkalosis. In one patient, mixed alkalosis with respiratory and metabolic component was present. The results of this study showed that acid-base balance could be maintained successfully in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, even only with lactate-buffered solutions included in the treatment, although they were continuously proclaimed as inferior in comparison with bicarbonate-buffered ones. In well educated and informed patients who carefully use this method, accompanied by the attentive and thorough care of their physicians, this method can provide quality continuous replacement of lost renal function as well as better quality of life.

  14. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus infection in a peritoneal dialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent H.J.F. Mooren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A disseminated peritoneal dialysis-related Mycobacterium abscessus infection is very rare. M. abscessus belongs to the rapidly growing mycobacteria and can be misidentified as a diphtheroid bacterium, which in our case delayed diagnosis and optimal treatment. Due to intrinsic resistance to most antimicrobials, therapeutic options in M. abscessus infections are limited. Infection often leads to catheter loss. A fatal outcome, like in our case, is not exceptional.

  15. Metabolic Profiling of Impaired Cognitive Function in Patients Receiving Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Chertow, Glenn M.; Depner, Thomas A.; Nissenson, Allen R.; Schiller, Brigitte; Mehta, Ravindra L.; Liu, Sai; Sirich, Tammy L.

    2016-01-01

    Retention of uremic metabolites is a proposed cause of cognitive impairment in patients with ESRD. We used metabolic profiling to identify and validate uremic metabolites associated with impairment in executive function in two cohorts of patients receiving maintenance dialysis. We performed metabolic profiling using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry applied to predialysis plasma samples from a discovery cohort of 141 patients and an independent replication cohort of 180 patients partici...

  16. Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    2008-11-18

    Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public

  17. A method of failed fuel detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To keep the coolant fed to a fuel assembly at a level below the temperature of existing coolant to detect a failed fuel with high accuracy without using a heater. Structure: When a coolant in a coolant pool disposed at the upper part of a reactor container is fed by a coolant feed system into a fuel assembly through a cap to fill therewith and exchange while forming a boundary layer between said coolant and the existing coolant, the temperature distribution of the feed coolant is heated by fuel rods so that the upper part is low whereas the lower part is high. Then, the lower coolant is upwardly moved by the agitating action and fission products leaked through a failed opening at the lower part of the fuel assembly and easily extracted by the sampling system. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. Method for detecting a failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method for the detection of failed fuel by pouring hot water, in which pouring speed of liquid to be poured and temperature of the liquid are controlled to prevent the leakage of the liquid. Constitution: The method comprises blocking the top of a fuel assembly arranged in coolant to stop a flow of coolant, pouring a liquid higher in temperature than that of coolant into the fuel assembly, sampling the liquid poured, and measuring the concentration of radioactivity of coolant already subjected to sampling to detect a failed fuel. At this time, controlling is made so that the pouring speed of the poured liquid is set to about 25 l/min, and an increased portion of temperature from the temperature of liquid to the temperature of coolant is set to a level less than about 15 0 C. (Furukawa, Y.)

  19. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, D. R.

    1993-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power- gener-ating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive compo-nents are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in serv-ice. The failures discussed are (1) intergranular stress- corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (2) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressurized water reactor, (3) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (4) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor.

  20. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power-generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with an analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (1) intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (2) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressurized water reactor, (3) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (4) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor

  1. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1992-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (a) intergranular stress corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (b) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressure water reactor, (c) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (d) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor

  2. Laparoscopic revision of failed antireflux operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, F M; Bloomston, M; Zervos, E; Muench, J; Albrink, M H; Murr, M; Rosemurgy, A S

    2001-01-01

    A small number of patients fail fundoplication and require reoperation. Laparoscopic techniques have been applied to reoperative fundoplications. We reviewed our experience with reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication. Reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication was undertaken in 28 patients, 19 F and 9 M, of mean age 56 years +/- 12. Previous antireflux procedures included 19 open and 12 laparoscopic antireflux operations. Symptoms were heartburn (90%), dysphagia (35%), and atypical symptoms (30%%). The mean interval from antireflux procedure to revision was 13 months +/- 4.2. The mean DeMeester score was 78+/-32 (normal 14.7). Eighteen patients (64%) had hiatal breakdown, 17 (60%) had wrap failure, 2 (7%) had slipped Nissen, 3 (11%) had paraesophageal hernias, and 1 (3%) had an excessively tight wrap. Twenty-five revisions were completed laparoscopically, while 3 patients required conversion to the open technique. Complications occurred in 9 of 17 (53%) patients failing previous open fundoplications and in 4 of 12 patients (33%) failing previous laparoscopic fundoplications and included 15 gastrotomies and 1 esophagotomy, all repaired laparoscopically, 3 postoperative gastric leaks, and 4 pneumothoraces requiring tube thoracostomy. No deaths occurred. Median length of stay was 5 days (range 2-90 days). At a mean follow-up of 20 months +/- 17, 2 patients (7%) have failed revision of their fundoplications, with the rest of the patients being essentially asymptomatic (93%). The results achieved with reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication are similar to those of primary laparoscopic fundoplications. Laparoscopic reoperations, particularly of primary open fundoplication, can be technically challenging and fraught with complications. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Pulmonary hypertenstion ad leading factor in patients undergoing dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, I.U.; Sumera, A.; Idrees, M.K.; Tanweer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and leading factors of pulmonary hypertension among chronic hemodialysis patients. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Hemodialysis Unit, Department of Nephrology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi, from September 2011 to March 2012. Methodology: Patients of either gender aged between 16 to 60 years of age undergoing hemodialysis for at least 3 months not having pre-existing valvular heart disease, chronic lung disease or connective tissue disorder were included. Pulmonary hypertension was prospectively estimated by Doppler echocardiogram on patients undergoing dialysis. Pulmonary artery pressure was calculated on the post-dialysis day and leading factors were compared between patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Results: A total of 178 patients were included in study with male to female ratio120/58 (2.06:1). The mean age was 33.84 +- 11.9 years. The mean duration of hemodialysis was 23.85 +- 22.48 months. Pulmonary hypertension was found in 76 (42.7%) patients. Out of the studied factors, low serum albumin ( 3.4 mg/dl, p = 0.01) was found to be statistically significant in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: Pulmonary hypertension was frequently present in dialysis population (42.7%). This subset of patients had significantly lower albumin levels in serum. More research is needed in its pathogenesis to arrest its course. (author)

  4. Serum sodium and mortality in a national peritoneal dialysis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Vanessa A; Streja, Elani; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Sim, John J; Harley, Kevin; Ayus, Juan Carlos; Amin, Alpesh N; Brunelli, Steven M; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Rhee, Connie M

    2017-07-01

    Sodium disarrays are common in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, and may be associated with adverse outcomes in this population. However, few studies of limited sample size have examined the association of serum sodium with mortality in PD patients, with inconsistent results. We hypothesized that both hypo- and hypernatremia are associated with higher death risk in a nationally representative cohort of US PD patients. We sought to examine the association of serum sodium over time and mortality among 4687 adult incident PD patients from a large US dialysis organization who underwent one or more serum sodium measurements within the first 3 months of dialysis over January 2007 to December 2011. We examined the association of time-dependent and baseline sodium with all-cause mortality as a proxy of short- and long-term sodium-mortality associations, respectively. Hazard ratios were estimated using Cox models with three adjustment levels: minimally adjusted, case-mix adjusted, and case-mix + laboratory adjusted. In time-dependent analyses, sodium levels mortality remained significant for levels mortality risk across all models (ref: 140 to <142 mEq/L). In PD patients, lower time-dependent and baseline sodium levels were independently associated with higher death risk. Further studies are needed to determine whether correction of dysnatremia improves longevity in this population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  5. Predictive Modelling Risk Calculators and the Non Dialysis Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Jennifer; Katz, Ivor

    2013-04-16

    This guideline will review the current prediction models and survival/mortality scores available for decision making in patients with advanced kidney disease who are being considered for a non-dialysis treatment pathway. Risk prediction is gaining increasing attention with emerging literature suggesting improved patient outcomes through individualised risk prediction (1). Predictive models help inform the nephrologist and the renal palliative care specialists in their discussions with patients and families about suitability or otherwise of dialysis. Clinical decision making in the care of end stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients on a non-dialysis treatment pathway is currently governed by several observational trials (3). Despite the paucity of evidence based medicine in this field, it is becoming evident that the survival advantages associated with renal replacement therapy in these often elderly patients with multiple co-morbidities and limited functional status may be negated by loss of quality of life (7) (6), further functional decline (5, 8), increased complications and hospitalisations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-management support for peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarian, Mari; Brault, Diane; Perreault, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses and kidney disease, in particular, makes it necessary to adopt new approaches towards their management (Wagner, 1998). Evidence suggests that promoting self-management improves the health status of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, as they manage upwards of 90% of their own care. Patients who are unable to self-manage suffer from various complications. This project proposes an intervention aimed at improving self-management skills among PD patients. To promote self-management in peritoneal dialysis patients. This is achieved through the following objectives: (a) develop an algorithm that can improve patients' ability to solve the specific problem of fluid balance maintenance, (b) develop an educational session for patients on how to use the algorithm, and (c) develop an implementation strategy in collaboration with the PD nurse. Three measures evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. First, a telephone call log shows that participating patients call the clinic less to inquire about fluid balance maintenance. Next, a pre- and post-intervention knowledge test measures definite knowledge increase. Finally, a Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire reveals overall satisfaction with the intervention. This project, which proved beneficial to our patient population, could be duplicated in other clinics. The algorithm "How do I choose a dialysis bag" and the slides of the educational sessions can be shared with PD nurses across the country for the benefit of PD patients.

  7. DIALYSIS SERVICES’ INFECTED WASTE: A DISCUSSION ABOUT ITS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izilda Simões Vitorino Eliam

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Professionals of the dialysis services face risky situations since from the accomplishment of the pratical procedures to the management of the different kinds of waste generated in these services. Accidents with needlestick materials represent one of the biggest risks for workers of the health. The objective was to characterize the management of infected waste in the dialysis services in Goiânia - GO. This is a descriptive study, with data collected in 2004, march, by check list elaborated accordancing to RDC 33/ 03/ANVISA, previously validated, with ethical and legal aspects observed and legal allowance of the eleven services. It was clearly shown that the discharging of needlestick materials is done specific by four units of service; seven services improvise the container, using bottles of dialysis solution, in order to deischarge the materials. In eight services milky white bags were used to discharge the dialysers. The segregation of the needlestick material waste does happen next to the generating source in the majority of the units (91%. The majority of the units didn’t have dustbin for infected waste with covers in motion for pedal. The internal transport is made manually in 82% of the services. This study concluded that in the majority of the researched services, the management of the waste does not follow the biosecurity rules, increasing the collective biological risk. KEYWORDS: Medical Waste; Hospital Hemodialysis Units; Enviroment.

  8. Adherence of pediatric patients to automated peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Annabelle N; Warady, Bradley A

    2011-05-01

    Little information is available on adherence to a home automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) prescription for children with end-stage renal disease. We have therefore retrospectively reviewed HomeChoice PRO Card data from patients Adherence was characterized as occurring ≥ 95%, 90-94%, or treatment adherence and patient age, gender, race and if the patient had received training, respectively, was assessed. Of the 51 patients (57% male), with a mean age at peritoneal dialysis (PD) onset of 11.8 ± 5.3 years, 28 (55%) were adherent for all variables. No difference in mean age or if patients were trained existed between the two groups. Males were more likely to be non-adherent (p = 0.026) as were African Americans (p = 0.048). The majority of patients were adherent to duration (96%) and number of cycles (92%), whereas non-adherence was more common with number of sessions (82%) and dialysate volume (78%). In conclusion, 45% of the pediatric patients in our study cohort exhibited some non-adherence to their prescribed APD regimen, emphasizing the value of closely monitoring the performance of home dialysis in children.

  9. Pleuroperitoneal leak complicating peritoneal dialysis: a case series.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, C

    2012-02-01

    Pressure related complications such as abdominal wall hernias occur with relative frequency in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Less frequently, a transudative pleural effusion containing dialysate can develop. This phenomenon appears to be due to increased intra-abdominal pressure in the setting of congenital or acquired diaphragmatic defects. We report three cases of pleuroperitoneal leak that occurred within a nine-month period at our institution. We review the literature on this topic, and discuss management options. The pleural effusion resolved in one patient following drainage of the peritoneum and a switch to haemodialysis. One patient required emergency thoracocentesis. The third patient developed a complex effusion requiring surgical intervention. The three cases highlight the variability of this condition in terms of timing, symptoms and management. The diagnosis of a pleuroperitoneal leak is an important one as it is managed very differently to most transudative pleural effusions seen in this patient population. Surgical repair may be necessary in those patients who wish to resume peritoneal dialysis, or in those patients with complex effusions. Pleuroperitoneal leak should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pleural effusion, particularly a right-sided effusion, in a patient on peritoneal dialysis.

  10. [Diverticular disease of the colon in peritoneal dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, M; Aloisi, C; Romeo, A; Sturiale, A; Barilla', A; Cosentini, V; Aloisi, E; Corica, F; Ruello, A; Frisina, N

    2002-01-01

    Colon diverticular disease is a very common pathology in western countries and represents a risk factor for septic-type complications, especially in peritoneal dialysis patients. We examined both diagnostic procedure and therapeutics options, either pharmacological or surgical. Ultrasonography, which is useful for the diagnosis of diverticulosis and diverticular disease, has been supported in the last few years by new imaging techniques, such as NMR and CT, that also find applications in the treatment of diverticulitis complications like peritoneal abscesses. Our emphasis is on the therapeutic perspective, either dietetic - based on the use of a fibre-rich diet and the infusion of liquids by intravenous injection - or surgical, such as the Hartmann procedure, single anastomosis with stomia conservation and laparoscopic and endoscopic treatment. These therapeutic approaches have reduced both morbidity and mortality rate and have emphasized how the reduction of surgical stress on the mesothelium promotes the recovery of the functional integrity and, consequently, faster resumption of peritoneal dialysis. In conclusion, diverticulosis alone is not a contraindication for peritoneal dialysis, but constitutes a risk factor for the continuation of this alternative treatment.

  11. Revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Bin; Yokota, Atsushi; Gill, Harpreet S; El Rassi, George; McFarland, Edward G

    2005-09-01

    With the failure of thermal capsulorrhaphy for shoulder instability, there have been concerns with capsular thinning and capsular necrosis affecting revision surgery. To report the findings at revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy and to evaluate the technical effects on subsequent revision capsular plication. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fourteen patients underwent arthroscopic evaluation and open reconstruction for a failed thermal capsulorrhaphy. The cause of the failure, the quality of the capsule, and the ability to suture the capsule were recorded. The patients were evaluated at follow-up for failure, which was defined as recurrent subluxations or dislocations. The origin of the instability was traumatic (n = 6) or atraumatic (n = 8). At revision surgery in the traumatic group, 4 patients sustained failure of the Bankart repair with capsular laxity, and the others experienced capsular laxity alone. In the atraumatic group, all patients experienced capsular laxity as the cause of failure. Of the 14 patients, the capsule quality was judged to be thin in 5 patients and ablated in 1 patient. A glenoid-based capsular shift could be accomplished in all 14 patients. At follow-up (mean, 35.4 months; range, 22 to 48 months), 1 patient underwent revision surgery and 1 patient had a subluxation, resulting in a failure rate of 14%. Recurrent capsular laxity after failed thermal capsular shrinkage is common and frequently associated with capsular thinning. In most instances, the capsule quality does not appear to technically affect the revision procedure.

  12. A simulation model to estimate the cost and effectiveness of alternative dialysis initiation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chris P; Chertow, Glenn M; Zenios, Stefanos A

    2006-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require dialysis to maintain survival. The optimal timing of dialysis initiation in terms of cost-effectiveness has not been established. We developed a simulation model of individuals progressing towards ESRD and requiring dialysis. It can be used to analyze dialysis strategies and scenarios. It was embedded in an optimization frame worked to derive improved strategies. Actual (historical) and simulated survival curves and hospitalization rates were virtually indistinguishable. The model overestimated transplantation costs (10%) but it was related to confounding by Medicare coverage. To assess the model's robustness, we examined several dialysis strategies while input parameters were perturbed. Under all 38 scenarios, relative rankings remained unchanged. An improved policy for a hypothetical patient was derived using an optimization algorithm. The model produces reliable results and is robust. It enables the cost-effectiveness analysis of dialysis strategies.

  13. Impact of facility size and profit status on intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenfield, D L; Sugarman, J R; Presley, R J; Helgerson, S D; Rocco, M V

    2000-08-01

    Little information is available regarding the influence of dialysis facility size or profit status on intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients. We have combined data from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Core Indicators Project; the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) facility survey; and the HCFA On-Line Survey, Certification, and Reporting System to analyze trends in this area. For hemodialysis patients, larger facilities were more likely than smaller facilities to perform dialysis on patients who were younger than 65 years of age, black, or undergoing dialysis 2 years or more (P profit units (P reduction ratio, but not with hematocrit or serum albumin values. Facility profit status was not associated with these intermediate outcomes. For peritoneal dialysis patients, there were no significant differences in patient demographics based on facility size. More patients in nonprofit units had been undergoing dialysis 2 or more years than patients in for-profit units (P profit status.

  14. Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Obesity Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... youthonline . [Accessed 08/18/2017] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY People who are overweight are more likely to ...

  15. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders among Native Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A MERICANS Native American cultures, which encompass American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian tribes, are rich with history, tradition, spirituality, and art. There are 562 Federally recognized tribes across the ...

  16. Factors influencing access to education, decision making, and receipt of preferred dialysis modality in unplanned dialysis start patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machowska, Anna; Alscher, Mark Dominik; Vanga, Satyanarayana Reddy

    2016-01-01

    for patients receiving education, making a decision, and receiving their preferred modality choice in UPS patients following a UPS educational program (UPS-EP). Methods: The Offering Patients Therapy Options in Unplanned Start (OPTiONS) study examined the impact of the implementation of a specific UPS......-EP, including decision support tools and pathway improvement on dialysis modality choice. Linear regression models were used to examine the factors predicting three key steps: referral and receipt of UPS-EP, modality decision making, and actual delivery of preferred modality choice. A simple economic assessment...... was performed to examine the potential benefit of implementing UPS-EP in terms of dialysis costs. Results: The majority of UPS patients could receive UPS-EP (214/270 patients) and were able to make a decision (177/214), although not all patients received their preferred choice (159/177). Regression analysis...

  17. Efficiency of delivery observed treatment in hemodialysis patients: the example of the native vitamin D therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanaye, Pierre; Cavalier, Etienne; Fafin, Coraline; Dubois, Bernard E; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie; Moranne, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Adherence to therapy is a relevant challenge in chronic hemodialysis patients. The directly observed therapy (DOT) could be an effective method to increase adherence for specific therapies. We aimed to study the performance of DOT versus home medication. We follow the impact of providing native vitamin D directly by the nurse after a dialysis session on the 25-hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] concentrations. In this observational study, we included 38 dialysis patients treated by stable dosage of cholecalciferol. DOT was implemented in December 2010. We considered the concentrations of 25-OH vitamin D three times before (T1 = June 2010, T2 = July 2010 and T3 = September 2010) and three times after the modification of prescription (T4 = February 2011, T5 = March 2011 and T6 = April 2011). Median age was 72 [62; 79] years and 48 % were diabetics. Mean body mass index was 26 ± 5 kg/m(2) and median dialysis vintage was 20 [8; 46] months. The patients were compared to themselves. Before DOT, median concentrations of 25(OH)D were 27 (14-36), 23 (17-31), 31 (22-38) ng/mL at T1, T2 and T3, respectively. When DOT was effective, the concentrations significantly increased to 34 (28-44), 35 (29-41), 39 (32-47) ng/mL at T4, T5 and T6, respectively. Before DOT, 19 patients (50 %) reached the target of 30 ng/mL. After DOT, 29 patients (76 %) reached the target concentration of 30 ng/mL. In hemodialysis patients, DOT is both simple and effective to increase the therapeutic impact to native vitamin D.

  18. A study on the information-motivation-behavioural skills model among Chinese adults with peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tian-Ying; Zhang, Yi-Lin; Shan, Yan; Liu, Sai-Sai; Song, Xiao-Yue; Li, Zheng-Yan; Du, Li-Ping; Li, Yan-Yan; Gao, Douqing

    2018-05-01

    To examine whether the information-motivation-behavioural skills model could predict self-care behaviour among Chinese peritoneal dialysis patients. Peritoneal dialysis is a treatment performed by patients or their caregivers in their own home. It is important to implement theory-based projects to increase the self-care of patients with peritoneal dialysis. The information-motivation-behavioural model has been verified in diverse populations as a comprehensive, effective model to guide the design, implementation and evaluation of self-care programmes. A cross-sectional, observational study. A total of 201 adults with peritoneal dialysis were recruited at a 3A grade hospital in China. Participant data were collected on demographics, self-care information (knowledge), social support (social motivation), self-care attitude (personal motivation), self-efficacy (behaviour skills) and self-care behaviour. We also collected data on whether the recruited patients had peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis from electronic medical records. Measured variable path analysis was performed using mplus 7.4 to identify the information-motivation-behavioural model. Self-efficacy, information and social motivation predict peritoneal dialysis self-care behaviour directly. Information and personal support affect self-care behaviour through self-efficacy, whereas peritoneal dialysis self-care behaviour has a direct effect on the prevention of peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis. The information-motivation-behavioural model is an appropriate and applicable model to explain and predict the self-care behaviour of Chinese peritoneal dialysis patients. Poor self-care behaviour among peritoneal dialysis patients results in peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis. The findings suggest that self-care education programmes for peritoneal dialysis patients should include strategies based on the information-motivation-behavioural model to enhance knowledge, motivation and behaviour

  19. Improving Dialysis Adherence for High Risk Patients Using Automated Messaging: Proof of Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Som, A.; Groenendyk, J.; An, T.; Patel, K.; Peters, R.; Polites, G.; Ross, W. R.

    2017-01-01

    Comorbidities and socioeconomic barriers often limit patient adherence and self-management with hemodialysis. Missed sessions, often associated with communication barriers, can result in emergency dialysis and avoidable hospitalizations. This proof of concept study explored using a novel digital-messaging platform, EpxDialysis, to improve patient-to-dialysis center communication via widely available text messaging and telephone technology. A randomized controlled trial was conducted through W...

  20. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid

  1. Medication burden in CKD-5D: impact of dialysis modality and setting

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Kathrine; Nikam, Milind; Jayanti, Anuradha; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is thought to be around 50% in the general and dialysis population. Reducing the pill burden (PB) reduces regime complexity and can improve adherence. Increased adherence should lead to improvement in treatment outcomes and patient quality of life. There is currently little published data on PB in CKD-5D across dialysis modalities. Methods This is a retrospective, single renal network study. All in-centre HD (MHD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home HD (HHD) pat...

  2. Pneumococcal peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis - three case reports and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Tiago Assis; Vizinho, Ricardo; Branco, Patricia; Gaspar, Augusta; Barata, José Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Peritonitis and catheter-related infections are a frequent complication in peritoneal dialysis, usually driven by commensal microorganisms. They carry a significant morbidity and mortality burden and have known consequences on viability of peritoneal dialysis and patient survival. This article describes three clinical cases, in which three different peritoneal dialysis patients presented pneumococcal peritonitis, two of which were related with obvious previous or concomitant respiratory sympt...

  3. Why did occidental modernity fail in the Arab Middle East: the failed modern state?

    OpenAIRE

    Sardar, Aziz

    2011-01-01

    This thesis asks a straightforward but nevertheless a complex question, that is: Why did modernity fail in the Arab Middle East? The notion of modernity in this thesis signifies the occidental modernity which reached the region in many different forms and through various channels. This occidental modernity had an impact on many areas and changed the societies and politics of the region. But these changes stopped short of reaching modernity, in other words it failed to change the society from ...

  4. The Rise of native advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius MANIC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Native advertising is described both as a new way for promoters to engage audiences and as a new, clever, source of revenue for publishers and media agencies. The debates around its morality and the need for a wide accepted framework are often viewed as calls for creativity. Aside from the various forms, strategies and the need for clarification, the fact that native advertising works and its revenue estimates increase annually transforms the new type of ad into a clear objective for companies, marketers and publishers. Native advertising stopped being a buzzword and started being a marketing reality.

  5. Improving Distress in Dialysis (iDiD): A tailored CBT self-management treatment for patients undergoing dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Joanna L; Moss-Morris, Rona; Game, David; Carroll, Amy; Chilcot, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    There is significant psychological distress in adults with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). However, psychological treatments tailored to address the unique challenges of kidney failure are absent. We identified psychological correlates of distress in ESKD to develop a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment protocol that integrates the mental health needs of patients alongside their illness self-management demands. Studies which examined relationships between distress and psychological factors that apply in the context of ESKD including: health threats, cognitive illness representations and illness management behaviours were narratively reviewed. Review findings were translated into a CBT formulation model to inform the content of a renal-specific seven session CBT treatment protocol, which was commented on and refined by patient representatives. Health threats related to distress were grouped into four themes including: acute ESKD events, loss of role, uncertainty and illness self-management. Having pessimistic illness and treatment perceptions were associated with elevated distress. Non-adherence and avoidance behaviours were related to feelings of distress, whereas cognitive reappraisal, acceptance, social support and assertiveness were associated with less distress. The dialysis-specific CBT formulation identifies the importance of targeting ESKD-specific correlates of distress to allow the delivery of integrated mental and physical health care. The 'Improving Distress in Dialysis (iDiD)' treatment protocol now requires further evaluation in terms of content, feasibility and potential efficacy. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  6. Physical function was related to mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease and dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Shinichiro; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Shirai, Nobuyuki

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that exercise improves aerobic capacity, muscular functioning, cardiovascular function, walking capacity, and health-related quality of life (QOL) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and dialysis. Recently, additional studies have shown that higher physical activity contributes to survival and decreased mortality as well as physical function and QOL in patients with CKD and dialysis. Herein, we review the evidence that physical function and physical activity play an important role in mortality for patients with CKD and dialysis. During November 2016, Medline and Web of Science databases were searched for published English medical reports (without a time limit) using the terms "CKD" or "dialysis" and "mortality" in conjunction with "exercise capacity," "muscle strength," "activities of daily living (ADL)," "physical activity," and "exercise." Numerous studies suggest that higher exercise capacity, muscle strength, ADL, and physical activity contribute to lower mortality in patients with CKD and dialysis. Physical function is associated with mortality in patients with CKD and dialysis. Increasing physical function may decrease the mortality rate of patients with CKD and dialysis. Physicians and medical staff should recognize the importance of physical function in CKD and dialysis. In addition, exercise is associated with reduced mortality among patients with CKD and dialysis. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  7. Understanding health decisions using critical realism: home-dialysis decision-making during chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Lori; Clark, Alexander M

    2012-03-01

    Understanding health decisions using critical realism: home-dialysis decision-making during chronic kidney disease This paper examines home-dialysis decision making in people with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) from the perspective of critical realism. CKD programmes focus on patient education for self-management to delay the progression of kidney disease and the preparation and support for renal replacement therapy e.g.) dialysis and transplantation. Home-dialysis has clear health, societal and economic benefits yet service usage is low despite efforts to realign resources and educate individuals. Current research on the determinants of modality selection is superficial and insufficient to capture the complexities embedded in the process of dialysis modality selection. Predictors of home-dialysis selection and the effect of chronic kidney disease educational programmes provide a limited explanation of this experience. A re-conceptualization of the problem is required in order to fully understand this process. The epistemology and ontology of critical realism guides our knowledge and methodology particularly suited for examination of these complexities. This approach examines the deeper mechanisms and wider determinants associated with modality decision making, specifically who chooses home dialysis and under what circumstances. Until more is known regarding dialysis modality decision making service usage of home dialysis will remain low as interventions will be based on inadequate epistemology. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The relationship between dialysis adequacy and serum uric acid in dialysis patients; a cross-sectional multi-center study in Iranian hemodialysis centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Eghlim; Khosravi, Arezoo; Einollahi, Behzad; Meshkati, Mehdi; Taghipour, Mehrdad; Abbaszadeh, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Uric acid is one of the most significant uremic toxins accumulating in chronic renal failure patients treated with standard dialysis. Its clearance has not any exact relation with urea and creatinine clearance. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between adequacy of dialysis and serum level of uric acid in dialysis patients of some dialysis centers in Iran. Patients and Methods: In this study 1271 hemodialysis patients who have been treated for more than 3 months were evaluated. Their information and examinations from their files in all over the country were gathered and analyzed using SPSS versin18.0. Results: In this study, a significant relationship between dialysis duration and serum level of uric acid was not detected, however, a significant relationship between patients Kt/V and uric acid (R=0.43, P =0.029) was seen. Patients who had higher adequacy of dialysis had a higher level of plasma uric acid. Conclusion: For better controlling of plasma uric acid level of hemodialysis patients, increasing of the adequacy of dialysis or its duration is not effective. Other modalities of decreasing of serum uric acid like, changing diet or lifestyle or medical therapy may be necessary.

  9. A Native American Theatre Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kent R.

    1973-01-01

    The ceremonial rituals American Indians have practiced for centuries are uncontestable testimony to how strongly they respond to theatre. These rituals, a pure and functional form of dramatic art, are practiced today by a Native American theater group. (FF)

  10. Charting Transnational Native American Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsinya Huang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to the Special Forum entitled "Charting Transnational Native American Studies: Aesthetics, Politics, Identity," edited by Hsinya Huang, Philip J. Deloria, Laura M. Furlan, and John Gamber

  11. Native Terrestrial Animal Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are...

  12. Radiological evaluation of failed total hip replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raspa, V.; Aldrovandi, S.; Pompei, G.

    1988-01-01

    The retrospective study of 50 operated cases of cemented total hip replacement and a review of the literature enabled the authors to define the radiological features of the above-mentioned condition. These features include one or more of the following signs: calcar reabsorption, lacunar erosions, modified relatioships between the prosthesis components, sepsis and loosening, periarticular calcifications dislocation and fracture of prosthesis components. Careful evaluation of these radiological features is extremely important for both an early diagnosis of failed total hip replacement and the choice of an adequate surgical treatment

  13. Why Do Large Infrastructure Projects Often Fail?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Henrik

    The paper reports, in a systematic manner, the views of a group of experienced practitioners on why large infrastructure projects often fail. The views, centering on the role played by the Owner (the Client or Buyer), can be summarized as follows:The owner should be aware of the need of clarity...... when it comes to own priorities, requirements, decision making authority, and risk allocation, and such clarity together with measures intended to secure a cooperative spirit, including a balanced sharing of risk and conflict resolution schemes that secure a quick resolution of conflicts, are central...... elements in securing successful projects....

  14. The Failed Image and the Possessed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This article asks if the recurrent queries regarding the value of images in visual anthropology could find new answers by exploring responses to visual media in neo-orthodox Islam. It proposes that the visual display of the photographic image shares a curious resemblance to the bodies of people...... possessed by invisible spirits called jinn. The image as a failed example or model of reality works like the possessed body as an amplifier of invisibility pointing towards that which cannot be seen, depicted visually, or represented in writing. This suggests a negative epistemology in which images obtain...

  15. Native Geoscience: Pathways to Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J. R.; Seielstad, G.

    2006-12-01

    We are living in a definite time of change. Distinct changes are being experienced in our most sacred and natural environments. This is especially true on Native lands. Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways. The knowledge of balancing the needs of people with the needs of our natural environments is paramount in all tribal societies. This inherent accumulated knowledge has become the foundation on which to build a "blended" contemporary understanding of western science. The Dakota's and Northern California have embraced the critical need of understanding successful tribal strategies to engage educational systems (K-12 and higher education), to bring to prominence the professional development opportunities forged through working with tribal peoples and ensure the continued growth of Native earth and environmental scientists The presentation will highlight: 1) past and present philosophies on building and maintaining Native/Tribal students in earth and environmental sciences; 2) successful educational programs/activities in PreK-Ph.D. systems; 3) current Native leadership development in earth and environmental sciences; and 4) forward thinking for creating proaction collaborations addressing sustainable environmental, educational and social infrastructures for all people. Humboldt State University (HSU) and the University of North Dakota's Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment and the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC) have been recognized nationally for their partnerships with Native communities. Unique collaborations are emerging "bridging" Native people across geographic areas in developing educational/research experiences which integrate the distinctive earth/environmental knowledge of tribal people. The presentation will highlight currently funded projects and initiatives as well as success stories of emerging Native earth system students and scientists.

  16. The Rise of native advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Marius MANIC

    2015-01-01

    Native advertising is described both as a new way for promoters to engage audiences and as a new, clever, source of revenue for publishers and media agencies. The debates around its morality and the need for a wide accepted framework are often viewed as calls for creativity. Aside from the various forms, strategies and the need for clarification, the fact that native advertising works and its revenue estimates increase annually transforms the new type of ad into a clear ob...

  17. Prevalence and Contents of Advance Directives of Patients with ESRD Receiving Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feely, Molly A; Hildebrandt, Daniel; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Mueller, Paul S

    2016-12-07

    ESRD requiring dialysis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates, including increased rates of cognitive impairment, compared with the general population. About one quarter of patients receiving dialysis choose to discontinue dialysis at the end of life. Advance directives are intended to give providers and surrogates instruction on managing medical decision making, including end of life situations. The prevalence of advance directives is low among patients receiving dialysis. Little is known about the contents of advance directives among these patients with advance directives. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis at a tertiary academic medical center between January 1, 2007 and January 1, 2012. We collected demographic data, the prevalence of advance directives, and a content analysis of these advance directives. We specifically examined the advance directives for instructions on management of interventions at end of life, including dialysis. Among 808 patients (mean age of 68.6 years old; men =61.2%), 49% had advance directives, of which only 10.6% mentioned dialysis and only 3% specifically addressed dialysis management at end of life. Patients who had advance directives were more likely to be older (74.5 versus 65.4 years old; Phydration (34.3%), and pain management (43.4%) than dialysis (10.6%). Although one-half of the patients receiving dialysis in our study had advance directives, end of life management of dialysis was rarely addressed. Future research should focus on improving discernment and documentation of end of life values, goals, and preferences, such as dialysis-specific advance directives, among these patients. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Differences in care burden of patients undergoing dialysis in different centres in the netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Ria; Uyl-de Groot, Carin; Hagen, Chris; Diepenbroek, Adry; Pasker-de Jong, Pieternel; Ter Wee, Piet

    2017-06-01

    A classification model was developed to simplify planning of personnel at dialysis centres. This model predicted the care burden based on dialysis characteristics. However, patient characteristics and different dialysis centre categories might also influence the amount of care time required. To determine if there is a difference in care burden between different categories of dialysis centres and if specific patient characteristics predict nursing time needed for patient treatment. An observational study. Two hundred and forty-two patients from 12 dialysis centres. In 12 dialysis centres, nurses filled out the classification list per patient and completed a form with patient characteristics. Nephrologists filled out the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Independent observers clocked the time nurses spent on separate steps of the dialysis for each patient. Dialysis centres were categorised into four types. Data were analysed using regression models. In contrast to other dialysis centres, academic centres needed 14 minutes more care time per patient per dialysis treatment than predicted in the classification model. No patient characteristics were found that influenced this difference. The only patient characteristic that predicted the time required was gender, with more time required to treat women. Gender did not affect the difference between measured and predicted care time. Differences in care burden were observed between academic and other centres, with more time required for treatment in academic centres. Contribution of patient characteristics to the time difference was minimal. The only patient characteristics that predicted care time were previous transplantation, which reduced the time required, and gender, with women requiring more care time. © 2017 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  19. Serum phosphorus reduction in dialysis patients treated with cinacalcet for secondary hyperparathyroidism results mainly from parathyroid hormone reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zitt, Emanuel; Fouque, Denis; Jacobson, Stefan H

    2013-01-01

    The calcimimetic cinacalcet lowers parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) in dialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). We explored serum P changes in dialysis patients treated with cinacalcet, while controlling for vitamin D sterol and phosphate binder (PB...

  20. Comparing Mortality of Peritoneal and Hemodialysis Patients in the First 2 Years of Dialysis Therapy: A Marginal Structural Model Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukowsky, Lilia R.; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Kheifets, Leeka; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Nissenson, Allen R.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives There are conflicting research results about the survival differences between hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, especially during the first 2 years of dialysis treatment. Given the challenges of conducting randomized trials, differential rates of modality switch and

  1. Nephrologists' perceptions regarding dialysis withdrawal and palliative care in Europe: lessons from a European Renal Best Practice survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Biesen, Wim; van de Luijtgaarden, Moniek W. M.; Brown, Edwina A.; Michel, Jean-Pierre; van Munster, Barbara C.; Jager, Kitty J.; van der Veer, Sabine N.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is a variation in dialysis withdrawal rates, but reasons for this variation across European countries are largely unknown. We therefore surveyed nephrologists' perceptions of factors concerning dialysis withdrawal and palliative care and explored relationships between these

  2. Cardiovascular risk factors in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helal Imed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The aim of our investigation was the evaluation of an extensive cardiovascular profile in hemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. We studied 74 patients with ESRD (38 males, 36 females, maintained either on chronic HD (n= 50 or chronic PD (n= 24 and age and sex matched 20 healthy subjects as controls. The lipid profile, homo-cysteine (Hcy and C reactive protein (CRP were measured. When compared to a healthy popu-lation, HD patients displayed a marked atherogenic profile, as attested by increased levels of total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, apolipoprotein A (Apo A, CRP, Hcy and lower concentrations of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, Apo B, albumin (ALB. A significant difference was noted concerning the rates of Apo B, HDL-C, TC, ALB and Hcy. Same biological disorders that those found at HD patients were noted in these PD patients. One also noted lower concentration in Apo A. there were a significant diffe-rence with the reference group concerning the rates of albumin, Apo A, HDL-Cl and Hcy. When compared to PD patients, HD patients had significantly decreased concentration of LDL-C. The peculiar metabolic changes observed in the present study confirm the marked tendency of patients with impaired renal function for developing cardiovascular diseases, irrespectively of the type of dialysis. We suggest including uremia-related risk factors in the panel for evaluation of cardio-vascular risk in dialysis patients.

  3. Setting research priorities for patients on or nearing dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Lillie, Erin; Dip, Sally Crowe P G; Cyr, Annette; Gladish, Michael; Large, Claire; Silverman, Howard; Toth, Brenda; Wolfs, Wim; Laupacis, Andreas

    2014-10-07

    With increasing emphasis among health care providers and funders on patient-centered care, it follows that patients and their caregivers should be included when priorities for research are being established. This study sought to identify the most important unanswered questions about the management of kidney failure from the perspective of adult patients on or nearing dialysis, their caregivers, and the health care professionals who care for these patients. Research uncertainties were identified through a national Canadian survey of adult patients on or nearing dialysis, their caregivers, and health care professionals. Uncertainties were refined by a steering committee that included patients, caregivers, researchers, and clinicians to assemble a short-list of the top 30 uncertainties. Thirty-four people (11 patients; five caregivers; eight physicians; six nurses; and one social worker, pharmacist, physiotherapist, and dietitian each) from across Canada subsequently participated in a workshop to determine the top 10 research questions. In total, 1570 usable research uncertainties were received from 317 respondents to the survey. Among these, 259 unique uncertainties were identified; after ranking, these were reduced to a short-list of 30 uncertainties. During the in-person workshop, the top 10 research uncertainties were identified, which included questions about enhanced communication among patients and providers, dialysis modality options, itching, access to kidney transplantation, heart health, dietary restrictions, depression, and vascular access. These can be used alongside the results of other research priority-setting exercises to guide researchers in designing future studies and inform health care funders. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Mechanisms of acid-base regulation in peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, Amadou; Morelle, Johann; Hautem, Nicolas; Bettoni, Carla; Wagner, Carsten A; Devuyst, Olivier

    2017-11-22

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) contributes to restore acid-base homeostasis in patients with end-stage renal disease. The transport pathways for buffers and carbon dioxide (CO2) across the peritoneal membrane remain poorly understood. Combining well-established PD protocols, whole-body plethysmography and renal function studies in mice, we investigated molecular mechanisms of acid-base regulation in PD, including the potential role of the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1). After instillation in peritoneal cavity, the pH of acidic dialysis solutions increased within minutes to rapidly equilibrate with blood pH, whereas the neutral pH of biocompatible solutions remained constant. Predictions from the three-pore model of peritoneal transport suggested that local production of HCO3- accounts at least in part for the changes in intraperitoneal pH observed with acidic solutions. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoforms were evidenced in the peritoneal membrane and their inhibition with acetazolamide significantly decreased local production of HCO3- and delayed changes in intraperitoneal pH. On the contrary, genetic deletion of AQP1 had no effect on peritoneal transport of buffers and diffusion of CO2. Besides intraperitoneal modifications, the use of acidic dialysis solutions enhanced acid excretion both at pulmonary and renal levels. These findings suggest that changes in intraperitoneal pH during PD are mediated by bidirectional buffer transport and by CA-mediated production of HCO3- in the membrane. The use of acidic solutions enhances acid excretion through respiratory and renal responses, which should be considered in patients with renal failure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  5. The elderly on dialysis: some considerations in compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKevitt, P M; Jones, J F; Lane, D A; Marion, R R

    1990-10-01

    Compliance with scheduled treatments, dietary and fluid restrictions, and multiple medications is an important component in the care and well-being of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Given the rigorus and complex demands of dialysis, it is important to examine the issue of compliance, focusing on a large and ever-increasing segment of our patient population, the elderly. The ESRD literature reflects efforts to define and measure levels of compliance, identify factors that influence and predict compliance, and develop intervention strategies to improve adherence to treatment regimens. While limited attention has been focused specifically on the elderly, there are studies suggesting that age may be a factor associated with improved adherence and that social support may be a significant contributor to compliance in this patient group. In an effort to examine the current status and needs of the dialysis elderly, research is in progress at Chromalloy American Kidney Center, Washington University, which replicates a study of 5 years ago. Eighty-four patients age 60 and over, on dialysis for a minimum of 6 months, were identified. Sociodemographic, treatment, compliance, and functional capacity data were collected; additional mental and psychological testing was completed on patients willing and able to participate. Preliminary data suggest the current elderly population is larger and significantly older than that of 5 years ago. Other sociodemographic data indicate the population is increasingly female, black, and more socioeconomically disadvantaged. In regard to compliance, the vast majority of elderly demonstrate good compliance as measured by serum potassium, fair to good compliance with phosphorus, and fair to poor compliance with fluid restrictions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Nativization Processes in L1 Esperanto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Benjamin K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes characteristics of the Native Esperanto of eight speakers, ranging from age 6 to 14 years. Found bilingualism and nativization effects, differentiating native from non-native Esperanto speech. Among these effects are loss or modification of the accusative case, phonological reduction, attrition of tense/aspect system, and pronominal…

  7. Peritoneal membrane characteristics in patients on peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Al-wakeel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis (PD is a well-established modality for treatment of patients with end-stage renal disease, giving excellent patient and technique survival rates. In Saudi Arabia, data collected by the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation showed that in 2008, patients on PD accounted for a mere 4.8% of total patients on renal replacement therapy, including hemodialysis and renal transplantation. This study was conducted to identify the characteristics of membrane per-meability in the Saudi population and to assess the role of various factors affecting solute transport across the peritoneal membrane. We followed up a total of 52 patients on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD as well as Automated Peritoneal Dialysis (APD, being treated in the PD unit of the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh. There were 30 female and 22 male patients; 14 patients were using CAPD while 38 patients were on APD. The mean age of the patients was 50.5 years, with a range of 14-86 years. The average body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m 2 and the mean body surface area (BSA of the study patients was 1.71 m 2 . A standardized PET test was performed on all patients, 4-6 weeks after initiation of regular PD. The Kt/V and creatinine clearance measured 6-8 weeks after initiation of dialysis were 1.96 and 56.59 L/week, respectively. Residual renal function was assessed on the basis of daily urine output, using 24-hour urine collection. The mean serum urea con-centration was 16.91 mmol/L and mean serum creatinine was 702 μmol/L. According to the Peritoneal Equiliberation Test (PET, 8% of the subjects belonged to the high trans-porter category, 44% patients belonged to the high-average transport group, 46% to the low-average category and 2% came in the low transporter category. Our study suggests that the patient characteristics and demographic para-meters seen in the Saudi population are comparable to those seen in other studies from the Middle East and

  8. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis in a peritoneal dialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najlaa Almaleki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is one of the commonly used drugs in type-2 diabetes mellitus. It reduces glucose levels by increasing insulin sensitivity, reducing hepatic glucose release and increasing muscle uptake. One of the serious complications associated with metformin use is lactic acidosis, and it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. This is more likely to happen in patients with renal failure due to reduced clearance. International guidelines recommend discontinuing metformin in advanced renal failure. We report a case of metformin-associated lactic acidosis in a patient with end-stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis. The patient presented with severe lactic acidosis, which was successfully treated with hemodialysis.

  9. The Association between Peritoneal Dialysis Modality and Peritonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David W.; McDonald, Stephen P.; Boudville, Neil; Borlace, Monique; Badve, Sunil V.; Sud, Kamal; Clayton, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives There is conflicting evidence comparing peritonitis rates among patients treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) or automated peritoneal dialysis (APD). This study aims to clarify the relationship between peritoneal dialysis (PD) modality (APD versus CAPD) and the risk of developing PD-associated peritonitis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study examined the association between PD modality (APD versus CAPD) and the risks, microbiology, and clinical outcomes of PD-associated peritonitis in 6959 incident Australian PD patients between October 1, 2003, and December 31, 2011, using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry. Median follow-up time was 1.9 years. Results Patients receiving APD were younger (60 versus 64 years) and had fewer comorbidities. There was no association between PD modality and time to first peritonitis episode (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] for APD versus CAPD, 0.98; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.91 to 1.07; P=0.71). However, there was a lower hazard of developing Gram-positive peritonitis with APD than CAPD, which reached borderline significance (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.00; P=0.05). No statistically significant difference was found in the risk of hospitalizations (odds ratio, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.35; P=0.22), but there was a nonsignificant higher likelihood of 30-day mortality (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.88; P=0.11) at the time of the first episode of peritonitis for patients receiving APD. For all peritonitis episodes (including subsequent episodes of peritonitis), APD was associated with lower rates of culture-negative peritonitis (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.94; P=0.002) and higher rates of gram-negative peritonitis (IRR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.46; P=0.01). Conclusions PD modality was not associated with a higher likelihood of developing peritonitis. However, APD was associated with a borderline

  10. Perceived illness intrusions among continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Bapat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the perceived illness intrusion of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD patients, to examine their demographics, and to find out the association among demographics, duration of illness as well as illness intrusion, 40 chronic kidney disease stage V patients on CAPD during 2006-2007 were studied. Inclusion criteria were patients′ above 18 years, willing, stable, and completed at least two months of dialysis. Those with psychiatric co-morbidity were excluded. Sociodemographics were collected using a semi-structured interview schedule. A 14-item illness intrusion checklist covering various aspects of life was administered. The subjects had to rate the illness intrusion in their daily life and the extent of intrusion. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi square test of association. The mean age of the subjects was 56.05 ± 10.05 years. There was near equal distribution of gender. 82.5% were married, 70.0% belonged to Hindu religion, 45.0% were pre-degree, 25.0% were employed, 37.5% were housewives and 30.0% had retired. 77.5% belonged to the upper socioeconomic strata, 95.0% were from an urban background and 65.0% were from nuclear families. The mean duration of dialysis was 19.0 ± 16.49 months. Fifty-eight percent of the respondents were performing the dialysis exchanges by themselves. More than 95.0%were on three or four exchanges per day. All the 40 subjects reported illness intrusion in their daily life. Intrusion was perceived to some extent in the following areas: health 47.5%, work 25.0%, finance 37.5%, diet 40.0%, and psychological 50.0%. Illness had not intruded in the areas of relationship with spouse 52.5%, sexual life 30.0%, with friends 92.5%, with family 85.5%, social functions 52.5%, and religious functions 75.0%. Statistically significant association was not noted between illness intrusion and other variables. CAPD patients perceived illness intrusion to some extent in their daily life

  11. Clinical Causes of Inflammation in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoungjee Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation at both systemic and local intraperitoneal levels commonly affects peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. Interest in inflammatory markers as targets of therapeutic intervention has been considerable as they are recognised as predictors of poor clinical outcomes. However, prior to embarking on strategies to reduce inflammatory burden, it is of paramount importance to define the underlying processes that drive the chronic active inflammatory status. The present review aims to comprehensively describe clinical causes of inflammation in PD patients to which potential future strategies may be targeted.

  12. FACTORS AND COMPLICATIONS AFFECTING CATHETER AND TECHNIQUE SURVIVAL WITH PERMANENT SINGLE-LUMEN DIALYSIS CATHETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEESTER, J; VANHOLDER, R; DEROOSE, J; RINGOIR, S

    1994-01-01

    This long-term study on the outcome of permanent silicone single-lumen dialysis catheters consisted of 43 surgically inserted catheters in 33 patients. All catheters were attached to a pressure-pressure single-cannula dialysis system. Technique and catheter survival were 80 and 59% at 1 year, and 63

  13. The energy cost of kidney proton dialysis in sickle cell anaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-01-18

    Jan 18, 2007 ... kidney as most of the energy for proton dialysis is wasted as a result of high entropy. Key words: Sickle cell, anaemia, energy, kidney, dialysis, proton, and enthalpy. INTRODUCTION. Evidence exists that for those with sickle cell syndromes. “kidney damage starts very early and progresses throu- ghout life” ...

  14. Membrane biocompatibility does not affect whole body protein metabolism during dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeneman, JM; Kingma, HA; Stellaard, F; de Jong, PE; Reijngoud, DJ; Huisman, RM

    2005-01-01

    Background: Protein-calorie malnutrition is present in 30-50% of dialysis patients. The lack of biocompatibility of the dialysis membrane, which results in low-grade inflammation, could be responsible for this malnutrition. We investigated whether protein-energy malnutrition could be partly due to

  15. Dialysis adequacy and necessity of implement health education models to its promotion in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Esmaili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and incidence of Chronic Renal Failure [CRF] is increasing in the world. The main way for treatment of End-Stage Kidney Disease [ESKD] - that leads from CRF - is hemodialysis. One of the most important criteria for the evaluation of hemodialysis treatment process is the measure of dialysis adequacy. Dialysis adequacy is considered to the best therapeutic indicator for patient's clinical results and the best index for the assessment of the dialysis adequacy is the urea clearance. Although adherence accurate diet by patients is complement for hemodialysis and it is recommended for effectively control of symptoms of uremic syndrome and preventing longterm complications, many of these patients do not keep diet and fluid restriction and result in non-adequate dialysis, therefore, in order to improve dialysis adequacy, education, justify and emend patient’s attitude about diet necessity of following dialysis period times precisely and on time refers are very important. Due to the complexity of the treatment and care of hemodialysis patients, as well as the needs for adequate dialysis implement for to achieve effective treatment for these patients, by designing and run an educational program based on Health Education Models, dialysis adequacy can be improved.

  16. 78 FR 51276 - Proposed Information Collection (Access to Care Dialysis Pilot Survey and Interview); Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... to Care Dialysis Pilot Survey and Interview); Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health... Care Dialysis Pilot Survey and Interview)'' in any correspondence. During the comment period, comments... and Interview, VA Form 10-10067. a. Access to Care Questionnaire, VA Form 10-10067. b. Access to Care...

  17. Characteristics and outcomes among patients with need for early dialysis after lung transplantation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banga, Amit; Mohanka, Manish; Mullins, Jessica; Bollineni, Srinivas; Kaza, Vaidehi; Tanriover, Bekir; Torres, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    With the introduction of lung allocation score (LAS), increasingly sicker patients are undergoing lung transplantation (LT). This study was conducted to determine the time trends in need for dialysis after LT, identify variables independently associated with need for dialysis, and evaluate its association with 1- and 5-year mortality. We queried the United Network of Organ Sharing database for adult patients undergoing LT between 1994 and 2014. We excluded patients with simultaneous dual organ transplantation and where data regarding the need for dialysis were not available. Time trends in the yearly incidence of the need for dialysis showed a gradual increase (P = .012). In the post-LAS era, ethnicity, underlying diagnosis, estimated GFR 35 mm Hg, ventilator or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support at LT, and >20% increase in serum creatinine between listing and match were independently associated with the need for dialysis. Patients with need for dialysis had significantly increased hazard of 1-year (n = 13 849; adjusted hazard ratio, 95% CI:7.23, 6.2-8.4, P need for early dialysis after LT, and these patients have significantly worse early and late survival. Several pre-transplant recipient characteristics are independently associated with the need for dialysis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Lactic Acid Recovery in Electro-Enhanced Dialysis: Modelling and Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado Rubio, Oscar Andres; Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2009-01-01

    and migration across the boundary layers and membranes. The model is validated for Donnan dialysis recovery of different monoprotic carboxylic acids. Simulations are used to evaluate the potential enhancement of lactate fluxes under current load conditions, referred as Electro-Enhanced Dialysis operation...

  19. Characteristics in nutritional status of patients on dialysis in south korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghyo Lee

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, specialized nutrition education depending on dialytic modality should be necessary to efficiently improve nutritional status, and it can be postulated that essential amino acid and other supplement are helpful for improving nutritional status in dialysis patients, especially in peritoneal dialysis patients

  20. Patients in assisted automated peritoneal dialysis develop strategies for self-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holch, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

      Background Since 2000, a model for Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis (aAPD) for patients in their own home needing chronic dialysis treatment has been developed at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. The patient group consists of physically or mentally frail elderly who cannot...

  1. Transdiaphragmatic peritoneal hernia complicating peritoneal dialysis: demonstration with spiral computed tomography peritoneography and peritoneal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coche, Emmanuel; Lonneux, Max; Goffin, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe a rare case of peritoneal transdiaphragmatic hernia discovered immediately after a car accident in a young male patient on peritoneal dialysis. The potential role of CT peritoneography and peritoneal scintigraphy to demonstrate and understand thoracic complications of ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is discussed. (orig.)

  2. The Natural Time Course of Membrane Alterations During Peritoneal Dialysis Is Partly Altered by Peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, Sadie; Struijk, Dirk G.; Krediet, Raymond T.

    2016-01-01

    ♦ The quality of the peritoneal membrane can deteriorate over time. Exposure to glucose-based dialysis solutions is the most likely culprit. Because peritonitis is a common complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), distinguishing between the effect of glucose exposure and a possible additive effect

  3. Laparoscopic versus open peritoneal dialysis catheter insertion, the LOCI-trial: A study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Hagen (Sander); A.M. van Alphen (Adriaan); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); F.J.M.F. Dor (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. It allows patients more freedom to perform daily activities compared to haemodialysis. Key to successful PD is the presence of a well-functioning dialysis catheter. Several complications, such as

  4. Challenges of Undergoing Dialysis With Emphasis on Aging Syndromes in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehterm Sadat Ilali

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion The number of elderly people undergoing dialysis has increased, and it seems that we need to know more about the problems of this age group. With the increasing awareness and knowledge about these problems, we can plan prevention, care, and rehabilitation programs for the elderly people with dialysis.

  5. Is the decline of renal function different before and after the start of dialysis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, Dinanda J.; Halbesma, Nynke; Krediet, Raymond T.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; le Cessie, Saskia; Dekker, Friedo W.; Grootendorst, Diana C.; Apperloo, A. J.; Bijlsma, J. A.; Boekhout, M.; Boer, W. H.; van der Boog, P. J. M.; Büller, H. R.; van Buren, M.; de Charro, F. Th; Doorenbos, C. J.; van den Dorpel, M. A.; van Es, A.; Fagel, W. J.; Feith, G. W.; de Fijter, C. W. H.; Frenken, L. A. M.; van Geelen, J. A. C. A.; Gerlag, P. G. G.; Grave, W.; Gorgels, J. P. M. C.; Huisman, R. M.; Jager, K. J.; Jie, K.; Koning-Mulder, W. A. H.; Koolen, M. I.; Hovinga, T. K. Kremer; Lavrijssen, A. T. J.; Luik, A. J.; van der Meulen, J.; Parlevliet, K. J.; Raasveld, M. H. M.; van der Sande, F. M.; Schonck, M. J. M.; Schuurmans, M. M. J.; Siegert, C. E. H.; Stegeman, C. A.; Stevens, P.; Thijssen, J. G. P.; Valentijn, R. M.; Vastenburg, G. H.; Verburgh, C. A.; Vincent, H. H.; Vos, P. F.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of glomerular filtration in dialysis patients is associated with improved survival and quality of life. This study explores the time course of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) between 1 year before and 1 year after the start of haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). This

  6. Addressing the burden of dialysis around the world: A summary of the roundtable discussion on dialysis economics at the First International Congress of Chinese Nephrologists 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Philip Kam-Tao; Lui, Sing Leung; Ng, Jack Kit-Chung; Cai, Guan Yan; Chan, Christopher T; Chen, Hung Chun; Cheung, Alfred K; Choi, Koon Shing; Choong, Hui Lin; Fan, Stanley L; Ong, Loke Meng; Yu, Linda Wai Ling; Yu, Xue Qing

    2017-12-01

    To address the issue of heavy dialysis burden due to the rising prevalence of end-stage renal disease around the world, a roundtable discussion on the sustainability of managing dialysis burden around the world was held in Hong Kong during the First International Congress of Chinese Nephrologists in December 2015. The roundtable discussion was attended by experts from Hong Kong, China, Canada, England, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan and United States. Potential solutions to cope with the heavy burden on dialysis include the prevention and retardation of the progression of CKD; wider use of home-based dialysis therapy, particularly PD; promotion of kidney transplantation; and the use of renal palliative care service. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  7. Staged Hand-Assisted Bilateral Native Nephrectomy for Management of Posttransplant Polyuria in an Adult with Dent’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M. Montero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyuria after kidney transplantation causes graft dysfunction and increased thrombotic risk. We present a case of a polyuric adult with Dent’s disease who underwent staged bilateral native nephrectomies, the first operation before transplant and the second four months after transplant. This led to improved allograft function maintained during four years of follow-up. The retroperitoneal laparoscopic approach was well tolerated and allowed continuation of peritoneal dialysis before transplantation. A staged approach helps regulate fluid balance perioperatively and may be tailored to individual need according to posttransplant urine output. This novel approach should be considered for polyuric patients with tubular dysfunction including Dent’s disease.

  8. Staged Hand-Assisted Bilateral Native Nephrectomy for Management of Posttransplant Polyuria in an Adult with Dent's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Rosa M.; Olsburgh, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    Polyuria after kidney transplantation causes graft dysfunction and increased thrombotic risk. We present a case of a polyuric adult with Dent's disease who underwent staged bilateral native nephrectomies, the first operation before transplant and the second four months after transplant. This led to improved allograft function maintained during four years of follow-up. The retroperitoneal laparoscopic approach was well tolerated and allowed continuation of peritoneal dialysis before transplantation. A staged approach helps regulate fluid balance perioperatively and may be tailored to individual need according to posttransplant urine output. This novel approach should be considered for polyuric patients with tubular dysfunction including Dent's disease. PMID:25649339

  9. Cognitive Impairment in Non-Dialysis-Dependent CKD and the Transition to Dialysis: Findings From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harhay, Meera N; Xie, Dawei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Vittinghoff, Eric; Go, Alan S; Sozio, Stephen M; Blumenthal, Jacob; Seliger, Stephen; Chen, Jing; Deo, Rajat; Dobre, Mirela; Akkina, Sanjeev; Reese, Peter P; Lash, James P; Yaffe, Kristine; Tamura, Manjula Kurella

    2018-05-02

    Advanced chronic kidney disease is associated with elevated risk for cognitive impairment. However, it is not known whether and how cognitive impairment is associated with planning and preparation for end-stage renal disease. Retrospective observational study. 630 adults participating in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study who had cognitive assessments in late-stage CKD, defined as estimated glome-rular filtration rate ≤ 20mL/min/1.73m 2 , and subsequently initiated maintenance dialysis therapy. Predialysis cognitive impairment, defined as a score on the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination lower than previously derived age-based threshold scores. Covariates included age, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, comorbid conditions, and health literacy. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) as first dialysis modality, preemptive permanent access placement, venous catheter avoidance at dialysis therapy initiation, and preemptive wait-listing for a kidney transplant. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Predialysis cognitive impairment was present in 117 (19%) participants. PD was the first dialysis modality among 16% of participants (n=100), 75% had preemptive access placed (n=473), 45% avoided using a venous catheter at dialysis therapy initiation (n=279), and 20% were preemptively wait-listed (n=126). Predialysis cognitive impairment was independently associated with 78% lower odds of PD as the first dialysis modality (adjusted OR [aOR], 0.22; 95% CI, 0.06-0.74; P=0.02) and 42% lower odds of venous catheter avoidance at dialysis therapy initiation (aOR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34-0.98; P=0.04). Predialysis cognitive impairment was not independently associated with preemptive permanent access placement or wait-listing. Potential unmeasured confounders; single measure of cognitive function. Predialysis cognitive impairment is associated with a lower likelihood of PD as a first dialysis modality and of venous catheter avoidance at dialysis therapy

  10. Detection method of a failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke; Utamura, Motoaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To divide a tank arrangement into a heating tank for the exclusive use of heating and a mixing tank for the exclusive use of mixing to thereby minimize the purifying amount of reactor water pumped from the interior of reactor and to considerably minimize the capacity of a purifier. Structure: In a detection method of a failed fuel comprising stopping a flow of coolant within fuel assemblies arranged in the coolant in a reactor container, sampling said coolant within the fuel assemblies, and detecting a radioactivity level of sampling liquid, the improvement of the method comprising the steps of heating a part of said coolant removed from the interior of said reactor container, mixing said heated coolant into the remainder of said removed coolant, pouring said mixed liquid into said fuel assemblies, and after a lapse of given time, sampling the liquid poured into said fuel assemblies. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. Method and device for detecting failed fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shozo; Suzumura, Takeshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To shorten the time required for inspecting a failed fuel by providing a first outlet for exhausting cleaning liquid to a sampling pipe and a second outlet for exhausting sampled coolant, thereby safely setting a collecting means to the first outlet. Constitution: A sampling pipe is inserted into a fuel assembly loaded within a reactor core, and coolant flow is thus prevented from passing through the fuel assembly interior. Then, with the coolant flow stopped, it is allowed to stand for a predetermined time. Subsequently, cleaning liquid is supplied into the sampling tube and the interior of the sampling pipe is cleaned. Thereafter, the sampling liquid that was in the sampling pipe is exhausted from the first outlet of the sampling pipe. Then, the coolant in the fuel assembly is supplied from the second outlet of the sampling pipe to a collecting means. (Aizawa, K.)

  12. Failed pelvic pouch substituted by continent ileostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasmuth, H H; Tranø, G; Wibe, A; Endreseth, B H; Rydning, A; Myrvold, H E

    2010-07-01

    The long-term failure rate of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is 10-15%. When salvage surgery is unsuccessful, most surgeons prefer pouch excision with conventional ileostomy, thus sacrificing 40-50 cm of ileum. Conversion of a pelvic pouch to a continent ileostomy (CI, Kock pouch) is an alternative that preserves both the ileal surface and pouch properties. The aim of the study was to evaluate clinical outcome after the construction of a CI following a failed IPAA. During 1984-2007, 317 patients were operated with IPAA at St Olavs Hospital and evaluated for failure, treatment and outcome. Seven patients with IPAA failure had CI. Four patients with IPAA failure referred from other hospitals underwent conversion to CI and are included in the final analysis. Seven patients had a CI constructed from the transposing pelvic pouch and four had the pelvic pouch removed and a new continent pouch constructed from the distal ileum. Median follow up after conversion to CI was 7 years (0-17 years). Two CI had to be removed due to fistulae. One patient needed a revision of the nipple valve due to pouch loosening. At the end of follow-up, 8 of the 11 patients were fully continent. One patient with Crohn's disease had minor leakage. In patients with pelvic pouch failure, the possibility of conversion to CI should be presented to the patient as an alternative to pouch excision and permanent ileostomy. The advantage is the continence and possibly a better body image. Construction of a CI on a new ileal segment may be considered, but the consequences of additional small bowel loss and risk of malnutrition if the Kock pouch fails should be appraised.

  13. Abnormal mitochondrial respiration in failed human myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, V G; Todor, A V; Silverman, N; Goldstein, S; Sabbah, H N

    2000-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is associated with morphologic abnormalities of cardiac mitochondria including hyperplasia, reduced organelle size and compromised structural integrity. In this study, we examined whether functional abnormalities of mitochondrial respiration are also present in myocardium of patients with advanced HF. Mitochondrial respiration was examined using a Clark electrode in an oxygraph cell containing saponin-skinned muscle bundles obtained from myocardium of failed explanted human hearts due to ischemic (ICM, n=9) or idiopathic dilated (IDC, n=9) cardiomyopathy. Myocardial specimens from five normal donor hearts served as controls (CON). Basal respiratory rate, respiratory rate after addition of the substrates glutamate and malate (V(SUB)), state 3 respiration (after addition of ADP, V(ADP)) and respiration after the addition of atractyloside (V(AT)) were measured in scar-free muscle bundles obtained from the subendocardial (ENDO) and subepicardial (EPI) thirds of the left ventricular (LV) free wall, interventricular septum and right ventricular (RV) free wall. There were no differences in basal and substrate-supported respiration between CON and HF regardless of etiology. V(ADP)was significantly depressed both in ICM and IDC compared to CON in all the regions studied. The respiratory control ratio, V(ADP)/V(AT), was also significantly decreased in HF compared to CON. In both ICM and IDC, V(ADP)was significantly lower in ENDO compared to EPI. The results indicate that mitochondrial respiration is abnormal in the failing human heart. The findings support the concept of low myocardial energy production in HF via oxidative phosphorylation, an abnormality with a potentially impact on global cardiac performance. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Etiologic analysis of 100 anatomically failed dacryocystorhinostomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Tarjani Vivek; Mohammed, Faraz Ali; Ali, Mohammad Javed; Naik, Milind N

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the etiological factors contributing to the failure of a dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). Patients and methods Retrospective review was performed in 100 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with anatomically failed DCR at presentation to a tertiary care hospital over a 5-year period from 2010 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed for demographic data, type of past surgery, preoperative endoscopic findings, previous use of adjuvants such as intubation and mitomycin C, and intraoperative notes during the re-revision. The potential etiological factors for failure were noted. Results Of the 100 patients with failed DCRs, the primary surgery was an external DCR in 73 and endoscopic DCR in 27 patients. Six patients in each group had multiple revisions. The mean ages at presentation in the external and endoscopic groups were 39.41 years and 37.19 years, respectively. All patients presented with epiphora. The most common causes of failure were inadequate osteotomy (69.8% in the external group and 85.1% in the endoscopic group, P=0.19) followed by inadequate or inappropriate sac marsupialization (60.2% in the external group and 77.7% in the endoscopic group, P=0.16) and cicatricial closure of the ostium (50.6% in the external group and 55.5% in the endoscopic group, P=0.83). The least common causes such as ostium granulomas and paradoxical middle turbinate (1.37%, n=1) were noted in the external group only. Conclusion Inadequate osteotomy, incomplete sac marsupialization, and cicatricial closure of the ostium were the most common causes of failure and did not significantly differ in the external and endoscopic groups. Meticulous evaluation to identify causative factors for failure and addressing them are crucial for subsequent successful outcomes. PMID:27555748

  15. The grown-up patient. The new customer in dialysis or--how to handle the demanding and emancipated dialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippold, I

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of dialysis patients is under pressure. As a result of strict budgeting and increased administrative work, enhancement and the further development of the dialysis health care system is needed. An essential element of that development is a radical change in the patient/nurse relationship. Customer relationship management assumes that the patient is seen as a client, is encouraged to make decisions on their treatment and also emphasises the professionalism of nursing.

  16. Opting out of dialysis – Exploring patients' decisions to forego dialysis in favour of conservative non-dialytic management for end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Angeline S T; Tan, Fiona; Srinivas, Subramaniam; Wu, Huei Yei; Griva, Konstadina

    2015-10-01

    Dialysis prolongs the life of people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but for patients who are elderly and suffer multiple comorbid illnesses the benefits of dialysis may be outweighed by its negative consequences. Non-dialytic conservative management has therefore become an alternative treatment route, yet little is known on patients' experience with choosing end-of-life treatment. To gain insight into the decision-making process leading to opting out of dialysis and the experience with conservative non-dialytic management from the patients' perspective. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was undertaken as the framework for data analysis. N = 9 ESRD participants who have taken the decision to forego dialysis were recruited from the advanced care programme under the National Healthcare Group, Singapore. Participants discussed life since ESRD diagnosis, and the personal and contextual factors that led them to choose conservative management. The perceived physical and financial burden of dialysis both for the individual but most importantly for their family, uncertainty over likely gains over risks which were fuelled by communication of negative dialysis stories of others, coupled with sense of life completion and achievement led them to refuse dialysis. All participants took ownership of their decision despite contrary advice by doctors and were content with their decision and current management. Study highlights the factors driving patients' decisions for conservative non-dialytic management over dialysis to allow medical professionals to offer appropriate support to patients through their decision-making process and in caring them for the rest of their lives. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Eosinophilic peritonitis: An unusual manifestation of tuberculous peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Wang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic peritonitis is an uncommon clinical entity with diagnostic considerations separate from those of tuberculous peritonitis. We report a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD with eosinophilic peritonitis resulting from tuberculous peritonitis. Acid-fast stain and mycobacterial culture of peritoneal dialysis effluent were both negative result. In the peritoneal dialysis effluent and blood samples, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction analyses. The initiation of antituberculous therapy resulted in resolution of the eosionphilia in the dialysis effluent. After 14 days of antituberculous therapy, the polymerase chain reaction analyses of tuberculosis were negative for both the blood and peritoneal dialysis effluents. Evaluation of tuberculosis infection is necessary if the CAPD-related peritonitis presents with an unusual and unexplained clinical course. Polymerase chain reaction can play an important role in the diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis in patients undergoing CAPD.

  18. Dialysis-Requiring Acute Kidney Injury in Denmark 2000-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Nicholas; Hommel, Kristine; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury is a severe illness associated with poor prognosis. However, information pertaining to incidence rates and prevalence of risk factors remains limited in spite of increasing focus. We evaluate time trends of incidence rates and changing patterns...... in prevalence of comorbidities, concurrent medication, and other risk factors in nationwide retrospective cohort study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients with dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury were identified between January 1st 2000 and December 31st 2012. By cross-referencing data from national...... administrative registries, the association of changing patterns in dialysis treatment, comorbidity, concurrent medication and demographics with incidence of dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury was evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 18,561 adult patients with dialysis-requiring AKI were identified between 2000...

  19. Body size and longitudinal body weight changes do not increase mortality in incident peritoneal dialysis patients of the Brazilian peritoneal dialysis multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Fernandes, Natália Maria; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Franco, Márcia Regina Gianotti; Chaoubah, Alfredo; da Glória Lima, Maria; Divino-Filho, José Carolino; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the roles of body size and longitudinal body weight changes in the survival of incident peritoneal dialysis patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients (n = 1911) older than 18 years of age recruited from 114 dialysis centers (Dec/2004-Oct/2007) and participating in the Brazilian Peritoneal Dialysis Multicenter Cohort Study were included. Clinical and laboratory data were collected monthly (except if the patient received a transplant, recovered renal function, was transferred to hemodialysis, or died). RESULTS: Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards. Total follow-up was 34 months. The mean age was 59 years (54% female). The weight category percentages were as follows: underweight: 8%; normal: 51%; overweight: 29%; and obese 12%. The multivariate model showed a higher risk of death for a body mass index 30 kg/m2. Patients were divided into five categories according to quintiles of body weight changes during the first year of dialysis: +7.1%. Patients in the lowest quintile had significantly higher mortality, whereas no negative impact was observed in the other quintiles. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that overweight/obesity and a positive body weight variation during the first year of peritoneal dialysis therapy do not increase mortality in incident dialysis patients in Brazil. PMID:23420157

  20. Closed External Fixation for Failing or Failed Femoral Shaft Plating in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbar, Adil; Witwit, Ibrahim; Al-Algawy, Alaa A Hussein

    2017-08-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are one of the common injuries that is treated by open reduction, with internal fixation by plate and screws or intramedullary nailing, which can achieve a high union rate. To evaluate the outcome of using closed external fixation to augment a failing plate; with signs of screw loosening and increasing bone/plate gap; a failed plate; broken plate; screws completely out of bone with redisplacement of fracture. A retrospective study on 18 patients, aged between 17-42 years, who presented between 6-18 weeks after initial surgical fixation, with pain, difficulty in limb function, deformity and abnormal movement at fracture site, was done. X-Rays showed plating failure with acceptable amount of callus, which unfortunately had refractured. Cases associated with infection and no radiological evidence of callus formation were excluded from this study. Closed reduction was done by manipulation, then fracture fixation by AO external fixator. The patients were encouraged for full weight bearing as early as possible with dynamization later on. Of the 18 patients who underwent external fixation after close reduction, 15 cases showed bone healing in a period between 11-18 weeks (mean of 14.27 weeks) with good alignment (Radiologically). Removal of external fixator was done followed by physical therapy thereafter. Closed external fixation for treatment of failing or failed femoral plating, achieves good success rate and has less complications, is a short time procedure, especially in a hospital with limited resources.

  1. Disaster preparedness of dialysis patients for Hurricanes Gustav and Ike 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpeter, Myra A

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita resulted in massive devastation of the Gulf Coast at Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas during 2005. Because of those disasters, dialysis providers, nephrologists, and dialysis patients used disaster planning activities to work to mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with the 2005 hurricane season for future events affecting dialysis patients. As Hurricane Gustav approached, anniversary events for Hurricane Katrina were postponed because of evacuation orders for nearly the entire Louisiana Gulf Coast. As part of the hurricane preparation, dialysis units reviewed the disaster plans of patients, and patients made preparation for evacuation. Upon evacuation, many patients returned to the dialysis units that had provided services during their exile from Hurricane Katrina; other patients went to other locations as part of their evacuation plan. Patients uniformly reported positive experiences with dialysis providers in their temporary evacuation communities, provided that those communities did not experience the effects of Hurricane Gustav. With the exception of evacuees to Baton Rouge, patients continued to receive their treatments uninterrupted. Because of extensive damage in the Baton Rouge area, resulting in widespread power losses and delayed restoration of power to hospitals and other health care facilities, some patients missed one treatment. However, as a result of compliance with disaster fluid and dietary recommendations, no adverse outcomes occurred. In most instances, patients were able to return to their home dialysis unit or a nearby unit to continue dialysis treatments within 4 - 5 days of Hurricane Gustav. Hurricane Ike struck the Texas Gulf Coast near Galveston, resulting in devastation of that area similar to the devastation seen in New Orleans after Katrina. The storm surge along the Louisiana Gulf Coast resulted in flooding that temporarily closed coastal dialysis units. Patients were prepared and experienced

  2. Employment status of patients receiving maintenance dialysis – peritoneal and hemodialysis: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Lakshmi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term dialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease takes a heavy toll of quality of life of the patient. Several factors such as fatigue and decreased physical capability, impaired social and mental functioning, contribute to this forlorn state. To meld maintenance dialysis treatment with a regular employment can be a serious test. A cross-sectional study of employment of patients on hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis in a state government tertiary institute in South India was performed between June 2015 and December 2015. Patients who completed 3 months of regular dialysis were only included in the study. The number of patients on hemodialysis was 157 and on peritoneal dialysis was 69. The employment status before the initiation of dialysis was 60% (93 out of 155 and 63.7% (44 out of 69 in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, respectively. After initiation, the loss of employment was observed in 44% (41 out of 93 in hemodialysis and 51.2% (26 out of 44 in peritoneal dialysis (P = 0.2604. Even though there was fall of absolute number of job holders in both the blue and white collar jobs, the proportion of jobholders in the white collar job holders improved. On univariate analysis, the factors which influenced the loss of employment were males, age between 50 and 60 years, number of comorbidities >2, illiteracy and blue collar versus white collar job before the initiation of dialysis. The majority of patients had the scores above 80 on Karnofsky performance scale and the majority belonged upper and middle classes than lower classes on modified Kuppuswamy's socioeconomic status scale; however, the loss of employment was also disproportionately high. There appeared a substantial difference in the attitude of the patients toward the employment. There was no difference between hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis in the loss of employment of our patients.

  3. Acute renal failure requiring dialysis--a 5 year series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooi, L S

    1997-09-01

    A retrospective review of 246 patients with established acute renal failure (ARF) needing dialysis from 1990-1994 is reported from Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Johor Bahru. Peritoneal dialysis was more commonly used than haemodialysis or haemofiltration. Patients on mechanical ventilation in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) who were hypercatabolic and fluid overloaded were treated with haemofiltration. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 1.5:1. The majority were Malays (61.4%). Most patients were from the district of Johor Bahru, but 41.5% were from other districts in the Johor state. The mean age was 47.1 years (SD 18.2). The ARF was caused by acute tubular necrosis in 55.3%, post-renal obstruction in 22.8%, nephrotoxins in 5.7% and other causes in 16.2%. The proportions of patients referred from the medical, surgical and obstetric and gynaecology units were 50.8%, 45.5% and 3.7% respectively. The mortality rate was 48%. Patients with established ARF should be dialysed early as they tolerate uraemia poorly. Prevention is by prompt treatment of patients with sepsis, avoidance of hypovolaemia and nephrotoxic drugs.

  4. Laparoscopy to evaluate scrotal edema during peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Stephen P; Jorge, Juaquito M

    2013-01-01

    Acute scrotal edema is an infrequent complication in patients who undergo continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), occurring in 2% to 4% of patients. Inguinal hernia is usually the cause, but the diagnosis is sometimes confusing. Imaging modalities such as computed tomographic peritoneography are helpful but can be equivocal. We have used diagnostic laparoscopy in conjunction with open unilateral or bilateral hernia repair for diagnosis and treatment of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients with acute scrotal edema. TECHNIQUE AND CASES: Three patients with acute scrotal edema while receiving CAPD over the span of 7 years had inconclusive results at clinical examination and on diagnostic imaging. All patients underwent diagnostic laparoscopy that revealed indirect inguinal hernia, which was concomitantly repaired using an open-mesh technique. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed the etiology of the scrotal edema 100% of the time, with no complications, and allowed concomitant repair of the hernia. One patient had postoperative catheter outflow obstruction, which was deemed to be unrelated to the hernia repair. Diagnostic laparoscopy is helpful in confirming the source of acute scrotal edema in CAPD patients and can be performed in conjunction with an open-mesh repair with minimal added time or risk.

  5. Improving retention and motivation in non-clinical dialysis employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anne

    2004-02-01

    For no additional expense, little intrusion into the schedule or duties of the day, and no additional personnel to hire, dialysis facilities can make a dramatic impact on the training, motivation, and retention of employees through the use of classes designed specifically for the needs of newly employed non-clinical personnel. In today's world where many are expected to do a task with little or no orientation to the overall values and goals of the organization and how their tasks matter, what other action can accomplish so much for employee motivation and retention for so little time and expense? At DCI Mid-Missouri this program has been successful in retaining many excellent employees over many years and has been part of an ongoing effort to increase employees' interest and commitment to their work and the organization. It has also made them much more aware of treatments, other personnel and most of all, of our patients and their needs. It fulfills the needs of humans to be valued and have meaningful work. It contains costs and helps efficiency and productivity. Most of all, it keeps excellent people on the job and enjoying their work more than they would have. Participants' words when evaluating the most recent series of classes speak for themselves in demonstrating these important benefits that can be achieved easily in dialysis facilities throughout the United States and the world.

  6. Association of betaine with blood pressure in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lulu; Zhao, Mingming; Liu, Wenjin; Li, Xiurong; Chu, Hong; Bai, Youwei; Sun, Zhuxing; Gao, Chaoqing; Zheng, Lemin; Yang, Junwei

    2018-02-01

    Mechanisms underlying elevated blood pressure in dialysis patients are complex as a variety of non-traditional factors are involved. We sought to explore the association of circulating betaine, a compound widely distributed in food, with blood pressure in dialysis patients. We used baseline data of an ongoing cohort study involving patients on hemodialysis. Plasma betaine was measured by high performance liquid chromatography in 327 subjects. Blood pressure level was determined by intradialytic ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The mean age of the patients was 52.6 ± 11.9 years, and 58.4% were male. Average interdialytic ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 138.4 ± 22.7 mm Hg and 84.4 ± 12.5 mm Hg, respectively. Mean plasma betaine level was 37.6 μmol/L. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed significant associations of betaine with both systolic blood pressure (β = -3.66, P = .003) and diastolic blood pressure (β = -2.00, P = .004). The associations persisted even after extensive adjustment for cardiovascular covariates. Subgroup analysis revealed that the association between betaine and blood pressure was mainly limited to female patients. Our data suggest that alteration of circulating betaine possibly contributes to blood pressure regulation in these patients. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Chest ultrasound and hidden lung congestion in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuccio, Vincenzo; Enia, Giuseppe; Tripepi, Rocco; Torino, Claudia; Garozzo, Maurizio; Battaglia, Giovanni Giorgio; Marcantoni, Carmelita; Infantone, Lorena; Giordano, Guido; De Giorgi, Maria Loreta; Lupia, Mario; Bruzzese, Vincenzo; Zoccali, Carmine

    2012-09-01

    Chest ultrasound (US) is a non-invasive well-validated technique for estimating extravascular lung water (LW) in patients with heart diseases and in end-stage renal disease. We systematically applied this technique to the whole peritoneal dialysis (PD) population of five dialysis units. We studied the cross-sectional association between LW, echocardiographic parameters, clinical [pedal oedema, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class] and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) markers of volume status in 88 PD patients. Moderate to severe lung congestion was evident in 41 (46%) patients. Ejection fraction was the echocardiographic parameter with the strongest independent association with LW (r = -0.40 P = 0.002). Oedema did not associate with LW on univariate and multivariate analysis. NYHA class was slightly associated with LW (r = 0.21 P = 0.05). Among patients with severe lung congestion, only 27% had pedal oedema and the majority (57%) had no dyspnoea (NYHA Class I). Similarly, the prevalence of patients with BIA, evidence of volume excess was small (11%) and not significantly different (P = 0.79) from that observed in patients with mild or no congestion (9%). In PD patients, LW by chest US reveals moderate to severe lung congestion in a significant proportion of asymptomatic patients. Intervention studies are necessary to prove the usefulness of chest US for optimizing the control of fluid excess in PD patients.

  8. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Vazirian, Shams; Seyedzadeh, Abolhasan; Rafeie, Mohammad; Salehi, Bahman; Amiri, Mohammad; Ebrahimimonfared, Mohsen

    2015-03-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common childhood psychiatric disorder. This disorder is more prevalent in some chronic disease. The aim of this study was to investigate ADHD in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and to compare the results with those of healthy children. This case-control study was conducted for six months (December 22, 2013 to June 21, 2014) on five to 16-year-old children, visiting the Pediatric Dialysis Unit of Amirkabir Hospital, Arak, Iran, and Taleghani Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran. A total of 100 children with ESRD who had undergone CAPD for at least six months and 100 healthy children were included in this study as case and control groups, respectively. ADHD was diagnosed by Conner's Parent Rating Scale-48 (CPRS-48) and DSM-IV-TR criteria, and was confirmed through consultation by psychologist. Data were analyzed by Binomial test in SPSS 18. The ADHD inattentive type was observed in 16 cases (16%) with CAPD and five controls (5%) (P = 0.01). Moreover, ADHD hyperactive-impulsive type was observed in 27 cases (27%) with CAPD and seven controls (9%) (P = 0.002). Despite these significant differences, no children were diagnosed with ADHD combined type among all subjects. Inattentive type and hyperactive-impulsive type of ADHD are more prevalent in children with ESRD undergoing CAPD. Therefore screening methods for ADHD is necessary in these patients.

  9. Malnutrition and cerebral white matter lesions in dialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Masanori; Mukai, Kazumitsu; Ichikawa, Hiroo; Sanada, Daisuke; Shibata, Takanori; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Akizawa, Tadao; Wakasa, Mikio

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between nutritional status and the severity of cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) in dialysis patients. Subjects consisted of 28 patients with end-stage renal failure who underwent regular hemodialysis in the affiliated hospitals of Showa University Hospital. All subjects underwent brain MRI and various clinical and laboratory tests. All subjects were divided into three groups based on the following criteria. Group I was defined as having 0 or 1 of the 4 findings of malnutrition (body mass index 2 , total lymphocyte counts 3 , serum albumin concentrations <3.5 g/dL, normalized protein catabolic rate <0.9 g/kg/day). Group II was defined as having 2 of these 4 findings, and group III was defined as having 3 or all of these 4 findings. WMLs detected on T2-weightd MRI were rated using the semiquantitative method yielding two continuous variables (perivascular hyperintensity (PVH) scores, deep subcortical white matter hyperintensity (DSWMH) scores). PVH and DSWMH scores were significantly higher in patients in groups III and II compared to that of those in group I. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the four findings of malnourishment described above had significant impact on PVH and DSWMH scores. These findings suggest that nutritional status (especially malnutrition) in dialysis patients may be involved in the severity of WMLs. (author)

  10. Dialyzer Reuse and Outcomes of High Flux Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Sattar, Abdus; Kellum, John A; Weissfeld, Lisa; Unruh, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of randomized trial evidence for the expanding use of High Flux (HF) hemodialysis worldwide comes from two randomized controlled trials, one of which (HEMODIALYSIS, HEMO) allowed, while the other (Membrane Outcomes Permeability, MPO) excluded, the reuse of membranes. It is not known whether dialyzer reuse has a differential impact on outcomes with HF vs low flyx (LF) dialyzers. Proportional Hazards Models and Joint Models for longitudinal measures and survival outcomes were used in HEMO to analyze the relationship between β2-microglobulin (β2M) concentration, flux, and reuse. Meta-analysis and regression techniques were used to synthesize the evidence for HF dialysis from HEMO and MPO. In HEMO, minimally reused (membranes (p for interaction between reuse and flux benefit with more extensively reused dialyzers. Meta-regression of HEMO and MPO estimated an adjusted HR of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.51-0.78) for non-reused HF dialyzers compared with non-reused LF membranes. This secondary analysis and synthesis of two large hemodialysis trials supports the widespread use of HF dialyzers in clinical hemodialysis over the last decade. A mechanistic understanding of the effects of HF dialysis and the reuse process on dialyzers may suggest novel biomarkers for uremic toxicity and may accelerate membrane technology innovations that will improve patient outcomes.

  11. Computerized tomography of kidneys in long-term dialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srp, A.; Merta, M.; Sulkova, S.

    1990-01-01

    A cohort is presented of 21 patients with irreversible kidney failure who were examined by computerized tomography in 1986-1987. The mean period of dialysis programme was 5.7 years, chronic glomerulonephritis and interstitial nephritis were the basic conditions. According to the results of computerized tomography, the patients were divided into four groups: 1. the presence of cysts or tumors was not established, 2. multiplecysts were found in bilateral location, 3. less than 3 cysts were found, 4. kidney tumor was diagnosed. The factor causing the development of the cysts was not identified. It is presumed that the disease is caused by a biologically active substance which is not efficiently dialyzed. The examination of the kidneys is recommended in patients in the stage of chronic kidney insufficiency and particularly in patients on dialysis for a long period of time. The recommended examination uses computerized tomography, and attention should be given to the possible occurence of acquired cystic disease or kidney tumors. (author). 6 figs., 8 refs

  12. Experience of peritoneal dialysis in renal failure in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraz, A.; Farhan, M.A.; Shaikh, K.; Ali, S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the course and efficacy of peritoneal dialysis in children presenting with renal failure. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Nephrology department of Children's Hospital and Institute of Child Health Lahore from Feb 2007 to Feb 2008. Material and Methods: Forty children diagnosed with renal failure at the Nephrology department of Children's Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore were evaluated for the efficacy of PD, duration of PD and the associated complications. Results: There were 55% cases of acute renal failure and 45% cases of chronic renal failure. The mean duration of PD was 3.8 days. About 75% of all the patients improved with PD. The mortality rate was 22.5%. Leading complications were Catheter-related (leakage/blockade) and peritonitis. Conclusion: We concluded that peritoneal dialysis is lifesaving procedure which improves the acute metabolic derangements of renal failure in children. It is associated with certain complications but the benefits outweigh the complications. (author)

  13. Removal of cobalt ion from bentonite using diffusion dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Hisao; Tamura, Kouichi; Katoh, Naotake

    1995-01-01

    A radioactive metal ion must be removed from contaminated soil which accidentally adsorbs the radioactive metal ion. With this situation, the authors examined the diffusion dialysis as a removal process of the radioactive ion from fine particles of the soil. In a dialyzer, the one side of the solution including fine particles of soil was referred to as diluting cell and the other side stripping was referred to as concentrating cell. The experiments by batch operations were carried out by interposing a cation exchange membrane (CMV) between both cells. The high separation of the ion from the soil could be achieved by the experiments when the aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid was used as stripping solution. Equations for batch diffusion dialysis system were set up and calculated. From the results of simulation, it was noted that the concentration of hydrochloric acid in the stripping solution, the selections of the membrane, and mass transfer coefficient at the surface of the membrane strongly affect the removal efficiency of the ion. (author)

  14. 7 CFR 983.52 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Failed lots/rework procedure. 983.52 Section 983.52..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.52 Failed lots/rework procedure. (a) Substandard pistachios... committee may establish, with the Secretary's approval, appropriate rework procedures. (b) Failed lot...

  15. 77 FR 9846 - Source of Income From Qualified Fails Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... temporary regulations noted that no trading practice existed at that time for fails charges on securities other than Treasuries, but that if a fails charge trading practice pertaining to other securities was... sources within the United States, and the income from the qualified fails charge is treated as effectively...

  16. Native grass hydroseed development : establishment protocols for three native Hawaiian plants on roadside areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The biggest mistake with using native plants on Hawaiis roadways is to assume that native plants do not require : nutrient enhancement or supplemental water to establish on these sites. The establishment of native plants will : require a detailed ...

  17. Oncological and functional outcomes of salvage renal surgery following failed primary intervention for renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando G. Abarzua-Cabezas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To assess the oncologic and functional outcomes of salvage renal surgery following failed primary intervention for RCC. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent surgery for suspected RCC during 2004-2012. We identified 839 patients, 13 of whom required salvage renal surgery. Demographic data was collected for all patients. Intraoperative and postoperative data included ischemic duration, blood loss and perioperative complications. Preoperative and postoperative assessments included abdominal CT or magnetic resonance imaging, chest CT and routine laboratory work. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was calculated according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Results The majority (85% of the patients were male, with an average age of 64 years. Ten patients underwent salvage partial nephrectomy while 3 underwent salvage radical nephrectomy. Cryotherapy was the predominant primary failed treatment modality, with 31% of patients undergoing primary open surgery. Pre-operatively, three patients were projected to require permanent post-operative dialysis. In the remaining 10 patients, mean pre- and postoperative serum creatinine and eGFR levels were 1.35 mg/dL and 53.8 mL/min/1.73 m2 compared to 1.43 mg/dL and 46.6 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively. Mean warm ischemia time in 10 patients was 17.4 min and for all patients, the mean blood loss was 647 mL. The predominant pathological stage was pT1a (8/13; 62%. Negative surgical margins were achieved in all cases. The mean follow-up was 32.9 months (3.5-88 months. Conclusion While salvage renal surgery can be challenging, it is feasible and has adequate surgical, functional and oncological outcomes.

  18. Outcomes of reintervention after failed urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerhult, Teresa Olsen; Lindqvist, Klas; Peeker, Ralph; Grenabo, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Urethroplasty is a procedure that has a high success rate. However, there exists a small subgroup of patients who require multiple procedures to achieve an acceptable result. This study analyses the outcomes of a series of patients with failed urethroplasty. This is a retrospective review of 82 failures out of 407 patients who underwent urethroplasty due to urethral stricture during the period 1999-2013. Failure was defined as the need for an additional surgical procedure. Of the failures, 26 patients had penile strictures and 56 had bulbar strictures. Meatal strictures were not included. The redo procedures included one or multiple direct vision internal urethrotomies, dilatations or new urethroplasties, all with a long follow-up time. The patients underwent one to seven redo surgeries (mean 2.4 procedures per patient). In the present series of patients, endourological procedures cured 34% (28/82) of the patients. Ten patients underwent multiple redo urethroplasties until a satisfactory outcome was achieved; the penile strictures were the most difficult to cure. In patients with bulbar strictures, excision with anastomosis and substitution urethroplasty were equally successful. Nevertheless, 18 patients were defined as treatment failures. Of these patients, nine ended up with clean intermittent self-dilatation as a final solution, five had perineal urethrostomy and four are awaiting a new reintervention. Complicated cases need centralized professional care. Despite the possibility of needing multiple reinterventions, the majority of patients undergoing urethroplasty have a good chance of successful treatment.

  19. Why SDI failed: A different perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codevilla, A.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional wisdom is wrong. SDI did not fail simply because science could not supply the means to build an anti-missile shield. Rather, it floundered on a combination of unsatisfiable technical requirements and technical boondoggles, charges the author. Rather than building on current technology and doing what could be done with what was at hand, those who shaped SDI policy - both military and civilian - insisted on virtually starting over. He also charges they were either passionately against building anti-missile weapons or lacking in intellectual self-confidence and interest with regard to the subject. Work on using modern optics and computers for anti-missile purposes began in the late 1970s, and the technology already was in use in intelligence satellites - a fact either unknown or ignored by most SDI officials. As a result of the conflicting interests among officials and the organizational structure they put into place, the author says the SDI program could not possibly develop any weapon, even if the people involved wanted to, which they did not

  20. The British Model in Britain: Failing slowly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Steve

    2006-01-01

    In 1990, Britain reorganised its electricity industry to run on competitive lines. The British reforms are widely regarded as successful and the model used provides the basis for reforms of electricity industries worldwide. The main reason for this perception of success is major reductions in the real price of electricity with no reduction in service quality. This paper examines whether the reputation of the British reforms is justified. It concludes that the reputation is not justified and that serious fundamental problems are beginning to emerge. The central question is: have the British reforms resulted in the creation of efficient wholesale and retail markets? On this criterion, the reforms have failed. The wholesale market is dominated by obscure long-term contracts, privileged access to the market and self-dealing within integrated generator/retailers, leaving the spot markets with minimal liquidity and unreliable prices. The failure to develop an efficient wholesale market places the onus on consumers to impose competitive forces on electricity companies by switching regularly. Small consumers will not do this and they are paying too much for their power. For the future, there is a serious risk that the electricity industry will become a weakly regulated oligopoly with a veneer of competition

  1. Peritoneal dialysis technique success during the initial 90 days of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Steven; Hayes, Andrew C; Story, Kenneth; Davis, Ira D

    2012-01-01

    Comparisons of technique success by peritoneal dialysis (PD) modality have typically excluded the initial 90 days of therapy. We analyzed a database of 51,469 new PD starts from 2004 to 2008 in the United States. The analysis concentrated on the initial 90 days of therapy to determine technique success and the impact of the continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) and automated PD (APD) modalities. Overall, 13.3% of patients stopped PD within 90 days. Of patients starting directly on APD, 14.3% stopped PD within 90 days. Of patients starting on CAPD, 12.6% stopped PD within 90 days, and 63.4% changed to APD within 90 days. Only 3.3% of the latter patients failed to reach 90 days of therapy. By comparison, technique failure occurred in 28.8% of those initiating with and remaining on CAPD. We conclude that initial training to perform CAPD, with timely transfer to APD within the first 3 months, was associated with the greatest technique success at 90 days. The reasons for that success are unclear, and further research should be directed to determining factors responsible. It is possible that patients trained initially to CAPD but converted to APD have a greater understanding of the total therapy, which improves confidence. Those converted to APD may be more appreciative of the lifestyle benefits of APD, which translates into improved compliance; alternatively, technical factors associated with APD may be responsible. Those technical factors may include improved catheter function in the recumbent position during APD or the reduced infection risk associated with just 2 connect/disconnect procedures in APD compared with 8 in CAPD.

  2. Heparin free dialysis in critically sick children using sustained low efficiency dialysis (SLEDD-f: A new hybrid therapy for dialysis in developing world.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Kumar Sethi

    Full Text Available In critically sick adults, sustained low efficiency dialysis [SLED] appears to be better tolerated hemodynamically and outcomes seem to be comparable to CRRT. However, there is paucity of data in critically sick children. In children, two recent studies from Taiwan (n = 11 and India (n = 68 showed benefits of SLED in critically sick children.The objective of the study was to look at the feasibility and tolerability of sustained low efficiency daily dialysis-filtration [SLEDD-f] in critically sick pediatric patients.Design: Retrospective study Inclusion criteria: All pediatric patients who had undergone heparin free SLEDD-f from January 2012 to October 2017. Measurements: Data collected included demographic details, vital signs, PRISM III at admission, ventilator parameters (where applicable, number of inotropes, blood gas and electrolytes before, during, and on conclusion of SLED therapy. Technical information was gathered regarding SLEDD-f prescription and complications.Between 2012-2017, a total of 242 sessions of SLEDD-f were performed on 70 patients, out of which 40 children survived. The median age of patients in years was 12 (range 0.8-17 years, and the median weight was 39 kg (range 8.5-66 kg. The mean PRISM score at admission was 8.77±7.22. SLEDD-f sessions were well tolerated, with marked improvement in fluid status and acidosis. Premature terminations had to be done in 23 (9.5% of the sessions. There were 21 sessions (8.6% terminated due to hypotension and 2 sessions (0.8% terminated due to circuit clotting. Post- SLEDD-f hypocalcemia occurred in 15 sessions (6.2%, post- SLEDD-f hypophosphatemia occurred in 1 session (0.4%, and post- SLEDD-f hypokalemia occurred in 17 sessions (7.0%.This study is the largest compiled data on pediatric SLEDD-f use in critically ill patients. Our study confirms the feasibility of heparin free SLEDD-f in a larger pediatric population, and even in children weighing <20 kg on inotropic support.

  3. Native herbaceous perennials as ornamentals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Gardening with native perennials is a way to bring nature closer to urban citizens and bring up reflections on nature in a busy world. During three seasons of trialing Salvia pratensis, Dianthus deltoides, Campanula trachelium, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria, Saxifraga granulata, Plantago media and P...

  4. Health-related quality of life and all-cause mortality in patients with diabetes on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østhus Tone Britt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study tests the hypotheses that health-related quality of life (HRQOL in prevalent dialysis patients with diabetes is lower than in dialysis patients without diabetes, and is at least as poor as diabetic patients with another severe complication, i.e. foot ulcers. This study also explores the mortality risk associated with diabetes in dialysis patients. Methods HRQOL was assessed using the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36, in a cross-sectional study of 301 prevalent dialysis patients (26% with diabetes, and compared with diabetic patients not on dialysis (n = 221, diabetic patients with foot ulcers (n = 127, and a sample of the general population (n = 5903. Mortality risk was assessed using a Kaplan-Meier plot and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Results Self-assessed vitality, general and mental health, and physical function were significantly lower in dialysis patients with diabetes than in those without. Vitality (p = 0.011 and general health (p Conclusions Physical aspects of HRQOL were perceived very low in dialysis patients with diabetes, and lower than in other dialysis patients and diabetic patients without dialysis. Mental aspects predicted mortality in dialysis patients with diabetes. Increased awareness and measures to assist physical function impairment may be particularly important in diabetes patients on dialysis.

  5. Depressed mood, usual activity level, and continued employment after starting dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Nancy G; Zhang, Rebecca; Huang, Yijian; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2010-11-01

    When patients start dialysis, their employment rate declines and disability benefits are an option. With patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics including disability income status controlled, we investigated the significance of depressed mood and usual activity level as predictors of patients' continued employment after dialysis start. Incident patients from 296 randomly selected dialysis clinics were surveyed in the Comprehensive Dialysis Study (CDS). Participants provided information about employment status, disability income status, education, depressive symptoms measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2), and usual activity level/energy expenditure measured by the Human Activity Profile. Age, gender, race, insurance, diabetes, inability to ambulate or transfer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular conditions, and hemoglobin and serum albumin values at treatment start were obtained from US Renal Data System files. Dialysis modality was defined at time of interview. Among 585 CDS participants who worked in the previous year, 191 (32.6%) continued working after dialysis start. On the basis of the PHQ-2 cutoff score ≥3, 12.1% of patients who remained employed had possible or probable depression, compared with 32.8% of patients who were no longer employed. In adjusted analyses, higher Human Activity Profile scores were associated with increased likelihood of continued employment, and there was a borderline association between lower PHQ-2 scores and continued employment. Screening and management of depressive symptoms and support for increased activity level may facilitate patients' opportunity for continued employment after dialysis start, along with generally improving their overall quality of life.

  6. Views of Japanese patients on the advantages and disadvantages of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Taira, Nanako; Muranaka, Yoshimi; Miwa, Masako; Kin, Seikon; Hirai, Kei

    2013-08-01

    The preference for dialysis modalities is not well understood in Japan. This study explored the subjective views of Japanese patients undergoing dialysis regarding their treatments. The participants were receiving in-center hemodialysis (CHD) or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). In Study 1, 34 participants (17 CHD and 17 CAPD) were interviewed about the advantages and disadvantages of dialysis modalities. In Study 2, 454 dialysis patients (437 CHD and 17 CAPD) rated the advantages and disadvantages of CHD and CAPD in a cross-sectional survey. Interviews showed that professional care and dialysis-free days were considered as advantages of CHD, while independence, less hospital visits, and flexibility were considered as advantages of CAPD. Disadvantages of CHD included restriction of food and fluids and unpleasant symptoms after each dialysis session. Catheter care was an additional disadvantage of CAPD. Survey showed that the highly ranked advantages were professional care in CHD and less frequent hospital visits in CAPD, while the highly ranked disadvantages were concerns about emergency and time restrictions in CHD, and catheter care and difficulty in soaking in a bath in CAPD. The total scores of advantages and disadvantages showed that CHD patients subjectively rated their own modality better CHD over CAPD, while CAPD patients had the opposite opinion. The results of this study indicate that the factors affecting the decision-making process of Japanese patients are unique to Japanese culture, namely considering the trouble caused to the people around patients (e.g., families, spouses, and/or caregivers).

  7. Experience of using heat citric acid disinfection method in central dialysis fluid delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Koji; Uchiumi, Nobuko; Sato, Sumihiko; Aida, Nobuhiko; Ishimatsu, Taketo; Igoshi, Tadaaki; Kodama, Yoshihiro; Hotta, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    We applied the heat citric acid disinfection method in the main part of the central dialysis fluid delivery system (MPCDDS), which consists of a multiple-patient dialysis fluid supply unit, dialysis console units, and dialysis fluid piping. This disinfection method has been used for single-patient dialysis machines, but this is the first trial in the MPCDDS. We examined, by points of safety and disinfection effect, whether this disinfection method is comparable to conventional disinfection methods in Japan. The conventional disinfection method is a combination of two disinfectants, sodium hypochlorite and acetic acid, used separately for protein removal and decalcification. Consequently, total microbial counts and endotoxin concentrations fully satisfied the microbiological requirements for standard dialysis fluid of ISO 11663. From our results and discussion, this heat citric acid disinfection method is proved to be safe and reliable for MPCDDS. However, to satisfy the microbiological requirements for ultrapure dialysis fluid, further consideration for this method in MPCDDS including the reverse osmosis device composition and piping is necessary.

  8. Reimbursement and economic factors influencing dialysis modality choice around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Paul M.; de Charro, Frank Th.; Tschosik, Elizabeth A.; Noe, Les L.; Bhattacharyya, Samir K.; Riella, Miguel C.

    2008-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of kidney failure is on the rise and treatment is costly; thus, the global burden of illness is growing. Kidney failure patients require either a kidney transplant or dialysis to maintain life. This review focuses on the economics of dialysis. Alternative dialysis modalities are haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). Important economic factors influencing dialysis modality selection include financing, reimbursement and resource availability. In general, where there is little or no facility or physician reimbursement or payment for PD, the share of PD is very low. Regarding resource availability, when centre HD capacity is high, there is an incentive to use that capacity rather than place patients on home dialysis. In certain countries, there is interest in revising the reimbursement structure to favour home-based therapies, including PD and home HD. Modality selection is influenced by employment status, with an association between being employed and PD as the modality choice. Cost drivers differ for PD and HD. PD is driven mainly by variable costs such as solutions and tubing, while HD is driven mainly by fixed costs of facility space and staff. Many cost comparisons of dialysis modalities have been conducted. A key factor to consider in reviewing cost comparisons is the perspective of the analysis because different costs are relevant for different perspectives. In developed countries, HD is generally more expensive than PD to the payer. Additional research is needed in the developing world before conclusive statements may be made regarding the relative costs of HD and PD. PMID:18234844

  9. Effect of water deionisers on 'fracturing osteodystrophy' and dialysis encephalopathy in Plymouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leather, H M; Lewin, I G; Calder, E; Braybrooke, J; Cox, R R

    1981-01-01

    In the Plymouth area, 95 patients with end-stage renal failure have undergone haemodialysis for 6 months or longer. Of the 47 patients beginning dialysis between 1967 and 1973, when water deionisers were not used routinely, a bone disease with multiple fractures, 'fracturing osteodystrophy', occurred in 18 patients and dialysis encephalopathy in 10. Of the 48 patients first dialysing between 1974 and 1979, when water deionisers used commonly, fracturing osteodystrophy occurred in only one and dialysis encephalopathy also in only one. Duration of dialysis without a water deioniser appeared to be the most important factor in the development of these two conditions. The use of water deionisers usually led to healing of fractures in patients with fracturing osteodystrophy and also led to improvement in 4 of the 11 patients with dialysis encephalopathy. Neither condition has occurred in any patient using a water deioniser from the first dialysis. Water deionisers, therefore, appeared to be effective in both the treatment and prevention of fracturing osteodystrophy and dialysis encephalopathy.

  10. Failing States or Failing Models?: Accounting for the Incidence of State Collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Doornbos

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the notion and phenomenon of .failingÿ states - states deemed incapable to fulfil the basic tasks of providing security for their populace -, has been rapidly drawing attention. I will start off with a closer look at the inci- dence of fragile states and state failure, more specifically of state collapse. Connected with this, I will raise the question of differential degrees of propensity to failure and collapse among contemporary state systems, and to point to apparent region...

  11. A comparison of the quality of life of the patients undergoing hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis and its correlation to the quality of dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolamir Atapour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, there has been a steady increase in the number of patients requiring dialysis. However, no consensus exists between choosing either hemodialysis (HD or peritoneal dialysis (PD as the preferred method of dialysis for patients. In this study, we have compared the quality of life of the patients undergoing either HD or PD. This cross-sectional study was performed in the dialysis center of the Noor and Saint Ali Asghar University Hospital in Isfahan, Iran in 2012. Forty-six patients who underwent PD (28 males and 18 females and 46 similar patients undergoing HD (26 males and 20 females were compared. A standardized Persian version of the short form-36 (SF-36 tool was used to assess the quality of life and to assess the quality of dialysis weekly Kt/V in patients undergoing PD and single random Kt/V sampling in HD patients were assessed. Patients undergoing PD reported higher scores in physical functioning. The lowest scores in both groups were reported in mental health section. In physical functioning section, physical role functioning section and overall score of the SF-36 tool, PD patients reported significantly higher scores compared to the HD patients (P <0.05. There was no significant difference between the qualities of the dialysis in the two patient groups. Aspects of quality of life such as physical functioning, physical role functioning, bodily pain, general health perceptions, and overall score were significantly different between the two groups. If these results are substantiated by subsequent longitudinal studies, then the choice of dialysis could be better guided in patients by the quality of life issues.

  12. Relationship between stroke and mortality in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, James B; Phadnis, Milind A; Ellerbeck, Edward F; Shireman, Theresa I; Rigler, Sally K; Mahnken, Jonathan D

    2015-01-07

    Stroke is common in patients undergoing long-term dialysis, but the implications for mortality after stroke in these patients are not fully understood. A large cohort of dually-eligible (Medicare and Medicaid) patients initiating dialysis from 2000 to 2005 and surviving the first 90 days was constructed. Medicare claims were used to ascertain ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes occurring after 90-day survival. A semi-Markov model with additive hazard extension was generated to estimate the association between stroke and mortality, to calculate years of life lost after a stroke, and to determine whether race was associated with differential survival after stroke. The cohort consisted of 69,371 individuals representing >112,000 person-years of follow-up. Mean age±SD was 60.8±15.5 years. There were 21.1 (99% confidence interval [99% CI], 20.0 to 22.3) ischemic strokes and 4.7 (99% CI, 4.2 to 5.3) hemorrhagic strokes after cohort entry per 1000 patient-years. At 30 days, mortality was 17.9% for ischemic stroke and 53.4% for hemorrhagic stroke. The adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) depended on time since entry into the cohort; for patients who experienced a stroke at 1 year after cohort entry, for example, the AHR of hemorrhagic stroke for mortality was 25.4 (99% CI, 22.4 to 28.4) at 1 week, 9.9 (99% CI, 8.4 to 11.6) at 3 months, 5.9 (99% CI, 5.0 to 7.0) at 6 months, and 1.8 (99% CI, 1.5 to 2.1) at 24 months. The corresponding AHRs for ischemic stroke were 11.7 (99% CI, 10.2 to 13.1) at 1 week, 6.6 (99% CI, 6.4 to 6.7) at 3 months, and 4.7 (99% CI, 4.5 to 4.9) at 6 months, remaining significantly >1.0 even at 48 months. Median months of life lost were 40.7 for hemorrhagic stroke and 34.6 for ischemic stroke. For both stroke types, mortality did not differ by race. Dialysis recipients have high mortality after a stroke with corresponding decrements in remaining years of life. Poststroke mortality does not differ by race. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Dialysis Facility Transplant Philosophy and Access to Kidney Transplantation in the Southeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Jennifer; Browne, Teri; Plantinga, Laura; Pastan, Stephen O; Sauls, Leighann; Krisher, Jenna; Patzer, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of dialysis facility treatment philosophy on access to transplant. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between the dialysis facility transplant philosophy and facility-level access to kidney transplant waitlisting. A 25-item questionnaire administered to Southeastern dialysis facilities (n = 509) in 2012 captured the facility transplant philosophy (categorized as 'transplant is our first choice', 'transplant is a great option for some', and 'transplant is a good option, if the patient is interested'). Facility-level waitlisting and facility characteristics were obtained from the 2008-2011 Dialysis Facility Report. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between the dialysis facility transplant philosophy and facility waitlisting performance (dichotomized using the national median), where low performance was defined as fewer than 21.7% of dialysis patients waitlisted within a facility. Fewer than 25% (n = 124) of dialysis facilities reported 'transplant is our first option'. A total of 131 (31.4%) dialysis facilities in the Southeast were high-performing facilities with respect to waitlisting. Adjusted analysis showed that facilities who reported 'transplant is our first option' were twice (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.0-3.9) as likely to have high waitlisting performance compared to facilities who reported that 'transplant is a good option, if the patient is interested'. Facilities with staff who had a more positive transplant philosophy were more likely to have better facility waitlisting performance. Future prospective studies are needed to further investigate if improving the kidney transplant philosophy in dialysis facilities improves access to transplantation.

  14. Factors Associated with Unplanned Dialysis Starts in Patients followed by Nephrologists: A Retropective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Antoine Brown

    Full Text Available The number of patients starting dialysis is increasing world wide. Unplanned dialysis starts (patients urgently starting dialysis in hospital is associated with increased costs and high morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for starting dialysis urgently in hospital have not been well studied. The primary objective of this study was to identify risk factors for unplanned dialysis starts in patients followed in a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease (CKD clinic. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 649 advanced CKD patients followed in a multidisciplinary CKD clinic at a tertiary care hospital from January 01, 2010 to April 30, 2013. Patients were classified as unplanned start (in hospital or elective start. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with unplanned dialysis initiation. 184 patients (28.4% initiated dialysis, of which 76 patients (41.3% initiated dialysis in an unplanned fashion and 108 (58.7% starting electively. Unplanned start patients were more likely to have diabetes (68.4% versus 51.9%; p = 0.04, CAD (42.1% versus 24.1%; p = 0.02, congestive heart failure (36.8% versus 17.6%; p = 0.01, and were less likely to receive modality education (64.5% vs 89.8%; p < 0.01 or be assessed by a surgeon for access creation (40.8% vesrus 78.7% p < 0.01. On multivariable analysis, higher body mass index (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02, 1.13, and a history of congestive heart failure (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.09, 5.41 were independently associated with an unplanned start. Unplanned dialysis initiation is common among advanced CKD patients, even if they are followed in a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic. Timely education and access creation in patients at risk may lead to lower costs and less morbidity and mortality.

  15. [10 years of external quality assurance in dialysis in Germany: Results and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchtemann, Dorothea; Meinhold, Stefan; Follert, Peter

    2017-10-01

    In 2006, the Federal Joint Committee introduced a quality assurance programme for ambulatory dialysis treatment in Germany. Regarding the impact of chronic dialysis treatment on the quality of life of patients and on health care costs, quality assurance in dialysis is considered highly relevant. The directive on Quality Assurance in Dialysis (QSD-RL) established an external quality assurance programme on the basis of the assessment of certain quality parameters combined with an internal quality management system based on benchmarking parameters in all dialysis practices and centres. Data on quality parameters are collected and analysed quarterly. Regional associations of statutory health insurance physicians take responsibility for quality improvement measures and sanctions. This article aims to provide an overview of the development of quality parameters from 2008 to 2015. We analysed the summarised annual quality reports published on the website of the Federal Joint Committee between 2009 and 2016. We present results on the so-called core quality parameters duration and frequency of dialysis sessions (both for haemodialysis patients), wKt/V for peritoneal dialysis patients, and percentage of haemodialysis patients with central venous catheters which has only been measured since 2014. In 2015, 92,000 patients received outpatient dialysis. Between 2008 and 2015, the results for the core quality parameters duration and frequency of haemodialysis improved while the results for wKt/V seemingly show an unfavourable trend. The percentage of patients with central venous catheters appears to be quite high, and thus indicates that there is potential for quality improvement. For the future, the Federal Joint Committee has resolved to merge the quality assurance programmes in dialysis and in kidney transplantation into a newly designed programme that has the potential to follow patients through all stages and kinds of renal replacement therapy and to focus on further aspects

  16. Development of a standardized transfusion ratio as a metric for evaluating dialysis facility anemia management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiannong; Li, Suying; Gilbertson, David T; Monda, Keri L; Bradbury, Brian D; Collins, Allan J

    2014-10-01

    Because transfusion avoidance has been the cornerstone of anemia treatment for patients with kidney disease, direct measurement of red blood cell transfusion use to assess dialysis facility anemia management performance is reasonable. We aimed to explore methods for estimating facility-level standardized transfusion ratios (STfRs) to assess provider anemia treatment practices. Retrospective cohort study. Point prevalent US hemodialysis patients on January 1, 2009, with Medicare as primary payer and dialysis duration of 90 days or longer were included (n = 223,901). All dialysis facilities with eligible patients were included (n = 5,345). Dialysis facility assignment. Receiving a red blood cell transfusion in the inpatient or outpatient setting. We evaluated 3 approaches for estimating STfR: ratio of observed to expected numbers of transfusions (STfR(obs)), a Bayesian approach (STfR(Bayes)), and a modified version of the Bayesian approach (STfR(modBayes)). The overall national transfusion rate in 2009 was 23.2 per 100 patient-years. Our model for predicting the expected number of transfusions performed well. For large facilities, all 3 STfRs worked well. However, for small facilities, while the STfR(modBayes) worked well, STfR(obs) values demonstrated instability and the STfR(Bayes) may produce more bias. Administration of transfusions to dialysis patients reflects medical practice both within and outside the dialysis unit. Some transfusions may be deemed unavoidable and transfusion practices are subject to considerable regional variation. Development of an STfR metric is feasible and reasonable for assessing anemia treatment at dialysis facilities. The STfR(obs) is simple to calculate and works well for larger dialysis facilities. The STfR(modBayes) is more analytically complex, but facilitates comparisons across all dialysis facilities, including small facilities. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. How accessible are interpreter services to dialysis patients of Non-English Speaking background?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Zimbudzi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Benefits of utilising professional interpreters in clinicalsettings have been well documented. However, not manystudies have focused on use of professional interpreters bydialysis patients of Non-English Speaking Background (NESBwho are in the clinical settings every second day of their lives.The underlying question for this research was to determinethe level of interpreter utilisation by dialysis patients of NESBat a major urban teaching hospital.MethodA multi-method approach was used involving (a in-depthinterviews of health care professionals working with dialysispatients to elicit their views regarding interpreter access anduse by dialysis patients of NESB, (b observations ofinteractions between staff and dialysis patients of NESB and(c review of medical records belonging to dialysis patients ofNESB who were admitted 24 months prior to the study.ResultsInterviews revealed that only 50% of Health Care Workers(HCWs had accessed an interpreter for dialysis patients ofNESB over a period of six months. Observations of staff/NESBpatient interactions showed that professional interpreterswere used in only 25% of the observed occasions. Thereview of medical records revealed that there was noevidence of interpreter use in 32% of the recordsbelonging to dialysis patients of NESB. The study alsoshowed that non-compliance with dialysis treatmentregime was more likely to occur among patients who hadlimited access to interpreters.ConclusionThe study demonstrated a suboptimal utilisation ofinterpreter services by dialysis patients of NESB. Severalbarriers to inaccessibility and underutilisation ofprofessional interpreters were identified.Recommendations to improve communication betweenHCWs and dialysis patients of NESB are suggested.

  18. 4D monitoring of actively failing rockslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Nick; Williams, Jack; Hardy, Richard; Brain, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the conditions which promote rockfall to collapse relies upon detailed monitoring, ideally before, during and immediately after failure. With standard repeat surveys it is common that surveys do not coincide with or capture precursors, or that surveys are widely spaced relative to the timing and duration of driving forces such as storms. As a result gaining insight into the controls on failure and the timescales over which precursors operate remains difficult to establish with certainty, and establishing direct links between environmental conditions and rock-falls, or sequences of events prior to rockfall, remain difficult to define. To address this, we present analysis of a high-frequency 3D laser scan dataset captured using a new permanently installed system developed to constantly monitor actively failing rock slopes. The system is based around a time of flight laser scanner, integrated with and remotely controlled by dedicated controls and analysis software. The system is configured to capture data at 0.1 m spacing across > 22,000 m3 at up to 30 minute intervals. Here we present results captured with this system over a period of 9 months, spanning spring to winter 2015. Our analysis is focussed upon improving the understanding of the nature of small (volumetric measurement of rock face erosion. The results hold implications for understanding of rockfall mechanics, but also for how actively eroding surfaces can be monitored at high temporal frequency. Whilst high frequency data is ideal for describing processes that evolve rapidly through time, the cumulative errors that accumulate when monitored changes are dominated by inverse power-law distributed volumes are significant. To conclude we consider the benefits of defining survey frequency on the basis of the changes being detected relative to the accumulation of errors that inevitably arises when comparing high numbers of sequential surveys.

  19. Disorganized junior doctors fail the MRCP (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Adrian G; Khan, Khalid M; Hussain, Walayat; Tweed, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Career progression during undergraduate and early postgraduate years is currently determined by successfully passing examinations. Both academic factors (secondary school examination results, learning style and training opportunities) and non-academic factors (maturity, ethnic origin, gender and motivation) have been identified as predicting examination outcome. Few studies have examined organization skills. Disorganized medical students are more likely to perform poorly in end-of-year examinations but this observation has not been examined in junior doctors. This study asked whether organization skills relate to examination outcome amongst junior doctors taking the clinical Part II examination for the Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills). The study was conducted prospectively at four consecutive clinical courses that provided clinical teaching and practice to prepare trainees for the examination. Arrival time at registration for the course was the chosen surrogate for organization skills. Trainees were advised that they should arrive promptly at 8.00 a.m. for registration and it was explained that the course would start at 8.30 a.m. Recorded arrival times were compared with the pass lists published by the Royal College of Physicians. The mean arrival time was 8.17 a.m. A total of 81 doctors (53.3%) passed the examination with a mean arrival time of 8.14 a.m. However, 71 doctors failed the exam and arrived, on average, six minutes later than doctors who passed (p?=?0.006). Better-prepared junior doctors were more likely to pass the final examination. Arriving on time represents a composite of several skills involved in the planning of appropriate travel arrangements and is therefore a valid marker of organization skills and preparation. This novel study has shown that good time-keeping skills are positively associated with examination outcome.

  20. Why Lumbar Artificial Disk Replacements (LADRs) Fail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettine, Kenneth; Ryu, Robert; Techy, Fernando

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected data. To determine why artificial disk replacements (ADRs) fail by examining results of 91 patients in FDA studies performed at a single investigational device exemption (IDE) site with minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients following lumbar ADR generally achieve their 24-month follow-up results at 3 months postoperatively. Every patient undergoing ADR at 1 IDE site by 2 surgeons was evaluated for clinical success. Failure was defined as <50% improvement in ODI and VAS or any additional surgery at index or adjacent spine motion segment. Three ADRs were evaluated: Maverick, 25 patients; Charité, 31 patients; and Kineflex, 35 patients. All procedures were 1-level operations performed at L4-L5 or L5-S1. Demographics and inclusion/exclusion criteria were similar and will be discussed. Overall clinical failure occurred in 26% (24 of 91 patients) at 2-year follow-up. Clinical failure occurred in: 28% (Maverick) (7 of 25 patients), 39% (Charité) (12 of 31 patients), and 14% (Kineflex) (5 of 35 patients). Causes of failure included facet pathology, 50% of failure patients (12 of 24). Implant complications occurred in 5% of total patients and 21% of failure patients (5 of 24). Only 5 patients went from a success to failure after 3 months. Only 1 patient went from a failure to success after a facet rhizotomy 1 year after ADR. Seventy-four percent of patients after ADR met strict clinical success after 2-year follow-up. The clinical success versus failure rate did not change from their 3-month follow-up in 85 of the 91 patients (93%). Overall clinical success may be improved most by patient selection and implant type.

  1. Imaging studies for failed back surgery syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosnard, G.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Sarrazin, J.L.; Soulie, D.

    1995-01-01

    In patients with failed back surgery syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be the best first-line imaging study because it simplifies the diagnosis. This update is based on over 600 cases. MRI shows the scar tissue at the surgical site, persistent evidence of disk herniation for several weeks after surgery, and evidence of local and regional edema in one-fourth of cases. The edema is most marked between two months and two years after the operation and can misleadingly suggest discitis. MRI is the best investigation for detecting recurrent herniation at the same vertebral level or another level. Herniated disk material is seen as a mass that does not enhance after gadolinium, in contrast to the vascularized scar tissue. Free fragments are often clearly visible within the scar tissue. Fragments that migrate to the epidural space can give rise to granulomatous reactions. Scar tissue can be seen in the epidural space and within the disk; it can show enhancement after gadolinium for several years. The scar can be atrophic or hypertrophic and can encase or impinge on the dural sac and nerve roots. Pathological fibrosis cannot be differentiated from ordinary scar tissue. Arachnoiditis causing adherence of the nerve roots to the dura mater or to each other occurs in 5 % to 10 % of cases. Nerve root enhancement after gadolinium is seen in three-fourths of cases. Bone lesions are common, especially some time after surgery; they are usually accompanied with other lesions. Hematomas are seen in less than 10 % of cases. Infections are similarly rare (0.25 % each for discitis and epiduritis). The diagnosis of discitis is difficult and requires percutaneous biopsy of the disk, especially when MRI shows fluid within the disk, with decreased signal intensity on T2 images, and non enhancement after intravenous gadolinium. (authors). 19 refs., 7 figs

  2. Greater soil carbon accumulation in deeper soils in native- than in exotic-dominated grassland plantings in the southern Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, B. J.; Xu, X.; Polley, H. W.; Hofmockel, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    Global change includes invasion by non-native plant species, and invasion may affect carbon cycling and storage. We tested predictions in central Texas in an experiment that compares mixtures of all exotic or all native species under two summer irrigation treatments (128 or 0 mm) that varies the amount of summer drought stress. At the end of the eighth growing season after establishment, soils were sampled in 10 cm increments to 100 cm depth to determine if soil C differed among treatments, and if treatments differentially affected soil C in deeper soils. Soil C content was significantly (5%) higher under native plantings than under exotic species plantings (P plantings increased with depth, and native plantings had higher soil C in deeper soil layers than in surface layers (native-exotic x depth, P plantings had decreasing soil C with depth. Soil C:N ratio and δ13C/12C were also significantly affected by native-exotic status, with soils in exotic plots having a significantly greater C4 contribution than native soils. Soil C was unaffected by summer irrigation treatments. Our results suggest that a significant amount of carbon could be sequestered by replacing exotic plant species with native species in the southern Plains, and that more work should be conducted at deeper soil depths. If we had restricted our analyses to surface soil layers (e.g. top 30 cm), we would have failed to detect depth differences between natives and exotics.

  3. Clinical evaluation of novel methods to determine dialysis parameters using conductivity cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goldau, Rainer

    2002-01-01

    During the last two decades an ongoing discussion about the necessary dose of dialysis brought the result that the urea based Kt/V value is significantly correlated to morbidity of the end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Even if it is not completely accepted, it seems to be more and more agreement of the nephrological community that for good dialysis practice Kt/V should be kept above 1.2 to 1.3 in the usual 3X4 hours per week dialysis schedule for patients without own residual clearance...

  4. Knowledge Translation Interventions to Improve the Timing of Dialysis Initiation: Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Elaine M T; Manns, Braden J; Garg, Amit X; Sood, Manish M; Kim, S Joseph; Naimark, David; Nesrallah, Gihad E; Soroka, Steven D; Beaulieu, Monica; Dixon, Stephanie; Alam, Ahsan; Tangri, Navdeep

    2016-01-01

    Early initiation of chronic dialysis (starting dialysis with higher vs lower kidney function) has risen rapidly in the past 2 decades in Canada and internationally, despite absence of established health benefits and higher costs. In 2014, a Canadian guideline on the timing of dialysis initiation, recommending an intent-to-defer approach, was published. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a knowledge translation intervention to promote the intent-to-defer approach in clinical practice. This study is a multicenter, 2-arm parallel, cluster randomized trial. The study involves 55 advanced chronic kidney disease clinics across Canada. Patients older than 18 years who are managed by nephrologists for more than 3 months, and initiate dialysis in the follow-up period are included in the study. Outcomes will be measured at the patient-level and enumerated within a cluster. Data on characteristics of each dialysis start will be determined by linkages with the Canadian Organ Replacement Register. Primary outcomes include the proportion of patients who start dialysis early with an estimated glomerular filtration rate greater than 10.5 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and start dialysis in hospital as inpatients or in an emergency room setting. Secondary outcomes include the rate of change in early dialysis starts; rates of hospitalizations, deaths, and cost of predialysis care (wherever available); quarterly proportion of new starts; and acceptability of the knowledge translation materials. We randomized 55 multidisciplinary chronic disease clinics (clusters) in Canada to receive either an active knowledge translation intervention or no intervention for the uptake of the guideline on the timing of dialysis initiation. The active knowledge translation intervention consists of audit and feedback as well as patient- and provider-directed educational tools delivered at a comprehensive in-person medical detailing visit. Control clinics are only exposed to guideline

  5. Drug distribution in spinal cord during administration with spinal loop dialysis probes in anaesthetized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uustalu, Maria; Abelson, Klas S P

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H]Epibatid......The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H...... intraspinal administration of substances through the spinal loop dialysis probe....

  6. [Fungal peritonitis due to Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in a patient with automated peritoneal dialysis: Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Fernando J; Briones, Eduardo; Porte, Lorena; Amaro, José; Fica, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Fungal peritonitis is a major complication of peritoneal dialysis associated with high mortality. Most survivors have a high rate of abandonment of peritoneal dialysis. We report a case of fungal peritonitis due to an unusual agent. An 83 year-old woman, with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and multiple episodes of bacterial peritonitis associated to technical flaws in the implementation of automated peritoneal dialysis, was admitted due to abdominal pain and cloudy peritoneal fluid. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was identified in the peritoneal fluid by MALDI-TOF. She was treated with catheter removal and oral posaconazole for 14 days showing clinical resolution and non-recurrence.

  7. Mortality risk in European children with end-stage renal disease on dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chesnaye, Nicholas C.; Schaefer, Franz; Groothoff, Jaap W.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to describe survival in European pediatric dialysis patients and compare the differential mortality risk between patients starting on hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). Data for 6473 patients under 19 years of age or younger were extracted from the European Society of Pediat...... dialysis (HD/PD adjusted HR 6.55, 95% CI 2.35–18.28, PSM HR 2.93, 95% CI 1.04–8.23). Because unmeasured case-mix differences and selection bias may explain the higher mortality risk in the HD population, these results should be interpreted with caution....

  8. Cardiac surgery in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäck, Caroline; Hornum, Mads; Møller, Christian Joost Holdflod

    2017-01-01

    and 2015, 136 patients with end-stage renal disease initiating dialysis more than one month before surgery underwent cardiac surgery. Demographics, preoperative hemodynamic and biochemical data were collected from the patient records. Vital status and date of death was retrieved from a national register...... were age (p = .001), diabetes (p = .017) and active endocarditis (p = .012). CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference in mortality was found between patients in hemo- or peritoneal dialysis. However, we observed that patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis have two times higher...

  9. Dialysis and Depression in the Light of Suicide Attempt with Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbas Feray

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a common morbidity seen in chronic renal failure patients but it is often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Here we present a 36-year-old male dialysis patient who had undiagnosed severe depression and attempted to commit suicide with overconsumption of fruits. Fortunately, he was saved with emergent dialysis treatment and was referred to a psychiatry clinic for treatment and observation. In the light of this case we want to point out that diagnosing and treating psychiatric problems of dialysis patients is of vital importance to prevent suicides and also to improve quality of life.

  10. Acquired cystic kidney disease in dialysis and renal transplant patients: ultrasonography and CT analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Young Tae; Lee, Hae Kyung; Jung, Mi Sun; Yoon, Jong Pil; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Hwang, Seung Duk; Lee, Hi Bahl

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate by US and CT the incidence and complications of acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) in dialysis and renal transplant patients and to compare the effectiveness of US and CT in the diagnosis of this entity. This study was prospectively performed in 70 dialysis patients and 13 renal transplant patients, and excluded any with multiple renal cysts or polycystic kidney disease, on as seen on initial films. US were obtained in all patients, and CT scans were randomly obtained in 27 who had been on dialysis for 3 years or more; all these US and CT scans were analyzed, with particular emphasis on whether or not cysts were present. In order to correlate the numbers of cysts with duration of dialysis, all patients were assigned to one of three groups, according to the number of cysts found (group 1, 0; group 2, 1-4; group 3, >4). Only group 3 was diagnosed as suffering from ACKD. In order to compare the cyst-detection capability of US with that of CT, 27 dialysis patients who had undergone US and CT were divided into four groups according to the number of cysts found (grade 1, 0; grade 2, 1-4; grade 3, 5-10; grade 4, >10). Seventy dialysis patients were divided according to the results of US, as follows : group 1, 20%; group 2, 47.1%; group 3, 32.9%. The mean duration of dialysis in group 1 (31.9 months) was statistically different from that in group 2 (50.6 months) and in group 3 (95.8 months) (p < 0.000). Thirteen renal transplant patients were divided as follows : group 1, 61.5%; group 2, 38.5%; group 3, 0%. In dialysis patients with ACKD, complications noted were renal cell carcinoma (n=1), hemorrhagic cysts (n=2), and hematomas (n=2). Among the 27 dialysis patients who underwent CT, this and US showed an equal grade of cystic change in 53.7%, while CT showed a higher grade in 46.3%. The detection rate of ACKD in these 27 patients was 46% on US and 63% on CT. A prolongation of dialysis corresponded to an increased incidence of ACKD; renal neoplasm and

  11. The practical problem of improving quality in multicenter dialysis facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Multifacility dialysis groups are frequently interested in improving overall quality and find that there are major differences between individual units. Upper management must consider what strategy is needed for the whole company and what strategy must be formulated by individual facilities. To make substantive changes, management must decide to adopt a new culture of true teamwork, drive out fear, and emphasize leadership and education both at the management level and in the individual unit. Both at the corporate and unit levels, leaders must be chosen who are able to recognize people who have the ability, the educational background, the enthusiasm, and the time to direct change. Empowering the individual units and individual employees to make changes and be enthusiastic about improvement is the key to success.

  12. Micrococcus species-related peritonitis in patients receiving peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chih-Chin; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Peritonitis is a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and remains the most common cause of PD failure. Micrococci are catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, and gram-positive cocci that are spherical, often found in tetrad, and belong to the family Micrococcaceae. Micrococcus species are commonly found in the environment, and it is now recognized that Micrococcus species can be opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients. The only consistent predisposing factor for Micrococcus infection is an immunocompromised state. We report three cases of Micrococcus PD peritonitis. Improper practice of PD may have been the causative factor. Although Micrococcus species are low-virulence pathogens, infection could result in refractory peritonitis and subsequent PD failure. Intraperitoneal administration of vancomycin for at least 2 weeks is recommended for Micrococcus peritonitis.

  13. Nationwide peritoneal dialysis nurse training in Thailand: 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaiyuenwong, Jutiporn; Mahatanan, Nanta; Jiravaranun, Somsong; Boonyakarn, Achara; Rodpai, Somrak; Eiam-Ong, Somchai; Tungsanga, Kriang; Dhanakijcharoen, Prateep; Kanjanabuch, Talerngsak

    2011-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) center is not possible to operate if there is no availability of dedicated PD nurse. Generally, the nurse has to play many roles, including educator coordinator, and sometimes leader. As professionalism, the PD nurses need to have both theoretical and practical skills. With the tremendous leap of PD population after the launch of "PD First" policy in Thailand, the shortage of skillful PD nurse is concerned. Hence, the nationwide PD nurse training course was established with the collaborations of many organizations and institutes. Until now, 3 generations of 225 PD nurses are the productions of the course. This number represents 80 percent of PD nurses distributed throughout the whole nation. The survey operated in the year 2010 demonstrated that the output of the course was acceptable in terms of quality since most of the trained PD nurses had a confidence in taking care of PD patients. The quality of patient care is good as indicated by KPIs.

  14. Bidirectional peritoneal transport of albumin in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1995-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to assess bidirectional peritoneal kinetics of albumin after simultaneous i.v. and i.p. injection of radioiodinated albumin tracers (125I-RISA and 131I-RISA) in eight clinically stable uraemic patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis...... (CAPD). The plasma volume, intravascular albumin mass (IVM), and overall extravasation rate of albumin were not significantly different from that found in healthy controls. Albumin flux from the plasma into the peritoneal cavity was 3.71 +/- 0.82 (SD) mumol/h, which was only 3% of the overall...... extravasation rate (137 +/- 52 mumol/h). Albumin flux from the peritoneal cavity into the plasma was substantially lower (0.22 +/- 0.07 mumol/h, P peritoneal accumulation of the albumin from plasma over 4 h was 14 +/- 3.2 mumol, which was significantly lower than the intraperitoneal albumin...

  15. Glucose pump test can be used to measure blood flow rate of native arteriovenous fistula in chronic hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Y C; Selcuk, N Y; Altıntepe, L; Güney, I; Yavuz, S

    2018-01-01

    In chronic hemodialysis patients, the low flow of vascular access may leads to inadequate dialysis, increased rate of hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality. It was found that surveillance should be performed for native arteriovenous (AV) should not be performed for AV graft in various studies. However, surveillance was done in graft AV fistulas in most studies. Doppler ultrasonography (US) was suggested for surveillance of AV fistulas by the last vascular access guideline of National Kidney Foundation Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF KDOQI). The aim of study is to determine whether glucose pump test (GPT) is used for surveillance of native AV fistulas by using Doppler US as reference. In 93 chronic hemodialysis patients with native AV fistula, blood flow rates were measured by Doppler US and GPT. For GPT, glucose was infused to 16 mL/min by pump and was measured at basal before the infusion and 11 s after the start of the infusion by glucometer. Doppler US was done by an expert radiologist. Used statistical tests were Mann-Whitney U test, Friedman test, regression analysis, and multiple regression analysis. Median values of blood flow rates measured by GPT (707 mL/min) and by Doppler US (700 mL/min) were not different (Z = 0.414, P = 0.678). Results of GPT and Doppler US measurements were positive correlate by regression analysis. The mean GPT value of diabetic patients (n = 39; 908 mL/min) was similar to that of nondiabetic patients (n = 54; 751 mL/min; Z = 1.31, P = 0.188). GPT values measured at three different dialysis session did not differ from each other that by Friedman test (F = 0.92, P = 0.39). This showed that GPT was stable and reliable. Glucose pump test can be used to measure blood flow rate of native AV fistula. GPT is an accurate and reliable test.

  16. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Asthma Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders National data for ... very limited. While all of the causes of asthma remain unclear, children exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke ...

  17. Peritoneal dialysis and peritonitis rate: Kuwait, four years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyousef, Anas M; Abdou, Salah M; Mansour, Yasser S; Radi, Ahmad D

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) program was established in Farwaniya Hospital Kidney Center, Kuwait, in February 2011. Patient recruitment for this modality of treatment was growing steadily. One of the major complications of PD is peritonitis. There is a belief that PD therapy is inferior and carries more complications than hemodialysis, we aimed to show that PD is a good and a non-inferior option for dialysis therapy with comparable outcome in both patient and technique survival. This was a retrospective analysis of all patients who were on PD from February 2011 to December 2014. Peritonitis rate, exit site infection rate, and all-cause mortality rate were all assessed for this period. Peritonitis rate during the 1 st year, 2011, was 0.92 incidents/year. This number had progressively declined in the following years; in 2012, it was 0.65 incidents/year; in 2013, it was 0.58 incidents/year; and in 2014, it was 0.38 incidents/year. This improvement in the rate of peritonitis incidence could be explained by better education of patients and meticulous supervision of the nursing staff. Farwaniya Hospital Kidney Center had an all-cause mortality rate of 9.3% among patients on renal replacement therapy in 2011. In 2012, all-cause mortality rate increased to 17.1%. The following year, 2013, it decreased to 14.3%, and in 2014, all-cause mortality rate dropped further to 7.6%. All-cause mortality rate among PD patients was zero in 2011. In 2012, the all-cause mortality rate in PD was 11.54%, and in 2013, it decreased to 10.52%. Then, again in 2014, the all-cause mortality rate among PD patients was zero. This improvement in all-cause mortality rate could be explained by the better medical care offered to the end-stage renal disease patients, in particular PD patients, in Farwaniya Hospital Kidney Center.

  18. Implementation of a cooperative program for peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kazuyoshi; Abe, Masanori; Soma, Masayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Nephrologists and dialysis specialists familiar with renal replacement therapies (RRTs) should periodically send appropriate information to chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients from the early stage via a cooperation program and educate patients on choosing a suitable RRT themselves. From 2009 to 2010, 63 patients (32 men and 31 women) were introduced to our hospital by a general practitioner through a cooperation program. Five patients (7.9%) measured home blood pressure and 2 (3.2%) received nutrition education. On close inspection, 7 patients (11.1%) had undergone surgery for cancer or a severe cardiovascular disease. We changed the prescription contents of the general practitioners in 58 patients (92.1%) and gave nutrition education to the 61 patients (96.8%) who did not receive it. In the 57 patients (90.5%) who continued the cooperation program, we changed the prescription contents of 32 patients (56.1%), and all patients recorded home blood pressure on the second visit. Participation in the educational peritoneal dialysis (PD) promotion program enabled advanced-stage CKD patients to understand PD, and as a result, PD selectivity at our hospital increased from 8.8 to 15.0% over 2 years. Periodic intervention of specialists in the cooperation program is necessary to assess values of parameters such as blood pressure, blood glucose, lipids, uric acid, and anemia during the clinical course to delay the progression of CKD. It is important that PD patients improve their quality of life by continuing treatment to prevent deterioration of residual renal function as much as possible after PD initiation in the same manner as CKD predialysis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Compatibility of Meropenem with Different Commercial Peritoneal Dialysis Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesholzer, Martin; Winter, Alexandra; Kussmann, Manuel; Zeitlinger, Markus; Pichler, Petra; Burgmann, Heinz; Reznicek, Gottfried; Poeppl, Wolfgang

    ♦ BACKGROUND: Intraperitoneal administration of antimicrobial agents is recommended for the treatment of peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis. For home-based antimicrobial therapy it is common to supply patients with PD fluid bags with admixed antibiotic. Thus, the compatibility of meropenem with different PD fluids (PDFs), namely Extraneal, Physioneal 1.36% and Physioneal 2.27% (all Baxter Healthcare Corp., Deerfield, IL, USA), was investigated under varying storage conditions. ♦ METHODS: Meropenem (Venus Pharma, Werne, Germany) was stored at 6°C and 25°C over 14 days and at 37°C over 24 hours. Drug concentration over time was determined using high performance liquid chromatography, drug activity by a diffusion disk method, diluent stability by visual inspection and drug adsorption was calculated. Blank PD fluids and deionized water were used as comparator solutions. ♦ RESULTS: Compared to water, the stability of meropenem was minimally lower in Extraneal but markedly reduced in both Physioneal solutions. No significant drug adsorption was detected for any PDF investigated. ♦ CONCLUSIONS: Meropenem is stable and compatible with Extraneal and might be stored for up to a week at refrigeration temperature (6°C). A loss of ~20% of meropenem after 2 days at room temperature should be considered. Mixed Physioneal appears not suitable for storage at any temperature after meropenem has been admixed. A considerable drug degradation due to the warming up to body temperature through heating plates should further be taken into account in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  20. Icodextrine and insulin resistance in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbakan, Mustafa; Sahin, Gülizar Manga

    2007-01-01

    Insulin resistance is commonly observed in uremic patients. Glucose-based peritoneal dialysis solutions have long-term metabolic complications like hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. The purpose of this study was to examine the insulin resistance in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) with standard glucose and icodextrin containing solutions. The entire non diabetic CAPD patients of our center were studied: forty-four patients in all who were on CAPD treatment for 36.2 +/- 23.7 months. Twenty-seven of them (11 male and 16 female) with a mean age of 46 +/- 16 years were treated with standard glucose solutions (glucose group). The other 17 patients (10 male and 7 female) with a mean age of 49 +/- 16 years were treated with standard glucose solutions during the day and icodextrin dwell during the night, for a median of 12 +/- 6.3 months (icodextrin group). Morning fasting serum insulin levels were 20.59 +/- 17.86 in the glucose group and 10.15 +/- 6.87 in the icodextrin group (p = 0.0001). Homeostasis Model Assessment Method scores of the glucose group were significantly higher (4.8+/-4.1 vs 2.3+/- 1.7; p = 0.025) than the icodextrin group. A significant positive correlation of HOMA score with insulin, fasting plasma glucose, and triglyceride levels were found in HOMA (IR+) patients. Twenty patients of the icodextrin group (74%) and 15 patients of the glucose group (88%) were hypertensive, but there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.13). The groups showed no significant differences for body mass index and serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, VLDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and fibrinogen. In conclusion, the use of icodextrin in the long nighttime dwell can reduce serum insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity in CAPD patients.

  1. Increased risk of hydrocephalus in long-term dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Cheng, Yu-Kai; Chou, Che-Yi; Liang, Chih-Chia; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2016-05-01

    The risk of hydrocephalus in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on dialysis has not been studied in depth. Using Taiwan National Health Insurance claims data, we identified 29 684 incident ESRD patients from 2000 to 2010, including 10 030 peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and 19 654 hemodialysis (HD) patients. The control cohort consisted of 118 736 people randomly selected from those without kidney disease, frequency matched with ESRD patients by age, sex and index year. We also established propensity score-matched cohorts with 10 014 PD and 10 014 HD patients. The incidence rates and hazard ratios (HRs) of hydrocephalus were calculated until the end of 2011. Incidence rates of hydrocephalus were greater in HD and PD patients than in controls (8.44 and 11.0 versus 4.11 per 10 000 person-years, respectively), with an adjusted HR of 1.86 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43-2.41] for all ESRD patients compared with controls. A higher proportion of hydrocephalus patients underwent surgical bypass to relieve hydrocephalus in ESRD patients than controls, 40.7% (46/113) versus 24.5% (67/273), with an adjusted odds ratio of 2.11 (95% CI 1.33-3.36). Compared with controls, the adjusted HRs of communicating hydrocephalus for HD and PD patients were 1.77 (95% CI 1.22-2.55) and 2.51 (95% CI 1.61-3.89), respectively. The propensity score-matched analysis showed an HR of 0.72 (95% CI 0.42-1.23) for hydrocephalus in HD patients compared with PD patients. Patients with ESRD are at an increased risk of hydrocephalus. The risk difference between HD and PD patients is not significant. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  2. Home visit program improves technique survival in peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Francesca; Adıbelli, Z; Mason, G; Nayak, A; Ariyanon, W; Rettore, E; Crepaldi, Carlo; Rodighiero, Mariapia; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a home therapy, and technique survival is related to the adherence to PD prescription at home. The presence of a home visit program could improve PD outcomes. We evaluated its effects on clinical outcome during 1 year of follow-up. This was a case-control study. The case group included all 96 patients who performed PD in our center on January 1, 2013, and who attended a home visit program; the control group included all 92 patients who performed PD on January 1, 2008. The home visit program consisted of several additional visits to reinforce patients' confidence in PD management in their own environment. Outcomes were defined as technique failure, peritonitis episode, and hospitalization. Clinical and dialysis features were evaluated for each patient. The case group was significantly older (p = 0.048), with a lower grade of autonomy (p = 0.033), but a better hemoglobin level (p = 0.02) than the control group. During the observational period, we had 11 episodes of technique failure. We found a significant reduction in the rate of technique failure in the case group (p = 0.004). Furthermore, survival analysis showed a significant extension of PD treatment in the patients supported by the home visit program (52 vs. 48.8 weeks, p = 0.018). We did not find any difference between the two groups in terms of peritonitis and hospitalization rate; however, trends toward a reduction of Gram-positive peritonitis rates as well as prevalence and duration of hospitalization related to PD problems were identified in the case group. The retrospective nature of the analysis was a limitation of this study. The home visit program improves the survival of PD patients and could reduce the rate of Gram-positive peritonitis and hospitalization. Video Journal Club "Cappuccino with Claudio Ronco" at http://www.karger.com/?doi=365168.

  3. Evaluation of adherence and depression among patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhen Li; Yeoh, Lee Ying; Seow, Ying Ying; Luo, Xue Chun; Griva, Konstadina

    2012-07-01

    It is challenging for dialysis patients to maintain adherence to their medical regimen, and symptoms of depression are prevalent among them. Limited data is available about adherence and depression among patients receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD). This study aimed to examine the rates of treatment non-adherence and depression in PD patients. A total of 20 PD patients (response rate 71.4%; mean age 64.4 ± 11.6 years) were assessed using the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire, Self Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) and Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form. A self-reported adherence (PD exchanges, medication and diet) scale developed for the study was also included. Medical information (e.g. most recent biochemistry results) was obtained from chart review. The mean self-reported scores indicated an overall high level of adherence, although a significant proportion of patients were non-adherent. Among the latter, 20% of patients were non-adherent to medication and 26% to diet due to forgetfulness, while 15% and 26% of patients admitted to deliberate non-adherence to medication and diet, respectively. Treatment modality, employment, self-care status and self-efficacy were associated with overall adherence. Using a cutoff point of 8 for HAD depression and anxiety subscales, 40% of patients were found to be depressed and 30% had symptoms of anxiety. This is the first study to document treatment adherence and depression among PD patients in Singapore. Findings of high prevalence of depression and anxiety, and reports of poor adherence warrant development of intervention programmes.

  4. Trends in Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju-Yeh; Lee, Tsung-Chun; Montez-Rath, Maria E.; Paik, Jane; Chertow, Glenn M.; Desai, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Impaired kidney function is a risk factor for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, an event associated with poor outcomes. The burden of upper GI bleeding and its effect on patients with ESRD are not well described. Using data from the US Renal Data System, we quantified the rates of occurrence of and associated 30-day mortality from acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding in patients undergoing dialysis; we used medical claims and previously validated algorithms where available. Overall, 948,345 patients contributed 2,296,323 patient-years for study. The occurrence rates for upper GI bleeding were 57 and 328 episodes per 1000 person-years according to stringent and lenient definitions of acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding, respectively. Unadjusted occurrence rates remained flat (stringent) or increased (lenient) from 1997 to 2008; after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbid conditions, however, we found a significant decline for both definitions (linear approximation, 2.7% and 1.5% per year, respectively; Pupper GI bleeding episodes and were more likely to receive blood transfusions during an episode. Overall 30-day mortality was 11.8%, which declined significantly over time (relative declines of 2.3% or 2.8% per year for the stringent and lenient definitions, respectively). In summary, despite declining trends worldwide, crude rates of acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding among patients undergoing dialysis have not decreased in the past 10 years. Although 30-day mortality related to upper GI bleeding declined, perhaps reflecting improvements in medical care, the burden on the ESRD population remains substantial. PMID:22266666

  5. Metabolic Profiling of Impaired Cognitive Function in Patients Receiving Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Chertow, Glenn M; Depner, Thomas A; Nissenson, Allen R; Schiller, Brigitte; Mehta, Ravindra L; Liu, Sai; Sirich, Tammy L

    2016-12-01

    Retention of uremic metabolites is a proposed cause of cognitive impairment in patients with ESRD. We used metabolic profiling to identify and validate uremic metabolites associated with impairment in executive function in two cohorts of patients receiving maintenance dialysis. We performed metabolic profiling using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry applied to predialysis plasma samples from a discovery cohort of 141 patients and an independent replication cohort of 180 patients participating in a trial of frequent hemodialysis. We assessed executive function with the Trail Making Test Part B and the Digit Symbol Substitution test. Impaired executive function was defined as a score ≥2 SDs below normative values. Four metabolites-4-hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetylglutamine, hippurate, and prolyl-hydroxyproline-were associated with impaired executive function at the false-detection rate significance threshold. After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, the associations remained statistically significant: relative risk 1.16 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.32), 1.39 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.71), 1.24 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.50), and 1.20 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.38) for each SD increase in 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetylglutamine, hippurate, and prolyl-hydroxyproline, respectively. The association between 4-hydroxyphenylacetate and impaired executive function was replicated in the second cohort (relative risk 1.12; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.23), whereas the associations for phenylacetylglutamine, hippurate, and prolyl-hydroxyproline did not reach statistical significance in this cohort. In summary, four metabolites related to phenylalanine, benzoate, and glutamate metabolism may be markers of cognitive impairment in patients receiving maintenance dialysis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. A national study of efficiency for dialysis centers: an examination of market competition and facility characteristics for production of multiple dialysis outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgen, Hacer; Ozcan, Yasar A

    2002-06-01

    To examine market competition and facility characteristics that can be related to technical efficiency in the production of multiple dialysis outputs from the perspective of the industrial organization model. Freestanding dialysis facilities that operated in 1997 submitted cost report fonns to the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), and offered all three outputs--outpatient dialysis, dialysis training, and home program dialysis. The Independent Renal Facility Cost Report Data file (IRFCRD) from HCFA was utilized to obtain information on output and input variables and market and facility features for 791 multiple-output facilities. Information regarding population characteristics was obtained from the Area Resources File. Cross-sectional data for the year 1997 were utilized to obtain facility-specific technical efficiency scores estimated through Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). A binary variable of efficiency status was then regressed against its market and facility characteristics and control factors in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The majority of the facilities in the sample are functioning technically inefficiently. Neither the intensity of market competition nor a policy of dialyzer reuse has a significant effect on the facilities' efficiency. Technical efficiency is significantly associated, however, with type of ownership, with the interaction between the market concentration of for-profits and ownership type, and with affiliations with chains of different sizes. Nonprofit and government-owned Facilities are more likely than their for-profit counterparts to become inefficient producers of renal dialysis outputs. On the other hand, that relationship between ownership form and efficiency is reversed as the market concentration of for-profits in a given market increases. Facilities that are members of large chains are more likely to be technically inefficient. Facilities do not appear to benefit from joint production of a variety of

  7. Cost analysis of the Hemodialysis Reliable Outflow (HeRO) Graft compared to the tunneled dialysis catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shakarchi, Julien; Inston, Nicholas; Jones, Robert G; Maclaine, Grant; Hollinworth, David

    2016-04-01

    In end-stage renal disease patients with central venous obstruction, who have limited vascular access options, the Hemodialysis Reliable Outflow (HeRO) Graft is a new alternative with a lower incidence of complications and longer effective device life compared to tunneled dialysis catheters (TDCs). We undertook an economic analysis of introducing the HeRO Graft in the UK. A 1-year cost-consequence decision analytic model was developed comparing management with the HeRO Graft to TDCs from the perspective of the National Health Service in England. The model comprises four 3-month cycles during which the vascular access option either remains functional for hemodialysis or fails, patients can experience access-related infection and device thrombosis, and they can also accrue associated costs. Clinical input data were sourced from published studies and unit cost data from National Health Service 2014-15 Reference Costs. In the base case, a 100-patient cohort managed with the HeRO Graft experienced 6 fewer failed devices, 53 fewer access-related infections, and 67 fewer device thromboses compared to patients managed with TDCs. Although the initial device and placement costs for the HeRO Graft are greater than those for TDCs, savings from the lower incidence of device complications and longer effective device patency reduces these costs. Overall net annual costs are £2600 for each HeRO Graft-managed patient compared to TDC-managed patients. If the National Health Service were to reimburse hemodialysis at a uniform rate regardless of the type of vascular access, net 1-year savings of £1200 per patient are estimated for individuals managed with the HeRO Graft. The base case results showed a marginal net positive cost associated with vascular access with the HeRO Graft compared with TDCs for the incremental clinical benefit of reductions in patency failures, device-related thrombosis, and access-related infection events in a patient population with limited options for

  8. Atypical lateralization of ERP response to native and non-native speech in infants at risk for autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seery, Anne M; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Nelson, Charles A

    2013-07-01

    Language impairment is common in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and is often accompanied by atypical neural lateralization. However, it is unclear when in development language impairment or atypical lateralization first emerges. To address these questions, we recorded event-related-potentials (ERPs) to native and non-native speech contrasts longitudinally in infants at risk for ASD (HRA) over the first year of life to determine whether atypical lateralization is present as an endophenotype early in development and whether these infants show delay in a very basic precursor of language acquisition: phonemic perceptual narrowing. ERP response for the HRA group to a non-native speech contrast revealed a trajectory of perceptual narrowing similar to a group of low-risk controls (LRC), suggesting that phonemic perceptual narrowing does not appear to be delayed in these high-risk infants. In contrast there were significant group differences in the development of lateralized ERP response to speech: between 6 and 12 months the LRC group displayed a lateralized response to the speech sounds, while the HRA group failed to display this pattern. We suggest the possibility that atypical lateralization to speech may be an ASD endophenotype over the first year of life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Native American Women: Living with Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the role of Native American women in the spiritual and cultural life of American Indians. Native American spirituality is deeply connected to the land through daily use, ritual, and respect for sacred space. Often Native American women act as conduits and keepers of this knowledge. (MJP)

  10. Encountering Complexity: Native Musics in the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyea, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Describes Native American musics, focusing on issues such as music and the experience of time, metaphor and metaphorical aspects, and spirituality and sounds from nature. Discusses Native American metaphysics and its reflection in the musics. States that an effective curriculum would provide a new receptivity to Native American musics. (CMK)

  11. North Dakota Native American Essential Understandings

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Dakota Department of Public Instruction, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In the spring of 2015, the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction brought together tribal Elders from across North Dakota to share stories, memories, songs, and wisdom in order to develop the North Dakota Native American Essential Understandings (NDNAEU) to guide the learning of both Native and non-Native students across the state. They…

  12. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The language...

  13. Recruiting Native Journalists: The New Storytellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Candy

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to increase the number of Native American journalists, summer programs at the University of North Dakota and the University of Wisconsin give Native American high school students hands-on, culturally relevant journalism experience. The Native American Journalists Association offers college scholarships in journalism for American…

  14. South Texas Native Plant Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The South Texas Native Plant Restoration Project was a resounding success in that the primary goal of : developing commercial sources of native seed has been substantially met. By the conclusion of the project : on August 31, 2011, 20 native seed sou...

  15. Surrounded by Beauty: Arts of Native America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    Native American languages have no equivalent for the word "art." Yet the objects Native Americans have used and still use suggest that they are a highly spiritual people who create objects of extraordinary beauty. In Native American thought, there is no distinction between what is beautiful or functional, and what is sacred or secular.…

  16. Tamarisk coalition - native riparian plant materials program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy Kolegas

    2012-01-01

    The Tamarisk Coalition (TC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to riparian restoration in the western United States, has created a Native Plant Materials Program to address the identified need for native riparian plant species for use in revegetation efforts on the Colorado Plateau. The specific components of the Native Plant Materials Program include: 1) provide seed...

  17. Credibility of native and non-native speakers of English revisited: Do non-native listeners feel the same?

    OpenAIRE

    Hanzlíková, Dagmar; Skarnitzl, Radek

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on research stimulated by Lev-Ari and Keysar (2010) who showed that native listeners find statements delivered by foreign-accented speakers to be less true than those read by native speakers. Our objective was to replicate the study with non-native listeners to see whether this effect is also relevant in international communication contexts. The same set of statements from the original study was recorded by 6 native and 6 nonnative speakers of English. 121 non-native listen...

  18. Native Speakers in Linguistic Imperialism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of Native English Speaking Teachers’ performance in schemes in six Asian contexts, commissioned by the British Council, and undertaken by three British academics, is subjected to critical evaluation. Key issues for exploration are the issue of a monolingual approach to English le...... the economic and geopolitical agenda behind this English teaching business, there is clear evidence of linguistic imperialism in the functions of this global professional service. These activities serve to strengthen Western interests.......An investigation of Native English Speaking Teachers’ performance in schemes in six Asian contexts, commissioned by the British Council, and undertaken by three British academics, is subjected to critical evaluation. Key issues for exploration are the issue of a monolingual approach to English...... learning and teaching, and the inappropriate qualifications of those sent to education systems when they are unfamiliar with the learners’ languages, cultures, and pedagogical traditions. Whether the schemes involved constitute linguistic imperialismis analysed. Whereas the need for multilingual competence...

  19. Ecological impacts of non-native species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are considered one of the greatest threats to freshwater biodiversity worldwide (Drake et al. 1989; Allen and Flecker 1993; Dudgeon et al. 2005). Some of the first hypotheses proposed to explain global patterns of amphibian declines included the effects of non-native species (Barinaga 1990; Blaustein and Wake 1990; Wake and Morowitz 1991). Evidence for the impact of non-native species on amphibians stems (1) from correlative research that relates the distribution or abundance of a species to that of a putative non-native species, and (2) from experimental tests of the effects of a non-native species on survival, growth, development or behaviour of a target species (Kats and Ferrer 2003). Over the past two decades, research on the effects of non-native species on amphibians has mostly focused on introduced aquatic predators, particularly fish. Recent research has shifted to more complex ecological relationships such as influences of sub-lethal stressors (e.g. contaminants) on the effects of non-native species (Linder et al. 2003; Sih et al. 2004), non-native species as vectors of disease (Daszak et al. 2004; Garner et al. 2006), hybridization between non-natives and native congeners (Riley et al. 2003; Storfer et al. 2004), and the alteration of food-webs by non-native species (Nystrom et al. 2001). Other research has examined the interaction of non-native species in terms of facilitation (i.e. one non-native enabling another to become established or spread) or the synergistic effects of multiple non-native species on native amphibians, the so-called invasional meltdown hypothesis (Simerloff and Von Holle 1999). Although there is evidence that some non-native species may interact (Ricciardi 2001), there has yet to be convincing evidence that such interactions have led to an accelerated increase in the number of non-native species and cumulative impacts are still uncertain (Simberloff 2006). Applied research on the control, eradication, and

  20. digital natives and digital immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Cardina, Bruno; Francisco, Jerónimo; Reis, Pedro; trad. Silva, Fátima

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the generational gaps in school learning. Initially, we have tried to provide the framework in relation to the term digital native in order to understand the key aspects of the generation born after the advent and the global use of the Internet. They were found to be “multitasking” people, linked to technology and connectivity, as opposed to digital immigrants, born in an earlier period and seeking to adapt to the technological world. We also present some r...